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Sample records for acute care wards

  1. Emergency room referral to internal medicine wards or to coronary care units of patients with first acute myocardial infarction. Israel Study Group on First Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Drory, Y; Shapira, I; Goldbourt, U; Fisman, E Z; Villa, Y; Tenenbaum, A; Pines, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with ward assignment in the emergency room for patients < or = 65 years old with first acute myocardial infarction. We analysed uni- and multivariate predictors for ward assignment (coronary care unit versus internal ward). Eight major centrally located Israeli hospitals provided data during one year. The study population included 1252 patients, of whom 83% were men, 37% were hypertensives, 22% were diabetics, and 14% had previous anginal syndrome. Most patients (83%) were admitted to the coronary care unit. Internal medicine ward assignment was significantly associated with advanced age, history of hypertension or diabetes, a longer time from appearance of symptoms to arrival at the hospital, and myocardial infarction type (non-Q-wave or non-anterior). The likelihood of medical ward referral increased stepwise with the increasing number of a patient's predictive factors: those with > or = 4 factors had a > 30% chance of being assigned to a medical ward compared to a < 10% chance when there were 0-3 risk factors. Exclusion of patients with thrombolysis had no effect on the results. The shortage of cardiac care unit beds apparently leads to emergency room selection acting in detriment of patients with poorest prognoses. Clear guidelines for decision making in the emergency room are needed to resolve this paradoxical situation. PMID:10998758

  2. Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction

  3. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  4. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  5. Regular ward checks raise standards of care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    2012-05-01

    This article reports on the introduction of intentional rounding at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust. The approach was piloted and implemented on the initiative of two nurses in wards that ranged from orthopaedic to general medical. Intentional rounding aims to put patients at the centre of care and consists of checking on their condition at hourly or two-hourly intervals, recording their nutritional status and skin integrity, and asking if they need pain relief or help with eating. The introduction of the approach follows concerns about failures in care highlighted by a number of recent high-profile reports. PMID:22690424

  6. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    PubMed

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  7. Experience based co-design reduces formal complaints on an acute mental health ward

    PubMed Central

    Springham, Neil; Robert, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    An acute mental health triage ward at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust was attracting high levels of formal service user and family complaints. The Trust used experience based co-design to examine the issues and redesign procedures. This resulted in an immediate eradication of formal complaints for a period of 23 months. This paper describes two outcomes: firstly, the successful adaptations made to the experience based co-design methodology from its origins in physical care, in order to ensure it was safe and effective in an acute mental health setting; and, secondly, the changes made to the ward as a result of this quality improvement intervention. PMID:26734433

  8. Do ward housekeepers free up time for care?

    PubMed

    Tye, Laura; Urmson, Stephanie; Maloney, Lindsey

    Introducing a ward housekeeping service may give nursing staff more time to focus on essential care. This small-scale evaluation found the role freed up healthcare assistant time and improved staff morale. PMID:22479768

  9. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Gholamreza; Roudi, Masoumeh; Shah Farhat, Ahmad; Shahabian, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB). Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax) and the equalizing level (Leq). The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq) because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq) in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax) in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq) was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion: The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area. PMID:24303374

  10. Anxiety and depression on an acute respiratory ward

    PubMed Central

    Thew, Graham R; MacCallam, Jackie; Salkovskis, Paul M; Suntharalingam, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Psychological difficulties are a common complication among patients with respiratory disease, and are associated with poorer health outcomes and increased use of healthcare. As prevalence studies typically sample patients from community settings, this study aimed to explore the extent and nature of psychological difficulties during acute hospital admission. Methods: A case example of an acute respiratory ward is presented. In total, 41 acute respiratory inpatients completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety, and health anxiety. Results: Rates of clinically significant depression, anxiety, and health anxiety were 71%, 40%, and 21%, respectively, with 76% of participants showing clinically significant scores on at least one measure. Comparison to existing literature suggests depression rates may be elevated in the acute inpatient context. The difficulties experienced encompassed both contextual factors related to being in hospital and broader health concerns. Conclusion: We suggest that psychological distress may be particularly prevalent in inpatient settings and that larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:27508081

  11. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  12. Influence of Parental Encouragement towards Health Care of Their Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sophia, R. Grace; Veliappan, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore how parents are encouraging towards health care of their wards. A "Survey Method" was used in the present study. A standardized "Agarwal Parental Encouragement Scale (APES)" was used to collect information from the students. The sample consists of thousand and ninety five higher…

  13. Improving the quality of care for medical inpatients by placing a higher priority on ward rounds.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ash; Riyaz, Shahzad; Said, Elmhutady; Hale, Melissa; Mills, Andy; Kapur, Kapil

    2013-12-01

    Models suggested for managing acute, non-elective, medical admissions include expanding geriatric services, extending the role of the acute physician and rejuvenating the role of the general physician. We investigated improving inpatient care by changing consultants' work patterns and placing a higher priority on the ward rounds. A focus group and a questionnaire were used to study the impact on several ward round parameters. All respondents reported an overall satisfaction: 93% rated the quality of care as good or excellent, 75% reported increased safe patient discharges and 68% observed improved teamwork. Length of stay reduced to 4 days from 5.3 days without an increase in readmission. The main themes showed improved quality of care, better assured patients and relatives, and better consultant job satisfaction, but also showed reduced junior doctors' independent decision-making and a slight reduction in specialty-related activity. The study concluded that placing a higher priority on ward rounds by altering consultants' work patterns has a positive impact on inpatient care. PMID:24298094

  14. The prevalence of drivers in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, R.; Turnbull, C. J.; King, D.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of 150 patients on five acute geriatric wards found that 28 (19%) still drove. Forty-three (28%) used to drive but had given up, whilst 79 (53%) (76 of whom were female) had never driven. Former drivers gave the main reason for stopping as cost. No driver could recall being advised about driving by a doctor. Twenty-two drivers (79%) had a significant clinical condition that could affect driving, ranging from blackouts to arthritis. It is recommended that all elderly patients should be asked if they drive and any clinical conditions they might have that would adversely affect their driving be sought. Appropriate advice should be given by doctors to their elderly patients in order to safeguard them and the public from road traffic accidents. PMID:8545286

  15. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p = 0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and

  16. Recovery coaching in an acute older people rehabiliation ward

    PubMed Central

    Kibble, Sharon; Gray, Debra; Prat-Sala, Merce; Ross, Kirsty; Johnson, Karen; Packer, Jane; Shire, Elizabeth; Cross, Rhian; Harden, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    Our patient, carer, and staff feedback clearly tells us that elderly patients are frequently disempowered by acute care provision, environments, and attitudes. This debilitates individuals mentally and physically, reducing their independent functioning, and may mean that they require prolonged care or are unfit to return home. We developed the concept of “recovery coaching” to support acute inpatient elderly care rehabilitation. We designed a training intervention to achieve “coaching conversations” between our staff and our patients. Data were collected from 46 participants; 22 in the pre-intervention stage and 24 in the post-intervention stage. For the post-intervention patients, mean scores indicated that there was slightly higher increase in the patient's independence in terms of their Barthel (ADL) scores and that they reported higher feelings of self-efficacy. For this patient group it was also found that more returned home with the same level of care as on their admission, and that fewer patients required residential care placements at discharge. This innovative intervention allowed us to challenge the fundamental basis of “I do it for you” to “I will do it with you”, allowing the patient to become an integral partner in their health care. PMID:27493732

  17. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  18. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies. PMID:23117538

  19. Do post-take ward round proformas improve communication and influence quality of patient care?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A; Jacob, K; Fulton, J; McGavin, C

    2004-01-01

    The post-take ward round is a critical time for reviewing the initial history, examination and results, and the stage at which further treatment and investigations will be determined. However documentation of this ward round is often inadequate, so the benefits of decision making are lost. The documentation of 95 ward rounds was assessed for key items of information before and after the introduction of a proforma sheet. The introduction of the proforma led to a significant improvement in the documentation of a diagnosis, management plan, prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis, and resuscitation status (p<0.05), which will have a significant impact on patient care. PMID:15537856

  20. Five-year review of absconding in three acute psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Oster, Candice; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Deb; Ash, David; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2015-02-01

    Absconding, where patients under an involuntary mental health order leave hospital without permission, can result in patient harm and emotional and professional implications for nursing staff. However, Australian data to drive nursing interventions remain sparse. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate absconding in three acute care wards from January 2006 to June 2010, in order to determine absconding rates, compare patients who did and did not abscond, and to examine incidents. The absconding rate was 17.22 incidents per 100 involuntary admissions (12.09% of patients), with no significant change over time. Being male, young, diagnosed with a schizophrenia or substance-use disorder, and having a longer hospital stay were predictive of absconding. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients had higher odds of absconding than Caucasian Australians. Over 25% of absconding patients did so multiple times. Patients absconded early in admission. More incidents occurred earlier in the year, during summer and autumn, and later in the week, and few incidents occurred early in the morning. Almost 60% of incidents lasted ≤24 hours. Formulation of prospective interventions considering population demographic factors and person-specific concerns are required for evidence-based nursing management of the risks of absconding and effective incident handling when they do occur. PMID:25444670

  1. Inpatient Performance of Primary Care Residents: Impact of Reduction in Time on the Ward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goroll, Allan H.

    1979-01-01

    The inpatient (ward/intensive care unit) performance of primary care medical residents was compared with that of their peers in the standard internal medicine residency program. Nearly identical performances of the two groups suggests that substantial time in the first two years of residency can be devoted successfully to ambulatory training.…

  2. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  3. Association between chloride-rich versus chloride-restrictive intravenous fluid administration and acute kidney injury in cardiovascular patients in ICU wards

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Chao; Huang, Guangsu; Han, Dahe; Meng, Xiaoyan; Guo, Yi; Kan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of chloride-restrictive fluid to prevent acute kidney injury (AKI) in cardiovascular patients in intensive care unit (ICU) wards. Between January 2013 and September 2014, 456 patients admitted to ICU wards following diagnosis of cardiovascular disease were recruited and randomized to receive chloride-rich (232 patients) or chloride-restrictive (224 patients) fluid. The baseline characteristics and incidence of Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)-defined AKI was then compared. No significant difference was identified in the baseline characteristics between the two groups. The incidence of moderate-to-severe KDIGO-defined AKI was significantly decreased in patients who received chloride-restrictive fluid. In conclusion, chloride-restrictive may be a novel effective intervention in preventing KDIGO-defined AKI in cardiovascular patients in ICU wards.

  4. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  5. Observations of mealtimes in hospital aged care rehabilitation wards.

    PubMed

    Walton, Karen; Williams, Peter; Tapsell, Linda; Hoyle, Matthew; Shen, Zhi Wei; Gladman, Lauren; Nurka, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in long-stay elderly hospitalized patients and their dietary intakes are often poor, despite the provision of adequate quantities of food to meet patient needs. The aim of this study was to identify environmental factors that were associated with achieving adequate food consumption in a hospital context. This study observed the daily routines of 30 elderly patients over 2days in rehabilitation wards in three Australian hospitals. All activities associated with mealtimes were recorded, from the commencement of breakfast to the conclusion of supper at the end of the day. Four key themes emerged: the eating location; assistance given at meals; negative and positive interruptions. The time taken to eat meals averaged 22min, ranging from 3 to 55min. Food intakes appeared to be better when meals were consumed communally in a dining room. There were many occasions when patients needed more assistance to eat than was available. The most common factors negatively affecting meal consumption were medication rounds, inappropriate placement of trays, packaging being hard to open, and patient showering. The presence of visitors, dietitians and nutrition assistants appeared to improve dietary intakes. Trials of protected mealtimes in Australian hospitals are certainly important and timely. PMID:23523667

  6. Improving the quality and safety of care on the medical ward: A review and synthesis of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Wachter, Robert M; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Despite its place at the heart of inpatient medicine, the evidence base underpinning the effective delivery of medical ward care is highly fragmented. Clinicians familiar with the selection of evidence-supported treatments for specific diseases may be less aware of the evolving literature surrounding the organisation of care on the medical ward. This review is the first synthesis of that disparate literature. An iterative search identified relevant publications, using terms pertaining to medical ward environments, and objective and subjective patient outcomes. Articles (including reviews) were selected on the basis of their focus on medical wards, and their relevance to the quality and safety of ward-based care. Responses to medical ward failings are grouped into five common themes: staffing levels and team composition; interdisciplinary communication and collaboration; standardisation of care; early recognition and treatment of the deteriorating patient; and local safety climate. Interventions in these categories are likely to improve the quality and safety of care in medical wards, although the evidence supporting them is constrained by methodological limitations and inadequate investment in multicentre trials. Nonetheless, with infrequent opportunities to redefine their services, institutions are increasingly adopting multifaceted strategies that encompass groups of these themes. As the literature on the quality of inpatient care moves beyond its initial focus on the intensive care unit and operating theatre, physicians should be mindful of opportunities to incorporate evidence-based practice at a ward level. PMID:25457434

  7. Reducing conflict and containment rates on acute psychiatric wards: The Safewards cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Simpson, Alan; Stewart, Duncan; Hodsoll, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute psychiatric wards manage patients whose actions may threaten safety (conflict). Staff act to avert or minimise harm (containment). The Safewards model enabled the identification of ten interventions to reduce the frequency of both. Objective To test the efficacy of these interventions. Design A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with psychiatric hospitals and wards as the units of randomisation. The main outcomes were rates of conflict and containment. Participants Staff and patients in 31 randomly chosen wards at 15 randomly chosen hospitals. Results For shifts with conflict or containment incidents, the experimental condition reduced the rate of conflict events by 15% (95% CI 5.6–23.7%) relative to the control intervention. The rate of containment events for the experimental intervention was reduced by 26.4% (95% CI 9.9–34.3%). Conclusions Simple interventions aiming to improve staff relationships with patients can reduce the frequency of conflict and containment. Trial registration IRSCTN38001825. PMID:26166187

  8. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  9. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  10. The quantity of nursing care on wards working 8- and 12-hour shifts.

    PubMed

    Reid, N; Robinson, G; Todd, C

    1993-10-01

    Interest in 12-hour nursing shifts has been renewed in response to demands for improved cost-effectiveness in the NHS, but the effects of this shift on the delivery of patient care have been unclear. This paper describes the results of a repeated-measures study of 10 wards, using activity analysis to describe patterns of care under an 8-hour compared to a 12-hour shift system. Significant reductions in the amount of direct patient care were found under the 12-hour shift, with corresponding increases in unofficial work-breaks. It is suggested that these findings, which were consistent over all study wards and throughout the whole 12-hour day, demonstrate a "pacing" effect by nurses who face 12 hours on duty. Such a detrimental effect should be a major consideration when coming to any decision to implement a 12-hour shift. PMID:8225806

  11. A replication study of the City nurse intervention: reducing conflict and containment on three acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Bowers, L; Flood, C; Brennan, G; Allan, T

    2008-11-01

    Conflict and containment on acute inpatient psychiatric wards pose a threat to patient and staff safety, and it is desirable to minimize the frequency of these events. Research has indicated that certain staff attitudes and behaviours might serve to accomplish this, namely, positive appreciation, emotional regulation and effective structure. A previous test of an intervention based on these principles, on two wards, showed a good outcome. In this study, we tested the same intervention on three further wards. Two 'City nurses' were employed to work with three acute wards, assisting with the implementation of changes according to the working model of conflict and containment generation. Evaluation was via before-and-after measures, with parallel data collected from five control wards. While simple before-and-after analysis of the two experimental wards showed significant reductions in conflict and containment, when a comparison with controls was conducted, with control for patient occupancy and clustering of results by ward, no effect of the intervention was found. The results were therefore ambiguous, and neither confirm nor contradict the efficacy of the intervention. A further intervention study may need to be conducted with a larger sample size to achieve adequate statistical power. PMID:18844799

  12. Experiences of the advanced nurse practitioner role in acute care.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Alison; Cooper, Joanne; Goldberg, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the service evaluation presented in this article was to explore the multidisciplinary team's (MDT) experiences and perception of the advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) role on an acute health care of the older person ward. A qualitative case study was carried out comprising semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT, exploring their experiences of the ANP role. An overarching theme of 'Is it a nurse? Is it a doctor? No, it's an ANP' emerged from the data, with three subthemes: the missing link; facilitating and leading holistic care; and safe, high quality care. The ANP role is valued by the MDT working with them and provides a unique skill set that has the potential to enhance care of older patients living with frailty. While there are challenges to its introduction, it is a role worth introducing to older people's wards. PMID:27125941

  13. Caring for patients with cancer in non-specialist wards: the nurse experience.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Wilkes, L M; Ogunsiji, O; Walker, A

    2005-07-01

    This study aims to describe the experiences of nurses caring for cancer patients in non-specialist wards. The study was conducted in a large (420 beds) and small (32 beds) hospital in an area health service with urban and rural populations in the west of Sydney. A qualitative descriptive approach was utilized to collect data from the nurses. Data were collected using a survey and in-depth interviews of nurses working in non-specialist cancer wards. Transcribed data were managed with Nudist Vivo software and analysed for common themes using process of constant comparison and contrast. Twenty-five surveys were returned and five nurses volunteered to be interviewed. The six major themes that emerged from analysis of data were: emotional nature of care, lack of time, lack of knowledge of cancer treatment, family support, environment not conducive to proper care and dealing with patient's non-acceptance of cancer diagnosis. The nurses in this study wished to provide quality supportive care for cancer patients and their families but the inconducive environment and inadequate relevant training hindered the nurses' efforts. This then presents further need of relevant training for nurses in cancer care and time management, to meet up with these challenges. PMID:15952970

  14. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  15. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  16. Nursing dependency in registered nursing homes and long term care geriatric wards in Edinburgh.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, A E; Primrose, W R; MacIntyre, C

    1986-01-01

    There has been growing interest and public investment in registered nursing homes, apparently based on the assumption that these homes are the private equivalent of hospital long term care. We have tested this hypothesis in a survey comparing 400 patients in 18 registered nursing homes with 217 patients in 11 geriatric long term care wards in Edinburgh. The nursing home patients formed a distinct and separate group: 362 (92%) were women, 392 (98%) were single or widowed, and 358 (90%) were self financing, whereas in the geriatric long term care group 148 (68%) were women and 35 (16%) were still married. Patients in nursing homes were also far less dependent than those in geriatric long term care wards (p less than 0.005). This study suggests that there may be large differences between the patients in these two types of institution, particularly with regard to nursing dependency. This finding has important implications in the future planning of long term places for the dependent elderly. PMID:3089370

  17. Differences in selected medical care parameters in rheumatic disease ward patients of different ages of life

    PubMed Central

    Pobrotyn, Piotr; Susło, Robert; Milczanowski, Piotr; Drobnik, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are becoming more and more common in Poland with the ageing of the population. Nearly 18% of the total hospital admissions in Poland result from rheumatic diseases, which was equivalent to 350 thousand cases in the year 2008. These diseases tend to last for many decades, decreasing both the quality of life and income of the patients as well as increasing the medical institutions’ workload and society's financial burden. The aim of the study was to determine whether the medical care parameters in a rheumatic disease hospital ward show any significant differences among different patient age groups – especially such that would support taking them into account as a basis for adjusting the financial coverage level of medical services. Material and methods Data on hospitalizations at the Rheumatic Diseases Ward of Wroclaw University Hospital in Wroclaw in the years 2009–2015 were analyzed, taking into account the age groups, number of hospital admissions, their duration and causes. Relevant statistical data analysis was performed. Discussion The study revealed that the number of old patients hospitalized at the rheumatic diseases ward increased over the last 6 years and that such statistically significant differences do exist: on average the old patients not only tend to stay much longer at the hospital, but also suffer from a different and more diverse spectrum of diseases in comparison to their younger counterparts. Conclusions The detected differences in medical care parameters support the need for more individualized medical care and increased cost of the hospital stay in the case of older patients. Consequently, those factors justify the necessity to increase the value of medical services in the case of old patients, possibly also taking into account the variation between age subgroups. PMID:27407280

  18. Activity sampling of nurses of a sub-acute ward of a large hospital.

    PubMed

    Bobdey, C S; Sandhu, M S; Urmil, A C; Dayakar, T

    1992-07-01

    A study was conducted in a 43 bedded subacute family ward of a large hospital to find out the adequacy and efficiency of its nursing service. Activity analysis in respect of nurses was carried out by Activity Sampling Technique. The study revealed that out of 334 activities, observed, 78 (23.3%) were non-productive, whereas 256 (76.7%) were productive. Out of the productive activities, 148 (44.3%) were for direct patient care mainly comprising of 46 (31.1% for carrying out technical procedures, 36 (24.32%) for determining patients' needs, 20 (13.15%) for preparing patients for various procedures and 15 (10.14%) for assisting in technical procedures. Number wise the nurses were found to be adequate. PMID:10130935

  19. Prediction of mortality in patients in acute medical wards using basic laboratory and anthropometric data.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J.; Mak, Y. T.; Lau, J.; Swaminathan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The value of anthropometric and biochemical indices in predicting short-term mortality among patients in general medical wards was assessed in 294 patients admitted consecutively to a district hospital over a one month period. Using a stepwise logistic regression model and supported by the linear discriminant analysis method, mortality within 3 months could be predicted with sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 84% using the following variables: sex, functional ability, urea, total protein, alkaline phosphatase and albumin-adjusted calcium. Addition of anthropometric values and biochemical nutritional indices did little to improve the accuracy of the prediction, contrary to previous findings among surgical patients and elderly residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:1494524

  20. Integrating care for high-risk patients in England using the virtual ward model: lessons in the process of care integration from three case sites

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Geraint; Vaithianathan, Rhema; Wright, Lorraine; Brice, Mary R; Lovell, Paul; Rankin, Seth; Bardsley, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients at high risk of emergency hospitalisation are particularly likely to experience fragmentation in care. The virtual ward model attempts to integrate health and social care by offering multidisciplinary case management to people at high predicted risk of unplanned hospitalisation. Objective To describe the care practice in three virtual ward sites in England and to explore how well each site had achieved meaningful integration. Method Case studies conducted in Croydon, Devon and Wandsworth during 2011–2012, consisting of semi-structured interviews, workshops, and site visits. Results Different versions of the virtual wards intervention had been implemented in each site. In Croydon, multidisciplinary care had reverted back to one-to-one case management. Conclusions To integrate successfully, virtual ward projects should safeguard the multidisciplinary nature of the intervention, ensure the active involvement of General Practitioners, and establish feedback processes to monitor performance such as the number of professions represented at each team meeting. PMID:24250284

  1. Infrastructural arrangements for integrated care: implementing an electronic nursing plan in a psychogeriatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Gunnar; Munkvold, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The paper contributes to the conceptualisation of “integrated care” in heterogeneous work practices. A dynamic perspective is developed, emphasising how integrated care is malleable, open, and achieved in practice. Furthermore, we explore the role of nursing plans in integrated care practices, underscoring the inherent difficulties of building one common infrastructural system for integrated care. Methods Empirically, we studied the implementation of an electronic nursing plan in a psychiatric ward at the University Hospital of North Norway. We conducted 80 hours of participant observation and 15 interviews. Results While the nursing plan was successful as a formal tool among the nurses, it was of limited use in practice where integrated care was carried out. In some instances, the use of the nursing plan even undermined integrated care. Conclusion Integrated care is not a constant entity, but is much more situated and temporal in character. A new infrastructural system for integrated care should not be envisioned as replacing most of the existing information sources, but rather seen as an extension to the heterogeneous ensemble of existing ones. PMID:17627295

  2. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  3. Effects of family-centered care on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in pediatric wards in a pediatric ward in Chaloos in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Forouzan; Hassan, Syed Tajuddin Syed; Yaghmai, Farideh; Ismaeil, Suriani Binti; Suandi, Turiman Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family-centered care (FCC) involves holistic care and requires cooperation with the family in planning, intervention, and the evolution of the care that is being provided. Many previous studies have provided results that indicate the importance of the family’s involvement in pediatric care, but there is still resistance in doing so within the organizational culture of the hospitals in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of FCC on the satisfaction of parents of children hospitalized in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Methods: This Quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2012 in the pediatric ward at Razi Hospital in Chaloos, Iran. Seventy hospitalized children between the ages of 1 and 3 who suffered from diarrhea, vomiting, or pneumonia were selected through convenience sampling. They were divided randomly into two equal groups, a control group (routine care) and an experimental group (family-centered care). SPSS Statistics 14 software was used to analyze the data, and p<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: In the FCC group, the mean score of satisfaction among the parents of the children was 20 out of 90 before the intervention, but, after the FCC method was used, it increased to 83.2 out of 90. In addition, a significant difference was found between the scores of satisfaction for the control and experimental groups (p<0.001), and all parents of children in the experimental group expressed high satisfaction. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the practice of FCC in caring for the sick children can increase the satisfaction of their parents significantly. The role of the family’s involvement is critical in every component of the intervention efforts, as shown by the constructs of participatory support, educational support, and psychological support. Thus, a notable implication here is that FCC may lead to increased quality of care and should be included in the educational programs of

  4. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  5. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. PMID:22384949

  6. How much does care in palliative care wards cost in Poland?

    PubMed Central

    Pokropska, Wieslawa; Łuczak, Jacek; Kaptacz, Anna; Stachowiak, Andrzej; Hurich, Krystyna; Koszela, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main task of palliative care units is to provide a dignified life for people with advanced progressive chronic disease through appropriate symptom management, communication between medical specialists and the patient and his family, as well as the coordination of care. Many palliative care units struggle with low incomes from the National Health Fund (NHF), which causes serious economic problems. The aim of the study was to estimate of direct and administrative costs of care and the actual cost per patient per day in selected palliative care units and comparison of the results to the valuation of the NHF. Material and methods The study of the costs of hospitalization of 175 patients was conducted prospectively in five palliative care units (PCUs). The costs directly associated with care were recorded on the specially prepared forms in each unit and also personnel and administrative costs provided by the accounting departments. Results The total costs of analyzed units amounted to 209 002 EUR (898 712 PLN), while the payment for palliative care services from the NHF amounted to 126 010 EUR (541 844 PLN), which accounted for only 60% of the costs incurred by the units. The average cost per person per day of hospitalization, calculated according to the actual duration of hospitalization in the unit, was 83 EUR (357 PLN), and the average payment from the NHF was 52.8 EUR (227 PLN). Underpayment per person per day was approximately 29.2 EUR (125 PLN). Conclusions The study showed a significant difference between the actual cost of palliative care units and the level of refund from the NHF. Based on the analysis of costs, the application has been submitted to the NHF to change the reimbursement amount of palliative care services in 2013. PMID:27186194

  7. The prevalence of depression among elderly warded in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan.

    PubMed

    Sherina, M S; Rampal, L; Hanim, M Arfah; Thong, P L

    2006-03-01

    Depression is characterized by symptoms like disturbance in behavior, cognition and mood. This is commonly known to affect people aged 60 years and above especially those who are also afflicted with illnesses. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among the elderly in a tertiary care centre in Wilayah Persekutuan. A cross sectional study design was done. Stratified cluster sampling method was used to select the respondents. All elderly patients were selected from the orthopaedic, surgical, gynaecology and medical wards in a government hospital in Wilayah Persekutuan. A 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale questionnaire was used as a screening instrument. Out of the 246 elderly subjects, 198 were interviewed giving a response rate of 80.5%. The results showed that 54% of the elderly respondents were found to have depressive symptoms. Age (p=0.022), sex (p=0.008), ethnicity (p=0.022) and functional disabilities in bathing (p=0.001), grooming (p=0.007), dressing (p= 0.007), using the toilet (p=0.002), transferring from bed to chair and back (p=0.000), mobility (p=0.000) and climbing stairs (p=0.000) were all found to be significantly associated with depression among the elderly respondents. The outcome of this study will have an important impact on the implementation of the health policy for the elderly patients admitted to hospitals. PMID:16708729

  8. Alberta's Acute Care Funding Project.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Hall, E M; Lave, J R; Glendining, M

    1992-01-01

    Alberta initiated the Acute Care Funding Project (ACFP) in 1988, a new hospital funding system that institutes case mix budgeting adjustments to the global budget so that hospitals can be treated more equitably. The initiative is a significant departure in principle from the former method of funding. The ACFP is summarized and critiqued, and focuses on the inpatient side of the picture. The various elements of the project are discussed, such as the hospital performance index, the hospital performance measure, the Refined Diagnostic Related Group, case weights, typical and outlier cases, and the costing mechanisms. Since its implementation, the ACFP has undergone substantial changes; these are discussed, as well as some of the problems that still need to be addressed. Overall, the system offers incentives to reduce length of stay and to increase the efficiency with which inpatient care is provided. PMID:10121446

  9. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053-0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  10. A comparative study of epidural catheter colonization and infection in Intensive Care Unit and wards in a Tertiary Care Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Harde, Minal; Bhadade, Rakesh; Iyer, Hemlata; Jatale, Amol; Tiwatne, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a potentially serious complication of epidural analgesia and with an increase in its use in wards there is a necessity to demonstrate its safety. We aimed to compare the incidence of colonization of epidural catheters retained for short duration (for 48 h) postoperative analgesia in postanesthesia care unit and wards. It was a prospective observational study done in a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 2 years and included 400 patients with 200 each belonged to two groups PACU and ward. We also studied epidural tip culture pattern, skin swab culture at the entry point of the catheter, their relation to each other and whether colonization is equivalent to infection. Data were analyzed using statistical software GraphPad. Overall positive tip culture was 6% (24), of them 7% (14) were from PACU and 5% (10) were from ward (P = 0.5285). Positive skin swab culture was 38% (150), of them 20% (80) were from PACU and 18% (70) were from ward (P = 0.3526). The relation between positive tip culture and positive skin swab culture in same patients is extremely significant showing a strong linear relationship (95% confidence interval = 0.1053–0.2289). The most common microorganism isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis. No patient had signs of local or epidural infection. There is no difference in the incidence of epidural catheter tip culture and skin swab culture of patients from the general ward and PACU. Epidural analgesia can be administered safely for 48 h in general wards without added risk of infection. The presence of positive tip culture is not a predictor of epidural space infection, and colonization is not equivalent to infection; hence, routine culture is not needed. Bacterial migration from the skin along the epidural track is the most common mode of bacterial colonization; hence, strict asepsis is necessary. PMID:27076712

  11. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  12. Reconsidering the transfer of patients from the intensive care unit to the ward: a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiung-Jung Jo; Coyer, Fiona

    2007-03-01

    Evidence indicates that the poorly managed transfer of a patient from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the ward can lead to physical and psychological complications for the patient, and often require ICU readmission and rehospitalization. Reviewing this patient transfer process to improve the quality of care would be a positive step towards enhancing patients' recovery and providing skills to staff. The aim of this paper is to review case studies of transferring ICU patients to general wards in order to identify the shortcomings of this process. A literature review was conducted to evaluate current practices in the ICU transfer process. The results of this paper have clinical implications, suggest approaches to improve support for patients and their carers, and provide strategies to improve the transfer procedure. PMID:17300545

  13. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  14. Wards from hell.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-03-16

    'You're kidding,' I thought, having just realised the special care baby unit where I intended to work was next to the ward where they performed terminations of pregnancy. To make matters worse, women who had miscarried were on the same ward. PMID:26982847

  15. Can patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure from COPD be treated safely with noninvasive mechanical ventilation on the ward?

    PubMed Central

    Yalcinsoy, Murat; Salturk, Cuneyt; Oztas, Selahattin; Gungor, Sinem; Ozmen, Ipek; Kabadayi, Feyyaz; Oztim, Aysem Askim; Aksoy, Emine; Adıguzel, Nalan; Oruc, Ozlem; Karakurt, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) usage outside of intensive care unit is not recommended in patients with COPD for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF). We assessed the factors associated with failure of NIMV in patients with ARF and severe acidosis admitted to the emergency department and followed on respiratory ward. Patients and methods This is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital specialized in chest diseases and thoracic surgery between June 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. COPD patients who were admitted to our emergency department due to ARF were included. Patients were grouped according to the severity of acidosis into two groups: group 1 (pH=7.20–7.25) and group 2 (pH=7.26–7.30). Results Group 1 included 59 patients (mean age: 70±10 years, 30.5% female) and group 2 included 171 patients (mean age: 67±11 years, 28.7% female). On multivariable analysis, partial arterial oxygen pressure to the inspired fractionated oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio <200, delta pH value <0.30, and pH value <7.31 on control arterial blood gas after NIMV in the emergency room and peak C-reactive protein were found to be the risk factors for NIMV failure in COPD patients with ARF in the ward. Conclusion NIMV is effective not only in mild respiratory failure but also with severe forms of COPD patients presenting with severe exacerbation. The determination of the failure criteria of NIMV and the expertise of the team is critical for treatment success. PMID:27330283

  16. Ward rounds, participants, roles and perceptions: literature review.

    PubMed

    Walton, Victoria; Hogden, Anne; Johnson, Julie; Greenfield, David

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to classify and describe the purpose of ward rounds, who attends each round and their role, and participants' perception of each other's role during the respective ward rounds. Design/methodology/approach - A literature review of face-to-face ward rounds in medical wards was conducted. Peer reviewed journals and government publications published between 2000 and 2014 were searched. Articles were classified according to the type of round described in the study. Purposes were identified using keywords in the description of why the round was carried out. Descriptions of tasks and interactions with team members defined participant roles. Findings - Eight round classifications were identified. The most common were the generalised ward; multidisciplinary; and consultant rounds. Multidisciplinary rounds were the most collaborative round. Medical officers were the most likely discipline to attend any round. There was limited reference to allied health clinicians and patient involvement on rounds. Perceptions attendees held of each other reiterated the need to continue to investigate teamwork. Practical implications - A collaborative approach to care planning can occur by ensuring clinicians and patients are aware of different ward round processes and their role in them. Originality/value - Analysis fulfils a gap in the literature by identifying and analysing the different ward rounds being undertaken in acute medical wards. It identifies the complexities in the long established routine hospital processes of the ward round. PMID:27142947

  17. Meeting ethical challenges in acute care work as narrated by enrolled nurses.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Venke; Kihlgren, Annica Larsson; Kihlgren, Mona

    2004-03-01

    Five enrolled nurses (ENs) were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of registered nurses, ENs and patients about their experiences in an acute care ward. The ward opened in 1997 and provides patient care for a period of up to three days, during which time a decision has to be made regarding further care elsewhere or a return home. The ENs were interviewed concerning their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations and of acute care work. The method of phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used. The most prominent feature was the focus on relationships, as expressed in concern for society's and administrators' responsibility for health care and the care of older people. Other themes focus on how nurse managers respond to the ENs' work as well as their relationships with fellow ENs, in both work situations and shared social and sports activities. Their reflections seem to show an expectation of care as expressed in their lived experiences and their desire for a particular level and quality of care for their own family members. A lack of time could lead to a bad conscience over the 'little bit extra' being omitted. This lack of time could also lead to tiredness and even burnout, but the system did not allow for more time. PMID:15030025

  18. Acute care hospitals' accountability to provincial funders.

    PubMed

    Kromm, Seija K; Ross Baker, G; Wodchis, Walter P; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  19. Acute Care Hospitals' Accountability to Provincial Funders

    PubMed Central

    Kromm, Seija K.; Ross Baker, G.; Wodchis, Walter P.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Ontario's acute care hospitals are subject to a number of tools, including legislation and performance measurement for fiscal accountability and accountability for quality. Examination of accountability documents used in Ontario at the government, regional and acute care hospital levels reveals three trends: (a) the number of performance measures being used in the acute care hospital sector has increased significantly; (b) the focus of the health system has expanded from accountability for funding and service volumes to include accountability for quality and patient safety; and (c) the accountability requirements are misaligned at the different levels. These trends may affect the success of the accountability approach currently being used. PMID:25305386

  20. Psychiatric wards: places of safety?

    PubMed

    Jones, J; Nolan, P; Bowers, L; Simpson, A; Whittington, R; Hackney, D; Bhui, K

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, the purpose and quality of provision delivered in acute inpatient psychiatric settings have been increasingly questioned. Studies from a service user perspective have reported that while some psychiatric inpatients feel safe and cared for, others feel their time in hospital is neither safe nor therapeutic. This paper explores the experiences of service users on acute inpatient psychiatric wards in England, with a particular focus on their feelings of safety and security. Interviews were conducted with 60 psychiatric inpatients in England. The majority of service users felt safe in hospital and felt supported by staff and other service users. However, anything that threatened their sense of security such as aggression, bullying, theft, racism and the use of alcohol and drugs on the ward, made some respondents feel insecure and unsafe. Psychiatric wards are still perceived by many as volatile environments, where service users feel forced to devise personal security strategies in order to protect themselves and their property. It would appear that there remains much to do before research findings and policies are implemented in ways that facilitate all service users to derive the maximum benefit from their inpatient experience. PMID:20465757

  1. Acute care management of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Mitcho, K; Yanko, J R

    1999-08-01

    Meeting the health care needs of the spinal cord-injured patient is an immense challenge for the acute care multidisciplinary team. The critical care nurse clinician, as well as other members of the team, needs to maintain a comprehensive knowledge base to provide the care management that is essential to the care of the spinal cord-injured patient. With the active participation of the patient and family in care delivery decisions, the health care professionals can help to meet the psychosocial and physical needs of the patient/family unit. This article provides an evidence-based, comprehensive review of the needs of the spinal cord-injured patient in the acute care setting including optimal patient outcomes, methods to prevent complications, and a plan that provides an expeditious transition to rehabilitation. PMID:10646444

  2. Stepping Back and Listening: Staff Experiences of Using a Coaching Approach in an Acute Rehabilitation Ward for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gray, Debra; Ross, Kirsty; Prat-Sala, Merce; Kibble, Sharon; Harden, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has highlighted that acute care provision can lead to a loss of confidence, control, and independent functioning in older adult patients. In addition, it is recognized that interactions between patients and health care staff are central to the prevention of functional decline in patients. In this study, we aimed to affect the staff-patient relationship by implementing a coaching intervention in an older adult acute care setting. Here, we report on staff experiences of this coaching approach. Data were collected from 16 members of staff via semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: Putting a Label on It, Stepping Back and Listening, Identifying the Opportunities, and Working as Team. Our findings show that a coaching approach can be successful in getting staff to reconsider their interactions with patients and to focus on strategies that foster the independence and autonomy of older adult patients. PMID:26481943

  3. Postdischarge Treatment Costs Following Closure of a State Geropsychiatric Ward: Comparison of 2 Levels of Community Care

    PubMed Central

    St. Dennis, Clarke; Hendryx, Michael; Henriksen, Anne-Lenora; Setter, Stephen M.; Singer, Brandy

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purposes of this study were to (1) examine the cost of community-based health care services for geropsychiatric inpatients discharged into the community after the closure of an inpatient state geropsychiatric unit and (2) compare costs for patients treated with extra support through an Expanded Community Services (ECS) program to patients treated traditionally. Method: This study was a 6-month prospective, observational analysis of 30 patients discharged in conjunction with a ward closure in October 2002 (17 patients were nonrandomly assigned to the ECS program, and 13, to standard care). We analyzed costs of care, mortality, and rehospitalization rates derived from Medicaid paid claims and other data sources and compared costs to an estimate of hospital costs had the patients not been discharged. Patients were discharged to various community placements including long-term care facilities, assisted living facilities, and adult family homes in Eastern Washington State. Results: Costs for community care were approximately half of estimated costs for hospital care. Patients treated in the ECS program, representing the most severely in-need discharges, had costs of care that were nonsignificantly higher than non-ECS patients but still significantly lower than estimated hospital care. No differences in mortality or rehospitalization rates were found between ECS and non-ECS patients. Conclusion: Costs of community care were significantly lower than hospital care. Quality of life for patients in the community settings versus the hospital was not assessed. The ECS program was able to maintain high-risk geropsychiatric patients in the community comparably to less severely ill patients at less than hospital costs. Recommendations are provided for ways to establish community treatment programs for deinstitutionalized elderly patients with serious mental illness. PMID:17235384

  4. The Revolving Door Phenomenon in an Italian Acute Psychiatric Ward: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis of the Potential Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Sagona, Marco; Landi, Giulia; Martire, Lisa; Piemonte, Chiara; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2016-09-01

    To highlight the revolving door (RD) phenomenon in an acute psychiatric ward, we retrospectively identified the patients hospitalized three or more times in a calendar year from 1/1/2009 to 31/12/2013 as RD patients (RDP). We collected sociodemographic and clinical variables of RDP and statistically analyzed the potential RD risk factors. We divided RDP into "high" and "extremely high" utilizers and evaluated the variables related to more frequent readmissions. RDP represented 5.68% of all patients and their hospitalizations (RDH) 25% of all admissions. The statistically significant risk factors for all RDH were "disability pension," "substance abuse/dependence," "mild/severe aggressiveness," and "psychiatric and social rehabilitative programs". The comparison between "high" and "extremely high" utilizers showed that "manic episodes" and "personality disorders," among the diagnoses, "familial relational conflicts" and "violence/suicidality", among the hospitalization reasons, were statistically significant risk factors for more frequent readmissions. RD phenomenon was greatly affected by severe clinical conditions with social disability. PMID:27227558

  5. Nursing staff satisfaction with the acute pain service in a surgical ward setting.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Erica; Carryer, Jenny

    2010-03-01

    Over the last 20 years significant advances in the management of pain have been made. Specifically, establishment during the 1990s of Acute Pain Services (APS) within hospitals both nationally and internationally resulted in improved awareness and management of pain. However there has been little research into staff satisfaction with the service, and no studies have been undertaken at a local hospital level. Nurses play a major role in the assessment and treatment of acute pain; therefore it is useful to determine the level of their satisfaction following introduction of APS. The purpose of the present study was to explore, by means of a survey, the level of nursing staff satisfaction with the APS in a large hospital in New Zealand (NZ). Questionnaires, predominantly quantitative in form, were distributed to 58 nursing staff who worked alongside the APS. Thirty six (62%) responded. The findings showed that while, overall, respondents were very satisfied, or satisfied with the APS, responses to open-ended section of the questionnaire brought to light areas that the researchers see as warranting further attention. PMID:20518440

  6. Clinical Assessment of Nursing Care Regarding Hemovigilance in Neonatal Wards and Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Selected Hospitals Affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (2013 - 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Tajalli, Saleheh; Nourian, Manijeh; Rassouli, Maryam; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemovigilance is a series of surveillance procedures encompassing the entire transfusion chain from the collection of blood and its components to the follow-up of its recipients. It is intended to collect and access information on unanticipated or adverse effects stemming from the therapeutic use of labile blood products. Blood transfusion, particularly in neonates, requires meticulous clinical assessment to ensure safety before, during, and after the procedure. Therefore, it is essential to investigate how nurses and other health care providers implement hemovigilance with a view to elevating the standards of care. Objectives: The aim of this study, conducted between 2013 and 2014, was to assess nursing care regarding hemovigilance in the neonatal wards and neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of selected hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study assessed nursing care concerning hemovigilance in 144 neonates. Data were collected using a checklist at the neonatal wards and NICUs of Mahdiyeh, Mofid, and Imam Hussain hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. The checklist contained information on the standard of care in relation to neonatal hemovigilance in three components of request, transfusion, and documentation. Descriptive statistics with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 21) were used to analyze the collected data. Results: The rates of compliance with the hemovigilance guidelines in terms of request, transfusion, and documentation were 47%, 63.2%, and 68%, correspondingly, with a total score of 59.6% in all areas of research. Accordingly, compliance with hemovigilance guidelines was highest in documentation (68%), followed by transfusion (63.2%) and request (47%). Conclusions: The overall score of nursing care as regards adherence to the neonatal hemovigilance guidelines was 59.6% in the present study, indicating a lack

  7. Caring for children with cerebral malaria: insights gleaned from 20 years on a research ward in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Terrie E

    2009-04-01

    Clinicians treating patients with severe malaria in endemic areas confront a variety of challenges inherent to resource-poor settings, but it is possible to provide excellent care. The basic requirements, in addition to a thorough clinical examination of the patient, include assessing parasitaemia; determining anaemia (via haematocrit or haemoglobin); estimating blood glucose and lactate concentrations; establishing and maintaining i.v. access; measuring oxygen saturation and providing supplemental oxygen when necessary; grouping, cross-matching and transfusing blood. This paper provides practical information on determining the Blantyre Coma Score, collecting cerebrospinal fluid and measuring the opening pressure, and administering controlled volumes of i.v. fluids. Included is a narrative protocol describing the approach to patients with cerebral malaria used on the research ward at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. PMID:19128813

  8. Detection and documentation of dementia and delirium in acute geriatric wards.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Jouko V; Pitkala, Kaisu H; Strandberg, Timo E; Tilvis, Reijo S

    2004-01-01

    Detection of cognitive impairment among hospitalized older individuals has shown to be insufficient. A point prevalence study in two geriatric hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, was performed among 219 acutely ill individuals over 70 years to assess the detection of dementia and delirium. Documentation of dementia and delirium in medical records, and recordings of confusional symptoms in nurses' notes were compared with the researchers' diagnosis made after a detailed assessment of cognitive status. The cognitive decline was mentioned in medical records in 70/88 (79.5%) of the cases. Cognitive testing was performed on 42/88 (47.7%) of the dementia patients, and the diagnosis of dementia was recorded in 47/88 (53.4%) of them. A specific etiological diagnosis was recorded in only 4/88 (4.5%) cases. Cognitive impairment in at least one of these four means was recorded in 80/88 (90.9%) of cases (sensitivity 0.93). Eight patients had a false-positive diagnosis of dementia (specificity 0.94). Delirium was diagnosed in 77 (35.2%) patients by the researchers, but it was recorded in only 31/77 (40.3%) in medical records. In 64/77 (83.1%) cases signs of confusion were recorded in nurses' notes. Poor detection and documentation may lead to undertreatment of both disorders. PMID:14757300

  9. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  10. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  11. Transcultural encounters in a medical ward in Sweden: experiences of health care practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dellenborg, Lisen; Skott, Carola; Jakobsson, Eva

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the approach adopted by health care practitioners when handling transcultural encounters. The study was performed by means of action research, a reflective process led by practitioners and researchers working together to improve practice and solve problems. Data were collected through participant observations at a coronary unit in Sweden and group discussions with the health care professionals and were analyzed and interpreted using a hermeneutic approach. The narratives in the interview text illustrated a switch between three levels of understanding human behavior: the individual level (personality), the collective or group level (what is termed culture), and the universal level (human nature), focusing on differences in the first two and similarities in the third. This study highlights the importance of practitioners comprehending the complex relationship between individuality and cultural context and understanding cultural identity as being fluid and coexisting with other differences, such as class, education, gender, and age. PMID:22802303

  12. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  13. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  14. Telling stories and hearing voices: narrative work with voice hearers in acute care.

    PubMed

    Place, C; Foxcroft, R; Shaw, J

    2011-11-01

    Mental health nurses do not always feel at ease talking in detail with voice hearers about their experiences. Using the approach of Romme and Escher, a project was developed to support staff on an acute inpatient ward to explore voice hearing with patients. Romme and Escher suggest that a person's own understanding of their voices and their meaning is the key to recovery. Working together, the nurse helps voice hearers construct a narrative that tells the story of their voices. Examples from the narratives show how they can help increase understanding of a person's voices, and how the mental health nurse in acute care can realistically offer therapeutic interventions that may help a person towards recovery. PMID:21985687

  15. Teaching a 'good' ward round.

    PubMed

    Powell, Natalie; Bruce, Christopher G; Redfern, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Ward rounds are a vital part of hospital medicine and junior doctors play a key role in their delivery. Despite the importance of ward rounds to patient care and experience, we believe that junior doctors may lack the training and skills to carry them out most effectively. We designed a simulation-based training session focusing on ward round skills themed to key patient safety issues and have delivered the training to over 100 learners (medical students and foundation year one doctors). Few learners had any prior training in ward rounds. The session was highly valued by all participants and surveys completed both before and after the session showed statistically significant improvements in confidence in leading and documenting ward rounds. In addition, 94% of final year medical students and 93% of doctors felt such training should be included in the undergraduate curriculum. We believe there is a current gap in training around ward round skills and would strongly encourage simulation-based ward round training to be developed for undergraduates. Further sessions following qualification may then consolidate and develop ward round skills adapted to the level of the doctor. PMID:25824064

  16. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  17. The habitus of 'rescue' and its significance for implementation of rapid response systems in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2014-11-01

    The need to focus on patient safety and improve the quality and consistency of medical care in acute hospital settings has been highlighted in a number of UK and international reports. When patients on a hospital ward become acutely unwell there is often a window of opportunity for staff, patients and relatives to contribute to the 'rescue' process by intervening in the trajectory of clinical deterioration. This paper explores the social and institutional processes associated with the practice of rescue, and implications for the implementation and effectiveness of rapid response systems (RRSs) within acute health care. An ethnographic case study was conducted in 2009 in two UK hospitals (focussing on the medical directorates in each organisation). Data collection involved 180 h of observation, 35 staff interviews (doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers) and documentary review. Analysis was informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice and his relational concept of the 'field' of the general medical ward. Three themes illustrated the nature of rescue work within the field and collective rules which guided associated occupational distinction practices: (1) the 'dirty work' of vital sign recording and its distinction from diagnostic (higher order) interpretive work; (2) the moral order of legitimacy claims for additional help; and (3) professional deference and the selective managerial control of rescue work. The discourse of rescue provided a means of exercising greater control over clinical uncertainty. The acquisition of 'rescue capital' enabled the social positioning of health care assistants, nurses and doctors, and shaped use of the RRS on the wards. Boundary work, professional legitimation and jurisdictional claims defined the social practice of rescue, as clinical staff had to balance safety, professional and organisational concerns within the field. This paper offers a nuanced understanding of patient safety on the front-line, challenging notions of

  18. Capacity for care: meta-ethnography of acute care nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Jackie; Nicholson, Caroline; Maben, Jill; Pope, Catherine; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Tziggili, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Aims To synthesize evidence and knowledge from published research about nurses' experiences of nurse-patient relationships with adult patients in general, acute inpatient hospital settings. Background While primary research on nurses' experiences has been reported, it has not been previously synthesized. Design Meta-ethnography. Data sources Published literature from Australia, Europe, and North America, written in English between January 1999–October 2009 was identified from databases: CINAHL, Medline, British Nursing Index and PsycINFO. Review methods Qualitative studies describing nurses' experiences of the nurse-patient relationship in acute hospital settings were reviewed and synthesized using the meta-ethnographic method. Results Sixteen primary studies (18 papers) were appraised as high quality and met the inclusion criteria. The findings show that while nurses aspire to develop therapeutic relationships with patients, the organizational setting at a unit level is strongly associated with nurses' capacity to build and sustain these relationships. The organizational conditions of critical care settings appear best suited to forming therapeutic relationships, while nurses working on general wards are more likely to report moral distress resulting from delivering unsatisfactory care. General ward nurses can then withdraw from attempting to emotionally engage with patients. Conclusion The findings of this meta-ethnography draw together the evidence from several qualitative studies and articulate how the organizational setting at a unit level can strongly influence nurses' capacity to build and sustain therapeutic relationships with patients. Service improvements need to focus on how to optimize the organizational conditions that support nurses in their relational work with patients. PMID:23163719

  19. Acute and critical care in neurology.

    PubMed

    Bertram, M; Schwarz, S; Hacke, W

    1997-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic management of selected neurological diseases requiring intensive treatment is summarized with special regard for current standards and new developments in therapy. Ischemic stroke is an emergency since the outcome can be improved by immediate and adequate general supporting as well as specific (thrombolytic) therapy in specialized stroke units. Surgical evacuation of supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We give an overview of conditions in which surgical therapy such as cerebellar hemorrhage and large, nondominant ganglionic hemorrhage might be advisable. Cerebral venous thrombosis is treated with full-dose intravenous heparin even if hemorrhage is present. In acute bacterial meningitis, early treatment of foci and empiric antibiotic therapy is crucial in order to prevent complications. The outcome of herpes simplex encephalitis can be favorably influenced by treatment with aciclovir and aggressive therapy of elevated ICP and seizures. Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome requires daily monitoring of vital functions in order to recognize the need for intensive care; intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are equally recommended for clinical and financial reasons. PMID:9363827

  20. Protocol to describe the analysis of text-based communication in medical records for patients discharged from intensive care to hospital ward

    PubMed Central

    Parsons Leigh, Jeanna; Brown, Kyla; Buchner, Denise; Stelfox, Henry T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Effective communication during hospital transitions of patient care is fundamental to ensuring patient safety and continuity of quality care. This study will describe text-based communication included in patient medical records before, during and after patient transfer from the intensive care unit (ICU) to a hospital ward (n=10 days) by documenting (1) the structure and focus of physician progress notes within and between medical specialties, (2) the organisation of subjective and objective information, including the location and accessibility of patient data and whether/how this changes during the hospital stay and (3) missing, illegible and erroneous information. Methods This study is part of a larger mixed methods prospective observational study of ICU to hospital ward transfer practices in 10 ICUs across Canada. Medical records will be collected and photocopied for each consenting patient for a period of up to 10 consecutive days, including the final 2 days in the ICU, the day of transfer and the first 7 days on the ward (n=10 days). Textual analysis of medical record data will be completed by 2 independent reviewers to describe communication between stakeholders involved in ICU transfer. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics board approval has been obtained at all study sites, including the coordinating study centre (which covers 4 Calgary-based sites; UofC REB 13-0021) and 6 additional study sites (UofA Pro00050646; UBC PHC Hi4-01667; Sunnybrook 336-2014; QCH 20140345-01H; Sherbrooke 14-172; Laval 2015-2171). Findings from this study will inform the development of an evidence-based tool that will be used to systematically analyse the series of notes in a patient's medical record. PMID:27401367

  1. Changing model of nursing care from individual patient allocation to team nursing in the acute inpatient environment.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, Greg; Jones, Aaron; Rivas, Ketty

    2010-06-01

    Agreement was reached with 12 acute medical and surgical wards/units at Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital to participate in a trial of team nursing (TN). Six units employed action research principles to undertake a change to a team nursing model and six remained with the pre-existing individual patient allocation (IPA) model. Task-based teaming was widely discarded by the team nursing units in favour of allocating patients within the team and introducing more supportive and communicative processes aimed at fostering responsibility sharing. Localised team-based models of care arose in the change wards and were outlined, implemented and refined using social action research principles. A 12-month prospective experimental comparison of job satisfaction and staff retention between the TN and IPA groups indicated statistically significant job satisfaction benefits and practically important staff retention benefits associated with moving away from an IPA model of nursing care delivery towards a team-based model of care delivery. Perhaps not surprisingly, job satisfaction gains were most marked among new graduate nurses, who reported real benefits from a teaming inspired shift in model of care in the acute inpatient environment. PMID:20950201

  2. Older Jail Inmates and Community Acute Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Chodos, Anna H.; Ahalt, Cyrus; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Myers, Janet; Goldenson, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined older jail inmates’ predetainment acute care use (emergency department or hospitalization in the 3 months before arrest) and their plans for using acute care after release. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study of 247 jail inmates aged 55 years or older assessing sociodemographic characteristics, health, and geriatric conditions associated with predetainment and anticipated postrelease acute care use. Results. We found that 52% of older inmates reported predetainment acute care use and 47% planned to use the emergency department after release. In modified Poisson regression, homelessness was independently associated with predetainment use (relative risk = 1.42; 95% confidence interval = 1.10, 1.83) and having a primary care provider was inversely associated with planned use (relative risk = 0.69; 95% confidence interval = 0.53, 0.89). Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act has expanded Medicaid eligibility to all persons leaving jail in an effort to decrease postrelease acute care use in this high-risk population. Jail-to-community transitional care models that address the health, geriatric, and social factors prevalent in older adults leaving jail, and that focus on linkages to housing and primary care, are needed to enhance the impact of the act on acute care use for this population. PMID:25033146

  3. Making post-acute care assets viable: a system's approach to continuing care.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Jeffery S; Oberst, Larry; Griffin, Kathleen M

    2013-04-01

    To build a strong continuing care network, leaders at Spectrum Health: Recruited industry veterans in post-acute care, Increased the visibility of the parent brand, Gained greater alignment throughout the system, Filled gaps in the health system's post-acute care portfolio. PMID:23596835

  4. Risk of Care Home Placement following Acute Hospital Admission: Effects of a Pay-for-Performance Scheme for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kasteridis, Panagiotis; Goddard, Maria; Jacobs, Rowena; Santos, Rita; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Beatriz; McGonigal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Quality and Outcomes Framework, or QOF, rewards primary care doctors (GPs) in the UK for providing certain types of care. Since 2006, GPs have been paid to identify patients with dementia and to conduct an annual review of their mental and physical health. During the review, the GP also assesses the carer’s support needs, including impact of caring, and ensures that services are co-ordinated across care settings. In principle, this type of care should reduce the risk of admission to long-term residential care directly from an acute hospital ward, a phenomenon considered to be indicative of poor quality care. However, this potential effect has not previously been tested. Methods Using English data from 2006/07 to 2010/11, we ran multilevel logit models to assess the impact of the QOF review on the risk of care home placement following emergency admission to acute hospital. Emergency admissions were defined for (a) people with a primary diagnosis of dementia and (b) people with dementia admitted for treatment of an ambulatory care sensitive condition. We adjusted for a wide range of potential confounding factors. Results Over the study period, 19% of individuals admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of dementia (N = 31,120) were discharged to a care home; of those admitted for an ambulatory care sensitive condition (N = 139,267), the corresponding figure was 14%. Risk factors for subsequent care home placement included older age, female gender, vascular dementia, incontinence, fall, hip fracture, and number of comorbidities. Better performance on the QOF review was associated with a lower risk of care home placement but only when the admission was for an ambulatory care sensitive condition. Conclusions The QOF dementia review may help to reduce the risk of long-term care home placement following acute hospital admission. PMID:27227403

  5. End-of-Life Care in an Acute Care Hospital: Linking Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ros; Iedema, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The care of people who die in hospitals is often suboptimal. Involving patients in decisions about their care is seen as one way to improve care outcomes. Federal and state government policymakers in Australia are promoting shared decision making in acute care hospitals as a means to improve the quality of end-of-life care. If policy is to be…

  6. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards. PMID:22788975

  7. Accuracy and optimization of a subcutaneous insulin model for less acute critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Felicity; Dickson, Jennifer; Pretty, Chris; Stewart, Kent; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2015-08-01

    Extending safe, effective glycemic control to the general wards requires a simple approach using subcutaneous (SC) insulin. However, this approach can increase relative risk compared to intravenous insulin due to the increased variability of SC insulin appearance. This paper evaluates the accuracy of a SC plasma insulin model and optimizes its parameters using measured plasma insulin data from 6 less acute critical care patients treated with SC insulin. The SC plasma insulin model used captures the dynamics of regular SC insulin well. However, there appears to be a positive bias leading to an overall median [IQR] residual error of -28.3 [-37 - 19] mU/L. The optimized model reduced the RMS residual error by 20-70% for each patient. The distinct inter- and intra-patient, and cohort variation seen in this data highlights the importance to of understanding how SC insulin appearance dynamics may be affected by the subject condition. PMID:26737279

  8. Clinical and Organizational Factors Related to the Reduction of Mechanical Restraint Application in an Acute Ward: An 8-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Miani, Fiorenza; Formicola, Vitantonio; Ferri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of mechanical restraint use in an acute psychiatric ward and to analyze which variables may have significantly influenced the use of this procedure. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in the Servizio Psichiatrico di Diagnosi e Cura (SPDC) of Modena Centro. The following variables of our sample, represented by all restrained patients admitted from 1-1-2005 to 31-12-2012, were analyzed: age, gender, nationality, psychiatric diagnoses, organic comorbidity, state and duration of admission, motivation and duration of restraints, nursing shift and hospitalization day of restraint, number of patients admitted at the time of restraint and institutional changes during the observation period. The above variables were statistically compared with those of all other non-restrained patients admitted to our ward in the same period. Results: Mechanical restraints were primarily used as a safety procedure to manage aggressive behavior of male patients, during the first days of hospitalization and night shifts. Neurocognitive disorders, organic comorbidity, compulsory state and long duration of admission were statistically significantly related to the increase of restraint use (p<.001, multivariate logistic regression). Institutional changes, especially more restricted guidelines concerning restraint application, were statistically significantly related to restraint use reduction (p<.001, chi2 test, multivariate logistic regression). Conclusion: The data obtained highlight that mechanical restraint use was influenced not only by clinical factors, but mainly by staff and policy factors, which have permitted a gradual but significant reduction in the use of this procedure through a multidimensional approach. PMID:25320635

  9. The periodicities in and biometeorological relationships with bed occupancy of an acute psychiatric ward in Antwerp, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, M.; de Meyer, F.; Peeters, D.; Meltzer, H.; Schotte, C.; Scharpe, S.; Cosyns, P.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, some investigators have established a seasonal pattern in normal human psychology, physiology and behaviour, and in the incidence of psychiatric psychopathology. In an attempt to elucidate the chronopsy and meteotropism in the latter, we have examined the chronograms of, and the biometeorological relationships to bed occupancy of the psychiatric ward of the Antwerp University Hospital during three consecutive calendar years (1987 1989). Weather data for the vicinity were provided by a local meteorological station and comprise mean atmospheric pressure, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and minutes of sunlight and precipitation/day. The number of psychiatric beds occupied during the study period exhibited a significant seasonal variation. Peaks in bed occupancy were observed in March and November, with lows in August. An important part of the variability in the number of beds occupied could be explained by the composite effects of weather variables of the preceding weeks. Our results suggest that short-term fluctuations in atmospheric activity may dictate some of the periodicities in psychiatric psychopathology.

  10. Acute coronary care: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 58 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radionuclide Techniques for Diagnosing and Sizing of Myocardial Infarction; The Use of Serial Radionuclide Angiography for Monitoring Function during Acute Myocardial Infarction; Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Myocardial Infarction; and The Valve of Radionuclide Angiography for Risk Assessment of Patients following Acute Myocardial Infarction.

  11. The effect of continuing care on patient's quality-of-life after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person wards

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Eslami, Manijeh; Yousefi, Hojatollah; Tabesh, Homayoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, lumbar herniation discs, a prevalent problem with a sign of lumbar and feet pain in society. Removal of disk by surgery decrease pain but reduce quality-of-life (QOL). In some cases, lake of following and caring of patient after surgery, herniation disc recurrent. Previous studies show that patient education and followings is important, therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of continuing care on patient QOL after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person (VIP) ward in Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 64 patients hospitalized in the neurosurgery and VIP wards of Al-Zahra Hospital, in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The patients were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to two groups (study and control). Patients’ response to short form-36 questionnaire before and 4 weeks and 3 months after continuing care in study group, and simultaneously, in the control group. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant difference in mean of physical and psychological dimensions before and 4 weeks and 3 months after intervention in study group (P < 0.05), but in control group, the difference was not significant (P = 0.8). Pairwise comparison of mean physical and psychological dimensions at different time points by Fisher's least significant difference showed that there was a significant difference in the intervention group (P < 0.022). But in the control group, there was no significant difference between pairs of time points (P > 0.18). Conclusion: Continuing care improves dimensions of patients’ QOL, and it is recommended as a nursing and nonmedical intervention in disc surgery patients. PMID:27462648

  12. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  13. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  14. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  15. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness. PMID:23977778

  16. Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions. PMID:24556792

  17. Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2014-11-01

    From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (P<0.05), and most of these isolates were isolated during a later year than cluster E isolates (P<0.05). By MLST analysis, 94% of cluster E and G isolates (29/31) were ST68. Although no time or space clustering could be identified by the conventional hospital-acquired infection monitoring system, E. coli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (P<0.05). Isolates obtained from patients who had stayed in the respiratory care ward had a significantly higher rate of aac(6')-Ib-cr and blaCTX-M-14 positivity, and were more likely to belong to ST68/S68-like (all P<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report of prolonged clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period. PMID:25168964

  18. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Chin Yee; Tan, Jane An Qi; Foong, Yi-Lin; Koh, Hui Mien; Chen, Denise Zhen Yue; Tan, Jessie Joon Chen; Ng, Chong Jin; Yap, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT) programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD) in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4) were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy) on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music) and days 2 and 3 (with CMT). Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES) and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS). Results Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01) in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01) in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014). Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01) and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045) were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation. PMID:27489560

  19. Components of nurse innovation: a model from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Neidlinger, S H; Drews, N; Hukari, D; Bartleson, B J; Abbott, F K; Harper, R; Lyon, J

    1992-12-01

    Components that promote nurse innovation in acute care hospitals are explicated in the Acute Care Nursing Innovation Model. Grounded in nursing care delivery systems and excellent management-organizations perspectives, nurse executives and 30 nurse "intrapreneurs" from 10 innovative hospitals spanning the United States shared their experiences and insights through semistructured, tape-recorded telephone interviews. Guided by interpretive interactionist strategies, the essential components, characteristics, and interrelationships are conceptualized and described so that others may be successful in their innovative endeavors. Successful innovation is dependent on the fit between and among the components; the better the fit, the more likely the innovation will succeed. PMID:1444282

  20. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  1. Large-system acute care transformation.

    PubMed

    Tatman, Judy; Zauner, Janiece

    2014-01-01

    All organizations are steeped in making delivery model changes to address the changing health care landscape specific to the expectations of health care reform. Too often, these changes focus solely on improving processes rather than developing creative and innovative work processes that decrease waste and increase quality. The Providence Health and Services system has embraced the challenge to transform health care services from a large-system perspective, beginning with 1 region. The authors share the beginning stages of this innovative work, the unique contributions to health care processes, and the early outcomes on 2 patient care units. PMID:24317032

  2. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:23433506

  3. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  4. On-ward participation of a hospital pharmacist in a Dutch intensive care unit reduces prescribing errors and related patient harm: an intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for prescribing errors and related adverse drug events (ADEs). An effective intervention to decrease this risk, based on studies conducted mainly in North America, is on-ward participation of a clinical pharmacist in an ICU team. As the Dutch Healthcare System is organized differently and the on-ward role of hospital pharmacists in Dutch ICU teams is not well established, we conducted an intervention study to investigate whether participation of a hospital pharmacist can also be an effective approach in reducing prescribing errors and related patient harm (preventable ADEs) in this specific setting. Methods A prospective study compared a baseline period with an intervention period. During the intervention period, an ICU hospital pharmacist reviewed medication orders for patients admitted to the ICU, noted issues related to prescribing, formulated recommendations and discussed those during patient review meetings with the attending ICU physicians. Prescribing issues were scored as prescribing errors when consensus was reached between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians. Results During the 8.5-month study period, medication orders for 1,173 patients were reviewed. The ICU hospital pharmacist made a total of 659 recommendations. During the intervention period, the rate of consensus between the ICU hospital pharmacist and ICU physicians was 74%. The incidence of prescribing errors during the intervention period was significantly lower than during the baseline period: 62.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days versus 190.5 per 1,000 monitored patient-days, respectively (P < 0.001). Preventable ADEs (patient harm, National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention severity categories E and F) were reduced from 4.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the baseline period to 1.0 per 1,000 monitored patient-days during the intervention period (P = 0.25). Per

  5. Mirror mirror on the ward, who’s the most narcissistic of them all? Pathologic personality traits in health care

    PubMed Central

    Bucknall, Vittoria; Burwaiss, Suendoss; MacDonald, Deborah; Charles, Kathy; Clement, Rhys

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stereotypes in medicine have become exaggerated for the purpose of workplace amusement. Our objective was to assess the levels of “dark triad” personality traits expressed by individuals working in different health care specialties in comparison with the general population. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional study within multiple departments of a UK secondary care teaching hospital. A total of 248 health care professionals participated, and 159 members of the general population were recruited as a comparison group. We measured 3 personality traits — narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy — through the validated self-reported personality questionnaires Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), MACH-IV and the Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale (LSRP), respectively. Results: Health care professionals scored significantly lower on narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy (mean scores 12.0, 53.0 and 44.7, respectively) than the general population (p < 0.001). Nursing professionals exhibited a significantly higher level of secondary psychopathy than medical professionals (p = 0.04, mean LSRP score 20.3). Within the cohort of medical professionals, surgeons expressed significantly higher levels of narcissism (p = 0.03, mean NPI score 15.0). Interpretation: Health care professionals expressed low levels of dark triad personality traits. The suggestion that health care professionals are avaricious and untrustworthy may be refuted, even for surgeons. PMID:26644545

  6. Ward-based Critical Care: A Guide for Health Professionals (second edition) Price Ann M Smith Sally A and Challiner Alistair Ward-based Critical Care: A Guide for Health Professionals (second edition) 416pp £49 m&k publishing 9781905539925 1905539924 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    This book gives a well-rounded overview of the principles of ABCDE, which underpin all aspects of care in nursing, particularly acute care. It begins by exploring the ABCDE approach and looks at this from a multiprofessional view. It then links specific conditions. PMID:27286614

  7. Psychosocial Care and its Association with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Agarwal, Sheesham

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study compared 120 children having severe acute malnutrition with 120 healthy children for exposure to 40 behaviors, by measuring psychosocial care based on Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory. The mean (SD) psychosocial care score of cases and controls significantly differed [18.2 (2.2) vs 23.5 (2.1); P<0.001]. A score of less than 14 was significantly associated with severe acute malnutrition (OR 23.2; 95% CI 8.2, 50). PMID:27254059

  8. A critical narrative analysis of shared decision-making in acute inpatient mental health care.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Gemma; Felton, Anne; Morgan, Alastair; Stickley, Theo; Willis, Martin; Diamond, Bob; Houghton, Philip; Johnson, Beverley; Dumenya, John

    2016-01-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM) is a high priority in healthcare policy and is complementary to the recovery philosophy in mental health care. This agenda has been operationalised within the Values-Based Practice (VBP) framework, which offers a theoretical and practical model to promote democratic interprofessional approaches to decision-making. However, these are limited by a lack of recognition of the implications of power implicit within the mental health system. This study considers issues of power within the context of decision-making and examines to what extent decisions about patients' care on acute in-patient wards are perceived to be shared. Focus groups were conducted with 46 mental health professionals, service users, and carers. The data were analysed using the framework of critical narrative analysis (CNA). The findings of the study suggested each group constructed different identity positions, which placed them as inside or outside of the decision-making process. This reflected their view of themselves as best placed to influence a decision on behalf of the service user. In conclusion, the discourse of VBP and SDM needs to take account of how differentials of power and the positioning of speakers affect the context in which decisions take place. PMID:26833106

  9. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  10. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  11. Situation analysis and issues in management of biomedical waste in select small health care facilities in a ward under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Chethana, Thirthahalli; Thapsey, Hemanth; Gautham, Melur Sukumar; Sreekantaiah, Pruthvish; Suryanarayana, Suradhenupura Puttajois

    2014-04-01

    Smaller health care facilities especially clinics though believed to generate lesser quantum/categories of medical waste, the number of clinics/small health care settings are considerable. The movement to manage biomedical waste in a safe and scientific manner has gathered momentum among the medium and large hospitals in Bangalore, but there has been a little understanding and focus on the smaller health care facilities/clinics in this aspect. It is important to gather evidence regarding the current situation of bio-medical waste (BMW) management and issues in smaller health care settings, so as to expand the safe management to all points of generation in Bangalore and will also help to plan relevant interventional strategies for the same. Hence an exploratory study was conducted to assess the current situation and issues in management of BMW among small health care facilities (sHCF). This cross sectional study was conducted in T. Dasarahalli (ward number 15) under Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagar Palike (BBMP) of Bangalore. Data was collected from a convenient sample of 35 nursing homes (<50 beds) and clinics in December 2011. The results of this study indicate that 3 (20 %) of nursing homes had a Policy for Health Care Waste Management, though committees for Infection control and Hospital waste management were absent. Recording system like injury and waste management registers were non-existent. In our study the Common Bio-medical Waste Treatment Facility operator collected waste from 28 (80 %) of the sHCF. Segregation at the point of generation was present in 22 (62.9 %) of the sHCF. Segregation process was compliant as per BMW rules 1998 among 5 (16.1 %) of the sHCF. 18 sHCF workers were vaccinated with hepatitis B and tetanus. Deficiencies were observed in areas of containment, sharps management and disinfection. It was observed that though the quantum and category of waste generated was limited there exist deficiencies which warrant initiation of system development

  12. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  13. Patients in acute care settings. Which health-care services are provided?

    PubMed

    Dugan, J; Mosel, L

    1992-07-01

    Studies have shown that early discharge planning, multidisciplinary care, and a focus on functional abilities for older adults do reduce acute care hospital readmissions. Of the 101 records reviewed of acute care admissions 75 years of age and older, 36 had no multidisciplinary service documented and 75 had no discharge planning documented within 48 hours of admission. Eleven functional activities were assessed and documented in one record with a range of 4 to 11 activities assessed in the remaining 100 documents. Identifying and filling gaps in care provided to this age group might provide substantial cost savings, improve care, and decrease complications. Advocacy, coordination of care, and greater knowledge may be keys to narrowing these service gaps. PMID:1629531

  14. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  15. Charge Nurse Perspectives on Frontline Leadership in Acute Care Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Rose O.; Schwarzkopf, Ruth; Kiger, Anna J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently issued report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States on the Future of Nursing included a recommendation that nurses should receive leadership development at every level in order to transform the healthcare system. Charge nurses, at the frontline of patient care in acute care settings, are in key positions to lead this change. This paper presents findings from research conducted with nurses in the Tenet Health System. Charge nurses from ten facilities who attended a one-day work shop were surveyed to gain insight into the experience of being a frontline leader in today's acute care environment. The relationship of these findings to the IOM report and the implications for both the Tenet Health System and other healthcare organizations that are working to support nurses who assume these challenging roles are discussed. PMID:22191051

  16. Innovative use of tele-ICU in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mullen-Fortino, Margaret; Sites, Frank D; Soisson, Michael; Galen, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) typically provide remote monitoring for ICUs of acute care, short-stay hospitals. As part of a joint venture project to establish a long-term acute level of care, Good Shepherd Penn Partners became the first facility to use tele-ICU technology in a nontraditional setting. Long-term acute care hospitals care for patients with complex medical problems. We describe describes the benefits and challenges of integrating a tele-ICU program into a long-term acute care setting and the impact this model of care has on patient care outcomes. PMID:22828067

  17. Healing Environments: Integrative Medicine and Palliative Care in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Estores, Irene M; Frye, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    Conventional medicine is excellent at saving lives; however, it has little to offer to address the physical, mental, and emotional distress associated with life-threatening or life-limiting disease. An integrative approach to palliative care in acute care settings can meet this need by creating healing environments that support patients, families, and health care professionals. Mindful use of language enhances the innate healing response, improves communication, and invites patients and families to participate in their care. Staff should be offered access to skills training to cultivate compassion and mindful practice to enhance both patient and self-care. PMID:26333757

  18. Concise Care Bundles In Acute Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kivlin, Jude; Altemimi, Harith

    2015-01-01

    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, Norfolk is a 488 bed hospital providing services to approximately 331,000 people across 750 square miles. In 2012 a need was recognised for documentation (pathways) in a practical format to increase usage of national guidelines and facilitate adherence to best practice (gold standards of care) that could be easily version controlled, auditable and provide support in clinical decision-making by junior doctors. BMJ Action Sets[1] fulfilled the brief with expert knowledge, version control and support, though they were deemed too lengthy and unworkable in fast paced settings like the medical assessment unit; they formed the base creation of concise care bundles (CCB). CCB were introduced for 21 clinical presentations and one procedure. Outcomes were fully audited and showed significant improvement in a range of measures, including an increase in completions of CHADVASC score in atrial fibrillation, antibiotics prescribed per protocol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and Blatchford score recorded for patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:26734437

  19. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  20. Post–Acute Care Use and Hospital Readmission after Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tiffanie K.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Small, Dylan S.; Halpern, Scott D.; Hanish, Asaf; Umscheid, Craig A.; Baillie, Charles A.; Kerlin, Meeta Prasad; Gaieski, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The epidemiology of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis remains largely unknown. Objectives: To examine the rate of post–acute care use and hospital readmission after sepsis and to examine risk factors and outcomes for hospital readmissions after sepsis. Methods: In an observational cohort study conducted in an academic health care system (2010–2012), we compared post–acute care use at discharge and hospital readmission after 3,620 sepsis hospitalizations with 108,958 nonsepsis hospitalizations. We used three validated, claims-based approaches to identify sepsis and severe sepsis. Measurements and Main Results: Post–acute care use at discharge was more likely after sepsis, driven by skilled care facility placement (35.4% after sepsis vs. 15.8%; P < 0.001), with the highest rate observed after severe sepsis. Readmission rates at 7, 30, and 90 days were higher postsepsis (P < 0.001). Compared with nonsepsis hospitalizations (15.6% readmitted within 30 d), the increased readmission risk was present regardless of sepsis severity (27.3% after sepsis and 26.0–26.2% after severe sepsis). After controlling for presepsis characteristics, the readmission risk was found to be 1.51 times greater (95% CI, 1.38–1.66) than nonsepsis hospitalizations. Readmissions after sepsis were more likely to result in death or transition to hospice care (6.1% vs. 13.3% after sepsis; P < 0.001). Independent risk factors associated with 30-day readmissions after sepsis hospitalizations included age, malignancy diagnosis, hospitalizations in the year prior to the index hospitalization, nonelective index admission type, one or more procedures during the index hospitalization, and low hemoglobin and high red cell distribution width at discharge. Conclusions: Post–acute care use and hospital readmissions were common after sepsis. The increased readmission risk after sepsis was observed regardless of sepsis severity and was associated with

  1. [Quality of coding in acute inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Stausberg, J

    2007-08-01

    Routine data in the electronic patient record are frequently used for secondary purposes. Core elements of the electronic patient record are diagnoses and procedures, coded with the mandatory classifications. Despite the important role of routine data for reimbursement, quality management and health care statistics, there is currently no systematic analysis of coding quality in Germany. Respective concepts and investigations share the difficulty to decide what's right and what's wrong, being at the end of the long process of medical decision making. Therefore, a relevant amount of disagreement has to be accepted. In case of the principal diagnosis, this could be the fact in half of the patients. Plausibility of coding looks much better. After optimization time in hospitals, regular and complete coding can be expected. Whether coding matches reality, as a prerequisite for further use of the data in medicine and health politics, should be investigated in controlled trials in the future. PMID:17676418

  2. Improving Alcohol Withdrawal Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Melson, Jo; Kane, Michelle; Mooney, Ruth; McWilliams, James; Horton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Context Excessive alcohol consumption is the nation’s third leading cause of preventable deaths. If untreated, 6% of alcohol-dependent patients experience alcohol withdrawal, with up to 10% of those experiencing delirium tremens (DT), when they stop drinking. Without routine screening, patients often experience DT without warning. Objective: Reduce the incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT, restraint use, and transfers to the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with DT. Design: In October 2009, the alcohol withdrawal team instituted a care management guideline used by all disciplines, which included tools for screening, assessment, and symptom management. Data were obtained from existing datasets for three quarters before and four quarters after implementation. Follow-up data were analyzed and showed a great deal of variability in transfers to the ICU and restraint use. Percentage of patients who developed DT showed a downward trend. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of alcohol withdrawal advancing to DT and, in patients with DT, restraint use and transfers to the ICU. Results: Initial data revealed a decrease in percentage of patients with alcohol withdrawal who experienced DT (16.4%–12.9%). In patients with DT, restraint use decreased (60.4%–44.4%) and transfers to the ICU decreased (21.6%–15%). Follow-up data indicated a continued downward trend in patients with DT. Changes were not statistically significant. Restraint use and ICU transfers maintained postimplementation levels initially but returned to preimplementation levels by third quarter 2012. Conclusion: Early identification of patients for potential alcohol withdrawal followed by a standardized treatment protocol using symptom-triggered dosing improved alcohol withdrawal management and outcomes. PMID:24867561

  3. Hiring appropriate providers for different populations: acute care nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Haut, Cathy; Madden, Maureen

    2015-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioners, prepared as providers for a variety of populations of patients, continue to make substantial contributions to health care. Evidence indicates shorter stays, higher satisfaction among patients, increased work efficiency, and higher quality outcomes when acute care nurse practitioners are part of unit- or service-based provider teams. The Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education outlines detailed guidelines for matching nurse practitioners' education with certification and practice by using a population-focused algorithm. Despite national support for the model, nurse practitioners and employers continue to struggle with finding the right fit. Nurse practitioners often use their interest and previous nursing experience to apply for an available position, and hospitals may not understand preparation or regulations related to matching the appropriate provider to the work environment. Evidence and regulatory guidelines indicate appropriate providers for population-focused positions. This article presents history and recommendations for hiring acute care nurse practitioners as providers for different populations of patients. PMID:26033108

  4. 4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FIRE BREAK BETWEEN PSYCHIATRIC WARD AND NEXT WARD TO THE SOUTH - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  5. Retrospective analysis of absconding behaviour by acute care consumers in one psychiatric hospital campus in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mosel, Krista A; Gerace, Adam; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2010-06-01

    Absconding is increasingly being recognized as a problem within mental health settings with significant risks for consumers. This study examines absconding behaviours across three acute care wards within an Australian psychiatric hospital campus over a 12-month period. A descriptive statistical analysis determined the rate of absconding from 49 consumers who absconded 64 times. The absconding rate was 13.33% (absconding events), with most absconding events arising from males diagnosed with schizophrenia (57.14%) aged between 20 and 29 years, and with 62.50% of absconding events occurring whilst consumers were on their first 21-day detention order. Nearly half of all absconding events were by consumers who had absconded previously, with the highest proportion of events occurring during nursing handover. A profile of people who abscond, time of day of absconding, legal status and repeated absconding behaviours are described. The emergent profile of consumers who absconded within this study bears some similarities to that described in overseas research, although in this study consumers were slightly older and 25% of absconders were female. Of particular interest are findings that identify the timings of absconding events in relation to a consumer's legal status. Implications for practice, including assessment of risk of absconding and management, are considered. PMID:20550641

  6. Improving nutrition in older people in acute care.

    PubMed

    Best, Carolyn; Hitchings, Helen

    2015-07-22

    Older people have an increased risk of becoming malnourished when they are ill. Admission to hospital may affect their nutritional intake and nutritional status. Nutrition screening and implementation of nutrition care plans can help minimise the risk of malnutrition in acute care settings, if used effectively. The nutritional care provided to older inpatients should be timely, co-ordinated, reviewed regularly and communicated effectively between healthcare professionals and across shifts. This article explores what malnutrition means, why older people in hospital might be at risk of malnutrition and the effect hospital admission might have on nutrition and fluid intake. It makes suggestions for addressing these issues, encourages nurses to look at the nutritional care provided in their clinical area, to reflect on what they do well and consider what can be done to improve patients' experiences. PMID:26198529

  7. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  8. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  9. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  10. Redesigning nurse staffing plans for acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Niday, Patricia; Inman, Yolanda Otero; Smithgall, Lisa; Hilton, Shane; Grindstaff, Sharon; McInturff, Debbie

    2012-06-01

    Johnson City Medical Center's approach to maximizing staffing in nursing units, particularly in acute care settings, had four primary goals: Identify opportunities to maximize the effectiveness of nurse staffing based on a review of core staffing schedules. Reduce cost duplication and improve workflow. Decrease the use of contract labor (with the goal of eliminating the use of contract labor). Develop financial dashboards for staffing that could be used by nursing managers. PMID:22734326

  11. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards.

    PubMed

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  12. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  13. Acute Myocardial Infarction Quality of Care: The Strong Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G.; Butt, Amir; Conroy, Britt; Devereux, Richard B.; Galloway, James M.; Jolly, Stacey; Lee, Elisa T.; Silverman, Angela; Yeh, Jeun-Liang; Welty, Thomas K.; Kedan, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the quality of care provided patients with acute myocardial infarction and compare with similar national and regional data. Design Case series. Setting The Strong Heart Study has extensive population-based data related to cardiovascular events among American Indians living in three rural regions of the United States. Participants Acute myocardial infarction cases (72) occurring between 1/1/2001 and 12/31/2006 were identified from a cohort of 4549 participants. Outcome measures The proportion of cases that were provided standard quality of care therapy, as defined by the Healthcare Financing Administration and other national organizations. Results The provision of quality services, such as administration of aspirin on admission and at discharge, reperfusion therapy within 24 hours, prescription of beta blocker medication at discharge, and smoking cessation counseling were found to be 94%, 91%, 92%, 86% and 71%, respectively. The unadjusted, 30 day mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion Despite considerable challenges posed by geographic isolation and small facilities, process measures of the quality of acute myocardial infarction care for participants in this American Indian cohort were comparable to that reported for Medicare beneficiaries nationally and within the resident states of this cohort. PMID:21942161

  14. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  15. Developing a general ward nursing dashboard.

    PubMed

    Russell, Margot; Hogg, Maggie; Leach, Stuart; Penman, Mags; Friel, Susan

    2014-12-15

    The seventh and final article in the series on Leading Better Care explores some of the challenges in clinical practice relating to the use of data and making information meaningful to senior charge nurses and ward sisters. It describes the collaborative approach taken by NHS Lanarkshire, which involved nursing staff, programme leads and the eHealth team in the development of a general ward nursing dashboard as a means of ensuring safe, effective person-centred care. The article also illustrates how this web-based data-reporting programme is used to support clinical practice. PMID:25492791

  16. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    PubMed

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market. PMID:20077382

  17. Alternatives to ward admission from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Penelope A; Hopper, Sandy M

    2016-02-01

    There is ever-increasing pressure on hospital resources in general and emergency departments (ED) in particular. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that traditional inpatient ward-based care is not necessary for the majority of children presenting to the ED with acute illness, and that there are patient, family and hospital benefits to pursuing other options. Here, we describe alternative pathways for children presenting to the ED, including short stay and observational medicine, hospital-in-the-home and non-admission enhanced care, in other words, additional management practices or pathways for children who are discharged from the ED. We discuss the principles, models and practical considerations involved in each of these. PMID:27062630

  18. Reframing tobacco dependency management in acute care: A case study.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Annette S H; Guzman, Randolph; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V; Thurmeier, Rick; Fedorowicz, Anna; Fulmore, Kaitlin

    2016-08-01

    Effective tobacco dependence treatment within acute care tends to be inadequate. The purpose of the Utilizing best practices to Manage Acute care patients Tobacco Dependency (UMAT) was to implement and evaluate an evidence-based intervention to support healthcare staff to effectively manage nicotine withdrawal symptoms of acute surgical patients. Data collection for this one-year longitudinal case study included: relevant patient experiences and staff reported practice, medication usage, and chart review. Over the year each data source suggested changes in tobacco dependence treatment. Key changes in patient survey responses (N=55) included a decrease in daily smoking and cigarette cravings. Of patients who used nicotine replacement therapy, they reported an increase in symptom relief. Staff (N=45) were surveyed at baseline, mid-point and end of study. Reported rates of assessing smoking status did not change over the year, but assessment of withdrawal symptoms emerged as daily practice and questions about cessation diminished. Also delivery of nicotine replacement therapy products increased over the year. Chart reviews showed a shift in content from documenting smoking behavior to withdrawal symptoms and administration of nicotine replacements; also frequency of comments increased. In summary, the evidence-based intervention influenced unit norms and reframed the culture related to tobacco dependence treatment. PMID:27392584

  19. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  20. 4GL ward management system.

    PubMed Central

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferred. A host of potentials and pitfalls is associated with the implementation of this new approach to Patient Management. PMID:1807662

  1. Improving acute care through use of medical device data.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, R J

    1998-02-01

    The Medical Information Bus (MIB) is a data communications standard for bedside patient connected medical devices. It is formally titled IEEE 1073 Standard for Medical Device Communications. MIB defines a complete seven layer communications stack for devices in acute care settings. All of the design trade-offs in writing the standard were taken to optimize performance in acute care settings. The key clinician based constraints on network performance are: (1) the network must be able to withstand multiple daily reconfigurations due to patient movement and condition changes; (2) the network must be 'plug-and-play' to allow clinicians to set up the network by simply plugging in a connector, taking no other actions; (3) the network must allow for unambiguous associations of devices with specific patients. A network of this type will be used by clinicians, thus giving complete, accurate, real time data from patient connected devices. This capability leads to many possible improvements in patient care and hospital cost reduction. The possible uses for comprehensive automatic data capture are only limited by imagination and creativity of clinicians adapting to the new hospital business paradigm. PMID:9600414

  2. Rural Implications of Medicare's Post-Acute-Care Transfer Payment Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenman, Julie A.; Mueller, Curt D.

    2005-01-01

    Under the Medicare post-acute-care (PAC) transfer policy, acute-care hospitals are reimbursed under a per-diem formula whenever beneficiaries are discharged from selected diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) to a skilled nursing facility, home health care, or a prospective payment system (PPS)-excluded facility. Total per-diem payments are below the…

  3. Impact of administrative technology on acute care bed need.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J B; Dahlstrom, G A; Johnston, C M

    1985-01-01

    This article reports an evaluation of the impact of three administrative technologies--Admission Scheduling (AS) Systems, Outpatient Surgery (OPS) Programs, and Preadmission Testing (PAT) Programs--on the number of acute care beds required by a hospital. The evaluation mechanism reported here is called the ADTECH Computerized Planning Model. ADTECH uses parameters of each technology, identified from previous literature and discussions with health care professionals, to predict the changes in bed requirements resulting from implementation of these programs. Data from eight hospitals of various characteristics and sizes were run to test the ADTECH model. The results from these test runs indicate that the proper implementation of AS, OPS, and PAT can significantly influence a hospital's required bed complement. PMID:3988530

  4. Decision support systems for robotic surgery and acute care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanzides, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Doctors must frequently make decisions during medical treatment, whether in an acute care facility, such as an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), or in an operating room. These decisions rely on a various information sources, such as the patient's medical history, preoperative images, and general medical knowledge. Decision support systems can assist by facilitating access to this information when and where it is needed. This paper presents some research eorts that address the integration of information with clinical practice. The example systems include a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for pediatric traumatic brain injury, an augmented reality head- mounted display for neurosurgery, and an augmented reality telerobotic system for minimally-invasive surgery. While these are dierent systems and applications, they share the common theme of providing information to support clinical decisions and actions, whether the actions are performed with the surgeon's own hands or with robotic assistance.

  5. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  6. Ethnic variations in pathways to acute care and compulsory detention for women experiencing a mental health crisis

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Caroline; Cole, Laura; Howard, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Much recent debate on excess rates of compulsory detention and coercive routes to care has focused on young black men; evidence is less clear regarding ethnic variations among women and factors that may mediate these. Aim: To explore ethnic variations in compulsory detentions of women, and to explore the potential role of immediate pathways to admission and clinician-rated reasons for admission as mediators of these differences. Method: All women admitted to an acute psychiatric inpatient ward or a women’s crisis house in four London boroughs during a 12-week period were included. Data were collected regarding their pathways to care, clinician-rated reasons for admission, hospital stays, and social and clinical characteristics. Results: Two hundred and eighty seven (287) women from white British, white other, black Caribbean, black African and black other groups were included. Adjusting for social and clinical characteristics, all groups of black patients and white other patients were significantly more likely to have been compulsorily admitted than white British patients; white British patients were more likely than other groups to be admitted to a crisis house and more likely than all the black groups to be admitted because of perceived suicide risk. Immediate pathways to care differed: white other, black African and black other groups were less likely to have referred themselves in a crisis and more likely to have been in contact with the police. When adjustment was made for differences in pathways to care, the ethnic differences in compulsory admission were considerably reduced. Discussion: There are marked ethnic inequities not only between white British and black women, but also between white British and white other women in experiences of acute admission. Differences between groups in help-seeking behaviours in a crisis may contribute to explaining differences in rates of compulsory admission. PMID:21059630

  7. Inequalities in care in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shabnam; Simms, Alexander; Batin, Phillip; Kurian, John; Gale, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the single largest cause of death in developed countries. Guidelines exist for the management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet despite these, significant inequalities exist in the care of these patients. The elderly, deprived socioeconomic groups, females and non-caucasians are the patient populations where practice tends to deviate more frequently from the evidence base. Elderly patients often had higher mortality rates after having an AMI compared to younger patients. They also tended to present with symptoms that were not entirely consistent with an AMI, thus partially contributing to the inequalities in care that is seen between younger and older patients. Furthermore the lack of guidelines in the elderly age group presenting with AMI can often make decision making challenging and may account for the discrepancies in care that are prevalent between younger and older patients. Other patients such as those from a lower socioeconomic group, i.e., low income and less than high school education often had poorer health and reduced life expectancy compared to patients from a higher socioeconomic group after an AMI. Lower socioeconomic status was also seen to be contributing to racial and geographical variation is the care in AMI patients. Females with an AMI were treated less aggressively and had poorer outcomes when compared to males. However even when females were treated in the same way they continued to have higher in hospital mortality which suggests that gender may well account for differences in outcomes. The purpose of this review is to identify the inequalities in care for patients who present with an AMI and explore potential reasons for why these occur. Greater attention to the management and a better understanding of the root causes of these inequalities in care may help to reduce morbidity and mortality rates associated with AMI. PMID:26730295

  8. Role of the acute care nurse in managing patients with heart failure using evidence-based care.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sara; Hice, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a major US public health problem, accounting for more than 1 million hospitalizations each year. As part of the health care team, nurses play an important role in the evaluation and management of patients presenting to the emergency department with acute decompensated heart failure. Once acute decompensation is controlled, nurses also play a critical role in preparing patients for hospital discharge and educating patients and caregivers about strategies to improve long-term outcomes and prevent future decompensation and rehospitalization. Nurses' assessment skills and comprehensive knowledge of acute and chronic heart failure are important to optimize patient care and improve outcomes from initial emergency department presentation through discharge and follow-up. This review presents an overview of current heart failure guidelines, with the goal of providing acute care cardiac nurses with information that will allow them to better use their knowledge of heart failure to facilitate diagnosis, management, and education of patients with acute heart failure. PMID:25185764

  9. Delayed transfer of care from NHS secondary care to primary care in England: its determinants, effect on hospital bed days, prevalence of acute medical conditions and deaths during delay, in older adults aged 65 years and over

    PubMed Central

    Jasinarachchi, Krishantha H; Ibrahim, Ibrahim R; Keegan, Breffni C; Mathialagan, Rajaratnam; McGourty, John C; Phillips, James RN; Myint, Phyo K

    2009-01-01

    Background The delay in discharge or transfer of care back to the community following an acute admission to the hospital in older adults has long been a recognized challenge in the UK. We examined the determinants and outcomes of delayed transfer of care in older adults. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in a district general hospital with a catchment population of 250,000 in England, UK. Those >= 65 years admitted to two care of the elderly wards during February 2007 were identified and prospectively followed-up till their discharge. Data was presented descriptively. Results 36.7% (58/158) of patients had a delay in transfer of care. They tended to be older, had poorer pre-morbid mobility, and were more likely to be confused at the time of admission. Compared to the 2003 National Audit Report, a significantly higher percentage (29.3%vs.17%) awaited therapist assessments or (27.6%vs.9%) domiciliary care, with a lower percentage (< 1%vs.14%) awaiting further NHS care. Of 18 in-patient deaths, five occurred during the delay. Seven patients developed medical conditions during the delay making them unfit for discharge. The number of extra bed days attributable to delayed discharges in this study was 682 (mean = 4.8) days. Conclusion Awaiting therapy and domiciliary care input were significant contributing factors in delayed transfer of care. Similar local assessments could provide valuable information in identifying areas for improvement. Based on available current evidence, efficacy driven changes to the organisation and provision of support, for example rapid response delayed discharge services at the time of "fit to discharge" may help to improve the situation. PMID:19161614

  10. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  11. Antimicrobial use over a four-year period using days of therapy measurement at a Canadian pediatric acute care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R; MacTavish, Sandra J; Bresee, Lauren C; Rajapakse, Nipunie; Vanderkooi, Otto; Vayalumkal, Joseph; Conly, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is a concern that is challenging the ability to treat common infections. Surveillance of antimicrobial use in pediatric acute care institutions is complicated because the common metric unit, the defined daily dose, is problematic for this population. OBJECTIVE: During a four-year period in which no specific antimicrobial stewardship initiatives were conducted, pediatric antimicrobial use was quantified using days of therapy (DOT) per 100 patient days (PD) (DOT/100 PD) at the Alberta Children’s Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) for benchmarking purposes. METHODS: Drug use data for systemic antimicrobials administered on wards at the Alberta Children’s Hospital were collected from electronic medication administration records. DOT were calculated and rates were determined using 100 PD as the denominator. Changes over the surveillance period and subgroup proportions were represented graphically and assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial use decreased from 93.6 DOT/100 PD to 75.7 DOT/100 PD (19.1%) over the 2010/2011 through to the 2013/2014 fiscal years. During this period, a 20.0% increase in PD and an essentially stable absolute count of DOT (2.9% decrease) were observed. Overall, antimicrobial use was highest in the pediatric intensive care and oncology units. DISCUSSION: The exact changes in prescribing patterns that led to the observed reduction in DOT/100 PD with associated increased PD are unclear, but may be a topic for future investigations. CONCLUSION: Antimicrobial use data from a Canadian acute care pediatric hospital reported in DOT/100 PD were compiled for a four-year time period. These data may be useful for benchmarking purposes. PMID:26600813

  12. Acute clinical care and care coordination for traumatic brain injury within Department of Defense.

    PubMed

    Jaffee, Michael S; Helmick, Kathy M; Girard, Philip D; Meyer, Kim S; Dinegar, Kathy; George, Karyn

    2009-01-01

    The nature of current combat situations that U.S. military forces encounter and the use of unconventional weaponry have dramatically increased service personnel's risks of sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the true incidence and prevalence of combat-related TBI are unknown, service personnel returning from deployment have reported rates of concussion between 10% and 20%. The Department of Defense has recently released statistics on TBI dating back to before the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to better elucidate the impact and burden of TBI on America's warriors and veterans. Patients with severe TBI move through a well-established trauma system of care, beginning with triage of initial injury by first-responders in the war zone to acute care to rehabilitation and then returning home and to the community. Mild and moderate TBIs may pose different clinical challenges, especially when initially undetected or if treatment is delayed because more serious injuries are present. To ensure identification and prompt treatment of mild and moderate TBI, the U.S. Congress has mandated that military and Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals screen all service personnel returning from combat. Military health professionals must evaluate them for concussion and then treat the physical, emotional, and cognitive problems that may surface. A new approach to health management and care coordination is needed that will allow medical transitions between networks of care to become more centralized and allow for optimal recovery at all severity levels. This article summarizes the care systems available for the acute management of TBI from point of injury to stateside military treatment facilities. We describe TBI assessment, treatment, and overall coordination of care, including innovative clinical initiatives now used. PMID:20104395

  13. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  14. Demographic diversity, value congruence, and workplace outcomes in acute care.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michael G; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. PMID:22377771

  15. Alberta's acute care funding plan: update to December 1994.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Hall, E M; Plain, R H

    1995-01-01

    From 1990 until 1994 Alberta Health adjusted the acute care portion of hospital budgets based on a case mix index, initially called the Hospital Performance Index (HPI). The HPI formula method was a temporary measure; in November 1993, Alberta Health announced that, commencing in 1994, hospitals would be funded on a prospective basis, although they would still use the core of the HPI in the setting of funding rates. The creation of 17 health regions in June 1994 created the need for a new system of funding which would supplant the modified prospective system. In this paper we review the evolution of the HPI plan and its individual components-patient data, patient classification, funding weights, inpatient costs and adjustment factors. PMID:10144217

  16. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E.; Pringle, Patricia L.; Santry, Heena P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. Methods We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public/charity, university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents’ views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. Results We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a healthcare delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS due to increased desirability for trauma/critical care careers and improved outcomes for EGS was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true healthcare delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation Theory. Conclusions Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care-delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. PMID:25891673

  17. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  18. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1) was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC). The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763) or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393). The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic and Canadian data sets

  19. Despite Federal Legislation, Shortages Of Drugs Used In Acute Care Settings Remain Persistent And Prolonged.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene I; Fox, Erin R; Hall, M Kennedy; Ross, Joseph S; Bucholz, Emily M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    Early evidence suggests that provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 are associated with reductions in the total number of new national drug shortages. However, drugs frequently used in acute unscheduled care such as the care delivered in emergency departments may be increasingly affected by shortages. Our estimates, based on reported national drug shortages from 2001 to 2014 collected by the University of Utah's Drug Information Service, show that although the number of new annual shortages has decreased since the act's passage, half of all drug shortages in the study period involved acute care drugs. Shortages affecting acute care drugs became increasingly frequent and prolonged compared with non-acute care drugs (median duration of 242 versus 173 days, respectively). These results suggest that the drug supply for many acutely and critically ill patients in the United States remains vulnerable despite federal efforts. PMID:27140985

  20. Perspectives on the value of biomarkers in acute cardiac care and implications for strategic management.

    PubMed

    Kossaify, Antoine; Garcia, Annie; Succar, Sami; Ibrahim, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas; Kossaify, Mikhael; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers in acute cardiac care are gaining increasing interest given their clinical benefits. This study is a review of the major conditions in acute cardiac care, with a focus on biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic assessment. Through a PubMed search, 110 relevant articles were selected. The most commonly used cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin, natriuretic peptides, and C-reactive protein) are presented first, followed by a description of variable acute cardiac conditions with their relevant biomarkers. In addition to the conventional use of natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, and C-reactive protein, other biomarkers are outlined in variable critical conditions that may be related to acute cardiac illness. These include ST2 and chromogranin A in acute dyspnea and acute heart failure, matrix metalloproteinase in acute chest pain, heart-type fatty acid binding protein in acute coronary syndrome, CD40 ligand and interleukin-6 in acute myocardial infarction, blood ammonia and lactate in cardiac arrest, as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atrial fibrillation. Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the physiopathology of most cardiac diseases, whether acute or chronic. In summary, natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, C-reactive protein are currently the most relevant biomarkers in acute cardiac care. Point-of-care testing and multi-markers use are essential for prompt diagnostic approach and tailored strategic management. PMID:24046510

  1. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  2. Designing and Evaluating an Interactive Multimedia Web-Based Simulation for Developing Nurses’ Competencies in Acute Nursing Care: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Fun; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Ho, Jasmine Tze Yin; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Ang, Sophia Bee Leng; Goh, Poh Sun; Ang, Emily Neo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background Web-based learning is becoming an increasingly important instructional tool in nursing education. Multimedia advancements offer the potential for creating authentic nursing activities for developing nursing competency in clinical practice. Objective This study aims to describe the design, development, and evaluation of an interactive multimedia Web-based simulation for developing nurses’ competencies in acute nursing care. Methods Authentic nursing activities were developed in a Web-based simulation using a variety of instructional strategies including animation video, multimedia instructional material, virtual patients, and online quizzes. A randomized controlled study was conducted on 67 registered nurses who were recruited from the general ward units of an acute care tertiary hospital. Following a baseline evaluation of all participants’ clinical performance in a simulated clinical setting, the experimental group received 3 hours of Web-based simulation and completed a survey to evaluate their perceptions of the program. All participants were re-tested for their clinical performances using a validated tool. Results The clinical performance posttest scores of the experimental group improved significantly (P<.001) from the pretest scores after the Web-based simulation. In addition, compared to the control group, the experimental group had significantly higher clinical performance posttest scores (P<.001) after controlling the pretest scores. The participants from the experimental group were satisfied with their learning experience and gave positive ratings for the quality of the Web-based simulation. Themes emerging from the comments about the most valuable aspects of the Web-based simulation include relevance to practice, instructional strategies, and fostering problem solving. Conclusions Engaging in authentic nursing activities using interactive multimedia Web-based simulation can enhance nurses’ competencies in acute care. Web

  3. Creating learning momentum through overt teaching interactions during real acute care episodes.

    PubMed

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R

    2015-10-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand the specific contexts in which overt teaching interactions occurred in acute care environments. We conducted a naturalistic observational study based on constructivist grounded theory methodology. Using participant observation, we collected data on the teaching interactions occurring between clinical supervisors and medical trainees during 74 acute care episodes in the critical care unit of two academic centers, in Toronto, Canada. Three themes contributed to a better understanding of the conditions in which overt teaching interactions among trainees and clinical supervisors occurred during acute care episodes: seizing emergent learning opportunities, coming up against challenging conditions, and creating learning momentum. Our findings illustrate how overt learning opportunities emerged from certain clinical situations and how clinical supervisors and trainees could purposefully modify unfavorable learning conditions. None of the acute care episodes encountered in the critical care environment represented ideal conditions for learning. Yet, clinical supervisors and trainees succeeded in engaging in overt teaching interactions during many episodes. The educational value of these overt teaching interactions should be further explored, as well as the impact of interventions aimed at increasing their use in acute care environments. PMID:25476262

  4. Strategies for integrating cost-consciousness into acute care should focus on rewarding high-value care.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Newman, David; Pilgrim, Randy; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2013-12-01

    The acute care system reflects the best and worst in American medicine. The system, which includes urgent care and retail clinics, emergency departments, hospitals, and doctors' offices, delivers 24/7 care for life-threatening conditions and is a key part of the safety net for the under- and uninsured. At the same time, it is fragmented, disconnected, and costly. We describe strategies to contain acute care costs. Reducing demands for acute care may be achieved through public health measures and educational initiatives; in contrast, delivery system reform has shown mixed results. Changing providers' behavior will require the development of care pathways, assessments of goals of care, and practice feedback. Creating alternatives to hospitalization and enhancing the interoperability of electronic health records will be key levers in cost containment. Finally, we contend that fee-for-service with modified payments based on quality and resource measures is the only feasible acute care payment model; others might be so disruptive that they could threaten the system's effectiveness and the safety net. PMID:24301400

  5. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-01

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  6. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  7. Symptom control in end-of-life care: pain, eating, acute illnesses, panic attacks, and aggressive care.

    PubMed

    Lamers, William M

    2005-01-01

    This feature is based on actual questions and answers adapted from a service provided by the Hospice Foundation of America. Queries addressing the propriety of managing acute medical conditions in patients enrolled in a terminal care program and the mistaken belief that death from cancer is always painful are provided. Questions included in this set address management of acute medical conditions during end-of-life care, the lack of inevitability of pain with cancer, nutrition in advanced disease, managing panic attacks, and appropriate care for a dying 90 year old gentleman. PMID:16431836

  8. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. PMID:25128363

  9. Assessment of acute trauma care training in Kenya.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jana B A; Gravelin, Sara; Jones, Tait; Gololov, Alex; Thomas, Michelle; Omondi, Benson; Bukusi, E

    2009-11-01

    An Acute Trauma Care (ATC) course was adapted for resource-limited healthcare systems based on the American model of initial care for injured patients. The course was taught to interested medical personnel in Kenya. This study undertook a survey of the participants' healthcare facilities to maximize the applicability of ATC across healthcare settings. The ATC course was conducted three times in Kenya in 2006. A World Health Organization (WHO) Needs Assessment survey was administered to 128 participants. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Ninety-two per cent had a physician available in the emergency department and 63 per cent had a clinical officer. A total of 71.7 per cent reported having a designated trauma room. A total of 96.7 per cent reported running water, but access was uninterrupted more often in private hospitals as opposed to public facilities (92.5 vs 63.6%, P = 0.0005). Private and public employees equally had an oxygen cylinder (95.6 vs 98.5%, P > 0.05), oxygen concentrator (69.2 vs 54.2%, P = 0.12), and oxygen administration equipment (95.7 vs 91.4%, P > 0.05) at their facilities. However, private employees were more likely to report that "all" of their equipment was in working order (53 vs 7.9%, P < 0.0001). Private employees were also more likely to report that they had access to information on emergency procedures and equipment (64.4 vs 33.3%, P = 0.001) and that they had learned new procedures (54.8 vs 25.4%, P = 0.002). Despite a perception of public facility lack, this survey showed that public institutions and private institutions have similar basic equipment availability. Yet, problems with equipment malfunction, lack of repair, and availability of required information and training are far greater in the public sector. The content of the ATC course is valid for both private and public sector institutions, but refinements of the course should focus on varying facets of inexpensive and alternative equipment resources

  10. Characteristics of acute care utilization of a Delaware adult sickle cell disease patient population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nina; Bellot, Jennifer; Senu-Oke, Oluseyi; Ballas, Samir K

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that is chronic in nature and manifests itself through many facets of the patient's life. Comprehensive specialty centers have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care for patients who have chronic medical conditions such as heart failure and SCD. The purpose of this practice inquiry was to analyze de-identified data for acute care episodes involving SCD in order to create a detailed picture of acute care utilization for adult patients in Delaware with SCD from 2007 to 2009. Gaining a better understanding of acute care utilization for adults with SCD may provide evidence to improve access to high-quality health care services for this vulnerable patient population in the state of Delaware. PMID:23965046

  11. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework. PMID:18476854

  12. Caring around the Clock: rounding in practice.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Marie

    A large acute trust in the East Midlands looked to the US to inform its implementation of hourly rounding, otherwise known as intentional rounding. A combination of transformational leadership and meaningful interactions form the basis of a new approach to rounding--Caring around the Clock. The trust piloted the concept on 10 wards with results showing a 32% reduction in call lights. The successful change in practice required an investment in staff education to equip staff with the necessary skills. The trust is currently rolling out Caring around Hourly rounding can reducethe Clock to 79 inpatient wards. PMID:23342834

  13. Older patients in the acute care setting: rural and metropolitan nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Courtney, M; Tong, S; Walsh, A

    2000-04-01

    Many studies reporting nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients in long-term care settings have used instruments designed for older people. However, nurses' attitudes toward older patients are not as positive as their attitudes toward older people. Few studies investigate acute care nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients. In order to address these shortcomings, a self-report questionnaire was developed to determine nurses' knowledge of, and attitudes and practices toward, older patients in both rural and metropolitan acute care settings. Rural nurses were more knowledgeable about older patients' activities during hospitalisation, the likelihood of them developing postoperative complications and the improbability of their reporting incontinence. Rural nurses also reported more positive practices regarding pain management and restraint usage. However, metropolitan nurses reported more positive attitudes toward sleeping medications, decision making, discharge planning and the benefits of acute gerontological units, and were more knowledgeable about older patients' bowel changes in the acute care setting. PMID:11111426

  14. Columbia University's Competency and Evidence-based Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Christine R.; Roberts, W. Dan

    2002-01-01

    Columbia University's acute care nurse practitioner curriculum incorporates evaluation strategies and standards to assess clinical competence and foster evidence-based practice. The curriculum consists of four core courses, supporting sciences, and specialty courses. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  15. Hospital admission avoidance through the introduction of a virtual ward.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joanne; Carroll, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The ageing British population is placing increased demands on the delivery of care in mainstream health-care institutions. While people are living longer, a significant percentage is also living with one or more long-term conditions. These issues, alongside continuing financial austerity measures, require a radical improvement in the care of patients away from hospitals. The Wyre Forest Clinical Commissioning Group introduced a virtual ward model for two main purposes: to save on spiralling costs of hospital admissions, and, secondly, to ensure the preferred wishes of most patients to be cared for and even die at home were achieved. This commentary describes how the virtual ward model was implemented and the impact of preventing unplanned emergency admissions to hospitals. The setting up of enhanced care services and virtual wards in one county is discussed, aiming to highlight success points and potential pitfalls to avoid. The results from the implementation of the virtual ward model show a significant reduction in emergency and avoidable patient admissions to hospital. The success of virtual wards is dependent on integrated working between different health-care disciplines. PMID:25039341

  16. YACHIYO HOSPITAL; Center of SUPER CARE MIX--Comprehensive Care from Emergency to Home for the community.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takatoshi; Iyomasa, Shinsuke; Fukatsu, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Anjo City has two general hospitals. Kosei Hospital, a central medical center for advanced care, and our Yachiyo Hospital for regional care. Recently, Kosei Hospital faced over-capacity problem because of overflow in emergency visits and congested wards due to shortage of post-acute beds. We planned a project to ease the congestion of the central hospital and manage post-acute patients. PMID:27180467

  17. 15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. New York Connecting Railroad: Wards Island Viaduct. Wards Island, New York Co., NY. Sec. 4207, MP 7.65. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New Jersey/New York & New York/Connecticut State Lines, New York County, NY

  18. The Integration of Adult Acute Care Surgeons into Pediatric Surgical Care Models Supplements the Workforce without Compromising Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Judhan, Rudy J; Silhy, Raquel; Statler, Kristen; Khan, Mija; Dyer, Benjamin; Thompson, Stephanie; Richmond, Bryan

    2015-09-01

    Acute care of children remains a challenge due to a shortage of pediatric surgeons, particularly in rural areas. In our institutional norm, all cases in patients age six and older are managed by dedicated general surgeons. The provision of care to these children by these surgeons alleviates the impact of such shortages. We conducted a five-year retrospective analysis of all acute care pediatric surgical cases performed in patients aged 6 to 17 years by a dedicated group of adult general surgeons in a rural tertiary care hospital. Demographics, procedure, complications, outcomes, length of stay, and time of consultation/operation were obtained via chart review. Elective, trauma related, or procedures performed by a pediatric surgeon were excluded. Descriptive statistics are reported. A total of 397 cases were performed by six dedicated general surgeons during the study period. Mean age was 11.5 ± 3.1 years. In all, 100 (25.2%) were transferred from outlying facilities and 52.6 per cent of consultations/operations occurred at night (7P-7A), of which 33.2 per cent occurred during late night hours (11P-7A). On weekends, 34.0 per cent occurred. Appendectomy was the most commonly performed operation (n = 357,89.9%), of which 311 were laparoscopic (87.1%). Others included incision/drainage (4.5%), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (2.0%), bowel resection (1.5%), incarcerated hernia (0.5%), small bowel obstruction (0.5%), intra-abdominal abscess drainage (0.3%), resection of intussusception (0.3%), Graham patch (0.3%), and resection omental torsion (0.3%). Median length of stay was two days. Complications occurred in 23 patients (5.8%), of which 22(5.5%) were the result of the disease process. These results parallel those published by pediatric surgeons in this age group and for the diagnoses treated. Models integrating dedicated general surgeons into pediatric call rotations can be designed such that quality of pediatric care is maintained while providing relief to an

  19. Understanding and evaluating the effects of implementing an electronic paediatric prescribing system on care provision and hospital work in paediatric hospital ward settings: a qualitatively driven mixed-method study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Farre, Albert; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic prescribing systems can improve the quality and safety of healthcare services, but their implementation is not straightforward and may create unexpected change. However, the added complexity of paediatric prescribing (eg, dose calculations, dilutions, manipulations) may pose additional challenges. This study will aim to (1) understand the complex organisational reality of a paediatric hospital in which a new electronic paediatric prescribing (ePP) system will be introduced; (2) describe ePP-related change, over time, in paediatric hospital ward settings; (3) explore staff perspectives in relation to currently established practices and processes; and (4) assess the impact of ePP on care provision and hospital work from the perspective of paediatricians, paediatric nurses and managers. Methods and analysis A qualitatively driven mixed-method approach will be adopted, including 3 inter-related substudies. The core component of the study will be qualitative (substudy 1): we will use ethnographic research methods, including non-participant observation in wards and informal conversational interviews with members of staff. In addition, the design will include 2 embedded supplementary components: a qualitative 1 (substudy 2) based on in-depth interviews and/or focus groups with paediatricians, paediatric nurses, paediatric pharmacists/pharmacy technicians and managers; and a quantitative 1 (substudy 3) in which a staff survey will be developed and administered before and after the ePP implementation. Analytic themes will be identified from ethnographic field notes and interview data. Survey data will be analysed using descriptive statistics and baseline and follow-up data compared to establish impact evaluation measures. Ethics and dissemination A favourable ethical opinion has been obtained from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (15/SS/0157). NHS research governance approval has been obtained at the relevant hospital site

  20. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  1. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  2. Noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in a children's day care facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, C I; Barreiros, M A B; Brown, D W G; Nascimento, J P; Leite, J P G

    2004-03-01

    Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses) are an important cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They are the most common cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the adult population and occur in nursing homes for the elderly, geriatric wards, medical wards, and in hotel and restaurant settings. Food-borne outbreaks have also occurred following consumption of contaminated oysters. This study describes the application of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay using random primers (PdN6) and specific Ni and E3 primers, directed at a small region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-coding region of the norovirus genome, and DNA sequencing for the detection and preliminary characterisation of noroviruses in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in children in Brazil. The outbreak samples were collected from children <5 years of age at the Bertha Lutz children's day care facility at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, that occurred between 1996 and 1998, where no pathogen had been identified. At the Bertha Lutz day care center facility, only Fiocruz's employee children are provided for, and they come from different social, economic and cultural backgrounds. Three distinct genogroup II strains were detected in three outbreaks in 1997/98 and were most closely related to genotypes GII-3 (Mexico virus) and GII-4 (Grimsby virus), both of which have been detected in paediatric and adult outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. PMID:15060697

  3. Utilization of Acute Care among Patients with ESRD Discharged Home from Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Toles, Mark; Massing, Mark; Jackson, Eric; Peacock-Hinton, Sharon; O’Hare, Ann M.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Older adults with ESRD often receive care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) after an acute hospitalization; however, little is known about acute care use after SNF discharge to home. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study used Medicare claims for North and South Carolina to identify patients with ESRD who were discharged home from a SNF between January 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Nursing Home Compare data were used to ascertain SNF characteristics. The primary outcome was time from SNF discharge to first acute care use (hospitalization or emergency department visit) within 30 days. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify patient and facility characteristics associated with the outcome. Results Among 1223 patients with ESRD discharged home from a SNF after an acute hospitalization, 531 (43%) had at least one rehospitalization or emergency department visit within 30 days. The median time to first acute care use was 37 days. Characteristics associated with a shorter time to acute care use were black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04 to 1.51), dual Medicare-Medicaid coverage (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), higher Charlson comorbidity score (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.12), number of hospitalizations during the 90 days before SNF admission (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.22), and index hospital discharge diagnoses of cellulitis, abscess, and/or skin ulcer (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.45). Home health use after SNF discharge was associated with a lower rate of acute care use (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.87). There were no statistically significant associations between SNF characteristics and time to first acute care use. Conclusions Almost one in every two older adults with ESRD discharged home after a post–acute SNF stay used acute care services within 30 days of discharge. Strategies to reduce acute care utilization in these patients are needed. PMID:25649158

  4. Fibrinolytic Therapy in CCU Instead of Emergency Ward: How It Affects Door to Needle Time?

    PubMed Central

    Zeraati, Fatemeh; Homayounfar, Shahram; Esna-Ashari, Farzaneh; Khalili, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The door-to-needle-time (DNT) is considered a standard time for scheduling thrombolysis for acute ST-segment elevation of myocardial infarction and this time can be reduced by minimizing the delay in starting thrombolytic treatment once the patient has reached to the hospital. This study was carried out on a sample of Iranian patients with acute myocardial infarction to determine the DNT in those after changing schedule of thrombolysis during 8 years from emergency to coronary care unit (CCU). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on all consecutive patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to the emergency ward of Ekbatan Hospital in Hamadan, Iran, within 2011 and had an indication of fibrinolytic therapy, which 47 patients were finally indicated to receive streptokinase in the part of CCU. Results: The mean time interval between arrival at the hospital and electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment was 6.30 min, taking ECG and patient's admission was 21.6 min and transferring the patient from admission to CCU ward was 31.9. The time between transferring the patients to CCU ward and fibrinolytic administration order and the time between its ordering and infusion was 31.2 min and 14.0 min respectively. In sum, the DNT was estimated 84.48 ± 53.00 min ranged 30-325 min that was significantly more than standard DNT (P <0.01). Furthermore, DNT mean in this study is significantly more than a study conducted 8 years ago in the same hospital (P <0.01). Conclusions: The DNT is higher than the standard level and higher than the estimated level in the past. This shows that DNT was longer after transferring to CCU. PMID:24829715

  5. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH Follow-up... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 414, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  6. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ..., phone 1-800-743-3951. Electronic Access This Federal Register document is also available from the... CFR Parts 412, 413, 415, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011...

  7. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  8. The use of oral nutritional supplements in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2016-06-23

    Oral nutritional supplements offer support to patients in acute care who are undernourished or at risk of malnutrition. Yet doubts remain over cost and compliance. Omorogieva Ojo, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at University of Greenwich weighs up the evidence. PMID:27345066

  9. Organization of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals in Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Perpich, Denise

    2004-01-01

    One in 4 Americans lives in a rural community and relies on rural hospitals and medical systems for emergent care of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI). The infrastructure and organization of AMI care in rural and urban Kansas hospitals was examined. Using a nominal group process, key elements within hospitals that might influence quality of AMI…

  10. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  11. A Summary of the October 2009 Forum on the Future of Nursing: Acute Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the IOM, seeks to transform nursing as part of larger efforts to reform the health care system. The first of the Initiative's three forums was held on October 19, 2009, and focused on safety, technology, and interdisciplinary collaboration in acute care. Appended are: (1)…

  12. Creating Learning Momentum through Overt Teaching Interactions during Real Acute Care Episodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand…

  13. [Pre-hospital care management of acute spinal cord injury].

    PubMed

    Hess, Thorsten; Hirschfeld, Sven; Thietje, Roland; Lönnecker, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf; Stuhr, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Acute injury to the spine and spinal cord can occur both in isolation as also in the context of multiple injuries. Whereas a few decades ago, the cause of paraplegia was almost exclusively traumatic, the ratio of traumatic to non-traumatic causes in Germany is currently almost equivalent. In acute treatment of spinal cord injury, restoration and maintenance of vital functions, selective control of circulation parameters, and avoidance of positioning or transport-related additional damage are in the foreground. This article provides information on the guideline for emergency treatment of patients with acute injury of the spine and spinal cord in the preclinical phase. PMID:27070515

  14. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  15. Assessing and understanding quality of care in a labour ward: a pilot study combining clinical and social science perspectives in Gondar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Pitchforth, Emma; Lilford, Richard J; Kebede, Yigzaw; Asres, Getahun; Stanford, Charlotte; Frost, Jodie

    2010-11-01

    Ensuring high quality intrapartum care in developing countries is a crucial component of efforts to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. Conceptual frameworks for understanding quality of care have broadened to reflect the complexity of factors affecting quality of health care provision. Yet, the role of social sciences within the assessment and understanding of quality of care in this field has focused primarily on seeking to understand the views and experiences of service users and providers. In this pilot study we aimed to combine clinical and social science perspectives and methods to best assess and understand issues affecting quality of clinical care and to identify priorities for change. Based in one referral hospital in Ethiopia, data collection took place in three phases using a combination of structured and unstructured observations, interviews and a modified nominal group process. This resulted in a thorough and pragmatic methodology. Our results showed high levels of knowledge and compliance with most aspects of good clinical practice, and non-compliance was affected by different, inter-linked, resource constraints. Considering possible changes in terms of resource implications, local stakeholders prioritised five areas for change. Some of these changes would have considerable resources implications whilst others could be made within existing resources. The discussion focuses on implications for informing quality improvement interventions. Improvements will need to address health systems issues, such as supply of key drugs, as well as changes in professional practice to promote the rational use of drugs. Furthermore, the study considers the need to understand broader organizational factors and inter-professional relationships. The potential for greater integration of social science perspectives as part of currently increasing monitoring and evaluation activity around intrapartum care is highlighted. PMID:20855142

  16. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this. PMID:26576033

  17. Enhancing critical thinking in clinical practice: implications for critical and acute care nurses.

    PubMed

    Shoulders, Bridget; Follett, Corrinne; Eason, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of patients in the critical and acute care settings requires that nurses be skilled in early recognition and management of rapid changes in patient condition. The interpretation and response to these events can greatly impact patient outcomes. Nurses caring for these complex patients are expected to use astute critical thinking in their decision making. The purposes of this article were to explore the concept of critical thinking and provide practical strategies to enhance critical thinking in the critical and acute care environment. PMID:24895950

  18. The Effect of Educational Intervention on Nurses’ Attitudes Toward the Importance of Family-Centered Care in Pediatric Wards in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Forouzan; Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Yaghmai, Farideh; Ismaeil, Suriani Binti; BinSuandi, Turiman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Family-centered care sustains the unity of the child’s and the family’s health. The aim of this study was to determine nurses’ attitudes toward parents’ participation in the care of their hospitalized children in Iran in 2015. Methods: In this experimental study, 200 pediatric nurses from hospitals affiliated with the Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran were selected using the multi-stage, random-sampling method. Data were gathered using a questionnaire that covered demographic information and nurses’ attitudes. The questionnaire consisted of 31 items and was completed by the nurses in three stages: 1) before intervention (pre-test), 2) immediately after intervention (post-test), and 3) three months after intervention (follow-up). The data were analyzed via SPSS software and using descriptive and analytical methods. Descriptive statistics, the Spearman Correlation Coefficient, and Repeated Measure Analysis (the Bonferroni method) were used to assess the data. Results: The results indicated that there was a significant increase in the mean score of attitude after intervention [M (pre) = 3.35%, M (post) = 3.97%, p < 0.001)]. Most of subjects had neutral attitudes toward family participation in their children’s care. There were no significant relationship between the nurses’ socio-demographic characteristics and their attitudes. Conclusion: The nurses’ attitudes toward the family’s participation in the care of their hospitalized children were moderate. The nurses’ attitudes should be improved by taking part in continuous training programs. PMID:26435826

  19. Perihepatic nodes detected by point-of-care ultrasound in acute hepatitis and acute-on-chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, I Che; Wang, Szu Jen; Sheu, Ming Jen; Koay, Lok-Beng; Lin, Ching Yih; Ho, Chung Han; Sun, Chi Shu; Kuo, Hsing Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the manifestations of perihepatic lymph nodes during the episode of acute hepatitis flare by point-of-care ultrasonography. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-six patients with an episode of acute hepatitis flare (ALT value > 5 × upper normal limit) were enrolled retrospectively. Diagnosis of etiology of the acute hepatitis flare was based on chart records and serological and virological assays. The patients were categorized into two groups (viral origin and non-viral origin) and further defined into ten subgroups according to the etiologies. An ultrasonograpy was performed within 2 h to 72 h (median, 8 h). The maximum size of each noticeable lymph node was measured. Correlation between clinical parameters and nodal manifestations was analyzed RESULTS: Enlarged lymph nodes (width ≥ 5mm) were noticeable in 110 (62.5%) patients, mostly in acute on chronic hepatitis B (54.5%). The viral group had a higher prevalence rate (89/110 = 80.9%) and larger nodal size (median, 7 mm) than those of the non-viral group (21/66 = 31.8%; median, 0 mm) (P < 0.001 for both). Meanwhile, there were significant differences in the nodal size between acute and chronic viral groups (P < 0.01), and between acute hepatitis A and non-hepatitis A viral groups (P < 0.001). In logistical regression analysis, the nodal width still showed strong significance in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001) to stratify the two groups. The area under the curve of ROC was 0.805, with a sensitivity of 80.9%, a specificity of 68.2%, positive predictive value of 80.92%, negative predictive value of 68.18%, and an accuracy of 76.14%. CONCLUSION: Point-of-care ultrasonography to detect perihepatic nodal change is valuable for clarifying the etiologies in an episode of acute hepatitis flare. PMID:26640338

  20. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2), abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7), and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this

  1. Impact of conversion from an open ward design paediatric intensive care unit environment to all isolated rooms environment on incidence of bloodstream infections and antibiotic resistance in Southern Israel (2000 to 2008).

    PubMed

    Lazar, I; Abukaf, H; Sofer, S; Peled, N; Leibovitz, E

    2015-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical aspects and outcome of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit. All BSI episodes were prospectively identified and analysed. The paediatric intensive care unit moved in 2006 from an open-plan unit to a new (all single room) unit. Three hundred and fifty-three BSI episodes occurred in 299 of 4162 patients. Overall, BSI incidence was 85 per 1000 hospitalised children. Fewer BSI episodes occurred during the last two years of the study (2007 to 2008), compared with 2000 to 2006 (70 of 1061 admissions, 6.5% versus 283 of 3101 admissions, 9.1%, respectively, P=0.01). There were 127 of 340 (37.4%) community-acquired and 213 of 340 (62.6%) nosocomial BSI episodes (31 of 1000 and 51 of 1000, respectively). Nosocomial BSI episodes decreased during 2007 to 2008 versus 2000 to 2006 (37.7% versus 55.8%, P=0.03). In 448 instances, pathogens were isolated, 231 (52%) Gram-positive and 188 (42%) Gram-negative. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (41.1%, 19.9% and 11.7%, respectively) were the most common Gram-positive and Enterobacteriaceae spp. the most frequent Gram-negative organisms (45.2%, of them Klebsiella spp. and E. coli 40% and 29.4%, respectively). A significant decrease was recorded during 2007 to 2008 in Enterobacteriaceae resistance to piperacillin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Thirty of 299 (10%, 9 with S. pneumoniae-BSI) patients died. A significant decrease in BSI and nosocomial incidence and Enterobacteriaceae spp. antibiotic resistance was recorded following the conversion of the paediatric intensive care unit from an open ward to an all isolated rooms environment. PMID:25579287

  2. How do psychiatrists address delusions in first meetings in acute care? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Communicating about delusions can be challenging, particularly when a therapeutic relationship needs to be established in acute care. So far, no systematic research has explored how psychiatrists address patients’ delusional beliefs in first meetings in acute care. The aim of this study was to describe how psychiatrists address patients’ delusional experiences in acute in-patient care. Methods First meetings between five psychiatrists and 14 patients in acute care were audio-recorded and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results 296 psychiatrist statements about delusions were identified and coded. Three commonly used approaches (with a total of 6 subthemes) were identified. The most common approaches were eliciting the content (1 subtheme: eliciting content and evidence) and understanding the impact (3 subthemes: identifying emotions, exploring links with dysfunctional behaviour and discussing reasons for hospital admission) while questioning the validity of the beliefs (2 subthemes: challenging content and exploring alternative explanations) was less common. The last approach sometimes put patients in a defensive position. Conclusions Psychiatrists commonly use three approaches to address patients’ delusions in the first meeting in acute in-patient care. Questioning the patients’ beliefs can lead to disagreement which might hinder establishing a positive therapeutic relationship. Future research should explore the impact of such an approach on outcomes and specify to what extent questioning the validity of delusional beliefs is appropriate in the first meeting. PMID:24935678

  3. General surgery 2.0: the emergence of acute care surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, S. Morad; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Ball, Chad G.; Pagliarello, Joe; Razek, Tarek; Parry, Neil; Widder, Sandy; Minor, Sam; Buczkowski, Andrzej; MacPherson, Cailan; Johner, Amanda; Jenkin, Dan; Wood, Leanne; McLoughlin, Karen; Anderson, Ian; Davey, Doug; Zabolotny, Brent; Saadia, Roger; Bracken, John; Nathens, Avery; Ahmed, Najma; Panton, Ormond; Warnock, Garth L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a groundswell of support in Canada for the development of organized, focused and multidisciplinary approaches to caring for acutely ill general surgical patients. Newly forged acute care surgery (ACS) services are beginning to provide prompt, evidence-based and goal-directed care to acutely ill general surgical patients who often present with a diverse range of complex pathologies and little or no pre- or postoperative planning. Through a team-based structure with attention to processes of care and information sharing, ACS services are well positioned to improve outcomes, while finding and developing efficiencies and reducing costs of surgical and emergency health care delivery. The ACS model also offers enhanced opportunities for surgical education for students, residents and practicing surgeons, and it will provide avenues to strengthen clinical and academic bonds between the community and academic surgical centres. In the near future, cooperation of ACS services from community and academic hospitals across the country will lead to the formation of systems of acute surgical care whose development will be informed by rigorous data collection and research and evidence-based quality-improvement initiatives. In an era of increasing subspecialization, ACS is a strong unifying force in general surgery and a platform for collective advocacy for an important patient population. PMID:20334738

  4. How can clinicians measure safety and quality in acute care?

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Nolan, Thomas; Zeger, Scott; Miller, Marlene; Rubin, Haya

    2011-03-01

    The demand for high quality care is increasing and warranted. Evidence suggests that the quality of care in hospitals can be improved. The greatest opportunity to improve outcomes for patients over the next quarter century will probably come not from discovering new treatments but from learning how to deliver existing effective therapies. To improve, caregivers need to know what to do, how they are doing, and be able to improve the processes of care. The ability to monitor performance, though challenging in healthcare, is essential to improving quality of care. We present a practical method to assess and learn from routine practice. Methods to evaluate performance from industrial engineering can be broadly applied to efforts to improve the quality of healthcare. One method that may help to provide caregivers frequent feedback is time series data--ie, results are graphically correlated with time. Broad use of these tools might lead to the necessary improvements in quality of care. PMID:23451357

  5. Critical care in the emergency department: acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nee, Patrick A; Bailey, David J; Todd, Victoria; Lewington, Andrew J; Wootten, Andrea E; Sim, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common among emergency department patients admitted to hospital. There is evidence of inadequate management of the condition leading to adverse outcomes. We present an illustrative case of AKI complicating a gastrointestinal disorder in an older adult. We discuss the clinical presentation, assessment and management of AKI with reference to recent consensus guidelines on classification and treatment. PMID:25969433

  6. Developing and validating a risk prediction model for acute care based on frailty syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Soong, J; Poots, A J; Scott, S; Donald, K; Bell, D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Population ageing may result in increased comorbidity, functional dependence and poor quality of life. Mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying frailty have not been fully elucidated, thus absolute consensus on an operational definition for frailty is lacking. Frailty scores in the acute medical care setting have poor predictive power for clinically relevant outcomes. We explore the utility of frailty syndromes (as recommended by national guidelines) as a risk prediction model for the elderly in the acute care setting. Setting English Secondary Care emergency admissions to National Health Service (NHS) acute providers. Participants There were N=2 099 252 patients over 65 years with emergency admission to NHS acute providers from 01/01/2012 to 31/12/2012 included in the analysis. Primary and secondary outcome measures Outcomes investigated include inpatient mortality, 30-day emergency readmission and institutionalisation. We used pseudorandom numbers to split patients into train (60%) and test (40%). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and ordering the patients by deciles of predicted risk was used to assess model performance. Using English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, we built multivariable logistic regression models with independent variables based on frailty syndromes (10th revision International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Injuries and Causes of Death (ICD-10) coding), demographics and previous hospital utilisation. Patients included were those >65 years with emergency admission to acute provider in England (2012). Results Frailty syndrome models exhibited ROC scores of 0.624–0.659 for inpatient mortality, 0.63–0.654 for institutionalisation and 0.57–0.63 for 30-day emergency readmission. Conclusions Frailty syndromes are a valid predictor of outcomes relevant to acute care. The models predictive power is in keeping with other scores in the literature, but is a simple, clinically relevant and potentially

  7. Exploring Real-time Patient Decision-making for Acute Care: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Adam L.; Chang, Tammy; Cobb, Enesha; Gossa, Weyinshet; Rowe, Zachary; Kohatsu, Lauren; Heisler, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Research has described emergency department (ED) use patterns in detail. However, evidence is lacking on how, at the time a decision is made, patients decide if healthcare is required or where to seek care. Methods Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a mixed-methods descriptive pilot study. Due to the exploratory, hypothesis-generating nature of this research, we did not perform power calculations, and financial constraints only allowed for 20 participants. Hypothetical vignettes for the 10 most common low acuity primary care complaints (cough, sore throat, back pain, etc.) were texted to patients twice daily over six weeks, none designed to influence the patient’s decision to seek care. We conducted focus groups to gain contextual information about participant decision-making. Descriptive statistics summarized responses to texts for each scenario. Qualitative analysis of open-ended text message responses and focus group discussions identified themes associated with decision-making for acute care needs. Results We received text survey responses from 18/20 recruited participants who responded to 72% (1092/1512) of the texted vignettes. In 48% of the vignettes, participants reported they would do nothing, for 34% of the vignettes participants reported they would seek care with a primary care provider, and 18% of responses reported they would seek ED care. Participants were not more likely to visit an ED during “off-hours.” Our qualitative findings showed: 1) patients don’t understand when care is needed; 2) patients don’t understand where they should seek care. Conclusion Participants were unclear when or where to seek care for common acute health problems, suggesting a need for patient education. Similar research is necessary in different populations and regarding the role of urgent care in acute care delivery. PMID:25247042

  8. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  9. A qualitative exploration of discharge destination as an outcome or a driver of acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with acute stroke do not receive recommended care in tertiary hospital settings. Allied health professionals have important roles within multidisciplinary stroke teams and influence the quality of care patients receive. Studies examining the role of allied health professionals in acute stroke management are scarce, and very little is known about the clinical decision making of these stroke clinicians. In this study we aimed to describe factors that influence the complex clinical decision making of these professionals as they prioritise acute stroke patients for recommended care. This qualitative study was part of a larger mixed methods study. Methods The qualitative methodology applied was a constructivist grounded theory approach. Fifteen allied health professionals working with acute stroke patients at three metropolitan tertiary care hospitals in South Australia were purposively sampled. Semi-structured interviews were conducted face to face using a question guide, and digital recording. Interviews were transcribed and analysed by two researchers using rigorous grounded theory processes. Results Our analysis highlighted ‘predicted discharge destination’ as a powerful driver of care decisions and clinical prioritisation for this professional group. We found that complex clinical decision making to predict discharge destination required professionals to concurrently consider patient’s pre-stroke status, the nature and severity of their stroke, the course of their recovery and multiple factors from within the healthcare system. The consequences of these decisions had potentially profound consequences for patients and sometimes led to professionals experiencing considerable uncertainty and stress. Conclusions Our qualitative enquiry provided new insights into the way allied health professionals make important clinical decisions for patients with acute stroke. This is the first known study to demonstrate that the subjective prediction

  10. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACUTE CARE RESEARCH ORGANIZATION (MACRO): IF YOU BUILD IT THEY WILL COME

    PubMed Central

    Early, Barbara J.; Huang, David T.; Callaway, Clifton; Zenati, Mazen; Angus, Derek C.; Gunn, Scott; Yealy, Donald M.; Unikel, Daniel; Billiar, Timothy R.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical research will increasingly play a core role in the evolution and growth of acute care surgery (ACS) program development across the country. What constitutes an efficient and effective clinical research infrastructure in the current fiscal and academic environment remains obscure. We sought to characterize the effects of implementation of a multidisciplinary acute care research organization (MACRO) at a busy tertiary referral university setting. Methods In 2008, to minimize redundancy, cost, and maximize existing resources promoting acute care research, MACRO was created unifying clinical research infrastructure between the Departments of Critical Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine and Surgery. Over the time periods 2008–2012 we performed a retrospective analysis and determined volume of clinical studies, patient enrollment for both observational (OBS) and interventional (INTV) trials, and staff growth since MACROs origination and characterized changes over time. Results From 2008 to 2011, the volume of patients enrolled in clinical studies which MACRO facilitates has significantly increased over 300%. The % of INTV/OBS trials has remained stable over the same time period (50–60%). Staff has increased from 6 coordinators to 10 with an additional 15 research associates allowing 24/7 service. With this significant growth, MACRO has become financially self-sufficient and additional outside departments now seek MACROs services. Conclusions Appropriate organization of acute care clinical research infrastructure minimizes redundancy and can promote sustainable, efficient growth in the current academic environment. Further studies are required to determine if similar models can be successful at other ACS programs. PMID:23778448

  11. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  12. Supportive medical care for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Antillon, Federico; Pacheco, Carlos; Sullivan, Courtney E; Lam, Catherine G; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable progress in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been achieved in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), but survival rates remain significantly lower than those in high-income countries. Inadequate supportive care and consequent excess mortality from toxicity are important causes of treatment failure for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in LMIC. This article summarizes practical supportive care recommendations for healthcare providers practicing in LMIC, starting with core approaches in oncology nursing care, management of tumor lysis syndrome and mediastinal masses, nutritional support, use of blood products for anemia and thrombocytopenia, and palliative care. Prevention and treatment of infectious diseases are described in a parallel paper. PMID:26013005

  13. Implications of the New Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Pressure Ulcer Policy in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the leading questions on clinicians' minds is, What are the implications of the new ruling of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in acute care, and how will it affect the wound care clinician? The CMS recently unveiled its plans for reimbursement and nonpayment for facility-acquired pressure ulcers, among other issues, in acute care. Change is coming, and this time prevention and intervention underlie the CMS payment reform ruling, which includes payment incentive for prevention and quality patient care. Intensive and comprehensive patient screenings at the outset of admission, as well as diligent prevention during patient stay, are the mainstays of this initiative. Anyone who works in a hospital will play a major role. PMID:24527115

  14. Ward leadership styles.

    PubMed

    Bowman, G

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to devise a leadership style scale based in the authoritarian/democratic concept of leadership and to test it with a group of nurses. The working hypothesis was that nurses, working by primary nursing methods, would have a more democratic attitude to leadership than those nurses working in a traditional task allocation system. Recent papers such as that of Henry & Tuxill (1) plead for the caring professions to take on board the concept of the 'person'. Not only is the traditional model of nursing care seen as bad for the patient; it is seen also as harmful to the nurses. Fretwell (2) describes the task system as essentially an industrial model rather than a professional one which tends to satisfy the needs of the doctor rather than the patient or nurse. Kinston (3) describes nursing decision-making and work as Level I work (tradesmen). Current models of care that individualize the nurse's response to work and decision-making become Level II type (professional). Primary nursing fulfils the need for professionalizing nursing and meeting the need for more independence as well as respecting the patient as a 'person' with the organisation there to facilitate interaction between qualified nurse and patient. Changes in attitude and relationships are essential if work is to change from task to person-centred. Styles of leadership in nurses need to alter as our orientation to care issues change (4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2615867

  15. Managing patients with behavioral health problems in acute care: balancing safety and financial viability.

    PubMed

    Rape, Cyndy; Mann, Tammy; Schooley, John; Ramey, Jana

    2015-01-01

    With a recent decrease in community resources for the mental health population, acute care facilities must seek creative, cost-effective ways to protect and care for these vulnerable individuals. This article describes 1 facility's journey to maintaining patient and staff safety while reducing cost. Success factors of this program include staff engagement, environmental modifications, and a nurse-driven, sitter-reduction process. PMID:25479169

  16. Acute nursing care and management of patients with sickle cell.

    PubMed

    De, Diana

    The information provided in this article has been developed to coincide with the recent findings from a National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (2008) report, 'A Sickle Cell Crisis', which calls for nurses to learn more about the disorder in order to better support patients in their care. This article reiterates much of the previous written literature, which has made reference to compromised patient care due to the ongoing unfamiliarity surrounding sickle cell disorders among healthcare professionals in Western societies. Readers will be given an overview of the condition and general clinical guidance on the management of care for patients when they are experiencing a state of'crisis'. Readers should note that the term 'painful episodes' is sometimes used in preference to sickle cell 'crises'. PMID:18856142

  17. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  18. Traumatic brain injury in children: acute care management.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Kristen; Meller, Karen; Kulpan, Carol; Mowery, Bernice D

    2013-01-01

    The care of the pediatric patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an all-encompassing nursing challenge. Nursing vigilance is required to maintain a physiological balance that protects the injured brain. From the time a child and family first enter the hospital, they are met with the risk of potential death and an uncertain future. The family is subjected to an influx of complex medical and nursing terminology and interventions. Nurses need to understand the complexities of TBI and the modalities of treatment, as well as provide patients and families with support throughout all phases of care. PMID:24640314

  19. Experiences with Capnography in Acute Care Settings: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Clinical Staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.; Riera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While capnography is being incorporated into clinical guidelines, it is not used to it's full potential. We investigated reasons for limited implementation of capnography in acute care areas and explored facilitators and barriers to its implementation. Methods A purposeful sample of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU) participated in semistructured interviews. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to analyze the data to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Nineteen providers were interviewed from five hospitals. Six themes were identified: variability in use of capnography among acute care units, availability and accessibility of capnography equipment, the evidence behind capnography use, the impact of capnography on patient care, personal experiences impacting use of capnography, and variable knowledge about capnography. Barriers and facilitators to use were found within each theme. Conclusions We observed varied responsiveness to capnography and identified factors that work to foster or discourage its use. This data can guide future implementation strategies. A deliberate strategy to foster utilization, mitigate barriers and broadly accelerate implementation has the potential to profoundly impact use of capnography in acute care areas with the goal of improving patient care. PMID:25129575

  20. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  1. Management of Port-a-Cath devices in long-term acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bonczek, Rita; Nurse, Brenda A

    2012-01-01

    A reliable means of maintaining an intravascular access device (IVAD) is an important aspect of care for a patient in a long-term acute care (LTAC) setting. Overall, various authors have confirmed that complication rates are lower with use of an IVAD. The key to this success in low complication rates appears to be a team approach to catheter care and management. In our unique practice setting, LTAC, we have over 20 years of experience with IVAD care and management. In an extensive 15-year retrospective review of the IVAD care, we found very low rates of complications, including infections. This is directly related to a team approach to catheter care, protocol development, employee education, and postoperative management. PMID:23212956

  2. Dying in two acute hospitals: would usual care meet Australian national clinical standards?

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine; Byfieldt, Naomi; Green, Malcolm; Saul, Peter; Lack, Jill; Philips, Jane L

    2014-05-01

    The Australian Commission for Quality and Safety in Health Care (ACQSHC) has articulated 10 clinical standards with the aim of improving the consistency of quality healthcare delivery. Currently, the majority of Australians die in acute hospitals. But despite this, no agreed standard of care exists to define the minimum standard of care that people should accept in the final hours to days of life. As a result, there is limited capacity to conduct audits that focus on the gap between current care and recommended care. There is, however, accumulating evidence in the end of life literature to define which aspects of care are likely to be considered most important to those people facing imminent death. These themes offer standards against which to conduct audits. This is very apt given the national recommendation that healthcare should be delivered in the context of considering people's wishes while always treating people with dignity and respect. PMID:24589365

  3. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children. PMID:25352538

  4. Improving Diagnostic Accuracy of Anaphylaxis in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Hjalti M.; Graffeo, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The identification and appropriate management of those at highest risk for life-threatening anaphylaxis remains a clinical enigma. The most widely used criteria for such patients were developed in a symposium convened by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. In this paper we review the current literature on the diagnosis of acute allergic reactions as well as atypical presentations that clinicians should recognize. Review of case series reveals significant variability in definition and approach to this common and potentially life-threatening condition. Series on fatal cases of anaphylaxis indicate that mucocutaneous signs and symptoms occur less frequently than in milder cases. Of biomarkers studied to aid in the work-up of possible anaphylaxis, drawing blood during the initial six hours of an acute reaction for analysis of serum tryptase has been recommended in atypical cases. This can provide valuable information when a definitive diagnosis cannot be made by history and physical exam. PMID:21293765

  5. [Special challenges in the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe].

    PubMed

    Marugg, Donat

    2015-04-22

    Oberengadin Hospital in Samedan is faced with particular challenges, as the highest-elevation acute-care hospital in Europe (1750 m = 5,740 ft above sea level). The factors responsible for this are elevation-related and meteorological/climatic influences, as well as seasonal variations in Südbünden's demographic structure due to tourism. PMID:26072605

  6. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  7. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  8. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  9. Effect of a Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention Initiative in Veterans Affairs Acute Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of clinically confirmed hospital-onset healthcare facility-associated Clostridium difficile infections from July 1, 2012, through March 31, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Affairs facilities were evaluated. Quarterly pooled national standardized infection ratios decreased 15% from baseline by the final quarter of the analysis period (P=.01, linear regression). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:720-722. PMID:26864803

  10. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  11. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  12. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  13. New care model targets high-utilizing, complex patients, frees up emergency providers to focus on acute care concerns.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN, has developed a new model of care, designed to meet the needs of high-utilizing hospital and ED patients with complex medical, social, and behavioral needs.The Coordinated Care Center (CCC) provides easy access to patients with a history of high utilization, and delivers multidisciplinary care in a one-stop-shop format. In one year, the approach has slashed ED visits by 37%, freeing up emergency providers to focus on patients with acute needs. In-patient care stays are down by 25%. The CCC focuses on patients with diagnoses that are primarily medical, such as CHF [congestive heart failure], COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], or diabetes. ED-based clinical coordinators keep an eye out for patients who world be good candidates for the CCC, and facilitate quick transitions when their needs would be better served in that setting. Administrators describe CCC as an ambulatory intensive care unit, with an on-site pharmacist, social worker, psychologist, and chemical health counselor as well as physicians, nurse practitioners, LPNs, and patient navigators--enough personnel to comprise two full care teams. While the model does not pay for itself under current payment models, administrators anticipate that the approach will work well under future payment reforms that focus on total cost of care. PMID:24195142

  14. [Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute medical care: myths versus reality].

    PubMed

    von Düring, Stephan; Bruchez, Stéphanie; Suppan, Laurent; Niquille, Marc

    2015-08-12

    Oxygen adiministration for both medical and traumatic emergencies is regarded as an essential component of resuscitation. However, many recent studies suggest that the use of oxygen should be more restrictive. Detrimental effects of normobaric oxygen therapy in patients suffering from hypercapnic respiratory diseases have been demonstrated, especially because of the suppression of the hypoxic drive. Apart from this particular situation, correction of hypoxemia is still a widely accepted treatment target, although there is growing evidence that hyperoxemia could be harmful in acute coronary syndromes and cardio-respiratory arrests. In other pathologies, such as stroke or hemorragic shock, the situation is still unclear, and further studies are needed to clarify the situation. Generally speaking, oxygen therapy should from now on be goal-directed, and early monitoring of both pulse oximetry and arterial blood gases is advised. PMID:26449100

  15. Practice Patterns in the Care of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Ujash; Wasserstein, David; Moineddin, Rahim; Jenkinson, Richard; Kreder, Hans; Jaglal, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of level I evidence supporting non-operative management (focused on early range of motion and weight bearing) of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Despite this emerging evidence, there have been very few studies evaluating its uptake. Our primary objective was to determine whether the findings from a landmark trial assessing the optimal management strategy for acute Achilles tendon ruptures influenced the practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada over a 12-year time period. As a second objective we examined whether patient and provider predictors of surgical repair utilization differed before and after dissemination of the landmark trial results. Methods: Using provincial health administrative databases, we identified Ontario residents ≥ 18 years of age with an acute Achilles tendon rupture from April 2002 to March 2014. The proportion of surgically repaired ruptures was calculated for each calendar quarter and year. A time series analysis using an interventional autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to determine whether changes in the proportion of surgically repaired ruptures were chronologically related to the dissemination of results from a landmark trial by Willits et al. (first quarter, 2009). Spline regression was then used to independently identify critical time-points of change in the surgical repair rate to confirm our findings. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess for differences in patient (baseline demographics) and provider (hospital type) predictors of surgical repair utilization before and after the landmark trial. Results: In 2002, ˜19% of acute Achilles tendon ruptures in Ontario were surgically repaired, however, by 2014 only 6.5% were treated operatively. A statistically significant decrease in the rate of surgical repair (p < 0.001) was observed after the results from a landmark trial were presented at a major

  16. Impact of Thromboprophylaxis across the US Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A.; Rushton-Smith, Sophie K.; Cohen, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be reduced by appropriate use of anticoagulant prophylaxis. VTE prophylaxis does, however, remain substantially underused, particularly among acutely ill medical inpatients. We sought to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of increasing use of American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP)-recommended VTE prophylaxis among medical inpatients from a US healthcare system perspective. Methods and Findings In this retrospective database cost-effectiveness evaluation, a decision-tree model was developed to estimate deaths within 30 days of admission and outcomes attributable to VTE that might have been averted by use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated using “no prophylaxis” as the comparator. Data from the ENDORSE US medical inpatients and the US nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were used to estimate the annual number of eligible inpatients who failed to receive ACCP-recommended VTE prophylaxis. The cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that VTE-prevention strategies would reduce deaths by 0.5% and 0.3%, comparing LMWH and UFH strategies with no prophylaxis, translating into savings of $50,637 and $25,714, respectively, per death averted. The ENDORSE findings indicated that 51.1% of US medical inpatients were at ACCP-defined VTE risk, 47.5% of whom received ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. By extrapolating these findings to the NIS and applying cost-effectives analysis results, the full implementation of ACCP guidelines would reduce number of deaths (by 15,875 if using LMWH or 10,201 if using UFH), and was extrapolated to calculate the cost reduction of $803M for LMWH and $262M for UFH. Conclusions Efforts to improve VTE prophylaxis use in acutely ill inpatients are warranted due to the potential for reducing VTE-attributable deaths, with net cost savings to healthcare systems. PMID:25816146

  17. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practise. We elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. Methods A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within ten emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practise, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use, and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff, and user friendliness were facilitators. Conclusions This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  18. Is accounting for acute care beds enough? A proposal for measuring infection prevention personnel resources.

    PubMed

    Gase, Kathleen A; Babcock, Hilary M

    2015-02-01

    There is still little known about how infection prevention (IP) staffing affects patient outcomes across the country. Current evaluations mainly focus on the ratio of IP resources to acute care beds (ACBs) and have not strongly correlated with patient outcomes. The scope of IP and the role of the infection preventionist in health care have expanded and changed dramatically since the Study on the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control (SENIC Project) recommended a 1 IP resource to 250 ACB ration in the 1980s. Without a universally accepted model for accounting for additional IP responsibilities, it is difficult to truly assess IP staffing needs. A previously suggested alternative staffing model was applied to acute care hospitals in our organization to determine its utility. PMID:25480447

  19. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  20. Characteristics and Acute Care Use Patterns of Patients in a Senior Living Community Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Ryan; Gillespie, Suzanne M.; Nelson, Dallas; Newman, Calvin; Shah, Manish N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Primary care medical practices dedicated to the needs of older adults who dwell in independent and assisted living residences in senior living communities (SLCs) have been developed. To date, the demographic and acute medical care use patterns of patients in these practices have not been described. Design A descriptive study using a six-month retrospective record review of adults enrolled in a medical primary care practice that provides on-site primary medical care in SLCs. Setting Greater Rochester, New York. Participants 681 patients residing in 19 SLCs. Measurements Demographic and clinical data were collected. Use of acute medical care by patients in the SLC program including phone consultation, provider emergent/urgent in-home visit, emergency department (ED) visit, and hospital admissions were recorded. ED visit and hospital admissions at the two primary referral hospitals for the practice were reviewed for chief complaint and discharge plan. Results 635/681 (93%) of records were available. The median age was 85 years (interquartile range (IQR) 77, 89). Patients were predominantly female (447, 70%) and white (465, 73%). Selected chronic medical diseases included: dementia/cognitive impairment (367, 58%); cardiac disease (271, 43%); depression (246, 39%); diabetes (173, 27%); pulmonary disease (146, 23%); renal disease (118, 19%); cancer (115, 18%); stroke/TIA (93,15%). The median MMSE score was 25 (IQR 19, 28; n=446). Patients took a median of 10 medications (IQR 7, 12). Important medication classes included: cardiovascular (512 (81%); hypoglycemics (117, 18%); benzodiazepines (71, 11%); dementia (194, 31%); and anticoagulants (51, 8%). Patients received acute care 1,876 times (median frequency 3, IQR 2, 6) for 1,504 unique medical issues. Falls were the most common complaint (399, 20%). Of these 1,876 episodes, patients accessed acute care via telephone (1071, 57%), provider visit at the SLC (417, 22%), and ED visit (388, 21%). Of the cases

  1. Interprofessional care co-ordinators: the benefits and tensions associated with a new role in UK acute health care.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jackie; Meyer, Julienne; Glynn, Michael; Bentley, Jane; Reeves, Scott

    2003-08-01

    While more flexible models of service delivery are being introduced in UK health and social care, little is known about the impact of new roles, particularly support worker roles, on the work of existing practitioners. This action research study aimed to explore the impact of one such new role, that of interprofessional care co-ordinators (IPCCs). The general (internal) medical service of a UK hospital uses IPCCs to provide support to the interprofessional team and, in doing so, promote efficiency of acute bed use. Using a range of methods, mainly qualitative, this action research study sought to explore the characteristics and impact of the role on interprofessional team working. While the role's flexibility, autonomy and informality contributed to success in meeting its intended objectives, these characteristics also caused some tensions with interprofessional colleagues. These benefits and tensions mirror wider issues associated with the current modernisation agenda in UK health care. PMID:12834925

  2. Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

  3. A new model for quality improvement in acute inpatient psychiatry: observational data from an acute assessment unit

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Joseph; Gibbons, Rachel; Outim, Faizal; Tang, Sylvia; Chakraborty, Apu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is little research into the constituents of effective psychiatric inpatient care. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a newly adopted model of inpatient care; the acute assessment ward. Design Review of data collected over a year-long period. Setting Acute assessment ward in North London. Participants All Admissions between 8 October 2009 and 7 October 2010. Main outcome measures Duration of stay, need for readmission, patient satisfaction and frequency of conflict behaviours. Results A total of 485 admissions over the yearlong study period. The median stay to discharge from the assessment ward was 6 days, whereas in those transferred it was 19 days. Readmission within 28 days following discharge from the assessment ward was 13.9%, whereas those discharged from other wards was 9.2% (P = 0.1). Patient satisfaction was no lower, for all domains, than for other wards in the trust. Frequency of conflict behaviour was equal to previous studies,1 but self harm was significantly less common (P = 0.01). Conclusions Our data show that focusing on the ‘point of entry’ to inpatient services means that some admission times can be reduced without an increase in 28-day readmission rates or conflict behaviours. The acute assessment model attempts to address the need for the NHS to deliver more for less, whilst remaining focused on service-user and staff satisfaction. Research into which areas of this complex intervention are effective is challenging, but we would urge others who run services with novel structures to publish data about their functioning. PMID:23323205

  4. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  5. [Update on current care guidelines. Current care guideline: Acute lower respiratory tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Pekka; Broas, Markku; Hedman, Jouni; Jartti, Airi; Järvinen, Asko; Koskela, Markku; Meinander, Tuula; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rautakorpi, Ulla; Syrjälä, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is recognised in patients suffering from acute cough or deteriorated general condition. Patients with acute cough without pneumonia-related symptoms or clinical findings do not benefit from antimicrobial treatment. Those with suspected or confirmed pneumonia are treated with antibiotics, amoxicillin being the first choice. Most patients with pneumonia can be treated at home. Those with severe symptoms are referred to hospital. Patients are always encouraged to contact his/her physician if the symptoms worsen or do not ameliorate within 2-3 days. Patients aged 50 years or older and smokers are controlled by thoracic radiography in 6-8 weeks. PMID:26237912

  6. Challenges in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Management: Optimizing Care Despite Incomplete Evidence and Imperfect Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Alan S.; Storrow, Alan B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute heart failure is a common condition associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, and cost. However, evidence-based data on treating heart failure in the acute setting are limited, and current individual treatment options have variable efficacy. The healthcare team must often individualize patient care in ways that may extend beyond available clinical guidelines. In this review, we address the question, “How do you do the best you can clinically with incomplete evidence and imperfect drugs?” Expert opinion is provided to supplement guideline-based recommendations and help address the typical challenges that are involved in the management of patients with acute heart failure. Specifically, we discuss 4 key areas that are important in the continuum of patient care: differential diagnosis and risk stratification; choice and implementation of initial therapy; assessment of the adequacy of therapy during hospitalization or observation; and considerations for discharge/transition of care. A case study is presented to highlight the decision-making process throughout each of these areas. Evidence is accumulating that should help guide patients and healthcare providers on a path to better quality of care. PMID:25679083

  7. Gaining entry-level clinical competence outside of the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne; Taper, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, an emphasis has been placed on dietetic interns' attainment of entry-level clinical competence in acute care facilities. The perceived risks and benefits of acquiring entry-level clinical competence within long-term and acute care clinical environments were examined. The study included a purposive sample of recent graduates and dietitians (n=14) involved in an integrated internship program. Study subjects participated in in-depth individual interviews. Data were thematically analyzed with the support of data management software QSR N6. Perceived risks and benefits were associated with receiving clinical training exclusively in either environment; risks in one area surfaced as benefits in the other. Themes that emerged included philosophy of care, approach to practice, working environment, depth and breadth of experience, relationships (both client and professional), practice outcomes, employment opportunities, and attitude. Entry-level clinical competence is achievable in both acute and long-term care environments; however, attention must be paid to identified risks. Interns who consider gaining clinical competence exclusively in one area can reduce risks and better position themselves for employment in either practice area by incorporating an affiliation in the other area into their internship program. PMID:18334052

  8. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

    2014-06-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

  9. ALERT--a multiprofessional training course in the care of the acutely ill adult patient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Osgood, Vicky M; Crane, Sue

    2002-03-01

    The Acute Life-threatening Events--Recognition and Treatment (ALERT) course is a one-day multidisciplinary course originally designed to give newly qualified doctors and nurses greater confidence and ability in the recognition and management of adult patients who have impending or established critical illness. It may also be suitable for many other groups of health service workers. ALERT was developed using principles common to many advanced life support courses and incorporates aspects of clinical governance, multidisciplinary education and interprofessional working. It incorporates pre-course reading, informal and interactive seminars, practical demonstrations and role-play during clinically based scenarios. A novel aspect of ALERT is that participants undertake role interchange during scenarios, thereby facilitating mutual understanding. At all times during the course, participants are encouraged to reflect on their actions and to pay particular attention to detail. The course focuses on those problems that lead ward nurses to call doctors for assistance, e.g. 'the blue patient', 'the hypotensive patient'. Communication skills are covered frequently in the course, during seminars and scenarios, but also as a specific session that covers three aspects--breaking bad news, writing patient notes and interpersonal/interprofessional communication. PMID:11886734

  10. Information and research needs of acute-care clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spath, M; Buttlar, L

    1996-01-01

    The majority of nurses surveyed used the library on a regular but limited basis to obtain information needed in caring for or making decisions about their patients. A minority indicated that the libraries in their own institutions totally met their information needs. In fact, only 4% depended on the library to stay abreast of new information and developments in the field. Many of the nurses had their own journal subscriptions, which could account in part for the limited use of libraries and the popularity of the professional journal as the key information source. This finding correlates with the research of Binger and Huntsman, who found that 95% of staff development educators relied on professional journal literature to keep up with current information in the field, and only 45% regularly monitored indexing-and-abstracting services. The present study also revealed that nurses seek information from colleagues more than from any other source, supporting the findings of Corcoran-Perry and Graves. Further research is necessary to clarify why nurses use libraries on a limited basis. It appears, as Bunyan and Lutz contend, that a more aggressive approach to marketing the library to nurses is needed. Further research should include an assessment of how the library can meet the information needs of nurses for both research and patient care. Options to be considered include offering library orientation sessions for new staff nurses, providing current-awareness services by circulating photocopied table-of-contents pages, sending out reviews of new monographs, inviting nurses to submit search requests on a topic, scheduling seminars and workshops that teach CD-ROM and online search strategies, and providing information about electronic databases covering topics related to nursing. Information on databases may be particularly important in light of the present study's finding that databases available in CD-ROM format are consulted very little. Nursing education programs should

  11. 45 CFR 46.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the state or any other agency, institution, or entity can be included in research approved under § 46.406 or § 46.407 only if such research is: (1) Related to their status as wards; or (2) Conducted in...

  12. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the creation, implementation and utilisation of a knowledge sharing proforma that is used on their admission to the ward. Methods and analysis The project uses qualitative interviews to understand the complex processes associated with being admitted and discharged from inpatient mental health wards. Practitioners will be asked to identify and map the relevant stakeholders involved in admission and discharge, and discuss any problems with the process. The study team will work with clinicians to develop a knowledge collection proforma, which will be piloted for 2 months. Qualitative interviews will be carried out to collect reflections on the experiences of using the tool, with data used for further refinement of the intervention. Baseline and repeat quantitative measures will be taken to illustrate any changes to length of stay and readmission rates achieved as a result of the study. Ethics and dissemination A key issue is that participants are able to comment frankly on something that is a core part of their work, without fear or reprise. It is equally important that all participants are offered the opportunity to develop and coproduce the knowledge collection proforma, in order that the intervention produced is fit for purpose and usable in the real world, away from a research environment. The study has received ethical approval from Nottingham University Business School ethics committee, and has all appropriate National Health Service research governance clearances. PMID

  13. Nurse Value-Added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Yakusheva, Olga; Lindrooth, Richard; Weiss, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to (1) estimate the relative nurse effectiveness, or individual nurse value-added (NVA), to patients’ clinical condition change during hospitalization; (2) examine nurse characteristics contributing to NVA; and (3) estimate the contribution of value-added nursing care to patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Electronic data on 1,203 staff nurses matched with 7,318 adult medical–surgical patients discharged between July 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011 from an urban Magnet-designated, 854-bed teaching hospital. Study Design Retrospective observational longitudinal analysis using a covariate-adjustment value-added model with nurse fixed effects. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from the study hospital's electronic patient records and human resources databases. Principal Findings Nurse effects were jointly significant and explained 7.9 percent of variance in patient clinical condition change during hospitalization. NVA was positively associated with having a baccalaureate degree or higher (0.55, p = .04) and expertise level (0.66, p = .03). NVA contributed to patient outcomes of shorter length of stay and lower costs. Conclusions Nurses differ in their value-added to patient outcomes. The ability to measure individual nurse relative value-added opens the possibility for development of performance metrics, performance-based rankings, and merit-based salary schemes to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. PMID:25256089

  14. An evaluation of a formative assessment process used on post take ward rounds.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of clinical training is to develop doctors capable of delivering professional, personal, effective, high quality, safe clinical care with Intelligent Kindness. The processes supporting training must promote development towards excellence. In 2004 a formative assessment process for use on medical post take ward rounds was introduced based on a model of a Driving Instructor and Learner Driver. This process has been evaluated in comparison with the Case based Discussion (CbD) and mini-Cex by 140 of 369 trainees, using online surveys. Ten trainees were interviewed in depth. The majority of trainees reported that this process had helped them more in their development as doctors than the CbD or mini-CEX. Trainees were able to describe positive effects in areas such as diagnosis, prescribing and confidence in their work. In the NHS the assessments are meant to be "trainee driven", however all but one of the trainees stated that they preferred the routine provision of an assessment to having to ask for an assessment. This evaluation of a truly formative assessment process shows that the trainees benefit in their progression towards clinical excellence. Effective formative feedback can be provided on an Acute Medical Unit even within the constraints of busy post take ward rounds. Within a team of Consultants one should be allowed time to develop an extended Clinical Supervisor role. PMID:24364051

  15. Nurses in Action: A Response to Cultural Care Challenges in a Pediatric Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Mixer, Sandra J; Carson, Emily; McArthur, Polly M; Abraham, Cynthia; Silva, Krystle; Davidson, Rebecca; Sharp, Debra; Chadwick, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Culturally congruent care is satisfying, meaningful, fits with people's daily lives, and promotes their health and wellbeing. A group of staff nurses identified specific clinical challenges they faced in providing such care for Hispanic and underserved Caucasian children and families in the pediatric medical-surgical unit of an urban regional children's hospital in the southeastern U.S. To address these challenges, an academic-practice partnership was formed between a group of nurse managers and staff nurses at the children's hospital and nursing faculty and graduate students at a local, research-intensive public university. Using the culture care theory, the partners collaborated on a research study to discover knowledge that would help the nursing staff resolve the identified clinical challenges. Twelve families and 12 healthcare providers participated. Data analysis revealed five care factors that participants identified as most valuable: family, faith, communication, care integration, and meeting basic needs. These themes were used to formulate nursing actions that, when applied in daily practice, could facilitate the provision of culturally congruent care for these children and their families. The knowledge generated by this study also has implications for healthcare organizations, nursing educators, and academic-practice partnerships that seek to ensure the delivery of equitable care for all patients. PMID:26072213

  16. Effectively using communication to enhance the provision of pediatric palliative care in an acute care setting

    PubMed Central

    Hubble, Rosemary; Trowbridge, Kelly; Hubbard, Claudia; Ahsens, Leslie; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    The capability of effectively communicating is crucial when providing palliative care, especially when the patient is a child. Communication among healthcare professionals with the child and family members must be clear, concise, and consistent. Use of a communication tool provides documentation for conversations, treatment plans, and specific desires related to care. This paper describes communication theory, portrays the use of this theory to develop a communication tool, and illustrates the use of this tool by multidisciplinary members of a healthcare team to provide pediatric palliative care. PMID:21197332

  17. [Lung ultrasound in acute and critical care medicine].

    PubMed

    Zechner, P M; Seibel, A; Aichinger, G; Steigerwald, M; Dorr, K; Scheiermann, P; Schellhaas, S; Cuca, C; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-07-01

    The development of modern critical care lung ultrasound is based on the classical representation of anatomical structures and the need for the assessment of specific sonography artefacts and phenomena. The air and fluid content of the lungs is interpreted using few typical artefacts and phenomena, with which the most important differential diagnoses can be made. According to a recent international consensus conference these include lung sliding, lung pulse, B-lines, lung point, reverberation artefacts, subpleural consolidations and intrapleural fluid collections. An increased number of B-lines is an unspecific sign for an increased quantity of fluid in the lungs resembling interstitial syndromes, for example in the case of cardiogenic pulmonary edema or lung contusion. In the diagnosis of interstitial syndromes lung ultrasound provides higher diagnostic accuracy (95%) than auscultation (55%) and chest radiography (72%). Diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary embolism can be achieved at the bedside by evaluating subpleural lung consolidations. Detection of lung sliding can help to detect asymmetrical ventilation and allows the exclusion of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound-based diagnosis of pneumothorax is superior to supine anterior chest radiography: for ultrasound the sensitivity is 92-100% and the specificity 91-100%. For the diagnosis of pneumothorax a simple algorithm was therefore designed: in the presence of lung sliding, lung pulse or B-lines, pneumothorax can be ruled out, in contrast a positive lung point is a highly specific sign of the presence of pneumothorax. Furthermore, lung ultrasound allows not only diagnosis of pleural effusion with significantly higher sensitivity than chest x-ray but also visual control in ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis. PMID:22772347

  18. Governing board structure, business strategy, and performance of acute care hospitals: a contingency perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Young, G; Beekun, R I; Ginn, G O

    1992-01-01

    Contingency theory suggests that for a hospital governing board to be effective in taking on a more active role in strategic management, the board needs to be structured to complement the overall strategy of the organization. A survey study was conducted to examine the strategies of acute care hospitals as related to the structural characteristics of their governing boards. After controlling for organizational size and system membership, results indicated a significant relationship between the governing board structure of 109 acute care hospitals and their overall business strategy. Strategy also accounted for more of the variance in board structure than either organization size or system membership. Finally, the greater the match between board structure and hospital strategy, the stronger the hospitals' financial performance. PMID:1399656

  19. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  20. World society of emergency surgery study group initiative on Timing of Acute Care Surgery classification (TACS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Timing of surgical intervention is critical for outcomes of patients diagnosed with surgical emergencies. Facing the challenge of multiple patients requiring emergency surgery, or of limited resource availability, the acute care surgeon must triage patients according to their disease process and physiological state. Emergency operations from all surgical disciplines should be scheduled by an agreed time frame that is based on accumulated data of outcomes related to time elapsed from diagnosis to surgery. Although literature exists regarding the optimal timing of various surgical interventions, implementation of protocols for triage of surgical emergencies is lacking. For institutions of a repetitive triage mechanism, further discussion on optimal timing of surgery in diverse surgical emergencies should be encouraged. Standardizing timing of interventions in surgical emergencies will promote clinical investigation as well as a commitment by administrative authorities to proper operating theater provision for acute care surgery. PMID:23634784

  1. Direct costs of acute respiratory infections in a pediatric long-term care facility.

    PubMed

    Murray, Meghan T; Heitkemper, Elizabeth; Jackson, Olivia; Neu, Natalie; Stone, Patricia; Cohen, Bevin; Saiman, Lisa; Hutcheon, Gordon; Larson, Elaine L

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) are a major burden in pediatric long-term care. We analyzed the financial impact of ARI in 2012-2013. Costs associated with ARI during the respiratory viral season were ten times greater than during the non-respiratory viral season, $31 224 and $3242 per 1000 patient-days, respectively (P < 0·001). ARI are burdensome for pediatric long-term care facilities not only because of the associated morbidity and mortality, but also due to the great financial costs of prevention. PMID:26425787

  2. [The organizational technologies of quality support of emergency and acute medical care in megalopolis: Moscow case].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of emergency medical care in conditions of megalopolis on the example of the Moscow A.S. Putchkov emergency and acute medical care station. The analysis is applied to such new organizational technologies as the automatic navigational dispatcher system of field brigades 'management, the zoning of transport mains according accessibility of emergency medical are stations, the organization of emergency medical posts on the most conducive to accident areas of megalopolis, the integrated municipal inter-warning system in case of road accidents. PMID:22279806

  3. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting. PMID:21655513

  4. Duplex ultrasound, clinical score, thrombotic risk, and D-dimer testing for evidence based diagnosis and management of deep vein thrombosis and alternative diagnoses in the primary care setting and outpatient ward.

    PubMed

    Michiels, J J; Moosdorff, W; Maasland, H; Michiels, J M; Lao, M U; Neumann, H A; Dulicek, P; Stvrtinova, V; Barth, J; Palareti, G

    2014-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has an annual incidence of 0.2% in the urban population. First episodes of calf vein thrombosis (CVT) and proximal DVT are frequently elicited by risk factors, including varicose veins, cancer, pregnancy/postpartum, oral contraceptives below the age of 50 years, immobility or surgery. Leg pain and tenderness in the calf and popliteal fossa on physical examination may result from other conditions than DVT labeled as alternative diagnosis (AD) Congenital venous thrombophilia is present in every third first DVT, increased FVIII in every fourth first DVT, and FV Leiden/FII mutation in 40% of women on oral anticonceptive pill before reaching the menopause. Routine thrombophilia testing for FV Leiden/prothrombin mutation and FVIII as main risk factor for venous thrombosis is recommended. Primary superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) and DVT patients with a autosomal dominant family history of DVT are candidates for thrombophilia testing for congenital AT, PC and PS deficiency. The requirement for a safe diagnostic strategy of CVT and DVT should be based on an objective post-test incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) of less than 0.1% with a negative predictive value for exclusion of DVT of 99.9% during 3 months follow-up. Modification of the Wells score by elimination of the "minus 2 points" for AD is mandatory and will improve the diagnostic accuracy of CVT/DVT suspicion in the primary care setting and outpatient ward. The sequential use of complete DUS, ELISA D-dimer testing and modified clinical Wells' score assessment is safe and effective for the exclusion and diagnosis of CVT, DVT and AD. About 10% to 20% of patients with DVT develop overt post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) at one year post-DVT, and both PTS and DVT recurrences further increase to about 30% during long-term follow-up. Objective risk stratification of PTS complications using DUS for recanalization and reflux and D-dimer testing will become an integral part in routine

  5. Enhancing the population impact of collaborative care interventions: Mixed method development and implementation of stepped care targeting posttraumatic stress disorder and related comorbidities after acute trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick; Jurkovich, Gregory; Russo, Joan; Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wang, Jin; Wagner, Amy; Stephens, Kari; Dunn, Chris; Uehara, Edwina; Petrie, Megan; Engel, Charles; Davydow, Dimitri; Katon, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a stepped collaborative care intervention targeting PTSD and related co-morbidities to enhance the population impact of early trauma-focused interventions. Method We describe the design and implementation of the Trauma Survivors Outcomes & Support Study (TSOS II). An interdisciplinary treatment development team was comprised of trauma surgical, clinical psychiatric and mental health services “change agents” who spanned the boundaries between front-line trauma center clinical care and acute care policy. Mixed method clinical epidemiologic and clinical ethnographic studies informed the development of PTSD screening and intervention procedures. Results Two-hundred and seven acutely injured trauma survivors with high early PTSD symptom levels were randomized into the study. The stepped collaborative care model integrated care management (i.e., posttraumatic concern elicitation and amelioration, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation) with cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy targeting PTSD. The model was feasibly implemented by front-line acute care MSW and ARNP providers. Conclusions Stepped care protocols targeting PTSD may enhance the population impact of early interventions developed for survivors of individual and mass trauma by extending the reach of collaborative care interventions to acute care medical settings and other non-specialty posttraumatic contexts. PMID:21596205

  6. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  7. Using clinical simulation to teach patient safety in an acute/critical care nursing course.

    PubMed

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Cunningham, Helene

    2005-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation using lifelike mannequins has been used to teach medical and aviation students, but little is known about using this method to educate nurses. The process and methods authors used to develop, implement, and evaluate high-fidelity simulation experiences in an acute/critical care elective for senior nursing students are described. Authors share their insight, experiences, and lessons learned, along with practical information and a framework, in developing simulations and debriefing. PMID:16030454

  8. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:19939251

  9. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    PubMed

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs. PMID:15714021

  10. Sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Roxanne; Humphries, Karin H.; Shimony, Avi; Bacon, Simon L.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Rabi, Doreen; Karp, Igor; Tsadok, Meytal Avgil; Pilote, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care may be implicated in disparities between men and women in death after acute coronary syndrome, especially among younger adults. We aimed to assess sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome and to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of access to care. Methods: We studied 1123 patients (18–55 yr) admitted to hospital for acute coronary syndrome and enrolled in the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study. Outcome measures were door-to-electrocardiography, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, as well as proportions of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, reperfusion or nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention. We performed univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of timely procedures and use of invasive procedures. Results: Women were less likely than men to receive care within benchmark times for electrocardiography (≤ 10 min: 29% v. 38%, p = 0.02) or fibrinolysis (≤ 30 min: 32% v. 57%, p = 0.01). Women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely than men to undergo reperfusion therapy (primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis) (83% v. 91%, p = 0.01), and women with non–ST-segment elevation MI or unstable angina were less likely to undergo nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (48% v. 66%, p < 0.001). Clinical determinants of poorer access to care included anxiety, increased number of risk factors and absence of chest pain. Gender-related determinants included feminine traits of personality and responsibility for housework. Interpretation: Among younger adults with acute coronary syndrome, women and men had different access to care. Moreover, fewer than half of men and women with ST-segment elevation MI received timely primary coronary intervention. Our results also highlight that men and women with no chest pain and those with anxiety

  11. The USA's nurse managers and UK's ward sisters: critical roles for empowerment.

    PubMed

    Cameron-Buccheri, R; Ogier, M E

    1994-07-01

    The nurse manager/ward sister role is becoming endangered as many of these nurses are being asked to take fiscal and personnel responsibility for multiple units/programmes and supervise more non-registered nursing staff. Loss of this important nurse manager/ward sister role could severely decrease nursing's voice in the development and implementation of policies that affect nurses and the care they deliver. The authors review 20 years of literature from both the USA and the UK regarding supportive supervision and the role of the nurse manager/ward sister. Nurse managers/ward sisters were found to be key individuals within the entire health-care organization. Nurse managers/ward sisters can empower the nurses they supervise to initiate changes that will improve patient care. Nurse managers/ward sisters can also improve the working conditions and thus increase the job satisfaction and retention of those they supervise. Strategies for being more supportive of these overworked and endangered nurse managers/ward sisters are suggested. PMID:8055167

  12. [Relationship between child day-care attendance and acute infectious disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Barajas Sánchez, M Verisima; Muñoz Martín, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Child day-care attendance is considered to be an acute early childhood disease risk factor, the studies available however not affording the possibility of fully quantifying this risk. A systematic review of clinical trials and cohort studies was conducted, in which the effects child day-care attendance had on the health of young children based on the Cochrane Collaboration, PubMed and Spanish Medical Index databases, without any time or language-related limits, were analyzed and rounded out with analyses of referenced works and an additional EMBASE search. The methodological quality was evaluated by means of personalized criteria. Pooling measures (relative risks, incidence density ratios and weighted mean differences) were calculated with their confidence intervals, assuming random effects models. A significant increase was found to exist of a risk consistent over time and among different social and geographical environments. Considering the most methodologically-stringent studies with adjusted effect estimates, child day-care attendance was related to an increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection (RR=1,88), acute otitis media (RR=1,58), otitis media with fluid draining (RR=2,43), lower respiratory tract infections (overall RR=210; acute pneumonia RR=1.70; broncholitis RR=1,80; bronchitis RR=2,10) and gastroenteritis (RR=1,40). Child day-care attendance could be responsible for 33%-50% of the episodes of respiratory infection and gastroenteritis among the exposed population. In conclusion, it can be said that the risk for childhood health attributable to the child day-care attendance is discreet but of high-impact. This information has some major implications for research, clinical practice, healthcare authorities and society as a whole. PMID:17639680

  13. An Instrument to Prepare for Acute Care of the Individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Migyanka, Joann M; Cramer, Ryan; McGonigle, John J

    2016-07-01

    We present an instrument to allow individuals with autism spectrum disorder, their families and/or their caregivers to prepare emergency department staff for the care needs of this patient population ahead of acute presentation. PMID:27040555

  14. An Instrument to Prepare for Acute Care of the Individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Emergency Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkat, Arvind; Migyanka, Joann M.; Cramer, Ryan; McGonigle, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an instrument to allow individuals with autism spectrum disorder, their families and/or their caregivers to prepare emergency department staff for the care needs of this patient population ahead of acute presentation.

  15. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  16. Communicating with culturally and linguistically diverse patients in an acute care setting: nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, R N Jane

    2003-03-01

    Communication with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) patients has been shown to be difficult. This study describes nurses' experiences of communicating with CLD patients in an acute care setting. A purposive sample of registered nurses and certified midwives (n=23) were interviewed. Main findings were: interpreters, bilingual health workers and combinations of different strategies were used to communicate with CLD patients; some nurses showed empathy, respect and a willingness to make an effort in the communication process with others showing an ethnocentric orientation. Main recommendations were: prioritising access to appropriate linguistic services, providing nurses with support from health care workers, e.g., bilingual health care workers who are able to provide more in-depth information, increasing nurses' understanding of legal issues within patient encounters, supporting nurses to translate their awareness of cultural diversity into acceptance of, appreciation for and commitment to CLD patients and their families. PMID:12605952

  17. Nursing practice environment, quality of care, and morale of hospital nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Eriko; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Japanese hospital nurses' perceptions of the nursing practice environment and examine its association with nurse-reported ability to provide quality nursing care, quality of patient care, and ward morale. A cross-sectional survey design was used including 223 nurses working in 12 acute inpatient wards in a large Japanese teaching hospital. Nurses rated their work environment favorably overall using the Japanese version of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Subscale scores indicated high perceptions of physician relations and quality of nursing management, but lower scores for staffing and resources. Ward nurse managers generally rated the practice environment more positively than staff nurses except for staffing and resources. Regression analyses found the practice environment was a significant predictor of quality of patient care and ward morale, whereas perceived ability to provide quality nursing care was most strongly associated with years of clinical experience. These findings support interventions to improve the nursing practice environment, particularly staffing and resource adequacy, to enhance quality of care and ward morale in Japan. PMID:23855754

  18. Rationale, Design, Methodology and Hospital Characteristics of the First Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry (Gulf CARE)

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Kadhim J.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Al-Habib, Khalid; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Husam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of data on heart failure (HF) in the Gulf Middle East. The present paper describes the rationale, design, methodology and hospital characteristics of the first Gulf acute heart failure registry (Gulf CARE). Materials and Methods: Gulf CARE is a prospective, multicenter, multinational registry of patients >18 year of age admitted with diagnosis of acute HF (AHF). The data collected included demographics, clinical characteristics, etiology, precipitating factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with AHF. In addition, data about hospital readmission rates, procedures and mortality at 3 months and 1-year follow-up were recorded. Hospital characteristics and care provider details were collected. Data were entered in a dedicated website using an electronic case record form. Results: A total of 5005 consecutive patients were enrolled from February 14, 2012 to November 13, 2012. Forty-seven hospitals in 7 Gulf States (Oman, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Kuwait, United Gulf Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain) participated in the project. The majority of hospitals were community hospitals (46%; 22/47) followed by non-University teaching (32%; 15/47 and University hospitals (17%). Most of the hospitals had intensive or coronary care unit facilities (93%; 44/47) with 59% (28/47) having catheterization laboratory facilities. However, only 29% (14/47) had a dedicated HF clinic facility. Most patients (71%) were cared for by a cardiologist. Conclusions: Gulf CARE is the first prospective registry of AHF in the Middle East, intending to provide a unique insight into the demographics, etiology, management and outcomes of AHF in the Middle East. HF management in the Middle East is predominantly provided by cardiologists. The data obtained from this registry will help the local clinicians to identify the deficiencies in HF management as well as provide a platform to implement evidence based preventive and treatment strategies to reduce the burden of HF in

  19. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nate, Kent C.; Griffin, Kristen H.; Christianson, Jon B.; Dusek, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM) at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW), a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches. PMID:26693242

  20. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26271029

  1. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  2. Reduction of Behavioral Psychological Symptoms of Dementia by Multimodal Comprehensive Care for Vulnerable Geriatric Patients in an Acute Care Hospital: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Miwako; Ito, Mio; Ishikawa, Shogo; Takebayashi, Yoichi; Tierney, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) is a key challenge in geriatric dementia care. A multimodal comprehensive care methodology, Humanitude, with eye contact, verbal communication, and touch as its elements, was provided to three geriatric dementia patients for whom conventional nursing care failed in an acute care hospital. Each episode was evaluated by video analysis. All patients had advanced dementia with BPSD. Failure of care was identified by patient's shouting, screaming, or abrupt movements of limbs. In this case series, conventional care failed for all three patients. Each element of care communication was much shorter than in Humanitude care, which was accepted by the patients. The average of the elements performed during the care was eye contact 0.6%, verbal communication 15.7%, and touch 0.1% in conventional care and 12.5%, 54.8%, and 44.5% in Humanitude care, respectively. The duration of aggressive behavior of each patient during care was 25.0%, 25.4%, and 66.3% in conventional care and 0%, 0%, and 0.3% in Humanitude, respectively. In our case series, conventional care was provided by less eye contact, verbal communication, and touch. The multimodal comprehensive care approach, Humanitude, decreased BPSD and showed success by patients' acceptance of care. PMID:27069478

  3. Functional Status Predicts Acute Care Readmissions from Inpatient Rehabilitation in the Stroke Population

    PubMed Central

    Slocum, Chloe; Gerrard, Paul; Black-Schaffer, Randie; Goldstein, Richard; Singhal, Aneesh; DiVita, Margaret A.; Ryan, Colleen M.; Mix, Jacqueline; Purohit, Maulik; Niewczyk, Paulette; Kazis, Lewis; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute care readmission risk is an increasingly recognized problem that has garnered significant attention, yet the reasons for acute care readmission in the inpatient rehabilitation population are complex and likely multifactorial. Information on both medical comorbidities and functional status is routinely collected for stroke patients participating in inpatient rehabilitation. We sought to determine whether functional status is a more robust predictor of acute care readmissions in the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population compared with medical comorbidities using a large, administrative data set. Methods A retrospective analysis of data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation from the years 2002 to 2011 was performed examining stroke patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A Basic Model for predicting acute care readmission risk based on age and functional status was compared with models incorporating functional status and medical comorbidities (Basic-Plus) or models including age and medical comorbidities alone (Age-Comorbidity). C-statistics were compared to evaluate model performance. Findings There were a total of 803,124 patients: 88,187 (11%) patients were transferred back to an acute hospital: 22,247 (2.8%) within 3 days, 43,481 (5.4%) within 7 days, and 85,431 (10.6%) within 30 days. The C-statistics for the Basic Model were 0.701, 0.672, and 0.682 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. As compared to the Basic Model, the best-performing Basic-Plus model was the Basic+Elixhauser model with C-statistics differences of +0.011, +0.011, and + 0.012, and the best-performing Age-Comorbidity model was the Age+Elixhauser model with C-statistic differences of -0.124, -0.098, and -0.098 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. Conclusions Readmission models for the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population based on functional status and age showed better predictive ability than models based on medical comorbidities. PMID

  4. Switching between thienopyridines in patients with acute myocardial infarction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Francois; Puymirat, Etienne; Bonello, Laurent; Meneveau, Nicolas; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Motreff, Pascal; Ravan, Ramin; Leclercq, Florence; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute coronary syndromes, switching between thienopyridines is frequent. The aims of the study were to assess the association between switching practices and quality of care. Methods Registry study performed in 213 French public university, public non-academic and private hospitals. All consecutive patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (MI; <48 hours) between 1/10/2010 and 30/11/2010 were eligible. Clinical and biological data were recorded up to 12 months follow-up. Results Among 4101 patients receiving thienopyridines, a switch was performed in 868 (21.2%): 678 (16.5%) from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 190 (4.6%) from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Predictors of switch were ST segment elevation MI presentation, admission to a cardiology unit, previous percutaneous coronary intervention, younger age, body weight >60 kg, no history of stroke, cardiac arrest, anaemia or renal dysfunction. In patients with a switch, eligibility for prasugrel was >82% and appropriate use of a switch was 86% from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 20% from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Quality indicators scored higher in the group with a switch and also in centres where the switch rate was higher. Conclusions As applied in the French Registry on Acute ST-elevation and non ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (FAST-MI) registry, switching from one P2Y12 inhibitor to another led to a more appropriate prescription and was associated with higher scores on indicators of quality of care. PMID:27252877

  5. Counting the costs of accreditation in acute care: an activity-based costing approach

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Virginia; Greenfield, David; Hogden, Anne; Forde, Kevin; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the costs of hospital accreditation in Australia. Design Mixed methods design incorporating: stakeholder analysis; survey design and implementation; activity-based costs analysis; and expert panel review. Setting Acute care hospitals accredited by the Australian Council for Health Care Standards. Participants Six acute public hospitals across four States. Results Accreditation costs varied from 0.03% to 0.60% of total hospital operating costs per year, averaged across the 4-year accreditation cycle. Relatively higher costs were associated with the surveys years and with smaller facilities. At a national level these costs translate to $A36.83 million, equivalent to 0.1% of acute public hospital recurrent expenditure in the 2012 fiscal year. Conclusions This is the first time accreditation costs have been independently evaluated across a wide range of hospitals and highlights the additional cost burden for smaller facilities. A better understanding of the costs allows policymakers to assess alternative accreditation and other quality improvement strategies, and understand their impact across a range of facilities. This methodology can be adapted to assess international accreditation programmes. PMID:26351190

  6. Noninvasive ventilation practice patterns for acute respiratory failure in Canadian tertiary care centres: A descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Digby, Geneviève C; Keenan, Sean P; Parker, Christopher M; Sinuff, Tasnim; Burns, Karen E; Mehta, Sangeeta; Ronco, Juan J; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Rose, Louise; Ayas, Najib T; Berthiaume, Luc R; D’Arsigny, Christine L; Stollery, Daniel E; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use for patients with acute respiratory failure in Canadian hospitals, indications for use and associated outcomes are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe NIV practice variation in the acute setting. METHODS: A prospective observational study involving 11 Canadian tertiary care centres was performed. Data regarding NIV indication, mode and outcomes were collected for all adults (>16 years of age) treated with NIV for acute respiratory failure during a four-week period (between February and August 2011). Logistic regression with site as a random effect was used to examine the association between preselected predictors and mortality or intubation. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients (mean [± SD] 30±12 per centre) were included. The most common indications for NIV initiation were pulmonary edema (104 [31.5%]) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (99 [30.0%]). Significant differences in indications for NIV use across sites, specialty of ordering physician and location of NIV initiation were noted. Although intubation rates were not statistically different among sites (range 10.3% to 45.4%), mortality varied significantly (range 6.7% to 54.5%; P=0.006). In multivariate analysis, the most significant independent predictor of avoiding intubation was do-not-resuscitate status (OR 0.11 [95% CI 0.03 to 0.37]). CONCLUSION: Significant variability existed in NIV use and associated outcomes among Canadian tertiary care centres. Assignment of do-not-resuscitate status prevented intubation. PMID:26469155

  7. iPad use during ward rounds: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Lehnbom, Elin C; Adams, Kristian; Day, Richard O; Westbrook, Johanna I; Baysari, Melissa T

    2014-01-01

    Much clinical information is computerised and doctors' use of mobile devices such as iPad tablets to access this information is expanding rapidly. This study investigated the use of iPads during ward rounds and their usefulness in providing access to information during ward rounds. Ten teams of doctors at a large teaching hospital were given iPads for ten weeks and were observed on ward rounds for 77.3 hours as they interacted with 525 patients. Use of iPads and other information technology devices to access clinical information was recorded. The majority of clinical information was accessed using iPads (56.2%), followed by computers-on-wheels (35.8%), stationary PCs (7.9%) and smartphones (0.1%). Despite having read-only access on iPads, doctors were generally happy using iPads on ward rounds. These findings provide evidence of the value of iPads as a tool to access information at the point of care. PMID:25087529

  8. Comparison of the university hospital and county hospitals in western Sweden to identify potential weak links in the early chain of care for acute stroke: results of an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta; Herlitz, Johan; Hansson, Per Olof; Brink, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify weak links in the early chain of care for acute stroke. Setting 9 emergency hospitals in western Sweden, each with a stroke unit, and the emergency medical services (EMS). Participants All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke−between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011. The university hospital in the city of Gothenburg was compared with 6 county hospitals. Primary and secondary measures (1) The system delay, that is, median delay time from call to the EMS until diagnosis was designated as the primary end point. Secondary end points were: (2) the system delay time from call to the EMS until arrival in a hospital ward, (3) the use of the EMS, (4) priority at the dispatch centre and (5) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse. Results In all, 1376 acute patients with stroke (median age 79 years; 49% women) were included. The median system delay from call to the EMS until (1) diagnosis (CT scan) and (2) arrival in a hospital ward was 3 h and 52 min and 4 h and 22 min, respectively. The system delay (1) was significantly shorter in county hospitals. (3) The study showed that 76% used the EMS (Gothenburg 71%; the county 79%; p<0.0001). (4) Priority 1 was given at the dispatch centre in 54% of cases. (5) Stroke was suspected in 65% of cases. A prenotification was sent in 32% (Gothenburg 52%; the county 20%; p<0.0001). Conclusions System delay is still long and only a small fraction of patients received thrombolysis. Three of four used the EMS (more frequent in the county). They were given the highest priority at the dispatch centre in half of the cases. Stroke was suspected in two-thirds of the cases, but a prenotification was seldom sent to the hospital. PMID:26351184

  9. Delayed Recognition of Deterioration of Patients in General Wards Is Mostly Caused by Human Related Monitoring Failures: A Root Cause Analysis of Unplanned ICU Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Babiche E. J. M.; Merten, Hanneke; Ludikhuize, Jeroen; van der Spoel, Johannes I.; Kramer, Mark H. H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background An unplanned ICU admission of an inpatient is a serious adverse event (SAE). So far, no in depth-study has been performed to systematically analyse the root causes of unplanned ICU-admissions. The primary aim of this study was to identify the healthcare worker-, organisational-, technical,- disease- and patient- related causes that contribute to acute unplanned ICU admissions from general wards using a Root-Cause Analysis Tool called PRISMA-medical. Although a Track and Trigger System (MEWS) was introduced in our hospital a few years ago, it was implemented without a clear protocol. Therefore, the secondary aim was to assess the adherence to a Track and Trigger system to identify deterioration on general hospital wards in patients eventually transferred to the ICU. Methods Retrospective observational study in 49 consecutive adult patients acutely admitted to the Intensive Care Unit from a general nursing ward. 1. PRISMA-analysis on root causes of unplanned ICU admissions 2. Assessment of protocol adherence to the early warning score system. Results Out of 49 cases, 156 root causes were identified. The most frequent root causes were healthcare worker related (46%), which were mainly failures in monitoring the patient. They were followed by disease-related (45%), patient-related causes (7, 5%), and organisational root causes (3%). In only 40% of the patients vital parameters were monitored as was instructed by the doctor. 477 vital parameter sets were found in the 48 hours before ICU admission, in only 1% a correct MEWS was explicitly documented in the record. Conclusions This in-depth analysis demonstrates that almost half of the unplanned ICU admissions from the general ward had healthcare worker related root causes, mostly due to monitoring failures in clinically deteriorating patients. In order to reduce unplanned ICU admissions, improving the monitoring of patients is therefore warranted. PMID:27537689

  10. Improving Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Acute Care: Evidence and Lessons Learned From Across the Care Spectrum.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Eleanor S; Karel, Michele J

    2016-01-01

    As the prevalence of Alzheimer disease and related dementias increases, dementia-related behavioral symptoms present growing threats to care quality and safety of older adults across care settings. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) such as agitation, aggression, and resistance to care occur in nearly all individuals over the course of their illness. In inpatient care settings, if not appropriately treated, BPSD can result in care complications, increased length of stay, dissatisfaction with care, and caregiver stress and injury. Although evidence-based, nonpharmacological approaches to treating BPSD exist, their implementation into acute care has been thwarted by limited nursing staff expertise in behavioral health, and a lack of consistent approaches to integrate behavioral health expertise into medically focused inpatient care settings. This article describes the core components of one evidence-based approach to integrating behavioral health expertise into dementia care. This approach, called STAR-VA, was implemented in Veterans' Health Administration community living centers (nursing homes). It has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing the severity and frequency of BPSD, while improving staff knowledge and skills in caring for people with dementia. The potential for adapting this approach in acute care settings is discussed, along with key lessons learned regarding opportunities for nursing leadership to ensure consistent implementation and sustainability. PMID:27259128

  11. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  12. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  13. Management of Levofloxacin Induced Anaphylaxis and Acute Delirium in a Palliative Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Levofloxacin is a commonly prescribed antibiotic for managing chest and urinary tract infections in a palliative care setting. Incidence of Levofloxacin-associated anaphylaxis is rare and delirium secondary to Levofloxacin is a seldom occurrence with only few published case reports. It is an extremely rare occurrence to see this phenomenon in combination. Early identification and prompt intervention reduces both mortality and morbidity. A 17-year-old male with synovial sarcoma of right thigh with chest wall and lung metastasis and with no prior psychiatric morbidity presented to palliative medicine outpatient department with community-acquired pneumonia. He was initiated on intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Levofloxacin. Post IV Levofloxacin patient developed anaphylaxis and acute delirium necessitating IV Hydrocortisone, IV Chlorpheneramine, Oxygen and IV Haloperidol. Early detection and prompt intervention helped in complete recovery. Patient was discharged to hospice for respite after 2 days of hospitalization and then discharged home. Acute palliative care approach facilitated management of two life-threatening medical complications in a palliative care setting improving both quality and length of life. PMID:25709191

  14. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  15. Infectious Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illness among Patients Seeking Health Care in South-Central Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Matthew R.; Blair, Patrick J.; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L.; Burgess, Timothy H.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Putnam, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations. PMID:22302857

  16. A multi-organisation aged care emergency service for acute care management of older residents in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jane; Dilworth, Sophie; Hullick, Carolyn; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Turner, Catherine; Higgins, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    This case study describes a multi-organisation aged care emergency (ACE) service. The service was designed to enable point-of-care assessment and management for older people in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Design of the ACE service involved consultation and engagement of multiple key stakeholders. The ACE service was implemented in a large geographical region of a single Medicare Local (ML) in New South Wales, Australia. The service was developed over several phases. A case control pilot evaluation of one emergency department (ED) and four RACFs revealed a 16% reduction in presentations to the ED as well as reductions in admission to the hospital following ED presentation. Following initial pilot work, the ACE service transitioned across another five EDs and 85 RACFs in the local health district. The service has now been implemented in a further 10 sites (six metropolitan and four rural EDs) across New South Wales. Ongoing evaluation of the implementation continues to show positive outcomes. The ACE service offers a model shown to reduce ED presentations and admissions from RACFs, and provide quality care with a focus on the needs of the older person. PMID:25981903

  17. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fang-I; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010-2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006-08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  18. Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care in Taiwan: The Breakthrough Collaborative in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Chang-Ming; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Liao, Hsun-Hsiang; Chang, Hang; LaBresh, Kenneth A.; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Lien, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the management of acute ischemic stroke, guideline adherence is often suboptimal, particularly for intravenous thrombolysis or anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. We sought to improve stroke care quality via a collaborative model, the Breakthrough Series (BTS)-Stroke activity, in a nationwide, multi-center activity in Taiwan. A BTS Collaborative, a short-term learning system for a large number of multidisciplinary teams from hospitals, was applied to enhance acute ischemic stroke care quality. Twenty-four hospitals participated in and submitted data for this stroke quality improvement campaign in 2010–2011. Totally, 14 stroke quality measures, adopted from the Get With The Guideline (GWTG)-Stroke program, were used to evaluate the performance and outcome of the ischemic stroke patients. Data for a one-year period from 24 hospitals with 13,181 acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. In 14 hospitals, most stroke quality measures improved significantly during the BTS-activity compared with a pre-BTS-Stroke activity period (2006–08). The rate of intravenous thrombolysis increased from 1.2% to 4.6%, door-to-needle time ≤60 minutes improved from 7.1% to 50.8%, symptomatic hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis decreased from 11.0% to 5.6%, and anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation increased from 32.1% to 64.1%. The yearly composite measures of five stroke quality measures revealed significant improvements from 2006 to 2011 (75% to 86.3%, p<0.001). The quarterly composite measures also improved significantly during the BTS-Stroke activity. In conclusion, a BTS collaborative model is associated with improved guideline adherence for patients with acute ischemic stroke. GWTG-Stroke recommendations can be successfully applied in countries besides the United States. PMID:27487190

  19. Improving the acute care of COPD patients across Gloucestershire: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig; Cushley, Claire; Redler, Kasey; Mitchell, Claire; Aynsley Day, Elizabeth; Mansfield, Helen; Nye, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Admissions for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present a significant proportion of patients in the acute medical take. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) provides guidelines for time specific interventions, that should be delivered to those with an acute exacerbation of COPD through the admission care bundle. These include correct diagnosis, correct assessment of oxygenation, early administration of treatment, recognition of respiratory failure, and specialist review. Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (GHNHSFT) chose improvement in acute COPD care to be a local Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme, which enables commissioners to reward excellence by linking a proportion of English healthcare providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals. The effects of initiatives put in place by senior clinicians had waned, and further improvements were required to meet the CQUIN target. The aim of the scheme was to improve compliance with the BTS guidelines and CQUIN scheme for patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Specific bundle paperwork to be used for all patients admitted to the Trust with an exacerbation of COPD was introduced to the Trust in June 2014, with training and education of medical staff at that time. This had improved compliance rates from 10% to 63% by September 2014. Compliance with each intervention was audited through the examination of notes of patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Compliance rates had plateaued over the last three months, and so a focus group involving junior medical staff met in September 2014 to try to increase awareness further, in order to drive greater improvements in care, and meet the CQUIN requirements. Their strategies were implemented, and then compliance with the CQUIN requirements was reaudited as described above. The December 2014 audit results showed a further improvement in overall COPD care, with 73% of patients

  20. Lean and Six Sigma in acute care: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Deblois, Simon; Lepanto, Luigi

    2016-03-14

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic review of literature reviews, summarizing how Lean and Six Sigma management techniques have been implemented in acute care settings to date, and assessing their impact. To aid decision makers who wish to use these techniques by identifying the sectors of activity most often targeted, the main results of the interventions, as well as barriers and facilitators involved. To identify areas of future research. Design/methodology/approach - A literature search was conducted, using eight databases. The methodological quality of the selected reviews was appraised with AMSTAR. A narrative synthesis was performed according to the guidelines proposed by Popay et al. (2006). Data were reported according to PRISMA. Findings - The literature search identified 149 publications published from 1999 to January 2015. Seven literature reviews were included into the systematic review, upon appraisal. The overall quality of the evidence was poor to fair. The clinical settings most described were specialized health care services, including operating suites, intensive care units and emergency departments. The outcomes most often appraised related to processes and quality. The evidence suggests that Lean and Six Sigma are better adapted to settings where processes involve a linear sequence of events. Research limitations/implications - There is a need for more studies of high methodological quality to better understand the effects of these approaches as well as the factors of success and barriers to their implementation. Field studies comparing the effects of Lean and Six Sigma to those of other process redesign or quality improvement efforts would bring a significant contribution to the body of knowledge. Practical implications - Lean and Six Sigma can be considered valuable process optimization approaches in acute health care settings. The success of their implementation requires significant participation of clinical

  1. Temporal Changes in the Quality of Acute Stroke Care in Five National Audits across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hillmann, Steffi; Wiedmann, Silke; Fraser, Alec; Baeza, Juan; Rudd, Anthony; Norrving, Bo; Asplund, Kjell; Niewada, Maciej; Dennis, Martin; Hermanek, Peter; Wolfe, Charles D. A.; Heuschmann, Peter U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Data on potential variations in delivery of appropriate stroke care over time are scarce. We investigated temporal changes in the quality of acute hospital stroke care across five national audits in Europe over a period of six years. Methods. Data were derived from national stroke audits in Germany, Poland, Scotland, Sweden, and England/Wales/Northern Ireland participating within the European Implementation Score (EIS) collaboration. Temporal changes in predefined quality indicators with comparable information between the audits were investigated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate adherence to quality indicators over time. Results. Between 2004 and 2009, individual data from 542,112 patients treated in 538 centers participating continuously over the study period were included. In most audits, the proportions of patients who were treated on a SU, were screened for dysphagia, and received thrombolytic treatment increased over time and ranged from 2-fold to almost 4-fold increase in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy in 2009 compared to 2004. Conclusions. A general trend towards a better quality of stroke care defined by standardized quality indicators was observed over time. The association between introducing a specific measure and higher adherence over time might indicate that monitoring of stroke care performance contributes to improving quality of care. PMID:26783519

  2. Everybody matters 2: promoting dignity in acute care through effective communication.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Flatley, Mary; Wilkinson, Charlotte; Meyer, Julienne; Dale, Patricia; Wessel, Lucinda

    The Dignity in Care Project (DCP) aims to deepen understanding and develop practical interventions to promote dignified care in hospitals. A key feature is that "everybody matters" (a project slogan) and that promoting and sustaining dignity in acute care requires recognition and support for staff as well as for patients and their families. DCP is a nurse led research collaboration with Royal Free Hampstead Trust, Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals Trust and City University. Practical interventions devised by the project are presented around three keythemes. Part 1 of this series explored the first theme, "maintaining identity: see who I am", and this second part examines the second theme, "creating community: connect with me". This recognises that in the act of caring, nurses receive as well as give. Dignified care has a reciprocity where both carer and patient/family give and receive, rather than simply involving a list of practical tasks done t o someone. The third and final part looks at "shared decision making involve me" (Bridges et al, 2009). PMID:20590038

  3. Interest and applicability of acute care surgery among surgeons in Quebec: a provincial survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Émilie; Trottier, Vincent; Thauvette, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute care surgery (ACS) comprises trauma and emergency surgery. The purpose of this new specialty is to involve trauma and nontrauma surgeons in the care of acutely ill patients with a surgical pathology. In Quebec, few acute care surgery services (ACSS) exist, and the concept is still poorly understood by most general surgeons. This survey was meant to determine the opinions and interest of Quebec general surgeons in this new model. Methods We created a bilingual electronic survey using a Web interface and sent it by email to all surgeons registered with the Association québécoise de chirurgie. A reminder was sent 2 weeks later to boost response rates. Results The response rate was 36.9%. Most respondents had academic practices, and 16% worked in level 1 trauma centres. Most respondents had a high operative case load, and 66% performed at least 10 urgent general surgical cases per month. Although most (88%) thought that ACS was an interesting field, only 45% were interested in participating in an ACSS. Respondents who deemed this concept least applicable to their practices were more likely to be working in nonacademic centres. Conclusion Despite a strong interest in emergency general surgery, few surgeons were interested in participating in an ACSS. This finding may be explained by lack of comprehension of this new model and by comfort with traditional practice. We aim to change this paradigm by demonstrating the feasibility and benefits of the new ACSS at our centre in a follow-up study. PMID:23883506

  4. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  5. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  6. Non-Invasive Continuous Respiratory Monitoring on General Hospital Wards: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Kim; van Zaane, Bas; Bosch, Els J.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Peelen, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure to recognize acute deterioration in hospitalized patients may contribute to cardiopulmonary arrest, unscheduled intensive care unit admission and increased mortality. Purpose In this systematic review we aimed to determine whether continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring improves early diagnosis of patient deterioration and reduces critical incidents on hospital wards. Data Sources Studies were retrieved from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane library, searched from 1970 till October 25, 2014. Study Selection Electronic databases were searched using keywords and corresponding synonyms ‘ward’, ‘continuous’, ‘monitoring’ and ‘respiration’. Pediatric, fetal and animal studies were excluded. Data Extraction Since no validated tool is currently available for diagnostic or intervention studies with continuous monitoring, methodological quality was assessed with a modified tool based on modified STARD, CONSORT, and TREND statements. Data Synthesis Six intervention and five diagnostic studies were included, evaluating the use of eight different devices for continuous respiratory monitoring. Quantitative data synthesis was not possible because intervention, study design and outcomes differed considerably between studies. Outcomes estimates for the intervention studies ranged from RR 0.14 (0.03, 0.64) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation to RR 1.00 (0.41, 2.35) for unplanned ICU admission after introduction of continuous respiratory monitoring, Limitations The methodological quality of most studies was moderate, e.g. ‘before-after’ designs, incomplete reporting of primary outcomes, and incomplete clinical implementation of the monitoring system. Conclusions Based on the findings of this systematic review, implementation of routine continuous non-invasive respiratory monitoring on general hospital wards cannot yet be advocated as results are inconclusive, and methodological quality of the studies needs improvement. Future

  7. Impact of individualized care on readmissions after a hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Simon L; Burns, Jane; Camp, Pat G; Sin, Don D; van Eeden, Stephan F

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) increase COPD morbidity and mortality and impose a great burden on health care systems. Early readmission following a hospitalization for AECOPD remains an important clinical problem. We examined how individualized comprehensive care influences readmissions following an index hospital admission for AECOPD. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data of patients admitted for AECOPD to two inner-city teaching hospitals to determine the impact of a comprehensive and individualized care management strategy on readmissions for AECOPD. The control group consisted of 271 patients whose index AECOPD occurred the year before the comprehensive program, and the experimental group consisted of 191 patients who received the comprehensive care. The primary outcome measure was the total number of readmissions in 30- and 90-day postindex hospitalizations. Secondary outcome measures included the length of time between the index admission and first readmission and all-cause mortality. Results The two groups were similar in terms of age, sex, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, body mass index (BMI), pack-years, and the number and types of comorbidities. Comprehensive care significantly reduced 90-day readmission rates in females (P=0.0205, corrected for age, BMI, number of comorbidities, substance abuse, and mental illness) but not in males or in the whole group (P>0.05). The average times between index admission and first readmission were not different between the two groups. Post hoc multivariate analysis showed that substance abuse (P<0.01) increased 30- and 90-day readmissions (corrected for age, sex, BMI, number of comorbidities, and mental illness). The 90-day all-cause in-hospital mortality rates were significantly less in the care package group (2.67% versus 7.97%, P=0.0268). Conclusion Comprehensive individualized care for subjects admitted to hospital for AECOPD did not reduce 30- and 90-day

  8. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Simulation in Improving Nurses’ Workplace Practice With Deteriorating Ward Patients: A Pre- and Postintervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Fun; Lim, Eunice Ya Ping; Ang, Sophia Bee Leng; Mujumdar, Sandhya; Ho, Jasmine Tze Yin; Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Ang, Emily Neo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurses play an important role in detecting patients with clinical deterioration. However, the problem of nurses failing to trigger deteriorating ward patients still persists despite the implementation of a patient safety initiative, the Rapid Response System. A Web-based simulation was developed to enhance nurses’ role in recognizing and responding to deteriorating patients. While studies have evaluated the effectiveness of the Web-based simulation on nurses’ clinical performance in a simulated environment, no study has examined its impact on nurses’ actual practice in the clinical setting. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of Web-based simulation on nurses' recognition of and response to deteriorating patients in clinical settings. The outcomes were measured across all levels of Kirkpatrick’s 4-level evaluation model with clinical outcome on triggering rates of deteriorating patients as the primary outcome measure. Methods A before-and-after study was conducted on two general wards at an acute care tertiary hospital over a 14-month period. All nurses from the two study wards who undertook the Web-based simulation as part of their continuing nursing education were invited to complete questionnaires at various time points to measure their motivational reaction, knowledge, and perceived transfer of learning. Clinical records on cases triggered by ward nurses from the two study wards were evaluated for frequency and types of triggers over a period of 6 months pre- and 6 months postintervention. Results The number of deteriorating patients triggered by ward nurses in a medical general ward increased significantly (P<.001) from pre- (84/937, 8.96%) to postintervention (91/624, 14.58%). The nurses reported positively on the transfer of learning (mean 3.89, SD 0.49) from the Web-based simulation to clinical practice. A significant increase (P<.001) on knowledge posttest score from pretest score was also reported. The

  9. Nurse-sensitive health care outcomes in acute care settings: an integrative analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pierce, S F

    1997-04-01

    With the advent of profit maximization in health care came an increased focus on defining quality through outcomes achieved. The article describes an analysis of the nursing literature from 1974 to 1996 using Donabedian's structure-process-outcome framework and the specific indicators identified by the American Nurses Association report card, the Institute of Medicine, and the nursing-sensitive outcomes classification. Although evidence exists documenting nursing's positive impact on patient outcomes, this analysis suggests a real need to integrate our clinical and administrative studies and to employ a more comprehensive, longitudinal, multifacility approach if we are to answer the scientific question regarding which nursing structures and processes truly produce the best health outcomes. PMID:9097521

  10. Adjusting Bowel Regimens When Prescribing Opioids in Women Receiving Palliative Care in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Lucia K; Delmastro, Margaret A; Boyd, Denise M; Sterling, Melvyn L; Aube, Patricia A; Le, Rosemary N; Traucht, Lisa; Quinal, Leonida R; Georges, Jane M; Glaser, Dale N

    2016-08-01

    In palliative medicine, constipation is the third most common symptom after pain and anorexia, causing some patients to discontinue opioid therapy. Women experience higher incidence of constipation than men. The prevalence of infrequent bowel movements (<3 times/wk) and adherence to an established bowel regimen among women receiving opioids were studied. Referral to the palliative care team decreased the prevalence of infrequent bowel movements from 72% to 45%, and algorithm adherence increased from 38% to 78%. Education of oncology nurses decreased the prevalence of infrequent bowel movements among patients with cancer from 71% to 60%, and algorithm adherence increased from 0% to 10%. Patients benefit from stool softeners and stimulants when receiving opioids. PMID:25964648

  11. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  12. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Post-Acute Long-Term Care Setting: Case Discussion and Updates.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Nicole J; Heil, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Improving the use of antimicrobial medications in the post-acute long-term care setting is critical for combating resistance and reducing adverse events in older adults. Antimicrobial stewardship refers to a set of commitments and actions designed to optimize the treatment of infectious diseases while minimizing the adverse effects associated with antimicrobial medication use. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend all nursing homes take steps to improve antimicrobial prescribing practices and reduce inappropriate use. The current article highlights initiatives and clinical considerations through a case discussion. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42 (7), 10-14.]. PMID:27337183

  13. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods

    PubMed Central

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. Method: User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Results: Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Conclusions: Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users. PMID:26886239

  14. The lived experience of new graduate nurses working in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    McCalla-Graham, James A; De Gagne, Jennie C

    2015-03-01

    The high attrition rate of graduate nurses will exacerbate the current nursing shortage as Baby Boomer nurses (born between 1946 and 1964) retire, negatively affecting the quality of patient care and increasing employer costs. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of new graduate nurses employed in an acute care setting in southwest Florida. This information provides further guidance to nurse educators as they develop curricula, support graduate nurses to transition into professional practice, and create strategies to increase retention. Ten participants who were traditional students in generic baccalaureate nursing programs, selected through purposeful and snowball sampling, were interviewed via open-ended questions. Using Colaizzi's classic phenomenological method of data analysis and NVivo 10 software, three over-arching themes emerged-knowledge, skills, and environment-which were interpreted in relation to graduates' lived experience. Recommendations include implementation of innovative initiatives that address new graduates' experience and increase retention. PMID:25723333

  15. Factors Related to Successful Transition to Practice for Acute Care Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Deborah L; Dolansky, Mary A; Casey, Kathy; Kelley, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The transition from student to acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) has been recognized as a time of stress. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational-comparative design pilot study was to examine: (1) the relationships among personal resources, community resources, successful transition, and job retention; (2) the difference between ACNPs with 0 to 4 years and ACNPs with more than 4 years of prior experience as a registered nurse in an intensive care unit or emergency department; and (3) the skills/procedures that ACNPs found difficult to perform independently. Thirty-four participants were recruited from a social media site for nurse practitioners. Organizational support, communication, and leadership were the most important elements of successful transition into the ACNP role. This information can help ACNP faculty and hospital orientation/fellowship program educators to help ACNPs transition into their first position after graduation. PMID:27153306

  16. Effective change management in a regional Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services setting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce W

    2012-02-01

    Government policies and community expectations in Australia continually lead to calls for healthcare change. These changes are often met with resistance from clinicians and managers. Making change happen requires consideration of the way policies, culture, context, shared vision and leadership can drive or impede change. This reflective case study critically investigates one change process; the evolution of a Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services (SACS) program in an Australian regional hospital over a 3-year period. The new Community Rehabilitation Services (CRS) program evolved from a merger of Centre and Home Based Rehabilitation (CBR and HBR). Hospital amalgamations, closures and privatisation, and the Department of Health policy relating to SACS, ambulatory care and rehabilitation were some of the key elements explored in this paper. PMID:22513018

  17. Leadership-organizational culture relationship in nursing units of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The phenomena of leadership and organizational culture (OC) has been defined as the driving forces in the success or failure of an organization. Today, nurse managers must demonstrate leadership behaviors or styles that are appropriate for the constantly changing, complex, and turbulent health care delivery system. In this study, researchers explored the relationship between nurse managers' leadership styles and OC of nursing units within an acute care hospital that had achieved excellent organizational performance as demonstrated by a consistent increase in patient satisfaction ratings. The data from this study support that transformational and transactional contingent reward leaderships as nurse manager leadership styles that are associated with nursing unit OC that have the ability to balance the dynamics of flexibility and stability within their nursing units and are essential for maintaining organizational effectiveness. It is essential for first-line nursing leaders to acquire knowledge and skills on organizational cultural competence. PMID:18389837

  18. Heart Failure in Post-Acute and Long-Term Care: Evidence and Strategies to Improve Transitions, Clinical Care, and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Arif; Smucker, William D

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is highly prevalent among older patients in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). HF outcomes for SNF patients suffer because of many factors, including staff training, lack of physician availability, and failure to implement evidence-based care. AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine has recently updated the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Heart Failure Management in SNFs. This review supplements the Guidelines with a robust focus on best practices for transitional care, symptom management, treatment and monitoring, and palliative care in patients with HF. PMID:26089116

  19. Utilization of Morning Report by Acute Care Surgery Teams: Results from a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Patricia L.; Collins, Courtney; Santry, Heena P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rigor of hand-offs is increasingly scrutinized in the era of shift-based patient care. Acute Care Surgery (ACS) embraced such a model of care; however, little is known about hand-offs in ACS programs. Methods We conducted 18 open-ended interviews with ACS leaders representing diverse geographic and practice settings. Two independent reviewers analyzed interviews using an inductive approach to elucidate themes regarding use of morning report (NVivo qualitative analysis software). Results 12/18 respondents reported a morning report but only 6/12 included attending-to-attending hand-offs. 1/12 incentivized attendings to participate, 2/12 included nursing staff, and 2/12 included physician extenders. Cited benefits of morning report were safe and effective information exchange (2/12), quality improvement (2/12), multidisciplinary discussion (1/12), and resident education (2/12). 3/12 respondents cited time commitment as the main limitation of morning report. Conclusions Morning report is under-utilized among ACS programs; however, if implemented strategically, it may improve patient care and resident education. PMID:24157348

  20. Outpatient care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Benefits, barriers, and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who receive intensive induction or re-induction chemotherapy with curative intent typically experience prolonged cytopenias upon completion of treatment. Due to concerns regarding infection and bleeding risk as well as significant transfusion and supportive care requirements, patients have historically remained in the hospital until blood count recovery-a period of approximately 30 days. The rising cost of AML care has prompted physicians to reconsider this practice, and a number of small studies have suggested the safety and feasibility of providing outpatient supportive care to patients following intensive AML (re-) induction therapy. Potential benefits include a significant reduction of healthcare costs, improvement in quality of life, and decreased risk of hospital-acquired infections. In this article, we will review the currently available literature regarding this practice and discuss questions to be addressed in future studies. In addition, we will consider some of the barriers that must be overcome by institutions interested in implementing an "early discharge" policy. While outpatient management of selected AML patients appears safe, careful planning is required in order to provide the necessary support, education and rapid management of serious complications that occur among this very vulnerable patient population. PMID:27101148

  1. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other agency, institution, or entity may be included in research approved under § 97.406 or § 97.407 only if that research... research is approved under paragraph (a) of this section, the IRB shall require appointment of an...

  2. Ophthalmic manifestations of acute and chronic leukemias presenting to a tertiary care center in India

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Jacob; John, M Joseph; Thomas, Satish; Kaur, Gurvinder; Batra, Nitin; Xavier, Wilson J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Screening for ocular manifestations of leukemia, although not a routine practice, is important as they may antedate systemic disease or form an isolated focus of its relapse. Aims: This study evaluates the spectrum of ocular manifestations in acute and chronic leukemias presenting to a tertiary care center in India. Settings and Design: Subjects of leukemia presenting to a tertiary care center in India. Subjects and Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study looking at the spectrum of ocular manifestations in all inpatients of acute or chronic leukemia. Statistical Analysis Used: The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences for Windows software, version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Results: The study subjects (n = 96) comprised 61 males and 35 females whose age ranged from 18 months to 91 years (mean = 39.73, ±22.1). There were 79 adults and 17 children, 53 new and 43 existing patients, 68 acute and 28 chronic, 61 myeloid and 35 lymphoid patients. Ocular lesions were found in 42 patients (43.8%). The ocular manifestations of leukemia were significantly (P = 0.01467) more frequent in acute 35/68 (51.9%) than chronic 7/28 (25%) leukemias. Primary or direct leukemic infiltration was seen in 8 (8.3%) subjects while secondary or indirect involvement due to anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperviscosity, total body irradiation, and immunosuppression were seen in 42 (43.8%) subjects. Ocular changes were present in 37/79 (46.8%) adults and 5/17 (29.4%) children (P = 0.09460). Twenty-eight males (28/61) 45.9% and 14/35 (40%) females had ocular manifestations (P = 0.2874). The ocular manifestations were significantly (P = 0.01158) more frequent in myeloid leukemias 32/61 (52.9%) than lymphoid leukemias 10/35 (28.6%). Conclusions: Leukemic ophthalmic lesions were found in 42/96 (43.8%) patients. Ocular involvement is more often seen in adults, acute and myeloid leukemias. All the primary leukemic manifestations were seen

  3. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients’ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care. PMID:27141107

  4. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications ("apps") and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity. PMID:25954465

  5. Nurses' knowledge of and compliance with universal precautions in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chan, Regina; Molassiotis, Alexander; Chan, Eunice; Chan, Virene; Ho, Becky; Lai, Chit-ying; Lam, Pauline; Shit, Frances; Yiu, Ivy

    2002-02-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the nurses' knowledge of and compliance with Universal Precautions (UP) in an acute hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 450 nurses were randomly selected from a population of acute care nurses and 306 were successfully recruited in the study. The study revealed that the nurses' knowledge of UP was inadequate. In addition, UP was not only insufficiently and inappropriately applied, but also selectively practiced. Nearly all respondents knew that used needles should be disposed of in a sharps' box after injections. However, nurses had difficulty in distinguishing between deep body fluids and other general body secretions that are not considered infectious in UP. A high compliance was reported regarding hand-washing, disposal of needles and glove usage. However, the use of other protective wear such as masks and goggles was uncommon. The results also showed no significant relationships between the nurses' knowledge and compliance with UP. It is recommended that UP educational programmes need to consider attitudes in conjunction with empirical knowledge. Nurse managers and occupational health nurses should take a leadership role to ensure safe practices are used in the care of patients. PMID:11755446

  6. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B.; Evans, Heather L.; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications (“apps”) and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity. PMID:25954465

  7. Perceptions on the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia on acute psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Jones, A

    2003-12-01

    Policy development and practice for hospital mental health care has shifted towards a user-focused and evidence-based direction. Important within this policy development has been a guideline for inpatient care, particularly the establishment of an inpatient Acute Care Forum. A vehicle to both commission and develop this agenda is the Implementation of a care pathway. A research study was designed to explore how a care pathway could be developed for inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Interviews with a range of health care professionals and observation of the process of care pathway development were the data-collection tools. Analysis was driven by emergent themes across the data set. Themes were then presented as one possible interpretation of the factors to be considered for the development of a care pathway for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Clinicians experienced many difficulties in finding and including evidence-based practice (EBP) within a care pathway. Professions on the whole felt that there was a certain futility to psychiatric care given the paucity of evidence to support practice. This may contribute towards the poor use of hospital care as a therapeutic intervention as part of the wider spectrum of care. Difficulties arise when trying to develop a care pathway with EBP, given the paucity of knowledge on why certain interventions are only partially effective. The development of a care pathway may inform the priorities of the inpatient Acute Care Forum for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. A care pathway should not be constrained, however, to EBP and should incorporate therapeutic activities to improve the overall experience of service users. Limitations on the study and the collection of evidence supporting these conclusions conclude the paper. PMID:15005479

  8. Validating a decision tree for serious infection: diagnostic accuracy in acutely ill children in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Verbakel, Jan Y; Lemiengre, Marieke B; De Burghgraeve, Tine; De Sutter, An; Aertgeerts, Bert; Bullens, Dominique M A; Shinkins, Bethany; Van den Bruel, Ann; Buntinx, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute infection is the most common presentation of children in primary care with only few having a serious infection (eg, sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia). To avoid complications or death, early recognition and adequate referral are essential. Clinical prediction rules have the potential to improve diagnostic decision-making for rare but serious conditions. In this study, we aimed to validate a recently developed decision tree in a new but similar population. Design Diagnostic accuracy study validating a clinical prediction rule. Setting and participants Acutely ill children presenting to ambulatory care in Flanders, Belgium, consisting of general practice and paediatric assessment in outpatient clinics or the emergency department. Intervention Physicians were asked to score the decision tree in every child. Primary outcome measures The outcome of interest was hospital admission for at least 24 h with a serious infection within 5 days after initial presentation. We report the diagnostic accuracy of the decision tree in sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values. Results In total, 8962 acute illness episodes were included, of which 283 lead to admission to hospital with a serious infection. Sensitivity of the decision tree was 100% (95% CI 71.5% to 100%) at a specificity of 83.6% (95% CI 82.3% to 84.9%) in the general practitioner setting with 17% of children testing positive. In the paediatric outpatient and emergency department setting, sensitivities were below 92%, with specificities below 44.8%. Conclusions In an independent validation cohort, this clinical prediction rule has shown to be extremely sensitive to identify children at risk of hospital admission for a serious infection in general practice, making it suitable for ruling out. Trial registration number NCT02024282. PMID:26254472

  9. Predictors of suppurative complications for acute sore throat in primary care: prospective clinical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, F D Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Campbell, John; Delaney, Brendan; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document whether elements of a structured history and examination predict adverse outcome of acute sore throat. Design Prospective clinical cohort. Setting Primary care. Participants 14 610 adults with acute sore throat (≤2 weeks’ duration). Main outcome measures Common suppurative complications (quinsy or peritonsillar abscess, otitis media, sinusitis, impetigo or cellulitis) and reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms within one month. Results Complications were assessed reliably (inter-rater κ=0.95). 1.3% (177/13 445) of participants developed complications overall and 14.2% (1889/13 288) reconsulted with new or unresolving symptoms. Independent predictors of complications were severe tonsillar inflammation (documented among 13.0% (1652/12 717); odds ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 1.28 to 2.89) and severe earache (5% (667/13 323); 3.02, 1.91 to 4.76), but the model including both variables had modest prognostic utility (bootstrapped area under the receiver operator curve 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65), and 70% of complications (124/177) occurred when neither was present. Clinical prediction rules for bacterial infection (Centor criteria and FeverPAIN) also predicted complications, but predictive values were also poor and most complications occurred with low scores (67% (118/175) scoring ≤2 for Centor; 126/173 (73%) scoring ≤2 for FeverPAIN). Previous medical problems, sex, temperature, and muscle aches were independently but weakly associated with reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms. Conclusion Important suppurative complications after an episode of acute sore throat in primary care are uncommon. History and examination and scores to predict bacterial infection cannot usefully identify those who will develop complications. Clinicians will need to rely on strategies such as safety netting or delayed prescription in managing the uncertainty and low risk of complications. PMID:24277339

  10. Study protocol: The Improving Care of Acute Lung Injury Patients (ICAP) study

    PubMed Central

    Needham, Dale M; Dennison, Cheryl R; Dowdy, David W; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Ciesla, Nancy; Desai, Sanjay V; Sevransky, Jonathan; Shanholtz, Carl; Scharfstein, Daniel; Herridge, Margaret S; Pronovost, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The short-term mortality benefit of lower tidal volume ventilation (LTVV) for patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) has been demonstrated in a large, multi-center randomized trial. However, the impact of LTVV and other critical care therapies on the longer-term outcomes of ALI/ARDS survivors remains uncertain. The Improving Care of ALI Patients (ICAP) study is a multi-site, prospective cohort study that aims to evaluate the longer-term outcomes of ALI/ARDS survivors with a particular focus on the effect of LTVV and other critical care therapies. Methods Consecutive mechanically ventilated ALI/ARDS patients from 11 intensive care units (ICUs) at four hospitals in the city of Baltimore, MD, USA, will be enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Exposures (patient-based, clinical management, and ICU organizational) will be comprehensively collected both at baseline and throughout patients' ICU stay. Outcomes, including mortality, organ impairment, functional status, and quality of life, will be assessed with the use of standardized surveys and testing at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI/ARDS diagnosis. A multi-faceted retention strategy will be used to minimize participant loss to follow-up. Results On the basis of the historical incidence of ALI/ARDS at the study sites, we expect to enroll 520 patients over two years. This projected sample size is more than double that of any published study of long-term outcomes in ALI/ARDS survivors, providing 86% power to detect a relative mortality hazard of 0.70 in patients receiving higher versus lower exposure to LTVV. The projected sample size also provides sufficient power to evaluate the association between a variety of other exposure and outcome variables, including quality of life. Conclusion The ICAP study is a novel, prospective cohort study that will build on previous critical care research to improve our understanding of the longer-term impact of ALI/ARDS, LTVV and

  11. Acute care in stroke: the importance of early intervention to achieve better brain protection.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B

    2004-01-01

    It is known that 'time is brain', and only early therapies in acute stroke have been effective, like thrombolysis within the first 3 h, and useful neuroprotective drugs are searched for that probably would be effective only with their very early administration. General care (respiratory and cardiac care, fluid and metabolic management, especially blood glucose and blood pressure control, early treatment of hyperthermia, and prevention and treatment of neurological and systemic complications) in acute stroke patients is essential and must already start in the prehospital setting and continue at the patient's arrival to hospital in the emergency room and in the stroke unit. A review of published studies analyzing the influence of general care on stroke outcome and the personal experience from observational studies was performed. Glucose levels >8 mmol/l have been found to be predictive of a poor prognosis after correcting for age, stroke severity, and stroke subtype. Although a clinical trial of glucose-insulin-potassium infusions is ongoing, increased plasma glucose levels should be treated. Moreover, insulin therapy in critically ill patients, including stroke patients, is safe and determines lower mortality and complication rates. Both high and low blood pressure levels have been related to a poor prognosis in acute stroke, although the target levels have not been defined yet in clinical trials. The body temperature has been shown to have a negative effect on stroke outcome, and its control and early treatment of hyperthermia are important. Hypoxemia also worsens the stroke prognosis, and oxygen therapy in case of <92% O(2) saturation is recommended. Besides, blood pressure stabilization avoiding falls of the diastolic pressure and the lowering of glycemia and temperature have been related to a better prognosis in stroke units patients, and homeostasis maintenance is associated with a better outcome. General care has become an emergent and first-line brain

  12. Acute Parotitis as a Complication of Noninvasive Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alaya, S; Mofredj, Ali; Tassaioust, K; Bahloul, H; Mrabet, A

    2016-09-01

    Several conditions, including oropharyngeal dryness, pressure sores, ocular irritation, epistaxis, or gastric distension, have been described during noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Although this technique has been widely used in intensive care units and emergency wards, acute swelling of the parotid gland remains a scarcely reported complication. We describe herein the case of an 82-year-old man who developed unilateral parotitis during prolonged NIV for acute heart failure. Intravenous antibiotics, corticosteroids, and adjusting the mask laces' position allowed rapid resolution of clinical symptoms. PMID:26928643

  13. PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARDJH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF A 1942 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING TITLED: "STANDARD WARD, WARD-J-H. FLOOR, FOUNDATION AND FRAMING PLANS." OCTOBER 31, 1942. - Madigan Hospital, Standard & Combination Wards, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  14. Building on a national health information technology strategic plan for long-term and post-acute care: comments by the Long Term Post Acute Care Health Information Technology Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Alwan, Majd; Batshon, Lynne; Bloom, Shawn M; Brennan, Richard D; Derr, John F; Dougherty, Michelle; Gruhn, Peter; Kirby, Annessa; Manard, Barbara; Raiford, Robin; Serio, Ingrid Johnson

    2011-07-01

    The LTPAC (Long Term Post Acute Care) Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative consists of an alliance of long-term services and post-acute care stakeholders. Members of the collaborative are actively promoting HIT innovations in long-term care settings because IT adoption for health care institutions in the United States has become a high priority. One method used to actively promote HIT is providing expert comments on important documents addressing HIT adoption. Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT released a draft of the Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan 2011-2015 for public comment. The following brief is intended to inform about recommendations and comments made by the Collaborative on the strategic plan. PMID:21667892

  15. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Cobb, J.M.; Smith, P.C.; Ramchandani, P.; Begen, F.M.; Padkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  16. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives.

    PubMed

    Turner-Cobb, J M; Smith, P C; Ramchandani, P; Begen, F M; Padkin, A

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  17. Eat walk engage: an interdisciplinary collaborative model to improve care of hospitalized elders.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Alison M; McRae, Prudence; Cruickshank, Mark

    2015-01-01

    High-quality, efficient health care for older patients is a priority for health care systems. Acute Care for Elders units improve outcomes but there is a need for generalizable models of care that adopt the principles pioneered in these units. This report describes Eat Walk Engage, a collaborative care model on a general medical ward in Brisbane, Australia. The model focused on early mobilization, feeding assistance, and cognitive stimulation. Using the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services implementation framework, the facilitation team enabled the clinical team to recognize barriers and develop solutions. Challenges included unclear responsibility, workload concerns, and risk aversion. Implementation strategies included engaging champions, education, audit and feedback, task delineation and delegation, improving physical resources, and workforce redesign. During the first 18 months, audits showed improved nursing documentation in targeted domains and improved performance of mobilizing and cognitive strategies; length of stay for older inpatients fell by 3 days on the intervention ward. PMID:24270172

  18. Newcastle satisfaction with nursing scales: an instrument for quality assessments of nursing care.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, L H; McColl, E; Priest, J; Bond, S; Boys, R J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To test the validity and reliability of scales for measuring patients' experiences of and satisfaction with nursing care; to test the ability of the scales to detect differences between hospitals and wards; and to investigate whether place of completion, hospital, or home influences response. DESIGN--Sample survey. SETTING--20 wards in five hospitals in the north east of England. PATIENTS--2078 patients in general medical and surgical wards. MAIN MEASURES-- Experiences of and satisfaction with nursing care. RESULTS--75% of patients approached to complete the questionnaires did so. Construct validity and internal consistency were both satisfactory. Both the experience and satisfaction scales were found to detect differences between randomly selected wards and hospitals. A sample of patients (102) were sent a further questionnaire to complete at home. 73% returned this; no significant differences were found in either experience or satisfaction scores between questionnaires given in hospital or at home. CONCLUSION--Scales to measure patients' experiences of and satisfaction with nursing in acute care have been developed and found to be valid, reliable, and able to detect differences between hospitals and wards. Questionnaires can be given before patients leave hospital or at home without affecting scores, but those given at home have a lower response rate. PMID:10158594

  19. Challenges in the Anesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Lambden, Simon; Smith, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality. In the past 2 decades, the treatment of AIS has been revolutionized by the introduction of several interventions supported by class I evidence-care on a stroke unit, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator within 4.5 hours of stroke onset, aspirin commenced within 48 hours of stroke onset, and decompressive craniectomy for supratentorial malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction. There is new class I evidence also demonstrating benefits of endovascular therapy on functional outcomes in those with anterior circulation stroke. In addition, the importance of the careful management of key systemic physiological variables, including oxygenation, blood pressure, temperature, and serum glucose, has been appreciated. In line with this, the role of anesthesiologists and intensivists in managing AIS has increased. This review highlights the main challenges in the endovascular and intensive care management of AIS that, in part, result from the paucity of research focused on these areas. It also provides guidelines for the management of AIS based upon current evidence, and identifies areas for further research. PMID:26368664

  20. Management of Hemichorea Hemiballismus Syndrome in an Acute Palliative Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Damani, Anuja; Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Hemichorea hemiballismus (HCHB) is a rare and debilitating presentation of hyperglycemia and subcortical stroke. Early identification, proper assessment and management of HCHB can lead to complete symptom relief. We describe a case of HCHB presenting to a palliative care setting. A 63-year-old diabetic and hypertensive lady, with history of ovarian cancer presented to Palliative Medicine outpatient clinic with two days history of right HCHB. Blood investigations and brain imaging showed high blood sugar levels and lacunar subcortical stroke. Blood sugar levels were controlled with human insulin and Aspirin. Clopidogrel and Atorvastatin were prescribed for the management of lacunar stroke. HCHB reduced markedly post-treatment, leading to significant reduction in morbidity and improvement in quality of life. The symptoms completely resolved within one week of starting the treatment and the patient was kept on regular home and outpatient follow up for further monitoring. Acute palliative care (APC) approach deals with the management of comorbidities and their complications along with supportive care. Prompt assessment and management of such complications lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:25709190

  1. Collegial relationship breakdown: a qualitative exploration of nurses in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Leanne S

    2013-01-01

    Poor collegial relations can cause communication breakdown, staff attrition and difficulties attracting new nursing staff. Underestimating the potential power of nursing team relationships means that opportunities to create better working environments and increase the quality of nursing care can be missed. Previous research on improving collegiality indicates that professionalism and work satisfaction increases and that staff attrition decreases. This study explores challenges, strengths and strategies used in nursing team communication in order to build collegial relationships. A qualitative approach was employed to gather nurses experiences and discussion of communication within their nursing teams and a constant comparison method was utilised for data analysis. A convenience sampling technique was employed to access both Registered Nurses and Enrolled Nurses to partake in six focus groups. Thirty mostly female nurses (ratio of 5:1) participated in the study. Inclusion criteria consisted of being a nurse currently working in acute care settings and the exclusion criteria included nursing staff currently working in closed specialty units (i.e. intensive care units). Results revealed three main themes: (1) externalisation and internalisation of nursing team communication breakdown, (2) the importance of collegiality for retention of nurses and (3) loss of respect, and civility across the healthcare workplace. A clear division between hierarchies of nurses was apparent in how nursing team communication was delivered and managed. Open, respectful and collegial communication is essential in today's dynamic and complex health environments. The nurses in this study highlighted how important nursing communication can be to work motivation and how leadership fosters teamwork. PMID:23898600

  2. Frequency and Factors Associated with Unexpected Death in an Acute Palliative Care Unit: Expect the Unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Sebastian; Chisholm, Gary; Santos, Renata Dos; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2015-01-01

    Context Few studies have examined the frequency of unexpected death and its associated factors in a palliative care setting. Objectives To determine the frequency of unexpected death in two acute palliative care units (APCUs); to compare the frequency of signs of impending death between expected and unexpected deaths; and to determine the predictors associated with unexpected death. Methods In this prospective, longitudinal, observational study, consecutive patients admitted to two APCUs were enrolled and physical signs of impending death were documented twice daily until discharge or death. Physicians were asked to complete a survey within 24 hours of APCU death. The death was considered unexpected if the physician answered “yes” to the question “Were you surprised by the timing of the death?” Results In total, 193 of 203 after-death assessments (95%) were collected for analysis. Nineteen of 193 patients died unexpectedly (10%). Signs of impending death, including nonreactive pupils, inability to close eyelids, decreased response to verbal stimuli, drooping of nasolabial folds, peripheral cyanosis, pulselessness of the radial artery, and respiration with mandibular movement, were documented more frequently in expected deaths than unexpected deaths (P < 0.05). Longer disease duration was associated with unexpected death (33 months vs. 12 months, P=0.009). Conclusion Unexpected death occurred in an unexpectedly high proportion of patients in the APCU setting, and was associated with fewer signs of impending death. Our findings highlight the need for palliative care teams to be prepared for the unexpected. PMID:25499421

  3. Management of hemichorea hemiballismus syndrome in an acute palliative care setting.

    PubMed

    Damani, Anuja; Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Hemichorea hemiballismus (HCHB) is a rare and debilitating presentation of hyperglycemia and subcortical stroke. Early identification, proper assessment and management of HCHB can lead to complete symptom relief. We describe a case of HCHB presenting to a palliative care setting. A 63-year-old diabetic and hypertensive lady, with history of ovarian cancer presented to Palliative Medicine outpatient clinic with two days history of right HCHB. Blood investigations and brain imaging showed high blood sugar levels and lacunar subcortical stroke. Blood sugar levels were controlled with human insulin and Aspirin. Clopidogrel and Atorvastatin were prescribed for the management of lacunar stroke. HCHB reduced markedly post-treatment, leading to significant reduction in morbidity and improvement in quality of life. The symptoms completely resolved within one week of starting the treatment and the patient was kept on regular home and outpatient follow up for further monitoring. Acute palliative care (APC) approach deals with the management of comorbidities and their complications along with supportive care. Prompt assessment and management of such complications lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:25709190

  4. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  5. Improving multidisciplinary communication at ward board rounds using video enhanced reflective practice

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, Cyril; Tully, Vicki; Forrest, Sandra; Jaggard, Pamela; MacRae, Morag; Habicht, Dirk; Greene, Alexandra; Collins, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The priority to ensure patient safety and use resources effectively, demands attention and innovation. Video enhanced reflective practice (VERP) provides training based upon analysis of film clips of one's professional practice to develop practical insight into the processes of communication, so that effective changes can be made to ongoing behaviour and practice. In this case the focus was on multi-disciplinary communication within daily board rounds on an acute medicine and care of the elderly ward. Baseline assessment and post intervention testing of perceptions of change by both full and core team were undertaken to establish the impact of VERP training. In addition pre and post focus group discussion and film analysis supplemented evaluation. The findings support the view that after VERP training of a core team, board rounds were seen as consistently easier to participate in, providing improved focus, were more efficient in goal setting and resulting in better care for patients as well as improved pathways to discharge. This suggests benefits to the communication “culture” of a multidisciplinary team resulting in increased benefits for the wider team. It is concluded that the use of tailored VERP training for personal, professional and team development is relevant, feasible, and worthy of further testing and investigation. PMID:26734342

  6. Standardized Glycemic Management with a Computerized Workflow and Decision Support System for Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Different Wards

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina M.; Höll, Bernhard; Aberer, Felix; Donsa, Klaus; Augustin, Thomas; Schaupp, Lukas; Spat, Stephan; Beck, Peter; Fruhwald, Friedrich M.; Schnedl, Christian; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Lumenta, David B.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated the efficacy, safety, and usability of standardized glycemic management by a computerized decision support system for non-critically ill hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes on four different wards. Materials and Methods: In this open, noncontrolled intervention study, glycemic management of 99 patients with type 2 diabetes (62% acute admissions; 41 females; age, 67±11 years; hemoglobin A1c, 65±21 mmol/mol; body mass index, 30.4±6.5 kg/m2) on clinical wards (Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Plastic Surgery) of a tertiary-care hospital was guided by GlucoTab® (Joanneum Research GmbH [Graz, Austria] and Medical University of Graz [Graz, Austria]), a mobile decision support system providing automated workflow support and suggestions for insulin dosing to nurses and physicians. Results: Adherence to insulin dosing suggestions was high (96.5% bolus, 96.7% basal). The primary outcome measure, percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in the range of 70–140 mg/dL, occurred in 50.2±22.2% of all measurements. The overall mean BG level was 154±35 mg/dL. BG measurements in the ranges of 60–70 mg/dL, 40–60 mg/dL, and <40 mg/dL occurred in 1.4%, 0.5%, and 0.0% of all measurements, respectively. A regression analysis showed that acute admission to the Cardiology Ward (+30 mg/dL) and preexisting home insulin therapy (+26 mg/dL) had the strongest impact on mean BG. Acute admission to other wards had minor effects (+4 mg/dL). Ninety-one percent of the healthcare professionals felt confident with GlucoTab, and 89% believed in its practicality and 80% in its ability to prevent medication errors. Conclusions: An efficacious, safe, and user-accepted implementation of GlucoTab was demonstrated. However, for optimized personalized patient care, further algorithm modifications are required. PMID:26355756

  7. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management. PMID:26734389

  8. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  9. Storage Media Profiles and Health Record Retention Practice Patterns in Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  10. Storage media profiles and health record retention practice patterns in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rinehart-Thompson, Laurie A

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the health record retention practices among health information management professionals in acute care general hospitals in the United States. A descriptive research design was used, and data were collected using a self-reporting survey. Respondents answered questions about the relationship between researcher-assigned storage media profiles (descriptions of the type or types of media on which facilities maintain health records); retention periods and factors affecting record retention periods; retention of secondary data; vendor usage; and continued reliance on paper in environments where electronic health records exist. Storage media profiles were found to be significantly related to facility operational and research needs and to the convenience of not purging records. These findings have implications for federal policy promoting the implementation of electronic health records by 2014. PMID:18574517

  11. Autologous blood donation in a small general acute-care hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, L. S.; Jones, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Increased public concerns about infectious risk associated with homologous blood transfusions have led to a significant increase in autologous blood collections. In response, blood banks and large hospitals have implemented autologous blood donation programs (ABDPs). Small hospitals lack the technical resources and patient case loads to effectively institute ABDPs. A preoperative ABDP designed to increase availability and patient convenience--and, therefore, utilization--is described. The program created in a rural 90-bed general acute-care hospital processed 105 donors and collected 197 units over a 38-month period. The percentage of the collected units that were transfused was 44.7%, and only 6.1% of participating patients required homologous transfusions. Comparisons of hematological and clinical data with previously published results indicate that small-scale preoperative ABDPs are clinically effective, safe, and provide cost-efficient utilization of the safest blood supply available. PMID:7674344

  12. Establishing an acute care nursing bed unit size: employing a decision matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Terry; Pati, Debajyoti

    2008-01-01

    Determining the number of patient rooms for an acute care (medical-surgical) patient unit is a challenge for both healthcare architects and hospital administrators when renovating or designing a new patient tower or wing. Discussions on unit bed size and its impact on hospital operations in healthcare design literature are isolated, and clearly there is opportunity for more extensive research. Finding the optimal solution for unit bed size involves many factors, including the dynamics of the site and existing structures. This opinion paper was developed using a "balanced scorecard" concept to provide decision makers a framework for assessing and choosing a customized solution during the early planning and conceptual design phases. The context of a healthcare balanced scorecard with the quadrants of quality, finance, provider outcomes, and patient outcomes is used to compare the impact of these variables on unit bed size. PMID:22973617

  13. Neural network classification of clinical neurophysiological data for acute care monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sgro, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of neurophysiological monitoring of the 'acute care' patient is to allow the accurate recognition of changing or deteriorating neurological function as close to the moment of occurrence as possible, thus permitting immediate intervention. Results confirm that: (1) neural networks are able to accurately identify electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns and evoked potential (EP) wave components, and measuring EP waveform latencies and amplitudes; (2) neural networks are able to accurately detect EP and EEG recordings that have been contaminated by noise; (3) the best performance was obtained consistently with the back propagation network for EP and the HONN for EEG's; (4) neural network performed consistently better than other methods evaluated; and (5) neural network EEG and EP analyses are readily performed on multichannel data.

  14. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures. PMID:25900584

  15. Achieving better in-hospital and after-hospital care of patients with acute cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Denaro, Charles P; Bennett, Cameron J; Hickey, Annabel C; Mudge, Alison M; Flores, Judy L; Sanders, Daniela C J; Thiele, Justine M; Wenck, Beres; Bennett, John W; Jones, Mark A

    2004-05-17

    In patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and congestive heart failure (CHF), evidence suggests opportunities for improving in-hospital and after-hospital care, patient self-care, and hospital-community integration. A multidisciplinary quality improvement program was designed and instigated in Brisbane in October 2000 involving 250 clinicians at three teaching hospitals, 1080 general practitioners (GPs) from five Divisions of General Practice, 1594 patients with ACS and 904 patients with CHF. Quality improvement interventions were implemented over 17 months after a 6-month baseline period and included: clinical decision support (clinical practice guidelines, reminders, checklists, clinical pathways); educational interventions (seminars, academic detailing); regular performance feedback; patient self-management strategies; and hospital-community integration (discharge referral summaries; community pharmacist liaison; patient prompts to attend GPs). Using a before-after study design to assess program impact, significantly more program patients compared with historical controls received: ACS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents at discharge, aspirin and beta-blockers at 3 months after discharge, inpatient cardiac counselling, and referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. CHF: Assessment for reversible precipitants, use of prophylaxis for deep-venous thrombosis, beta-blockers at discharge, ACE inhibitors at 6 months after discharge, imaging of left ventricular function, and optimal management of blood pressure levels. Risk-adjusted mortality rates at 6 and 12 months decreased, respectively, from 9.8% to 7.4% (P = 0.06) and from 13.4% to 10.1% (P = 0.06) for patients with ACS and from 22.8% to 15.2% (P < 0.001) and from 32.8% to 22.4% (P = 0.005) for patients with CHF. Quality improvement programs that feature multifaceted interventions across the continuum of care can change clinical culture, optimise care

  16. Unnecessary Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections: Association With Care Setting and Patient Demographics

    PubMed Central

    Barlam, Tamar F.; Soria-Saucedo, Rene; Cabral, Howard J.; Kazis, Lewis E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Up to 40% of antibiotics are prescribed unnecessarily for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). We sought to define factors associated with antibiotic overprescribing of ARTIs to inform efforts to improve practice. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of ARTI visits between 2006 and 2010 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Those surveys provide a representative sample of US visits to community-based physicians and to hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and outpatient practices. Patient factors (age, sex, race, underlying lung disease, tobacco use, insurance), physician specialty, practice demographics (percentage poverty, median household income, percentage with a Bachelor's Degree, urban-rural status, geographic region), and care setting (ED, hospital, or community-based practice) were evaluated as predictors of antibiotic overprescribing for ARTIs. Results. Hospital and community-practice visits had more antibiotic overprescribing than ED visits (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64 and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27–2.12 and OR = 1.59 and 95% CI, 1.26–2.01, respectively). Care setting had significant interactions with geographic region and urban and rural location. The quartile with the lowest percentage of college-educated residents had significantly greater overprescribing (adjusted OR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07–1.86) than the highest quartile. Current tobacco users were overprescribed more often than nonsmokers (OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.38–2.12). Patient age, insurance, and provider specialty were other significant predictors. Conclusions. Tobacco use and a lower grouped rate of college education were associated with overprescribing and may reflect poor health literacy. A focus on educating the patient may be an effective approach to stewardship. PMID:27006968

  17. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  18. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

  19. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  20. FloTrac/Vigileo system monitoring in acute-care surgery: current and future trends.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Fong; Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2013-11-01

    As acute critical-care surgery evolves, it is imperative to introduce reliable devices that can intraoperatively assess a patient's cardiovascular functions. Owing to the fact that traditional methods are usually invasive, non- or less-invasive innovations have attracted the attention of clinicians in recent decades. The FloTrac system monitors cardiovascular performance by analyzing peripheral arterial waveforms and a preset database, and it decreases the invasiveness by using a pulmonary arterial catheter. The reliability of cardiac output measurements was confirmed in many critically ill subjects in cardiac surgeries and intensive care units. Moreover, the FloTrac system is easy to set up, and interpreting the information is simple. The FloTrac system also provides a useful preload predictor, that is, stroke volume variation (SVV), for fluid management, which has been proven to enhance surgical safety in the treatment of critically ill patients. Goal-directed therapy guided by SVV and other hemodynamic variables was advocated for peri-operative fluid optimization. Although the evolution of each updated algorithm of the FloTrac system has demonstrated improved accuracy and limited shortcomings, the latest third-generation algorithm is still not equal to the gold standard reference. The accuracy of the latest third-generation algorithm is controversial in septic conditions, and its use is still unacceptable in liver transplantation. Due to vasoactive challenges, especially in the administration of norepinephrine, a conclusion could not be reached. Clinicians should recognize the appropriate uses and limitations when using the algorithm during acute critical surgeries. PMID:24147549

  1. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  2. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  3. Examination of the Perceptions of Registered Nurses Regarding the Use of Healing Touch in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Ann Friesen, Mary; Fabian, Jennifer; Swengros, Diane; Herbst, Anna; Mangione, Lucrezia

    2016-06-01

    Given the current transformation of traditional health care to provide more integrative and complementary modalities, health systems are implementing new programs and services to meet consumer and provider needs. One such integrative modality, Healing Touch, with a foundation in holistic nursing, is a gentle therapy that uses touch to promote health and well-being by balancing the human energy system. This article describes the perceptions of registered nurses regarding the implementation of a Healing Touch training program at a multihospital health system. Five themes were identified: benefit to the patient, benefit to the nurse, holism beyond task orientation, integrating Healing Touch into acute care, and barriers and challenges. Nurses recognize the importance of creating caring-healing relationships and a holistic approach to care. Training in Healing Touch provides one avenue for nurses and health care providers to provide compassionate care. PMID:26130464

  4. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  5. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  6. Applying quality improvement methods to address gaps in medicines reconciliation at transfers of care from an acute UK hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Vanessa; Kuo, Shirley; Vaughan, Louella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reliable reconciliation of medicines at admission and discharge from hospital is key to reducing unintentional prescribing discrepancies at transitions of healthcare. We introduced a team approach to the reconciliation process at an acute hospital with the aim of improving the provision of information and documentation of reliable medication lists to enable clear, timely communications on discharge. Setting An acute 400-bedded teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants The effects of change were measured in a simple random sample of 10 adult patients a week on the acute admissions unit over 18 months. Interventions Quality improvement methods were used throughout. Interventions included education and training of staff involved at ward level and in the pharmacy department, introduction of medication documentation templates for electronic prescribing and for communicating information on medicines in discharge summaries co-designed with patient representatives. Results Statistical process control analysis showed reliable documentation (complete, verified and intentional changes clarified) of current medication on 49.2% of patients' discharge summaries. This appears to have improved (to 85.2%) according to a poststudy audit the year after the project end. Pharmacist involvement in discharge reconciliation increased significantly, and improvements in the numbers of medicines prescribed in error, or omitted from the discharge prescription, are demonstrated. Variation in weekly measures is seen throughout but particularly at periods of changeover of new doctors and introduction of new systems. Conclusions New processes led to a sustained increase in reconciled medications and, thereby, an improvement in the number of patients discharged from hospital with unintentional discrepancies (errors or omissions) on their discharge prescription. The initiatives were pharmacist-led but involved close working and shared understanding about roles and responsibilities

  7. 6-PACK programme to decrease fall injuries in acute hospitals: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Renata T; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Caroline A; Haines, Terry P; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Botti, Mari; Cumming, Robert G; Livingston, Patricia M; Sherrington, Catherine; Zavarsek, Silva; Lindley, Richard I; Kamar, Jeannette

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the 6-PACK programme on falls and fall injuries in acute wards. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Six Australian hospitals. Participants All patients admitted to 24 acute wards during the trial period. Interventions Participating wards were randomly assigned to receive either the nurse led 6-PACK programme or usual care over 12 months. The 6-PACK programme included a fall risk tool and individualised use of one or more of six interventions: “falls alert” sign, supervision of patients in the bathroom, ensuring patients’ walking aids are within reach, a toileting regimen, use of a low-low bed, and use of a bed/chair alarm. Main outcome measures The co-primary outcomes were falls and fall injuries per 1000 occupied bed days. Results During the trial, 46 245 admissions to 16 medical and eight surgical wards occurred. As many people were admitted more than once, this represented 31 411 individual patients. Patients’ characteristics and length of stay were similar for intervention and control wards. Use of 6-PACK programme components was higher on intervention wards than on control wards (incidence rate ratio 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.14 to 4.34; P<0.001). In all, 1831 falls and 613 fall injuries occurred, and the rates of falls (incidence rate ratio 1.04, 0.78 to 1.37; P=0.796) and fall injuries (0.96, 0.72 to 1.27; P=0.766) were similar in intervention and control wards. Conclusions Positive changes in falls prevention practice occurred following the introduction of the 6-PACK programme. However, no difference was seen in falls or fall injuries between groups. High quality evidence showing the effectiveness of falls prevention interventions in acute wards remains absent. Novel solutions to the problem of in-hospital falls are urgently needed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000332921. PMID:26813674

  8. Post–Acute Care Data for Predicting Readmission After Ischemic Stroke: A Nationwide Cohort Analysis Using the Minimum Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Fehnel, Corey R; Lee, Yoojin; Wendell, Linda C; Thompson, Bradford B; Potter, N Stevenson; Mor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background Reducing hospital readmissions is a key component of reforms for stroke care. Current readmission prediction models lack accuracy and are limited by data being from only acute hospitalizations. We hypothesized that patient-level factors from a nationwide post–acute care database would improve prediction modeling. Methods and Results Medicare inpatient claims for the year 2008 that used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used to identify ischemic stroke patients older than age 65. Unique individuals were linked to comprehensive post–acute care assessments through use of the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Logistic regression was used to construct risk-adjusted readmission models. Covariates were derived from MDS variables. Among 39 178 patients directly admitted to nursing homes after hospitalization due to acute stroke, there were 29 338 (75%) with complete MDS assessments. Crude rates of readmission and death at 30 days were 8448 (21%) and 2791 (7%), respectively. Risk-adjusted models identified multiple independent predictors of all-cause 30-day readmission. Model performance of the readmission model using MDS data had a c-statistic of 0.65 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.66). Higher levels of social engagement, a marker of nursing home quality, were associated with progressively lower odds of readmission (odds ratio 0.71, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.92). Conclusions Individual clinical characteristics from the post–acute care setting resulted in only modest improvement in the c-statistic relative to previous models that used only Medicare Part A data. Individual-level characteristics do not sufficiently account for the risk of acute hospital readmission. PMID:26396202

  9. Eight challenges faced by general practitioners caring for patients after an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair; Thompson, Peter L

    2014-11-17

    The general practitioner is essential in the management of the patient who has recently been discharged from hospital following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), particularly as duration of hospital stay is shorter than in previous decades. GPs caring for patients after an ACS face numerous challenges. Often, the first of these is insufficient or delayed documentation from the discharging hospital, although electronic discharge summaries are alleviating this problem. Post-ACS patients often have comorbidities, and GPs play a key role in managing these. Patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy who need surgery, and post-ACS patients with atrial fibrillation, require particular care from GPs. Patients will often approach their GP for advice on the safety of other drugs, such as smoking cessation medication, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction. For patients complaining of persistent lethargy after an ACS, GPs must consider several differential diagnoses, including depression, hypotension, hypovolaemia, and side effects of β-blockers. GPs play an important ongoing role in ensuring that target cholesterol levels are reached with statin therapy; this includes ensuring long-term adherence. They may also need to advise patients who want to stop statin therapy, usually due to perceived side effects. Many of these challenges can be met with improved and respectful communication between the hospital, the treating cardiologist and the GP. The patient needs to be closely involved in the decision-making process, particularly when balancing the risks of bleeding versus thrombosis. PMID:25390497

  10. Stress management as a component of occupational therapy in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Affleck, A; Bianchi, E; Cleckley, M; Donaldson, K; McCormack, G; Polon, J

    1984-01-01

    The recent explosion of stress literature in the medical community has created a new awareness of "stress" as a potentially destructive force in itself. Contributing the physical and psychological dysfunction, stress has now been linked with a wide range of diagnoses including cancer, cardiac disease and arthritis. The importance of incorporating stress management activities into daily life is increasingly apparent. Occupational therapists concerned with patients' ability to achieve health enhancing independent living skills are in a key position to help patients master stress management skills and incorporate them into activities of daily living. This article will explore the incorporation of stress management into occupational therapy programming for a variety of acute care patients. It will review the components of stress, the stress cycle, the relaxation response, the occupational therapy role based on a model of human occupation, and will review current programs through case study of four patients: one diagnosed with cancer (leukemia), one with anorexia nervosa, one with chronic pain and the fourth, a patient in medical intensive care. PMID:23947299

  11. Characteristics and expectations of fluid bolus therapy: a bi-national survey of acute care physicians.

    PubMed

    Glassford, N J; Jones, S L; Martensson, J; Eastwoods, G M; Bailey, M; Cross, A M; Taylor, D McD; Bellomo, R

    2015-11-01

    There is little consensus on the definition or optimal constituents of fluid bolus therapy (FBT), and there is uncertainty regarding its physiological effects. The aims of this study were to determine clinician-reported definitions of FBT and to explore the physiological responses clinicians expect from such FBT. In June and October 2014, intensive care and emergency physicians in Australia and New Zealand were asked to participate in an electronic questionnaire of the reported practice and expectations of FBT. Two hundred and fifty-one questionnaires were completed, 65.3% from intensivists. We identified the prototypical FBT given by intensivists is more than 250 ml of compound sodium lactate, saline or 4% albumin given in less than 30 minutes, while that given by emergency department physicians is a similar volume of saline delivered over a similar time frame. Intensive care and emergency physicians expected significantly different changes in mean arterial pressure (P=0.001) and heart rate (P=0.033) following FBT. Substantial variation was demonstrated in the magnitude of expected response within both specialties for each variable. Major variations exist in self-reported FBT practice, both within and between acute specialties, and wide variation can be demonstrated in the expected physiological responses to FBT. International explorations of practice and prospective quantification of the actual physiological response to FBT are warranted. PMID:26603800

  12. Pre-hospital care seeking behaviour for childhood acute respiratory infections in south-western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Talabi, Ademola A; Aina, Olufemi B

    2012-12-01

    WHO/UNICEF currently recommend that childhood malaria and pneumonia be managed together in the community; most African countries are in the process of developing this policy. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine maternal awareness of general danger signs of childhood illnesses and the prevalence, determinants and sources of pre-hospital treatment by mothers during their child's acute respiratory illness in a poor urban community in south-western Nigeria. A total of 226 mothers were interviewed. Only 4.9% of the mothers were aware of the two pneumonia symptoms: difficult breathing and fast breathing. About 75% of the children were given pre-hospital medication at home and only 16.5% of them received the drugs within 24 hour of symptom recognition. Drug shops/patent medicine vendors (PMVs; 70.6%) were the most common source of care. Wishing to try home management first (46.6%); waiting for the child to improve (14.4%) and lack of money (31.6%) delayed care-seeking. Older maternal age (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.2-4.4) and having a child with cough and difficult and/or fast breathing (aOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-5.2) were positive predictors of pre-hospital treatment. Maternal education and adequately equipping PMVs could improve prompt access to integrated community-based child health services in Nigeria. PMID:24029675

  13. Recommended and prescribed symptomatic treatment for acute maxillary sinusitis in Finnish primary care.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Johanna; Rautakorpi, Ulla-Maija; Huikko, Solja; Honkanen, Pekka; Klaukkas, Timo; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Palva, Erkki; Roine, Risto; Sarkkinen, Hannu; Huovinen, Pentti; Varonen, Helena

    2007-09-01

    We studied the use of symptomatic medication in the treatment of acute maxillary sinusitis (AMS) in primary care and whether this use is in accordance with national guidelines. The data was collected annually in the Antimicrobial Treatment Strategies (MIKSTRA) Program in 30 primary health care centres throughout Finland during one week in November in the years from 1998 to 2002. Physicians and nurses collected the data about the diagnoses, prescription-only medicines and over the counter medicines prescribed or recommended for all patients with an infection during the study weeks. The MIKSTRA data comprised of 23.002 first consultations for an infection: 2.448 patients were diagnosed as having AMS. Altogether, 41% of them received some symptomatic medicine. Antihistamines with or without sympathomimetics were the most commonly prescribed or recommended symptomatic medicines (23% of the patients). For comparison, systemic antibacterial agents were prescribed for 93% of the AMS patients. We conclude that Finnish physicians recommend or prescribe more symptomatic medication without proven efficacy for AMS than recommended by the national guidelines. Especially, the use of antihistamines with or without sympathomimetics, mostly the combination of acrivastine and pseudoephedrine, was common although antihistamines were recommended only for patients with allergy or nasal polyps. PMID:17956017

  14. Measuring the impact of modern matrons in the ward setting.

    PubMed

    Shanley, Oliver

    With the The NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000) the government made it clear there was a need to reintroduce the role of matron to establish a clear responsibility for standards in the ward setting. The role of modern matron is now considered to be a fundamental part of clinical governance, ensuring the quality of the care provided is of the highest standard. Staff at South Essex Partnership NHS Trust instituted an audit to provide an accurate picture of the impact of modern matrons. PMID:15552487

  15. Nonurgent Use of the Emergency Department by Pediatric Patients: A Theory-Guided Approach for Primary and Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ohns, Mary Jean; Oliver-McNeil, Sandra; Nantais-Smith, Leanne M; George, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Providing quality, cost-effective care to children and their families in the appropriate setting is the goal of nurse practitioners in primary and acute care. However, increased utilization of the emergency department (ED) for nonurgent care threatens cost-effective quality care, interrupts continuity of care, and contributes to ED overcrowding. To date, descriptive research has identified demographics of those using the ED for nonurgent care, the chief complaints of children seeking nonurgent care, the cost to the health care system of pediatric nonurgent care, and characteristics of associated primary care settings. Using Donabedian's Model of Quality of Healthcare and a Theory of Dependent Care by Taylor and colleagues, acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners can incorporate interventions that will channel care to the appropriate setting and educate caregivers regarding common childhood illnesses and the value of continuity of care. By using a theoretical framework as a guide, this article will help both acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners understand why parents seek nonurgent care for their children in the ED and actions they can take to ensure that care is provided in an optimal setting. PMID:26489793

  16. Urinary Biomarkers Improve the Diagnosis of Intrinsic Acute Kidney Injury in Coronary Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Yang, Chia-Hung; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Lin, Chan-Yu; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is frequently encountered in coronary care units (CCUs). Its clinical presentation differs considerably from that of prerenal or intrinsic AKI. We used the biomarkers calprotectin and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and compared their utility in predicting and differentiating intrinsic AKI. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a CCU of a tertiary care university hospital. Patients who exhibited any comorbidity and a kidney stressor were enrolled. Urinary samples of the enrolled patients collected between September 2012 and August 2013 were tested for calprotectin and NGAL. The definition of AKI was based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes classification. All prospective demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were evaluated as predictors of AKI. A total of 147 adult patients with a mean age of 67 years were investigated. AKI was diagnosed in 71 (50.3%) patients, whereas intrinsic AKI was diagnosed in 43 (60.5%) of them. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed urinary calprotectin and serum albumin as independent risk factors for intrinsic AKI. For predicting intrinsic AKI, both urinary NGAL and calprotectin displayed excellent areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) (0.918 and 0.946, respectively). A combination of these markers revealed an AUROC of 0.946. Our result revealed that calprotectin and NGAL had considerable discriminative powers for predicting intrinsic AKI in CCU patients. Accordingly, careful inspection for medication, choice of therapy, and early intervention in patients exhibiting increased biomarker levels might improve the outcomes of kidney injury. PMID:26448023

  17. Patient satisfaction with eletriptan in the acute treatment of migraine in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nett, R B; Tiseo, P J; Almas, M; Sikes, C R

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective: The efficxacy of triptans for acute migraine has been well established in clinical trials but not in primary care, where they are most commonly prescribed. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the effectiveness of eletriptan 40 mg in primary care, using a patient-weighted satisfaction scale. Methods: Eligible patients met International Headache Society criteria for migraine, with 1–6 attacks per month. Patients completed questionnaires at screening and following a single eletriptan-treated attack. Treatment satisfaction was evaluated using a six-item Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). MSQ item scores were weighted, based on the important score ratings, to yield individualised satisfaction scores. The primary end-point was the difference in weighted satisfaction scores between the patient's previous treatment and eletriptan 40 mg. Secondary end-points assessed quality of life (QOL), functioning and efficacy of treatment. Results: Of 590 patients screened, 437 completed the study. Degree (95.2%), time (88.8%) and duration (83.8%) of headache pain relief were rated as most important by patients. The mean (±SD) total satisfaction score on the MSQ was higher for eletriptan than previous therapy (2.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). The high level of satisfaction with eletriptan vs. previous treatment reflects the improvements in QOL and functioning observed, and the high headache and pain-free response rates. Conclusions: Patient-weighted satisfaction with eletriptan 40 mg was higher than with previous treatment for all items. The use of patient-weighted importance ratings of satisfaction is a promising approach for establishing effectiveness of treatment in primary care. PMID:17877653

  18. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy. PMID:26745537

  20. Acute inpatient psychiatry in England: an old problem and a new priority.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    With the development of community care, the number of National Health Service psychiatric beds in England has been reduced to between one-fifth and one-quarter of those provided in the mid-1950s. Psychiatric bed numbers are close to the irreducible minimum if they have not already reached it. The problems facing today's acute psychiatric admission wards include: poor design, maintenance and ambience; a lack of therapeutic and leisure activities for patients leading to inactivity and boredom; frequent incidents of aggression and low-level violence and problems with staffing. It is suggested that there are a number of underlying causes: First, there has been failure to plan inpatient services, or to define their role, as attention has focused on new developments in community care. Second, the reduction in bed numbers has led to a change in the casemix of inpatients with a concentration on admission wards of a more challenging group of patients. Third, admission ward environments are permeable to the adverse effects of local street life, including drug taking. After years of neglect, acute inpatient psychiatric services in England are now high on the UK Government agenda. The paper lists a number of national initiatives designed to improve their quality and safety. A recent review of qualitative research suggests that acute psychiatric wards in other countries face similar problems to those reported in England. It is suggested that there might be a need for joint action which might take the form either of international research about acute inpatient care or the development of international standards and a common quality improvement system. PMID:16865927

  1. [Nursing support at a rooming-in maternity ward].

    PubMed

    Grochans, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    The international congress called "Birth Quality-Life Quality" has been a key scientific event in Poland resulting in great changes in perinatal care. Improvements in the quality of care at maternity wards were not limited to purely medical issues. Attention became increasingly focused on psycho-social problems of women after parturition. Emphasis is now directed to support by the doctors and nurses and efforts to acquaint young mothers with the benefits of natural feeding, as well as to prepare them for taking good care of their child. Social support is seen as an important tool in the improvement of care over the mother and child. The present study has classified social support according to J. House as informational, emotional, instrumental and worthing. Informational support consists of methods to cope with specific problems that require delivery of information and teaching of new skills. Emotional support focuses on demonstrating care, winning trust and showing empathy. Instrumental support is reflected by delivery of goods or services to persons in need. Finally, worthing support aims at promoting self-esteem. The aim of this study was (1) to analyze the determinants of informational, emotional, instrumental and worthing support and to compare the needs for different types of support among primiparas and multiparas at an obstetrics ward with the rooming-in system; (2) to study correlations between availability and demand for social support; (3) to determine the expectations of patients as to sources of informational, emotional, instrumental and worthing support and as to methods and means used during delivery of informational support. The study was done in a group of 200 women giving birth at the Department of Obstetrics and Perinatology, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin. A special questionnaire was developed to determine the needs for support. A modified Social Support Score was also used. It was found that the demand for all determinants of

  2. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification). Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only moderately consistent with

  3. Learning from positively deviant wards to improve patient safety: an observational study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ruth; Taylor, Natalie; Kellar, Ian; Lawton, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Positive deviance is an asset-based approach to improvement which has recently been adopted to improve quality and safety within healthcare. The approach assumes that solutions to problems already exist within communities. Certain groups or individuals identify these solutions and succeed despite having the same resources as others. Within healthcare, positive deviance has previously been applied at individual or organisational levels to improve specific clinical outcomes or processes of care. This study explores whether the positive deviance approach can be applied to multidisciplinary ward teams to address the broad issue of patient safety among elderly patients. Methods and analysis Preliminary work analysed National Health Service (NHS) Safety Thermometer data from 34 elderly medical wards to identify 5 ‘positively deviant’ and 5 matched ‘comparison’ wards. Researchers are blinded to ward status. This protocol describes a multimethod, observational study which will (1) assess the concurrent validity of identifying positively deviant elderly medical wards using NHS Safety Thermometer data and (2) generate hypotheses about how positively deviant wards succeed. Patient and staff perceptions of safety will be assessed on each ward using validated surveys. Correlation and ranking analyses will explore whether this survey data aligns with the routinely collected NHS Safety Thermometer data. Staff focus groups and researcher fieldwork diaries will be completed and qualitative thematic content analysis will be used to generate hypotheses about the strategies, behaviours, team cultures and dynamics that facilitate the delivery of safe patient care. The acceptability and sustainability of strategies identified will also be explored. Ethics and dissemination The South East Scotland Research Ethics Committee 01 approved this study (reference: 14/SS/1085) and NHS Permissions were granted from all trusts. Findings will be published in peer

  4. Summary of prospective quantification of reimbursement recovery from inpatient acute care outliers.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Gerald S; Paulson, Albert S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify inpatient acute care hospital cases that are eligible for additional financial reimbursement. Acute care hospitals are reimbursed by third-party payers on behalf of their patients. Reimbursement is a fixed amount dependent primarily upon the diagnostic related group (DRG) of the case and the service intensity weight of the individual hospital. This method is used by nearly all third-party payers. For a given case, reimbursement is fixed (all else being equal) until a certain threshold level of charges, the cost outlier threshold, is reached. Above this amount the hospital is partially reimbursed for additional charges above the cost outlier threshold. Hospital discharge information has been described as having an error rate of between 7 and 22 percent in attribution of basic case characteristics. It can be expected that there is a significant error rate in the attribution of charges as well. This could be due to miscategorization of the case, misapplication of charges, or other causes. Identification of likely cases eligible for additional reimbursement would alleviate financial pressure where hospitals would have to absorb high expenses for outlier cases. Determining predicted values for total charges for each case was accomplished by exploring associative relationships between charges and case-specific variables. These variables were clinical, demographic, and administrative. Year-by-year comparisons show that these relationships appear stable throughout the five-year period under study. Beta coefficients developed in Year 1 are applied to develop predictions for Year 3 cases. This was also done for year pairs 2 and 4, and 3 and 5. Based on the predicted and actual value of charges, recovery amounts were calculated for each case in the second year of the year pairs. The year gap is necessary to allow for collection and analysis of the data of the first year of each pair. The analysis was performed in two parts

  5. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  6. Palliative care need and management in the acute hospital setting: a census of one New Zealand Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving palliative care management in acute hospital settings has been identified as a priority internationally. The aim of this study was to establish the proportion of inpatients within one acute hospital in New Zealand who meet prognostic criteria for palliative care need and explore key aspects of their management. Methods A prospective survey of adult hospital inpatients (n = 501) was undertaken. Case notes were examined for evidence that the patient might be in their last year of life according to Gold Standards Framework (GSF) prognostic indicator criteria. For patients who met GSF criteria, clinical and socio-demographic information were recorded. Results Ninety-nine inpatients met GSF criteria, representing 19.8% of the total census population. The patients’ average age was 70 years; 47% had a primary diagnosis of cancer. Two thirds had died within 6 months of their admission. Seventy-eight of the 99 cases demonstrated evidence that a palliative approach to care had been adopted; however documentation of discussion about goals of care was very limited and only one patient had evidence of an advance care plan. Conclusion One fifth of hospital inpatients met criteria for palliative care need, the majority of whom were aged >70 years. Whilst over three quarters were concluded to be receiving care in line with a palliative care approach, very little documented evidence of discussion with patients and families regarding end of life issues was evident. Future research needs to explore how best to support ‘generalist’ palliative care providers in initiating, and appropriately recording, such discussions. PMID:23537092

  7. Validation of the Recording of Acute Exacerbations of COPD in UK Primary Care Electronic Healthcare Records

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Kieran J.; Müllerová, Hana; Hurst, John R.; Smeeth, Liam; Davis, Kourtney; Thomas, Sara L.; Quint, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute Exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) identified from electronic healthcare records (EHR) are important for research, public health and to inform healthcare utilisation and service provision. However, there is no standardised method of identifying AECOPD in UK EHR. We aimed to validate the recording of AECOPD in UK EHR. Methods We randomly selected 1385 patients with COPD from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We selected dates of possible AECOPD based on 15 different algorithms between January 2004 and August 2013. Questionnaires were sent to GPs asking for confirmation of their patients’ AECOPD on the dates identified and for any additional relevant information. Responses were reviewed independently by two respiratory physicians. Positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity were calculated. Results The response rate was 71.3%. AECOPD diagnostic codes, lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) codes, and prescriptions of antibiotics and oral corticosteroids (OCS) together for 5–14 days had a high PPV (>75%) for identifying AECOPD. Symptom-based algorithms and prescription of antibiotics or OCS alone had lower PPVs (60–75%). A combined strategy of antibiotic and OCS prescriptions for 5–14 days, or LRTI or AECOPD code resulted in a PPV of 85.5% (95% CI, 82.7–88.3%) and a sensitivity of 62.9% (55.4–70.4%). Conclusion Using a combination of diagnostic and therapy codes, the validity of AECOPD identified from EHR can be high. These strategies are useful for understanding health-care utilisation for AECOPD, informing service provision and for researchers. These results highlight the need for common coding strategies to be adopted in primary care to allow easy and accurate identification of events. PMID:26959820

  8. Incident reporting by acute pain service at a tertiary care university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aliya; Yasir, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Provision of effective and safe postoperative pain management is the principal responsibility of acute pain services (APSs). Continuous quality assurance is essential for high-quality patient care. We initiated anonymous reporting of critical incidents by APS to ensure continuous quality improvement and here present prospectively collected data on the reported incidents. Our objective was to analyze the frequency and nature of incidents and to see if any harm was caused to patients. Material and Methods: Data were collected from January 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. An incident related to pain management was defined as An incident that occurs in a patient receiving pain management supervised by APS, and causes or has the potential to cause harm or affects patient safety. A form was filled including incident type, personnel involved, any harm caused, and steps taken to rectify it. Frequencies and percentages were computed for categorical variables. Results: A total of 2042 patients were seen and 442 (21.64%) incidents reported during the study period, including documentation errors (136/31%), noncompliance with protocols (113/25.56%), wrong combination of drugs (56/12.66%), premature discontinuation (74/16.72%), prolonged delays in change of syringes (27/6.10%), loss to follow-up (19/4.29%), administration of contraindicated drugs (9/2.03%), catheter pull-outs (6/1.35%), and faulty equipment (2/0.45%). Steps were taken to rectify the errors accordingly. No harm was caused to any patient. Conclusion: Reporting of untoward incidents and their regular analysis by APS is recommended to ensure high-quality patient care and to provide guidance in making teaching strategies and guidelines to improve patient safety. PMID:26702208

  9. Pioneering early Intensive Care Medicine by the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment for severe acute barbiturate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2015-07-01

    Between the 1920s and the mid-1950s, barbiturates were the sedative-hypnotic agents most used in clinical practice. Their ready availability and narrow therapeutic margin accounted for disturbingly high rates of acute poisoning, whether suicidal or accidental. Until the late 1940s, medical treatment was relatively ineffective, with mortality subsequently high - not only from the effects of coma, respiratory depression and cardiovascular shock with renal impairment, but also from complications of the heavy use in the 1930s and 1940s of analeptic stimulating agents. Incidence of barbiturate intoxication increased substantially following World War II and this paper details development of what became known as the 'Scandinavian Method' of treatment, which contributed substantially to the earliest establishment of intensive care units and to the practice and methods of intensive care medicine. Three names stand out for the pioneering of this treatment. Successively, psychiatrist, Aage Kirkegaard, for introducing effective anti-shock fluid therapy; anaesthetist, Eric Nilsson, for introducing anaesthesiologic principles, including manual intermittent positive pressure ventilation into management; and, psychiatrist, Carl Clemmesen, for introducing centralisation of seriously poisoned patients in a dedicated unit. Clemmesen's Intoxication Unit opened at the Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, on 1 October 1949. ICU pioneer Bjørn Ibsen suggested it was the initial ICU, while noting that it supplied Intensive Therapy for one type of disorder only (as had HCA Lassen's Blegdam Hospital unit for Denmark's 1952 to 1953 polio epidemic). Treatment for barbiturate poisoning during the 1950s in some other Scandinavian hospitals will also be considered briefly. PMID:26126074

  10. Structured nursing communication on interdisciplinary acute care teams improves perceptions of safety, efficiency, understanding of care plan and teamwork as well as job satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gausvik, Christian; Lautar, Ashley; Miller, Lisa; Pallerla, Harini; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, accurate, and timely communication is required for quality health care and is strongly linked to health care staff job satisfaction. Developing ways to improve communication is key to increasing quality of care, and interdisciplinary care teams allow for improved communication among health care professionals. This study examines the patient- and family-centered use of structured interdisciplinary bedside rounds (SIBR) on an acute care for the elderly (ACE) unit in a 555-bed metropolitan community hospital. This mixed methods study surveyed 24 nurses, therapists, patient care assistants, and social workers to measure perceptions of teamwork, communication, understanding of the plan for the day, safety, efficiency, and job satisfaction. A similar survey was administered to a control group of 38 of the same staff categories on different units in the same hospital. The control group units utilized traditional physician-centric rounding. Significant differences were found in each category between the SIBR staff on the ACE unit and the control staff. Nurse job satisfaction is an important marker of retention and recruitment, and improved communication may be an important aspect of increasing this satisfaction. Furthermore, improved communication is key to maintaining a safe hospital environment with quality patient care. Interdisciplinary team rounds that take place at the bedside improve both nursing satisfaction and related communication markers of quality and safety, and may help to achieve higher nurse retention and safer patient care. These results point to the interconnectedness and dual benefit to both job satisfaction and patient quality of care that can come from enhancements to team communication. PMID:25609978

  11. Determinants of Burnout in Acute and Critical Care Military Nursing Personnel: A Cross-Sectional Study from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05) and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05). Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01), working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01), and inversely associated with age (p<0.05). Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05). Conclusion Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential screening and

  12. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  13. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O’Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids’ side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  14. Regional anesthesia for management of acute pain in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Mario; Dagal, Armagan; O'Donnell, Brendan; Stogicza, Agnes; Chiu, Sheila; Edwards, William Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a major problem for Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Despite numerous improvements it is estimated that as many as 70% of the patients experience moderate-to-severe postoperative pain during their stay in the ICU. Effective pain management means not only decreasing pain intensity, but also reducing the opioids' side effects. Minimizing nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and sedation may indeed facilitate patient recovery and it is likely to shorten the ICU and hospital stay. Adequate postoperative and post-trauma pain management is also crucial for the achievement of effective rehabilitation. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that effective acute pain management may be helpful in reducing the development of chronic pain. When used appropriately, and in combination with other treatment modalities, regional analgesia techniques (neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks) have the potential to reduce or eliminate the physiological stress response to surgery and trauma, decreasing the possibility of surgical complications and improving the outcomes. Also they may reduce the total amount of opioid analgesics necessary to achieve adequate pain control and the development of potentially dangerous side effects. PMID:26557482

  15. Environment of care: vertical evacuation concerns for acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    This perspective paper was intended to raise awareness and the urgency of needing additional evacuation-related, hospital building design policies. We addressed the challenges to maintain the integrity of exits and inadequate hospital design considerations for individuals with restricted mobility. Hospitals are occupied by people who may have restricted mobility and visitors who are likely unfamiliar with their surroundings. A hospital fire threatens all people in the building, but especially patients in the intensive care unit who are frail and have limited mobility. Evacuating immobile patients is complex, involving horizontal and vertical evacuation approaches. Hospital design must consider the needs of individuals with restricted mobility, who are the most vulnerable in case of a hospital fire. Consequently, we urge that acutely ill patients and others with restricted mobility should occupy units located on the ground floor or Level 2. In addition, when configuring the physical environment of hospitals, providing step-free ground floor access (indoor or outdoor ramps) and evacuation aids for vertical evacuation is crucial. Step-free ground floor access between Level 2 and the ground floor should be wide enough to allow transporting patients on their beds. A standard revision to include these recommendations is desperately needed. PMID:24404945

  16. Striving to prevent falls in an acute care setting--action to enhance quality.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A; Jones, N

    1996-07-01

    Although most falls do not result in serious physical injury, they can contribute to a loss of confidence and mobility which can culminate in a significant reduction in quality of life. Furthermore, the potential to fall is often increased when an individual is institutionalized because of frailty or confusion. The purpose of the study was, therefore, to establish whether a structured intervention would assist in preventing falls in an acute setting. This pre-test/post-test study was carried out over a 12-month period. Interventions included risk assessment, an alert system, reinforcing preventive actions, staff education and ongoing audits and feedback. Initial analysis of the data and comparison of fall rates indicated a significant reduction in the rate of falls between the pre- and post-intervention phases, although subsequent statistical analysis did not identify any significant relationships. It must be noted that no controls existed for extraneous variables, although patient profiles varied minimally during the period of the study. Outcomes include: a reduction in fall numbers and rates, enhanced staff morale with ownership of the programme, provision of a learning experience for staff (on which to build), and the fostering of a professional approach to improving the quality of patient care. PMID:8718053

  17. Six-month survival and quality of life of intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) has high incidence among the critically ill and associates with dismal outcome. Not only the long-term survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of patients with AKI is relevant due to substantial burden of care regarding these patients. We aimed to study the long-term outcome and QOL of patients with AKI treated in intensive care units. Methods We conducted a predefined six-month follow-up of adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients from the prospective, observational, multi-centre FINNAKI study. We evaluated the QOL of survivors with the EuroQol (EQ-5D) questionnaire. We included all participating sites with at least 70% rate of QOL measurements in the analysis. Results Of the 1,568 study patients, 635 (40.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 38.0-43.0%) had AKI according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Of the 635 AKI patients, 224 (35.3%), as compared to 154/933 (16.5%) patients without AKI, died within six months. Of the 1,190 survivors, 959 (80.6%) answered the EQ-5D questionnaire at six months. The QOL (median with Interquartile range, IQR) measured with the EQ-5D index and compared to age- and sex-matched general population was: 0.676 (0.520-1.00) versus 0.826 (0.812-0.859) for AKI patients, and 0.690 (0.533-1.00) versus 0.845 (0.812-0.882) for patients without AKI (P <0.001 in both). The EQ-5D at the time of ICU admission was available for 774 (80.7%) of the six-month respondents. We detected a mean increase of 0.017 for non-AKI and of 0.024 for AKI patients in the EQ-5D index (P = 0.728). The EQ-5D visual analogue scores (median with IQR) of patients with AKI (70 (50–83)) and patients without AKI (75 (60–87)) were not different from the age- and sex-matched general population (69 (68–73) and 70 (68–77)). Conclusions The health-related quality of life of patients with and without AKI was already lower on ICU admission than that of the age- and sex-matched general

  18. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice. PMID:23039017

  19. Intensive care management of patients with acute intermittent porphyria: Clinical report of four cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Madhur; Rath, Girija P.; Padhy, Uma P.; Marda, Manish; Mahajan, Charu; Dash, Hari H.

    2010-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common and the most severe form of acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant condition. It results from lower-than-normal levels (less than 50%) of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Patients may present commonly with gastrointestinal complaints and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diagnosis may be confirmed with the presence of intermediary metabolites of haem synthesis, amino levulinic acid (ALA) and PBG in urine or with specific enzyme assays. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom (90%). Peripheral polyneuropathy, primarily motor with flaccid paresis of proximal musculature, with or without autonomic involvement, is characteristic. Respiratory failure necessitates ventilator and intensive care support. Avoidance of precipitating factors and the use of haem preparations and intravenous dextrose form the basis of management. Gabapentin and propofol, rather than the conventional antiepileptics appear to be the appropriate choice for seizure control. Here, we present intensive care management of four cases of AIP with varying clinical presentation. PMID:20859493

  20. A Critical Care and Transplantation-Based Approach to Acute Respiratory Failure after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    Elbahlawan, Lama; Srinivasan, Ashok; Morrison, R Ray

    2016-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure contributes significantly to nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although there is a trend of improved survival over time, mortality remains unacceptably high. An understanding of the pathophysiology of early respiratory failure, opportunities for targeted therapy, assessment of the patient at risk, optimal use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, strategies to improve alveolar recruitment, appropriate fluid management, care of the patient with chronic lung disease, and importantly, a team approach between critical care and transplantation services may improve outcomes. PMID:26409244

  1. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1) an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2) a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician. PMID:27147862

  2. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  3. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  4. Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p <0. 001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  5. Improving room layouts for venepuncture, cannulation and ABG equipment on surgical wards.

    PubMed

    Pedley, Ryan; Whitehouse, Anna; Hammond, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The Productive Ward series has effectively helped to standardise the storage of equipment in hospital ward treatment rooms; however, in our organisation equipment for venepunture and cannulation had been excluded. This resulted in clinicians having to navigate several unfamiliar environments while on-call and hence waste valuable time searching for basic equipment. We aimed to make it easier to locate and identify the basic equipment used for cannulation, venepuncture, and arterial blood gas sampling and more efficient to collect. We examined the initial layout of equipment on four surgical wards in a large teaching hospital. The time taken for junior doctors, nurses, health care assistants, and physician assistants to gather equipment on these wards was recorded along with a process map of steps involved. Our intervention was to relocate the equipment into adjacent storage and make it easily identifiable by the use of a 'red dot'. Following these changes we repeated the measurements. There was an overall reduction in the mean time taken to gather the equipment required to insert a venous cannula on an unfamiliar ward from 2 min 41 s pre-intervention (range 52 s to 6 mins 58 s, n = 23) to 26 s post-intervention (range 8 s to 1 min 20 s, n = 51). Additionally, the number of steps involved in the process was reduced from 16 to five. All of the 32 junior doctors surveyed felt that faster identification improved patient safety. A significant reduction in the time wasted by clinicians searching for venepuncture equipment on surgical wards has been achieved by simplifying the storage, layout, and identification of this kit. The accumulated benefit includes increased productivity, familiarity, and safety, which is paramount when attending unwell patients on unfamiliar wards. PMID:26734247

  6. "Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

  7. Dealing with Scabies in a Hospital Ward.

    PubMed

    Clavagnier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    A case of scabies has been diagnosed in the Medical Ward where Sophie works, and the hospital is having to take appropriate measures. Scabies mites can spread quickly, and staff who are in contact with the infected patient risk catching the parasites and contaminating their own family in turn. One of the night nurses is probably infected. PMID:26365648

  8. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  9. Henry Ward Beecher: A Nation's Tribune.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Daniel Ross

    Henry Ward Beecher was America's most prominent 19th century liberal preacher and a major spokesperson for New England Transcendentalism. His philosophy integrated four fundamental themes: the creation of a moral code based on the internalization of values and peer group pressures, the establishment of the reform ideal of the impartial nonpartisan…

  10. Impact of dialysis practice patterns on outcomes in acute kidney injury in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Annigeri, Rajeev A.; Nandeesh, Venkatappa; Karuniya, Ramanathan; Rajalakshmi, Sasikumar; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent advances in dialysis therapy have made an impact on the clinical practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute kidney injury (AKI) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We studied the impact of RRT practice changes on outcomes in AKI in ICU over a period of 8 years. Subjects and Methods: AKI patients requiring RRT in ICU referred to a nephrologist during two different periods (period-1: Between May 2004 and May 2007, n = 69; period-2: Between August 2008 and May 2011, n = 93) were studied. The major changes in the dialysis practice during the period-2, compared to period-1 were introduction of prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT), early dialysis for metabolic acidosis, early initiation of RRT for anuria and positive fluid balance and use of bicarbonate-based fluids for continuous RRT (CRRT) instead of lactate buffer. The primary study outcome was 28-day hospital mortality. Results: The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.1 years and 72.6% were male. Introduction of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction in utilization of CRRT during period-2 (from 85.5% to 53.7%). The overall mortality was high (68%) but was significantly reduced during period-2 compared to period-1 (59% vs. 79.7%, P = 0.006). Metabolic acidosis but not the mode of RRT, was the significant factor which influenced mortality. Conclusions: Adaption of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction of utilization of CRRT. The mortality rate was significantly reduced during the period of adaption of PIRRT, possibly due to early initiation of RRT in the latter period for indications such as anuria and metabolic acidosis. PMID:26955212

  11. Teaching acute care nurses cognitive assessment using LOCFAS: what's the best method?

    PubMed

    Flannery, J; Land, K

    2001-02-01

    The Levels of Cognitive Functioning Assessment Scale (LOCFAS) is a behavioral checklist used by nurses in the acute care setting to assess the level of cognitive functioning in severely brain-injured patients in the early post-trauma period. Previous research studies have supported the reliability and validity of LOCFAS. For LOCFAS to become a more firmly established method of cognitive assessment, nurses must become familiar with and proficient in the use of this instrument. The purpose of this study was to find the most effective method of instruction by comparing three methods: a self-directed manual, a teaching video, and a classroom presentation. Videotaped vignettes of actual brain-injured patients were presented at the end of each training session, and participants were required to categorize these videotaped patients by using LOCFAS. High levels of reliability were observed for both the self-directed manual group and the teaching video group, but an overall lower level of reliability was observed for the classroom presentation group. Examination of the accuracy of overall LOCFAS ratings revealed a significant difference for instructional groups; the accuracy of the classroom presentation group was significantly lower than that of either the self-directed manual group or the teaching video group. The three instructional groups also differed on the average accuracy of ratings of the individual behaviors; the accuracy of the classroom presentation group was significantly lower than that of the teaching video group, whereas the self-directed manual group fell in between. Nurses also rated the instructional methods across a number of evaluative dimensions on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Evaluative statements ranged from average to good, with no significant differences among instructional methods. PMID:11233362

  12. A Comprehensive Review of Prehospital and In-hospital Delay Times in Acute Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Foraker, Randi; Morris, Dexter L.; Rosamond, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and summarize prehospital and in-hospital stroke evaluation and treatment delay times. We identified 123 unique peer-reviewed studies published from 1981 to 2007 of prehospital and in-hospital delay time for evaluation and treatment of patients with stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke-like symptoms. Based on studies of 65 different population groups, the weighted Poisson regression indicated a 6.0% annual decline (p<0.001) in hours/year for prehospital delay, defined from symptom onset to emergency department (ED) arrival. For in-hospital delay, the weighted Poisson regression models indicated no meaningful changes in delay time from ED arrival to ED evaluation (3.1%, p=0.49 based on 12 population groups). There was a 10.2% annual decline in hours/year from ED arrival to neurology evaluation or notification (p=0.23 based on 16 population groups) and a 10.7% annual decline in hours/year for delay time from ED arrival to initiation of computed tomography (p=0.11 based on 23 population groups). Only one study reported on times from arrival to computed tomography scan interpretation, two studies on arrival to drug administration, and no studies on arrival to transfer to an in-patient setting, precluding generalizations. Prehospital delay continues to contribute the largest proportion of delay time. The next decade provides opportunities to establish more effective community based interventions worldwide. It will be crucial to have effective stroke surveillance systems in place to better understand and improve both prehospital and in-hospital delays for acute stroke care. PMID:19659821

  13. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  14. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in acute care settings: dispensing and administration--1999.

    PubMed

    Ringold, D J; Santell, J P; Schneider, P J

    2000-10-01

    Results of the 1999 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in acute care settings that pertain to drug dispensing and administration practices are presented. Pharmacy directors at 1050 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. The response rate was 51%. About three-fourths of respondents described their inpatient pharmacy's distribution system as centralized. Of those with centralized distribution, 77.4% indicated that their system was not automated. Decentralized pharmacists were used in 29.4% of the hospitals surveyed; an average of 58.9% of their time was spent on clinical, as opposed to distributive, activities. About 67% of directors reported pharmacy computer access to hospital laboratory data, 38% reported access to automated medication-dispensing-unit data, and 19% reported computer access to hospital outpatient affiliates. Only 13% of hospitals had an electronic medication order-entry system; another 27% reported they were in the process of developing such a system. Decentralized medication storage and distribution devices were used in 49.2% of hospitals, while 7.3% used bedside information systems for medication management. Machine-readable coding was used for inpatient pharmacy dispensing by 8.2% of hospitals. Ninety percent reported a formal, systemwide committee responsible for data collection, review, and evaluation of medication errors. Virtually all respondents (98.7%) reported that their staff initiated manual reports. Only two thirds tracked these reports and reported trends to the staff. Fewer than 15% reported that staff were penalized for making or contributing to an error. Pharmacists are making a significant contribution to the safety of medication distribution and administration. The increased use of technology to improve efficiency and reduce costs will require that pharmacists continue to focus on the impact of changes on the safety of the medication-use system. PMID:11030028

  15. A proposed emergency management program for acute care facilities in response to a highly virulent infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno; Ferguson, Brandy; Walker, Milena; Lee, Yeo-Jin; Little, Gary; Parenti, David; Simon, Gary

    2016-01-01

    To address the organizational complexities associated with a highly virulent infectious disease (HVID) hazard, such as Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), an acute care facility should institute an emergency management program rooted in the fundamentals of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This program must address all known facets of the care of a patient with HVID, from unannounced arrival to discharge. The implementation of such a program not only serves to mitigate the risks from an unrecognized exposure but also serves to prepare the organization and its staff to provide for a safe response, and ensure a full recovery. Much of this program is based on education, training, and infection control measures along with resourcing for appropriate personal protective equipment which is instrumental in ensuring an organized and safe response of the acute care facility in the service to the community. This emergency management program approach can serve as a model in the care of not only current HVIDs such as EVD but also future presentations in our healthcare setting. PMID:26963227

  16. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care. PMID:25847647

  17. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  18. 3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PSYCHIATRIC WARD IN 24' X 60' QUONSET HUT, VIEW OF SOUTH FACE - Fort Randall, Neuro-Psychiatric Ward, Northeast of intersection of California Boulevard & Nurse Drive, Cold Bay, Aleutian Islands, AK

  19. Prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of pertussis in adults with acute cough: a prospective, observational study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Teepe, Jolien; Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Ieven, Margareta; Loens, Katherine; Huygen, Kris; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; de Melker, Hester; Butler, Chris C; Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Coenen, Samuel; Goossens, Herman; Verheij, Theo JM

    2015-01-01

    Background Most cases of adult pertussis probably remain undiagnosed. Aim To explore the prevalence, diagnosis, and disease course of acute pertussis infection in adult patients presenting with acute cough. Design and setting Prospective observational study between 2007 and 2010 in primary care in 12 European countries. Method Adults presenting with acute cough (duration of ≤28 days) were included. Bordetella pertussis infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction (from nasopharyngeal flocked swabs and sputa) and by measurement of immunoglobulin G antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) in venous blood at day 28. An antibody titre to PT of ≥125 IU/ml or PCR positive result in a respiratory sample defined recent infection. Patients completed a symptom diary for 28 days. Results Serum and/or respiratory samples were obtained in 3074 patients. Three per cent (93/3074) had recent B. pertussis infection. Prior cough duration >2 weeks discriminated to some extent between those with and without pertussis (adjusted odds ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval = 1.17 to 3.07; P = 0.010). Median cough duration after presentation was 17 and 12 days in patients with and without pertussis, respectively (P = 0.008). Patients with pertussis had longer duration of phlegm production (P = 0.010), shortness of breath (P = 0.037), disturbed sleep (P = 0.013) and interference with normal activities or work (P = 0.033) after presentation. Conclusion Pertussis infection plays a limited role among adults presenting with acute cough in primary care, but GPs should acknowledge the possibility of pertussis in uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infection. As in children, pertussis also causes prolonged symptoms in adults. However, pertussis is difficult to discern from other acute cough syndromes in adults at first presentation. PMID:26412843

  20. How Can Ward Teaching Be Made More Systematic?

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the June 1926 issue, offers ideas "by which we hope to make ward experiences of more value to the student." Author Mina A. McKay originally presented this material at a meeting of the Massachusetts State League of Nursing Education. She calls for more comprehensive morning and evening reports ("not just a mere reading of… orders"), the use of student experience records, ward clinics ("the type of bedside talk which supplements class room lectures"), and case reports presented by the students themselves. Efforts to improve clinical nursing education are ongoing, and in "'Flipping' the Classroom" in this month's AJN, Diane M. Billings describes a relatively new way of translating clinical concepts into practice. PMID:27560341

  1. Long-Term Care and Health Information Technology: Opportunities and Responsibilities for Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    MacTaggart, Patricia; Thorpe, Jane Hyatt

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and post-acute care providers (LTPAC) need to understand the multiple aspects of health information technology (HIT) in the context of health systems transformation in order to be a viable participant. The issues with moving to HIT are not just technical and funding, but include legal and policy, technical and business operations, and very significantly, governance. There are many unanswered questions. However, changes in payment methodologies, service delivery models, consumer expectations, and regulatory requirements necessitate that LTPAC providers begin their journey. PMID:24159273

  2. Long-term care and health information technology: opportunities and responsibilities for long-term and post-acute care providers.

    PubMed

    MacTaggart, Patricia; Thorpe, Jane Hyatt

    2013-01-01

    Long-term and post-acute care providers (LTPAC) need to understand the multiple aspects of health information technology (HIT) in the context of health systems transformation in order to be a viable participant. The issues with moving to HIT are not just technical and funding, but include legal and policy, technical and business operations, and very significantly, governance. There are many unanswered questions. However, changes in payment methodologies, service delivery models, consumer expectations, and regulatory requirements necessitate that LTPAC providers begin their journey. PMID:24159273

  3. Is a good death possible in Australian critical and acute settings?: physician experiences with end-of-life care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Australia approximately 70% of all deaths are institutionalised but over 15% of deaths occur in intensive care settings where the ability to provide a “good death” is particularly inhibited. Yet, there is a growing trend for death and dying to be managed in the ICU and physicians are increasingly challenged to meet the new expectations of their specialty. This study examined the unexplored interface between specialised Australian palliative and intensive care and the factors influencing a physician’s ability to manage deaths well. Method A qualitative investigation was focused on palliative and critical/acute settings. A thematic analysis was conducted on semi-structured in-depth interviews with 13 specialist physicians. Attention was given to eliciting meanings and experiences in Australian end-of-life care. Results Physicians negotiated multiple influences when managing dying patients and their families in the ICU. The way they understood and experienced end-of-life care practices was affected by cultural, institutional and professional considerations, and personal values and beliefs. Interpersonal and intrapsychic aspects highlighted the emotional and psychological relationship physicians have with patients and others. Many physicians were also unaware of what their cross-disciplinary colleagues could or could not do; poor professional recognition and collaboration, and ineffective care goal transition impaired their ability to assist good deaths. Experience was subject to the efficacy of physicians in negotiating complex bedside dynamics. Conclusions Regardless of specialty, all physicians identified the problematic nature of providing expert palliation in critical and acute settings. Strategies for integrating specialised palliative and intensive care were offered with corresponding directions for future research and clinical development. PMID:25147481

  4. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  5. Transfusion-free treatment strategies for acute anemia in critical care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Caitlin A; Byul Sarah, Sae; Forest, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Acute anemia is a frequently encountered diagnosis in critically ill patients, and can be a challenge if blood products are not readily available or if patients refuse these products on the basis of their religious beliefs. This article discusses the goals of anemia management and summarizes several alternatives to blood transfusions that can be used to prevent and treat acute anemia. PMID:27467297

  6. Biomarkers as point-of-care tests to guide prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute respiratory infections in primary care.

    PubMed

    Aabenhus, Rune; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik S; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are by far the most common reason for prescribing an antibiotic in primary care, even though the majority of ARIs are of viral or non-severe bacterial aetiology. Unnecessary antibiotic use will, in many cases, not be beneficial to the patients' recovery and expose them to potential side effects. Furthermore, as a causal link exists between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, reducing unnecessary antibiotic use is a key factor in controlling this important problem. Antibiotic resistance puts increasing burdens on healthcare services and renders patients at risk of future ineffective treatments, in turn increasing morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. One strategy aiming to reduce antibiotic use in primary care is the guidance of antibiotic treatment by use of a point-of-care biomarker. A point-of-care biomarker of infection forms part of the acute phase response to acute tissue injury regardless of the aetiology (infection, trauma and inflammation) and may in the correct clinical context be used as a surrogate marker of infection,possibly assisting the doctor in the clinical management of ARIs.Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of point-of-care biomarker tests of infection to guide antibiotic treatment in patients presenting with symptoms of acute respiratory infections in primary care settings regardless of age.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1946 to January 2014), EMBASE (2010 to January 2014), CINAHL (1981 to January 2014), Web of Science (1955 to January 2014) and LILACS (1982 to January 2014).Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in primary care patients with ARIs that compared use of point-of-care biomarkers with standard of care. We included trials that randomised individual patients as well as trials that randomised clusters of patients(cluster-RCTs).Two review authors independently extracted data on the following outcomes: i

  7. [Palliative care - also in geriatrics?].

    PubMed

    Sandgathe Husebø, B; Husebø, S

    2001-10-01

    Red Cross Clinic is the largest geriatric center in Norway (240 beds). Major parts of the center are: long time geriatric ward (215 beds), rehabilitation and acute ward (25 beds), day clinic (45 patients) and a teaching and research unit. A palliative care unit (10 beds) will be opened in spring 2000. In mai 1998 a national project: Palliative care for the elderly was opened at our center. The projects main goal is to develop and support proper palliative care to all severe ill and dying patients in Norway. In a prospective study we examined 179 consecutive deaths between 1998 and 1999. Average age was 84.5. Major symptom problems were pain, dyspnoea, death-rattle and anxiety. In the last 24 hours 83% of the patients received opioids, 67% of the cases morphine (mean daily dosage 31.8 mg). 37% of the patients received scopolamine (mean daily dosage 0.8 mg), 12% benzodiazepines and 3% of the patients haloperidol. 152 (85%) of the deaths were expected, 27 (15%) unexpected. In 137 patients (77%) open, honest, frank communication with patient or their nearest kin regarding the imminent death was possible. In our experience it is a myth that the relatives want doctors to practise "maximal therapy". All old patients in geriatric clinics and nursing homes need palliative care. We have found no international textbooks of geriatrics with chapters on palliative care or textbooks on palliative care with chapters on the elderly. They need doctors and nurses who are properly trained and educated in palliative care. In most countries in Europe this training and education is not provided. PMID:11810376

  8. Fast-tracking acute hospital care--from bed crisis to bed crisis.

    PubMed

    Rae, Brendon; Busby, Wendy; Millard, Peter H

    2007-02-01

    We describe here the results of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) project, the Delayed Discharge Project, in a general medicine service in a New Zealand teaching hospital. Average length of stay (ALOS) dropped by 2.6 days (6.5 to 3.9), readmission rates did not rise, costs of service delivery dropped by US dollars 2.4 million, patient numbers increased by 145 (2445 to 2590), while bed numbers reduced from 56 to 32 and ward outliers all but disappeared, suggesting success. However, 2 years after the successful cost-saving measures were introduced the new system crashed as a result of additional bed closures and organisational restructures. PMID:17266488

  9. Comparison of PCR/Electron spray Ionization-Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry versus Traditional Clinical Microbiology for active surveillance of organisms contaminating high-use surfaces in a burn intensive care unit, an orthopedic ward and healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding nosocomial pathogen transmission is restricted by culture limitations. Novel platforms, such as PCR-based electron spray ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), may be useful as investigational tools. Methods Traditional clinical microbiology (TCM) and PCR/ESI-TOF-MS were used to recover and detect microorganisms from the hands and personal protective equipment of 10 burn intensive care unit (ICU) healthcare workers providing clinical care at a tertiary care military referral hospital. High-use environmental surfaces were assessed in 9 burn ICU and 10 orthopedic patient rooms. Clinical cultures during the study period were reviewed for pathogen comparison with investigational molecular diagnostic methods. Results From 158 samples, 142 organisms were identified by TCM and 718 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. The molecular diagnostic method detected more organisms (4.5 ± 2.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.8, p < 0.01) from 99% vs. 67% of samples (p < 0.01). TCM detected S. aureus in 13 samples vs. 21 by PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. Gram-negative organisms were less commonly identified than gram-positive by both methods; especially by TCM. Among all detected bacterial species, similar percentages were typical nosocomial pathogens (18-19%) for TCM vs. PCR/ESI-TOF-MS. PCR/ESI-TOF-MS also detected mecA in 112 samples, vanA in 13, and KPC-3 in 2. MecA was associated (p < 0.01) with codetection of coagulase negative staphylococci but not S. aureus. No vanA was codetected with enterococci; one KPC-3 was detected without Klebsiella spp. Conclusions In this pilot study, PCR/ESI-TOF-MS detected more organisms, especially gram-negatives, compared to TCM, but the current assay format is limited by the number of antibiotic resistance determinants it covers. Further large-scale assessments of PCR/ESI-TOF-MS for hospital surveillance are warranted. PMID:23050585

  10. Intensive chemotherapy, azacitidine, or supportive care in older acute myeloid leukemia patients: an analysis from a regional healthcare network.

    PubMed

    Bories, Pierre; Bertoli, Sarah; Bérard, Emilie; Laurent, Julie; Duchayne, Eliane; Sarry, Audrey; Delabesse, Eric; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Huguet, Françoise; Récher, Christian

    2014-12-01

    We assessed in a French regional healthcare network the distribution of treatments, prognostic factors, and outcome of 334 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients aged 60 years or older over a 4-year period of time (2007-2010). Patients were selected in daily practice for intensive chemotherapy (n = 115), azacitidine (n = 95), or best supportive care (n = 124). In these three groups, median overall survival was 18.9, 11.3, and 1.8 months, respectively. In the azacitidine group, multivariate analysis showed that overall survival was negatively impacted by higher age (P = 0.010 for one unit increase), unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 0.001), lymphocyte count <0.5 G/L (P = 0.015), and higher lactate dehydrogenase level (P = 0.005 for one unit increase). We compared the survival of patients treated by azacitidine versus intensive chemotherapy and best supportive care using time-dependent analysis and propensity score matching. Patients treated by intensive chemotherapy had a better overall survival compared with those treated by azacitidine from 6 months after diagnosis, whereas patients treated by azacitidine had a better overall survival compared with those treated by best supportive care from 1 day after diagnosis. This study of "real life" practice shows that there is a room for low intensive therapies such as azacitidine in selected elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25195872

  11. A Comparison of Free-Standing versus Co-Located Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Barnato, Amber E.; Lave, Judith R.; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Le, Tri Q.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACs) provide specialized treatment for patients with chronic critical illness. Increasingly LTACs are co-located within traditional short-stay hospitals rather than operated as free-standing facilities, which may affect LTAC utilization patterns and outcomes. Methods We compared free-standing and co-located LTACs using 2005 data from the United States Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We used bivariate analyses to examine patient characteristics and timing of LTAC transfer, and used propensity matching and multivariable regression to examine mortality, readmissions, and costs after transfer. Results Of 379 LTACs in our sample, 192 (50.7%) were free-standing and 187 (49.3%) were co-located in a short-stay hospital. Co-located LTACs were smaller (median bed size: 34 vs. 66, p <0.001) and more likely to be for-profit (72.2% v. 68.8%, p = 0.001) than freestanding LTACs. Co-located LTACs admitted patients later in their hospital course (average time prior to transfer: 15.5 days vs. 14.0 days) and were more likely to admit patients for ventilator weaning (15.9% vs. 12.4%). In the multivariate propensity-matched analysis, patients in co-located LTACs experienced higher 180-day mortality (adjusted relative risk: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00–1.11, p = 0.04) but lower readmission rates (adjusted relative risk: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.75–0.98, p = 0.02). Costs were similar between the two hospital types (mean difference in costs within 180 days of transfer: -$3,580, 95% CI: -$8,720 –$1,550, p = 0.17). Conclusions Compared to patients in free-standing LTACs, patients in co-located LTACs experience slightly higher mortality but lower readmission rates, with no change in overall resource use as measured by 180 day costs. PMID:26440102

  12. Recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute inpatient mental health settings in Australia: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Dhital, Deepa; Ireland, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Recovery-oriented care acknowledges the unique journey that consumers lead with the aim of regaining control of their lives in order to live a good life. Recovery has become a dominant policy-directed model of many mental health care organizations, but in older-adult acute mental health inpatient settings, nurses do not have a clear description of how to be recovery-oriented. The aims of this study were to determine the extent to which elements of existing nursing practice resemble the domains of recovery-oriented care and provide a baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented mental health care provision. An exploratory, qualitative research design was used to meet the research aims. A purposive sample of mental health nurses (N = 12) participated in focus groups in three older-adult inpatient settings in Australia. A general inductive approach was used to analyze the qualitative data. The mental health nurses in this study readily discussed aspects of their current practice within the recovery domains. They described pragmatic ways to promote a culture of hope, collaborative partnerships, meaningful engagement, autonomy and self-determination, and community participation and citizenship. Nurses also discussed challenges and barriers to recovery-oriented care in older-adult acute mental health settings. This study identified a reasonable baseline understanding of practice in preparation for transformation to recovery-oriented older-adult mental healthcare provision. A concerted drive focused on recovery education is required to effectively embed a recovery-orientated paradigm into older-adult mental health settings. PMID:25263738

  13. Barriers to Nurse-Patient Communication in Cardiac Surgery Wards: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. Objectives: The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. Design and Methods: This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Conclusions: Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care. PMID:25363126

  14. Control of infection in hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Blowers, Robert

    1961-01-01

    Some of the problems of ward management are reviewed. Methods suggested for dealing with them are probably not the ideals that should ultimately be attained but minimum standards to serve as immediate objectives. They concern indications for and methods of isolation, control of infection from staff, environmental contamination, and a few technical procedures. A new type of dressing towel for wounds is described. Images PMID:16810967

  15. An exploration of the leadership attributes and methods associated with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Steed, Airica

    2012-01-01

    The lean system has been shown to be a viable and sustainable solution for the growing number of cost, quality, and efficiency issues in the health care industry. While there is a growing body of evidence to support the outcomes that can be achieved as a result of the successful application of the lean system in hospital organizations, there is not a complete understanding of the leadership attributes and methods that are necessary to achieve successful widespread mobilization and sustainment. This study was an exploration of leadership and its relevant association with successful lean system deployments in acute care hospitals. This research employed an exploratory qualitative research design encompassing a research questionnaire and telephonic interviews of 25 health care leaders in 8 hospital organizations across the United States. The results from this study identified the need to have a strong combination of personal characteristics, learned behaviors, strategies, tools, and tactics that evolved into a starting adaptable framework for health care leaders to leverage when starting their own transformational change journeys using the lean system. Health care leaders could utilize the outcomes reported in this study as a conduit to enhance the effective deployment, widespread adoption, and sustainment of the lean system in practice. PMID:22207019

  16. Assessment tools for determining appropriateness of admission to acute care of persons transferred from long-term care facilities: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents of long-term care facilities have a high risk of acute care admission. Estimates of the frequency of inappropriate transfers vary substantially throughout the studies and various assessment tools have been used. The purpose of this study is to systematically review and describe the internationally existing assessment tools used for determining appropriateness of hospital admissions among long-term care residents. Method Systematic review of the literature of two databases (PubMed and CINAHL®). The search covered seven languages and the period between January 2000 and December 2012. All quantitative studies were included if any assessment tool for appropriateness of hospital and/or emergency department admission of long-term care residents was used. Two pairs of independent researchers extracted the data. Results Twenty-nine articles were included, covering study periods between 1991 and 2009. The proportion of admissions considered as inappropriate ranged from 2% to 77%. Throughout the studies, 16 different assessment tools were used; all were based on expert opinion to some extent; six also took into account published literature or interpretation of patient data. Variation between tools depended on the concepts studied, format and application, and aspects evaluated. Overall, the assessment tools covered six aspects: specific medical diagnoses (assessed by n = 8 tools), acuteness/severity of symptoms (n = 7), residents’ characteristics prior to admission (n = 6), residents’ or families’ wishes (n = 3), existence of a care plan (n = 1), and availability or requirement of resources (n = 10). Most tools judged appropriateness based on one fulfilled item; five tools judged appropriateness based on a balance of aspects. Five tools covered only one of these aspects and only six considered four or more aspects. Little information was available on the psychometric properties of the tools. Conclusions Most assessment tools

  17. Development of a resource model for infection prevention and control programs in acute, long term, and home care settings: conference proceedings of the Infection Prevention and Control Alliance.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Judith

    2004-02-01

    There is mounting concern about the impact of health care restructuring on the provision of infection prevention services across the health care continuum. In response to this, Health Canada hosted two meetings of Canadian infection control experts to develop a model upon which the resources required to support an effective, integrated infection prevention and control program across the health care continuum could be based. The final models project the IPCP needs as three full time equivalent infection control professionals/500 beds in acute care hospitals and one full time equivalent infection control professional/150-250 beds in long term care facilities. Non human resource requirements are also described for acute, long term, community, and home care settings. PMID:14755227

  18. Restraint use in acute and extended mental health services for older persons.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; Oster, Candice; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear

    2013-12-01

    Restraint of older persons in inpatient and residential care is used to control aggression, and prevent falls and other adverse outcomes. Initiatives to reduce these practices are being implemented worldwide. However, there has been little examination of restraint practice in psychiatric services for older persons. This paper reports a retrospective comparative analysis of restraint use in three acute and two extended care psychiatric inpatient wards in Australia. The analysis involved examination of restraint incidents and comparison of restrained and non-restrained patients. There was significant variation in restraint use between wards. On one acute ward, 12.74% of patients were restrained, although restraint use declined during the data collection period. Patients with dementia were restrained at higher rates than patients with other diagnoses, and restrained patients stayed in hospital for a longer duration. Restraint occurred early in admission, and few differences emerged between those restrained once or multiple times. Mechanical restraint was more prevalent than physical restraint, with restraint predominantly used to manage aggression and falls. Findings provide new data on restraint in older persons' psychiatric services. Greater conceptual understandings of behaviours associated with dementia and the unique needs of patients with these disorders may assist in reducing restraint use in these settings. PMID:23009335

  19. Linking the Activity Measure for Post-acute Care and the Quality of Life Outcomes in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Pengsheng; Lai, Jin-shei; Tian, Feng; Coster, Wendy J.; Jette, Alan M.; Straub, Donald; Cella, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To use item response theory (IRT) methods to link physical functioning items in the Activity Measure for Post-acute Care (AM-PAC) and the Quality of Life Outcomes in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QOL) Design Secondary data analysis of the physical functioning items of AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL. We used a non-equivalent group design with 36 core items common to both instruments. We used a test characteristic curve transformation method to for linking AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL scores. Linking was conducted so that both raw scores and scaled AM-PAC and Neuro-QOL scores (converted-logit scores with mean = 50 and SD = 10) could be compared. Setting AM-PAC items were administered to rehabilitation patients in post-acute care settings. Neuro-QOL items were administered to a community sample of adults via the Internet. Participants The AM-PAC sample consisted of 1,041 post acute care patients; the Neuro-QOL sample was 549 community-dwelling adults. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures 25 Mobility items and 11 ADL items common to both instruments were included in the analysis. Results Neuro-QOL items were linked to the AM-PAC scale using the Generalized Partial Credit Model. Mobility and ADL subscale scores from the two instruments were calibrated to the AM-PAC metric. Conclusions An IRT-based linking method placed AM-PAC and NeuroQOL Mobility and ADL scores on a common metric. This linking allowed estimation of AM-PAC Mobility and ADL subscale scores based on Neuro-QOL Mobility and ADL subscale scores, and vice versa. The accuracy of these results should be validated in a future sample in which participants respond to both instruments. PMID:21958921

  20. Robotic CABG decreases 30-day complication rate, length of stay and acute care facility discharge rate compared to conventional surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leyvi, Galina; Forest, Stephen; Srinivas, V. S.; Greenberg, Mark; Wang, Nan; Mais, Alec; Snyder, Max; DeRose, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to compare the short term outcomes of robotic with conventional on pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods The study population included 2091 consecutive patients who underwent either conventional or robotic CABG from January 2007 to March 2012. Pre-operative, intra-operative and 30-day post-operative variables were collected for each group. In order to compare the incidence of rapid recovery between conventional and robotic CABG, the surrogate variables of early discharge and discharge to home (versus rehabilitation or acute care facility) were evaluated. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized. Results One hundred and fifty robotic and 1,619 conventional CABG cases were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that robotic surgery was a strong predictor of lower 30-day complications (OR = 0.24, p=0.005), short length of stay (OR 3.31, p < 0.001), and decreased need for an acute care facility (OR 0.55, p = 0.032). In the presence of complications (NY State Complication Composite), the robotic technique was not associated with a change in discharge status. Conclusions In this retrospective review robotic CABG was associated with a lower 30-day complication rate, a shorter length of stay and a lower incidence of acute care facility discharge than conventional on pump CABG. It may suggest a more rapid recovery to pre-operative status after robotic surgery: however, only a randomized prospective study could confirm the advantages of a robotic approach PMID:25238421

  1. Development of clinical practice guidelines for urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrea R

    2014-01-01

    This study developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings. The research team conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on urinary continence interventions and outcomes. The team then developed a set of recommendations outlined in the resulting clinical practice guidelines titled Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the Urinary Continence Care of Stroke Survivors in Acute and Rehabilitation Settings. The evaluation of the CPGs consisted of a two-part assessment and pilot implementation. An expert panel of 25 local and regional experts in stroke and continence care assessed the proposed CPGs. This assessment consisted of two stages: a) evaluating the guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Instrument (http://www. agreetrust.org); and, b) conducting focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the guidelines using the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU). Results from the expert panel assessments/feedback contributed to the refinement of the CPGs as well as identification and construction of implementation strategies. Two sites conducted a three-month pilot implementation of three recommendations from the CPGs as selected by each site. The two inpatient sites were a rehabilitation setting and a mixed acute and rehabilitation setting. The implementation of the CPGs included the development of learning strategies tailored to the needs of each site and in addition to the creation of an online self-learning portal. This study assessed nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding urinary continence challenges using a survey before and after the pilot. Chart reviews before and after the pilot implementation audited the nurses' urinary continence practices for patients and uptake of the selected guidelines' recommendations. Study findings suggested the implementation of the CPGs

  2. Planning and process evaluation of a multi-faceted influenza vaccination implementation strategy for health care workers in acute health care settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza transmitted by health care workers (HCWs) is a potential threat to frail patients in acute health care settings. Therefore, immunizing HCWs against influenza should receive high priority. Despite recommendations of the World Health Organization, vaccine coverage of HCWs remains low in all European countries. This study explores the use of intervention strategies and methods to improve influenza vaccination rates among HCWs in an acute care setting. Methods The Intervention Mapping (IM) method was used to systematically develop and implement an intervention strategy aimed at changing influenza vaccination behaviour among HCWs in Dutch University Medical Centres (UMCs). Carried out during the influenza seasons 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, the interventions were then qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by way of feedback from participating UMCs and the completion of a web-based staff questionnaire in the following spring of each season. Results The IM method resulted in the development of a transparent influenza vaccination intervention implementation strategy. The intervention strategy was offered to six Dutch UMCs in a randomized in a clustered Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT), where three UMCs were chosen for intervention, and three UMCs acted as controls. A further two UMCs elected to have the intervention. The qualitative process evaluation showed that HCWs at four of the five intervention UMCs were responsive to the majority of the 11 relevant behavioural determinants resulting from the needs assessment in their intervention strategy compared with only one of three control UMCs. The quantitative evaluation among a sample of HCWs revealed that of all the developed communication materials, HCWs reported the posters as the most noticeable. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that it is possible to develop a structured implementation strategy for increasing the rate of influenza vaccination by HCWs in acute health care settings. The

  3. Creating a Nurse-Led Culture to Minimize Horizontal Violence in the Acute Care Setting: A Multi-Interventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Parker, Karen M; Harrington, Ann; Smith, Charlene M; Sellers, Kathleen F; Millenbach, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal violence (HV) is prevalent in nursing. However, few strategies are identified to address this phenomenon that undermines communication and patient safety. Nurses at an acute care hospital implemented multiple interventions to address HV resulting in increased knowledge of hospital policies regarding HV, and significantly (p < .05) less HV prevalence than was reported by nurses in other organizations throughout New York State. With the aid and oversight of nursing professional development specialists, evidence-based interventions to address HV were developed including policies, behavioral performance reviews, and staff/manager educational programs. PMID:26985749

  4. Identification of high-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome using point-of-care echocardiography in the ED.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Oron; Riguzzi, Christine; Nagdev, Arun

    2014-06-01

    Stratifying risk of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED) remains a frequent challenge. When ST-elevation criteria are absent, current recommendations rely upon insensitive and time-intensive methods such as the electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme testing. Here, we report on a series of cases, where emergency physicians used a simplified model for identifying regional wall motion abnormalities by point-of-care echocardiography in patients presenting with chest pain to the ED. With the use of a simplified model described herein, high-risk patients with ACS were identified rapidly in a cohort usually difficult to risk stratify. PMID:24745875

  5. Assessments of urine cofilin-1 in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units with acute kidney injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Jang; Chao, Cheng-Han; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien

    2013-02-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family has been reported to be associated with ischemia induced renal disorders. Here we examine if cofilin-1 is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI). We exploited a 96-well based fiber-optic biosensor that uses conjugated gold nanoparticles and a sandwich immunoassay to detect the urine cofilin-1 level of AKI patients. The mean urine cofilin-1 level of the AKI patients was two-fold higher than that of healthy adults. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that cofilin-1 is a potential biomarker for discriminating AKI patients from healthy adults for intensive care patients.

  6. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  7. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals. PMID:18975486

  8. The Relationship between Therapeutic Alliance and Service User Satisfaction in Mental Health Inpatient Wards and Crisis House Alternatives: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Angela; Fahmy, Sarah; Nolan, Fiona; Morant, Nicola; Fox, Zoe; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Osborn, David; Burgess, Emma; Gilburt, Helen; McCabe, Rosemarie; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor service user experiences are often reported on mental health inpatient wards. Crisis houses are an alternative, but evidence is limited. This paper investigates therapeutic alliances in acute wards and crisis houses, exploring how far stronger therapeutic alliance may underlie greater client satisfaction in crisis houses. Methods and Findings Mixed methods were used. In the quantitative component, 108 crisis house and 247 acute ward service users responded to measures of satisfaction, therapeutic relationships, informal peer support, recovery and negative events experienced during the admission. Linear regressions were conducted to estimate the association between service setting and measures, and to model the factors associated with satisfaction. Qualitative interviews exploring therapeutic alliances were conducted with service users and staff in each setting and analysed thematically. Results We found that therapeutic alliances, service user satisfaction and informal peer support were greater in crisis houses than on acute wards, whilst self-rated recovery and numbers of negative events were lower. Adjusted multivariable analyses suggest that therapeutic relationships, informal peer support and negative experiences related to staff may be important factors in accounting for greater satisfaction in crisis houses. Qualitative results suggest factors that influence therapeutic alliances include service user perceptions of basic human qualities such as kindness and empathy in staff and, at service level, the extent of loss of liberty and autonomy. Conclusions and Implications We found that service users experience better therapeutic relationships and higher satisfaction in crisis houses compared to acute wards, although we cannot exclude the possibility that differences in service user characteristics contribute to this. This finding provides some support for the expansion of crisis house provision. Further research is needed to investigate why acute

  9. Transitions of care in the management of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Jaime E; Hamada, Yukihiro; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have evolved over a relatively short period of time to become one of the most challenging medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Notably the high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) across the continuum of care has coincided with increased outpatient failures and higher rates of hospital admissions for parental antibiotic therapy. Consequently the management of ABSSSI constitutes a tremendous burden to the healthcare system in terms of cost of care and consumption of institutional and clinical resources. This perspective piece discusses current and new approaches to the management of ABSSSI in a hospital setting and the need for a multifaceted approach. Treatment strategies for the management through the utilization of observation units (OU), Outpatient Parental Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT), and newly developed antibiotics for the use against skin infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria will be discussed in the context of ABSSSI. PMID:27248789

  10. Monitoring the impact of the DRG payment system on nursing service context factors in Swiss acute care hospitals: Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spirig, Rebecca; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Martin, Jacqueline S.; Frei, Irena Anna; Müller, Marianne; Kleinknecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims: With this study protocol, a research program is introduced. Its overall aim is to prepare the instruments and to conduct the first monitoring of nursing service context factors at three university and two cantonal hospitals in Switzerland prior to the introduction of the reimbursement system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) and to further develop a theoretical model as well as a methodology for future monitoring following the introduction of DRGs. Background: DRG was introduced to all acute care hospitals in Switzerland in 2012. In other countries, DRG introduction led to rationing and subsequently to a reduction in nursing care. As result, nursing-sensitive patient outcomes were seriously jeopardised. Switzerland has the opportunity to learn from the consequences experienced by other countries when they introduced DRGs. Their experiences highlight that DRGs influence nursing service context factors such as complexity of nursing care or leadership, which in turn influence nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. For this reason, the monitoring of nursing service context factors needs to be an integral part of the introduction of DRGs. However, most acute care hospitals in Switzerland do not monitor nursing service context data. Nursing managers and hospital executive boards will be in need of this data in the future, in order to distribute resources effectively. Methods/Design: A mixed methods design in the form of a sequential explanatory strategy was chosen. During the preparation phase, starting in spring 2011, instruments were selected and prepared, and the access to patient and nursing data in the hospitals was organized. Following this, online collection of quantitative data was conducted in fall 2011. In summer 2012, qualitative data was gathered using focus group interviews, which helped to describe the processes in more detail. During 2013 and 2014, an integration process is being conducted involving complementing, comparing and contrasting

  11. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists: changing care in acute care hospitals in New York City.

    PubMed

    Mezey, M; Dougherty, M; Wade, P; Mersmann, C

    1994-12-01

    To respond to the shrinking pool of primary care physicians and to demands from managed care programs for cost containment, hospitals in New York City have increased their use of nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and nurse anesthetists, creating an increased demand for these personnel. We report here on a survey of hospitals and schools of nursing in New York City and present findings on (a) current use of, and projected demand for nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (midwives) and nurse anesthetists (anesthetists) in hospitals in New York City; (b) the practice patterns of NPs, midwives, and anesthetists currently employed in hospitals; and (c) current and projected enrollment and curriculum in NP, midwifery, and anesthetist education programs in the New York metropolitan area. PMID:7853064

  12. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] More on Ward Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    The May 23rd Eos “In Brief” could have been considerably more informative about Ward Valley and the work of the NAS panel in reviewing issues raised about the proposed site. The article should have included more comprehensive discussion by the scientific participants who reviewed the technical issues involved. In addition, the article raised two very different subjects—safety issues at Ward Valley and alleged bias of NAS panels—but did not separate the subjects well. Readers may not have distinguished between the Ward Valley panel and the NAS Board on Radioactive Waste Management in the question of bias. In addition, the nature of the reported-on attacks on scientific and personal integrity of the scientists may well discourage qualified but thinner-skinned geoscientists from public service on panels.

  13. Patient safety and acute care medicine: lessons for the future, insights from the past

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2010 (Springer Verlag) and co-published as a series in Critical Care. Other articles in the series can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/yearbook. Further information about the Yearbook of Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/2855. PMID:20236461

  14. Auditing the needs of recovery room staff providing care for the child in an acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Nicholas-Holley, J

    2016-05-01

    This article examines the results of an audit into recovery nurse knowledge and understanding of paediatric care standards. It will critically analyse the availability of current standards for children's services in the recovery room and discuss the need for a national document specifically dedicated to standards of practise for the care of the child in the recovery room providing immediate post operative care. The article will also look at the development of such a document. PMID:27400487

  15. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. PMID:25143721

  16. Use of a care bundle in the emergency department for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cormac; Brennan, John R; Brown, Lindsay; Donaghy, Deirdre; Jones, Patricia; Whelan, Rory; McCormack, Niamh; Callanan, Ian; Ryan, John; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the efficacy and usefulness of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care bundle designed for the initial management of acute exacerbations of COPD and to assess whether it improves quality of care and provides better outcomes. Introduction The level of care provided in the emergency department (ED) for COPD exacerbations varies greatly, and there is a need for a more systematic, consistent, evidence-based quality improvement approach to improve outcomes and costs. Methods A prospective before and after study was carried out in a university teaching hospital. Fifty consecutive patients were identified in the ED with COPD exacerbations and their management was reviewed. Following the education of ED staff and the implementation of a COPD care bundle, the outcome for 51 consecutive patients was analyzed. This COPD care bundle consisted of ten elements considered essential to the management of COPD exacerbations and was scored 0–10 according to the number of items on the checklist implemented correctly. Results Following implementation, the mean bundle score out of 10 improved from 4.6 to 7 (P<0.001). There was a significant decrease in the unnecessary use of intravenous corticosteroids from 60% to 32% (P=0.003) and also a marked improvement in the use of oxygen therapy, with appropriate treatment increasing from 76% to 96% (P=0.003). Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism also improved from 54% to 73% (P=0.054). The 30-day readmission rate did not significantly improve. Conclusion The use of a bundle improves the delivery of care for COPD exacerbations in the ED. There is more appropriate use of therapeutic interventions, especially oxygen therapy and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:24348033

  17. The influence of insurance status on waiting times in German acute care hospitals: an empirical analysis of new data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate in Germany about the assumption that patients with private health insurance (PHI) benefit from better access to medical care, including shorter waiting times (Lüngen et al. 2008), compared to patients with statutory health insurance (SHI). Problem Existing analyses of the determinants for waiting times in Germany are a) based on patient self-reports and b) do not cover the inpatient sector. This paper aims to fill both gaps by (i) generating new primary data and (ii) analyzing waiting times in German hospitals. Methods We requested individual appointments from 485 hospitals within an experimental study design, allowing us to analyze the impact of PHI versus SHI on waiting times (Asplin et al. 2005). Results In German acute care hospitals patients with PHI have significantly shorter waiting times than patients with SHI. Conclusion Discrimination in waiting times by insurance status does occur in the German acute hospital sector. Since there is very little transparency in treatment quality in Germany, we do not know whether discrimination in waiting times leads to discrimination in the quality of treatment. This is an important issue for future research. PMID:20025744

  18. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  19. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  20. Review of nucleic acid amplification tests and clinical prediction rules for diagnosis of tuberculosis in acute care facilities.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Amit S; Davis, J Lucian; Schecter, Gisela F; Barry, Pennan M; Flood, Jennifer M

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important cause of hospitalization and mortality in the United States. Prevention of TB transmission in acute care facilities relies on prompt identification and implementation of airborne isolation, rapid diagnosis, and treatment of presumptive pulmonary TB patients. In areas with low TB burden, this strategy may result in inefficient utilization of airborne infection isolation rooms (AIIRs). We reviewed TB epidemiology and diagnostic approaches to inform optimal TB detection in low-burden settings. Published clinical prediction rules for individual studies have a sensitivity ranging from 81% to 100% and specificity ranging from 14% to 63% for detection of culture-positive pulmonary TB patients admitted to acute care facilities. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have a specificity of >98%, and the sensitivity of NAATs varies by acid-fast bacilli sputum smear status (positive smear, ≥95%; negative smear, 50%-70%). We propose an infection prevention strategy using a clinical prediction rule to identify patients who warrant diagnostic evaluation for TB in an AIIR with an NAAT. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether use of clinical prediction rules and NAATs results in optimized utilization of AIIRs and improved detection and treatment of presumptive pulmonary TB patients. PMID:26166303

  1. A practical guide to the implementation of an effective incident reporting scheme to reduce medication error on the hospital ward.

    PubMed

    Webster, Craig S; Anderson, David J

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses an anonymous incident reporting scheme to reduce drug administration error on the hospital ward, as part of an effective, non-punitive, systems-focused approach to safety. Drug error is costly in terms of increased hospital stay, resources consumed, patient harm, lives lost and careers ruined. Safety initiatives that focus, not on blaming individuals, but on improving the wider system in which personnel work have been adopted in a number of branches of health care. However, in nursing, blame remains the predominant approach for dealing with error, and the ward has seen little application of the systems approach to safety. Safety interventions founded on an effective incident scheme typically pay for themselves in terms of dollar savings arising from averted harm. Recent calls for greater health-care safety require finding new ways to make drug administration safer throughout the hospital, and the scope for such safety gains on the hospital ward remains considerable. PMID:12100674

  2. The cost of a hospital ward in Europe: is there a methodology available to accurately measure the costs?

    PubMed

    Negrini, D; Kettle, A; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Edbrooke, D L

    2004-01-01

    Costing health care services has become a major requirement due to an increase in demand for health care and technological advances. Several studies have been published describing the computation of the costs of hospital wards. The objective of this article is to examine the methodologies utilised to try to describe the basic components of a standardised method, which could be applied throughout Europe. Cost measurement however is a complex matter and a lack of clarity exists in the terminology and the cost concepts utilised. The methods discussed in this review make it evident that there is a lack of standardized methodologies for the determination of accurate costs of hospital wards. A standardized costing methodology would facilitate comparisons, encourage economic evaluation within the ward and hence assist in the decision-making process with regard to the efficient allocation of resources. PMID:15366283

  3. Quality of acute stroke care improvement framework for the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry: facilitating policy and system change at the hospital level.

    PubMed

    LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2006-12-01

    The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry prototypes baseline data collection demonstrated a significant gap in the use of evidenced-based interventions. Barriers to the use of these interventions can be characterized as relating to lack of knowledge, attitudes, and ineffective behaviors and systems. Quality improvement programs can address these issues by providing didactic presentations to disseminate the science and peer interactions to address the lack of belief in the evidence, guidelines, and likelihood of improved patient outcomes. Even with knowledge and intention to provide evidenced-based care, the absence of effective systems is a significant behavioral barrier. A program for quality improvement that includes multidisciplinary teams of clinical and quality improvement professionals has been successfully used to carry out redesign of stroke care delivery systems. Teams are given a methodology to set goals, test ideas for system redesign, and implement those changes that can be successfully adapted to the hospital's environment. Bringing teams from several hospitals together substantially accelerates the process by sharing examples of successful change and by providing strategies to support the behavior change necessary for the adoption of new systems. The participation of many hospitals also creates momentum for the adoption of change by demonstrating observable and successful improvement. Data collection and feedback are useful to demonstrate the need for change and evaluate the impact of system change, but improvement occurs very slowly without a quality improvement program. This quality improvement framework provides hospitals with the capacity and support to redesign systems, and has been shown to improve stroke care considerably, when coupled with an Internet-based decision support registry, and at a much more rapid pace than when hospitals use only the support registry. PMID:17178313

  4. Safe patient handling program in critical care using peer leaders: lessons learned in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Knibbe, Hanneke J J; Knibbe, Nico E; Klaassen, Annemarie J W M

    2007-06-01

    Occupational back pain remains a serious problem for nurses. In Dutch health care, ergonomic changes are stimulated through convenants. For acute and critical care, a covenant was drawn up and guidelines for nursing practice developed and implemented. Because of the diverse and rapidly changing nature of ergonomic problems, the process has to be specific. A strong emphasis thus was placed on self-management and empowerment of nurses. One or two nurses were appointed per ward as peer leaders, called ergocoaches. They received additional training and were given responsibility for safe work practices. This article reports on progress made to date, viewed as work in progress. PMID:17512476

  5. Concept of a Paediatric Emergency Ward for the Cities of a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Leary, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    Children's hospitals in developing countries carry an enormous patient load. Available facilities must be organized to provide essential care for all. At the Red Cross Children's Hospital in Cape Town this has been achieved by the development of an emergency ward attached to the outpatient department. It is suggested that this concept should be applied in large hospitals of other developing countries. Imagesp722-ap722-bp722-cp722-dp722-ep722-f PMID:4646852

  6. Information Needs Assessment for a Medicine Ward-Focused Rounding Dashboard.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher A; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    To identify the routine information needs of inpatient clinicians on the general wards for the development of an electronic dashboard. Survey of internal medicine and subspecialty clinicians from March 2014-July 2014 at Saint Marys Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. An information needs assessment was generated from all unique data elements extracted from all handoff and rounding tools used by clinicians in our ICUs and general wards. An electronic survey was distributed to 104 inpatient medical providers. 89 unique data elements were identified from currently utilized handoff and rounding instruments. All data elements were present in our multipurpose ICU-based dashboard. 42 of 104 (40 %) surveys were returned. Data elements important (50/89, 56 %) and unimportant (24/89, 27 %) for routine use were identified. No significant differences in data element ranking were observed between supervisory and nonsupervisory roles. The routine information needs of general ward clinicians are a subset of data elements used routinely by ICU clinicians. Our findings suggest an electronic dashboard could be adapted from the critical care setting to the general wards with minimal modification. PMID:27307266

  7. Patient-oriented pharmacy on a special ward: results of a pilot project in Germany.

    PubMed

    Litzinger, A; Rohde-Boehler, R

    1997-04-01

    In Germany a pilot project in patient-oriented pharmacy has been started in the Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Ludwigshafen to demonstrate the efficiency of this modem way of practising pharmacy in hospital. A special ward of the orthopaedic department (spinal injuries, 25 beds) was chosen for this project. Since February 1st, 1994, the pharmacists have taken over the stock management on the ward and dispense oral drugs in unit-dose systems for each patient. The pharmacists participate also in ward rounds and check the patients' medication charts in order to support and inform the physicians. So the project is a combination of improved patient care and an advisory service in pharmaceutical questions for the medical staff. In the first year of this project, which is still ongoing (February 1994-January 1995), 123 patients were treated on the ward; the average duration of stay was about 77 days. During this first year the pharmacists registered 111 questions and events leading to pharmaceutical interventions. The most important results of the project are the improvement in drug safety and more effective drug use. Other positive results are: during the course of the project the cooperation between the medical and pharmaceutical staff has been improved and the drug management by the pharmacy has resulted in a 17 per cent reduction of medication costs in comparison to the year before. All these results clearly demonstrate the success of these first steps in patient-oriented pharmacy. PMID:9151349

  8. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  9. Through the lens of instructional design: appraisal of the Jeffries/National League for Nursing Simulation Framework for use in acute care.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca D; Hagler, Debra

    2012-09-01

    As human patient simulation becomes more prevalent in acute care settings, clinical experts are often asked to assist in developing scenarios. Although the Jeffries/National League for Nursing Simulation Framework has been used in academic settings to guide the instructional design of clinical simulations, its use in acute care settings is less known. This framework incorporates a consideration of contextual elements, design characteristics, and outcomes. An external validation study applying the framework within the context of acute care showed its overall strength as well as elements that were problematic. The implications derived from the study of the design characteristics in a hospital setting can be used by nurses who are considering either adopting or adapting this framework for their own practice. PMID:22715871

  10. Development and Pilot of a Checklist for Management of Acute Liver Failure in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Iris; Karvellas, Constantine J.; Ganger, Daniel R.; Forde, Kimberly A.; Subramanian, Ram M.; Boylan, Alice; Hanje, James; Stravitz, R. Todd; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute liver failure (ALF) is an ideal condition for use of a checklist. Our aims were to develop a checklist for the management of ALF in the intensive care unit (ICU) and assess the usability of the checklist among multiple providers. Methods The initial checklist was developed from published guidelines and expert opinion. The checklist underwent pilot testing at 11 academic liver transplant centers in the US and Canada. An anonymous, written survey was used to assess the usability and quality of the checklist. Written comments were used to improve the checklist following the pilot testing period. Results We received 81 surveys involving the management of 116 patients during the pilot testing period. The overall quality of the checklist was judged to be above average to excellent by 94% of users. On a 5-point Likert scale, the majority of survey respondents agreed or agreed strongly with the following checklist characteristics: the checklist was easy to read (99% agreed/agreed strongly), easy to use (97%), items are categorized logically (98%), time to complete the checklist did not interfere with delivery of appropriate and safe patient care (94%) and was not excessively burdensome (92%), the checklist allowed the user the freedom to use his or her clinical judgment (80%), it is a useful tool in the management of acute liver failure (98%). Web-based and mobile apps were developed for use of the checklist at the point of care. Conclusion The checklist for the management of ALF in the ICU was shown in this pilot study to be easy to use, helpful and accepted by a wide variety of practitioners at multiple sites in the US and Canada. PMID:27176033

  11. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  12. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse managers, educators, and primary nurses in rooming-in wards. Expert reviews (n = 15) were conducted to identify emergent themes in a Delphi fashion. A competency assessment questionnaire was then developed and tested with 246 rooming-in ward nurses in local hospitals. Results: We constructed a three-factor linear model for obstetric rooming-in nurse competency assessment. Further refinement resulted in a self-assessment questionnaire containing three first-tier, 12 second-tier, and 43 third-tier items for easy implementation. The questionnaire was reliable, contained satisfactory content, and had construct validity. Discussion: Our competency assessment tool provides a systematic, easy, and operational subjective evaluation model for nursing managers and administrators to evaluate obstetric rooming-in ward primary nurses. The application of this tool will facilitate various human resources functions, such as nurse training/education effect evaluation, and will eventually promote high-quality nursing care delivery. PMID:26770468

  13. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Receipt of HIV prevention interventions is more common in community-based clinics than in primary care or acute care settings for Black men who have sex with men in the District of Columbia.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew E; Watson, Christopher Chauncey; Glick, Sara Nelson; Kuo, Irene; Wilton, Leo; Brewer, Russell A; Fields, Sheldon D; Criss, Vittoria; Magnus, Manya

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of structural barriers that impede the receipt of HIV prevention and care services is critical to addressing the HIV epidemic among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM). This study investigated the utilization of HIV prevention and general care services among a non-clinic-based sample of BMSM who reported at least one structural barrier to engagement in care. Proportions of participants who had received HIV prevention services and general care services in different settings were compared using Fisher's exact test and correlates of service receipt were assessed using logistic regression. Among 75 BMSM, 60% had accessed a community-based clinic, 21% had accessed a primary care setting, and 36% had accessed an acute care setting in the last 6 months. Greater proportions of participants who had accessed community-based clinics received HIV prevention services during these visits (90%) compared to those who had accessed primary care (53%) and acute care (44%) settings (p = .005). Opportunities for BMSM to receive HIV prevention interventions differed by care setting. Having access to health care did not necessarily facilitate the uptake of HIV prevention interventions. Further investigation of the structurally rooted reasons why BMSM are often unable to access HIV prevention services is warranted. PMID:26643856

  15. The effect of a national quality improvement collaborative on prehospital care for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown wide variations in prehospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) for improving ambulance care for AMI and stroke. Methods We used an interrupted time series design to investigate the effect of a national QIC on change in delivery of care bundles for AMI (aspirin, glyceryl trinitrate [GTN], pain assessment and analgesia) and stroke (face-arm-speech test, blood pressure and blood glucose recording) in all English ambulance services between January 2010 and February 2012. Key strategies for change included local quality improvement (QI) teams in each ambulance service supported by a national coordinating expert group that conducted workshops educating staff in QI methods to improve AMI and stroke care. Expertise and ideas were shared between QI teams who met together at three national workshops, between QI leads through monthly teleconferences, and between the expert group and participants. Feedback was provided to services using annotated control charts. Results We analyzed change over time using logistic regression with three predictor variables: time, gender, and age. There were statistically significant improvements in care bundles in nine (of 12) participating trusts for AMI (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04, 1.04), nine for stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05, 1.07), 11 for either AMI or stroke, and seven for both conditions. Overall care bundle performance for AMI increased in England from 43 to 79% and for stroke from 83 to 96%. Successful services all introduced provider prompts and individualized or team feedback. Other determinants of success included engagement with front-line clinicians, feedback using annotated control charts, expert support, and shared learning between participants and organizations. Conclusions This first national prehospital QIC led to significant improvements in ambulance care for AMI and

  16. Quality of Care Delivered Before versus After A Quality Improvement Intervention for Acute Geriatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lillian; Cryer, Henry; Chan, Chiao-Li; Roth, Carol; Tillou, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Background Older trauma injury patients had improved recovery after we implemented routine geriatric consultation for patients ≥ age 65 at a level-1 academic trauma center. The intervention aimed to improve quality of geriatric care. However, the specific care processes that improved are unknown. Study Design Prospective observation comparing medical care after (December 2007-November 2009) versus before (December 2006-November 2007) implementation of the geriatric consult-based intervention. To measure quality-of-care (QOC) we used 33 previously-validated care-process quality indicators (QIs) from the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) study, measured by review of medical records for 76 Geriatric Consult [GC] versus 71 control group patients. As pre-specified subgroup analyses, we aggregated QIs by type: geriatric (e.g., delirium screening) versus non-geriatric condition-based care (e.g., thrombosis prophylaxis) and compared QI scores by type of care. Last, we aggregated QI scores into overall, geriatric, and non-geriatric QOC scores for each patient (# QIs passed/# QIs eligible), and compared patient-level QOC for the GC versus control group, adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, comorbidity, and injury severity. Results 63% of the GC versus 11% of the control group patients received a geriatric consultation. We evaluated 2505 QIs overall (1664 geriatric-type and 841 non-geriatric QIs). In general, fewer geriatric-type QIs were passed than non-geriatric QIs (71% vs 81%, p<.001). We provided better overall-QOC to the GC (77%) than control group patients (73%, p<.05). However, the difference was not statistically significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.08). We improved geriatric-QOC for the GC (74%) compared to the control group (68%, p<.01), a difference that was significant after multivariable adjustment (p=.01). Conclusion Geriatricians and surgeons can collaboratively improve geriatric QOC for older trauma patients. PMID:25840534

  17. A Multi-Method Study of the Geriatric Learning Needs of Acute Care Hospital Nurses in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mary T; Butler, Jeffrey I; Persaud, Malini; Tregunno, Deborah; Sidani, Souraya; McCague, Hugh

    2016-02-01

    Older people are at risk of experiencing functional decline and related complications during hospitalization. In countries with projected increases in age demographics, preventing these adverse consequences is a priority. Because most Canadian nurses have received little geriatrics content in their basic education, understanding their learning needs is fundamental to preparing them to respond to this priority. This two-phased multi-method study identified the geriatrics learning needs and strategies to address the learning needs of acute care registered nurses (RNs) and registered practical nurses (RPNs) in the province of Ontario, Canada. In Phase I, a survey that included a geriatric nursing knowledge scale was completed by a random sample of 2005 Ontario RNs and RPNs. Average scores on the geriatric nursing knowledge scale were in the "neither good nor bad" range, with RNs demonstrating slightly higher scores than RPNs. In Phase II, 33 RN and 24 RPN survey respondents participated in 13 focus group interviews to help confirm and expand survey findings. In thematic analysis, three major themes were identified that were the same in RNs and RPNs: (a) geriatric nursing is generally regarded as simple and custodial, (b) older people's care is more complex than is generally appreciated, and (c) in the current context, older people's care is best learned experientially and in brief on-site educational sessions. Healthcare providers, policy-makers, and educators can use the findings to develop educational initiatives to prepare RNs and RPNs to respond to the needs of an aging hospital population. PMID:26471253

  18. Burden and viral aetiology of influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infection in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Tramuto, Fabio; Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Napoli, Giuseppe; Mammina, Caterina; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cala', Cinzia; Amodio, Emanuele; Vitale, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the viral aetiology of influenza-like illness (ILI) and acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) among patients requiring intensive care unit admission. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out in Sicily over a 4-year period. A total of 233 respiratory samples of patients with ILI/ARTI admitted to intensive care units were molecularly analyzed for the detection of a comprehensive panel of aetiologic agents of viral respiratory infections. About 45% of patients was positive for at least one pathogen. Single aetiology occurred in 75.2% of infected patients, while polymicrobial infection was found in 24.8% of positive subjects. Influenza was the most common aetiologic agent (55.7%), especially among adults. Most of patients with multiple aetiology (76.9%) were adults and elderly. Mortality rates among patients with negative or positive aetiology did not significantly differ (52.4% and 47.6%, respectively). Highly transmissible respiratory pathogens are frequently detected among patients with ILI/ARTI admitted in intensive care units, showing the occurrence of concurrent infections by different viruses. The knowledge of the circulation of several types of microorganisms is of crucial importance in terms of appropriateness of therapies, but also for the implication in prevention strategies and hospital epidemiology. PMID:26706819

  19. Efficacy of amoxycillin versus amoxycillin/clavulanate in acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary obstructive disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Llor, Carl; Hernández, Silvia; Ribas, Anna; Álvarez, Carmen; Cots, Josep Maria; Bayona, Carolina; González, Isabel; Miravitlles, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background Amoxycillin/clavulanate is considered first-line treatment for ambulatory exacerbations of COPD. However, narrow-spectrum antibiotics may be as useful for mild to moderate patients. Objective To compare the clinical efficacy of amoxycillin versus amoxicyllin/clavulanate in exacerbations of COPD in primary care. Methods A randomized, double-blind, noninferiority clinical trial was carried out in eight primary care centers in Catalonia, Spain. Spirometrically-diagnosed patients older than 40 years with COPD, without criteria of hospitalization and Anthonisen’s types I or II exacerbations were included. The main outcome was clinical cure at the end of treatment (EOT) visit on day 10. Results A total of 137 patients were enrolled in the study (68 assigned to amoxycillin and 69 to amoxycillin/clavulanate). The mean forced expiratory flow in one second was 61.6% and the mean age was 71.4 years. At EOT, 92.8% of patients in the amoxycillin/clavulanate and 90.9% in the amoxycillin group were considered clinically cured, a statistically non-significant difference. Adverse effects were observed in 11 subjects, 3 in the amoxycillin group and 8 in the amoxycillin/clavulanate group, 2 of whom required a change in treatment. Conclusions Amoxycillin was at least as effective clinically and as safe as amoxycilin/ clavulanate in the treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD in mild to moderate patients in primary care. PMID:19436696

  20. Use of the Modified SNOT-16 in Primary Care Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Acute Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, Jane; Spitznagel, Edward; Piccirillo, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine the reliability, validity, responsiveness and the minimal important difference (MID) for the SNOT-16 in the measurement of disease-specific quality of life in adults with acute rhinosinusitis Study Design Randomized controlled trial to evaluate antibiotic treatment for acute rhinosinusitis Setting Ten community practices in St Louis, MO Subjects and Methods The modified SNOT-16 was completed at baseline (by both face-to-face and telephone interviews) and by telephone interview at 3, 7 and 10 days by 166 adults with acute rhinosinusitis diagnosed clinically using standardized criteria (36% male, 78% Caucasian). Considering severity and frequency, subjects rated how much they were bothered by each item using a 4-point scale. The mean SNOT-16 score (ranging from 0, no problem to 3, large problem) was compared to the subjects’ global assessment of change to evaluate responsiveness and the MID. Results The instrument was easy to use and took < 5 minutes to complete. The SNOT-16 score identified statistically significant differences in the hypothesized direction for those reporting more or less severe symptoms (p=0.0161) and more or less bother (p<0.0001) demonstrating construct-related validity. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.82 to 0.91 demonstrating high internal consistency. There was a statistically significant decrease in scores with time (MANOVA, p<0.0001). The effect sizes at days 3, 7, and 10 were 1.45, 2.34 and 2.90 respectively, indicating high sensitivity to clinical change. The Minimum Important Difference (MID) was 0.5 units. Conclusion The modified SNOT-16 is a valid instrument to assess effectiveness of interventions to improve disease-specific QOL in adults with acute rhinosinusitis. PMID:21844413

  1. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality.

  2. An adenovirus 4 outbreak amongst staff in a pediatric ward manifesting as keratoconjunctivitis-a possible failure of contact and aerosol infection control.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Elizabeth; Er