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Sample records for acute carrageenan-induced paw

  1. Anti-inflammatory potential of probiotic Lactobacillus spp. on carrageenan induced paw edema in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Archer, Ann Catherine; Muthukumar, S P; Halami, Prakash M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory ability of novel indigenous probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum MCC 2759, L. fermentum MCC 2760 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii MCC 2775 in a carrageenan induced acute inflammatory paw edema model. Probiotic cultures were administered to male Wistar rats via oral route. Carrageenan at a concentration of 1% was injected into hind paw of rats 30min after oral gavage on the 8th day of treatment regimen. Paw thickness (mm), stair climbing activity and motility score were the parameters used to score the inflammatory response. L. fermentum MCC 2759, L. fermentum MCC 2760 and L. delbrueckii MCC 2775 showed significant reduction in paw thickness (P<0.05) showing percentage inhibition of 15.67%, 14.72% and 14.84%, respectively, 24h after carrageenan induction. Probiotic treatment also markedly alleviated the stair climbing and motility score. Histological analysis of tissue sections revealed reduction in cellular infiltration of probiotic and drug treatment groups. Adhesion to resected rat intestinal tissue also showed significant adherence capability (>40%) of the probiotic cultures used. Therefore, L. fermentum MCC 2759, L. fermentum MCC 2760 and L. delbrueckii MCC 2775 may be used as potent anti-inflammatory agents with probiotic health benefits. PMID:26314910

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Lactobacillus on Carrageenan-Induced Paw Edema in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amdekar, Sarika; Roy, Purabi; Singh, Vinod; Kumar, Avnish; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus were used to assess the anti-inflammatory properties in carrageenan induced acute inflammatory model. Materials and Methods. Diclofenac sodium was used as standard drug at concentration of 150 mg/kg of body weight. Culture of Lactobacillus  2 × 107 CFU/ml was given orally. Edema was induced with 1% carrageenan to all the groups after one hour of the oral treatments. Paw thickness was checked at t = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 24 hours. Stair climbing score and motility score were assessed at t = 24 hours. Cytokines assay for IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α was performed on serum samples. Results. Lactobacillus showed a statistically significant decrease in paw thickness at P < 0.001. L. acidophilus and L. casei decreased by 32% and 28% in paw thickness. They both significantly increased the stair climbing and motility score. Lactobacillus treatment significantly downregulated IL-6 and TNF-α while upregulated IL-10 at P < 0.0001. Conclusion. L. casei and L. acidophilus significantly decreased the inflammatory reactions induced by carrageenan. This study has also proposed that Lactobacillus ameliorated the inflammatory reaction by downregulating the proinflammatory cytokines pathway. PMID:22518342

  3. Gelam Honey Inhibits the Production of Proinflammatory, Mediators NO, PGE(2), TNF-α, and IL-6 in Carrageenan-Induced Acute Paw Edema in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Saba Zuhair; Mohd Yusoff, Kamaruddin; Makpol, Suzana; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum

    2012-01-01

    Natural honey is well known for its therapeutic value and has been used in traditional medicine of different cultures throughout the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of Malaysian Gelam honey in inflammation-induced rats. Paw edema was induced by a subplantar injection of 1% carrageenan into the rat right hind paw. Rats were treated with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) Indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or Gelam honey at different doses (1 or 2 g/kg, p.o.). The increase in footpad thickness was considered to be edema, which was measured using a dial caliper. Plasma and paw tissue were collected to analyze the production of inflammatory mediators, such as NO, PGE(2), TNF-α, and IL-6, as well as iNOS and COX-2. The results showed that Gelam honey could reduce edema in a dose-dependent fashion in inflamed rat paws, decrease the production of NO, PGE(2), TNF-α, and IL-6 in plasma, and suppress the expression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 in paw tissue. Oral pretreatment of Gelam honey at 2 g/kg of body weight at two time points (1 and 7 days) showed a significantly decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines, which was similar to the effect of the anti-inflammatory drug Indomethacin (NSAID), both in plasma and tissue. Thus, our results suggest that Gelam honey has anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the rat paw edema size and inhibiting the production of proinflammatory mediators. Gelam honey is potentially useful for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:22919407

  4. Effect of Fluvoxamine on Carrageenan-Induced Paw Edema in Rats Evaluation of the Action Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Sadeghi, Hossein; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Movahedian, Ahmad; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory effect of fluvoxamine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) anti-depressant, on carrageenan-induced paw edema in more details. At first, fluvoxamine was administered intra-peritoneally (2.5, 12.5, 25 and 50 mg Kg-1) 30 min before the subplantar injection of carrageenan. Fluvoxamine was also injected intra-peritoneally at a dose of 50 mg Kg-1 30 or 90 min after carrageenan injection. Then, fluvoxamine was given intra-cerebroventricularly (25, 50 and 100 μg/rat) and intra-thecally (25, 50 and 100 μg/rat) 30 min before the carrageenan challenge. Finally, the effect of mifepristone (5 mg Kg-1), an antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor, on the anti-edema effect of fluvoxamine (50 mg Kg-1) was investigated. Results showed that intra-peritoneal (IP) administration of fluvoxamine before or after carrageenan injection considerably inhibited paw edema response at 4 h post-carrageenan (p < 0.001), but intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intra-thecal (i.t.) injection of fluvoxamine did not alter the degree of paw swelling. The inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine was reduced by the pretreatment of mifepristone (p < 0.01). Our results suggest that IP administration of fluvoxamine produces a noticeable anti-inflammatory effect in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and at least, a part of this effect is mediated through glucocorticoid receptor. Moreover, it seems unlikely that central sites have an important role in this inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine. PMID:24250395

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of linezolid on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Obara, Shigeaki; Kuroda, Yuko; Kizu, Junko

    2015-12-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of linezolid has recently been reported using in vitro experimental models. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of linezolid has not yet been demonstrated using in vivo experimental models. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of linezolid and other anti-MRSA agents using the carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. The pretreatment with 50 mg/kg linezolid significantly suppressed edema rates, compared with control (5% glucose), with edema rates at 0.5 and 3 h after the administration of carrageenan being 17.3 ± 3.5 and 30.8 ± 3.0%, respectively. On the other hand, edema rates were not suppressed by the pretreatments with 50 mg/kg vancomycin, teicoplanin, arbekacin, and daptomycin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that linezolid exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were observed at linezolid concentrations that are achievable in human serum with conventional dosing. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that the anti-inflammatory activities of linezolid, in addition to its antimicrobial effects, have a protective effect against destructive inflammatory responses in areas of inflammation. PMID:26362409

  6. Novel phenanthridine (PHE-4i) derivative inhibits carrageenan-induced rat hind paw oedema through suppression of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    George, Leema; Ramasamy, Tamizhselvi; Manickam, Venkatraman; Iyer, Sathiyanarayanan Kulathu; Radhakrishnan, Vidya

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to assess the anti-inflammatory effect of a novel synthesized phenanthridine alkaloid (PHE-4i) and to examine the possible involvement of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in anti-inflammatory mechanism. The synthesized phenanthridine derivative PHE-4i (2, 5, and 10 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to rats. One hour following treatment, inflammation was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (1 %), in the hind paw. Paw volume as the index of inflammation was measured before and after carrageenan injection. Neutrophil sequestration into the hind paw was quantified by measuring tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and was compared for the inhibition of H2S production. Pretreatment with PHE-4i significantly reduced carrageenan-induced hind paw weight, MPO activity, leukocyte infiltration, and H2S production in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001). These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effect of PHE-4i on carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema could be via the inhibition of the gaseous mediator H2S. PMID:27380491

  7. The anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine in the rat model of carrageenan-induced paw edema

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Banafshe, Hamid Reza; Mesdaghinia, Azam; Abed, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Recently anti-inflammatory effects of antidepressants have been demonstrated. Venlafaxine belongs to newer antidepressants with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibition property. The pain alleviating properties of venlafaxine in different pain models such as neurogenic pain, diabetic neuropathy, and fibromyalgia have been demonstrated. Anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine and also its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of venlafaxine and determine possible underlying mechanisms. Materials and Methods: We examined the anti-inflammatory effects of intraperitoneal (IP) and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of venlafaxine in the rat model of carrageenan-induced paw edema. Results: Our results showed that both IP (50 and 100 mg/kg) and ICV (50 and 100 μg/rat) injection of venlafaxine inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema. Also IP and ICV administration of venlafaxine significantly decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production. Finally, we tried to reverse the anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine by yohimbine (5 mg/kg, IP), an alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. Our results showed that applied antagonist failed to change the anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine. Conclusion: These results demonstrated that venlafaxine has potent anti-inflammatory effect which is related to the peripheral and central effects of this drug. Also we have shown that anti-inflammatory effect of venlafaxine is mediated mostly through the inhibition of IL-1β and TNF-α production and decreases MPO activity in the site of inflammation. PMID:26351555

  8. Gelam Honey Attenuates Carrageenan-Induced Rat Paw Inflammation via NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Saba Zuhair; Mohd Yusoff, Kamaruddin; Makpol, Suzana; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum

    2013-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of Gelam honey in inflammation induced rats via NF-κB signalling pathway. Rats paw edema was induced by subplantar injection of 1% carrageenan into the right hind paw. Rats were pre-treated with Gelam honey at different doses (1 or 2 g/kg, p.o.) and NSAID Indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.), in two time points (1 and 7 days). Our results showed that Gelam honey at both concentrations suppressed the gene expressions of NF-κB (p65 & p50) and IκBα in inflamed rats paw tissues. In addition, Gelam honey inhibited the nuclear translocation and activation of NF-κB and decreased the cytosolic degradation of IκBα dose dependently in inflamed rats paw tissues. The immunohistochemical expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators COX-2 and TNF-α were also decreased in inflamed rats paw tissues when treated with Gelam honey. The results of our findings suggest that Gelam honey exhibits its inhibitory effects by attenuating NF-κB translocation to the nucleus and inhibiting IκBα degradation, with subsequent decrease of inflammatory mediators COX-2 and TNF-α. PMID:24015236

  9. Diet containing partially hydrogenated vegetable fat enhances the carrageenan induced paw inflammation but not oxidative stress markers in liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Y Poorna Chandra; Lokesh, B R

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of feeding Partially hydrogenated vegetable fat (PHVF) on carrageenan induced paw inflammation and oxidative stress markers in liver of rats. In addition, the effect of feeding rats with Linseed Oil (LSO, α-linolenic acid, n-3 PUFA) or PHVF blended with incremental amounts of LSO on these markers were also monitored. Rats weighing 200 g were given 1 mL of different oils (PHVF, Groundnut Oil; GNO, Olive Oil; OO and LSO) per day for 15 days. Rats given PHVF showed higher levels of paw inflammation in response to carrageenan injection. Rats given LSO showed least amounts of paw inflammation when injected with carrageenan. A second set of experiment was conducted by feeding weaning rats with AIN-93 purified diet supplemented with PHVF or PHVF with incremental amounts of LSO for 60 days. The rats fed PHVF showed higher degree of carrageenan induced inflammation as compared to rats given GNO and LSO. However, the rats fed PHVF showed lower levels of lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls, 8-hydroxy guanine and antioxidant enzyme activities in liver homogenate as compared to those given LSO. In conclusion dietary PHVF rendered the rats prone to higher levels of carrageenan induced inflammation which can be reduced by giving PHVF blended with LSO. However, oxidative stress markers found to be higher levels in rats given LSO or PHVF blended with LSO as compared to rats given PHVF as sole source of fat. PMID:26396384

  10. Exosomes from Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Suppress Carrageenan-Induced Acute Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pivoraitė, Ugnė; Jarmalavičiūtė, Akvilė; Tunaitis, Virginijus; Ramanauskaitė, Giedrė; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Kašėta, Vytautas; Biziulevičienė, Genė; Venalis, Algirdas; Pivoriūnas, Augustas

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to examine the effects of human dental pulp stem cell-derived exosomes on the carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. Exosomes were purified by differential ultracentrifugation from the supernatants of stem cells derived from the dental pulp of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) cultivated in serum-free medium. At 1 h post-carrageenan injection, exosomes derived from supernatants of 2 × 10(6) SHEDs were administered by intraplantar injection to BALB/c mice; 30 mg/kg of prednisolone and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Edema was measured at 6, 24, and 48 h after carrageenan injection. For the in vivo imaging experiments, AngioSPARK750, Cat B 750 FAST, and MMPSense 750 FAST were administered into the mouse tail vein 2 h post-carrageenan injection. Fluorescence images were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h after edema induction by IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system. Exosomes significantly reduced the carrageenan-induced edema at all the time points studied (by 39.5, 41.6, and 25.6% at 6, 24, and 48 h after injection, respectively), to similar levels seen with the positive control (prednisolone). In vivo imaging experiments revealed that, both exosomes and prednisolone suppress activities of cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) at the site of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation, showing more prominent effects of prednisolone at the early stages, while exosomes exerted their suppressive effects gradually and at later time points. Our study demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from human dental pulp stem cells suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in mice. PMID:25903966

  11. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effect of all-trans retinoic acid in carrageenan-induced paw edema in Wistar rats: Involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Navneet; Bijjem, Krishna Reddy V.; Sharma, Pyare L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we investigated the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-β/δ receptors in carrageenan-induced inflammation and in the anti-inflammatory effects of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Materials and Methods: The λ-carrageenan (0.1 ml of 1% w/v) was injected into intra-plantar (i.pl.) region of the hind paw to produce acute inflammation. Paw volume was measured by using the mercury plethysmography. Further, mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) were assessed by using the dynamic plantar aesthesiometer and plantar test apparatus, respectively. In addition, markers of oxido-nitrosative stress were assessed spectrophotometrically in the hind paw tissue 5 h post-carrageenan. Results: An i.pl injection of carrageenan has produced a marked mechanical hyperalgesia (MH) and TH in ipsilateral paw, which was associated with significant elevated oxido-nitrosative stress. Treatment with ATRA (5 mg/kg/p.o/4 days) and GW0742, a selective PPAR-β/δ receptor agonist (0.1 mg/kg/i.p/4 days), significantly decreased the paw volume, mechanical and TH as compared to vehicle control. Administration of GSK0660, selective PPAR-β/δ receptor antagonist, at a dose of (0.3 mg/kg/i.p/4 days), did not produce a significant effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema, MH and TH. However, co-administration of GSK0660 (0.3 mg/kg/i.p/4 days) along with both ATRA (5 mg/kg/p.o/4 days) and GW0742 (0.1 mg/kg/i.p/4 days), significantly reverse the decreased paw edema, MH, and TH. These observed ameliorative effects on inflammatory pain symptoms are correlated with the extent of reduction of oxido-nitrosative stress. Conclusion: From above findings, it can be concluded that ATRA exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effect, possibly through activation of PPAR-β/δ and subsequent reduction of oxido-nitrosative stress. PMID:23833373

  12. Bromoenol Lactone, an Inhibitor of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2, Suppresses Carrageenan-Induced Prostaglandin Production and Hyperalgesia in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Keiichiro; Ibuki, Takae; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 and PGI2 are essential to hyperalgesia in inflammatory tissues. These prostaglandins are produced from arachidonic acid, which is cleaved from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Which isozyme of PLA2 is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandins essential to inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of two PLA2 isozyme-specific inhibitors on carrageenan-induced production of PGE2 and PGI2 in rat hind paw and behavioral nociceptive response to radiant heat. Local administration of bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2), significantly reduced carrageenan-induced elevation of prostaglandins in the inflamed foot pad 3 h after injection. It also ameliorated the hyperalgesic response between 1 h and 3 h after carrageenan injection. On the other hand, AACOCF3, an inhibitor of cytosolic PLA2, suppressed neither prostaglandin production nor the hyperalgesic response. BEL did not suppress the mRNA levels of iPLA2β, iPLA2γ, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase, prostaglandin I synthase, or proinflammatory cytokines in the inflamed foot pad, indicating that BEL did not suppress inflammation itself. These results suggest that iPLA2 is involved in the production of prostaglandins and hyperalgesia at the inflammatory loci. PMID:26063975

  13. A study of the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of ellagic acid in carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Mard, Seyyed Ali; Rezaie, Anahita; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Ellagic acid (EA) has shown antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzymes and also cytokines play a key role in many inflammatory conditions. This study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of EA. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema model was used for induction of inflammation. Results: The results showed that intraplantar injection of carrageenan led to time-dependent development of peripheral inflammation, which resulted in a significant increase in the levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) β, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and also iNOS and COX-2 protein expression in inflamed paw. However, systemic administration of EA (1–30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) could reduce edema in a dose-dependent fashion in inflamed rat paws with ED50 value 8.41 (5.26–14.76) mg/kg. It decreased the serum concentration of NO, PGE2, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, and suppress the protein expression of iNOS, COX-2 enzymes, and attenuated the formation of PGE2, TNF-α and IL-1 β in inflamed paw tissue. We also demonstrated that EA significantly decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in liver at 5 h after carrageenan injection. Moreover, histopathological studies indicated that EA significantly diminished migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into site of inflammation, as did indomethacin. Conclusions: Collectively, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of EA might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA, iNOS, and COX-2 in the edema paw via the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL1 β), NO and PGE2 overproduction. PMID:26069367

  14. Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Effects of the Organic Extract of the Red Sea Marine Sponge Xestospongia testudinaria against Carrageenan Induced Rat Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    El-Shitany, Nagla A.; Abbas, Aymn T.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Azhar, Esam I.; Ali, Soad S.; van Soest, Rob W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are found to be a rich source of bioactive compounds which show a wide range of biological activities including antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the possible anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulator effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea marine sponge Xestospongia testudinaria. The chemical composition of the Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. DPPH (2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl) was measured to assess the antioxidant activity of the sponge extract. Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was adopted in this study. Six groups of rats were used: group1: Control, group 2: Carrageenan, group 3: indomethacin (10 mg/kg), group 4–6: Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg). Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity was performed by both calculating the percentage increase in paw weight and hisopathologically. Assessment of the antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity was performed. GC-MS analysis revealed that there were 41 different compounds present in the methanolic extract. Sponge extract exhibited antioxidant activity against DPPH free radicals. Xestospongia testudinaria methanolic extract (100 mg/kg) significantly decreased % increase in paw weight measured at 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after carrageenan injection. Histopathologically, the extract caused a marked decrease in the capillary congestion and inflammatory cells infiltrate. The extract decreased paw malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) and increased the reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activity. It also decreased the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 β(IL-1β) and IL-6. The results of this study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of the methanolic extract of the Red Sea

  15. Release-active dilutions of diclofenac enhance anti-inflammatory effect of diclofenac in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model.

    PubMed

    Sakat, Sachin S; Mani, Kamaraj; Demidchenko, Yulia O; Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Tarasov, Sergey A; Mathur, Archna; Epstein, Oleg I

    2014-02-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the effect of technologically treated diclofenac (release-active dilutions of diclofenac (RAD of diclofenac)) on anti-inflammatory activity of diclofenac in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model. Ninety male Wistar albino rats (6-8 weeks) divided into nine groups (n = 10) were used. Anti-inflammatory activity was assessed at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 h after subplantar injection of carrageenan (0.1 ml of a 1 % solution in normal saline). Diclofenac alone was studied at 5 and 20 mg/kg, RAD of diclofenac alone at 7.5 ml/kg and their combination at 5 and 7.5 ml/kg, respectively. Diclofenac reduced (p < 0.05 at least) paw edema at all time points. RAD of diclofenac enhanced (p < 0.05) anti-inflammatory effect of diclofenac (5 mg/kg) at 2, 4, and 6 h on concurrent and at 2 and 4 h on sequential administration. Moreover at 2 h, anti-inflammatory effect of combination treatment reached values comparable to those of diclofenac (20 mg/kg). In conclusion, RAD of diclofenac enhanced anti-inflammatory effect of diclofenac. PMID:24005897

  16. Vinpocetine Reduces Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in the Paw and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W.; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A.; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F.; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  17. Vinpocetine reduces carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice by inhibiting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation in the paw and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Miyazawa, Kenji W; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Pavão-de-Souza, Gabriela F; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a safe nootropic agent used for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The anti-inflammatory activity of vinpocetine has been shown in cell based assays and animal models, leading to suggestions as to its utility in analgesia. However, the mechanisms regarding its efficacy in inflammatory pain treatment are still not completely understood. Herein, the analgesic effect of vinpocetine and its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms were addressed in murine inflammatory pain models. Firstly, we investigated the protective effects of vinpocetine in overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ) and formalin. The intraplantar injection of carrageenan was then used to induce inflammatory hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated using the electronic von Frey and the hot plate tests, respectively, with neutrophil recruitment to the paw assessed by a myeloperoxidase activity assay. A number of factors were assessed, both peripherally and in the spinal cord, including: antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) levels, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Vinpocetine inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, PBQ and formalin (at both phases), as well as the carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and associated neutrophil recruitment. Both peripherally and in the spinal cord, vinpocetine also inhibited: antioxidant capacity and GSH depletion; increased superoxide anion; IL-1β and TNF-α levels; and NF-κB activation. As such, vinpocetine significantly reduces inflammatory pain by targeting oxidative stress, cytokine production and NF-κB activation at both peripheral and spinal cord levels. PMID:25822523

  18. A new co-micronized composite containing palmitoylethanolamide and polydatin shows superior oral efficacy compared to their association in a rat paw model of carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esposito, E; D, Impellizzeri; G, Bruschetta; M, Cordaro; R, Siracusa; E, Gugliandolo; R, Crupi; S, Cuzzocrea

    2016-07-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a special food for medical purposes, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Nevertheless, PEA lacks direct ability to prevent free radical formation. Polydatin (PLD), a natural precursor of resveratrol, has antioxidant activity. The combination of PEA and PLD could have beneficial effects on oxidative stress induced by inflammatory processes. In the present study, we compared the effects of micronized PEA (PEA-m) and PLD association (PEA-m+PLD) with a new co-micronized composite containing PEA and PLD (m(PEA/PLD)) in the rat paw model of carrageenan (CAR)-induced acute inflammation. Intraplantar injection of CAR led to a time-dependent development of peripheral inflammation, in terms of paw edema, cytokine release in paw exudates, nitrotyrosine formation, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. m(PEA/PLD) reduced all measured parameters. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were also markedly reduced. At the spinal cord level, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was found to be nitrated and subsequently deactivated. Further, m(PEA/PLD) treatment increased spinal MnSOD expression, prevented IkB-α degradation and nuclear factor-κB translocation, suggesting a possible role on central sensitization. m(PEA/PLD) showed more robust anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effects compared to the simple association of PEA-m and PLD. This composite formulation approach opens a new therapeutic strategy for the development of novel non-narcotic anti-hyperalgesic agents. PMID:27095683

  19. The effects of newly synthesized pyrazole derivatives on formaldehyde-, carrageenan-, and dextran-induced acute paw edema in rats.

    PubMed

    Süleyman, H; Büyükokuroğlu, M E

    2001-10-01

    The antiinflammatory effects of 10 newly synthesized pyrazole derivatives on formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema were investigated. The most effective of them (K-3) was investigated again in dextran- and carrageenan-induced paw edema. In formaldehyde-induced paw edema, K-3 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg p.o. inhibited the edema by 48.9% (p<0.002), 68.7% (p<0.001), and 79.1% (p<0.001), respectively, 3 h after administration. In dextran-induced paw edema, the same dose of K-3 produced 27.1% (p<0.05), 46.8% (p<0.01), and 63.8% (p<0.002) inhibition, respectively. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema test, K-3 100 mg/kg decreased the inflammatory response by 52.0% after 4 h. Acute toxicity studies revealed that K-3 was nontoxic up to an oral dose of 2500 mg/kg. PMID:11642317

  20. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Gelsolin in Acetic Acid Induced Writhing, Tail Immersion and Carrageenan Induced Paw Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Parasar, Devraj; Sagar, Amin; Choudhary, Vikas; Chopra, Bhupinder Singh; Garg, Renu; Ashish; Khatri, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Plasma gelsolin levels significantly decline in several disease conditions, since gelsolin gets scavenged when it depolymerizes and caps filamentous actin released in the circulation following tissue injury. It is well established that our body require/implement inflammatory and analgesic responses to protect against cell damage and injury to the tissue. This study was envisaged to examine analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of exogenous gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) in mice models of pain and acute inflammation. Administration of gelsolin in acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests not only demonstrated a significant reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhing effects, but also exhibited an analgesic activity in tail immersion test in mice as compared to placebo treated mice. Additionally, anti-inflammatory function of gelsolin (8 mg/mouse) compared with anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg)] was confirmed in the carrageenan injection induced paw edema where latter was measured by vernier caliper and fluorescent tomography imaging. Interestingly, results showed that plasma gelsolin was capable of reducing severity of inflammation in mice comparable to diclofenac sodium. Analysis of cytokines and histo-pathological examinations of tissue revealed administration of gelsolin and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. Additionally, carrageenan groups pretreated with diclofenac sodium or gelsolin showed a marked decrease in edema and infiltration of inflammatory cells in paw tissue. Our study provides evidence that administration of gelsolin can effectively reduce the pain and inflammation in mice model. PMID:26426535

  1. Effects of Pinus brutia bark extract and Pycnogenol in a rat model of carrageenan induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ince, I; Yesil-Celiktas, O; Karabay-Yavasoglu, N U; Elgin, G

    2009-12-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the anti-inflammatory activities of Pinus brutia bark extract and Pycnogenol in a rat model of carrageenan-induced inflammation. Firstly, the compositions of both samples were determined using HPLC. Then, carrageenan-induced paw edema was used to assess anti-inflammatory activity in mice. Paw volume was measured before and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6h after the injection of carrageenan. Intraperitoneal administration of both the extract and Pycnogenol inhibited paw swelling dose-dependently at 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6h after carrageenan injection. Both samples exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activities at doses of 75 and 100 mg/kg body wt. between 2 and 4 hours after administration (p<0.05), respectively. Additionally, P. brutia bark extract showed significantly better activity at doses of 75 and 100mg/kg body wt. than indomethacine at the dose of 10mg/kg body wt. (p<0.05). No acute toxicity was identified in intraplantar injection of the extract at a dose of 2000 mg/kg body wt.. Therefore, P. brutia bark extract possessing 3.3-fold more total catechins and 9.8-fold more taxifolin than Pycnogenol can be utilized as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:19577447

  2. Effects of Astaxanthin from Litopenaeus Vannamei on Carrageenan-Induced Edema and Pain Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kuedo, Zulkiflee; Sangsuriyawong, Anantita; Klaypradit, Wanwimol; Tipmanee, Varomyalin; Chonpathompikunlert, Pennapa

    2016-01-01

    Carrageenan produces both inflammation and pain when injected in mouse paws via enhancement of reactive oxygen species formation. We have investigated an effect of astaxanthin extracted from Litopenaeus vannamei in carrageenan-induced mice paw edema and pain. The current study demonstrates interesting effects from astaxanthin treatment in mice: an inhibition of paw edema induced in hind paw, an increase in mechanical paw withdrawal threshold and thermal paw withdrawal latency, and a reduction in the amount of myeloperoxidase enzyme and lipid peroxidation products in the paw. Furthermore the effect was comparable to indomethacin, a standard treatment for inflammation symptoms. Due to adverse effects of indomethacin on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems, our study suggests promising prospect of astaxanthin extract as an anti-inflammatory alternative against carrageenan-induced paw edema and pain behavior. PMID:27007359

  3. [Investigations on the acute, carrageenan-induced inflammatory reaction and pharmacology of orally administered sodium salicylate in turkeys].

    PubMed

    Cramer, Kerstin; Schmidt, Volker; Richter, Andreas; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Abraham, Getu; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The complex mechanisms of acute inflammation have been subject to veterinary investigations since a long time. However, knowledge on the role of specific inflammatory mediators, as well as pharmacokinetics (PK) and -dynamics (PD) of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in birds is limited. The objective of this work therefore was to establish a modified tissue cage-model to investigate the acute, carrageenan-mediated inflammatory response, as well as plasma and exudate-kinetics and the antiphlogistic effect of orally administered sodium salicylate on the elicited inflammatory reaction in turkeys. Within the class Aves, comparable studies have so far only been published in chicken. Following bilateral subcutaneous implantation of carrageenan-treated synthetic sponges in the lateral thoracic region, sodium salicylate was administered orally at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight (BW; therapy group) twice daily on three consecutive days, while a control group received drinking water as a placebo (n = 24 per group). Combined PK and PD of sodium salicylate were evaluated on the basis of salicylate- and prostaglandin (PG) E2-plasma- and -exudate-concentrations, exudate volumes, as well as leukocyte exudate counts. Sodium salicylate was readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and accumulated in the inflammatory exudate. At 4, 6, and 10 h after first application, sodium salicylate significantly reduced PG E2-concentrations in the inflammatory exudate when compared to the control group, whereas leukocyte exudate counts increased over time in both study groups, unaffected by sodium salicylate The described modified tissue cage-model can be beneficial for further research on the pathophysiology of avian inflammatory processes and the investigation of the combined pharmacodynamics and -kinetics of drugs in birds of adequate size. PMID:26054231

  4. Inhibition of Carrageenan-Induced Acute Inflammation in Mice by Oral Administration of Anthocyanin Mixture from Wild Mulberry and Cyanidin-3-Glucoside

    PubMed Central

    Hassimotto, Neuza Mariko Aymoto; Moreira, Vanessa; do Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Souto, Pollyana Cristina Maggio de Castro; Teixeira, Catarina; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanins are flavonoids which demonstrated biological activities in in vivo and in vitro models. Here in the anti-inflammatory properties of an anthocyanin-enriched fraction (AF) extracted from wild mulberry and the cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), the most abundant anthocyanin in diet, were studied in two acute inflammation experimental models, in the peritonitis and in the paw oedema assays, both of which were induced by carrageenan (cg) in mice. In each trial, AF and C3G (4 mg/100 g/animal) were orally administered in two distinct protocols: 30 min before and 1 h after cg stimulus. The administration of both AF and C3G suppresses the paw oedema in both administration times (P < 0.05). In the peritonitis, AF and C3G reduced the polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) influx in the peritoneal exudates when administered 1 h after cg injection. AF was more efficient reducing the PMN when administered 30 min before cg. Both AF and C3G were found to suppress mRNA as well as protein levels of COX-2 upregulated by cg in both protocols, but the inhibitory effect on PGE2 production in the peritoneal exudates was observed when administered 30 min before cg (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that AF and C3G minimize acute inflammation and they present positive contributions as dietary supplements. PMID:23484081

  5. Pimaradienoic Acid Inhibits Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Leukocyte Recruitment and Edema in Mice: Inhibition of Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide and Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2016-01-01

    Pimaradienoic acid (PA; ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid) is a pimarane diterpene found in plants such as Vigueira arenaria Baker (Asteraceae) in the Brazilian savannas. Although there is evidence on the analgesic and in vitro inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways, and paw edema by PA, its anti-inflammatory effect deserves further investigation. Thus, the objective of present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of PA in carrageenan-induced peritoneal and paw inflammation in mice. Firstly, we assessed the effect of PA in carrageenan-induced leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity and paw edema and myeloperoxidase activity. Next, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of PA. The effect of PA on carrageenan-induced oxidative stress in the paw skin and peritoneal cavity was assessed. We also tested the effect of PA on nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and inflammatory cytokine production in the peritoneal cavity. PA inhibited carrageenan-induced recruitment of total leukocytes and neutrophils to the peritoneal cavity in a dose-dependent manner. PA also inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema and myeloperoxidase activity in the paw skin. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of PA depended on maintaining paw skin antioxidant activity as observed by the levels of reduced glutathione, ability to scavenge the ABTS cation and reduce iron as well as by the inhibition of superoxide anion and nitric oxide production in the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, PA inhibited carrageenan-induced peritoneal production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. PA presents prominent anti-inflammatory effect in carrageenan-induced inflammation by reducing oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and cytokine production. Therefore, it seems to be a promising anti-inflammatory molecule that merits further investigation. PMID:26895409

  6. Pimaradienoic Acid Inhibits Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Leukocyte Recruitment and Edema in Mice: Inhibition of Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Sandra S; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Zarpelon, Ana C; Possebon, Maria I; de Souza, Anderson R; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Arakawa, Nilton S; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-01-01

    Pimaradienoic acid (PA; ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid) is a pimarane diterpene found in plants such as Vigueira arenaria Baker (Asteraceae) in the Brazilian savannas. Although there is evidence on the analgesic and in vitro inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways, and paw edema by PA, its anti-inflammatory effect deserves further investigation. Thus, the objective of present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of PA in carrageenan-induced peritoneal and paw inflammation in mice. Firstly, we assessed the effect of PA in carrageenan-induced leukocyte recruitment in the peritoneal cavity and paw edema and myeloperoxidase activity. Next, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of PA. The effect of PA on carrageenan-induced oxidative stress in the paw skin and peritoneal cavity was assessed. We also tested the effect of PA on nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and inflammatory cytokine production in the peritoneal cavity. PA inhibited carrageenan-induced recruitment of total leukocytes and neutrophils to the peritoneal cavity in a dose-dependent manner. PA also inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema and myeloperoxidase activity in the paw skin. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of PA depended on maintaining paw skin antioxidant activity as observed by the levels of reduced glutathione, ability to scavenge the ABTS cation and reduce iron as well as by the inhibition of superoxide anion and nitric oxide production in the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, PA inhibited carrageenan-induced peritoneal production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. PA presents prominent anti-inflammatory effect in carrageenan-induced inflammation by reducing oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and cytokine production. Therefore, it seems to be a promising anti-inflammatory molecule that merits further investigation. PMID:26895409

  7. The inhibitory effect of locally injected dexmedetomidine on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuka; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Yabuki-Kawase, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies showed that the administration of dexmedetomidine relieved hyperalgesia in the presence of neuropathic pain. These findings have led to the hypothesis that the local administration of dexmedetomidine is useful for relieving acute inflammatory nociception, such as postoperative pain. Thus, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of locally injected dexmedetomidine on acute inflammatory nociception. Acute inflammatory nociception was induced by an intraplantar injection of 1% carrageenan into the hindpaws of rats, and dexmedetomidine was also injected combined with carrageenan. The paw withdrawal threshold based on von Frey filament stimulation was measured until 12 h after injection. We compared the area under the time-curve (AUC) between carrageenan and carrageenan with dexmedetomidine. To clarify that the action of dexmedetomidine was via α2-adrenoceptors, we evaluated the effect of yohimbine, a selective antagonist of α2-adrenoceptors, on the anti-nociception of dexmedetomidine. As the results, the intraplantar injection of carrageenan with over 10 μM dexmedetomidine significantly increased AUC, compared to that with only carrageenan injection. This effect of dexmedetomidine was reversed by the addition of yohimbine to carrageenan and dexmedetomidine. These results demonstrated that the locally injected dexmedetomidine was effective against carrageenan-induced inflammatory nociception via α2-adrenoceptors. The findings suggest that the local injection of dexmedetomidine is useful for relieving local acute inflammatory nociception. PMID:26160316

  8. Potentiation of indomethacin-induced anti-inflammatory response by pioglitazone in carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats: Role of PPARγ receptors.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, Gholamreza; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the interaction between anti-inflammatory effects of pioglitazone (peroxysome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonist, PGL), and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, IND) and to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms. Paw edema induced by carrageenan was used to induce inflammation. Different doses of IND (0.3-10mg/kg) and PGL (1-20mg/kg) alone or in combination were administered intraperitoneally to rats. Paw tissue levels of PPARγ, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10 were also estimated. Doses of IND and PGL showed a statistically significant anti-inflammatory effect. Combination of a non-effective dose of IND (0.3mg/kg) with increasing doses of PGL (1-10mg/kg) resulted in potentiated anti-inflammation and vise versa. IND, PGL and the combination were able to reduce the COX-2, PGE2 contents and TNF-α level. Moreover, all these treatments caused elevation in PPARγ levels and IL-10 levels. However, when the rats were pre-treated with GW-9662 (a selective PPARγ antagonist), all the anti-inflammation and alterations in the biochemical factors were antagonized. These results showed that PGL markedly enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of IND and this effect mediated partly at least, through PPARγ. Possible mechanisms of the interaction were that PGL stimulates the PPARγ and inhibits COX-2 by those cytokines that trigger the PPARγ and also inhibit COX-2. This study suggests that combination therapy with pioglitazone and indomethacin may provide an alternative for the clinical control of inflammation especially in patients with diabetes. PMID:27376854

  9. Neurogram recording during acute inflammation in the rat hind paw.

    PubMed

    Bohrman, J S; Runion, H I; Malone, M H

    1981-03-01

    Electrophysiological recording was conducted using the intact tibiotarsal nerve of the left hind leg of adult male rats before and after subplantar injections of three different phlogistic agents or saline vehicle in the left hind paw. In three-hour recordings, peak neural activity as activated by 5 g of pressure to the injected paw was reached in 90 min (dextran), 120 min (brewer's yeast) and 150 min (carrageenan). The least neural hyperactivity was seen with dextran, while yeast and carrageenan produced comparably high degrees of hyperactivity. Neurograms were also studied in rats receiving orally administered prototype anti-inflammatory agents or chlorpromazine 1 hr before carrageenan was injected pedally. Chlorpromazine HCl pretreatment (100 mg/kg) exerted the greatest protective effect with the nadir of neural activity seen at 90-120 min. The nadir for phenylbutazone (100 mg/kg) was at 60-120 min, indomethacin (10 mg/kg) at 60-90 min and aspirin (300 mg/kg) at 45-90 min. Despite these temporal differences, the protective effects of these three anti-inflammatory agents were statistically equivalent at the doses tested. Hydrocortisone alcohol (20 mg/kg) provided a significant reduction in hyperactivity at 30-60 min but the duration was much shorter than the other agents which showed protective effects through to the end of the 180-min observation period. PMID:7271377

  10. Sinularin from Indigenous Soft Coral Attenuates Nociceptive Responses and Spinal Neuroinflammation in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammatory Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ying; Chen, Nan-Fu; Chen, Wu-Fu; Hung, Han-Chun; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Lin, Yen-You; Wang, Hui-Min; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Three decades ago, the marine-derived compound sinularin was shown to have anti-edematous effects on paw edema induced by carrageenan or adjuvant. To the best of our knowledge, no new studies were conducted to explore the bioactivity of sinularin until we reported the analgesic properties of sinularin based on in vivo experiments. In the present study, we found that sinularin significantly inhibits the upregulation of proinflammatory proteins, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and upregulates the production of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells according to western blot analysis. We found that subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of sinularin (80 mg/kg) 1 h before carrageenan injection significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, including thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, cold allodynia, and hindpaw weight-bearing deficits. Further, s.c. sinularin (80 mg/kg) significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced microglial and astrocyte activation as well as upregulation of iNOS in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. Moreover, s.c. sinularin (80 mg/kg) inhibited carrageenan-induced tissue inflammatory responses, redness and edema of the paw, and leukocyte infiltration. The results of immunohistochemical studies indicate that s.c. sinularin (80 mg/kg) could upregulate production of TGF-β1 in carrageenan-induced inflamed paw tissue. The present results demonstrate that systemic sinularin exerts analgesic effects at the behavioral and spinal levels, which are associated with both inhibition of leukocyte infiltration and upregulation of TGF-β1. PMID:23118711

  11. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  12. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  13. Acute and chronic nociceptive phases observed in a rat hind paw ischemia/reperfusion model depend on different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Klafke, J Z; da Silva, M A; Rossato, M F; de Prá, S Dal Toé; Rigo, F K; Walker, C I B; Bochi, G V; Moresco, R N; Ferreira, J; Trevisan, G

    2016-02-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) may be evoked by ischemia/reperfusion, eliciting acute and chronic pain that is difficult to treat. Despite this, the underlying mechanism of CRPS1 has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the goal of this study is to evaluate the involvement of inflammation, oxidative stress, and the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel, a chemosensor of inflammation and oxidative substances, in an animal model of chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP). Male Wistar rats were subjected to 3 h hind paw ischemia/reperfusion (CPIP model). Different parameters of nociception, inflammation, ischemia, and oxidative stress were evaluated at 1 (acute) and 14 (chronic) days after CPIP. The effect of a TRPA1 antagonist and the TRPA1 immunoreactivity were also observed after CPIP. In the CPIP acute phase, we observed mechanical and cold allodynia; increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (hind paw), ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), lactate (serum), and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, hind paw and spinal cord); and higher myeloperoxidase (MPO) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activities (hind paw). In the CPIP chronic phase, we detected mechanical and cold allodynia and increased levels of IMA (serum), protein carbonyl (hind paw and spinal cord), and 4-HNE (hind paw and spinal cord). TRPA1 antagonism reduced mechanical and cold allodynia 1 and 14 days after CPIP, but no change in TRPA1 immunoreactivity was observed. Different mechanisms underlie acute (inflammation and oxidative stress) and chronic (oxidative stress) phases of CPIP. TRPA1 activation may be relevant for CRPS1/CPIP-induced acute and chronic pain. PMID:26490459

  14. Oxysophocarpine Ameliorates Carrageenan-induced Inflammatory Pain via Inhibiting Expressions of Prostaglandin E2 and Cytokines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Hong-Ling; Jin, Shao-Ju; Zhou, Ru; Qiao, Hai-Qi; Du, Juan; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Oxysophocarpine is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora alopecuroides. We investigated the analgesic effect of oxysophocarpine on carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain in mice, in order to explore its possible mechanisms. Mouse ear swelling tests and carrageenan-induced paw edema tests were used to investigate the effects of oxysophocarpine on inflammatory pain in mice. Morphological changes on inflamed paw sections were measured by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The mRNA and protein expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 and prostaglandin E2 were investigated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, western-blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In our results, oxysophocarpine shows a significant anti-inflammatory effect in the mouse ear swelling test. Oxysophocarpine also significantly reduced the paw edema volume and improved mechanical allodynia threshold value on carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain, as well as relieved paw tissues inflammatory damage and reduced the numbers of neutrophils in mice. Oxysophocarpine significantly suppressed over-expression of cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 and prostaglandin E2, and inhibited the over-phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Based on these findings we propose that oxysophocarpine attenuates inflammatory pain by suppressing the levels of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6. PMID:26132856

  15. Pitavastatin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent in the rat paw model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Farida; Alam, Syed Mahboob; Siddiqi, Abeer Qamar; Kamran, Afshan

    2014-11-01

    Statins are used extensively as anti-hyperlipidemic agents. In addition to curtailing cholesterol synthesis they have been found to have multiple actions unrelated to cholesterol lowering "the pleiotropic effects," which includes inhibition of inflammation. We aimed at investigating the effect of pitavastatin a 3rd generation statin, in suppressing acute inflammation in rat paw edema model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of five groups (n=8): Control, indomethacin and pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg, 0.4mg/kg, 0.8mg/kg) treated. 1hour following treatment, inflammation was induced by sub-planter injection of egg albumin into the hind paw. Anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by measurement of edema formation every half hour for three hours, assessment of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration and measurement of tissue damage in skin biopsies. Ascending doses of pitavastatin were found to attenuate these parameters. The lowest dose of pitavastatin (0.2mg/kg) was found to significantly reduce edema volume, PMNL infiltration and tissue damage. The efficacy of the smallest dose was found comparable to indomethacin. PMID:26045381

  16. Effect of some plants' extracts used in Sudanese folkloric medicines on carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mona Salih; Khalid, Hassan Subki; Muddathir, Abd Elkhaliq; El-Tahir, Kamal; Khan, Azmat Ali; Algadir, Haidar Abd; Osman, Wadah Jamal Ahmed; Siddiqui, Nasir Ali

    2015-01-01

    Investigations for anti-inflammatory potential and categorization of Sudanese medicinal plants according to their potency. Anti-inflammatory effect of plants' extracts of 17 genera were studied using the carrageenan induced inflammation in rats' paws. The plant extracts were obtained using methanol and dichloromethane as solvent and administered intra peritoneally at the concentration of 2g/kg body weight. The results obtained in this experiment strongly support and validate the traditional uses of these Sudanese medicinal plants to treat various inflammatory diseases. 63.9% of plants extracts showed marked inhibition of inflammation induced by carrageenan (78.3% out of this percentage represented by methanolic extract), 27.8% showed no activity and 8.3% enhanced the carrageenan induced inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of many of these plants has not been reported previously, yet they have been extensively used in Sudanese folkloric medicine. The result of this study justify the traditional medicinal use of the evaluated plants species in treating inflammatory disorders and helped in categorizing the investigated plants into most useful, moderately useful and least useful category for inflammatory diseases. Out of the 17 investigated plant species 05 belongs to most useful and 06 belongs to moderately useful category. However, toxicity studies are required to prove the safety of these plant materials. PMID:25553680

  17. TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Heni; Safitri, Dewi; Pradana, Aditya Trias; Adnyana, I Ketut

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS)-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan) was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27537907

  18. PEP-1-FK506BP12 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase expression in human articular chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Park, In Young; Kim, Dae Won; Choi, Soo Young; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FK506BP12), an immunosuppressor, modulates T cell activation via calcineurin inhibition. In this study, we investigated the ability of PEP-1-FK506BP12, consisting of FK506BP12 fused to the protein transduction domain PEP-1 peptide, to suppress catabolic responses in primary human chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced paw arthritis model. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis showed that PEP-1-FK506BP12 efficiently penetrated chondrocytes and cartilage explants. In interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated chondrocytes, PEP-1-FK506BP12 significantly suppressed the expression of catabolic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -3, and -13 in addition to cyclooxygenase-2, at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas FK506BP12 alone did not. In addition, PEP-1-FK506BP12 decreased IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complex (p38, JNK, and ERK) and the inhibitor kappa B alpha. In the mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw arthritis, PEP-1-FK506BP12 suppressed both carrageenan-induced MMP-13 production and paw inflammation. PEP-1-FK506BP12 may have therapeutic potential in the alleviation of OA progression. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 407-412] PMID:25887750

  19. PEP-1-FK506BP12 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase expression in human articular chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Park, In Young; Kim, Dae Won; Choi, Soo Young; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-07-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein (FK506BP12), an immunosuppressor, modulates T cell activation via calcineurin inhibition. In this study, we investigated the ability of PEP-1-FK506BP12, consisting of FK506BP12 fused to the protein transduction domain PEP-1 peptide, to suppress catabolic responses in primary human chondrocytes and in a mouse carrageenan-induced paw arthritis model. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis showed that PEP-1-FK506BP12 efficiently penetrated chondrocytes and cartilage explants. In interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-treated chondrocytes, PEP-1-FK506BP12 significantly suppressed the expression of catabolic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, -3, and -13 in addition to cyclooxygenase-2, at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas FK506BP12 alone did not. In addition, PEP-1-FK506BP12 decreased IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) complex (p38, JNK, and ERK) and the inhibitor kappa B alpha. In the mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw arthritis, PEP-1-FK506BP12 suppressed both carrageenan-induced MMP-13 production and paw inflammation. PEP-1-FK506BP12 may have therapeutic potential in the alleviation of OA progression. PMID:25887750

  20. Anti-inflammatory effect of laser acupuncture in ST36 (Zusanli) acupoint in mouse paw edema.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Vanessa; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Nohama, Percy

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in acupuncture is a low-power laser applied to acupoints for providing luminous energy, capable to produce photobiological induction that results in biochemical, bioelectric, and bioenergetic effects. ST36 (Zusanli) is a point of acupuncture commonly used for treatment of several pathological alterations, such as inflammation, acute pain, and gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of LLLT (830 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) in ST36 acupoint through the model of carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice and the possible mechanisms involved. Female Swiss mice were treated with LLLT in ST36 before the paw edema induction, which was measured by means of a digital micrometer and the temperature through a high-resolution digital thermograph. After this, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were quantified. In another set of experiments, the paw edema was induced by bradykinin, histamine, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). LLLT in ST36 acupoint significantly inhibited the edema formation for 4 h after the carrageenan injection and reduced the paw temperature in 10 %. Furthermore, LLLT also reduced the levels of ROS (55 %) and LOOH (50 %) but, however, did not alter the GSH levels. LLLT in ST36 reduced the paw edema induced by bradykinin (30 min, 6 %, 60 min, 7 %), histamine (30 min, 11 %), and PGE2 (90 min, 10 %, 120 min, 16 %). In conclusion, these results prove that LLLT in ST36 acupoint produces a relevant anti-inflammatory effect, reducing edema, temperature, and free radicals levels in mice paw. PMID:26738499

  1. Diethylcarbamazine Attenuates the Development of Carrageenan-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Edlene Lima; Barbosa, Karla Patricia de Souza; Fragoso, Ingrid Tavares; Donato, Mariana Aragão Matos; Oliveira dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana; da Silva, Bruna Santos; Silva, Amanda Karolina Soares e; Rocha, Sura Wanessa Santos; Amaro da Silva Junior, Valdemiro; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is an antifilarial drug with potent anti-inflammatory properties as a result of its interference with the metabolism of arachidonic acid. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of DEC in a mouse model of acute inflammation (carrageenan-induced pleurisy). The injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity induced the accumulation of fluid containing a large number of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) as well as infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and increased production of nitrite and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased expression of interleukin-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Carrageenan also induced the expression of nuclear factor-κB. The oral administration of DEC (50 mg/Kg) three days prior to the carrageenan challenge led to a significant reduction in all inflammation markers. The present findings demonstrate that DEC is a potential drug for the treatment of acute lung inflammation. PMID:24550603

  2. Acute turpentine inflammation and kinin release in rat-paw thermic oedema.

    PubMed

    Limãos, E A; Borges, D R; Souza-Pinto, J C; Gordon, A H; Prado, J L

    1981-12-01

    Livers from rats at 2-3 days after s.c. injection of turpentine, when perfused, synthesized prekallikrein nearly 3 times faster than did livers from normal rats. On the other hand paw oedema, produced by heating to 46 degrees, in rats injured in this way was less marked. Likewise in such rats the amount of bradykinin release by 50 min. of coaxial perfusion of the paw was only 13.6 +/- 4.6 compared with 63.1 +/- 13.4 ng in normal rats. A possible explanation for the observed reduction in production of bradykinin may be inhibition of kallikrein due to an increased concentration of alpha 2-macroglobulin. PMID:6173056

  3. Effects of punicalagin and punicalin on carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Hsu, Y F; Lin, T C

    1999-01-01

    Punicalagin and punicalin were isolated from the leaves of Terminalia catappa L. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of punicalagin and punicalin carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats. After evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects, the edema rates were increased by carrageenan administration and reduced by drug treatment. After 4 hr of carrageenan administration, the best effect group was the punicalagin (10 mg/kg) treated group (inhibition rate was 58.15%), and the second was the punicalagin (5 mg/kg)-treated group (inhibition rate was 39.15%). However, even if the anti-inflammatory activity of punicalagin was the same as punicalin at the 5 mg/kg dose, the inhibition effect from larger doses of punicalagin was increased, but there was a decrease with a larger dose of punicalin. The data showed that both punicalagin and punicalin exert anti-inflammatory activity, but treatment with larger doses of punicalin may induce some cell damages. PMID:10592846

  4. Carrageenan-induced inflammation promotes ROS generation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation in a mouse model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Barth, Cristiane R; Funchal, Giselle A; Luft, Carolina; de Oliveira, Jarbas R; Porto, Bárbara N; Donadio, Márcio V F

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular proteins, such as neutrophil elastase (NE). NETs are released in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli. Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from Chondrus crispus, a marine algae, used for decades in research for its potential to induce inflammation in different animal models. In this study, we show for the first time that carrageenan injection can induce NET release in a mouse model of acute peritonitis. Carrageenan induced NET release by viable neutrophils with NE and myeloperoxidase (MPO) expressed on DNA fibers. Furthermore, although this polysaccharide was able to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by peritoneal neutrophils, NADPH oxidase derived ROS were dispensable for NET formation by carrageenan. In conclusion, our results show that carrageenan-induced inflammation in the peritoneum of mice can induce NET formation in an ROS-independent manner. These results may add important information to the field of inflammation and potentially lead to novel anti-inflammatory agents targeting the production of NETs. PMID:26786873

  5. The analgesic efficacy of intra-articular acetaminophen in an experimental model of carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Oguzhan; Canbay, Ozgur; Celebi, Nalan; Sahin, Altan; Konan, Ali; Atilla, Pergin; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen is one of the most common drugs used for the treatment of pain and fever. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of intra-articular (IA) acetaminophen on carrageenan-induced arthritic pain-related behaviour and spinal c-Fos expression in rats. METHODS: The present study was performed using 20 Sprague Dawley rats. Forty microlitres of IA 0.9% NaCl was injected in the control group, and 40 μL of IA carrageenan was injected in the carrageenan group. One hour after carrageenan injection, 400 μg of IA acetaminophen was injected in the IA acetaminophen group, and 400 μg of intraperitoneal (IP) acet-aminophen was injected in the IP acetaminophen group. One day before injection, and 4 h and 8 h after injection, diameters of both knee joints, motility of the rat, paw loading and joint mobility were assessed. After the rats were euthanized, L3 and L4 spinal segments were excised for c-Fos assessment. RESULTS: IA acetaminophen decreased both the severity and distribution of c-Fos expression. IP acetaminophen decreased only the distribution of c-Fos expression. IA acetaminophen decreased knee diameter at 8 h. IA and IP acetaminophen increased rat motility and paw loading scores. Joint mobility scores of IP acetaminophen were similar to saline at 8 h. CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate an analgesic and/or possible anti-inflammatory effect of IA acetaminophen and provide further evidence on the efficacy of systemic acetaminophen injection in reducing arthritic pain. PMID:24093120

  6. Thermoregulatory vasomotor tone of the rat tail and paws in thermoneutral conditions and its impact on a behavioral model of acute pain.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Karroum, Elias; Pincedé, Ivanne; Mouraux, André; Le Bars, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The tail and paws in rodents are heat exchangers involved in the maintenance of core body temperature (T(core)). They are also the most widely used target organs to study acute or chronic "models" of pain. We describe the fluctuations of vasomotor tone in the tail and paws in conditions of thermal neutrality and the constraints of these physiological processes on the responses to thermal nociceptive stimuli, commonly used as an index of pain. Skin temperatures were recorded with a calibrated thermal camera to monitor changes of vasomotor tone in the tail and paws of awake and anesthetized rats. In thermoneutral conditions, the sympathetic tone fluctuated at a rate of two to seven cycles/h. Increased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; ∼46 mmHg) was followed by increased heart rate (HR; ∼45 beats/min) within 30 s, vasoconstriction of extremities (3.5-7°C range) within 3-5 min, and increased T(core) (∼0.7°C) within 6 min. Decreased MAP was followed by opposite events. There was a high correlation between HR and T(core) recorded 5-6 min later. The reaction time of the animal's response to a radiant thermal stimulus-heat ramp (6°C/s, 20 mm(2) spot) generated by a CO2 laser-directed to the tail depends on these variations. Consequently, the fluctuations in tail and paw temperature thus represent a serious confound for thermal nociceptive tests, particularly when they are conducted at thermal neutrality. PMID:25008410

  7. Investigation of mucus obtained from different fish species on the acute pain induced with scalpel incision in paw of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahtiyar; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kiran, Altan; Gencoglu, Songul; Duzgun, Ahmet; Kurtoglu, Ilker Zeki; Yarali, Oguzhan; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    No comparative study could be found for the analgesic activity of mucuses from the Oncorhynchus mykiss (OM), Salvelinus fontinalis (SF), Salmo coruhensis (SC), Acipenser gueldenstaedtii (AG), and Acipenser baerii (AB) fish species in the literature. We aimed to investigate the effects of mucuses obtained from the abovementioned fish species on scalpel incision-induced pain in the rat paw and to examine the role of oxidant/antioxidant parameters and COX-2 gene expression in the analgesic activities. Animals were divided into groups: SIC (scalpel incision; SI), SIDS (SI+25 mg/kg diclofenac sodium), SOM (SI+25 mg/kg OM mucus), SFM (SI+25 mg/kg SF mucus), SCM (SI+25 mg/kg SC mucus), SAgM (SI+25 mg/kg AG mucus), SAbM (SI+25 mg/kg AB mucus), and HG (healthy). The paw pain thresholds were measured with a Basile algesimeter before and after diclofenac sodium (DS) or mucus administration, and then the rats were euthanized with thiopental sodium. Oxidant/antioxidant and COX-2 gene expression parameters were measured in paw tissues. OM, SC, AG, and AB fish mucuses could not decrease the SI-induced pain. However, SF fish mucus prevented this pain by 69% after the first hour and by 58.3% after the third hour. DS was shown to suppress pain more weakly than SF, preventing the pain by 62.1% and 50.0% after the first and third hours, respectively. SF mucus and DS significantly inhibited increase of COX-2 gene expression, while other fish mucuses could not. None of the fish mucuses except SF mucus in conjunction with DS could significantly inhibit the increase in oxidant parameters and decrease in antioxidants. SF fish mucus should be comparatively assessed in clinical practice for treatment of postoperative pain. PMID:26490740

  8. Effect of Trimeric Myricetin Rhamnoside (TMR) in Carrageenan-induced Inflammation and Caecal Ligation and Puncture-induced Lung Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Latief, Najeeb; Anand, Shikha; Lingaraju, Madhu Cholenahalli; Balaganur, Venkanna; Pathak, Nitya Nand; Kalra, Jaspreet; Kumar, Dinesh; Bhadoria, Brijesh K; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The Eugenia jambolana is used in folklore medicine. Leaves of E. jambolana contain flavonoids as their active constituents which possess in vitro antiinflammatory, antioxidant and the antimicrobial activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antiinflammatory and antioxidant effects of a flavonoid glucoside, trimeric myricetin rhamnoside (TMR) isolated from leaves of E. jambolana. TMR was studied for antiinflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced hind paw oedema and antioxidant activity in lung by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. Results of the present study indicated that TMR significantly attenuated the oedema, myeloperoxidase (MPO), cytokines and prostaglandin levels in the paw after 5 h of carrageenan injection as compared to vehicle control. It also reduced the lung MPO, lipid peroxides, and serum nitrite plus nitrate levels and increased lung reduced glutathione levels 20 h of CLP as compared to vehicle control. Thus the results of this study concluded that the TMR appears to have potential benefits in diseases that are mediated by both inflammation and oxidative stress and support the pharmacological basis of use of E. jambolana plant as traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26343251

  9. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  11. Therapeutic effect of the endogenous fatty acid amide, palmitoylethanolamide, in rat acute inflammation: inhibition of nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase systems

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Conti, Silvia; Giagnoni, Gabriella; Colleoni, Mariapia

    2002-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the endogenous fatty acid amide palmitoylethanolamide and its relationship to cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activity, nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen free radical production were investigated in the rat model of carrageenan-induced acute paw inflammation and compared with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin. Palmitoylethanolamide (1, 3, 5, 10 mg kg−1; p.o.) and indomethacin (5 mg kg−1; p.o.) were administered daily after the onset of inflammation for three days and the paw oedema was measured daily; 24 h after the last dose (fourth day) the rats were killed and the COX activity and the content of nitrite/nitrate (NO2−/NO3−), malondialdehyde (MDA), endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and iNOS) were evaluated in the paw tissues. Palmitoylethanolamide had a curative effect on inflammation, inhibiting the carrageenan-induced oedema in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was not reversed by the selective CB2 receptor antagonist (N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrazole-3 carboxamide) (SR144528), 3 mg kg−1 p.o. On the fourth day after carrageenan injection, COX activity and the level of NO2−/NO3−, eNOS and MDA were increased in the inflamed paw, but iNOS was not present. Palmitoylethanolamide (10 mg kg−1) and indomethacin markedly reduced these increases. Our findings show, for the first time, that palmitoylethanolamide has a curative effect in a model of acute inflammation. The inhibition of COX activity and of NO and free radical production at the site of inflammation might account for this activity. PMID:12359622

  12. Inhibition of rat paw oedema and pleurisy by the extract from Mandevilla velutina.

    PubMed

    Henriques, M G; Fernandes, P D; Weg, V B; Yunes, R A; Cordeiro, R S; Calixto, J B

    1991-07-01

    This study reports the oral anti-inflammatory profile of the crude extract (CE) of Mandevilla velutina, a plant which has been previously demonstrated to selectively antagonize bradykinin response of the isolated tissues on rat paw oedema and pleurisy caused by different phlogistic agents. The CE (50 to 200 mg/kg), given 60 min before, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner bradykinin (BK) and cellulose sulphate-induced paw oedema, maximal inhibition of 59% and 65%, respectively. In the same range dose the CE also significantly antagonized pleural exudate and cell infiltration caused by these substances, maximal inhibition of 34% and 46%, respectively. In addition, the CE (100 and 200 mg/kg) also inhibited paw oedema induced by serotonin, PAF-acether and zymosan, maximal inhibition of 55%, 38% and 46%, respectively, but enhanced histamine oedema. However, the CE revealed only partial or no inhibition in pleural exudate caused by these agents. The CE (100 and 200 mg/kg) also inhibited in a dose and time-dependent manner carrageenan-induced paw oedema with a maximal inhibition of 44%, but only partially affected carrageenan-induced pleural exudate. The CE also partially inhibited dextran oedema, but even at a higher dose (400 mg/kg) it failed to interfere with Bothrops Jaracaca-induced paw oedema. The CE inhibited BK and to a lesser extent cellulose sulphate-induced cell migration, but failed to interfere with the differential leukocyte migration in the pleural cavity. These findings provide evidence that the CE from M. velutina, besides antagonizing kinin action, exhibit an oral anti-oedematogenic activity against a variety of phologistic agents, but it was more effective in inhibiting those models where kinins are more involved. PMID:1719783

  13. Protective effect of proteins derived from Calotropis procera latex against acute inflammation in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V L; Guruprasad, B; Chaudhary, P; Fatmi, S M A; Oliveira, R S B; Ramos, M V

    2015-07-01

    The non-dialysable proteins present in the latex of plant Calotropis procera possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of latex proteins (LP) on the level of inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress markers and tissue histology in the rat model of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation. This study also aimed at evaluating the anti-inflammatory efficacy of LP against different mediators and comparing it with their respective antagonists. Paw inflammation was induced by subplantar injection of carrageenan, and the effect of LP was evaluated on oedema volume, level of TNF-α, PGE(2), myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and tissue histology at the time of peak inflammation. Paw inflammation was also induced by histamine, serotonin, bradykinin and PGE(2), and the inhibitory effect of LP against these mediators was compared with their respective antagonists at the time of peak effect. Treatment with LP produced a dose-dependent inhibition of oedema formation, and its anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw inflammation was accompanied by reduction in the levels of inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress markers and normalization of tissue architecture. LP also produced a dose-dependent inhibition of oedema formation induced by different inflammatory mediators, and its efficacy was comparable to their respective antagonists and more pronounced than that of diclofenac. Thus, our study shows that LP has a potential to be used for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions where the role of these mediators is well established. PMID:25882716

  14. Imaging of Carrageenan-Induced Local Inflammation and Adjuvant-Induced Systemic Arthritis with [11C]PBR28 PET

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xia; Wang, Xueding; English, Sean J; Desmond, Timothy; Sherman, Phillip S; Quesada, Carole A; Piert, Morand R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction [11C]PBR28 binding to translocator protein (TSPO) was evaluated for imaging of acute and chronic inflammation using two established rat models. Methods Acute inflammation was induced by local Carrageenan-injection into the paw of Fisher 344 rats (model A). T-cell mediated adjuvant arthritis was induced by heat-inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum injection in Lewis rats (model B). Micro-PET scan was performed after injection of approximately 35 MBq [11C]PBR28. In model A, volumes of interest (VOIs) were defined in the paw of Fisher 344 rats (n=6) with contralateral sham treatment as control. For model B, VOIs were defined in the tail, sacroiliac joints, hips, knees and thigh muscles of M. butyricum treated animals (n=8) and compared with sham-treated controls (n=4). The peak 11C-PBR28 SUV (SUVpeak) and area under the curve (AUCSUV) of 60-minute time-activity data were calculated. Immunohistochemistry for CD68, a macrophage stain, was performed from paw tissues. In addition, the [11C]PBR28 cell uptake was measured in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated and non-stimulated macrophage cultures. Results LPS-stimulated macrophages displayed dose-dependent increased [11C]PBR28 uptake, which was blocked by non-labeled PBR28. In both models, radiotracer uptake of treated lesions increased rapidly within minutes and displayed overall accumulative kinetics. The SUVpeak and AUCSUV of Carrageenan-treated paws was significantly increased compared to controls. Also, the [11C]PBR28 uptake ratio of Carrageenan-treated vs. sham-treated paw correlated significantly with CD68 staining ratios of the same animals. In adjuvant arthritis, significantly increased [11C]PBR28 SUVpeak and AUCSUV values were identified at the tail, knees, and sacroiliac joints, while no significant differences were identified in the lumbar spine and hips. Conclusions Based on our initial data, [11C]PBR28 PET appears to have potential for imaging of various inflammatory processes involving

  15. Mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of tricin, a flavonoid isolated from Njavara rice bran in LPS induced hPBMCs and carrageenan induced rats.

    PubMed

    Shalini, V; Jayalekshmi, Ananthasankaran; Helen, A

    2015-08-01

    Njavara is an indigenous medicinal rice variety traditionally used in Ayurvedic system of medicine practiced in Kerala, India. Tricin is a bioflavonoid present in significantly higher levels in rice bran of Njavara. Present study attempted to identify the molecular target of tricin in TLR mediated signaling pathways by using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) and carrageenan induced paw edema in rats as experimental models. Tricin acted upstream in the activation of inflammation cascade by interfering with TLR4 activation, preferably by blocking the LPS induced activation of TLR4, MYD88 and TRIF proteins in hPBMCs. Subsequently, tricin significantly blocked the activation of downstream kinases like p38MAPK, JNK1/2 and IRF3. Thus the inhibitory effect of tricin on NF-κB and IRF3 together confirms the specific inhibition of both MYD88 dependent and TRIF dependent pathways. Tricin treatment also inhibited the pro-inflammatory effect of LPS by blocking the TLR4 signaling mediated activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which is confirmed by specific inhibition of COX-2. Results demonstrated that in addition to NF-κB, tricin can prevent the activation of STAT proteins by significantly inhibiting the activation of both STAT1 and STAT3 via the down regulation of upstream phosphorylating enzymes like JAK1 and JAK2. The protective anti-inflammatory effect of tricin was also confirmed by in vivo experiments. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that tricin exerts its anti-inflammatory effect via a mechanism involving the TLR4/NF-κB/STAT signaling cascade. PMID:25839778

  16. A Novel Zebrafish Model to Provide Mechanistic Insights into the Inflammatory Events in Carrageenan-Induced Abdominal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi-Ying; Feng, Chien-Wei; Hung, Han-Chun; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chen, Wu-Fu; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Min David; Sung, Chun-Sung; Sun, Yu-Min; Wu, Chang-Yi; Liu, Wangta; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A suitable small animal model may help in the screening and evaluation of new drugs, especially those from natural products, which can be administered at lower dosages, fulfilling an urgent worldwide need. In this study, we explore whether zebrafish could be a model organism for carrageenan-induced abdominal edema. The research results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 1.5% λ-carrageenan in a volume of 20 µL significantly increased abdominal edema in adult zebrafish. Levels of the proinflammatory proteins tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were increased in carrageenan-injected adult zebrafish during the development of abdominal edema. An associated enhancement was also observed in the leukocyte marker, myeloperoxidase (MPO). To support these results, we further observed that i.p. methylprednisolone (MP; 1 µg), a positive control, significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammation 24 h after carrageenan administration. Furthermore, i.p. pretreatment with either an anti-TNF-α antibody (1∶5 dilution in a volume of 20 µL) or the iNOS-selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG; 1 µg) inhibited carrageenan-induced abdominal edema in adult zebrafish. This new animal model is uncomplicated, easy to develop, and involves a straightforward inducement of inflammatory edema for the evaluation of small volumes of drugs or test compounds. PMID:25141004

  17. The pre-ulcerative phase of carrageenan-induced colonic ulceration in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, S. N.; Marcus, A. J.; Marcus, R.; Ewen, S. W.; Watt, J.

    1992-01-01

    The pre-ulcerative phase of carrageenan-induced colonic ulceration was investigated in guinea-pigs supplied 3% degraded carrageenan as an aqueous solution as drinking fluid for 2 or 3 days during which no ulceration of the bowel was observed with the naked eye or dissecting microscope. Mucosal microscopic changes, from caecum to rectum, were multifocal and included cellular infiltrates, dilatation of glands, crypt abscesses, micro-ulcers and sulphated polysaccharide in the lamina propria. Sulphated polysaccharide was also demonstrated histologically for the first time within the surface epithelium and showed ultrastructural features similar to carrageenan. The results indicate that colonic epithelium in the guinea-pig is capable of macromolecular absorption. Carrageenan, a highly active polyanionic electrolyte, within the surface epithelial cells is most likely a primary factor in the breakdown of mucosal integrity. Macromolecular absorption causing enteropathy of the large bowel is a new pathophysiological concept which may have implications in man, particularly in the pathology of large bowel disease. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1356411

  18. Nicorandil inhibits neutrophil recruitment in carrageenan-induced experimental pleurisy in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Tamires C; Coura, Giovanna M E; Melo, Ivo S F; Batista, Carla R A; Augusto, Paulo Sérgio A; Godin, Adriana M; Araújo, Débora P; César, Isabela C; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Souza, Danielle G; Klein, André; de Fátima, Ângelo; Machado, Renes R; Coelho, Márcio M

    2015-12-15

    Nicorandil is a drug characterized by the coupling of a nitric oxide (NO) donor to nicotinamide. We have previously demonstrated that nicotinamide exhibits activity in different models of pain and inflammation. Now, we investigated the effects induced by per os (p.o.) administration of nicorandil (25, 50 or 100mg/Kg) on neutrophil recruitment in a carrageenan-induced model of pleurisy in mice. Effects induced by nicorandil (100mg/kg) were compared with those induced by equimolar doses of nicotinamide (58mg/kg) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-nicotinamide (NHN; 79mg/kg). We also investigated whether effects on the production of inflammatory mediators play a role in the activity of nicorandil. P.o. nicorandil, 0.5h before and 1h after the i.pl. injection of carrageenan, reduced neutrophil recruitment. However, equimolar doses of nicotinamide or NHN failed to induce such effect. Single treatment (previous or late) with nicorandil (100mg/Kg, p.o.) also reduced neutrophils recruitment, although to a lesser extent when compared to the double treatment. Nicorandil reduced the concentrations of interleukin-1β, CXCL-1 and prostaglandin E2 in the pleural exudate. Concluding, we demonstrated the activity of nicorandil in a model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan. This activity was characterized by reduction of the neutrophil accumulation and inhibition of production of inflammatory mediators. The effects induced by nicorandil on the leukocytes recruitment and production of inflammatory mediators contribute to a better understanding of its clinical benefits and indicate that these benefits may be due to its vasodilating and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26607465

  19. The Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria-fermented Soybean Milk Products on Carrageenan-induced Tail Thrombosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    KAMIYA, Seitaro; OGASAWARA, Masayoshi; ARAKAWA, Masayuki; HAGIMORI, Masayori

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is characterized by congenital and acquired procatarxis. Lactic acid bacteria-fermented soybean milk products (FS-LAB) inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation and prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation. However, the therapeutic efficacy of FS-LAB against thrombosis has yet to be investigated. In this study, FS-LAB were administered subcutaneously into the tails of rats, with the subsequent intravenous administration of κ-carrageenan 12 hr after the initial injection. In general, administration of κ-carrageenan induces thrombosis. The length of the infarcted tail regions was significantly shorter in the rats administered a single-fold or double-fold concentration of the FS-LAB solution compared with the region in control rats. Therefore, FS-LAB exhibited significant antithrombotic effects. Our study is the first to characterize the properties of FS-LAB and, by testing their efficacy on an in vivo rat model of thrombosis, demonstrate the potency of their antithrombotic effect. PMID:24936368

  20. Carrageenan-Induced Colonic Inflammation Is Reduced in Bcl10 Null Mice and Increased in IL-10-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Xue, Liquan; Devkota, Suzanne; Chang, Eugene; Morris, Stephan; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2013-01-01

    The common food additive carrageenan is a known activator of inflammation in mammalian tissues and stimulates both the canonical and noncanonical pathways of NF-κB activation. Exposure to low concentrations of carrageenan (10 μg/mL in the water supply) has produced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impaired insulin signaling in C57BL/6 mice. B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 10 (Bcl10) is a mediator of inflammatory signals from Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 in myeloid and epithelial cells. Since the TLR4 signaling pathway is activated in diabetes and by carrageenan, we addressed systemic and intestinal inflammatory responses following carrageenan exposure in Bcl10 wild type, heterozygous, and null mice. Fecal calprotectin and circulating keratinocyte chemokine (KC), nuclear RelA and RelB, phospho(Thr559)-NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK), and phospho(Ser36)-IκBα in the colonic epithelial cells were significantly less (P < 0.001) in the carrageenan-treated Bcl10 null mice than in controls. IL-10-deficient mice exposed to carrageenan in a germ-free environment showed an increase in activation of the canonical pathway of NF-κB (RelA) activation, but without increase in RelB or phospho-Bcl10, and exogenous IL-10 inhibited only the canonical pathway of NF-κB activation in cultured colonic cells. These findings demonstrate a Bcl10 requirement for maximum development of carrageenan-induced inflammation and lack of complete suppression by IL-10 of carrageenan-induced inflammation. PMID:23766559

  1. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    An ambitious project to develop an advanced, automated welding system is being funded as part of the Navy Joining Center with Babcock & Wilcox as the prime integrator. This program, the Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS), involves the integration of both planning and real-time control activities. Planning functions include the development of a graphical decision support system within a standard, portable environment. Real-time control functions include the development of a modular, intelligent, real-time control system and the integration of a number of welding process sensors. This paper presents each of these components of the PAWS and discusses how they can be utilized to automate the welding operation.

  2. Pawing by Standardbred Racehorses: Frequency and Patterns

    PubMed Central

    BUTLER, Christina L.; HOUPT, Katherine Albro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of pawing behavior in a population of Standardbred racehorses and the relationship of pawing frequency to time of day. Standardbreds (n=41) were observed using instantaneous scan sampling twice daily, in the morning before training and in the afternoon after training. A majority of the horses, twenty-four (58.5%) of the 41 horses showed pawing behavior at least once (median=7, interquartile range=2–15). After training, there were a median of 4 (interquartile range 1–11) observations of pawing or 11.2% of total observations. In the morning, before training, there were 3 (0–3.25) pawing observations, or 9.1% of total observations. There was a significantly greater frequency of pawing in the afternoon (P=0.0005). They pawed less on Sunday afternoons when they had not trained. Pawing may be related to exercise and, possibly, discomfort. PMID:25320552

  3. Effect of Hautriwaic Acid Isolated from Dodonaea viscosa in a Model of Kaolin/Carrageenan-Induced Monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Sánchez, David Osvaldo; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Pérez, Salud; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Tortoriello, Jaime; González-Cortazar, Manasés; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the antiarthritic activity of hautriwaic acid is reported. This ent-clerodane diterpene isolated from Dodonaea viscosa was evaluated in mice using a kaolin/carrageenan-induced monoarthritis model. The inflammation observed in the joint (knee) on days 1-8 ranged from 50-70 %. After 10 days of treatment with different doses of hautriwaic acid (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), a decrease in knee inflammation was detected. This recovery was observed with both reference drugs, methotrexate (1 mg/kg) and diclofenac (0.75 mg/kg). In these groups of mice, the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in the joint was significantly lower than that of the negative control group (animals with damage without any treatment). The negative control group presented a decrease in the concentration of interleukin-10, while the groups that received hautriwaic acid at different dose exhibited an increase in this interleukin. This anti-inflammatory cytokine was not modified in the joint of mice with diclofenac, but in mice that received methotrexate, a significant decrease was observed. Hautriwaic acid isolated from D. viscosa diminished the joint edema induced by this mixture of polysaccharides (carrageenan), possibly by acting as immunomodulator of the inflammatory response. PMID:26166136

  4. Ebselen Attenuates Lung Injury in Experimental Model of Carrageenan-Induced Pleurisy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Fabricia; Florentino, Drielly; Silvestre, Fernanda; Danielski, Lucineia Gainski; Nascimento, Diego Zapelini; Vieira, Andriele; Kanis, Luiz Alberto; Fortunato, Jucelia Jeremias; Badawy, Marwa; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, Joao

    2015-08-01

    The study evaluates the role of Ebselen (Eb), an organoselenium compound in animal model of acute lung injury induced by carrageenan (CG). Wistar rats received saline or 2 % λ-carrageenan in the pleural cavity, and treatment with Eb (50 mg/kg intragastrically) or dexamethasone (Dx) (0.5 mg/kg intraperitoneal) after CG administration. After 4 h, rats were euthanized and the pleural exudate removed for analysis of the total cell count, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and nitrite/nitrate. Moreover, lung tissue were removed to verify the myeloperoxidase activity and oxidative damage. Eb showed anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte influx, myeloperoxidase activity, and nitrite/nitrate concentration. Eb presented with an anti-inflammatory activity similar to Dx and an antioxidant activity better than Dx. This study suggests that Eb plays an important role against the oxidative damage associated with anti-inflammatory activity in animal model of acute lung injury, proving to be similar or potentially more effective than Dx. PMID:25616904

  5. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values. PMID:26193677

  6. Alterations in blood-brain barrier ICAM-1 expression and brain microglial activation after λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, J. D.; Campos, C. R.; Mark, K. S.; Davis, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that peripheral inflammatory pain increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and altered tight junction protein expression and the delivery of opioid analgesics to the brain. What remains unknown is which pathways and mediators during peripheral inflammation affect BBB function and structure. The current study investigated effects of λ-carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain (CIP) on BBB expression of ICAM-1. We also examined the systemic contribution of a number of proinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation in the brain to elucidate pathways involved in BBB disruption during CIP. We investigated ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression levels in isolated rat brain microvessels after CIP using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses, screened inflammatory cytokines during the time course of inflammation, assessed white blood cell counts, and probed for BBB and central nervous system stimulation and leukocyte transmigration using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results showed an early increase in ICAM-1 RNA and protein expression after CIP with no change in circulating levels of several proinflammatory cytokines. Changes in ICAM-1 protein expression were noted at 48 h. Immunohistochemistry showed that the induction of ICAM-1 was region specific with increased expression noted in the thalamus and frontal and parietal cortices, which directly correlated with increased expression of activated microglia. The findings of the present study were that CIP induces increased ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression at the BBB and that systemic proinflammatory mediators play no apparent role in the early response (1–6 h); however, brain region-specific increases in micro-glial activation suggest a potential for a central-mediated response. PMID:16199477

  7. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values. PMID:26193677

  8. The PAWS and STEM reliability analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Stevenson, Philip H.

    1988-01-01

    The PAWS and STEM programs are new design/validation tools. These programs provide a flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for the input of Markov models describing the behavior of fault-tolerant computer systems. These programs produce exact solutions of the probability of system failure and provide a conservative estimate of the number of significant digits in the solution. PAWS uses a Pade approximation as a solution technique; STEM uses a Taylor series as a solution technique. Both programs have the capability to solve numerically stiff models. PAWS and STEM possess complementary properties with regard to their input space; and, an additional strength of these programs is that they accept input compatible with the SURE program. If used in conjunction with SURE, PAWS and STEM provide a powerful suite of programs to analyze the reliability of fault-tolerant computer systems.

  9. Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Xylitol and Your Dog: Danger, Paws Off Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... back to top Why is Xylitol Dangerous to Dogs, but Not People? In both people and dogs, ...

  10. Inhibition of carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema by crotapotin, a polypeptide complexed with phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Landucci, E C; Antunes, E; Donato, J L; Faro, R; Hyslop, S; Marangoni, S; Oliveira, B; Cirino, G; de Nucci, G

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of purified crotapotin, a non-toxic non-enzymatic chaperon protein normally complexed to a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in South America rattlesnake venom, was studied in the acute inflammatory response induced by carrageenin (1 mg/paw), compound 48/80 (3 micrograms/paw) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (3 micrograms/paw) in the rat hind-paw. The effects of crotapotin on platelet aggregation, mast cell degranulation and eicosanoid release from guinea-pig isolated lung were also investigated. 2. Subplantar co-injection of crotapotin (1 and 10 micrograms/paw) with carrageenin or injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) into the contralateral paw significantly inhibited the carrageenin-induced oedema. This inhibition was also observed when crotapotin (10-30 micrograms/paw) was administered either intraperitoneally or orally. Subplantar injection of heated crotapotin (15 min at 60 degrees C) failed to inhibit carrageenin-induced oedema. Subplantar injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) also significantly inhibited the rat paw oedema induced by compound 48/80, but it did not affect 5-HT-induced oedema. 3. In adrenalectomized animals, subplantar injection of crotapotin markedly inhibited the oedema induced by carrageenin. The inhibitory effect of crotapotin was also observed in rats depleted of histamine and 5-HT stores. 4. Crotapotin (30 micrograms/paw) had no effect on either the histamine release induced by compound 48/80 in vitro or on the platelet aggregation induced by both arachidonic acid (1 nM) and platelet activating factor (1 microM) in human platelet-rich plasma. The platelet aggregation and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) release induced by thrombin (100 mu ml-1) in washed human platelets were also not affected by crotapotin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7537590

  11. On the ability of prostaglandin E1, and arachidonic acid to modulate experimentally induced oedema in the rat paw.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A J; Nelson, D J; Sugrue, M F

    1975-01-01

    1 Prostaglandins E1 and E2 but not prostaglandin F2alpha, arachidonic acid or linolenic acid, produced slight oedema when injected into the rat hindpaw. 2 Prostaglandin E1 potentiated hindpaw oedema produced by carrageenan, kaolin, bradykinin and trypsin but not that produced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), histamine, dextran B or compound 48/80. Carrageenan- and bradykinin-induced paw oedemas were also potentiated by prostaglandin E2. Arachidonic acid potentiated responses to carrageenan and kaolin but not responses to bradykinin, trypsin, 5-HT, histamine, dextran B or compound 48/80. Linolenic acid did not potentiate hindpaw oedema induced by carrageenan. 3 Potentiation of carrageenan-induced oedema by prostaglandin E1 was not diminished by pretreatment with indomethacin, hydrocortisone or cyproheptadine. However, arachidonic acid potentiation of carrageenan oedema was reduced by pretreatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but not by anti-inflammatory steroids or by paracetamol. 4 The enhancement of the response to carrageenan and kaolin by prostaglandins E1, E2 and arachidonic acid is discussed in terms of kinin mediation. PMID:1182349

  12. Involvement of serotonin and eicosanoids in the rat paw oedema response to the essential oil of Pilocarpus spicatus

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Subplantar injection of Pilocarpus spicatus essential oil (PSEO), induced rat hindpaw oedema in a dose-dependent manner. The time course study revealed that when compared to carrageenan-induced oedema, the oedema response to PSEO was greater at 1 h post-injection, and thereafter remained relatively constant until 5 h post-injection. By 24 h, it was still at almost the 50% level. This effect of PSEO was characterized using several inhibitors of oedema formation. Pretreatment with the H1-receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine did not affect this response, while a significant reduction of paw oedema was achieved with the serotonin antagonist methysergide, but only 1 h and 2 h after injection of PSEO. The oedemagenic activity of PSEO was also suppressed by pretreating the rats with the eicosanoid synthesis inhibitors, phenylbutazone, EP 10161 and dexamethasone. This last drug showed the greatest potency. These findings suggested a probable injury to dermal mast cells and liberation of arachidonate metabolites and eicosanoids at the late phase of oedema induced by PSEO. PMID:18475456

  13. Involvement of serotonin and eicosanoids in the rat paw oedema response to the essential oil of Pilocarpus spicatus.

    PubMed

    Silva, J C; Rao, V S

    1992-01-01

    Subplantar injection of Pilocarpus spicatus essential oil (PSEO), induced rat hindpaw oedema in a dose-dependent manner. The time course study revealed that when compared to carrageenan-induced oedema, the oedema response to PSEO was greater at 1 h post-injection, and thereafter remained relatively constant until 5 h post-injection. By 24 h, it was still at almost the 50% level. This effect of PSEO was characterized using several inhibitors of oedema formation. Pretreatment with the H(1)-receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine did not affect this response, while a significant reduction of paw oedema was achieved with the serotonin antagonist methysergide, but only 1 h and 2 h after injection of PSEO. The oedemagenic activity of PSEO was also suppressed by pretreating the rats with the eicosanoid synthesis inhibitors, phenylbutazone, EP 10161 and dexamethasone. This last drug showed the greatest potency. These findings suggested a probable injury to dermal mast cells and liberation of arachidonate metabolites and eicosanoids at the late phase of oedema induced by PSEO. PMID:18475456

  14. Treatment with Adenosine Receptor Agonist Ameliorates Pain Induced by Acute and Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Montes, Guilherme Carneiro; Hammes, Nathalia; da Rocha, Miguel Divino; Montagnoli, Tadeu Lima; Fraga, Carlos Alberto Manssour; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune condition, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in its pathophysiology. In vitro, (E)-N'-(3,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)-N-methylbenzohydrazide (LASSBio-1359) has exhibited anti-TNF-α properties, and in vivo these effects are mediated via activation of adenosine receptor. This work investigates the antinociceptive action of LASSBio-1359 in murine models of acute and chronic inflammatory pain. Male mice received an intraperitoneal injection of LASSBio-1359 and then were evaluated in formalin- and carrageenan-induced paw edema assays. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was used to induce a mouse model of monoarthritis. These mice were treated with LASSBio-1359 by oral gavage to evaluate thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression as well as histologic features were analyzed. The time of reactivity to formalin in the neurogenic phase was reduced from 56.3 ± 6.0 seconds to 32.7 ± 2.2 seconds and 23.8 ± 2.6 seconds after treatment with LASSBio-1359 at doses of 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. A reversal of the antinociceptive action of LASSBio-1359 was observed in the inflammatory phase after treatment with ZM 241385 [4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furly)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol], an adenosine A2A antagonist. Carrageenan-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were reduced after treatment with LASSBio-1359. Similarly, CFA-induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia were reduced after treatment with LASSBio-1359 (25 and 50 mg/kg). Levels of TNF-α and iNOS expression increased in the monoarthritis model and were normalized in animals treated with LASSBio-1359, which was also associated with beneficial effects in the histologic analysis. These results suggest that LASSBio-1359 represents an alternative treatment of monoarthritis. PMID:27194479

  15. Prolongation of Carrageenan-induced Inflammation in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells by Activation of an NFκB – BCL10 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Alip; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Natarajan, Arivarasu A.; Kumar, Anoop; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Carrageenan, a sulfated polysaccharide that is widely used as a food additive, induces inflammatory responses in animal models and human cells. The carrageenan-induced inflammatory cascades involve TLR4- and BCL10-dependent activation of NF-κB, leading to increased IL-8 production. Translocations involving BCL10 in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are associated with constitutive activation of NF-κB. This report presents a mechanism by which carrageenan exposure leads to prolonged activation of both BCL10 and NF-κB in human colonic epithelial cells. Study findings demonstrate that nuclear RelA and RelB bind to an NF-κB binding motif in the BCL10 promoter in human colonic epithelial NCM460 and HT-29 cells. In vitro oligonucleotide binding assay, non-radioactive gel shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) indicate binding of RelA and RelB to the BCL10 promoter. Prolonged inflammation follows activation of the BCL10-NFκB inflammatory loop in response to carrageenan, shown by increased BCL10, RelA, and IL-8 for 36 to 48 hours and increased RelB for 24 hours following withdrawal of carrageenan after 12 hours. In contrast, exposure to dextran sulfate sodium, which does not cause inflammation through TLR4 and BCL10 in the colonic epithelial cells, did not provoke prolonged activation of inflammation. The carrageenan-enhanced BCL10 promoter activity was blocked by caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and MB-132 which inhibit NF-κB activation. These results indicate that NF-κB binding to the BCL10 promoter can lead to prolonged activation of the carrageenan-induced inflammatory cascade by a transcriptional mechanism involving an NF-κB – BCL10 loop. PMID:22579587

  16. Disruption of 5-HT2A Receptor-PDZ Protein Interactions Alleviates Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; Pichon, Xavier; Dupuis, Amandine; Hernández, Alejandro; Privat, Anne-Marie; Aissouni, Youssef; Chalus, Maryse; Pelissier, Teresa; Eschalier, Alain; Marin, Philippe; Courteix, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Despite common pathophysiological mechanisms, inflammatory and neuropathic pain do not respond equally to the analgesic effect of antidepressants, except for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which show a limited efficacy in both conditions. We previously demonstrated that an interfering peptide (TAT-2ASCV) disrupting the interaction between 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ proteins (e.g. PSD-95) reveals a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesic effect and enhances the efficacy of fluoxetine (a SSRI) in diabetic neuropathic pain conditions in rats. Here, we have examined whether the same strategy would be useful to treat inflammatory pain. Sub-chronic inflammatory pain was induced by injecting λ-carrageenan (100 µl, 2%) into the left hind paw of the rat. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed after acute treatment with TAT-2ASCV or/and fluoxetine (SSRI) 2.5 h after λ-carrageenan injection. Possible changes in the level of 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ protein PSD-95 upon inflammation induction were quantified by Western blotting in dorsal horn spinal cord. Administration of TAT-2ASCV peptide (100 ng/rat, intrathecally) but not fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) relieves mechanical hyperalgesia (paw pressure test) in inflamed rats. This anti-hyperalgesic effect involves spinal 5-HT2A receptors and GABAergic interneurons as it is abolished by a 5-HT2A antagonist (M100907, 150 ng/rat, intrathecally) and a GABAA antagonist, (bicuculline, 3 µg/rat, intrathecally). We also found a decreased expression of 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal spinal cord of inflamed animals which could not be rescued by TAT-2ASCV injection, while the amount of PSD-95 was not affected by inflammatory pain. Finally, the coadministration of fluoxetine does not further enhance the anti-hyperalgesic effect of TAT-2ASCV peptide. This study reveals a role of the interactions between 5-HT2A receptors and PDZ proteins in the pathophysiological pathways of

  17. Inhibitory effect of Nymphaea pubescens Willd. flower extract on carrageenan-induced inflammation and CCl₄-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sukalyani; Ghosh, Subhalakshmi; Hazra, Banasri

    2013-09-01

    Nymphaea pubescens Willd. is used as ingredient of ethnic diet and folk medicine in South-East Asia. The water (NPW), methanol (NPM) and chloroform (NPC) extracts of N. pubescens flowers were investigated for NO·, O₂·⁻ and DPPH radical scavenging and iron chelating activities in vitro. NPW was found to be the most potent free radical scavenger (EC₅₀<100 μg/mL) whereas NPC did not show EC₅₀ at 500 μg/mL. Therefore, NPW was selected for further studies on anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities, using standard in vitro and in vivo models. NPW exhibited inhibition of nitrogen radical generation in LPS-activated macrophages (IC₅₀=75.5 μg/mL) through suppression of iNOS protein, with no associated toxicity in the cells. Further, 500 mg/kg of NPW reduced rat paw edema by ~50% after 6h of carrageenan administration. Hepatoprotective activity of NPW was also evaluated in vivo on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity model in rats. NPW treatment (500 mg/kg/day for ten days) attenuated CCl4-induced increase in serum enzymes, viz. alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (ALT and AST) and bilirubin. Also, glutathione and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-levels were restored towards normalcy in the liver of CCl4-treated rats, indicating the hepatoprotective role of NPW, which was found to contain a fair amount of flavonoids, phenolics, and saponin constituents. PMID:23827777

  18. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of Salbutamol on Acute and Chronic Models of Inflammation in Rats: Involvement of an Antioxidant Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uzkeser, Hulya; Cadirci, Elif; Halici, Zekai; Odabasoglu, Fehmi; Polat, Beyzagul; Yuksel, Tugba Nurcan; Ozaltin, Seda; Atalay, Fadime

    2012-01-01

    The possible role of β-2 adrenergic receptors in modulation of inflammatory and nociceptive conditions suggests that the β-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, salbutamol, may have beneficial anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Therefore, in this study, we induced inflammatory and nociceptive responses with carrageenan-induced paw edema or cotton-pellet-induced granuloma models, both of which result in oxidative stress. We hypothesized that salbutamol would prevent inflammatory and nociceptive responses by stimulating β-2 adrenergic receptors and the prevention of generation of ROS during the acute inflammation process in rats. Both doses of salbutamol used in the study (1 and 2 mg/kg) effectively blocked the acute inflammation and inflammatory nociception induced by carrageenan. In the cotton-pellet-induced granuloma test, both doses of salbutamol also significantly decreased the weight of granuloma tissue on the cotton pellets when compared to the control. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of salbutamol were found to be comparable with those of indomethacin. Salbutamol decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and level of glutathione (GSH) during the acute phase of inflammation. In conclusion, salbutamol can decrease acute and chronic inflammation, possibly through the stimulation of β-2 adrenergic receptors. This anti-inflammatory effect may be of significance in asthma treatment, where inflammation also takes part in the etiopathology. This study reveals that salbutamol has significant antioxidative effects, which at least partially explain its anti-inflammatory capabilities. These findings presented here may also shed light on the roles of β-2 adrenergic receptors in inflammatory and hyperalgesic conditions. PMID:22665951

  19. Stabilization of cat paw trajectory during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Klishko, Alexander N; Farrell, Bradley J; Beloozerova, Irina N; Latash, Mark L; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2014-09-15

    We investigated which of cat limb kinematic variables during swing of regular walking and accurate stepping along a horizontal ladder are stabilized by coordinated changes of limb segment angles. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) animals stabilize the entire swing trajectory of specific kinematic variables (performance variables); and 2) the level of trajectory stabilization is similar between regular and ladder walking and 3) is higher for forelimbs compared with hindlimbs. We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis to quantify the structure of variance of limb kinematics in the limb segment orientation space across steps. Two components of variance were quantified for each potential performance variable, one of which affected it ("bad variance," variance orthogonal to the UCM, VORT) while the other one did not ("good variance," variance within the UCM, VUCM). The analysis of five candidate performance variables revealed that cats during both locomotor behaviors stabilize 1) paw vertical position during the entire swing (VUCM > VORT, except in mid-hindpaw swing of ladder walking) and 2) horizontal paw position in initial and terminal swing (except for the entire forepaw swing of regular walking). We also found that the limb length was typically stabilized in midswing, whereas limb orientation was not (VUCM ≤ VORT) for both limbs and behaviors during entire swing. We conclude that stabilization of paw position in early and terminal swing enables accurate and stable locomotion, while stabilization of vertical paw position in midswing helps paw clearance. This study is the first to demonstrate the applicability of the UCM-based analysis to nonhuman movement. PMID:24899676

  20. Stabilization of cat paw trajectory during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Klishko, Alexander N.; Farrell, Bradley J.; Beloozerova, Irina N.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated which of cat limb kinematic variables during swing of regular walking and accurate stepping along a horizontal ladder are stabilized by coordinated changes of limb segment angles. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) animals stabilize the entire swing trajectory of specific kinematic variables (performance variables); and 2) the level of trajectory stabilization is similar between regular and ladder walking and 3) is higher for forelimbs compared with hindlimbs. We used the framework of the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis to quantify the structure of variance of limb kinematics in the limb segment orientation space across steps. Two components of variance were quantified for each potential performance variable, one of which affected it (“bad variance,” variance orthogonal to the UCM, VORT) while the other one did not (“good variance,” variance within the UCM, VUCM). The analysis of five candidate performance variables revealed that cats during both locomotor behaviors stabilize 1) paw vertical position during the entire swing (VUCM > VORT, except in mid-hindpaw swing of ladder walking) and 2) horizontal paw position in initial and terminal swing (except for the entire forepaw swing of regular walking). We also found that the limb length was typically stabilized in midswing, whereas limb orientation was not (VUCM ≤ VORT) for both limbs and behaviors during entire swing. We conclude that stabilization of paw position in early and terminal swing enables accurate and stable locomotion, while stabilization of vertical paw position in midswing helps paw clearance. This study is the first to demonstrate the applicability of the UCM-based analysis to nonhuman movement. PMID:24899676

  1. Extremely high paw accelerations during paw shake in the cat: A mechanism revealed by computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishko, Alexander; Cofer, David; Edwards, Donald; Prilutsky, Boris

    2008-03-01

    Paw shake response is a reflex aimed at removing an irritating stimulus from the paw by imparting to it high periodic accelerations (>10 g). These values seem too high to be produced by distal muscles exclusively. According to Prilutsky et al. (2005), resultant hip moments during paw shake are much greater than distal joint moments, whereas distal joint velocities and accelerations exceed those of the proximal joints. The goal of this study was to examine how proximal hip muscles could contribute to high paw accelerations. Using software AnimatLab, we developed a 2D model of the cat hindlimb consisting of 5 rigid segments with 4 hinge joints and 11 muscles spanning all joints. The muscles were assumed passive except for those crossing the hip. When in simulations the hip muscles were reciprocally activated to periodically flex and extend the hip joint with a typical paw shake frequency of 10 Hz, the hindlimb segments demonstrated motion resembling experimental observations: linear and angular velocities and accelerations of the distal segments exceeded several fold the values of the proximal segments. Simulated paw shake revealed features of a whip-like motion.

  2. Paw paw and cancer: annonaceous acetogenins from discovery to commercial products.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Jerry L

    2008-07-01

    Extracts of paw paw ( Asimina triloba, Annonaceae) are among the most potent of the 3500 species of higher plants screened for bioactive compounds in our laboratories at Purdue University. The paw paw is a small tree native to eastern North America; its edible fruits (sometimes referred to as "Indiana Bananas") have nurtured mankind for centuries. Activity-directed fractionation of the paw paw extracts, using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, led to the isolation and molecular characterization of over 50 unique annonaceous acetogenins. Fractionation of extracts from related species resulted in the identification of over 150 additional acetogenins. The annonaceous acetogenins are derivatives of long-chain (C32 or C34) fatty acids. They are potent inhibitors of mitochondrial (complex I) as well as cytoplasmic (anaerobic) production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the related nucleotides. The powerful cytotoxicity, in vivo antitumor, pesticidal, antimalarial, anthelmintic, piscicidal, antiviral, and antimicrobial effects indicated a myriad of potentially useful applications. Commercial development of these compounds uses natural mixtures of active components, incorporated into pesticidal, topical, and dietary supplement products. Successful applications and commercial products include a shampoo, highly effective in treating infestations of head lice, fleas, and ticks; a series of pesticidal sprays, which protects host plants against a diversity of pests; and an ointment for treatment of oral herpes (HSV-1) and other skin afflictions. The extract (in capsule form) enhances a mixture of natural anthelmintics. In addition, an encapsulated extract has been effectively used by certain cancer patients as a botanical supplement product. PMID:18598079

  3. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation. PMID:26037417

  4. Design and Synthesis of N-Arylphthalimides as Inhibitors of Glucocorticoid-Induced TNF Receptor-Related Protein, Proinflammatory Mediators, and Cytokines in Carrageenan-Induced Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Mashooq A; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Imam, Faisal; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Korashy, Hesham M; Voronkov, Andrey; Berishvili, Vladimir; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2015-11-25

    N-Arylphthalimides (1-10P) derived from thalidomide by insertion of hydrophobic groups were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity, and (4-(1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2H-isoindol-2-yl)-N'-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)methylidene]benzohydrazide 6P was identified as a promising anti-inflammatory agent. Further testing confirmed that compared with the control, 6P treatment resulted in a considerable decrease in CD4(+), NF-κB p65(+), TNF-α(+), IL-6(+), GITR(+), and IL-17(+) cell populations and an increase in the Foxp3(+), CD4(+)Foxp3(+), and IκBα(+) populations in whole blood and pleural fluid of a mouse model of lung inflammation. Moreover, treatment with compound 6P decreased the proteins associated with inflammation including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, GITR, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, and iNOS and increased the anti-inflammatory mediators such as IL-10 and IL-4. Further, histopathological examination confirmed the potent anti-inflammatory effects of compound 6P. Thus, the N-arylphthalimide derivative 6P acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent in the carrageenan-induced lung inflammation model, suggesting that this compound may be useful for the treatment of inflammation in a clinical setting. PMID:26456029

  5. In Vivo Anticoagulant and Thrombolytic Activities of a Fibrinolytic Serine Protease (Brevithrombolase) With the k-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, in vivo thrombolysis efficiency of Brevithrombolase, a nontoxic fibrinolytic enzyme purified from Brevibacillus brevis strain FF02B, was affirmed by significant inhibition of thrombus formation in the k-carrageenan-induced rat tail, in a dose-dependent manner. Brevithrombolase at a dose of 600 µg/kg showed an efficacy that was comparable to streptokinase and plasmin, in dissolving in vivo thrombus of k-carrageenan-treated rats under identical conditions. The in vivo anticoagulant property of Brevithrombolase was demonstrated by its prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and thrombin time in Wistar rats. However, the Brevithrombolase-treated rats demonstrated an insignificant decrease in fibrinogen (Fg) level of plasma compared with Fg level of control group of rats corroborating in vivo as well as in vitro anticoagulant activity of Brevithrombolase is due to its hydrolytic action on thrombin. These findings unequivocally suggest that Brevithrombolase may serve a promising alternative to the commercial thrombolytic drugs. PMID:25657326

  6. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of low-power optical radiation in acute inflammatory process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Denise M.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Cury, Yara; Frigo, Lucio; Barbosa, Daniella G.; da Silva Melo, Milene; Munin, Egberto

    2004-07-01

    Many research works have explored the use of the low power laser as a tool for the control of inflammatory processes. The anti-inflammatory effect of low power optical radiation and its ability to induce analgesia has been reported for different experimental conditions. Many published works are very qualitative in nature. In this work the action of low power laser radiation on acute inflammatory process is evaluated. The time evolution of rat paw edema and pain induced by carrageenan was experimentally monitored. A 632.8 nm He-Ne laser was used for the treatment. The laser treatment, at a dosage of 2,5 J/cm2, was applied at the first, second and third hour after the induction of the inflammation. A hydroplethysmometer was used for the evaluation of the inflammation. The measurement of pain sensitivity was performed according to the method described by Randall and Selito, (1957). The laser treatment was capable of inhibiting the carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia by 49% (p<0,001) at the second hour after the induction, as compared to the non-treated group. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on hyperalgesia) and at the sixth hour, the achieved inhibition was 49% (p<0,001) and 61% (p<0,001), respectively. In the treated groups, the edema evolution was inhibited by 38% (p<0,01), at the second hour after induction, as compared to the non-treated groups. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on leakage) and at sixth hour the achieved inhibition was 35% (p<0,01) and 30% (p<0,05) respectively.

  7. A sensitive and relevant model for evaluating anti-inflammatory activity-papaya latex-induced rat paw inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, O P; Sharma, N; Chand, D

    1992-08-01

    A new model employing latex of papaya as an inflammagen has been developed for testing anti-inflammatory activity. The latex (exudate) was harvested from the unripe papaya fruit, which had been dried under vacuum. The latex was then suspended in 0.05 M sodium acetate buffer. This suspension when injected in rat hind paw produced concentration-dependent inflammation. Of the 0.25% of this suspension, 0.1 ml was found ideal for evaluating anti-inflammatory activity of test drugs. This concentration produced 70%-100% inflammation lasting for about 5 hr with a maximum effect at h 3. The test drugs employed were prednisolone, aspirin, indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprofen, piroxicam, chloroquine, levamisole, and a mixture of boswellic acids. For comparison, these drugs were also tested against carrageenan-induced inflammation. All the test drugs--steroidal, aspirin, and non-aspirin-like--showed anti-inflammatory activity against latex-induced inflammation. The activity of chloroquine, levamisole, and boswellic acids was significantly more against latex as compared with that of the carrageenan model. The inflammation caused by latex may be attributed to both its hydrolytic enzymes--papain and chymopapain--and glutathione, the activator of these enzymes. These enzymes seem to act like lysosomal enzymes that are released in inflammatory disease processes which mediate inflammation by stimulating the synthesis of prostaglandins. The papaya latex-induced inflammation model appears to be a sensitive, broad-based, and relevant one likely to prove useful for discovering new and effective drugs against inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:1392054

  8. Rat models of acute inflammation: a randomized controlled study on the effects of homeopathic remedies

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Anita; Bellavite, Paolo; Bertani, Simone; Chiarotti, Flavia; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Raschetti, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background One of the cardinal principles of homeopathy is the "law of similarities", according to which patients can be treated by administering substances which, when tested in healthy subjects, cause symptoms that are similar to those presented by the patients themselves. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of pre-clinical (in vitro and animal) studies aimed at evaluating the pharmacological activity or efficacy of some homeopathic remedies under potentially reproducible conditions. However, in addition to some contradictory results, these studies have also highlighted a series of methodological difficulties. The present study was designed to explore the possibility to test in a controlled way the effects of homeopathic remedies on two known experimental models of acute inflammation in the rat. To this aim, the study considered six different remedies indicated by homeopathic practice for this type of symptom in two experimental edema models (carrageenan- and autologous blood-induced edema), using two treatment administration routes (sub-plantar injection and oral administration). Methods In a first phase, the different remedies were tested in the four experimental conditions, following a single-blind (measurement) procedure. In a second phase, some of the remedies (in the same and in different dilutions) were tested by oral administration in the carrageenan-induced edema, under double-blind (treatment administration and measurement) and fully randomized conditions. Seven-hundred-twenty male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 170–180 g were used. Six homeopathic remedies (Arnica montana D4, Apis mellifica D4, D30, Atropa belladonna D4, Hamamelis virginiana D4, Lachesis D6, D30, Phosphorus D6, D30), saline and indomethacin were tested. Edema was measured using a water-based plethysmometer, before and at different times after edema induction. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Student t test. Results In the first phase of experiments, some

  9. Relationship between visuospatial attention and paw preference in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; d'Ingeo, Serenella; Fornelli, Serena; Quaranta, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between visuospatial attention and paw preference was investigated in domestic dogs. Visuospatial attention was evaluated using a food detection task that closely matches the so-called "cancellation" task used in human studies. Paw preference was estimated by quantifying the dog's use of forepaws to hold a puzzle feeder device (namely the "Kong") while eating its content. Results clearly revealed a strong relationship between visuospatial attention bias and motor laterality, with a left-visuospatial bias in the left-pawed group, a right-visuospatial bias in the right-pawed group and with the absence of significant visuospatial attention bias in ambi-pawed subjects. The current findings are the first evidence for the presence of a relationship between motor lateralization and visuospatial attentional mechanisms in a mammal species besides humans. PMID:27545695

  10. Relationship between visuospatial attention and paw preference in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; d’Ingeo, Serenella; Fornelli, Serena; Quaranta, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between visuospatial attention and paw preference was investigated in domestic dogs. Visuospatial attention was evaluated using a food detection task that closely matches the so-called “cancellation” task used in human studies. Paw preference was estimated by quantifying the dog’s use of forepaws to hold a puzzle feeder device (namely the “Kong”) while eating its content. Results clearly revealed a strong relationship between visuospatial attention bias and motor laterality, with a left-visuospatial bias in the left-pawed group, a right-visuospatial bias in the right-pawed group and with the absence of significant visuospatial attention bias in ambi-pawed subjects. The current findings are the first evidence for the presence of a relationship between motor lateralization and visuospatial attentional mechanisms in a mammal species besides humans. PMID:27545695

  11. 44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "B" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. Enhanced therapeutic anti-inflammatory effect of betamethasone on topical administration with low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, 100 mW/cm(2)) ultrasound exposure on carrageenan-induced arthritis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gadi; Natsheh, Hiba; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Touitou, Elka; Lerman, Melissa A; Lazarovici, Philip; Lewin, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low-frequency, low-intensity (20 kHz, <100 mW/cm(2), spatial-peak, temporal-peak intensity) ultrasound, delivered with a lightweight (<100 g), tether-free, fully wearable, battery-powered applicator, is capable of reducing inflammation in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. The therapeutic, acute, anti-inflammatory effect was estimated from the relative swelling induced in mice hindlimb paws. In an independent, indirect approach, the inflammation was bio-imaged by measuring glycolytic activity with near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose. The outcome of the experiments indicated that the combination of ultrasound exposure and topical application of 0.1% (w/w) betamethasone gel resulted in statistically significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with drug or ultrasound treatment alone. The present study underscores the potential benefits of low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-assisted drug delivery. However, the proof of concept presented indicates the need for additional experiments to systematically evaluate and optimize the potential of, and the conditions for, tolerable low-frequency, low-intensity ultrasound-promoted non-invasive drug delivery. PMID:26003010

  13. Sex Difference in Oxytocin-Induced Anti-Hyperalgesia at the Spinal Level in Rats with Intraplantar Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Wu, Wan-Chuan; Chang, En-Pei; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated intrathecal administration of oxytocin strongly induced anti-hyperalgesia in male rats. By using an oxytocin-receptor antagonist (atosiban), the descending oxytocinergic pathway was found to regulate inflammatory hyperalgesia in our previous study using male rats. The activity of this neural pathway is elevated during hyperalgesia, but whether this effect differs in a sex-dependent manner remains unknown. We conducted plantar tests on adult male and female virgin rats in which paw inflammation was induced using carrageenan. Exogenous (i.t.) application of oxytocin exerted no anti-hyperalgesic effect in female rats, except at an extremely high dose. Female rats exhibited similar extent of hyperalgesia to male rats did when the animals received the same dose of carrageenan. When atosiban was administered alone, the severity of hyperalgesia was not increased in female rats. Moreover, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) was expressed at higher levels in the spinal cords of female rats compared with those of male rats. Oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia exhibits a sex-dependent difference in rats. This difference can partially result from the higher expression of IRAP in the spinal cords of female rats, because IRAP functions as an enzyme that degrades oxytocin. Our study confirms the existence of a sex difference in oxytocin-induced anti-hyperalgesia at the spinal level in rats. PMID:27606886

  14. 17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW WITH PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION. VIEW SHOWS "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE OF RADAR ARRAY SYSTEM. NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT). NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. 47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW OF "A" FACE (LEFT) WITH CLEANING SYSTEM INSTALLED (NOW REMOVED) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT) WITH CONSTRUCTION CRANE IN USE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. 42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - SHOWING BUILDING "RED IRON" STEEL STRUCTURE AT 46T DAY OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION. "BUILDING TOPPED OFF, 7 JULY, 1974. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  18. 43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "C" FACE (RIGHT) AND "B" FACE BEING PREPARED FOR INSTALLATION. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. 46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH ALL METAL SIDING INSTALLED AND WITH EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM NEARING OCMPLETION ON "B" FACE (RIGHT). VIEW ALSO SHOWS TRAVELING "CLEANING" SYSTEM ON "B" FACE - NOW REMOVED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  20. Sweating on paws and palms: what is its function?

    PubMed

    Adelman, S; Taylor, C R; Heglund, N C

    1975-11-01

    Man sweats on his palms and the soles of his feet in response to stress and exercise, but not in response to heat. Several functions have been proposed for this type of sweating: increasing friction between skin and substrate; increasing the toughness of the skin; and increasing tactile sensitivity. This study uses a comparative approach to evaluate the role of footpad sweating on increasing friction, utilizing a variety of mammals which possess sweat glands on their footpads (rat, tenrec, hyrax, and dog). We found that all of these animals sweat on their paws while running. Blocking this sweating with atropine sulfate dramatically decreased the coefficient of static friction between the paw and the tread of an inclined treadmill. A similar dose of atropine sulfate had no effect on the coefficient of static friction in a rabbit, and animal that possesses no sweat glands on its paws. We conclude that an important function of this type of sweating is to help prevent slipping between the paw and sthe substrate during running or climbing, and we postulate that the sweating observed in response to stress may play an important role in preparing an animal for fleeing from stressful situations. PMID:1200160

  1. Is movement organization in cat paw shake response optimal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prilutsky, Boris; Klishko, Alexander

    2008-03-01

    Animal musculoskeletal systems are highly redundant: they have more kinematic degrees of freedom and muscles than strictly necessary to execute a given motor task. Such redundancy gives the animal many choices in selecting kinematic and muscle activity patterns to achieve movement goal. Given a stereotypic execution of cat paw shake response (very fast periodic oscillations of the paw) among deferent cats despite the motor redundancy, we hypothesized that the movement strategy in this reflex is optimal. The goal of this study was to test several physiologically plausible cost functions, optimizations of which could explain the functional significance of chosen movement strategy in paw shake. A 2D, 5 degrees-of-freedom forward dynamics cat hindlimb model was developed. The model has 5 body segments, 4 frictionless hinge joints, 11 muscles with realistic muscle and activation dynamics. Muscle activations were computed using a simulated annealing optimization algorithm and several cost functions. The best match between simulated and experimentally recorded muscle activity patterns was obtained when peak paw acceleration was maximized.

  2. The rostral ventromedial medulla control of cutaneous vasomotion of paws and tail in the rat: implication for pain studies.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Huang, Gan; Mouraux, André; Le Bars, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Thermal neutrality in rodents is achieved by large cyclic variations of the sympathetic drive of the vasomotion of the tail and paws, the most widely used target organs in current acute or chronic animal models of pain. Given the pivotal functional role of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in nociception and rostral medullary raphe (rMR) in thermoregulation, two largely overlapping brain regions, we aimed at circumscribing the brainstem regions that are the source of premotor afferents to sympathetic preganglionic neurons that control the vasomotor tone of the tail and hind paws. A thermometric infrared camera recorded indirectly the vasomotor tone of the tail and hind paws. During the control period, the rat was maintained in vasoconstriction by preserving a stable, homogeneous, and constant surrounding temperature, slightly below the core temperature. The functional blockade of the RVM/rMR by the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (0.5 nmol, 50 nl) elicited an extensive increase of the temperature of the paws and tail, associated with a slight decrease of blood pressure and heart rate. Both the increased heat loss through vasodilatation and the decrease heart-induced heat production elicited a remarkable reduction of the central temperature. The effective zones were circumscribed to the parts of the RVM/rMR facing the facial nucleus. They match very exactly the brain regions often described as specifically devoted to the control of nociception. Our data support and urge on the highest cautiousness regarding the interpretation of results aimed at studying the effects of any pharmacological manipulations of RVM/rMR with the usual tests of pain. PMID:26581872

  3. Carica papaya (Paw-Paw) unripe fruit may be beneficial in ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ezike, A C; Akah, P A; Okoli, C O; Ezeuchenne, N A; Ezeugwu, S

    2009-12-01

    The anti-ulcer potentials of aqueous (AE) and methanol (ME) extracts of whole unripe Carica papaya fruit were evaluated using ethanol- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer models in rats. The effect of the extracts on small intestinal propulsion was also investigated. The extracts significantly reduced the ulcer index in both experimental models (P < .05) compared to the control group. ME showed a better protection against indomethacin-induced ulcers, whereas AE was more effective against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers. The extracts also significantly (P < .05) inhibited intestinal motility, with ME showing greater activity. Oral administration of AE and ME up to 5,000 mg/kg did not produce lethality or signs of acute toxicity in mice after 24 hours. The extracts of unripe C. papaya contain terpenoids, alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, glycosides, saponins, and steroids. The cytoprotective and antimotility properties of the extracts may account for the anti-ulcer property of the unripe fruit. PMID:20041780

  4. Star Formation in Giant Complexes: the Cat's Paw Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, Joana; Wolk, Scott; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, João; Rathborne, Jill; Forbrich, Jan; Leibundgut, Bruno; Hilker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    NGC 6334, the Cat's Paw Nebula, is a 106 M⊙ molecular cloud, one of the most massive known clouds in the Galaxy. It hosts the youngest massive cluster complex within 2 kpc of the Sun, and is therefore an ideal laboratory to investigate the onset and early evolution of star formation in an environment comparable to that of massive, extra-galactic complexes. Using multi-wavelength data, we are conducting the most sensitive and most complete characterization of this unique region to date.

  5. Gold nanoparticles and/or N-acetylcysteine mediate carrageenan-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Paula, Marcos M S; Petronilho, Fabricia; Vuolo, Francieli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; De Costa, Leandro; Santos, Giulia P; Effting, Pauline S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Dal-Bó, Alexandre G; Frizon, Tiago E; Silveira, Paulo C L; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2015-10-01

    We report the effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in an acute inflammation model induced by carrageenan (CG) and compared this effect with those induced by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) alone and by the synergistic effect of NAC and AuNP together. Male Wistar rats received saline or saline containing CG administered into the pleural cavity, and some rats also received NAC (20 mg/kg) subcutaneously and/or AuNP administered into the pleural cavity immediately after surgery. Four hours later, the rats were sacrificed and pleural exudates obtained for evaluation of cytokine levels and myeloperoxidase activities. Oxidative stress parameters were also evaluated in the lungs. The results demonstrated that the inflammatory process caused by the administration of CG into the pleural cavity resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and myeloperoxidase and a reduction in interleukin-10 levels. These levels seem to be reversed after different treatments in animals. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited positive responses after treatment of NAC + AuNP, and all treatments were effective at reducing lipid peroxidation and oxidation of thiol groups induced by CG. These findings suggest that small compounds, such as NAC plus AuNP, may be useful in the treatment of conditions associated with local inflammation. PMID:25917538

  6. The Cat's Other Paw: Star Formation in a Frothy Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Scott

    2010-09-01

    We propose deep a moderately deep (100ks) ACIS-I observation of the southwest "pad" of the Cat's Paw nebula (NGC 6334). The target region has a unique frothy structure seen in the light of Ha and Bracket alpha (via the IRAC [4.5] band) - reminiscent of a turbulent flow. We seek to explore 1) The IMF in high mass clusters - the inability of Spitzer to identify Class III stars and source confusion in the galatic plane requires X-ray selection of low mass stars. 2) The (non) disked nature of the sources ranging from revealed O stars to late-type protostars 3) The nature of turbulent structure which may manifest as diffuse emission.

  7. Effect of DHU001, a Polyherbal Formula on Formalin-induced Paw Chronic Inflammation of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon-Hee; Chung, In-Kwon; Cheon, Woo-Hyun; Lee, Hyeung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    The effect of DHU001, a mixed herbal formula consisted of 7 types aqueous extracts for various respiratory disorders were evaluated on the formalin-induced paw chronic inflammation in mice after oral administration. Mice were subaponeurotically injected in the left hind paw with 0.02 ml of 3.75% formalin, then subjected to 500, 250 and 125 mg/kg of DHU001 oral administration, once a day for 10 days during which then the hind-paw thickness and volume were measured daily. The paw wet-weight, histological profiles, histomorphometrical analyses and paw tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α contents were conducted at termination. After two formalin treatments, a marked increase in the paw thickness and volume was detected in the formalin-injected control as compared with that in the intact control, plus at the time of sacrifice the paw wet-weights, paw TNF-α contents were also dramatically increased with severe chronic inflammation signs at histopathological observations. However, these formalin-induced chronic inflammatory changes were dramatically decreased by treatment of dexamethasone and all three different dosages of DHU001. DHU001 has favorable effects on formalin-induced chronic inflammation mediated by TNF-α suppression, and DHU001 may represent an alternative approach for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24278557

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-Butanol Extract from Ipomoea stolonifera In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shuping; Ji, Bin; Wang, Jinzhi; Bai, Xueting; Shi, Ganggang

    2014-01-01

    Ipomoea stolonifera (I. stolonifera) has been used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine. However, the anti-inflammatory activity of I. stolonifera has not been elucidated. For this reason, the anti-inflammatory activity of n-butanol extract of I. stolonifera (BE-IS) was evaluated in vivo by using acute models (croton oil-induced mouse ear edema, carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, and carrageenan-induced rat pleurisy) and chronic models (cotton pellet-induced rat granuloma, and complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced rat arthritis). Results indicated that oral administration of BE-IS significantly attenuated croton oil-induced ear edema, decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema, reduced carrageenan-induced exudates and cellular migration, inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation and improved CFA-induced arthritis. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that BE-IS decreased the levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), increased the activity of anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) in vivo, and reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 macrophages in vitro. Results obtained in vivo and in vitro demonstrate that BE-IS has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of Ipomoea stolonifera in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24752203

  9. Right-but not left-paw use in female rats provides advantage in forced swim tests.

    PubMed

    Soyman, Efe; Tunckol, Elcin; Lacin, Emre; Canbeyli, Resit

    2015-10-15

    Left- and right-pawed adult female Wistar rats were subjected to forced swimming on two consecutive days. Compared to the right-pawed group, left- pawed rats displayed significantly increased immobility from the first to the second swim test and remained significantly more immobile in the second swim test. Both groups performed similarly in spatial learning in the Morris water maze suggesting that left- pawed rats are differentially and specifically susceptible to depressogenic treatment. PMID:26213334

  10. Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) Datasets for Multi-Mbar Simulations: An Evolutionary Algorithm Based Recipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, K.; Topsakal, M.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We attempt to achieve the accuracy of full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) method, as implemented in the WIEN2k code, at the favorable computational efficiency of the projector augmented wave (PAW) method for ab initio calculations of solids. For decades, PAW datasets have been generated by manually choosing its parameters and by visually inspecting its logarithmic derivatives, partial wave, and projector basis set. In addition to being tedious and error-prone, this procedure is inadequate because it is impractical to manually explore the full parameter space, as an infinite number of PAW parameter sets for a given augmentation radius can be generated maintaining all the constraints on logarithmic derivatives and basis sets. Performance verification of all plausible solutions against FLAPW is also impractical. Here we report the development of a hybrid algorithm to construct optimized PAW basis sets that can closely reproduce FLAPW results from zero to ultra-high pressures. The approach applies evolutionary computing (EC) to generate optimum PAW parameter sets using the ATOMPAW code. We have the Quantum ESPRESSO distribution to generate equation of state (EOS) to be compared with WIEN2k EOSs set as target. Softer PAW potentials reproducing yet more closely FLAPW EOSs can be found with this method. We demonstrate its working principles and workability by optimizing PAW basis functions for carbon, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, calcium, and iron atoms. The algorithm requires minimal user intervention in a sense that there is no requirement of visual inspection of logarithmic derivatives or of projector functions.

  11. Extended duration local anesthetic agent in a rat paw model.

    PubMed

    Ickowicz, D E; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Weiniger, C F

    2014-07-01

    Encapsulated local anesthetics extend postoperative analgesic effect following site-directed nerve injection; potentially reducing postoperative complications. Our study aim was to investigate efficacy of our improved extended duration formulation - 15% bupivacaine in poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 synthesized by ring opening polymerization. In vitro, around 70% of bupivacaine was released from the p(DLLA-CO) 3:7 after 10 days. A single injection of the optimal formulation of 15% bupivacaine-polymer or plain (0.5%) bupivacaine (control), was injected via a 22G needle beside the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under anesthesia; followed (in some animals) by a 1cm longitudinal incision through the skin and fascia of the paw area. Behavioral tests for sensory and motor block assessment were done using Hargreave's hot plate score, von Frey filaments and rearing count. The 15% bupivacaine formulation significantly prolonged sensory block duration up to at least 48 h. Following surgery, motor block was observed for 48 h following administration of bupivacaine-polymer formulation and rearing was reduced (returning to baseline after 48 h). No significant differences in mechanical nociceptive response were observed. The optimized bupivacaine-polymer formulation prolonged duration of local anesthesia effect in our animal model up to at least 48 h. PMID:24726301

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the rat paw edema induced by Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom.

    PubMed

    de Faria L; Antunes, E; Bon, C; de Araújo, A L

    2001-06-01

    The inflammatory response induced by Bothrops lanceolatus venom (BLV) in the rat hind-paw was studied measuring paw edema. Non-heated BLV (75microg/paw) caused a marked paw edema accompanied by intense haemorrhage whereas heated venom (97 degrees C, 30s; 12.5-100microg/paw) produced a dose- and time-dependent non-haemorrhagic edema. The response with heated BLV was maximal within 15min disappearing over 24h. Heated venom was then routinely used at the dose of 75microg/paw. The prostacyclin analogue iloprost (0.1microg/paw) potentiated by 125% the venom-induced edema. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist mepyramine (6mg/kg) or the serotonin/histamine receptor antagonist cyproheptadine (6mg/kg) partially inhibited BLV-induced edema whereas the combination of both compounds virtually abolished the edema. The lipoxygenase inhibitor BWA4C (10mg/kg), but not the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg), significantly inhibited the edema (35% reduction; P<0.05). Dexamethasone (1mg/kg) also markedly (P<0.001) reduced venom-induced edema. The bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist Hoe 140 (0.6mg/kg) reduced by 30% (P<0.05) the venom induced edema, whereas the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (300microg/paw) potentiated by 42% (P<0.05) the edema. Bothrops lanceolatus antivenon (anti-BLV) reduced by 28% (P<0.05) the venom-induced edema while intravenous administration of antivenom failed to affect the edema. In conclusion, BLV-induced rat paw edema involves mast cell degranulation causing local release of histamine and serotonin, a phenomenon mediated mainly by kinins and lipoxygenase metabolites. Additionally, the use of a specific Bothrops lanceolatus antivenom, given subplantarily or intravenously, revealed to be little effective to prevent BLV-induced edema. PMID:11137542

  13. Relationship between paw preference strength and noise phobia in Canis familiaris.

    PubMed

    Branson, N J; Rogers, L J

    2006-08-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between degree of lateralization and noise phobia in 48 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) by scoring paw preference to hold a food object and relating it to reactivity to the sounds of thunderstorms and fireworks, measured by playback and a questionnaire. The dogs without a significant paw preference were significantly more reactive to the sounds than the dogs with either a left-paw or right-paw preference. Intense reactivity, therefore, is associated with a weaker strength of cerebral lateralization. The authors note the similarity between their finding and the weaker hand preferences shown in humans suffering extreme levels of anxiety and suggest neural mechanisms that may be involved. PMID:16893254

  14. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the naïve rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  15. Hederagenin, a major component of Clematis mandshurica Ruprecht root, attenuates inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 cells and in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul Won; Park, Sang Mi; Zhao, Rongjie; Lee, Chu; Chun, Wonjoo; Son, Yonghae; Kim, Sung Hun; Jung, Ji Yun; Jegal, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Il Je; Ku, Sae Kwang; Kim, Young Woo; Ju, Seong A; Kim, Sang Chan; An, Won G

    2015-12-01

    Clematis mandshurica Ruprecht root has been used in Asia as a traditional anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antitumor agent. Its main active component is hederagenin, a naturally occurring triterpene, and in this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of hederagenin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and RT-PCR. In addition, its effects on acute inflammation in vivo were observed using a carrageenan-induced mouse hind paw edema assay. Furthermore, the changes on the histopathology and histomorphometry of hind paw skins were examined using carrageenan-treated mice. Treatment with hederagenin (10, 30 and 100μM) resulted in inhibited levels of protein expression of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB as well as production of NO, PGE2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide. Consistent with these results, hederagenin also dose-dependently reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced mRNA levels of iNOS and COX-2, and of the above-mentioned cytokines. Interestingly, results of the carrageenan-induced mouse hind paw edema assay showed an anti-edema effect of hederagenin. Furthermore, hederagenin (30mg/kg) inhibited the carrageenan-induced increases in skin thicknesses, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and mast cell degranulation. These results suggest that hederagenin may possess anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26481049

  16. Ciclamilast Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Shui-juan; Jin, Bo; Wu, Yujin; Yang, Xin-fu; Yu, Bing; Xie, Qiang-min

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effect of a novel and selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, ciclamilast, on chronic inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and acute inflammation in the rat and mouse model of carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis. Our results showed that daily oral administration of ciclamilast at 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the increase in hind paw volume of rats with AIA. The inhibition of paw edema was associated with inhibition of both the production of cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and cell infiltration assessed in subcutaneous paw tissue. Moreover, there was significantly less tissue destruction in the ciclamilast-treated rats compared to the vehicle-treated rats, as assessed by radiographic analysis and histopathological evaluation. In the two acute inflammation models, ciclamilast inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and inflammatory cell migration into the peritoneal cavity in mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results not only suggest that ciclamilast, as a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), can attenuate RA but also provide proof of principle that a PDE4 inhibitor may be useful for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26000303

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Medium Molecular Weight Heparinyl Amino Acid Derivatives on Ischemic Paw Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiichi; Toda, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the radical-scavenging effects of heparin (HE), medium molecular weight heparinyl phenylalanine (MHF), and medium molecular weight heparinyl leucine (MHL) using ischemic paw edema in mice. We also examined the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of mice that were administered these compounds as an index of their side-effects. HE had a preventative effect and significant reduced ischemic paw edema. However, its effect was not dose-dependent and the dose-response curve was bell-shaped. The effective dose of HE also exhibited a prolonged APTT. Pretreatment using MHF and MHL were effective against ischemic paw edema without a prolonged APTT. Remarkably, the action of MHF was not only preventively, but also therapeutically active. These results suggest that MHF and MHL are superior to HE as safe radical scavengers in vivo. PMID:27381605

  18. PAWS/STEM - PADE APPROXIMATION WITH SCALING AND SCALED TAYLOR EXPONENTIAL MATRIX (VAX VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional fault-tree techniques for analyzing the reliability of large, complex systems fail to model the dynamic reconfiguration capabilities of modern computer systems. Markov models, on the other hand, can describe fault-recovery (via system reconfiguration) as well as fault-occurrence. The Pade Approximation with Scaling (PAWS) and Scaled Taylor Exponential Matrix (STEM) programs provide a flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for the creation and evaluation of Markov models describing the behavior of fault-tolerant reconfigurable computer systems. PAWS and STEM produce exact solutions for the probability of system failure and provide a conservative estimate of the number of significant digits in the solution. The calculation of the probability of entering a death state of a Markov model (representing system failure) requires the solution of a set of coupled differential equations. Because of the large disparity between the rates of fault arrivals and system recoveries, Markov models of fault-tolerant architectures inevitably lead to numerically stiff differential equations. Both PAWS and STEM have the capability to solve numerically stiff models. These complementary programs use separate methods to determine the matrix exponential in the solution of the model's system of differential equations. In general, PAWS is better suited to evaluate small and dense models. STEM operates at lower precision, but works faster than PAWS for larger models. The mathematical approach chosen to solve a reliability problem may vary with the size and nature of the problem. Although different solution techniques are utilized on different programs, it is possible to have a common input language. The Systems Validation Methods group at NASA Langley Research Center has created a set of programs that form the basis for a reliability analysis workstation. The set of programs are: SURE reliability analysis program (COSMIC program LAR-13789, LAR-14921); the ASSIST

  19. PAWS/STEM - PADE APPROXIMATION WITH SCALING AND SCALED TAYLOR EXPONENTIAL MATRIX (SUN VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional fault-tree techniques for analyzing the reliability of large, complex systems fail to model the dynamic reconfiguration capabilities of modern computer systems. Markov models, on the other hand, can describe fault-recovery (via system reconfiguration) as well as fault-occurrence. The Pade Approximation with Scaling (PAWS) and Scaled Taylor Exponential Matrix (STEM) programs provide a flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for the creation and evaluation of Markov models describing the behavior of fault-tolerant reconfigurable computer systems. PAWS and STEM produce exact solutions for the probability of system failure and provide a conservative estimate of the number of significant digits in the solution. The calculation of the probability of entering a death state of a Markov model (representing system failure) requires the solution of a set of coupled differential equations. Because of the large disparity between the rates of fault arrivals and system recoveries, Markov models of fault-tolerant architectures inevitably lead to numerically stiff differential equations. Both PAWS and STEM have the capability to solve numerically stiff models. These complementary programs use separate methods to determine the matrix exponential in the solution of the model's system of differential equations. In general, PAWS is better suited to evaluate small and dense models. STEM operates at lower precision, but works faster than PAWS for larger models. The mathematical approach chosen to solve a reliability problem may vary with the size and nature of the problem. Although different solution techniques are utilized on different programs, it is possible to have a common input language. The Systems Validation Methods group at NASA Langley Research Center has created a set of programs that form the basis for a reliability analysis workstation. The set of programs are: SURE reliability analysis program (COSMIC program LAR-13789, LAR-14921); the ASSIST

  20. The pharmacological profile of ovalbumin-induced paw oedema in rats.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, R F G; Melcíades, G B; Assreuy, A M S; Rocha, M F G; Ribeiro, R A; Lima, A A M

    2002-06-01

    Rats are commonly used in anaphylaxis models, mainly in intestinal anaphylaxis. Hypersensitivity mechanisms are complex and they are not clearly defined. Ovalbumin (OVA) is commonly used for studies on the hypersensitivity mechanism. However, the potential pro-inflammatory mediators induced by this antigen in the model of paw oedema in immunized rats are still not completely understood. This work examines the pharmacological modulation of several mediators involved in rat hind paw immune oedema induced by OVA. Wistar rats were previously immunized (14-18 days) with OVA (30 microg, intraperitoneally) or sham-sensitized with aluminum hydroxide (control). The paw volumes were measured before the antigenic stimuli and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after the intraplantar injection of OVA (10 microg/paw). Subcutaneous injection of dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, cyproheptadine, chlorpromazine or methysergide significantly inhibited (p < 0.05) the allergic paw oedema. The dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase (NDGA), the cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), the lipoxygenase inhibitor (MK-886), the PAF antagonist (WEB 2086), the mast cell stabilizer (ketotifen), and the anti-histamine (meclizine) did not inhibit the immune oedema. In addition, thalidomide and pentoxifylline (anti-tumour necrosis factor drugs) were ineffective against OVA-induced oedema. The fact that indomethacin, MK-886, NDGA and WEB 2086 are unable to inhibit this allergic oedema indicates that the dexamethasone action seems not to be via phospholipase A2, but possibly due to the synthesis and/or the inhibitory activity of cytokines. The paw oedema inhibition by diphenhydramine, but not by meclizine, may suggest a different mechanism, which is independent of the effect of histamine. These data indicate that allergic oedema is more sensitive to anti-serotonin drugs, mainly anti-5-HT2, suggesting that the principal mediator of this inflammatory response is serotonin. PMID:12137244

  1. The pharmacological profile of ovalbumin-induced paw oedema in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, R F G; Melcíades, G B; Assreuy, A M S; Rocha, M F G; Ribeiro, R A; Lima, A A M

    2002-01-01

    Rats are commonly used in anaphylaxis models, mainly in intestinal anaphylaxis. Hypersensitivity mechanisms are complex and they are not clearly defined. Ovalbumin (OVA) is commonly used for studies on the hypersensitivity mechanism. However, the potential pro-inflammatory mediators induced by this antigen in the model of paw oedema in immunized rats are still not completely understood. This work examines the pharmacological modulation of several mediators involved in rat hind paw immune oedema induced by OVA. Wistar rats were previously immunized (14-18 days) with OVA (30 microg, intraperitoneally) or sham-sensitized with aluminum hydroxide (control). The paw volumes were measured before the antigenic stimuli and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after the intraplantar injection of OVA (10 microg/paw). Subcutaneous injection of dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, cyproheptadine, chlorpromazine or methysergide significantly inhibited (p < 0.05) the allergic paw oedema. The dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase (NDGA), the cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), the lipoxygenase inhibitor (MK-886), the PAF antagonist (WEB 2086), the mast cell stabilizer (ketotifen), and the anti-histamine (meclizine) did not inhibit the immune oedema. In addition, thalidomide and pentoxifylline (anti-tumour necrosis factor drugs) were ineffective against OVA-induced oedema. The fact that indomethacin, MK-886, NDGA and WEB 2086 are unable to inhibit this allergic oedema indicates that the dexamethasone action seems not to be via phospholipase A2, but possibly due to the synthesis and/or the inhibitory activity of cytokines. The paw oedema inhibition by diphenhydramine, but not by meclizine, may suggest a different mechanism, which is independent of the effect of histamine. These data indicate that allergic oedema is more sensitive to anti-serotonin drugs, mainly anti-5-HT2, suggesting that the principal mediator of this inflammatory response is serotonin. PMID:12137244

  2. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS): Control of welding through software and hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Martin D.; Doyle, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    The ATD phase of the PAWS program ended in November 1992 and the follow-on ManTech program was started in September 1993. The system will be industrially hardened during the first year of this program. Follow-on years will focus upon the transition into specific end-user sites. These implementations will also expand the system into other welding processes (e.g. FCAW, GTAW, PAW). In addition, the architecture is being developed for application to other non-welding robotic processes (e.g. inspection, surface finishing). Future development is anticipated to encompass hardening for extreme environments, expanded exception handling techniques, and application to a range of manipulators.

  3. Salicylates inhibit PAF-acether-induced rat paw oedema when cyclooxygenase inhibitors are ineffective.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, R S; Silva, P M; Martins, M A; Vargaftig, B B

    1986-11-01

    The cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen, naproxen and flurbiprofen failed to block rat paw oedema induced by PAF-acether, whereas aspirin and sodium salicylate were effective. Two mixed cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors NDGA, BW 755C and dexamethasone reduced oedema in a dose - dependently. The selective PAF-acether antagonist, BN 52021, was effective against PAF-acether at 5 - 20 mg/kg. The lipoxygenase derivates may be involved in paw oedema induced by PAF-acether in the rat and the inhibition produced by aspirin and by sodium salicylate should involve mechanisms other than the cyclooxygenase pathway. PMID:3103172

  4. Representability of Bloch states on Projector-augmented-wave (PAW) basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, Luis; Ferretti, Andrea; Curtarolo, Stefano; Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Design of small, yet `complete', localized basis sets is necessary for an efficient dual representation of Bloch states on both plane-wave and localized basis. Such simultaneous dual representation permits the development of faster more accurate (beyond DFT) electronic-structure methods for atomistic materials (e.g. the ACBN0 method.) by benefiting from algorithms (real and reciprocal space) and hardware acceleration (e.g. GPUs) used in the quantum-chemistry and solid-state communities. Finding a `complete' atomic-orbital basis (partial waves) is also a requirement in the generation of robust and transferable PAW pseudopotentials. We have employed the atomic-orbital basis from available PAW data sets, which extends through most of the periodic table, and tested the representability of Bloch states on such basis. Our results show that PAW data sets allow systematic and accurate representability of the PAW Bloch states, better than with traditional quantum-chemistry double-zeta- and double-zeta-polarized-quality basis sets.

  5. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory and liver-protective effects of anoectochilus formosanus, ganoderma lucidum and gynostemma pentaphyllum in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, J M; Lin, C C; Chiu, H F; Yang, J J; Lee, S G

    1993-01-01

    The pharmacological effects of Anoectochilus formosanus, Ganoderma lucidum and Gynostemma pentaphyllum were studied against carrageenan-induced paw edema and CC1(4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The water extracts of G. pentaphyllum and G. lucidum were found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan induced edema. The administration of Gynostemma pentaphyllum displayed an activity even more potent than indomethacin. In contrast, Anoectochilus formosanus showed a delayed onset of anti-inflammatory activity starting from 4 hrs post carrageenan administration. However, A. formosanus significantly decreased the acute increase in serum GOT and GPT level caused by CC1(4). Histological changes such as necrosis, fatty change, ballooning degeneration, inflammatory infiltration of lymphocytes and Kupffer cells around the central vein were simultaneously improved by the treatment of A. formosanus. PMID:8328423

  6. Mechanism of the pro-inflammatory activity of sympathomimetic amines in thermic oedema of the rat paw.

    PubMed

    Green, K L

    1974-02-01

    1 Thermic oedema induced by heating rat paws at 46.5 degrees C was potentiated by local injection of adrenaline, noradrenaline or high doses of isoprenaline. The pro-inflammatory effect of sympathomimetic amines was antagonized by phenoxybenzamine or phentolamine but not by propranolol.2 The subcutaneous space of heated rat paws was perfused with Tyrode solution and the perfusate collected and assayed for bradykinin, bradykininogen, kinin-forming activity and kininase activity. When adrenaline (0.5 mug/ml) was included in the perfusion fluid, kininase activity of the perfusate was increased by 76% and free bradykinin reduced by 46%.3 Increased vascular permeability induced by injection of bradykinin or kallikrein was reduced by adrenaline or noradrenaline, but isoprenaline had no significant effect.4 Pretreatment with soya bean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) or heparin did not antagonize the pro-inflammatory effect of adrenaline or thermic oedema per se.5 Potentiation of thermic oedema similar to that induced by sympathomimetic amines was obtained by injecting paws with vasopressin prior to heating, or by applying a ligature to stop blood flow to the paw for the first 15 min of heating.6 Thermistor probes inserted beneath the paw skin showed that sympathomimetic amines increased the internal temperature of heated paws. This was significant, as small changes in temperature had a marked effect on the development of thermic oedema.7 It is suggested that sympathomimetic amines potentiate thermic oedema of rat paws heated at 46.5 degrees C by reducing blood flow to the paw, thereby causing a greater rise in paw temperature and consequently greater injury. PMID:4371900

  7. Accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth elements (RE=La-Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Wentzcovitch, Renata

    2015-03-01

    We provide accurate projected augmented wave (PAW) datasets for rare-earth (RE) elements with some suggested Hubbard U values allowing efficient plane-wave calculations. Solid state tests of generated datasets were performed on rare-earth nitrides. Through density of state (DOS) and equation of state (EoS) comparisons, generated datasets were shown to yield excellent results comparable to highly accurate all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local orbital (FLAPW+LO) calculations. Hubbard U values for trivalent RE ions are determined according to hybrid functional calculations. We believe that these new and open-source PAW datasets will allow further studies on rare-earth materials. NSF/EAR 1319361

  8. PAW, a general-purpose portable software tool for data analysis and presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, René; Couet, Olivier; Vandoni, Carlo E.; Zanarini, Pietro

    1989-12-01

    During the last twenty years, CERN has played a leading role as the focus for development of packages and software libraries to solve problems related to high energy physics (HEP). The results of the integration of resources from many different laboratories can be expressed in several million lines of code written at CERN during this period of time, used at CERN and distributed to collaborating laboratories. Nowadays, this role of software developer is considered very important by the entire HEP community. In this paper a large software package, where man-machine interaction and graphics play a key role (PAW - Physics Analysis Workstation), is described. PAW is essentially an interactive system which includes many different software tools, strongly oriented towards data analysis and data presentation. Some of these tools have been available in different forms and with different human interfaces for several years.

  9. Environmental objections to the PAVE PAWS radar system: a scientific review.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    As part of our continental defense system, the United States Air Force has operated a radar system, known generally by the label PAVE PAWS, off of Cape Cod, MA since 1978. Some populated areas in the vicinity of the system are subject to a low level of background radiofrequency radiation from the system, and local citizens' groups have expressed concern that this radiofrequency radiation may affect their health. These concerns have been fueled by presentations and letters by Dr. R. A. Albanese, an applied mathematician at the Air Force Research Laboratory, who has proposed standards by which that PAVE PAWS radiofrequency radiation which is incident on populations should be judged. I discuss those standards that are sufficiently well defined to be subject to analysis and show that they are not based on sound quantitative reasoning. PMID:12492377

  10. Protective effects of papaverine salicylate in mouse ear dermatitis and PAF-induced rat paw oedema.

    PubMed

    de Bernardis, E; Leonardi, G; Caruso, A; Cutuli, V M; Amico-Roxas, M

    1994-08-01

    Papaverine salicylate (MR-800) has been tested as a topical antiinflammatory agent in several models of skin inflammation in rodents, such as mouse ear dermatitis induced by croton oil, cantharidin or zymosan, and rat paw oedema induced by PAF. MR-800 exerted a dose-dependent inhibitory activity in all assays, when equimolar doses of sodium salicylate or papaverine were less effective, suggesting the existence of a favourable synergism between salicylate and papaverine. PMID:7847181

  11. Dynamic Control of Walking and Paw-shaking in the Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jessica; Cymbalyuk, Gennady

    Multistable central pattern generators (CPGs) are capable of producing multiple rhythmic patterns with different periods. We developed a model of a half center oscillator, consisting of two reciprocally inhibitory neurons. Each neuron contains two slow inward currents, a Na+current, and a Ca+ + current. We found that a walking rhythm (1 Hz) and a paw-shaking rhythm (10 Hz) do coexist in this model . The kinetics of the inactivations of INaSand ICaS produce this multistability. A paw-shaking response can be demonstrated as a result of a switch in the multistable model or as a transient response of a nearby monostable model. The duration of this transient paw-shaking response depends on pulse duration and the phase of walking at which the pulse is initiated. We also developed a model of two populations with 20 neurons each, in which there are random inhibitory synapses across the two populations and random excitatory synapses within each population. This population model generates similar behavior as the two neuron model.

  12. Characteristics and effect of antiinflammatory drugs on adriamycin-induced inflammation in the mouse paw.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D M; Giri, S N; Scheinholtz, R M; Schwartz, L W

    1980-06-01

    A subplantar injection of 5--100 micrograms adriamycin in the mouse hind paw produced a biphasic inflammatory response. The first phase peaked at 2 h while the second, more severe phase peaked at four to five days. The magnitude of inflammation was dose related. Administration of [EH]adriamycin revealed that 78% of the drug was lost from the paw within one day. The loss of the remaining drug followed a biphasic decay curve. The first-phase half-life was 1.2 days, and the second-phase half-life was 16.0 days. Vascular permeability, as measured by the leakage of intravenously administered [125I]albumin, was increased between day 4 and day 8. Pathologically, the paw had mild edema and hemorrhage by 4 h after adriamycin injection. The most severe pathological response was seen at 5 days with diffuse inflammation characterized by edema of the dermis, cellular debris, and mononuclear inflammatory cells. By 10 days the inflammatory response was still present but the edema was milder. The antihistamine diphenhydramine, an H1-blocker, inhibited the first phase of inflammation at the highest dose tested but had no effect on the second phase of inflammation. The antihistamine metiamide, an H2-blocker; the antiserotonin drug, p-chlorophenylalanine; and the antiinflammatory drugs, aspirin, hydrocortisone, and ibuprofen failed to antagonize adriamycin-induced inflammation at 2 h or 5 days after adriamycin injection. Indomethacin reduced the inflammation after 5 days but only at toxic dose levels. PMID:6446523

  13. Antiinflammatory Activity of Hot Water Infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Ratnasooriya, W. D.; Jayakody, J. R. A. C.; Handunnetti, S. M.; Ratnasooriya, C. D. T.; Weerasekera, K. R.

    2015-01-01

    In Sri Lankan ethnomedicate it is claimed the flowers of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis is effective in the treatment of inflammatory conditions but this has not been scientifically validated. This experiment was carried to investigate the antinflammatory potential of hot water infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers. Oral antiinflammatory activity of hot water infusion of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers (concentrations: 3.75, 7.5, 12.5 and 18.75 mg/kg) was assessed in rats using both acute (carrageenan-induced paw oedema assay) and chronic (formaldehyde induced-paw oedema and cotton pellet-granuloma tests) inflammatory models. In an attempt to investigate its mode of action, antihistamine activity (by wheal test), inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis (by enteropooling test), inhibition of Tumor necrosis factorα secretion (using human mononuclear cells), and suppression of vascular permeability (acetic acid-induced vascular permeability test) and cytotoxicity (Evans blue test) were assessed. In the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test, hot water infusion simultaneously suppressed both initial and late stages of inflammation in an inversely dose related manner. Hot water infusion also inhibited paw oedema in formalin and cotton pellet granuloma tests. In addition, this infusion exhibited marked anti histamine activity, prostaglandin synthesis inhibition and suppression of vascular permeability. These findings scientifically support the traditional use of Nyctanthes arbo-tristis flowers in treatment of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26798178

  14. The effect of intra-articular vanilloid receptor agonists on pain behavior measures in a murine model of acute monoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mishal; Mahowald, Maren L; Frizelle, Sandra P; Dorman, Christopher W; Funkenbusch, Sonia C; Krug, Hollis E

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the US, and the primary manifestation of arthritis is joint pain that leads to progressive physical limitation, disability, morbidity, and increased health care utilization. Capsaicin (CAP) is a vanilloid agonist that causes substance P depletion by interacting with vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential V1 on small unmyelinated C fibers. It has been used topically for analgesia in osteoarthritis with variable success. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is an ultra potent CAP analog. The aim of this study was to measure the analgesic effects of intra-articular (IA) administration of CAP and RTX in experimental acute inflammatory arthritis in mice. Evoked pain score (EPS) and a dynamic weight bearing (DWB) device were used to measure nociceptive behaviors in a murine model of acute inflammatory monoarthritis. A total of 56 C57B16 male mice underwent EPS and DWB testing – 24 nonarthritic controls and 32 mice with carrageenan-induced arthritis. The effects of pretreatment with 0.1% CAP, 0.0003% RTX, or 0.001% RTX were measured. Nociception was reproducibly demonstrated by increased EPS and reduced DWB measures in the affected limb of arthritic mice. Pretreatment with 0.001% RTX resulted in statistically significant improvement in EPS and DWB measures when compared with those observed in carrageenan-induced arthritis animals. Pretreatment with IA 0.0003% RTX and IA 0.01% CAP resulted in improvement in some but not all of these measures. The remaining 24 mice underwent evaluation following treatment with 0.1% CAP, 0.0003% RTX, or 0.001% RTX, and the results obtained were similar to that of naïve, nonarthritic mice. PMID:27574462

  15. The effect of intra-articular vanilloid receptor agonists on pain behavior measures in a murine model of acute monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mishal; Mahowald, Maren L; Frizelle, Sandra P; Dorman, Christopher W; Funkenbusch, Sonia C; Krug, Hollis E

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the US, and the primary manifestation of arthritis is joint pain that leads to progressive physical limitation, disability, morbidity, and increased health care utilization. Capsaicin (CAP) is a vanilloid agonist that causes substance P depletion by interacting with vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential V1 on small unmyelinated C fibers. It has been used topically for analgesia in osteoarthritis with variable success. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is an ultra potent CAP analog. The aim of this study was to measure the analgesic effects of intra-articular (IA) administration of CAP and RTX in experimental acute inflammatory arthritis in mice. Evoked pain score (EPS) and a dynamic weight bearing (DWB) device were used to measure nociceptive behaviors in a murine model of acute inflammatory monoarthritis. A total of 56 C57B16 male mice underwent EPS and DWB testing - 24 nonarthritic controls and 32 mice with carrageenan-induced arthritis. The effects of pretreatment with 0.1% CAP, 0.0003% RTX, or 0.001% RTX were measured. Nociception was reproducibly demonstrated by increased EPS and reduced DWB measures in the affected limb of arthritic mice. Pretreatment with 0.001% RTX resulted in statistically significant improvement in EPS and DWB measures when compared with those observed in carrageenan-induced arthritis animals. Pretreatment with IA 0.0003% RTX and IA 0.01% CAP resulted in improvement in some but not all of these measures. The remaining 24 mice underwent evaluation following treatment with 0.1% CAP, 0.0003% RTX, or 0.001% RTX, and the results obtained were similar to that of naïve, nonarthritic mice. PMID:27574462

  16. Effect of Royal Jelly on Formalin Induced-Inflammation in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Arzi, Ardeshir; Olapour, Samaneh; Yaghooti, Hamid; Sistani Karampour, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Royal Jelly (RJ), a food item secreted by worker honeybees, is a mixture that contains protein, glucose, lipid, vitamins, and minerals; it is widely used as a commercial medical product. Previous studies have shown that RJ has a number of physiological effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antiallergic and antioxidant activities. Objectives: In the present study, the anti-inflammatory properties of RJ were investigated in formalin-induced rat paw edema. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into five equal groups (n = 6) as follows: test groups received different doses (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, ip) of RJ and a negative control group received normal saline (5 mL/kg) and a positive control group received aspirin (300 mg/kg, i.p). Edema was induced on the right hind paw of the rat by a subplantar injection of 100 µL of formalin (2.5%) after 30 minutes. Paw edema was measured in the rats received the drugs, saline and aspirin before and after the formalin injection during 5 hours, using a plethysmometer. Results: The results showed that RJ has a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect and the highest anti-inflammatory effect was observed in the doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg. Conclusions: Royal jelly has potent anti-inflammatory effects compared to aspirin and it could be used in the treatment of inflammation. However, further studies are required to determine the active components in RJ responsible for this effect and its mechanism of action. PMID:25866724

  17. Temperature sensitivity of the paw of the cat: a behavioural study

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Stanley; Norrsell, Ulf

    1974-01-01

    1. Cats were trained to respond to differences between the temperatures of the floors of two corridors of a modified T-maze for a food reward. 2. The cats were able to respond to differences between warm temperatures or differences between cool temperatures in the range of 1° C. 3. Both warm and cool discriminations were mediated by receptors located in or near the footpads. 4. The paw of the cat thus appears to be more sensitive to temperature changes than was believed previously, and its temperature sensitivity may be comparable to that of the hand of the primate. PMID:4854615

  18. Reinnervation of sweat glands in the rat hind paw following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bharali, L A; Burgess, S A; Lisney, S J; Pearson, D

    1988-08-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have been carried out to investigate the time course and extent of sweat gland reinnervation in the rat hind paw. The first evidence of functional reinnervation after nerve transection was obtained at 12 weeks, when the extent of innervation was 20% of that measured in control animals. By 20 weeks, reinnervation had reached almost 50% of control values but then there was no further improvement up to 52 weeks. These results are comparable to those for skin reinnervation by polymodal nociceptor afferents. PMID:3171090

  19. Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom induces oedema formation and increases vascular permeability in the mouse hind paw.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, A L; de Souza, A O; da Cruz-Höfling, M A; Flores, C A; Bon, C

    2000-02-01

    The ability of snake venoms to increase vascular permeability and to induce oedema through the release of pharmacologically active substances is well known. We have studied the oedema and vascular permeability induced by Bothrops lanceolatus venom in male Swiss white mice. Paw oedema was induced by the subplantar injection of B. lanceolatus venom (125-1000 ng/paw) and was quantified as the increase in paw weight. Changes in vascular permeability were assessed by measuring the amount of Evans blue dye extravasation. The oedema and the increase in vascular permeability were maximal within 2 h and had resolved after 24 h. The administration of the vasodilator iloprost (20 ng/paw) immediately after B. lanceolatus venom potentiated the oedema and the increase in vascular permeability by approximately four-fold. Pretreating the mice with indomethacin, dexamethasone, NDGA or BW A4C inhibited the venom-induced oedema and the increase in vascular permeability. In contrast, histamine, serotonin and PAF-acether antagonists (mepyramine, cyproheptadine and WEB 2086, respectively) were ineffective. Histological examination showed that B. lanceolatus venom (250 ng and 500 ng/paw) caused thickening of the inner dermal layers which was accompanied by extensive intercellular spaces indicative of oedema. In addition, there was a marked infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils, into the underlying muscle layer. The latter, however, remained morphologically unaffected during the 3 h of observation. Venom doses larger than 500 ng/paw produced intense haemorrhage. These results indicate that B. lanceolatus venom induces oedema and increases vascular permeability in the mouse hind paw. The principal mediators of this inflammatory response are cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products. PMID:10665802

  20. In vivo anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil from Radix Angelicae dahuricae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sun, Jingbo; Li, He; Yang, Xue; Liu, Huimin; Chen, Jianguang

    2016-07-01

    Although Radix Angelicae dahuricae (Angelica) has been traditionally used in patients with rheumatism arthralgia, its bioactive ingredients remain to be determined. In this study, the essential oil extract of Radix Angelicae dahuricae (EOAD) was assessed for its anti-inflammatory activities against xylene-induced acute ear swelling and carrageenan-induced acute paw edema in mice as well as its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis in rats. We found that EOAD at 100 mg/kg significantly alleviated xylene-induced ear swelling and carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. Moreover, in the FCA-induced rat arthritis model, EOAD significantly improved hind paw swelling, lowered the adjuvant arthritis score, mitigated synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, and cartilage destruction in the ankle joint, and reduced the serum levels of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2 as well as serum nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings support the fact that the essential oil extract of Angelica contains important active constituents responsible for its anti-inflammatory activities and therefore help to understand the phytotherapeutic effects of Angelica in the treatment of aseptic inflammation. PMID:26906120

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Aqueous Extract of Beta Vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Swati; Garg, Vipin Kumar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the investigation of phytochemically evaluated aqueous extract of leaves of Beta vulgaris for its anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method for acute inflammation and cotton pellet granuloma method for chronic inflammation. The standard drug used was indomethacin (10 mg/kg) for both the models. In both methods, aqueous extract at a dose level of 1000 mg/kg has shown significant activity which is comparable to that of the standard PMID:24826006

  2. Protective effect of propionyl-L-carnitine against PAF-induced rat paw oedema.

    PubMed

    Caruso, A; Cutuli, V M; De Bernardis, E; Leonardi, G; Amico-Roxas, M

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports from our laboratory gave evidence showing that propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), unlike L-carnitine (LC) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), has anti-inflammatory activity in some models of vascular inflammation in rodents. The present paper shows that PLC (50 to 200 mg kg-1 i.p.) inhibits rat paw oedema induced by platelet activating factor (PAF), while LC and ALC, as well as indomethacin and phenylbutazone, are ineffective. The extent of the maximal inhibition produced by PLC at 200 mg kg-1 was comparable to that of betamethasone 0.05 mg kg-1 or sodium salicylate 100 mg kg-1. PLC inhibited also the early phase (1-2 h) of carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema, which is partly dependent on PAF release, but it was ineffective in the eicosanoid-dependent late phase (3-4 h) of the carrageenin oedema. We suggest that such anti-inflammatory activity of PLC may be due to various mechanisms converging on a stabilizing action upon biomembranes. PMID:7784308

  3. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  4. Service learning: Priority 4 Paws mobile surgical service for shelter animals.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lynetta J; Ferguson, Nancy; Litster, Annette; Arighi, Mimi

    2013-01-01

    The increasing attention given to competencies needed to enter the workforce has revealed a need for veterinary students to gain more experience in performing small-animal elective surgery before graduation. In addition, guidelines for standards of care for shelter animals recommend that all dogs and cats should be spayed or neutered before adoption. Teaching surgical skills while serving the needs of local animal shelters represents an ideal service-learning opportunity. Following a pilot study and the benchmarking of other programs, an elective course in shelter medicine and surgery was created at Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (PVM) to allow senior DVM students an opportunity to spend 2 weeks on a mobile surgery unit (Priority 4 Paws) and 1 week at an animal shelter. With financial assistance from sponsors and donors, PVM purchased and equipped a mobile surgery unit, hired a full-time veterinarian and a registered veterinary technician, and established relationships with 12 animal shelters. From July 30, 2012, to March 22, 2013, 1,941 spays and neuters were performed with excellent postsurgical outcomes while training 33 veterinary students on rotation and 26 veterinary technician students. The program was well accepted by both students and the shelters being served. The Priority 4 Paws program is an example of an integrated, community-based service-learning opportunity that not only helps to improve the surgical skills of veterinary students but also helps to meet an identified community need. PMID:24113722

  5. Passive A-band Wind Sounder (PAWS) for measuring tropospheric wind velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miecznik, Grzegorz; Pierce, Robert; Huang, Pei; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Kaptchen, Paul; Roark, Shane; Johnson, Brian R.; Heath, Donald F.

    2007-09-01

    The Passive A-Band Wind Sounder (PAWS) was funded through NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to determine the feasibility of measuring tropospheric wind speed profiles from Doppler shifts in absorption O II A-band. It is being pursued as a low-cost and low-risk alternative capable of providing better wind data than is currently available. The instrument concept is adapted from the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) sensor on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The operational concept for PAWS is to view an atmospheric limb over an altitude range from the surface to 20 km with a Doppler interferometer in a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit. Two orthogonal views of the same sampling volume will be used to resolve horizontal winds from measured line-of-sight winds. A breadboard instrument was developed to demonstrate the measurement approach and to optimize the design parameters for the subsequent engineering unit and future flight sensor. The breadboard instrument consists of a telescope, collimator, filter assembly, and Michelson interferometer. The instrument design is guided by a retrieval model, which helps to optimize key parameters, spectral filter and optical path difference in particular.

  6. Severe Malaria Associated with Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax among Children in Pawe Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Geleta, Getachew

    2016-01-01

    Despite rigorous effort made to control malaria for more than a century, it is still among the main public health problems in least developed regions of the world. Majority of deaths associated with malaria occur in sub-Sahara Africa among biologically risked groups. Thus, this study was designed to assess the incidence of severe malaria syndromes among children in Pawe Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Children seeking medication for malaria infection in Pawe Hospital during the study period were recruited. Sociodemographic characteristics, physical, hematological, and clinical features of complicated malaria were assessed following standard parasitological and clinical procedures. A total of 263 children were found malaria positive. Among these, 200 were infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Most of the severe malaria symptoms were observed among children infected with P. falciparum and P. vivax. The study showed that significant number of the children developed severe life threatening malaria complications. This calls for prompt early diagnosis and effective treatment of patients to reduce mortality and complications associated with malaria in the study site. PMID:27047701

  7. Novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles as anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Durgashivaprasad, Ega; Mathew, Geetha; Sebastian, Sarine; Reddy, S.A Manohar; Mudgal, Jayesh; Nampurath, Gopalan Kutty

    2014-01-01

    Objective: 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring is a versatile moiety with a wide range of pharmacological properties. The present work deals with the synthesis and evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of two novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles (OSD and OPD). Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was employed as an acute model of inflammation. For evaluating sub-acute anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced inflammation in rat air pouch was employed. Complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was used as a model of chronic inflammation. To evaluate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells were used. Results: OSD (100 mg/kg) reduced carrageen-induced paw edema by 60%, and OPD (100 mg/kg) produced a modest 32.5% reduction. OSD also reduced leukocyte influx and myeloperoxidase in carrageenan-induced rat air pouch model. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis model, both OSD and OPD (200 mg/kg for 14 days) reduced paw edema and NO levels. In LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, OSD and OPD inhibited formation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, with OPD showing a better activity in comparison to OSD. Conclusions: OSD was the better of the two compounds in in vivo models of inflammation. The o-phenol substitution at position 2 of oxadiazole ring in OSD may be responsible for its better in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. The ability of the compounds to inhibit LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediator release suggests an anti-inflammatory mechanism targeting LPS-TLR4-NF-κB signalling pathway, which needs to be explored in detail. The disparate efficacy in vitro and in vivo also requires in-depth evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of these novel oxadiazoles. PMID:25298582

  8. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and GC-MS Studies on Castanospermum australe A. Cunn. & C. Fraser ex Hook.

    PubMed Central

    Sajeesh, Thankarajan; Parimelazhagan, Thangaraj

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Castanospermum australe and to profile phytochemicals by GC-MS. The ethanolic extracts were prepared by successive solvent extraction using Soxhlet apparatus. The analgesic activity was analyzed by hot plate method and acetic acid-induced writhing test whereas anti-inflammatory study was done by carrageenan induced paw oedema model. The acute toxicity study revealed that ethanol extracts of leaf and bark of C. australe were safe even at a higher dose of 2000 mg/kg whereas ethanol extract of seed was toxic at the same dose. In both hot plate method (5.85 s) and acetic acid-induced writhing test (57%), the leaf ethanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity (P < 0.001) at a dose of 400 mg/kg. The anti-inflammatory activity of leaf extract was exhibited by the reduction in paw linear diameter by 64.76% at 400 mg/kg in carrageenan induced paw oedema. The GC-MS analysis of the ethanol extract of leaf revealed sixteen major compounds of which 1,7-dimethyl-4,10-dioxa-1,7-diazacyclododecane, (+)-N-methylephedrine, and permethylspermine were found to be pharmaceutically and the most important. These findings justify that C. australe can be a valuable natural analgesic and anti-inflammatory source which seemed to provide potential phytotherapeutics against various ailments. PMID:24672339

  9. TigerPaw-NR, a New, High Yielding, Root-knot Nematode Resistant, Highly Pungent, Habanero-type Pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS has released a new Habanero-type pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) cultivar named TigerPaw-NR. The new cultivar is the product of a backcross breeding program to transfer a dominant root-knot nematode resistance gene from the Scotch Bonnet accession PA-426 into the Habanero-type accessi...

  10. The anti-inflammatory effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf extract in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Pa; Sudjarwo, Giftania Wardani; Kim, Ji-Su; Dirgantara, Septrianto; Maeng, Won Jai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme can cause inflammation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is also involved in the inflammatory response through regulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Areca catechu is one of the known fruit plants of the Palmaceae family. It has been used for a long time as a source of herbal medicine in Indonesia. In this study, we explored the effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf ethanol extract (ACE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and carrageenan-induced paw edema models. Recently, this natural extract has been in the spotlight because of its efficacy and limited or no toxic side effects. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effect remains to be elucidated. MATERIALS/METHODS We measured NO production by using the Griess reagent, and determined the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins, such as iNOS, COX2, and NF-κB, by western blot. To confirm the effect of ACE in vivo, we used the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. RESULTS Compared to untreated cells, LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells treated with ACE showed reduced NO generation and reduced iNOS and COX-2 expression. We found that the acute inflammatory response was significantly reduced by ACE in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. CONCLUSION Taken together, these results suggest that ACE can inhibit inflammation and modulate NO generation via downregulation of iNOS levels and NF-κB signaling in vitro and in vivo. ACE may have a potential medical benefit as an anti-inflammation agent. PMID:24944770

  11. Antiinflammatory activity of a polyherbal formulation.

    PubMed

    Deorukhakar, S R; Dethe, A; Vohra, R R; Ghosh, R; Chaudhary, J; Kadam, V

    2008-11-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of the polyherbal formulation Entox(®) was investigated in rats for acute and sub acute models of inflammation using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma methods respectively at a dose of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg administered orally. The formulation in doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg showed 51.61% and 54.84% inhibition of paw edema, respectively at the end of 3 h. The percent inhibition of granuloma by cotton pellet method was 27.92% and 53.17%, respectively. The formulation showed a significant antiinflammatory activity in both the experimental models and the activity was comparable to that of the standard drug, indomethacin. PMID:21369442

  12. In vivo antiarthritic activity of Rosa centifolia L. flower extract

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Nair, Vinod; Singh, Surender; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rosa centifolia L. (Rosaceae) have been used for the treatment of joint pain and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the traditional system of medicine. Aim: In this study, the antiarthritic activity of the alcoholic extract from the floral parts of R. centifolia was investigated. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of R. centifolia alcoholic extract (RCAE: 32, 64, and 128 mg/kg) was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis model. Serum from arthritic rats was collected for the estimation of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Further, the safety of RCAE was evaluated in an acute and sub-acute (28-day) oral toxicity study. Results: RCAE (64 and 128 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema at 1, 3, and 6 h post carrageenan challenge and demonstrated significant (P < 0.01) antiarthritic activity on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 day following CFA immunization. Further, RCAE (128 mg/kg) treatment also produced a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokine levels as compared with control. Further, no toxicologically significant treatment-related effects were observed in the oral sub-acute toxicity study conducted with the extract. Conclusion: The result of study demonstrates the antiarthritic activity of R. centifolia and validates its traditional use for the treatment of RA. PMID:27313424

  13. Enhanced release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation: involvement of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; White, T D; Sawynok, J

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of endogenous adenosine levels by inhibition of adenosine metabolism produces a peripheral antinociceptive effect in a neuropathic pain model. The present study used microdialysis to investigate the neuronal mechanisms modulating extracellular adenosine levels in the rat hind paw following tight ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves. Subcutaneous injection of 50 microl saline into the nerve-injured paw induced a rapid and short-lasting increase in extracellular adenosine levels in the subcutaneous tissues of the rat hind paw ipsilateral to the nerve injury. Saline injection did not increase adenosine levels in sham-operated rats or non-treated rats. The adenosine kinase inhibitor 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine and the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin, at doses producing a peripheral antinociceptive effect, did not further enhance subcutaneous adenosine levels in the nerve-injured paw. Systemic pretreatment with capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for small-diameter sensory afferents, markedly reduced the saline-evoked release of adenosine in rat hind paw following spinal nerve ligation. Systemic pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine, a neurotoxin selective for sympathetic afferent nerves, did not affect release. These results suggest that following nerve injury, peripheral capsaicin-sensitive primary sensory afferent nerve terminals are hypersensitive, and are able to release adenosine following a stimulus that does not normally evoke release in sham-operated or intact rats. Sympathetic postganglionic afferents do not appear to be involved in such release. The lack of effect on such release by the inhibitors of adenosine metabolism suggests an altered peripheral adenosine system following spinal nerve ligation. PMID:12204207

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of 4-Methylcyclopentadecanone on Edema Models in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yukui; Li, Yue; Li, Xiufeng; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of 4-methylcyclopentadecanone (4-MCPC) on edema models in mice and aimed to determine the safety of 4-MCPC after acute exposure. The acute toxicity of 4-MCPC was evaluated by oral administration to rats of single doses of 0, 5, 50, 500 and 5000 mg/kg. Toxic symptoms were observed for 14 days. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in xylene-induced mouse ear edema and carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema. The animals were treated with 4-MCPC once every day for seven consecutive days. Edema index, % inhibition, IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2 and MPO levels in paws were detected after the treatment with xylene or carrageenan. Our results indicated that the LD50 value of 4-MCPC in rats is greater than 5000 mg/kg. The ED50 of 4-MCPC in xylene-induced mouse ear edema model was 7.5 mg/kg. 4-MCPC (8 or 16 mg/kg) remarkably inhibited carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema. Further study revealed that 4-MCPC treatment also decreased IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2 and MPO levels in mice paws. Intragastric administration of 4-MCPC exhibited more significant anti-inflammatory activity than muscone at a dose of 16 mg/kg. Taken together, our results suggest that 4-MCPC has potent anti-inflammatory activity and the mechanisms might be related to the decreases of the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, PGE2 and MPO in inflamed paws. PMID:24351869

  15. Ameliorative Effects of a Polyphenolic Fraction of Cinnamomum zeylanicum L. Bark in Animal Models of Inflammation and Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Badal; Bodhankar, Subhash; Mohan, V.; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Syn C. verum, family: Lauraceae) is one of the oldest traditional medicines for inflammatory- and pain-related disorders. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the polyphenol fraction from Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark (CPP) in animal models of inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Dose-response studies of CPP (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) used in a separate set of in vivo experiments were conducted in acute (carrageenan-induced rat paw edema), subacute (cotton pellet-induced granuloma), and sub-chronic (AIA, adjuvant-induced established polyarthrtis) models of inflammation in rats and the acetic acid-induced writhing model of pain in mice. Effects of CPP on cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from Concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated lymphocytes were also evaluated in vitro. CPP showed a strong and dose-dependent reduction in paw volume, weight loss reversal effects against carrageenan-induced paw edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma models in rats. CPP (200 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days) showed a significant reduction in elevated serum TNF-α concentration without causing gastric ulcerogenicity in the AIA model in rats. CPP also demonstrated mild analgesic effects during acute treatment as evidenced by the reduction in the writhing and paw withdrawal threshold of the inflamed rat paw during the acetic acid-induced writhing model and Randall-Selitto test. CPP was found to inhibit cytokine (IL-2, IL-4, and IFNγ) release from ConA-stimulated lymphocytes in vitro. In conclusion, CPP demonstrated prominent action in animal models of inflammation and arthritis and therefore can be considered as a potential anti-rheumatic agent with disease-modifying action. PMID:23833722

  16. ERK1/2 Phosphorylation in the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus, Dorsal Raphe Nucleus, and Locus Coeruleus Neurons Following Noxious Stimulation to the Hind Paw.

    PubMed

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Phospho-ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) fluorescence-immunohistochemistry is specifically well suited to mirror neuronal activity in the pain pathway at the cellular level. This study employed this method to visualize neuronal activity in 3 rat CNS nuclei following an acute noxious stimulation. The rat hind paw was stimulated either by heat or by a sequence of mustard oil and heat. Two min after the thermal stimulation or after the combined mustard oil and thermal stimulation, there was a significant increase in cells showing pERK1/2 immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and in the locus coeruleus (LC). Pretreatment with the opioid analgesic morphine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 markedly attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings support the concept that the SON, the DRN, and the LC are integrated into pain processing at the hypothalamic and brain stem level. PMID:26599629

  17. Protein associated with SMAD1 (PAWS1/FAM83G) is a substrate for type I bone morphogenetic protein receptors and modulates bone morphogenetic protein signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Janis; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Herhaus, Lina; Gourlay, Robert; Macartney, Thomas; Campbell, David; Smith, James C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) control multiple cellular processes in embryos and adult tissues. BMPs signal through the activation of type I BMP receptor kinases, which then phosphorylate SMADs 1/5/8. In the canonical pathway, this triggers the association of these SMADs with SMAD4 and their translocation to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression. BMPs can also signal independently of SMAD4, but this pathway is poorly understood. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of PAWS1/FAM83G as a novel SMAD1 interactor. PAWS1 forms a complex with SMAD1 in a SMAD4-independent manner, and BMP signalling induces the phosphorylation of PAWS1 through BMPR1A. The phosphorylation of PAWS1 in response to BMP is essential for activation of the SMAD4-independent BMP target genes NEDD9 and ASNS. Our findings identify PAWS1 as the first non-SMAD substrate for type I BMP receptor kinases and as a novel player in the BMP pathway. We also demonstrate that PAWS1 regulates the expression of several non-BMP target genes, suggesting roles for PAWS1 beyond the BMP pathway. PMID:24554596

  18. Histamine paw edema of mice was increased and became H[sub 2]-antagonist sensitive by co-injection of nitric oxide forming agents, but serotonin paw edema was decreased

    SciTech Connect

    Oyanagui, Yoshihiko; Sato, Sachio )

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) surprisingly caused the opposite effect on histamine and serotonin edema. The local injection of acidified nitrite (0.3-30 [mu]g/paw which correspond 10 [mu]g-1mg/kg) increased histamine edema of mice up to 45[plus minus]4% and suppressed serotonin edema to 90[plus minus]3%. Other NO-generators (nitroprusside sodium and hydroxylamine) showed similar effects. These results were in accordance with previous data on endogenous NO. Methylene blue (MB, 30ng/paw which corresponds to 1 [mu]g/kg) suppressed histamine edema (62[plus minus]3%) and increased serotonin edema (43[plus minus]3%) in normal mice, being reversed by acidified nitrite. This suggests the involvement of guanosine 3[prime], 5[prime]-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) formation for the action of NO. Histamine edema became sensitive to H[sub 2]-antagonist, cimetidine, by co-injection of 30 [mu]g/paw (which corresponds to 1mg/kg) acidified nitrite (ED[sub 50] = 30 [mu]g/kg versus [much gt] 1mg/kg). NO seemed to modify the histamine receptor(s) or tautomeric form of histamine. NO, O[sup [minus

  19. Performance characteristics of the PAW instrumentation on Beagle 2 (the astrobiology lander on ESA's Mars Express Mission)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Mark R.; Pullan, D.; Fraser, George W.; Whitehead, S.; Sykes, J.; Holt, J.; Butcher, Gillian I.; Nelms, Nick; Dowson, J.; Ross, D.; Bicknell, C.; Crocker, M.; Favill, B.; Wells, Alan A.; Richter, L.; Kochan, H.; Hamacher, Hans; Ratke, L.; Griffiths, Andrew D.; Coates, A. J.; Phillips, N.; Senior, A.; Zarnecki, John C.; Towner, M. C.; Leese, M.; Patel, M.; Wilson, C.; Thomas, Nicolas; Hviid, S.; Josset, Jean-Luc; Klingelhoefer, G.; Bernhardt, B.; van Duijn, P.; Sims, G.; Yung, K. L.

    2003-02-01

    The performance of the PAW instrumentation on the 60kg Beagle 2 lander for ESA"s 2003 Mars Express mission will be described. Beagle 2 will search for organic material on and below the surface of Mars in addition to a study of the inorganic chemistry and mineralogy of the landing site. The lander will utilize acquisition and preparation tools to obtain samples from below the surface, and both under and inside rocks. In situ analysis will include examination of samples with an optical microscope, Mossbauer and fluorescent X-ray spectrometers. Extracted samples will be returned to the lander for analysis, in particular a search for organics and a measurement of their isotopic composition. The PAW experiment performance data will be described along with the status of the project.

  20. Immune Modulation of B. terrestris Worker (a Type of Bumblebee), Extract on CFA-induced Paw Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Ja; Han, Jea Woong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2014-01-01

    To develop a composition for enhancing immunity, based on alcohol extracts of the bumblebee as an active ingredient, bumblebee ethanol extracts were evaluated for their protective effect in chronic models of inflammation, adjuvant induced rat arthritis. B. terrestris worker extract (SDIEX) and, B. hypocrita sapporoensis lava an pupa extract (SPDYBEX), significantly decreased paw edema in arthritic rats, at a dose 100 mg/kg, respectively. The cytokine levels related inflammation of COX-2, sPLA2, VEGF, and TNF-α, were decreased, compared to positive control, indomethacin (5 mg/kg). Histopathological data demonstrated decreases inflammatory activity, hind paw edema, and repaired hyaline articular cartilage in DRG over a 2 wk administration. HPLC and GC-MS analysis of SDIEX and SPDYBEX revealed the presence of cantharidin. PMID:25584147

  1. Epidemiology of Salmonella on the Paws and in the Faeces of Free-Ranging Raccoons (Procyon Lotor) in Southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bondo, K J; Pearl, D L; Janecko, N; Boerlin, P; Reid-Smith, R J; Parmley, J; Jardine, C M

    2016-06-01

    Raccoons are common in urban and rural environments and can carry a wide range of bacteria, including Salmonella, that can negatively affect human and livestock health. Although previous studies have reported that raccoons shed a variety of Salmonella serovars in their faeces, it is unknown whether Salmonella is carried on raccoon paws. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of Salmonella on the paws and in the faeces of raccoons in south-western Ontario. Raccoons were sampled in a repeat cross-sectional study on five swine farms and five conservation areas from May to October 2012. A total of 416 paired faecal and paw samples were collected from 285 individual raccoons. Salmonella was detected in 18% (75/416; 95% CI, 14-22%) and 27% (111/416; 95% CI, 22-31%) of paw and faecal samples, respectively. Salmonella was detected only on paws in 8% (35/416; 95% CI, 5.9-11.5%), only in faeces in 17% (71/416; 95% CI, 13.6-21.0%) and on both paws and in faeces in 10% (40/416; 95% CI, 7.0-12.9%) of raccoon captures. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to examine associations between the presence of Salmonella and age (adult, juvenile), sex (male, female), location type (swine farm, conservation area), sample type (faeces, paw) and season (May-July and August-October). Random intercepts were included to account for clustering by individual animal and location. Significant differences, that varied by sample type and season, were noted in the prevalence of Salmonella carriage between sexes. Raccoons can carry Salmonella serovars known to infect humans and livestock on their paws and/or in their faeces and therefore have the potential to mechanically and biologically disseminate Salmonella among livestock facilities and human recreational areas. PMID:26404182

  2. Lateralised behaviour and immune response in dogs: relations between paw preference and interferon-gamma, interleukin-10 and IgG antibodies production.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, A; Siniscalchi, M; Frate, A; Iacoviello, R; Buonavoglia, C; Vallortigara, G

    2006-01-30

    The production of specific antibodies (IgG), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was evaluated in dogs in relation to behavioural lateralisation as assessed by paw preference. Left-handed, right-handed and ambidextrous dogs of mixed breed were selected on the basis of their performance in a task consisting of the removal of a piece of adhesive paper from the snout. All dogs were immunised with rabies vaccine. IgG anti-rabies antibody response was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Serum IFN-gamma and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA in animals showing significant individual left-, right- or no-paw preferences in the behavioural test. The results showed that the direction of behavioural lateralisation influenced the immune response in dogs. The titers of anti-rabies antibodies were lower in left-pawed dogs than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. Similarly, the IFN-gamma serum levels were lower in left-pawed dogs than in right-pawed and ambidextrous dogs. IL-10, on the contrary, seemed to be an immune parameter, which was not affected by lateralisation. These findings suggest that immunomodulation can be correlated with brain laterality in canine species by the regulation of the production of antibodies and some cytokines like IFN-gamma, which are molecules involved in the immune-neurohumoral crosstalk. PMID:16159674

  3. Contribution of α,β-Amyrenone to the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihypersensitivity Effects of Aleurites moluccana (L.) Willd.

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Nara Lins Meira; Rocha, Lilian W.; Silva, Gislaine Franciele; Reichert, Simone; Claudino, Vanessa D.; Lucinda-Silva, Ruth Meri; Malheiros, Angela; Souza, Márcia Maria De; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Bellé Bresolin, Tania M.; Machado, Marina da Silva; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the constituents of the dichloromethane fraction obtained from A. moluccana and also to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of α,β-amyrenone isolated from A. moluccana in mice. The dichloromethane fraction was evaluated by gas chromatography and submitted to purification. The mixture of α,β-amyrenone was isolated and then evaluated using the carrageenan-induced paw-oedema or pleurisy and CFA-induced arthritis models in mice. Five triterpenes, α,β-amyrenone, glutinol, and α,β-amyrin were isolated from dichloromethane fraction of A. moluccana leaf extract. The mixture of α,β-amyrenone, dosed orally, was able to reduce mechanical hypersensitivity and paw-oedema induced by carrageenan, interfering with neutrophil migration. Similar results were observed in the carrageenan-induced pleurisy model. Repeated administration of the compounds was also effective in reducing the mechanical sensitization and oedema developed in the arthritis model induced by CFA. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that α,β-amyrenone interferes in both acute and chronic inflammatory processes. We can infer that these effects involve, at least in part, a reduction in the neutrophil migration. Therefore, it seems reasonable to suggest that α,β-amyrenone could represent a new therapeutic tool for the management of painful and inflammatory diseases, especially those presenting a chronic profile. PMID:25386561

  4. Protective Effect of Metformin against Acute Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Rat.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhimanu; Kumar, Vijay L

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The antidiabetic drug, metformin, can inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators in several disease conditions. The present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of metformin in ameliorating edema formation, oxidative stress, mediator release and vascular changes associated with acute inflammation in the rat carrageenan model. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited paw swelling induced by carrageenan and normalized the tissue levels of the inflammatory markers myeloperoxidase and nitrite. It also maintained oxidative homeostasis as indicated by near normal levels of the oxidative stress markers glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, catalase and superoxide dismutase. The histopathology of the paw tissue in metformin-treated animals was similar to that in normal paw and had similar effects to diclofenac. In a rat peritonitis model, metformin reduced vascular permeability and cellular infiltration. In conclusion, this study shows that metformin has a potential for use in treating various inflammatory conditions. PMID:27510757

  5. Analytic projection from plane-wave and PAW wavefunctions and application to chemical-bonding analysis in solids.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Stefan; Deringer, Volker L; Tchougréeff, Andrei L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Quantum-chemical computations of solids benefit enormously from numerically efficient plane-wave (PW) basis sets, and together with the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method, the latter have risen to one of the predominant standards in computational solid-state sciences. Despite their advantages, plane waves lack local information, which makes the interpretation of local densities-of-states (DOS) difficult and precludes the direct use of atom-resolved chemical bonding indicators such as the crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) and the crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) techniques. Recently, a number of methods have been proposed to overcome this fundamental issue, built around the concept of basis-set projection onto a local auxiliary basis. In this work, we propose a novel computational technique toward this goal by transferring the PW/PAW wavefunctions to a properly chosen local basis using analytically derived expressions. In particular, we describe a general approach to project both PW and PAW eigenstates onto given custom orbitals, which we then exemplify at the hand of contracted multiple-ζ Slater-type orbitals. The validity of the method presented here is illustrated by applications to chemical textbook examples-diamond, gallium arsenide, the transition-metal titanium-as well as nanoscale allotropes of carbon: a nanotube and the C60 fullerene. Remarkably, the analytical approach not only recovers the total and projected electronic DOS with a high degree of confidence, but it also yields a realistic chemical-bonding picture in the framework of the projected COHP method. PMID:24022911

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of β-patchoulene isolated from patchouli oil in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Chen, Hanbin; Wang, Lan; Liang, Jiali; Luo, Dandan; Liu, Yuhong; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Yucui; Xie, Jianhui; Su, Ziren

    2016-06-15

    β-Patchoulene (β-PAE) is a tricyclic sesquiterpene isolated from the oil of Pogostemon cablin (patchouli oil), which has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, as one of the major principle of patchouli oil, the biological activity of β-PAE has not been explored so far. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, and the underlying mechanism, of β-PAE was investigated on experimental mice models of acute inflammation, i.e. xylene-induced ear edema, acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and carrageenan-induced paw edema. The results showed that β-PAE evoked a significant dose-dependent inhibition of ear edema induced by xylene, paw edema induced by carrageenan and suppressed the increase of vascular permeability elicited by acetic acid. Histopathological analysis indicated that β-PAE could markedly decrease the cellular infiltration in paw tissue. β-PAE was also shown to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in edema paw. In addition, carrageenan-induced production of some pro-inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO), were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner in mice subjected to β-PAE pretreatment, and it also significantly down-regulated the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Further analysis revealed that β-PAE also inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and stabilize the conversion of nuclear factor-κBα (IκBα) level. These results provided additional chemical and pharmacological basis for the traditional application of P. cablin in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27090925

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The PAWS catalogs of GMCs and islands in M51 (Colombo+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, D.; Hughes, A.; Schinnerer, E.; Meidt, S. E.; Leroy, A. K.; Pety, J.; Dobbs, C. L.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Dumas, G.; Thompson, T. A.; Schuster, K. F.; Kramer, C.

    2016-08-01

    The Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS; Schinnerer et al., 2013ApJ...779...42S) is a large IRAM program involving 210hr of observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and IRAM 30m telescope to conduct a sensitive, high angular resolution (1.16''*0.97''), 12CO(1-0) survey of the inner disk of M51a (field-of-view, FoV ~270''*170''). The spatial resolution at our assumed distance to M51 of 7.6Mpc (Ciardullo et al. 2002, cat. J/ApJ/577/31) is ~40pc. The inclusion of the 30m single dish data during joint deconvolution ensures that flux information on all spatial scales is conserved. The rms of the noise fluctuations in the cube is ~0.4K per 5km/s channel. This sensitivity is sufficient to detect an object with a gas mass of 1.2*105M{Sun} at the 5σrms level. The PAWS data cube covers the LSR velocity range between 173 and 769km/s. A detailed description of the observing strategy, calibration and data reduction is presented by Pety et al. (2013ApJ...779...43P). (2 data files).

  8. Thermographic evaluation of hind paw skin temperature and functional recovery of locomotion after sciatic nerve crush in rats

    PubMed Central

    Z. Sacharuk, Viviane; A. Lovatel, Gisele; Ilha, Jocemar; Marcuzzo, Simone; Severo do Pinho, Alexandre; L. Xavier, Léder; A. Zaro, Milton; Achaval, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral nerves are often damaged by direct mechanical injury, diseases, and tumors. The peripheral nerve injuries that result from these conditions can lead to a partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, which in turn are related to changes in skin temperature, in the involved segments of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in hind paw skin temperature after sciatic nerve crush in rats in an attempt to determine whether changes in skin temperature correlate with the functional recovery of locomotion. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n = 7), sham (n = 25), and crush (n = 25). All groups were subjected to thermographic, functional, and histological assessments. RESULTS: ΔT in the crush group was different from the control and sham groups at the 1st, 3rd and 7rd postoperative days (p<0.05). The functional recovery from the crush group returned to normal values between the 3rd and 4th week post-injury, and morphological analysis of the nerve revealed incomplete regeneration at the 4th week after injury. DISCUSSION: This study is the first demonstration that sciatic nerve crush in rats induces an increase in hind paw skin temperature and that skin temperature changes do not correlate closely with functional recovery PMID:21876984

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Chitooligosaccharides in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João C.; Spindola, Humberto; de Sousa, Vanessa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Pintado, Manuela E.; Malcata, Francisco Xavier; Carvalho, João E.

    2010-01-01

    All the reports to date on the anti-inflammatory activity of chitooligosaccharides (COS) are mostly based on in vitro methods. In this work, the anti-inflammatory activity of two COS mixtures is characterized in vivo (using balb/c mice), following the carrageenan-induced paw edema method. This is a widely accepted animal model of acute inflammation to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of drugs. Our data suggest that COS possess anti-inflammatory activity, which is dependent on dose and, at higher doses, also on the molecular weight. A single dose of 500 mg/kg b.w. weight may be suitable to treat acute inflammation cases; however, further studies are needed to ascertain the effect upon longer inflammation periods as well as studies upon the bioavailability of these compounds. PMID:20631868

  10. Anti-inflammatory and blood stasis activities of essential oil extracted from Artemisia argyi leaf in animals.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yue-Bin; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Xian-Ju; Mei, Zhi-Nan; Hong, Zong-Guo

    2016-07-01

    Artemisia argyi leaf is a well-known species in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the anti-inflammatory and activating blood stasis activities of its essential oil (AAEO) have not been explored in vivo. The present study measured the contents of three chemical components by gas chromatography (GC). The anti-acute inflammatory effects of AAEO were investigated in dimethyl benzene, glacial acetic acid and carrageenan-induced animals through skin administration or by oral gavage, respectively. The effects of AAEO on haemorheology were studied in a rat acute blood stasis model. The contents of eucalyptol, camphor and borneol in AAEO were 254.4, 51.6 and 58.7 mg/g, respectively. All dosages of AAEO by skin administration significantly decreased the swelling in dimethyl benzene-induced ear oedema and carrageenan-induced paw oedema, and reduced the permeability in glacial acetic acid-induced abdominal blood capillary (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, haemorheology indexes such as whole blood viscosity and the erythrocyte aggregation index significantly decreased only in the high dosage group. In addition, the effects of AAEO by oral gavage were weaker than skin administration at the medium dose in the experiments. It suggests that AAEO has better absorption bioavailability and pharmacological effects through skin administration due to the better skin permeability of essential oil than gastrointestinal absorption. PMID:26894818

  11. Drug modulation of antigen-induced paw oedema in guinea-pigs: effects of lipopolysaccharide, tumour necrosis factor and leucocyte depletion.

    PubMed

    da Motta, J I; Cunha, F Q; Vargaftig, B B; Ferreira, S H

    1994-05-01

    1. In guinea-pigs previously sensitized with ovalbumin, the intra-plantar administration of the antigen induced dose-dependent and sustained oedema. An intense infiltrate of neutrophils and eosinophils was observed at the peak of the oedema (4 h). 2. Oedema induced by ovalbumin at the doses of 50 or 200 micrograms/paw was not inhibited by antihistamines (meclizine and cetirizine), a PAF antagonist (BN 50730), a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin), a lipoxygenase inhibitor (MK-886), a dual type lipo- and cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor (NDGA), a bradykinin antagonist (Hoe 140) or the combination of cetirizine, MK-886, indomethacin and BN 50730. These drugs did inhibit paw oedema induced by their specific agonists or by carrageenin. These results suggest that histamine, PAF, prostaglandins, leukotrienes or bradykinin are not important in the development of immune paw oedema in guinea-pigs. 3. Dexamethasone (10 mg kg-1) inhibited oedema induced by ovalbumin (50 or 200 micrograms/paw, P < 0.05). This effect apparently does not result from inhibition of arachidonate metabolism, since indomethacin, MK-886 and NDGA were without effect. 4. Oedema induced by ovalbumin (50 or 200 micrograms/paw) was also inhibited by azelastine. This effect was not due to the anti-histaminic property of azelastine since two other potent-antihistamines, meclizine and cetirizine, were ineffective. 5. Intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependently inhibited the oedema induced by ovalbumin (200 micrograms/paw). This effect could not be attributed to hypotension or leucopenia since the maximal dose applied (81 micrograms kg-1) did not induce significant changes in the blood pressure or in the white blood cell levels of the animals. It is suggested that the effect of LPS is mediated by the endogenous release of cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). Murine TNF alpha dose dependently(9-81 microg kg-1) inhibited the paw oedema induced by ovalbumin.7. The anti

  12. Isolation of two triterpenoids and a biflavanone with anti-Inflammatory activity from Schinus molle fruits.

    PubMed

    Yueqin, Zeng; Recio, M Carmen; Máñez, Salvador; Giner, Rosa M; Cerdá-Nicolás, M; Ríos, José-Luis

    2003-10-01

    Three compounds with anti-inflammatory activity were isolated from Schinus molle fruits. Two of the compounds were identified as 3- epi-isomasticadienolalic acid ( 1), isomasticadienonalic acid ( 2) and chamaejasmin ( 3). Triterpenes 1 and 2, and biflavanone 3 were tested on two models of mice paw inflammation: one of acute inflammation, induced by subcutaneous injection of either phospholipase A (2) (PLA (2)) or carrageenan in the paws of mice, and one of chronic inflammation in the form of eczema, provoked by repeated administration of TPA to the ears of mice. On the PLA (2)-induced mouse paw oedema, only 2 was active (30 mg/kg, 66 % inhibition at 60 min), whereas all compounds reduced the chronic model of inflammation (48 to 26 % of swelling reduction), but only triterpenes reduced the leukocyte infiltration, measured as tissue peroxidase activity. In the case of the carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, only 3 led to a reduction of the swelling 3 h after challenge (50 mg/kg, 46 % oedema inhibition). In addition, 3 inhibited the LTB (4) production in rat peritoneal polymorphonuclear leukocytes with an IC (50) value of 29.8 microM, while triterpenes showed toxicity against cells at 100 microM. PMID:14648390

  13. Nociception and inflammatory hyperalgesia evaluated in rodents using infrared laser stimulation after Trpv1 gene knockout or resiniferatoxin lesion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kendall; Lebovitz, Evan E; Keller, Jason M; Mannes, Andrew J; Nemenov, Michael I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    TRPV1 is expressed in a subpopulation of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C-fibers. TRPV1+ fibers are essential for the transmission of nociceptive thermal stimuli and for the establishment and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that high-power, short-duration pulses from an infrared diode laser are capable of predominantly activating cutaneous TRPV1+ Aδ-fibers. Here we show that stimulating either subtype of TRPV1+ fiber in the paw during carrageenan-induced inflammation or following hind-paw incision elicits pronounced hyperalgesic responses, including prolonged paw guarding. The ultrapotent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) dose-dependently deactivates TRPV1+ fibers and blocks thermal nociceptive responses in baseline or inflamed conditions. Injecting sufficient doses of RTX peripherally renders animals unresponsive to laser stimulation even at the point of acute thermal skin damage. In contrast, Trpv1-/- mice, which are generally unresponsive to noxious thermal stimuli at lower power settings, exhibit withdrawal responses and inflammation-induced sensitization using high-power, short duration Aδ stimuli. In rats, systemic morphine suppresses paw withdrawal, inflammatory guarding, and hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent fashion using the same Aδ stimuli. The qualitative intensity of Aδ responses, the leftward shift of the stimulus-response curve, the increased guarding behaviors during carrageenan inflammation or after incision, and the reduction of Aδ responses with morphine suggest multiple roles for TRPV1+ Aδ fibers in nociceptive processes and their modulation of pathological pain conditions. PMID:24434730

  14. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30-35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes "holy water" green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for "body cleansing" and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  15. Brief hind paw stimulation is sufficient to induce delayed somatosensory discrimination learning in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Naoto; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-03-15

    Somatosensory learning and memory studies in rodents have primarily focused on the role of whiskers and the barrel structure of the sensory cortex, characteristics unique to rodents. In contrast, whether associative learning can occur in animals (and humans) via foot stimulation remains unclear. The sensory cortex corresponding to the plantar foot surface is localized in the centroparietal area, providing relatively easy access for studying somatosensory learning and memory. To assess the contribution of sole stimulation to somatosensory learning and memory, we developed a novel operant-lever-pressing task. In Experiment 1, head-fixed mice were trained to press a lever to receive a water reward upon presentation of an associated stimulus (S+). Following training, they were administered a reversal-learning protocol, in which "S+ " and "S-" (a stimulus not associated with reward) were switched. Mice were then submitted to training with a progressively extended delay period between stimulation and lever presentation. In Experiment 2, the delayed discrimination training was replicated with longer delay periods and restricted training days, to further explore the results of Experiment 1. When the stimuli were presented to a single left hind paw, we found that male C57BL/6J mice were capable of learning to discriminate between different foot stimuli (electrical or mechanical), and of retaining this information for 10s. This novel task has potential applications for electrophysiological and optogenetic studies to clarify the neural circuits underlying somatosensory learning and behavior. PMID:26711909

  16. The PdBI arcsecond whirlpool survey (PAWS): Environmental dependence of giant molecular cloud properties in M51

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, Dario; Hughes, Annie; Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon E.; Leroy, Adam K.; Pety, Jérôme; Dumas, Gaëlle; Schuster, Karl F.; Dobbs, Clare L.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Thompson, Todd A.; Kramer, Carsten

    2014-03-20

    Using data from the PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS), we have generated the largest extragalactic giant molecular cloud (GMC) catalog to date, containing 1507 individual objects. GMCs in the inner M51 disk account for only 54% of the total {sup 12}CO(1-0) luminosity of the survey, but on average they exhibit physical properties similar to Galactic GMCs. We do not find a strong correlation between the GMC size and velocity dispersion, and a simple virial analysis suggests that ∼30% of GMCs in M51 are unbound. We have analyzed the GMC properties within seven dynamically motivated galactic environments, finding that GMCs in the spiral arms and in the central region are brighter and have higher velocity dispersions than inter-arm clouds. Globally, the GMC mass distribution does not follow a simple power-law shape. Instead, we find that the shape of the mass distribution varies with galactic environment: the distribution is steeper in inter-arm region than in the spiral arms, and exhibits a sharp truncation at high masses for the nuclear bar region. We propose that the observed environmental variations in the GMC properties and mass distributions are a consequence of the combined action of large-scale dynamical processes and feedback from high-mass star formation. We describe some challenges of using existing GMC identification techniques for decomposing the {sup 12}CO(1-0) emission in molecule-rich environments, such as M51's inner disk.

  17. Effect of methanol extract of Bombax malabaricum leaves on nitric oxide production during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Emdad; Sarkar, Debjani; Chatterjee, Mitali; Chakraborty, Saikat; Mandal, Subhash C; Gupta, Jayanta K

    2013-01-01

    In different parts of India, Bombax malabaricum DC. (Family: Bombacaceae), a lofty deciduous tree with large leaves, is traditionally used in inflammation. The aim of the present study was to confirm its antiinflammatory activity and to search for the possible mechanism of action for methanol extract of Bombax malabaricum leaves (MEBM). The anti-inflammatory activity of MEBM was evaluated in a carrageenan-induced model of acute inflammation. As inflammation usually involves increased nitric oxide (NO) production, effect of MEBM on lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in mouse peritoneal macrophages was studied to evaluate its possible mechanism of action. It was found that MEBM was non-toxic up to a dose of 2 g/kg for mice and rats, orally. MEBM (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) significantly reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively). In mice peritoneal macrophages, the IC50 for MEBM was 258.33 +/- 6.96 microg/mL and it was non-toxic up to 125 microg/mL. MEBM (0-100 microg/mL) reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in macrophages in a dose-dependent fashion (p < 0.001). Hence, MEBM possesses antiinflammatory activity, mediated through inhibition of NO production. PMID:23614281

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  19. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  20. Bentonite-induced rat paw oedema as a tool for simultaneous testing of prophylactic and therapeutic effects of anti-inflammatory and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Marek, J

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of screening simultaneously the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a single dose of anti-inflammatory drugs was further tested. Bentonite oedema was induced in the left paw (0.05 ml of 5% bentonite gel subcutaneously). After the measurement of its size in the 23rd h, the rats were given the test drugs (i.m. or p.o.) and 1 h thereafter, bentonite oedema was induced in the right paw. Some of the drugs suppressed the oedema both prophylactically and therapeutically (steroidal and some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sodium aurothiomalate etc.), some others suppressed it only prophylactically (some derivatives of pyrazolone etc.) and some of the remaining drugs tested had no effect at all on the oedema after a single administration. Advantages and limitations of this method are discussed. PMID:7220586

  1. A Study on the Mechanism of Cinobufagin in the Treatment of Paw Cancer Pain by Modulating Local β-Endorphin Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Hu, Wei; He, Haibo; Gong, Zipeng; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xueqin; Ai, Ting; Zhan, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cinobufagin has been widely used in the treatment of carcinoma and plays an important role in the relief of cancer pain. But the involved mechanism remains unknown. Aim. To investigate the changes in thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in paw cancer pain in mice and the action mechanism of cinobufagin using a paw cancer pain model. Methods. 60 female mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group, model group, cinobufagin group, cinobufagin +NAL-M group, and morphine group; except ones in control group, mice were inoculated with H22 hepatoma cells in the right hind paw. From the 9th day after inoculation, mice were administrated drug once daily lasting for 8 days. The pain behavior was determined on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th days before and after administration. On the last day, they were sacrificed. The levels of β-END, CRF, and IL-1β were analyzed by ELISA; immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expressions of β-END, POMC, and μ-OR in the tumor and adjacent tissue. Results. The thresholds of thermal pain and mechanical pain were significantly increased by cinobufagin. Moreover, the expressions of β-END, CRF, POMC, and μ-OR were significantly upregulated by cinobufagin. The analgesic effect of cinobufagin was blocked by the peripheral opioid receptor antagonist NAL-M. Conclusions. Cinobufagin significantly relieved cancer pain in mice and raised their pain threshold, mainly upregulating the expression levels of β-END and μ-OR in the hind paw tumor and adjacent tissue. PMID:24187573

  2. A Study on the Mechanism of Cinobufagin in the Treatment of Paw Cancer Pain by Modulating Local β -Endorphin Expression In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hu, Wei; He, Haibo; Gong, Zipeng; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xueqin; Ai, Ting; Zhan, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background. Cinobufagin has been widely used in the treatment of carcinoma and plays an important role in the relief of cancer pain. But the involved mechanism remains unknown. Aim. To investigate the changes in thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in paw cancer pain in mice and the action mechanism of cinobufagin using a paw cancer pain model. Methods. 60 female mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group, model group, cinobufagin group, cinobufagin +NAL-M group, and morphine group; except ones in control group, mice were inoculated with H22 hepatoma cells in the right hind paw. From the 9th day after inoculation, mice were administrated drug once daily lasting for 8 days. The pain behavior was determined on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th days before and after administration. On the last day, they were sacrificed. The levels of β -END, CRF, and IL-1 β were analyzed by ELISA; immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expressions of β -END, POMC, and μ -OR in the tumor and adjacent tissue. Results. The thresholds of thermal pain and mechanical pain were significantly increased by cinobufagin. Moreover, the expressions of β -END, CRF, POMC, and μ -OR were significantly upregulated by cinobufagin. The analgesic effect of cinobufagin was blocked by the peripheral opioid receptor antagonist NAL-M. Conclusions. Cinobufagin significantly relieved cancer pain in mice and raised their pain threshold, mainly upregulating the expression levels of β -END and μ -OR in the hind paw tumor and adjacent tissue. PMID:24187573

  3. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation in the paw skin and spinal cord by targeting NF-κB and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Zarpelon, Ana C; Borghi, Sergio M; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) in superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain. Male Swiss mice were treated with PDTC and stimulated with an intraplantar or intraperitoneal injection of potassium superoxide, a superoxide anion donor. Subcutaneous PDTC treatment attenuated mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw oedema and leukocyte recruitment (neutrophils and macrophages). Intraplantar injection of superoxide anion activated NF-κB and increased cytokine production (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-10) and oxidative stress (nitrite and lipid peroxidation levels) at the primary inflammatory foci and in the spinal cord (L4-L6). PDTC treatment inhibited superoxide anion-induced NF-κB activation, cytokine production and oxidative stress in the paw and spinal cord. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of PDTC successfully inhibited superoxide anion-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia and inflammatory response in peripheral foci (paw). These results suggest that peripheral stimulus with superoxide anion activates the local and spinal cord oxidative- and NF-κB-dependent inflammatory nociceptive mechanisms. PDTC targets these events, therefore, inhibiting superoxide anion-induced inflammatory pain in mice. PMID:27160222

  4. Neutralization of the oedematogenic activity of Bothrops jararaca venom on the mouse paw by an antibothropic fraction isolated from opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) serum.

    PubMed

    Perales, J; Amorim, C Z; Rocha, S L; Domont, G B; Moussatché, H

    1992-11-01

    The pharmacological modulation of mice paw oedema produced by Bothrops jararaca venom (BJV) has been studied. Intraplantar injection of BJV (1-30 micrograms/paw) produced a dose- and time-related oedema, which was maximal 30 min after injection, reduced gradually thereafter and disappeared over 48 h. BJV heated at 100 degrees C for 5 or 15 min blocked local hemorrhage and caused partial inhibition of its oedematogenic activity. The BJV oedema was not inhibited by the anti-histamine meclizine, the inhibitor of histamine and serotonin, cyproheptadine, PAF-acether antagonist WEB 2170 or by the anti-leukotrienes C4/D4, LY 171883. Dexamethasone, aspirin, indomethacin, and the dual cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C inhibited BJV-induced oedema indicating that arachidonic acid metabolism products via the cyclooxygenase pathway participate in its genesis and/or maintenance. The antibothropic fraction (ABF) (25-200 micrograms/paw) isolated from Didelphis marsupialis serum neutralized the oedema induced by the venom with and without heating, the hemorrhage induced by BJV and partially blocked the oedema induced by bradykinin and by cellulose sulphate. The oedema produced by histamine, serotonin, PAF-acether or leukotriene C4 was not inhibited. PMID:1295374

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Yanshu spraying agent in animal models

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANQIAO; WANG, HONGSHENG; WANG, TIAN; CHONG, YATING; YU, PENGFEI; LU, CHENGWEN; XUE, YUNLI; FU, FENGHUA; ZHANG, LEIMING

    2013-01-01

    Acute pharyngitis is characterized by an inflammation of the mucous membranes in the pharynx. Yanshu spraying agent was prepared according to the traditional Chinese formulation for the treatment of acute pharyngitis. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of Yanshu in xylene-induced ear edema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats by measuring the degree of edema in the animal models. The histopathology and the levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hind paws of the carrageenan-treated rats were also analyzed. The results showed that Yanshu significantly reduced ear edema in the mice and paw edema in the rats. Furthermore, treatment with Yanshu also reduced the number of inflammatory cells in tissue and decreased the production of PGE2 and COX-2. These results suggest that Yanshu possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity mediated by the inhibition of COX-2 expression which, in turn, downregulates the inflammatory mediator PGE2. PMID:23251244

  6. Gas kinematics on giant molecular cloud scales in M51 with PAWS: Cloud stabilization through dynamical pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jérôme; Schuster, Karl F.; Dumas, Galle; Dobbs, Clare L.; Kramer, Carsten; Leroy, Adam K.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-12-10

    We use the high spatial and spectral resolution of the PAWS CO(1-0) survey of the inner 9 kpc of the iconic spiral galaxy M51 to examine the effects of gas streaming motions on the star-forming properties of individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We compare our view of gas flows in M51—which arise due to departures from axisymmetry in the gravitational potential (i.e., the nuclear bar and spiral arms)—with the global pattern of star formation as traced by Hα and 24 μm emission. We find that the dynamical environment of GMCs strongly affects their ability to form stars, in the sense that GMCs situated in regions with large streaming motions can be stabilized, while similarly massive GMCs in regions without streaming go on to efficiently form stars. We argue that this is the result of reduced surface pressure felt by clouds embedded in an ambient medium undergoing large streaming motions, which prevent collapse. Indeed, the variation in gas depletion time expected based on the observed streaming motions throughout the disk of M51 quantitatively agrees with the variation in the observed gas depletion time scale. The example of M51 shows that streaming motions, triggered by gravitational instabilities in the form of bars and spiral arms, can alter the star formation law; this can explain the variation in gas depletion time among galaxies with different masses and morphologies. In particular, we can explain the long gas depletion times in spiral galaxies compared with dwarf galaxies and starbursts. We suggest that adding a dynamical pressure term to the canonical free-fall time produces a single star formation law that can be applied to all star-forming regions and galaxies across cosmic time.

  7. Naringenin reduces inflammatory pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Zarpelon, Ana C; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Mizokami, Sandra S; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-01

    Naringenin is a flavonoid widely consumed by humans that present anti-inflammatory activity and low toxicity. Recently, the analgesic effect of naringenin has been demonstrated in neuropathic pain models. Herein, we tested the analgesic effects of naringenin in several models of inflammatory pain. Mice received treatment with naringenin (16.7-150 mg/kg, per oral), or with the controls anti-inflammatory drugs indomethacin (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or dipyrone (80 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) prior the inflammatory stimuli injection. For acute pain, we used acetic acid- and PBQ-induced visceral pain (abdominal writhings), and formalin-, capsaicin-, and CFA-induced paw flinching and licking. By using an electronic version of von Frey filaments, we also investigated the effects of naringenin in pain intensity to a mechanical stimulus (mechanical hyperalgesia) after carrageenan, capsaicin, CFA, or PGE2 intraplantar injection. Naringenin (50 mg/kg) reduced acute pain behaviors induced by all tested stimuli, including both phases of formalin test, suggesting a direct nociceptor modulatory effect of this compound besides its anti-inflammatory activity. Accordingly, naringenin also inhibited the increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulus induced by carrageenan, capsaicin, and PGE2. Daily treatment with naringenin during 7 days also reduced CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia without gastric or hepatic toxicity. The mechanisms of naringenin involve the inhibition of carrageenan-induced oxidative stress, hyperalgesic cytokines (IL-33, TNF-α, and IL-1β) production and NF-κB activation in the paw skin. Naringenin also activated the analgesic NO-cyclic GMP-PKG-ATP sensitive K(+) channel signaling pathway to inhibit carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment. These results suggest that naringenin inhibits both inflammatory pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:26907804

  8. Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of the ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta Gaertn. f. resin.

    PubMed

    Wani, T A; Chandrashekara, H H; Kumar, D; Prasad, R; Sardar, K K; Kumar, D; Tandan, S K

    2012-12-01

    Shorea robusta Gaertn. f. (Sal) is one of the most important traditional Indian medicinal plants. The resin of the plant has been used in the treatment of inflammation in folklore medicine. In the present study, ethanolic extract (70%) of S. robusta resin (SRE) was investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities. Acute inflammation was produced by carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and sub-acute by cotton pellet-induced granuloma in male Wistar rats. The antipyretic activity of SRE was studied using Brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. The rats were divided into five groups with five animals in each group. Group I was treated with vehicle i.e. 1% v/v Tween-80 and served as control. Groups II to IV were treated with three different doses of SRE (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg orally). Group V was treated with standard drug etoricoxib (10 mg/kg orally). The anti-inflammatory activity of SRE was assessed by per cent reduction in edema volume of carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and by per cent decrease in granuloma formation in cotton pellet-induced granuloma test. SRE (100 and 300 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction in edema volume and decrease in granulation tissue formation in rats. Significant reduction in pyrexia was observed at all the dose levels of SRE i.e. 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg. The results of the present study demonstrated anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of S. robusta resin and supported its traditional therapeutic use in painful inflammatory conditions and fever. PMID:23350282

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  11. Upregulation of B1 receptor mediating des-Arg9-BK-induced rat paw oedema by systemic treatment with bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Campos, M M; Souza, G E; Calixto, J B

    1996-03-01

    1. The effect of pretreatment with bacterial endotoxin (LPS, 10 micrograms, i.v., 24 h) on the bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor-induced oedema in the rat paw, and the interaction of B1-mediated responses with other inflammatory mediators, was investigated. 2. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of the selective B1 agonist, des-Arg9-BK (DABK, 100 nmol) in naive animals pretreated with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril caused a small increase in paw volume (0.04 +/- 0.003 ml, mean +/- s.e. mean, n = 6), while the B2-selective agonist, tyrosine8-bradykinin (T-BK, 3 nmol) induced marked oedema (0.36 +/- 0.02 ml). However, i.pl. injection of DABK (3-300 nmol) in rats pretreated with LPS (24 h beforehand) resulted in a marked dose- and time-related increase in paw volume, with mean ED50 of 24.1 nmol. In contrast, oedema caused by T-BK (3 nmol) was reduced by 79 +/- 4% in animals treated with LPS when compared with naive animals. 3. Oedema caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 10 nmol) was unaffected by LPS treatment, while oedema induced by histamine (100 nmol), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 nmol) and substance P (SP, 3 nmol) was reduced (P < 0.05). 4. The selective B1 antagonist, des-Arg9[Leu8]-BK (100-300 nmol), produced dose-dependent inhibition of DABK (100 nmol)-induced paw oedema in LPS-treated animals with mean IC50 of 134 nmol, while the selective B2 antagonists, Hoe 140 and NPC 17731 (each 10 nmol), had no effect. 5. Treatment of animals with dexamethasone (0.5 mg kg-1, s.c.) 24 or 48 h prior to LPS injection resulted in a graded inhibition of DABK (100 nmol)-induced oedema formation (58 +/- 3 and 82 +/- 2%, respectively), and almost reversed to control value oedema formation induced by T-BK (3 nmol) in LPS-pretreated rats. Cycloheximide (1 mg kg-1, s.c.) or indomethacin (2 mg kg-1, i.p.) pretreatment 24 and 1 h prior to LPS injection, respectively, markedly inhibited DABK (100 nmol)-induced paw oedema (98 +/- 2 and 50 +/- 4%, respectively). 6

  12. Study on anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of clomipramine in carrageenan- and lipopolysaccharide-induced rat models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Ilia; Delev, Delian; Petrova, Atanaska; Stanimirova, Irina; Draganova, Krassimira; Kostadinova, Ivanka; Murdjeva, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of clomipramine in carrageenan- and lipopolysaccharide-induced (LPS-induced) models of inflammation by investigating the changes in serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β after single and repeated administration of the drug. In order to study the effect of single and repeated doses of clomipramine on carrageenan-induced paw oedema, male Wistar rats were divided in five groups (n = 8): control, positive control group and three experimental groups treated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine, respectively. The effect of single and repeated doses of clomipramine on serum cytokine levels was studied as animals were divided in four groups: two control groups treated with saline and two experimental groups treated with clomipramine 20 mg/kg bw. Carrageenan and LPS were injected immediately after clomipramine or saline injection. Serum cytokine concentrations were tested by enzyme immunoassay. Following acute administration only the highest dose that was used inhibited the carrageenan-induced inflammation. Oedema inhibition was observed with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine after repeated administration. Single and repeated administration of clomipramine at a dose of 20 mg/kg bw did not significantly change the serum levels of TGF-1β, IL-10 and TNF-α when compared to the controls in carrageenan-induced inflammation. Following LPS-induced inflammation clomipramine significantly increased the serum levels of TGF-1β after repeated administration and decreased TNF-α in rats after single-dose and repeated pretreatment with 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine. A significant increase in the levels of IL-10 in relation to this inflammatory model was observed only in single dose treated animals. Clomipramine possesses an anti-inflammatory effect in the carrageenan-induced model of exudative inflammation. In LPS-induced inflammation

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of betalain-rich dye of Beta vulgaris: effect on edema, leukocyte recruitment, superoxide anion and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Renata M; Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T; Zarpelon, Ana C; Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Sassonia, Rogério C; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2015-04-01

    We have recently developed betalain-rich beetroot (Beta vulgaris) dye (betalain) to be used in food products. Betalain (30-300 mg/kg) intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment diminished carrageenan (100 µg/paw)-induced paw edema and neutrophil migration to the paw skin tissue. Betalain (100 mg/kg) treatment by subcutaneous or per oral routes also inhibited the carrageenan-induced paw edema. Importantly, the post-treatment with betalain (100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited carrageenan- and complete Freund's adjuvant (10 µl/paw)-induced paw edema. Betalain (100 mg/kg) also reduced carrageenan (500 µg/cavity)-induced recruitment of total leukocytes, including mononuclear cells and neutrophils, as well as increasing vascular permeability in the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, betalain significantly reduced carrageenan-induced superoxide anion, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β levels in the peritoneal fluid, as well as augmenting IL-10 levels. Therefore, this compound presents prominent anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema and peritonitis by reducing the production of superoxide anion and the cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, in addition to increasing IL-10 levels. These results suggest that betalain shows therapeutic potential that could be utilized in the treatment of inflammation-associated diseases. PMID:25173360

  14. Bioactivities of the ethanol extract from Ageratum fastigiatum branches: antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory.

    PubMed

    Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; Santos, Bruna C S; Alves, Maria Silvana; Araújo, Aílson L A; Yamamoto, Célia H; Pinto, Míriam A O; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C; Sousa, Orlando V

    2016-07-11

    The present study was designed to investigate the antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanol extract from Ageratum fastigiatum branches. Phytochemical screening and total phenol and flavonoid contents were determined. The antioxidant activity was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-pycrilhydrazin (DPPH) and iron reducing power methods. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, hot plate and tail immersion assays; while the carrageenan-induced paw edema and pleurisy tests were performed to examine the anti-inflammatory activity against acute inflammation. The extract revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, terpenes, sterols and saponins. Expressive levels of total phenols and flavonoids and a promising antioxidant effect were quantified. At the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, the extract inhibited the writhing, reduced both phases of paw licking time and increased the reaction time on the hot plate. In the tail immersion test, the extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) caused a significant inhibition of pain. In these doses, the paw edema, exudate volume and leucocyte mobilization were significantly reduced. These results suggest that A. fastigiatum can be an active source of substances with antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, adding scientific support to the appropriate use in the Brazilian folk medicine. PMID:27411067

  15. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF THE BARK OF FICUS BENGALENSIS IN PLANTS OF DIFFERENT AGE

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vikas V.; Patil, Vijay R.

    2010-01-01

    The medicinal plants have been selected for thorough studies from indigenous folk medicines, Ayurvedic, Unani and Siddha systems of medicines. The aim of this study deals with the comparative evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of the bark of Ficus bengalensis in plants of different age. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by rat paw edema model induced by carrageenan for acute inflammation and cotton pellet granuloma model for chronic inflammation. Indomethacin was used as a standard drug. The various extracts were studied for their anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats and the paw volume was measured plethysmometrically from 0 to 3h after injection. We have determined the anti-inflammatory activity of various extracts of the bark of Ficus bengalensis with oral administration doses of 300 and 600 mg/kg/day of body weight to healthy animals. Positive results for flavonoids, sterols, and triterpene, tannins and saponins compounds were investigated by phytochemical analysis. The ethanolic extract of younger plant showed a greater anti-inflammatory effect compared with the standard drug indomethacin. Present studies besides confirming anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanolic extract of younger more potent than mature plant help to identify from the comparative study of the bark of Ficus bengalensis. PMID:24825975

  16. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Solanum xanthocarpum Schrad and Wendl (Kaṇṭakāri) extract in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    More, Shraddha K.; Lande, Anirudha A.; Jagdale, Priti G.; Adkar, Prafulla P.; Ambavade, Shirishkumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Solanum xanthocarpum Schrad and Wendl (Kaṇṭakāri) is a diffuse herb with prickly stem, traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation and one in the group of daśamūla (group of ten herbs) herbs commonly used drug in Ayurveda. Aims: In continuation of search for potent natural anti-inflammatory agents, the present research work was planned to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ethanol extract of S. xanthocarpum whole plant. Settings and Design: The ethanol extract was evaluated at dose 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg p.o. in rats. Materials and Methods: Using pharmacological screening models carrageenan induced rat paw edema, histamine induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Dunnett test, P < 0.05 is considered as statistically significant. Results: Acute treatment didn’t show anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan and histamine induced paw edema. However, administration of 100 mg/kg p.o for 7 day reduced the granuloma formation in cotton pellet granuloma model. Conclusions: Present results support the traditional use of plant for anti-inflammatory activity. In brief, the results provide scientific pharmacological basis for the therapeutic use of S. xanthocarpum. PMID:24991071

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of erycristagallin, a pterocarpene from Erythrina mildbraedii.

    PubMed

    Njamen, Dieudonné; Talla, Emmanuel; Mbafor, Joseph Tanyi; Fomum, Zacharias Tanee; Kamanyi, Albert; Mbanya, Jean-Claude; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Giner, Rosa M; Recio, M Carmen; Ríos, José Luis

    2003-05-01

    Erycristagallin, a pterocarpene isolated from Erythrina mildbraedii, was tested in vitro for its antioxidant properties on the stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-pycryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical and on the arachidonic acid metabolism. In addition, erycristagallin was tested on different experimental models of inflammation, such as the acute and chronic inflammation induced by the application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on mice and the phospholipase A(2)-induced mouse paw oedema test. In the carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema test, the ethyl acetate extract obtained from E. mildbraedii showed anti-inflammatory activity, and erycristagallin was isolated as the active principle. In vivo, erycristagallin significantly inhibited the phospholipase A(2)-induced mouse paw oedema as well as the mouse ear oedema induced by TPA (ID(50)<10 microg/ear). Moreover, it significantly reduced the chronic inflammation and leukocyte infiltration induced by repeated application of TPA. In vitro, erycristagallin inhibited the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 5-lipoxygenase pathway in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (IC(50)=23.4 microM), but had no effect on cyclooxygenase-1 metabolism in human platelets, while showing antioxidant activity in the DPPH test. As with other phenolics, the anti-inflammatory activity of erycristagallin may be based on its capacity to inhibit the arachidonic acid metabolism via the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. PMID:12729844

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity and chemical composition of the essential oils from Senecio flammeus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Kai-Jun; Wang, Wen-Xia; Dai, Jia-Li; Zhu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Many species from Senecio genus have been used in traditional medicine, and their pharmacological activities have been demonstrated. This study investigated the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activities of essential oils from Senecio flammeus. A total of 48 components representing 98.41 % of the total oils were identified. The main compounds in the oils were α-farnesene (11.26 %), caryophyllene (8.69 %), n-hexadecanoic acid (7.23 %), and α-pinene (6.36 %). The anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oils was evaluated in rodents (10–90 mg/kg bw) in classical models of inflammation [carrageenan-induced paw edema, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma]. The essential oils at doses of 10, 30, and 90 mg/kg bw significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema by 17.42 % (P < 0.05), 52.90 % (P < 0.05), and 66.45 % (P < 0.05) 4 h after carrageenan injection, respectively, and significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity (P < 0.05). The essential oils (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg) also produced a significant dose-dependent response to reduce TPA-induced ear edema by 20.27 % (P < 0.05), 33.06 % (P < 0.05), and 53.90 % (P < 0.05), respectively. The essential oils produced significant dose-response anti-inflammatory activity against cotton pellet-induced granuloma that peaked at the highest dose of 90 mg/kg (49.08 % wet weight and 47.29 % dry weight). Results demonstrate that the essential oils of S. flammeus were effective in the treatment of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, thereby supporting the traditional use of this herb. PMID:26417301

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity and chemical composition of the essential oils from Senecio flammeus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kai-Jun; Wang, Wen-Xia; Dai, Jia-Li; Zhu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Many species from Senecio genus have been used in traditional medicine, and their pharmacological activities have been demonstrated. This study investigated the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activities of essential oils from Senecio flammeus. A total of 48 components representing 98.41 % of the total oils were identified. The main compounds in the oils were α-farnesene (11.26 %), caryophyllene (8.69 %), n-hexadecanoic acid (7.23 %), and α-pinene (6.36 %). The anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oils was evaluated in rodents (10-90 mg/kg bw) in classical models of inflammation [carrageenan-induced paw edema, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema, and cotton pellet-induced granuloma]. The essential oils at doses of 10, 30, and 90 mg/kg bw significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema by 17.42 % (P < 0.05), 52.90 % (P < 0.05), and 66.45 % (P < 0.05) 4 h after carrageenan injection, respectively, and significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity (P < 0.05). The essential oils (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg) also produced a significant dose-dependent response to reduce TPA-induced ear edema by 20.27 % (P < 0.05), 33.06 % (P < 0.05), and 53.90 % (P < 0.05), respectively. The essential oils produced significant dose-response anti-inflammatory activity against cotton pellet-induced granuloma that peaked at the highest dose of 90 mg/kg (49.08 % wet weight and 47.29 % dry weight). Results demonstrate that the essential oils of S. flammeus were effective in the treatment of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, thereby supporting the traditional use of this herb. PMID:26417301

  1. A Comparison of Spinal Iba1 and GFAP expression in Rodent Models of Acute and Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Sandoval, Alfonso; Chai, Nu; Nutile-McMenemy, Nancy; DeLeo, Joyce A.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of acute and chronic pain is still deficient. The modulation of glial cells may provide novel targets to treat pain. We hypothesize that astrocytes and microglia participate in the initiation and maintenance of both, acute surgical and chronic neuropathic pain. Rats underwent paw incision, L5 nerve exposure or L5 nerve transection surgery. Behavioral mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-ionized calcium binding adaptor protein, Iba-1 (microglia), and anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP (astrocytes) on day 1, 4 and 7 after surgery. Following paw incision and at spinal L5 segment GFAP expression was increased in laminae I-II and Iba1 in deep laminae on day 1, in the entire dorsal horn on day 4 and dissipate on day 7 after paw incision in parallel with the allodynia. L5 nerve transection induced mechanical allodynia from day 1 to 7 which correlated with Iba-1 increases on day 1, 4 (entire dorsal horn) and day 7 after nerve injury (deep laminae of the dorsal horn) at spinal L5 segment. Conversely, GFAP increased at later time points from day 4 (deep laminae) and on day 7 (entire dorsal horn). Our data demonstrates that astrocytes (GFAP expression) play a role in the initiation of acute pain and the maintenance of chronic pain while Iba-1 increases closely correlated with the early phase of neuropathic pain. Iba1 and GFAP increased rostrally, at L3 segment, after paw incision (day 4) and only Iba1 increased following L5 nerve transection (day 7). PMID:18538310

  2. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  3. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  4. Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. attenuates the inflammatory response to carrageenan-induced pleurisy in mice.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Gustavo Oliveira; Vicente, Geison; de Carvalho, Francieli Kanumfre; Heller, Melina; Micke, Gustavo Amadeu; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) from the aerial parts of Croton antisyphiliticus, its fractions and isolated compounds derived from it on the mouse model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan. The aerial parts of C. antisyphiliticus were dried, macerated and extracted with ethanol to obtain the CHE, which was fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction using solvents with increasing polarity to obtain hexane (Hex), ethyl acetate (EA) and aqueous (Aq) fractions. Vitexin and quinic acid were isolated from Aq fraction. Capillary electrophoresis analysis, physical characteristics and spectral data produced by infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H and (13)C NMR) and mass spectrometry analyses were used to identify and elucidate the structure of the isolated compounds. The experimental model of pleurisy was induced in mice by a single intrapleural injection of carrageenan (1 %). Leukocytes, exudate concentrations, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and adenosine-deaminase (ADA) activities and nitrate/nitrite (NOx), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels were determined in the pleural fluid leakage at 4 h after pleurisy induction. Animals pre-treated with CHE, Hex, EA, Aq, vitexin and quinic acid exhibited decreases in leukocytes, exudate concentrations, MPO and ADA activities and NOx levels (p < 0.05). Also CHE, Hex, EA and vitexin but not quinic acid inhibited TNF-α and IL-17 levels (p < 0.05). C. antisyphiliticus caused anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the activated leukocytes, exudate concentrations, NOx, TNF-α, and IL-17 levels. The compounds vitexin and quinic acid may be responsible for this anti-inflammatory action. PMID:23990384

  5. Carrageenan-induced ulceration of the large intestine in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1971-02-01

    A 5% aqueous solution of degraded carrageenan derived from the red seaweed Eucheuma spinosum was fed to guinea pigs in their drinking water over a period of 20-45 days. Occult blood in the faeces and multiple ulcers in the caecum, colon and rectum occurred in 100% of animals by the 30th day. The clinical and pathological features bear a close resemblance to human ulcerative colitis. The method provides a simple experimental model for the study of various aspects of the pathology of ulcerative lesions in the large intestine as well as the effects of therapeutic agents. PMID:5548564

  6. Dual effects of a homeopathic mineral complex on carrageenan-induced oedema in rats.

    PubMed

    Bertani, S; Lussignoli, S; Andrioli, G; Bellavite, P; Conforti, A

    1999-07-01

    Carrageenan oedema, a classical experimental model commonly used to test activity of anti-inflammatory drugs, was used to evaluate the therapeutic activity of a low-potency mineral complex (MC). The MC was administered in the right plantar surface of albino rats 60 min before, simultaneously and 30 min after injection of carrageenan, an irritant which causes a local, transitory increase of fluid volume. The administration of the MC 60 min before the injection of carrageenan primed the animal to enhanced inflammatory response to the irritant. The administration of MC contemporarily to carrageenan did not modify the kinetic and the extent of the oedema, while the administration of the MC 30 min after the induction of the oedema significantly reduced the early phase of the inflammatory reaction. This indicated that the therapeutic action of this MC is not due to conventional anti-inflammatory effect but to activation of endogenous regulatory mechanisms, a phenomenon which may be regarded as a simple application of the 'similia rule'. PMID:10449049

  7. Carrageenan Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Vitro1–3

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies in animal models have shown that the commonly used food additive carrageenan (CGN) induces inflammation and intestinal neoplasia. We performed the first studies to determine the effects of CGN exposure on human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in tissue culture and tested the effect of very low concentrations (1–10 mg/L) of undegraded, high-molecular weight CGN. These concentrations of CGN are less than the anticipated exposure of the human colon to CGN from the average Western diet. In the human colonic epithelial cell line NCM460 and in primary human colonic epithelial cells that were exposed to CGN for 1–8 d, we found increased cell death, reduced cell proliferation, and cell cycle arrest compared with unexposed control cells. After 6–8 d of CGN exposure, the percentage of cells reentering G0–G1 significantly decreased and the percentages of cells in S and G2-M phases significantly increased. Increases in activated p53, p21, and p15 followed CGN exposure, consistent with CGN-induced cell cycle arrest. Additional data, including DNA ladder, poly ADP ribose polymerase Western blot, nuclear DNA staining, and activities of caspases 3 and 7, indicated no evidence of increased apoptosis following CGN exposure and were consistent with CGN-induced necrotic cell death. These data document for the first time, to our knowledge, marked adverse effects of low concentrations of CGN on survival of normal human IEC and suggest that CGN exposure may have a role in development of human intestinal pathology. PMID:18287351

  8. Probability Distribution Functions of 12CO(J = 1 → 0) Brightness and Integrated Intensity in M51: The PAWS View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Annie; Meidt, Sharon E.; Schinnerer, Eva; Colombo, Dario; Pety, Jerôme; Leroy, Adam K.; Dobbs, Clare L.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Thompson, Todd A.; Dumas, Gaëlle; Schuster, Karl F.; Kramer, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the distribution of CO brightness temperature and integrated intensity in M51 at ~40 pc resolution using new 12CO(J = 1 → 0) data from the Plateau de Bure Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS). We present probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the CO emission within the PAWS field of view, which covers the inner ~11 × 7 kpc of M51. We find clear variations in the shape of CO PDFs both within different M51 environments, defined according to dynamical criteria, and among M51 and two nearby low-mass galaxies, M33 and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Globally, the PDFs for the inner disk of M51 can be represented by narrow lognormal functions that cover ~1-2 orders of magnitude in CO brightness and integrated intensity. The PDFs for M33 and the LMC are narrower and peak at lower CO intensities, consistent with their lower gas surface densities. However, the CO PDFs for different dynamical environments within the PAWS field depart significantly from the shape of the global distribution. The PDFs for the interarm region are approximately lognormal, but in the spiral arms and central region of M51, they exhibit diverse shapes with a significant excess of bright CO emission. The observed environmental dependence on the shape of the CO PDFs is qualitatively consistent with changes that would be expected if molecular gas in the spiral arms is characterized by a larger range of average densities, gas temperatures, and velocity fluctuations, although further work is required to disentangle the relative importance of large-scale dynamical effects versus star formation feedback in regulating these properties. We show that the shape of the CO PDFs for different M51 environments is only weakly related to global properties of the CO emission, e.g., the total CO luminosity, but is strongly correlated with properties of the local giant molecular cloud (GMC) and young stellar cluster populations, including the shape of their mass distributions. For galaxies with

  9. Improvement of bioavailability and anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin in combination with emu oil.

    PubMed

    Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Shrivastava, Shweta; Nair, Kala; Singareddy, Sreenivasa Reddy; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Talluri, M V N Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of emu oil on bioavailability of curcumin when co-administered and to evaluate the property that enhances the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin. Oral bioavailability of curcumin in combination with emu oil was determined by measuring the plasma concentration of curcumin by HPLC. The anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated in carrageenan-induced paw edema model (acute model) and in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis model (chronic model) in male SD rats. The anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin in combination with emu oil has been significantly increased in both acute and chronic inflammatory models as evident from inhibition of increase in paw volume, arthritic score, and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The increased anti-inflammatory activity in combination therapy is due to enhanced bioavailability (5.2-fold compared to aqueous suspension) of curcumin by emu oil. Finally, it is concluded that the combination of emu oil with curcumin will be a promising approach for the treatment of arthritis. PMID:25028100

  10. Pharmacological evaluation of Mallotus philippinensis (Lam.) Muell.-Arg. fruit hair extract for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Ghildiyal, Shivani; Nath, Gopal; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently, we observed wound healing activity of 50% ethanol extract of Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP) fruit hairs extract (MPE). In several intestinal infections, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we evaluated the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE in different rat experimental models. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan (acute) and turpentine oil induced formalin (subacute) induced paw edema and while granuloma pouch (subacute) in rats. Analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE was undertaken by tail-flick, hot-plate, and acetic acid-induced writhing tests while pentobarbitone-induced hypnotic potentiation in rats. Results: MPE at a dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h after their administration showed inhibition of formalin-induced paw edema by 41.60% (P < 0.001) and carrageenan-induced paw edema by 55.30% (P < 0.001). After 7 days of treatments, MPE showed 38.0% (P < 0.001) inhibition against formalin-induced paw edema and reduced weight of turpentine-induced granuloma pouch by 29.6% (P < 0.01) and volume of exudates by 26.1% (P < 0.01), respectively. MPE (200 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 120 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail flick method and increased reaction time in the hot-plate test while the reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 45.7% (P < 0.001). The pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis model showed potentiation, as defined by increased duration of sleep in treated group rats as compared to control. Conclusion: Thus, the study revealed MPE is effective in reducing acute and subacute inflammation and showed effective and similar analgesic activity. This seemed to be safe in the treatment of pain and inflammation. PMID:27069718

  11. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of leaf extracts of Skimmia anquetilia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijender; Bhat, Zulfiqar Ali; Kumar, Dinesh; Khan, NA; Chashoo, IA

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate anti-inflammatory potential of leaf extract of Skimmia anquetilia by in-vitro and in-vivo anti-inflammatory models. Methods Acute toxicity study was carried out to determine the toxicity level of different extract using acute toxic class method as described in Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines No.423. Carrageenan (1% w/w) was administered and inflammation was induced in rat paw. The leaf extracts of Skimmia anquetilia were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by in-vitro human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane stabilization method and in-vivo carrangeenan-induced rat paw edema method. Results The in-vitro membrane stabilizing test showed petroleum ether (PE), chloroform (CE), ethyl acetate (EE), methanol (ME) and aqueous extracts (AE) showed 49.44%, 59.39%, 60.15%, 68.40% and 52.18 % protection, respectively as compared to control groups. The in-vivo results of CE, EE and ME showed 58.20%, 60.17% and 67.53% inhibition of inflammation after 6h administration of test drugs in albino rats. The potency of the leaf extracts of Skimmia anquetilia were compared with standard diclofenac (10 mg/kg) which showed 74.18% protection in in-vitro HRBC membrane stabilization test and 71.64% inhibition in in-vivo carrangeenan-induced rat paw edema model. The ME showed a dose dependent significant (P< 0.01) anti-inflammatory activity in human red blood cell membrane stabilization test and reduction of edema in carrageenan induced rat paw edema. Conclusions The present investigation has confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of Skimmia anquetilia due to presence of bioactive phytoconstitutes for the first time and provide the pharmacological evidence in favor of traditional claim of Skimmia anquetilia as an anti- inflammatory agent. PMID:23569983

  12. Biological activity of a small molecule indole analog, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH), in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chandra Sekhar; Gejjalagere Honnappa, Chethan; Jitta, Srinivas Reddy; Gourishetti, Karthik; Daram, Prasanthi; Singh, Mahendra Pal; Hosur Shrungeswara, Akhila; Nayak, Yogendra; Unnikrishnan, Mazhuvancherry Kesavan

    2016-01-25

    A synthetic small molecule, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH) was conveniently synthesised by a one-step reaction, purified and characterised by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. HMPH scavenged free radicals and inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ROS generation and NO release in RAW-264.7 cells without signs of any detectable cytotoxicity. HMPH inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) with IC50 of 135 ± 9 as against 58 ± 8 μM for α-tocopherol. Further, HMPH (>50 μM) significantly reduced the LPS-induced TNF-α release in mouse peritoneal macrophages and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HMPH did not show any visible signs of toxicity in rats up to 400 mg/kg/intraperitoneal and 2000 mg/kg/oral. HMPH at 25 and 50 mg/kg attenuated neutrophil infiltration in air-pouch lavage and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in rat models. HMPH also reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitrite and TNF-α in air-pouch lavage in addition to MPO in plasma. HMPH reduced acute paw-inflammation in carrageenan-induced paw-edema. HMPH consistently decreased both ipsilateral and contralateral paw inflammation, minimised the clinical scores of arthritis, prevented body weight (B.wt.) loss, attenuated serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and rheumatoid factors (RF) in rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Histopathology and radio-graphical reports show that HMPH reduced bone erosion in both ipsilateral and contralateral paw joints. Failure to inhibit COX suggests that effectiveness of HMPH in both acute and chronic inflammation is mediated by a multimodal mechanism involving modulation of immunity, attenuating TNF-α, protecting bone attrition and reducing oxidative stress. PMID:26549477

  13. Nuclear and mtDNA lineage diversity in wild and cultured Pacific lion-paw scallop, Nodipecten subnodosus (Baja California Peninsula, Mexico).

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jessica L; Ibarra, Ana Maria; May, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    Pacific lion-paw scallops were collected from natural aggregations in Laguna Ojo de Liebre (Pacific Ocean), the Gulf of California, and from aquaculture facilities for genetic diversity analyses. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing uncovered two highly supported clades separated by 2.5% divergence. Data from ten microsatellite markers suggest individuals from these mitogroups are introgressed, raising questions about the mitotype origin. Some evidence suggests gene flow between La Paz and Ojo de Liebre; otherwise the Gulf of California and Ojo de Liebre are acting as two distinct populations. It is unclear whether translocations between sites have influenced the observed genetic structure or whether gene flow has been facilitated by past geologic events. Finally, scallops spawned for aquaculture are unique from the wild and have significantly less diversity. These results warrant the attention of managers and producers who should work to monitor and conserve genetic diversity in both wild and aquaculture populations. PMID:24391254

  14. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  15. Angiotensin II receptor type 2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Many pain syndromes are associated with abnormal proliferation of peripheral sensory fibers. We showed previously that angiotensin II, acting through its type 2 receptor (AT2), stimulates axon outgrowth by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. In this study, we assessed whether AT2 mediates nociceptor hyperinnervation in the rodent hind paw model of inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), but not saline, produced marked thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity through 7 days. This was accompanied by proliferation of dermal and epidermal PGP9.5- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) axons, and dermal axons immunoreactive for GFRα2 but not tyrosine hydroxylase or neurofilament H. Continuous infusion of the AT2 antagonist PD123319 beginning with CFA injection completely prevented hyperinnervation as well as hypersensitivity over a 7 day period. A single PD123319 injection 7 days after CFA also reversed thermal hypersensitivity and partially reversed mechanical hypersensitivity 3 hours later, without affecting cutaneous innervation. Angiotensin II synthesizing proteins renin and angiotensinogen were largely absent after saline but abundant in T-cells and macrophages in CFA-injected paws with or without PD123319. Thus, emigrant cells at the site of inflammation apparently establish a renin-angiotensin system, and AT2 activation elicits nociceptor sprouting and heightened thermal and mechanical sensitivity. Perspective Short-term AT2 activation is a potent contributor to thermal hypersensitivity, while long-term effects (such as hyperinnervation) also contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity. Pharmacological blockade of AT2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at biological mechanisms underlying chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:23726047

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Property of the Ethanol Extract of the Root and Rhizome of Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu-Wen; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Su, Zu-Qing; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Li, Yu-Cui

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory property of the ethanol extract of the root and rhizome of Pogostemon cablin (ERP). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated using four animal models including xylene-induced mouse ear edema, acetic acid-induced mouse vascular permeability, carrageenan-induced mouse pleurisy, and carrageenan-induced mouse hind paw edema. Results indicated that oral administration of ERP (120, 240, and 480 mg/kg) significantly attenuated xylene-induced ear edema, decreased acetic acid-induced capillary permeability, inhibited carrageenan-induced neutrophils recruitment, and reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema, in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathologically, ERP (480 mg/kg) abated inflammatory response of the edema paw. Preliminary mechanism studies demonstrated that ERP decreased the level of MPO and MDA, increased the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx, and GRd), attenuated the productions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 and NO, and suppressed the activities of COX-2 and iNOS. This work demonstrates that ERP has considerable anti-inflammatory potential, which provided experimental evidences for the traditional application of the root and rhizome of Pogostemon cablin in inflammatory diseases. PMID:24385881

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of an orange peel polymethoxylated flavone, 3’,4’,3,5,6,7,8,-heptamethoxyflavone, in the rat carrageenan/paw edema and mouse LPS-challenge assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anti-inflammatory properties of 3',4',3,5,6,7,8-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF), a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, were studied in the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge/tumor necrosis factor-a (TNFa) response in mice, and in the carrageenan/paw edema assay in rats. In each of these trials,...

  18. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  19. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  20. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  1. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of Trichodesma indicum root extract in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Perianayagam, James B; Sharma, S K; Pillai, K K

    2006-04-01

    The chloroform extract of Trichodesma indicum root has been evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity against oedema produced by carrageenan, dextran, histamine and serotonin, and against formation of granulation tissues by cotton pellet in rats. The effect was compared with the activity of indomethacin, cyperoheptadine and dexamethasone against different types of inflammation. The chloroform extract at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg exhibited significant (P < 0.001) anti-inflammatory activity in acute and chronic inflammatory models. At 200 mg/kg the chloroform extract showed maximum inhibition of 48.12% in carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema while the standard indomethacin inhibited it by 54.32% after 3 h of carrageenan injection. The chloroform extract (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) and dose-dependently inhibited dextran, histamine and serotonin-induced rat paw oedema compared with control group (vehicle-treated). In the chronic inflammatory model, the chloroform extract (100 and 200 mg/kg) inhibited the granuloma weight by 15.42 and 21.12%, respectively, whereas the indomethacin and dexamethasone inhibited it by 29.29 and 34.13%, respectively. The results obtained suggest marked anti-inflammatory activity of the extract at the dose levels examined. PMID:16303271

  3. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  4. Pycnogonids associated with the giant lion´s-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus (Sowerby) in Ojo de Liebre Bay, Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    de León-Espinosa, Angel; de León-González, Jesus A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Five species of epibenthic pycnogonids collected on the giant lion´s-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus are recorded. A new species of Eurycyde, Eurycyde bamberi, is described. Of the 19 species known in this genus; the new species is closest to Eurycyde hispida Kroyer, 1844 but differs from it in the absence of plumose spines and the shapes of the lateral process, first coxa, and ocular tubercle. The new species represents the third member of Eurycyde from the eastern Pacific in addition to Eurycyde spinosa Hilton, 1916 and Eurycyde clitellaria Stock, 1955. Besides Eurycyde bamberi, the following species were collected: Nymphopsis duodorsospinosa Hilton, 1942c; Callipallene californiensis (Hall, 1913); Nymphon lituus Child, 1979; and Pycnogonum rickettsi Schmitt, 1934. Pycnogonum rickettsi is recorded for first time from Mexican waters, as is Nymphon lituus from the western coast of Baja California Peninsula. Each of these four species are re-described and re-illustrated in order to fill in existing gaps in the literature of the region. PMID:26692802

  5. Multi-laminated metal hydroxide nanocontainers for oral-specific delivery for bioavailability improvement and treatment of inflammatory paw edema in mice.

    PubMed

    Kankala, Ranjith Kumar; Kuthati, Yaswanth; Sie, Huei-Wun; Shih, Hung-Yuan; Lue, Sheng-I; Kankala, Shravankumar; Jeng, Chien-Chung; Deng, Jin-Pei; Weng, Ching-Feng; Liu, Chen-Lun; Lee, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-15

    Multiple layers of pH-sensitive enteric copolymers were coated over layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles for controllable drug release and improved solubility of hydrophobic drugs. The nano-sized LDH carriers significantly improved the accessibility of sulfasalazine molecules that have positively charged frameworks. In addition, the successful encapsulation of negatively charged enteric copolymers was achieved via electrostatic attractions. The multi-layered enteric polymer coating could potentially protect nanoparticle dissolution at gastric pH and accelerate the dissolution velocity, which would improve the drug bioavailability in the colon. Next, biological studies of this formulation indicated a highly protective effect from the scavenging of superoxide free radicals and diethyl maleate (DEM) induced lipid peroxidation, which are major cell signalling pathways for inflammation. The histological view of the liver and kidney sections revealed that the nanoformulation is safe and highly biocompatible. The animal studies conducted via paw inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) revealed that enteric-coated LDH-sulfasalazine nanoparticles provided a sustained release that maintained the sulfasalazine concentrations in a therapeutic window. Therefore, this nanoformulation exhibited preferential efficacy in reducing the CFA-induced inflammation especially at day 4. PMID:26225492

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6) algal oils reduce inflammatory mediators in human peripheral mononuclear cells in vitro and paw edema in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nauroth, Julie M; Liu, Ying Chun; Van Elswyk, Mary; Bell, Rebecca; Hall, Eileen Bailey; Chung, Gloria; Arterburn, Linda M

    2010-05-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity associated with fish oil has been ascribed to the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), predominantly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Here we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of two DHA-rich algal oils, which contain little EPA, and determined the contribution of the constituent fatty acids, particularly DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6). In vitro, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was inhibited with apparent relative potencies of DPAn-6 (most potent) > DHA > EPA. In addition, DPAn-6 decreased intracellular levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and was a potent inhibitor of pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. DHA/DPAn-6-rich DHA-S (DHA-S) algal oil was more effective at reducing edema in rats than DHA-rich DHA-T (DHA-T), suggesting that DPAn-6 has anti-inflammatory properties. Further in vivo analyses demonstrated that feeding DPAn-6 alone, provided as an ethyl ester, reduced paw edema to an extent approaching that of indomethacin and enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of DHA when given in combination. Together, these results demonstrate that DPAn-6 has anti-inflammatory activity and enhances the effect of DHA in vitro and in vivo. Thus, DHA-S algal oil may have potential for use in anti-inflammatory applications. PMID:20364438

  7. Pycnogonids associated with the giant lion´s-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus (Sowerby) in Ojo de Liebre Bay, Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

    PubMed

    de León-Espinosa, Angel; de León-González, Jesus A

    2015-01-01

    Five species of epibenthic pycnogonids collected on the giant lion´s-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus are recorded. A new species of Eurycyde, Eurycyde bamberi, is described. Of the 19 species known in this genus; the new species is closest to Eurycyde hispida Kroyer, 1844 but differs from it in the absence of plumose spines and the shapes of the lateral process, first coxa, and ocular tubercle. The new species represents the third member of Eurycyde from the eastern Pacific in addition to Eurycyde spinosa Hilton, 1916 and Eurycyde clitellaria Stock, 1955. Besides Eurycyde bamberi, the following species were collected: Nymphopsis duodorsospinosa Hilton, 1942c; Callipallene californiensis (Hall, 1913); Nymphon lituus Child, 1979; and Pycnogonum rickettsi Schmitt, 1934. Pycnogonum rickettsi is recorded for first time from Mexican waters, as is Nymphon lituus from the western coast of Baja California Peninsula. Each of these four species are re-described and re-illustrated in order to fill in existing gaps in the literature of the region. PMID:26692802

  8. Cromoglycate and nedocromil enhanced the reactive oxygen species-dependent suppressions with, but not without, dexamethasone in ischaemic and histamine paw oedema of mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyanagui, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory actions of two anti-allergic drugs, alone or with dexamethasone (Dex) were examined in two models, because inflammation is claimed to be important for allergic events, especially for asthma. Cromoglycate and nedocromil were tested in ischaemic- and histamineinduced paw oedema models of mice. These antiallergic drugs (1–100 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to suppress these oedemata, but enhanced the suppressions by a low dose of dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) at 3–8 h after Dex injection. The mode of effects by anti-allergic drugs resembled that of a natural antioxidant (α-tocopherol, β-carotene etc.), and was different from that of an immunosuppressant like FK506. The enhancing potencies of the two anti-allergic drugs were similar at 6 h after Dex in both oedemata, and were diminished by superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase (i.p.). Cycloheximide completely abolished suppressions. Nedocromil, but not cromoglycate, inhibits inflammatory events. Therefore, there are common unknown actions by which the two anti-allergics enhance suppression by Dex. A possible mechanism of this action was supposed to enhance the superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide-dependent glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signalling in the target cells. PMID:18472872

  9. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  10. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ketoprofen in palm oil esters nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Sakeena, M H F; Yam, M F; Elrashid, S M; Munavvar, A S; Azmin, M N

    2010-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been used in the treatment of various kinds of pains, inflammation and arthritis. However, oral administration of ketoprofen produces serious gastrointestinal adverse effects. One of the promising methods to overcome these adverse effects is to administer the drug through the skin. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects from topically applied ketoprofen entrapped palm oil esters (POEs) based nanoemulsion and to compare with market ketoprofen product, Fastum(®) gel. The novelty of this study is, use of POEs for the oil phase of nanoemulsion. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic studies were performed on rats by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema test and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold test to compare the ketoprofen entrapped POEs based nanoemulsion formulation and market formulation. Results indicated that there are no significant different between ketoprofen entrapped POEs nanoemulsion and market formulation in carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema study and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold study. However, it shows a significant different between POEs nanoemulsion formulation and control group in these studies at p<0.05. From these results it was concluded that the developed nanoemulsion have great potential for topical application of ketoprofen. PMID:21099145

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of epiisopiloturine, an imidazole alkaloid isolated from Pilocarpus microphyllus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valdelânia G; Silva, Renan O; Damasceno, Samara R B; Carvalho, Nathalia S; Prudêncio, Rafael S; Aragão, Karoline S; Guimarães, Maria A; Campos, Stefano A; Véras, Leiz M C; Godejohann, Markus; Leite, José Roberto S A; Barbosa, André L R; Medeiros, Jand-Venes R

    2013-06-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of epiisopiloturine (1), an imidazole alkaloid found in the leaves of Pilocarpus microphyllus. The anti-inflammatory activity of 1 was evaluated using several agents that induce paw edema and peritonitis in Swiss mice. Paw tissue and peritoneal fluid samples were obtained to determine myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β levels. The antinociceptive activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing, the hot plate test, and pain induction using formalin. Compared to vehicle treatment, pretreatment with 1 (0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg, ip) of mice significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.05). Furthermore, compound 1 at a dose of 1 mg/kg effectively inhibited edema induced by dextran sulfate, serotonin, and bradykinin, but had no effect on histamine-induced edema. The administration of 1 (1 mg/kg) following carrageenan-induced peritonitis reduced total and differential peritoneal leukocyte counts and also carrageenan-induced paw MPO activity and TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the peritoneal cavity. Pretreatment with 1 also reduced acetic acid-induced writhing and inhibited the first and second phases of the formalin test, but did not alter response latency in the hot plate test. Pretreatment with naloxone reversed the antinociceptive effect of 1. PMID:23734744

  12. Understanding hydrologic budgets, dynamics in an arid basin and explore spatial scaling properties using Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator (PAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, K.; Shen, C.; Salve, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern California hot desert hosts a fragile ecosystem as well as a range of human economic activities, primarily mining, energy production and recreation. This inland arid landscape is characterized by occasional intensive precipitation events and year-round strong potential evapotranspiration. In this landscape, water and especially groundwater is vital for ecosystem functions and human use. However, the impact of recent development on the sustainability of groundwater resources in the area has not been thoroughly investigated. We apply an integrated, physically-based hydrologic-land surface model, the Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator + Community Land Model (PAWS+CLM) to evaluate the sustainability of the groundwater resources in the area. We elucidate the spatio-temporal patterns of hydrologic fluxes and budgets. The modeling results indicate that mountain front recharge is the essential recharging mechanism for the alluvial aquifer. Although pumping activities do not exceed annual-average recharge values, they are still expected to contribute significantly to groundwater drawdown in business-as-usual scenario. The impact of groundwater withdrawals is significant on the desert ecosystem. The relative importance of groundwater flow on NPP rises significantly as compared to other ecosystems. We further evaluate the fractal scaling properties of soil moisture in this very arid system and found the relationship to be much more static in time than that found in a humid continental climate system. The scaling exponents can be predicted using simple functions of the mean. Therefore, multi-scale model based on coarse-resolution surrogate model is expected to perform well in this system. The modeling result is also important for assessing the groundwater sustainability and impact of human activities in the desert environment.

  13. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  14. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  15. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  16. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  17. Plant Derived Aporphinic Alkaloid S-(+)-Dicentrine Induces Antinociceptive Effect in Both Acute and Chronic Inflammatory Pain Models: Evidence for a Role of TRPA1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, Deise Prehs; Córdova, Marina Machado; Soares Santos, Adair Roberto

    2013-01-01

    S-(+)-Dicentrine is an aporphinic alkaloid found in several plant species, mainly from Lauraceae family, which showed significant antinociceptive activity in an acute model of visceral pain in mice. In this work, we extended the knowledge on the antinociceptive properties of S-(+)-dicentrine and showed that this alkaloid also attenuates mechanical and cold hypersensitivity associated with cutaneous inflammation induced by Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in mice. Given orally, S-(+)-dicentrine (100 mg/kg) reversed CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, evaluated as the paw withdrawal threshold to von Frey hairs, and this effect lasted up to 2 hours. S-(+)-Dicentrine also reversed CFA-induced cold hypersensitivity, assessed as the responses to a drop of acetone in the injured paw, but did not reverse the heat hypersensitivity, evaluated as the latency time to paw withdrawal in the hot plate (50°C). Moreover, S-(+)-dicentrine (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was effective in inhibit nociceptive responses to intraplantar injections of cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 activator, but not the responses induced by capsaicin, a TRPV1 activator. When administered either by oral or intraplantar routes, S-(+)-dicentrine reduced the licking time (spontaneous nociception) and increased the latency time to paw withdrawal in the cold plate (cold hypersensitivity), both induced by the intraplantar injection of cinnamaldehyde. Taken together, our data adds information about antinociceptive properties of S-(+)-dicentrine in inflammatory conditions, reducing spontaneous nociception and attenuating mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, probably via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism. It also indicates that S-(+)-dicentrine might be potentially interesting in the development of new clinically relevant drugs for the management of persistent pain, especially under inflammatory conditions. PMID:23861794

  18. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2012-06-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent-onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:22515999

  19. [Acute myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Combes, Alain

    2013-05-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Acute myocarditis must be considered in patients who present with recent onset of cardiac failure or arrhythmia. Fulminant myocarditis is a distinct entity characterized by sudden onset of severe congestive heart failure or cardiogenic shock, usually following a flu-like illness, parvovirus B19, human herpesvirus 6, coxsackievirus and adenovirus being the most frequently viruses responsible for the disease. Treatment of myocarditis remains largely supportive, since immunosuppression has not been proven to be beneficial for acute lymphocytic myocarditis. Trials of antiviral therapies, or immunostimulants such as interferons, suggest a potential therapeutic role but require further investigation. Lastly, early recognition of patients rapidly progressing to refractory cardiac failure and their immediate transfer to a medical-surgical center experienced in mechanical circulatory support is warranted. In this setting, ECMO should be the first-line mechanical assistance. For highly unstable patients, a Mobile Cardiac Assistance Unit, that rapidly travels to primary care hospitals with a portable ECMO system and hooks it up before refractory multiorgan failure takes hold, is the preferred option. PMID:23789482

  20. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of a novel steroidal derivative from Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Gupta, Gaurav; Kazmi, Imran; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Afzal, Obaid; Alam, Jahangir; Hakeem, Khalidur Rahman; Pravez, Mohammad; Gupta, Ritu; Anwar, Firoz

    2012-07-01

    A new steroidal derivative, urs Stigmast-4, 20 (21), 23-trien-3-one and other four compounds were isolated from the leaves of Bryophyllum pinnatum. The structure of this new steroid was elucidated and established by standard spectroscopic methods. Carrageenan induced paw edema model was used for anti-inflammatory and acetic acid induced model used for analgesic activity. This new steroidal compound was found to be active in reducing inflammation (% inhibition 87.29 and 84.45 respectively) when compared with diclofenac. Further, it showed 75.72% protection in analgesic activity in acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. In conclusion the % inhibition against carrageenan induced rat paw edema and % protection against acetic acid induced writhings showed by new compound revealed that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of aqueous extract B. pinnatum are mainly due to the presence of this steroidal compound. PMID:22465504

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  2. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Otitis media - acute; Infection - inner ear; Middle ear infection - acute ... Casselbrandt ML, Mandel EM. Acute otitis media and otitis media with effusion. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  3. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 gene deficiency attenuates nociceptive behaviors in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Rahman, Md Habibur; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) 1-4, expressed in peripheral and central tissues, regulate the activity of the PDH complex (PDC). The PDC is an important mitochondrial gatekeeping enzyme that controls cellular metabolism. The role of PDKs in diverse neurological disorders, including neurometabolic aberrations and neurodegeneration, has been described. Implications for a role of PDKs in inflammation and neurometabolic coupling led us to investigate the effect of genetic ablation of PDK2/4 on nociception in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain. Deficiency in Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice led to attenuation of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors (flinching, licking, biting, or lifting of the injected paw). Likewise, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs substantially diminished the nociceptive responses in the second phase of the formalin test. Furthermore, formalin-provoked paw edema formation and mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities were significantly reduced in Pdk2/4-deficient mice. Formalin-driven neutrophil recruitment at the site of inflammation, spinal glial activation, and neuronal sensitization were substantially lessened in the second or late phase of the formalin test in Pdk2/4-deficient animals. Overall, our results suggest that PDK2/4 can be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931482

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of two cucurbitacins isolated from Cayaponia tayuya roots.

    PubMed

    Recio, M Carmen; Prieto, Maite; Bonucelli, Marina; Orsi, Cecilia; Máñez, Salvador; Giner, Rosa M; Cerdá-Nicolás, M; Ríos, José-Luis

    2004-05-01

    Fractionation of an anti-inflammatory extract from Cayaponia tayuya roots yielded two active compounds, identified as 23,24-dihydrocucurbitacin B (1) and cucurbitacin R (2). Both were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity on several experimental models of pain and inflammation. In addition, their cytotoxicity and effects on leukotriene B4 (LTB4) formation were evaluated in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Both compounds showed activity in the following models: carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema (1, 4 mg/kg p.o., 46% inhibition at 3 h), phospholipase A2-induced mouse paw oedema (2, 3 mg/kg i.p., 61% inhibition at 60 min), serotonin-induced mouse paw oedema (1 and 2, 0.5 mg/kg s.c., 73% and 79% inhibition, respectively), 12- O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced acute ear oedema (2, 36% inhibition at 4 mg/kg p.o., and 87% inhibition at 0.1 mg/ear topically). The compounds were also active against the inflammation induced by repeated application of TPA on mouse ears, affecting both the oedema itself (1 and 2 at 0.1 mg/ear, 44% and 56% inhibition, respectively) as well as cell infiltration (68% and 69%, respectively). The activity of both compounds against oedema induced by serotonin was not modified by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone; however, the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide abolished the anti-inflammatory response in both cases. Neither compound modified the production of LTB4 in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes, nor did they exhibit analgesic properties at the dose assayed. PMID:15124085

  5. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  6. [Isolation of the antiphlogistic principle from Epilobium angustifolium].

    PubMed

    Hiermann, A; Reidlinger, M; Juan, H; Sametz, W

    1991-08-01

    From the leaves of Epilobium angustifolium L. (Onagraceae) an antiphlogistic principle was isolated and identified as myricetin 3-O-beta-D-glucuronide. This novel flavonoid exhibited a very strong anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced edema in the rat hind paw (more than ten times more effective than indomethacin) and an inhibitory effect on prostaglandin biosynthesis (as effective as indomethacin). PMID:1775578

  7. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of leaves of Persea americana mill (lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, O O; Okpo, S O; Ogunti, O O

    2002-08-01

    The aqueous extract of Persea americana leaves produced a dose-dependent inhibition of both phases of formalin pain test in mice, a reduction in mouse writhing induced by acetic acid and an elevation of pain threshold in the hot plate test in mice. The extract also produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema. The results obtained indicate that the extract possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:12165331

  8. Combined SCI and TBI: Recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L.; Creasey, Graham H.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16–74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI + TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6 weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI + ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI + contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the

  9. Direct intrawound administration of dimethylsulphoxide relieves acute pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mayank; Prasoon, Pranav; Kumar, Rahul; Singh, Anurag; Shrimal, Prawal; Ray, Subrata B

    2016-04-01

    Wounds associated with injuries such as burns can produce moderate to severe pain. Besides causing distress to the patient, unrelieved pain could delay healing owing to stress-related problems. Thus, pain needs to be treated as early as possible after injury. It was hypothesised that local treatment of wounds with appropriate analgesic drugs could attenuate pain. HOE 140, a bradykinin receptor antagonist, reduced acute inflammatory pain in rats after intrawound administration. In this study, the analgesic effect of dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) was investigated in a similar hind-paw incision model in rats. An extremely small quantity (10 µl) of 100% DMSO was administered into the incision site just before closure of the wound. It persistently attenuated guarding behaviour in rats over a period of 3 days without affecting thermal hyperalgesia or allodynia. Accumulated evidence indicates that guarding is equivalent to pain at rest in humans. The possible mechanisms of the analgesic effect could be inhibition of C group of peripheral nerve fibres or even free radical scavenging. Healing of the wound was found to be normal at the end of the study period. In conclusion, DMSO could be useful in the treatment of acute pain resulting from tissue injuries such as burns. PMID:24750992

  10. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Typha angustifolia pollen grains extracts in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Varpe, Saroj S.; Juvekar, Archana R.; Bidikar, Mukta P.; Juvekar, Parikshit R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous and 70% methanolic extracts of pollen grains of Typha angustifolia. Materials and Methods: Female Sprague Dawley rats were used for the study. The acute anti-inflammatory activity of pollen grains of T. angustifolia was studied using the carrageenan as phlogistic agent, whereas its chronic anti-inflammatory effect was investigated by the percentage inhibition of cotton pellet-induced granuloma. Results: Both aqueous and 70% methanolic extracts of pollen grains of T. angustifolia showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema as compared to the control (P<0.001). It was observed that both the extracts at dose of 125 mg/kg inhibited the granuloma formation by 44.30% which is higher than at dose of 500, 250 mg/kg, thus causing a significant (P<0.001) non-dose-related inhibition of granuloma formation. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that extracts of pollen grains of T. angustifolia are effective in the treatment of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and thus support its traditional utilization. PMID:23248413

  11. A RG-II Type Polysaccharide Purified from Aconitum coreanum Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Inhibiting the NF-κB Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Jiaye; Shi, Songshan; Bligh, S. W. Annie; Li, Yuan; Jiang, Yongbo; Huang, Dan; Ke, Yan; Wang, Shunchun

    2014-01-01

    Korean mondshood root polysaccharides (KMPS) isolated from the root of Aconitum coreanum (Lévl.) Rapaics have shown anti-inflammatory activity, which is strongly influenced by their chemical structures and chain conformations. However, the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effect by these polysaccharides have yet to be elucidated. A RG-II polysaccharide (KMPS-2E, Mw 84.8 kDa) was isolated from KMPS and its chemical structure was characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. The backbone of KMPS-2E consisted of units of [→6) -β-D-Galp (1→3)-β-L-Rhap-(1→4)-β-D-GalpA-(1→3)-β-D-Galp-(1→] with the side chain →5)-β-D-Arap (1→3, 5)-β-D-Arap (1→ attached to the backbone through O-4 of (1→3,4)-L-Rhap. T-β-D-Galp is attached to the backbone through O-6 of (1→3,6)-β-D-Galp residues and T-β-D-Ara is connected to the end group of each chain. The anti-inflammatory effects of KMPS-2E and the underlying mechanisms using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and carrageenan-induced hind paw edema were investigated. KMPS-2E (50, 100 and 200 µg/mL) inhibits iNOS, TLR4, phospho-NF-κB–p65 expression, phosphor-IKK, phosphor-IκB-α expression as well as the degradation of IκB-α and the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and IL-6) mediated by the NF-κB signal pathways in macrophages. KMPS-2E also inhibited LPS-induced activation of NF-κB as assayed by electrophorectic mobility shift assay (EMSA) in a dose-dependent manner and it reduced NF-κB DNA binding affinity by 62.1% at 200µg/mL. In rats, KMPS-2E (200 mg/kg) can significantly inhibit carrageenan-induced paw edema as ibuprofen (200 mg/kg) within 3 h after a single oral dose. The results indicate that KMPS-2E is a promising herb-derived drug against acute inflammation. PMID:24927178

  12. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the aqueous extracts from three Flemingia species.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yu-Jen; Lu, Tsung-Chun; Kitanaka, Susumu; Liu, Chia Yu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Lin, Ying-Chih; Peng, Wen-Huang

    2010-01-01

    I-Tiao-Gung has long been used in the Kinmen area of Taiwan as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of rheumatic illness. The roots of Flemingia lineata (FL), Flemingia macrophylla (FM) and Flemingia prostrata (FP) are also used as I-Tiao-Gung in the Taiwan markets. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic effect of aqueous extracts of Flemingia lineata (FL), Flemingia macrophylla (FM), and Flemingia prostrata (FP) by acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin test, and the anti-inflammatory effect of FM, FL and FP by lambda-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. We also detected the changes in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GRx) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of liver in the lambda-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of FL and FM. The results showed that FL and FM significantly inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin-induced licking time during the late phase (p < 0.001). FL and FM also significantly decreased the lambda-carrageenan-induced paw edema (p < 0.001). FL and FM significantly increased the GRx and GPx activities in the liver and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the edema paw (p < 0.001). These results indicated that FL and FM possessed analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of FL and FM might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA in the edema paw via increasing the activities of GPx and GRx in the liver and decreasing the NO level in the edema paw. PMID:20503477

  13. Analgesic effect of percutaneously absorbed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an experimental study in a rat acute inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Shirasaka, Masayoshi; Konno, Shin-ichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Background External medication that is absorbed percutaneously may be used to reduce inflammation and relieve pain from acute injuries such as ankle sprains and bruises. The plaster method of percutaneous absorption for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was established in Japan in 1988. However, due to the possibility of a placebo effect, the efficacy of this method remains unclear. This experimental study was conducted to control for the placebo effect and to study the efficacy of the plaster method in relieving pain by using a rat model of inflammation. Methods Male Wistar-Imamichi rats were used. A yeast suspension was injected into the right hind paw to induce inflammation. A sheet (2.0 × 1.75 cm) containing the drug was adhered to the inflamed paw. Five treatment groups were used, and each sheet contained a single drug: loxoprofen sodium (loxoprofen-Na) (2.5 mg); felbinac (1.75 mg); indomethacin (1.75 mg); ketoprofen (0.75 mg); or base only (control, 0 mg). Mechanical pain threshold, expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and amount of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in the inflamed paw were evaluated. Results Pain threshold increased after treatment, and was significantly increased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Amounts of PGE2 were significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na and indomethacin groups compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Expression of c-Fos was significantly decreased in the loxoprofen-Na group compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Percutaneously absorbed NSAIDs have an analgesic effect, inhibit expression of c-Fos in the dorsal horn, and reduce PGE2 in inflamed tissue, indicating the efficacy of this method of administration for acute inflammation and localized pain. PMID:18234123

  14. Acetazolamide attenuates chemical-stimulated but not thermal-stimulated acute pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ya-jie; Chen, Ying; Pang, Chong; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Acetazolamide (AZA), a carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, has been found to alleviate inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of AZA on thermal- and chemical-stimulated acute pain in mice and the possible mechanisms underlying the effects. Methods: Five acute pain models based on thermal and chemical stimuli were established to investigate the effects of AZA on different types of nociception in mice. The antinociceptive effects of methazolamide (another CA inhibitor) and diazepam (a positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptor) were also examined. The drugs were administered either intraperitoneally (ip) or intrathecally. Results: AZA (50–200 mg/kg, ip) did not produce analgesia in two thermal-stimulated acute pain models, ie, mouse tail-flick and hot-plate tests. In contrast, AZA (50–200 mg/kg, ip) dose-dependently reduced paw licking time in both capsaicin and formalin tests in mice. A similar result was observed in a mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, AZA (10 nmol/mouse, intrathecally) did not produce significant analgesia in the 3 chemical-stimulated acute pain models. In addition, methazolamide (50–200 mg/kg, ip) and diazepam (0.25–1.0 mg/kg, ip) did not produce significant analgesia in either thermal- or chemical-stimulated acute pain. Conclusion: AZA produces analgesia in chemical-stimulated, but not thermal-stimulated acute pain in mice. The attenuation of chemical-stimulated acute pain by AZA may not be due to enhancement of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition via inhibiting CA activity but rather a peripheral ion channel-related mechanism. PMID:24335844

  15. In vivo evaluation method of the effect of nattokinase on carrageenan-induced tail thrombosis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Seitaro; Hagimori, Masayori; Ogasawara, Masayoshi; Arakawa, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Thrombosis is characterized by congenital and acquired procatarxis. Nattokinase inhibits thrombus formation in vitro. However, in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis remains to be conducted. Subcutaneous nattokinase injections of 1 or 2 mg/ml were administered to the tails of rats. Subsequently, κ-carrageenan was intravenously administered to the tails at 12 h after nattokinase injections. The mean length of the infarcted regions in the tails of rats was significantly shorter in rats administered 2 mg/ml of nattokinase than those in control rats. Nattokinase exhibited significant prophylactic antithrombotic effects. Previously, the in vitro efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis had been reported; now our study has revealed the in vivo efficacy of nattokinase against thrombosis. PMID:21071931

  16. Role of a histamine 4 receptor as an anti-inflammatory target in carrageenan-induced pleurisy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Abdel-Hamied, Hala E; Alrashidi, Ibrahim; Attia, Sabry M; Bakheet, Saleh A; Ashour, Abdelkader E; Abd-Allah, Adel R A

    2014-01-01

    The histamine 4 receptor (H4R) is expressed primarily on cells involved in inflammation and immune responses. Despite much research into inflammatory diseases, no drugs with favourable safety profiles are yet available for their treatment. The aim of the present study was to determine the potential anti-inflammatory effect of 4-methylhistamine (4-MeH) or JNJ77777120 (JNJ) and to explore the role of H4R in a mouse model of carrageenan (Cg) -induced pleurisy. A single dose of 4-MeH or JNJ (30 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1 hr before Cg administration. The results illustrate that both the numbers of CD4+, CD25+, CD4+ CD25+, GITR+, GITR+ IL-17A+-expressing T cells and the levels of T helper type 1 (Th1)/Th17 cytokines were markedly increased in both the Cg-treated and 4-MeH-treated groups, whereas the cytokines produced by Th2 cells were significantly decreased in the same groups. However, JNJ treatment significantly decreased both the number of T-cell subsets and GITR+, GITR+ IL-17A+-expressing T cells, and the production of Th1/Th17 cytokines. Further, JNJ up-regulated the expression of the Th2 cytokines. RT-PCR analysis revealed an increased expression of interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in the Cg-treated and 4-MeH-treated groups, which was reduced by treatment with JNJ in lung tissues. Moreover, histological examinations revealed anti-inflammatory effects of JNJ, whereas 4-MeH worsened Cg-induced inflammation. In conclusion, the results of the present work clearly indicate that JNJ possesses important anti-inflammatory properties that are increased in 4-MeH-treated mice, suggesting that H4R are involved in pleurisy and that JNJ has an anti-inflammatory effect in associated disease conditions. PMID:24460575

  17. Accounting for the Delay in the Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain: Axonal and Nuclear Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Bogen, Oliver; Reichling, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute insults produce hyperalgesic priming, a neuroplastic change in nociceptors that markedly prolongs inflammatory mediator-induced hyperalgesia. After an acute initiating insult, there is a 72 h delay to the onset of priming, for which the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that the delay is due to the time required for a signal to travel from the peripheral terminal to the cell body followed by a return signal to the peripheral terminal. We report that when an inducer of hyperalgesic priming (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) is administered at the spinal cord of Sprague Dawley rats, priming is detected at the peripheral terminal with a delay significantly shorter than when applied peripherally. Spinally induced priming is detected not only when prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is presented to the peripheral nociceptor terminals, but also when it is presented intrathecally to the central terminals in the spinal cord. Furthermore, when an inducer of priming is administered in the paw, priming can be detected in spinal cord (as prolonged hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal PGE2), but only when the mechanical stimulus is presented to the paw on the side where the priming inducer was administered. Both spinally and peripherally induced priming is prevented by intrathecal oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to the nuclear transcription factor CREB mRNA. Finally, the inhibitor of protein translation reversed hyperalgesic priming only when injected at the site where PGE2 was administered, suggesting that the signal transmitted from the cell body to the peripheral terminal is not a newly translated protein, but possibly a newly expressed mRNA. PMID:25589745

  18. Synthesis, acute toxicity and anti-inflammatory effect of bornyl salicylate, a salicylic acid derivative.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Renata Marcia Costa; Leite, Fagner Carvalho; Leite, Jacqueline Alves; Rodrigues Mascarenhas, Sandra; Rodrigues, Luis Cezar; Piuvezam, Marcia Regina

    2012-12-01

    Bornyl salicylate (BS) is a salicylic derivative, obtained by sterification of salicylic acid and monoterpene (-)-borneol, and its topical use in inflammatory diseases was described in the early 20th century. It is also known that borneol presents neuroprotective, genoprotective and analgesic properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate BS in experimental models of acute inflammation. The toxicity of BS was analyzed by measuring water and food intake, weight, mortality and weight of main organs. To assess its anti-inflammatory effect, BS-treated mice were challenged with carrageenan, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), bradikynin (BK) or histamine (HIS)-induced paw edema, zymosan-induced peritonitis and vascular permeability induced by acetic acid. Nitric oxide (NO) production was analyzed in peritoneal macrophage cultures. There was no sign of acute toxicity of BS in male and female mice. Furthermore, treatment with BS was significantly (p < 0.05) effective in reducing paw edema induced by carrageenan in early and late phases; this effect was related to PGE2 and BK, but HIS independent. Neutrophil migration and cytokine release (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) induced by zymosan and fluid leakage induced by acetic acid were also reduced in BS-treated animals. In vitro, BS (10 µg/mL) reduced NO production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. These data suggest that BS has an anti-inflammatory effect, which is related, at least in part, with decrease of mediators as PGE2, NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, further studies should be done to explore its potential as an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:22712758

  19. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli): involvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhsh, Pariya; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2015-07-01

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli) were investigated in mice and rats. The analgesic activity of neroli was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddy's hot plate methods, while acute and chronic anti-inflammatory effects were investigated by inflammatory paw edema in rat and the cotton pellet-induced granuloma tissue model, respectively. Mechanistic studies were conducted using L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Neroli significantly decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhes in mice compared to animals that received vehicle only. Also, it exhibited a central analgesic effect, as evidenced by a significant increase in reaction time in the hot plate method. The oil also significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The inhibitory activity of neroli (especially at 40 mg/kg) was found to be very close to the standard drug, diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg). In cotton pellet-induced granuloma, neroli was effective regarding the transudate and granuloma formation amount. Neroli was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and twenty-three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the oil, were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5 %), linalyl acetate (19.6 %), nerolidol (9.1 %), E,E-farnesol (9.1 %), α-terpineol (4.9 %), and limonene (4.6 %), which might be responsible for these observed activities. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have significant activity against acute and especially chronic inflammation, and have central and peripheral antinociceptive effects which support the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of pain and inflammation. PMID:25762161

  20. Determination of Teloschistes flavicans (sw) norm anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Eugênia C.; da Silva, Nicácio H.; Santos, Renata Almeida; Sudário, Ana Patrícia Paiva; Rodrigues e Silva, Antonio Alfredo; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2010-01-01

    Background: Lichens produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. However, rare products are submitted to rigorous scientific tests or have the risk potential or side effects evaluated. The lack of medical and sanitary control, absence of accurate botanical identification or purity certification, founded in diverse natural products, may represent great danger to population health. This work aimed to evaluate toxic effects and anti-inflammatory action in vivo of Teloschistes flavicans (Sw.) Norm. (TFN) unrefined extracts, as well as determinate its main constituents. Methods: The carrageenan induced paw edema and cotton pellet implant induced granuloma methods were utilized, besides a classic acute toxicity test. TFN acetone extract inhibited carrageenan paw edema on 60, 120, and 180 min (inhibition percentiles of 45.03%, 60.59% and 41.72%). Results: TFN ethereal (inhibition percentiles of 23.95% and 29.01%) and chloroform (inhibition percentiles of 28.8% and 22.04%) extracts inhibited edema on 120 and 180 min. None of the extract inhibited the granuloma development. None of the extract caused death or other acute toxicity signs. Vicanicine (60.26% in ethereal extract and 51.17% in acetone extract), parietine (9.60% in ethereal extract and 15.38% on second), falacinol (0.78% in ether and 14.95% in acetone) and very low concentration of falacinal (0.15% in ethereal extract and 3.32% in acetone extract) were detected in the medicine. Conclusions: The tested extracts have antiedematogenic activity, but are not effective on subchronic inflammation. The extracts do not present toxic effects in administered doses. PMID:21808568

  1. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  2. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  3. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  4. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  5. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease.

    PubMed

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4-8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer's patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines. PMID:26815859

  6. A Consistent Orally-Infected Hamster Model for Enterovirus A71 Encephalomyelitis Demonstrates Squamous Lesions in the Paws, Skin and Oral Cavity Reminiscent of Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phyu, Win Kyaw; Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes self-limiting, hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) that may rarely be complicated by encephalomyelitis. Person-to-person transmission is usually by fecal-oral or oral-oral routes. To study viral replication sites in the oral cavity and other tissues, and to gain further insights into virus shedding and neuropathogenesis, we developed a consistent, orally-infected, 2-week-old hamster model of HFMD and EV-A71 encephalomyelitis. Tissues from orally-infected, 2-week-old hamsters were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to detect viral antigens and RNA, respectively, and by virus titration. Hamsters developed the disease and died after 4–8 days post infection; LD50 was 25 CCID50. Macroscopic cutaneous lesions around the oral cavity and paws were observed. Squamous epithelium in the lip, oral cavity, paw, skin, and esophagus, showed multiple small inflammatory foci around squamous cells that demonstrated viral antigens/RNA. Neurons (brainstem, spinal cord, sensory ganglia), acinar cells (salivary gland, lacrimal gland), lymphoid cells (lymph node, spleen), and muscle fibres (skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles), liver and gastric epithelium also showed varying amounts of viral antigens/RNA. Intestinal epithelium, Peyer’s patches, thymus, pancreas, lung and kidney were negative. Virus was isolated from oral washes, feces, brain, spinal cord, skeletal muscle, serum, and other tissues. Our animal model should be useful to study squamous epitheliotropism, neuropathogenesis, oral/fecal shedding in EV-A71 infection, person-to-person transmission, and to test anti-viral drugs and vaccines. PMID:26815859

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Some Novel Pyrrolizine Derivatives as COX Inhibitors with Anti-Inflammatory/Analgesic Activities and Low Ulcerogenic Liability.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Ahmed M; Ali, Hamed I; Almalki, Waleed H; Azim, Mohamed A; Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory and pain relief medications. However, their use is associated with many drawbacks, including mainly serious gastric and renal complications. In an attempt to circumvent these risks, a set of N-(4-bromophenyl)-7-cyano-6-substituted-H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors. The structural elucidation, in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using a carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model and hot plate assay, were performed, respectively. From the results obtained, it was found that the newly synthesized pyrrolizines exhibited IC50 values in the range of 2.45-5.69 µM and 0.85-3.44 µM for COX-1 and COX-2, respectively. Interestingly, compounds 12, 13, 16 and 17 showed higher anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities compared to ibuprofen. Among these derivatives, compounds 16 and 19 displayed better safety profile than ibuprofen in acute ulcerogenicity and histopathological studies. Furthermore, the docking studies revealed that compound 17 fits nicely into COX-1 and COX-2 binding sites with the highest binding affinity, while compound 16 exerted the highest binding affinity for 5-LOX. In light of these findings, these novel pyrrolizine-5-carboxamide derivatives represent a promising scaffold for further development into potential dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors with safer gastric profile. PMID:26867188

  8. Evaluation of hemostatic and anti-inflammatory activities of extracts from different Lagochilus species in experimental animals: comparison of different extractives and sources.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ying; Chen, Pei-Hua; Xiong, Ai-Zhen; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung; Chou, Gui-Xin; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Different members of Lagochilus genus have been used in folkloric medicine to treat hemorrhages and inflammation. However, only a few species of them have received scientific attention supporting their efficacy. Here, the hemostatic and antiinflammatory activities of five Lagochilus species were determined and compared by using in vivo assays. The results showed that the extracts of Lagochilus lanatonodus and Lagochilus diacanthophyllus showed better hemostatic activities among five species. The high doses of L. lanatonodus extracts were able to shorten the values of thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time in a rat model. Moreover, the extracts of L. lanatonodus and L. diacanthophyllus showed strong inhibitory effects on the acute phase of inflammation in both xylene-induced ear edema mouse model and carrageenan-induced paw edema rat model. In parallel, the treatment of these extracts modulated the expressions of those inflammatory parameters, that is, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 , inducible nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase. L. lanatonodus and L. diacanthophyllus showed better hemostatic and antiinflammatory activities in several test models: these results therefore supported the folkloric utilization. L. lanatonodus was found to be the most active Lagochilus species. PMID:25175534

  9. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dhirender; Kumar, Ajay; Kaushik, Pawan; Rana, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae) is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models. PMID:22761611

  10. Proniosomal formulation of curcumin having anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity in different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Rai, A K

    2012-10-01

    Curcumin, the active ingredient of the spice turmeric, has a long history as an herbal remedy for a variety of diseases. Transdermal drug delivery has been recognized as an alternative route to oral delivery. Proniosomes offer a versatile vesicle delivery concept with the potential for drug delivery via the transdermal route. In this study, different proniosomal gel bases were prepared by the ether injection method, using Span 60 and Span 80, Tween 20, cholesterol, and formulation PA2. They were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, revealing vesicular structures, and assessed for stability and effect on in vitro skin permeation using rat skin. Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of formulation PA2 and PB1 were compared with a standard market product containing indomethacin. The effect of formulation PA2 and PB1 was evaluated for acute inflammation in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and for chronic inflammation in complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in rats. Further histopathological and radiographic evaluation was performed. The investigated curcumin loaded proniosomal formula proved to be non-irritant, non-toxic, but had lower anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects than the marketed indomethacin products. PMID:23136720

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation studies of novel quinazolinone derivatives as antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    F. Zayed, Mohamed; H. Hassan, Memy

    2013-01-01

    Some novel 6,8-diiodo-2-methyl-3-substituted-quinazolin-4(3H)-ones bearing sulfonamide derivatives (4–11) were synthesized in good yields and evaluated for their possible antibacterial, anti-inflammatory activities and acute toxicity. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed on the basis of their spectral data and elemental analysis. Their antibacterial activities were evaluated by the agar well diffusion method while their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated by the carrageenan-induced hind paw edema test. All the tested compounds showed considerable antibacterial activities and high to moderate anti-inflammatory activities that last for 12 h compared to ibuprofen. All the tested compounds showed no toxic symptoms or mortality rates 24 h post-administration at tested anti-inflammatory doses. In addition, LD50 for all tested compounds was higher than that for ibuprofen implying their good safety margin. The obtained results showed that the most active compounds could be useful as a template for future design, modification and investigation to produce more active analogs. PMID:24648828

  12. Antinociceptive anti-inflammatory effect of Monotropein isolated from the root of Morinda officinalis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongwon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Moo-Young; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Kyu; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2005-10-01

    The root of Morinda officinalis (Rubiaceae) is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and impotence in the traditional Oriental medicine. To identify the antinociceptive anti-inflammatory components of this crude drug, we adopted an activity-directed fractionation approach. The active fraction of the BuOH extract of M. officinalis root was subjected to silica gel and ODS column chromatography to yield two diterpenes, compounds 1 and 2 and these were identified as monotropein and deacetylasperulosidic acid, respectively. The iridoid glycoside, monotropein, was tested for its anti-inflammatory antinociceptive effects using hot plate- and writhing antinociceptive assays and by using carrageenan-induced anti-inflammatory assays in mice and rats. Pretreatment with monotropein (at 20, 30 mg/kg/d, p.o.) significantly reduced stretching episodes and prolonged action time in mice. It also significantly reduced acute paw edema by carrageenan in rats. These results indicate that monotropein contributes to the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action of Morinda officinalis root. PMID:16204945

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of Radix Gentianae Macrophyllae (Qinjiao), Rhizoma Coptidis (Huanglian) and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (Wenzhou migan) in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Rhee, Hae In; Park, Eun Kyung; Jung, Kiwon; Jeon, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ji-Hong; Yoo, Hunseung; Han, Chang-Kyun; Cho, Yong-Baik; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Yang, Hyung In; Yoo, Myung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Background KHU14, an ethanolic extract of Radix Gentianae Macrophyllae (Qinjiao), Rhizoma Coptidis (Huanglian) and Citri Unshiu Pericarpium (Wenzhou migan) was tested for its anti-inflammatory effects. Methods Three out of 20 herbs were found to have anti-inflammatory effects. The formulation of these herbs, i.e. KHU14 was tested for croton oil-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, acetic acid-induced capillary permeability, cotton pellet and delayed type hypersensitivity. Results KHU14 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of acute and chronic inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity of KHU14 observed was comparable to that of celecoxib. KHU14 inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 in LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, and reduced edema and the amount of infiltrated cells in animal models. Conclusion KHU14 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects as demonstrated in typical immunological tests for anti-inflammation in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18761750

  14. Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory and Anticancer Activities of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Jemaà, Mohamed; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2013-01-01

    Background. In folk medicine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is used as a remedy for a variety of diseases. This study investigates the in vivo antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of EVOO on mice and rats. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests in mice, the analgesic effect of EVOO was evaluated. Acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used as standard drugs, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by means of the carrageenan-induced paw edema model in rats using acetylsalicylic acid and dexamethasone as standard drugs. Last, the xenograft model in athymic mice was used to evaluate the anticancer effect in vivo. Results. EVOO significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes and reduces acute and inflammatory pain in the two phases of the formalin test. It has also a better effect than Dexamethasone in the anti-inflammatory test. Finally, the intraperitoneal administration of EVOO affects the growth of HCT 116 tumours xenografted in athymic mice. Conclusion. EVOO has a significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. However, further detailed studies are required to determine the active component responsible for these effects and mechanism pathway. PMID:24455277

  15. In vivo anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activities of aqueous extracts from Thymelaea hirsuta

    PubMed Central

    Azza, Zora; Oudghiri, Mounia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aerial parts of Thymelaea hirsuta (TH) are used as a decoction in the treatment of different pathologies in folk medicine in Morocco. Objective: The aqueous extracts were evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity and in inhibition of adjuvant induction arthritis in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity was carried out using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema model, and the antiarthritic activity was carried out using complete Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritis model. Results: The plant extract (500 mg/kg body weight) exhibited significant activity in acute inflammation produced 60% of inhibition after 4 h as compared with that of the standard anti-inflammatory drug, the diclofenac (100 mg/kg) which showed 40% of inhibition. In arthritis model, the extract produced 85% inhibition after 18 days when compared with the diclofenac (10 mg/kg; 72%). Conclusion: These results indicate that the aqueous extract of TH had an anti-inflammatory activity and inhibited the induction of adjuvant arthritis in male Wistar rats. PMID:25829798

  16. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Daphne retusa Hemsl.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Jin, Huizi; Xu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua; Yan, Shikai; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2008-10-30

    Daphne retusa Hemsl. belongs to the genus Daphne, a member of Thymelaeaceae family. The barks and stems of Daphne retusa are used as a folkloric medicine 'Zhu Shi Ma' in Western China because of its effects of detumescence and acesodyne. In this paper, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the 75% ethanol extract of the stems and barks of Daphne retusa and different fractions partitioned with petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats, while the acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test as models for evaluating the centrally and peripherally analgesic activity. The results showed the plant has significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the result of the acute toxicity test at which the MTD was above 5g/kg indicates that the plant extract is relatively safe in, and/or non-toxic to, mice. The findings of these experimental animal studies indicate that the Daphne retusa ethanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, and thus provide pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of 'Zhu shima' in the treatment and/of management of anti-inflammatory and painful conditions in China. PMID:18692124

  17. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and QSAR Studies of Newer Isoxazole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Asirvatham, Sahaya; Mahajan, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    A series of newer 3-(4'-methoxyphenyl)-5-substituted phenylisoxazoles derivatives have been synthesized by reacting hydroxylamine hydrochloride with chalcones. The chalcones were formed by reacting different aromatic aldehydes with 4-methoxyacetophenone in presence of aqueos potassium hydroxide (KOH). The purity of all the synthesized compounds was checked by recording their melting points and the retention Factors (Rf) values from thin layer chromatography. The structures of the compounds were characterized by recording their infrared (IR) spectra and confirmed by recording their nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. The acute toxicity study was carried out on all the synthesized compounds and they were screened for their antiinflammatory activity by carrageenan induced rat paw edema method. Anti-inflammatory studies showed statistically significant activity when compared to the control, indomethacin. The two most potent compounds giving good anti-inflammatory activity were further evaluated for their antiulcer activity. The compounds were subjected to quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) studies. A close correlation between the observed and the predicted anti-inflammatory activity (Log % inhibition) for the compounds indicated the development of the best QSAR model. The synthesized compounds were found to be non-ulcerogenic as compared to the standard, aspirin. PMID:26265199

  18. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  19. Acute loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tristán, Bekinschtein; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Acute loss of consciousness poses a fascinating scenario for theoretical and clinical research. This chapter introduces a simple yet powerful framework to investigate altered states of consciousness. We then explore the different disorders of consciousness that result from acute brain injury, and techniques used in the acute phase to predict clinical outcome in different patient populations in light of models of acute loss of consciousness. We further delve into post-traumatic amnesia as a model for predicting cognitive sequels following acute loss of consciousness. We approach the study of acute loss of consciousness from a theoretical and clinical perspective to conclude that clinicians in acute care centers must incorporate new measurements and techniques besides the classic coma scales in order to assess their patients with loss of consciousness. PMID:25702218

  20. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of derivative (E)-N-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-ylmethylene)-thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jamerson Ferreira; Nonato, Fabiana Regina; Zafred, Rafael Rosolen Teixeira; Leite, Nayara Maria Siqueira; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; da Silva, Anekécia Lauro; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Alves de Lima, Maria do Carmo

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to further investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of (E)-N-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(thiophen-2-ylmethylene)-thiosemicarbazone (BTTSC) as well as its antinociceptive effects. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed using the model of ear edema induced by croton oil-induced and also evaluated in models of paw edema carrageenan-induced and by compound 48/80. Evaluation of the antinociceptive effect was performed through formalin test. In the nociception test induced by formalin the BTTSC showed activity in both phases of the pain, highlighting inflammatory pain, where it was able to reduce the time to paw lick 62.3, 84.30 and 100% at doses of 30, 100 and 300mgkg(-1). The anti-inflammatory activity was performed ear edema induced by croton oil, where none of the doses tested was capable of significantly regress edema. The paw edema carrageenan-induced showed activity compound, where the edema was reduced by 81.9 and 83.2% in the first two times of the experiment at the highest dose used. The paw edema assay induced by compound 48/80, showed that BTTSC after 15min of the inoculum phlogistic agent showed significant reduction of edema with values of 56.53% at a dose of 30mgkg(-1). Our results suggesting this compound exerts its antinociception effects connected with peripheral mechanisms. Furthermore, the compound was able to act in two phases of inflammation carrageenan-induced, highlighting the initial phase. This suggests an action on the early mediators of inflammation. The paw edema assay induced by compound 48/80 confirmed our hypothesis indicating action of the compound via histamine. PMID:27133079

  1. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. [MODELING INFLAMMATORY EDEMA: ARE THE MODELS INTERCHANGEABLE].

    PubMed

    Hanh, Cong Hong; Khaziakhmetova, V N; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Experimental modeling of inflammatory edema by sub-plantar injection of carrageenan and formalin in mice and rats is widely used to evaluate potential anti-inflammatory activity of new drugs. This systematic analysis of published data showed that carrageenan induced paw edema model is used for evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity mostly in rats rather than mice. Formalin induced paw edema in rats and mice is used primarily for evaluation of the analgesic activity of drugs. Taken together, the results of this systematic review of available literature on edema modeling substantiate recommendation to use carrageenan paw edema in rats and formalin paw edema in mice as complementary, but not interchangeable models of inflammation. PMID:26591204

  3. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  4. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Leaf Methanol Extract of Cotyledon orbiculata L. (Crassulaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Amabeoku, George J.; Kabatende, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Leaf methanol extract of C. orbiculata L. was investigated for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities using acetic acid writhing and hot-plate tests and carrageenan-induced oedema test in mice and rats, respectively. C. orbiculata (100–400 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited acetic acid-induced writhing and significantly delayed the reaction time of mice to the hot-plate-induced thermal stimulation. Paracetamol (300 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. Morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly delayed the reaction time of mice to the thermal stimulation produced with hot plate. Leaf methanol extract of C. orbiculata (50–400 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) also significantly attenuated the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema. The LD50 value obtained for the plant species was greater than 4000 mg/kg (p.o.). The data obtained indicate that C. orbiculata has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, justifying the folklore use of the plant species by traditional medicine practitioners in the treatment of painful and inflammatory conditions. The relatively high LD50 obtained shows that C. orbiculata may be safe in or nontoxic to mice. PMID:22235200

  5. Peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts: Therapeutics for peroxynitrite-mediated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Stern, Michael K.; Currie, Mark G.; Misko, Thomas P.

    1998-01-01

    Inflamed tissue is often characterized by the production of NO and superoxide. These radicals react at diffusion-limited rates to form the powerful oxidant peroxynitrite (PN). When protonated, PN decomposes into either nitrate or reactive intermediates capable of mediating tissue damage by oxidation of protein, lipid, and nucleic acid. We recently have identified porphyrin derivatives capable of catalyzing an increase in nitrate formation with a concomitant decrease in the HO·-like and NO2·-like reactivity of PN. Here, we present evidence for the efficacy of these PN decomposition catalysts both in vitro and in vivo. Cells in culture were protected from exogenously added PN by the catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-disulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato iron (III), whereas free iron and the structurally related compound without iron 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-disulfonatophenyl)porphyrin did not protect. Cytoprotection correlated well with a reduction in the nitrotyrosine content of released cytosolic proteins, a biochemical marker for PN formation. Carrageenan-induced paw edema is a model of acute inflammation in which PN may play a major role. When tested in this system, both 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-disulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato iron (III) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4′-pyridyl)porphyrinato iron (III) caused a dose-dependent reduction in swelling and lactate dehydrogenase release as well as a detectable shift to nitrate formation in paw tissue. In addition, the catalysts did not elevate mean arterial pressure, suggesting a lack of interaction with NO. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence supporting the therapeutic value of manipulating PN pharmacologically. Thus, PN decomposition catalysts may represent a unique class of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:9482943

  6. Effect of Jyotishmati (Celastrus paniculatus) seeds in animal models of pain and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A.; Agarwal, Sneha; Garud, Mayuresh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Jyotishmati, scientifically known as Celastrus paniculatus Wild (Celastraceae) is one of the most important medicinal plants in Ayurveda. The plant has shown significant pharmacological activities like anti-arthritic, wound healing, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant. Objective: To study possible effects of alcoholic extract of Celastrus paniculatus seeds (AlcE) in experimentally induced pain and inflammation in mice. Materials and Methods: The antinociceptive activity was evaluated in Swiss albino mice by tail immersion, hot plate, and acetic-acid-induced writhing tests at doses of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in model of carrageenan-induced acute plantar inflammation in Wistar rats. Results: In tail immersion test, AlcE showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in tail withdrawal response at dose of 250 mg/kg with maximum possible effect of 15.71%. The maximum possible effect of 23.32% and 30.16% (P < 0.001) was seen at dose of 500 and 1000 mg/kg at 3 hours after administration of extract, respectively. In hot plate test, increase in paw licking time was reported at dose of 500 and 1000 mg/kg. AlcE (1,000 mg/kg) showed maximum response (6.23 ± 0.46) when compared with control (3.20 ± 0.18) at 90 min. In acetic acid induced writhings, AlcE at dose of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg body weight showed 32.35%, 49.01%, and 58.82% inhibition in writhings, respectively. AlcE treated animals (500 and 1,000 mg/kg) showed significant decrease in paw edema at 3 hours and 4 hours, when compared with control animals. Conclusion: Jyotishmati seed extract possesses significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26166997

  7. Beneficial Effects of Trillium govanianum Rhizomes in Pain and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ur Rahman, Shafiq; Adhikari, Achyut; Ismail, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Khurram, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Ali, Farman; Haseeb, Abdul; Akbar, Fazal; Iriti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Trillium govanianum rhizome is used as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory remedy in traditional medicine in northern Pakistan. In an attempt to establish its medicinal value, the present research evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of T. govanianum. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of extract and fractions was investigated in the carrageenan induced paw edema assay. The in vitro suppression of oxidative burst of extract, fractions and isolated compounds was assessed through luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. The in vivo analgesic activity was assayed in chemical and thermal induced nociceptive pain models. The crude methanol extract and its solvent fractions showed anti-inflammatory and analgesic responses, exhibited by significant amelioration of paw edema and relieve of the tonic visceral chemical and acute phasic thermal nociception. In the oxidative burst assay, based on IC50, the crude methanol extract and n-butanol soluble fraction produced a significant inhibition, followed by chloroform and hexane soluble fractions as compared to ibuprofen. Similarly, the isolated compounds pennogenin and borassoside E exhibited significant level of oxidative burst suppressive activity. The in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities as well as the in vitro inhibition of oxidative burst validated the traditional use of T. govanianum rhizomes as a phytotherapeutic remedy for both inflammatory conditions and pain. The observed activities might be attributed to the presence of steroids and steroid-based compounds. Therefore, the rhizomes of this plant species could serve as potential novel source of compounds effective for alleviating pain and inflammation. PMID:27556434

  8. Acute Arterial Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Dagnone, L. E.; Brown, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the primary care physician in the initial assessment and management of acute arterial injuries will often be the deciding factor in survival of life, limb or organ system. Most arterial emergencies occur as a result of trauma, disruption of vessel wall and/or occlusion of flow. The common clinical syndromes of acute arterial emergencies are injuries to and beyond the aorta, acute aortic dissection, ruptured aortic aneurysm, and thromboembolic occlusive arterial disease. The role of arteriography and the urgency of definitive surgical repair in acute arterial emergencies is summarized. PMID:21283323

  9. Antiperoxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimutagenic activities of ethanol extract of the mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum occurring in South India.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, B; Ajith, T A; Sheena, N; Gunapalan, Nidhi; Janardhanan, K K

    2003-01-01

    Free radical mediated genetic instability is widely thought to be a major etiological factor for initiation of carcinogenesis. Mushrooms represent a largely untapped source of powerful new pharmaceutical products. In the present study, we examined the antiperoxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimutagenic activities of the ethanol extract of the mycelium of a medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, occurring in south India. Antiperoxidative activity was evaluated using Fe(2+)-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate and a phorbol ester (croton oil)-induced lipid peroxidation in mouse skin. Antiinflammatory activity was evaluated against carrageenan-induced acute and formalin-induced chronic inflammatory paw edema in mouse and phorbol ester-induced mouse skin inflammation. Antimutagenic activity was determined by the Ames mutagenicity assay using histidine mutant of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98, TA100, and TA102. Sodium azide (NaN(3)), N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD), and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) were used as the mutagens. The extract showed significant inhibition of Fe(2+)-induced peroxidation of lipid in rat liver (IC(50) 510 +/- 22 microg/ml) and 37% inhibition of croton oil-induced peroxidation on the mouse skin at 20 mg/0.1 ml/skin. Carrageenan-induced acute and formalin-induced chronic inflammatory edema were inhibited by 56 and 60%, respectively, by the extract at 1,000 mg/kg body wt (i.p). The extract at a concentration of 5 mg/plate showed inhibition of mutagenicity elicited by direct acting mutagens, NaN(3) (55.5 and 75.7%) and MNNG (50.0 and 57.5%) for S. typhymurium strains TA100 and TA102, respectively. The extract at the same concentration also inhibited mutagenicity elicited by NPD (52.4 and 64.2%) and B[a]P (60.7 and 59.6%) for TA98 and TA100 strains, respectively. The B[a]P was activated in the presence of rat liver microsomal (S9) fraction. The results of our study revealed that

  10. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  11. Antiinflammatory activity of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) in rats.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sung Kee; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Se Ra; Kim, Jong Choon; Bae, Chun Sik; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae Ran; Jang, Jong Sik; Kim, Sung Ho

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluated a new herbal preparation, HemoHIM, for its antiinflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced edema, the formation of granulation tissues by cotton pellet and experimental colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The HemoHIM was prepared by adding its ethanol-insoluble polysaccharide fraction to the total water extract of Angelica Radix, Cnidii Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. The preparation (4 mg of solids/mL of drinking water, p.o., 50-100 mg/kg of body weight, i.p.) produced a dose-related inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma in rats. In addition, HemoHIM also reduced the degree of TNBS-induced colitis and improved the gross and histological changes such as thickening, dilatation, ulceration, and infiltration by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and multiple erosive lesions. These results demonstrate that the HemoHIM has a potent antiinflammatory effect. PMID:17486680

  12. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Joanna; Zuber, Kim; Davis, Jane

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates up to 20% of all hospital admissions. Responding to the increase in admissions, complications, mortality, morbidity, and cost of AKI, Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes convened an expert panel to study the issue, review the literature, and publish guidelines to evaluate and treat patients with AKI in the acute setting. This article reviews those guidelines. PMID:27023656

  13. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies. PMID:27253358

  14. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  15. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Novel Polysaccharide Sacran Extracted from Cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum in Various Inflammatory Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Keiichi; Tanida, Yuki; Hata, Kyona; Hayashi, Tomoya; Hashim, Irhan Ibrahim Abu; Higashi, Taishi; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Kondo, Yuki; Irie, Tetsumi; Kaneko, Shinichiro; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the topical anti-inflammatory effects of the megamolecular polysaccharide sacran extracted from cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum using various inflammatory animal models. Sacran showed potent anti-inflammatory effects with optimum effective concentrations at 0.01 and 0.05% (w/v). Sacran markedly inhibited paw swelling and neutrophil infiltration in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Additionally, 6,7-dimethoxy-1-methyl-2(1H)-quinoxalinone-3-propionyl-carboxylic acid (DMEQ)-labeled sacran had the ability to penetrate carrageenan-induced rat paw skin rather than normal skin. Also, sacran significantly suppressed kaolin-induced and dextran-induced rat paw edema throughout the duration of the study. Furthermore, sacran significantly suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse ear edema and mRNA expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Safety of sacran solution was verified by negligible cytotoxicity in HaCaT cells. These results suggest that sacran may be useful as a therapeutic agent against inflammatory skin diseases with no life-threatening adverse effects. PMID:27170516

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of leaf essential oil from Cinnamomum longepaniculatum (Gamble) N. Chao

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yong-Hua; Feng, Rui-Zhang; Li, Qun; Wei, Qin; Yin, Zhong-Qiong; Zhou, Li-Jun; Tao, Cui; Jia, Ren-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the essential oil from C. longepaniculatum was evaluated by three experimental models including the dimethyl benzene-induced ear edema in mice, the carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat and the acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice. The influence of the essential oil on histological changes and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) production associated with carrageenan-induced rat paw edema was also investigated. The essential oil (0.5, 0.25, 0.13 ml/kg b.w.) showed significantly inhibition of inflammation along with a dose-dependent manner in the three experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil was occurred both in early and late phase and peaked at 4 h after carrageenan injection. The essential oil resulted in a dose dependent reduction of the paw thickness, connective tissue injury and the infiltration of inflammatory cell. The essential oil also significantly reduced the production of PGE2, histamine and 5-HT in the exudates of edema paw induced by carrageenan. Both the essential oil and indomethacin resulted relative lower percentage inhibition of histamine and 5-HT than that of PGE2 at 4 h after carrageenan injection. PMID:25664080

  17. Analgesic activity of the ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta resin in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Kumar, Dhirendra; Prasad, Raju; Verma, Pawan Kumar; Sardar, Kaustuk K.; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Shorea robusta (Sal), an important traditional Indian medicinal plant used in various ailments and rituals and the indigenous use of the resin of this plant as a medicament for treatment of various inflammatory conditions is well documented in literature. In the present study, ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (SRE) was evaluated for its analgesic activity by making use of different central and peripheral pain models. Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity of SRE was assessed by employing different pain models such as, i) hot plate and tail flick tests for central analgesia, ii) acetic acid- induced writhing (peripheral analgesic model), iii) formalin-induced hind paw licking (both central and peripheral model), iv) carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia (peripheral analgesic model) and v) post-surgical pain (peripheral analgesic model). Results: The extract produced significant central and peripheral analgesic effects, as is evident from increase in reaction time in hot plate and tail flick tests, inhibition in writhing counts in acetic acid-induced writhing test, inhibition of licking time in formalin-induced hind paw licking, increased pain threshold in paw withdrawal latency in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and increased paw withdrawal threshold in post-surgical pain. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrate marked antinociceptive effects of SRE. PMID:23087512

  18. Intrathecal cannabinoid-1 receptor agonist prevents referred hyperalgesia in acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Marsha Ritter; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bjorling, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of intrathecal arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, to inhibit referred hyperalgesia and increased bladder contractility resulting from acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats. 24 female rats were divided into 4 groups: 1) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical saline; 2) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical acrolein; 3) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical saline; and 4) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical acrolein. Bladder catheters were placed 4-6 days prior to the experiment. On the day of the experiment, rats were briefly anesthetized with isoflurane to recover the external end of the cystostomy catheter. After recovery from anesthesia, pre-treatment cystometry was performed, and mechanical sensitivity of the hindpaws was determined. Rats were again briefly anesthetized with isoflurane to inject ACEA or vehicle into the intrathecal space between L5-L6. Beginning 10 minutes after intrathecal injection, saline or acrolein was infused into the bladder for 30 minutes. Post-treatment cystometry and mechanical sensitivity testing were performed. Rats were euthanized, and bladders were collected, weighed, and fixed for histology. The intrathecal vehicle/intravesical acrolein group developed mechanical hyperalgesia with post-treatment mechanical sensitivity of 6 ± 0.3 g compared to pretreatment of 14 ± 0.4 g (p < 0.01). Pre- and post-treatment hind paw mechanical sensitivity was statistically similar in rats that received intrathecal ACEA prior to intravesical infusion of acrolein (15 ± 0.2 g and 14 ± 0.4 g, respectively). Acrolein treatment increased basal bladder pressure and maximal voiding pressure and decreased intercontraction interval and voided volume. However, intrathecal ACEA was ineffective in improving acrolein-related urodynamic changes. In addition, bladder histology demonstrated submucosal and muscularis edema that was similar for all acrolein-treated groups, irrespective of ACEA treatment

  19. The microalga Spirulina platensis presents anti-inflammatory action as well as hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic properties in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joventino, Ivan P; Alves, Henrique G R; Neves, Lia C; Pinheiro-Joventino, Francisca; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A M; Neves, Samya A; Ferreira, Francisco Valdeci; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Viana, Glauce B

    2012-01-01

    Spirulina platensis (Spi) is a microalga presenting high contents of proteins, γ-linolenic acid, vitamins and minerals, and showing many biological activities. It is a promising drug for the treatment of diseases including diabetes. The objectives of this work were to study Spi effects on alloxan-induced diabetic rats, and associate this to its anti-inflammatory activity. The treatment with Spi (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg, p.o.) started 48 h after the alloxan injection, continuing for 5 or 10 days. Biochemical parameters were measured in sera of treated and untreated animals. The anti-inflammatory activity of Spi was assessed by the formalin test and carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. Immunostainings for TNF-alpha were carried out in the carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats, before and after the Spi treatment, and its effect on the release of myeloperoxidase from human neutrophils was also determined. Spi decreased glycemia as well as triglyceride and total cholesterol levels of diabetic rats. Levels of urea and creatinine were also reduced, while liver transaminases were unaltered. Spi also decreased dose-dependently the 1st (neurogenic) and mainly the 2nd phase (inflammatory) of the formalin test, as well as the carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of Spi was further confirmed by decreases in TNF-alpha immunostaining in the inflamed paw and in the myeloperoxidase release from human neutrophils. The results showed that the anti-diabetic effect of S. platensis is already manifested after a 5-day treatment. Additionally, considering the relationship between diabetes and inflammation, the microalga anti-inflammatory action may also be involved. PMID:22944720

  20. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  1. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  2. Acute porphyric disorders.

    PubMed

    Moore, A W; Coke, J M

    2000-09-01

    Acute porphyrias are classified into 3 distinct groups of rare genetic disorders of metabolic enzyme biosynthesis. Acute porphyrias can significantly impact multiple organ systems, which often provides a challenge to the dentist presented with such a patient. A case of hereditary coproporphyria is reported in a patient with many of the classical signs and symptoms. The patient also had complex dental needs that required special medical and pharmacotherapeutic modifications. The acute porphyrias are reviewed by the authors with presentation of this challenging case. Recommendations for other dental health care professionals encountering these patients are then presented. PMID:10982942

  3. Nickel(II) Complex of Polyhydroxybenzaldehyde N4-Thiosemicarbazone Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Sheng Wei; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Phan, Alicia Yi Ling; Wong, Won Fen; Wang, Hao; Paterson, Ian C.; Ea, Chee Kwee; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Background The biological properties of thiosemicarbazone have been widely reported. The incorporation of some transition metals such as Fe, Ni and Cu to thiosemicarbazone complexes is known to enhance its biological effects. In this study, we incorporated nickel(II) ions into thiosemicarbazone with N4-substitution groups H3L (H; H3L1, CH3; H3L2, C6H5; H3L3 and C2H5; H3L4) and examined its potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Four ligands (1–4) and their respective nickel-containing complexes (5–8) were synthesized and characterized. The compounds synthesized were tested for their effects on NF-κB nuclear translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NF-κB transactivation activity. The active compound was further evaluated on its ability to suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in vivo. A potential binding target of the active compound was also predicted by molecular docking analysis. Conclusions/Significance Among all synthesized compounds tested, we found that complex [Ni(H2L1)(PPh3)]Cl (5) (complex 5), potently inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells as well as TNFα-stimulated HeLa S3 cells. In addition, complex 5 significantly down-regulated LPS- or TNFα-induced transcription of NF-κB target genes, including genes that encode the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IFNβ and IL6. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that complex 5 inhibited the transactivation activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effect of complex 5 was also supported by its suppressive effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema formation in wild type C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, molecular docking study showed that complex 5 potentially interact with the active site of IKKβ. Taken together, we suggest complex 5 as a novel NF-κB inhibitor with potent anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24977407

  4. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sale You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... one of these diseases before they enter a weight-loss program. Also, they should not participate in a ...

  5. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  7. Acute coronary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Heart attack-ACS; Myocardial infarction-ACS; MI-ACS; Acute MI-ACS; ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-ACS; Unstable angina-ACS; Accelerating angina-ACS; New- ...

  8. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  10. Acute Flaccid Myelitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, ... from a variety of causes including viral infections. AFM is characterized by a sudden weakness in one ...

  11. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  12. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Radiation Emergencies & Your Health Possible Health Effects Contamination and Exposure Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) Cutaneous Radiation ... Decision Making in Radiation Emergencies Protective Actions Internal Contamination Clinical Reference (ICCR) Application Psychological First Aid in ...

  13. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Rania; Idowu, Modupe; Brown, Gregory S.; Jaber, Yasmeen M.; Reid, Matthew B.; Person, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP. PMID:25525547

  14. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    PubMed

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children. PMID:27613655

  15. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis impairs dermal lymphatic function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agollah, Germaine D; Wu, Grace; Peng, Ho-Lan; Kwon, Sunkuk

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether dermal lymphatic function and architecture are systemically altered in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. METHODS: Balb/c mice were administered 4% DSS in lieu of drinking water ad libitum for 7 d and monitored to assess disease activity including body weight, diarrhea severity, and fecal bleeding. Control mice received standard drinking water with no DSS. Changes in mesenteric lymphatics were assessed following oral administration of a fluorescently-labelled fatty acid analogue, while dermal lymphatic function and architecture was longitudinally characterized using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging following intradermal injection of indocyanine green (ICG) at the base of the tail or to the dorsal aspect of the left paw prior to, 4, and 7 d after DSS administration. We also measured dye clearance rate after injection of Alexa680-bovine serum albumin (BSA). NIRF imaging data was analyzed to reveal lymphatic contractile activity after selecting fixed regions of interest (ROIs) of the same size in fluorescent lymphatic vessels on fluorescence images. The averaged fluorescence intensity within the ROI of each fluorescence image was plotted as a function of imaging time and the lymphatic contraction frequency was computed by assessing the number of fluorescent pulses arriving at a ROI. RESULTS: Mice treated with DSS developed acute inflammation with clinical symptoms of loss of body weight, loose feces/watery diarrhea, and fecal blood, all of which were aggravated as disease progressed to 7 d. Histological examination of colons of DSS-treated mice confirmed acute inflammation, characterized by segmental to complete loss of colonic mucosa with an associated chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate that extended into the deeper layers of the wall of the colon, compared to control mice. In situ intravital imaging revealed that mice with acute colitis showed significantly fewer fluorescent mesenteric lymphatic vessels

  16. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenols-rich extract from tea (Camellia sinensis) flowers in acute and chronic mice models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bang-Tian; Li, Wei-Xi; He, Rong-Rong; Li, Yi-Fang; Tsoi, Bun; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Kurihara, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    While beneficial health properties of tea leaves have been extensively studied, less attention is paid to the flowers of tea. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of hot water extract of tea (Camellia sinensis) flowers were investigated. Pharmacological studies found that administration of tea flowers extract (TFE) could effectively inhibit croton oil-induced ear edema and carrageenin-induced paw edema. Furthermore, administration of TFE also protected against Propionibacterium acnes (P. ances) plus lipopolysaccharide-(LPS-) induced liver inflammation by reversing the histologic damage and plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase. Moreover, the levels of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-(TNF)-α and interleukin-(IL-) 1β mRNA in mouse liver were markedly suppressed after treatment with TFE in mice with immunological liver inflammation. These results indicated that tea flowers had potent anti-inflammatory effects on acute and immunological inflammation in vivo, and may be used as a functional natural food. PMID:22900128

  18. Acute bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sudhanshu; Jindal, Atul; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit C

    2011-11-01

    Acute asthma is the third commonest cause of pediatric emergency visits at PGIMER. Typically, it presents with acute onset respiratory distress and wheeze in a patient with past or family history of similar episodes. The severity of the acute episode of asthma is judged clinically and categorized as mild, moderate and severe. The initial therapy consists of oxygen, inhaled beta-2 agonists (salbutamol or terbutaline), inhaled budesonide (three doses over 1 h, at 20 min interval) in all and ipratropium bromide and systemic steroids (hydrocortisone or methylprednisolone) in acute severe asthma. Other causes of acute onset wheeze and breathing difficulty such as pneumonia, foreign body, cardiac failure etc. should be ruled out with help of chest radiography and appropriate laboratory investigations in first time wheezers and those not responding to 1 h of inhaled therapy. In case of inadequate response or worsening, intravenous infusion of magnesium sulphate, terbutaline or aminophylline may be used. Magnesium sulphate is the safest and most effective alternative among these. Severe cases may need ICU care and rarely, ventilatory support. PMID:21769523

  19. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  20. Hubbard physics in the PAW GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, J. M.; Drumm, D. W.; Casey, P. S.; Smith, J. S.; Russo, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    It is demonstrated that the signatures of the Hubbard Model in the strongly interacting regime can be simulated by modifying the screening in the limit of zero wavevector in Projector-Augmented Wave GW calculations for systems without significant nesting. This modification, when applied to the Mott insulator CuO, results in the opening of the Mott gap by the splitting of states at the Fermi level into upper and lower Hubbard bands, and exhibits a giant transfer of spectral weight upon electron doping. The method is also employed to clearly illustrate that the M1 and M2 forms of vanadium dioxide are fundamentally different types of insulator. Standard GW calculations are sufficient to open a gap in M1 VO2, which arise from the Peierls pairing filling the valence band, creating homopolar bonds. The valence band wavefunctions are stabilized with respect to the conduction band, reducing polarizability and pushing the conduction band eigenvalues to higher energy. The M2 structure, however, opens a gap from strong on-site interactions; it is a Mott insulator.

  1. Hubbard physics in the PAW GW approximation.

    PubMed

    Booth, J M; Drumm, D W; Casey, P S; Smith, J S; Russo, S P

    2016-06-28

    It is demonstrated that the signatures of the Hubbard Model in the strongly interacting regime can be simulated by modifying the screening in the limit of zero wavevector in Projector-Augmented Wave GW calculations for systems without significant nesting. This modification, when applied to the Mott insulator CuO, results in the opening of the Mott gap by the splitting of states at the Fermi level into upper and lower Hubbard bands, and exhibits a giant transfer of spectral weight upon electron doping. The method is also employed to clearly illustrate that the M1 and M2 forms of vanadium dioxide are fundamentally different types of insulator. Standard GW calculations are sufficient to open a gap in M1 VO2, which arise from the Peierls pairing filling the valence band, creating homopolar bonds. The valence band wavefunctions are stabilized with respect to the conduction band, reducing polarizability and pushing the conduction band eigenvalues to higher energy. The M2 structure, however, opens a gap from strong on-site interactions; it is a Mott insulator. PMID:27369500

  2. Keyboard Success: MicroType PAWS Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidanque, Ann; And Others

    This is a teacher's guide to a 30-lesson keyboarding program for elementary and middle school students. The primary instructional objectives are to teach students how to: (1) keyboard from a correct position; (2) identify the names for the fingers to be used to keyboard; and (3) locate the most frequently used keys with the correct finger. No…

  3. Southwest PAVE PAWS radar system: Environmental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, S. J.; Edson, W. A.; Heynick, L. N.; Pierce, S. R.; Shepherd, R. A.; Wlaklet, T. H.

    1983-03-01

    This document describes the probable environmental impacts of constructing and operating a new surveillance and tracking radar that would operate between 420 and 450 MHz. Four candidate sites in the vicinity of Goodfellow Air Force Base were considered. The impact analysis found that chronic exposure of humans to the radiofrequency radiation levels outside the exclusion fence is not likely to be harmful. No hazards would be associated with fuel handling or cardiac pacemakers at ground level beyond the exclusion fence. Interference with TV reception and other home electronic systems and with UHF land mobile and amateur radios is possible, depending on the site. Handling and use of electro-explosive devices (EEDs) would be safe beyond about 1.2 miles for the basic system and about 2.4 miles for the optional, higher power system. Electromagnetic interference with radar altimeters, air navigation, and air-ground communication is not likely except at two candidate sites, where interference and EED and pacemaker hazards may exist for aircraft operating into or out of a nearby landing strip. No significant adverse biophysical impacts are expected in any location.

  4. Antinociceptive and antiedematogenic properties and acute toxicity of Tabebuia avellanedae Lor. ex Griseb. inner bark aqueous extract

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Fábio Guilherme Gonçalves; Vilar, Jeane Carvalho; Alves, Ivana Andréa Nunes; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Antoniolli, Ângelo Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Background Tabebuia avellanedae is a tree from the Bignoniaceae family. Commonly know as "pau d'arco" in Brazil, its inner bark is used as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antineoplasic and diuretic at the Brazilian northeast. A validation of the plant usage has not been previously performed. Results Antinociceptive and antiedematogenic effects of Tabebuia avellanedae Lor. ex Griseb. inner bark were measured by nociceptive experimental models in mice. A rat paw edema test induced by carrageenan (1%) was also performed in rats to access the plant's antiedematogenic effect. The inner bark aqueous extract, administered via oral in three different concentration, namely 100, 200 and 400 mg/Kg, reduced the nociception produced by acetic acid (0.6% in water, i.p.) by 49.9%, 63.7% and 43.8%, respectively. The aqueous extract (200 and 400 mg/Kg, p.o.) reduced formalin (1%) effects only at the second phase of the experiment by 49.3% and 53.7%, respectively. Naloxone (5 mg/Kg, i.p.) was not able to revert the extract effect, however caffeine (10 mg/Kg, i.p.) reverted its effect by 19.8% at the second phase of the formalin test. The aqueous extract (200 mg/Kg, p.o.) inhibited edema by 12.9% when we used the rat paw edema model. The acute toxicity was low in mice. Conclusion The T. avellanedae inner bark aqueous extract presented antinociceptive and antiedematogenic activities at the used models, with a possible antinociceptive effect associated to the adenosine system. PMID:11574048

  5. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  6. Acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Barie, Philip S; Eachempati, Soumitra R

    2003-08-01

    Acute cholecystitis can develop without gallstones in critically ill or injured patients. However, the development of acute acalculous cholecystitis is not limited to surgical or injured patients, or even to the intensive care unit. Diabetes, malignant disease, abdominal vasculitis, congestive heart failure, cholesterol embolization, and shock or cardiac arrest have been associated with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Children may also be affected, especially after a viral illness. The pathogenesis of acute acalculous cholecystitis is a paradigm of complexity. Ischemia and reperfusion injury, or the effects of eicosanoid proinflammatory mediators, appear to be the central mechanisms, but bile stasis, opioid therapy, positive-pressure ventilation, and total parenteral nutrition have all been implicated. Ultrasound of the gallbladder is the most accurate diagnostic modality in the critically ill patient, with gallbladder wall thickness of 3.5 mm or greater and pericholecystic fluid being the two most reliable criteria. The historical treatment of choice for acute acalculous cholecystitis has been cholecystectomy, but percutaneous cholecystostomy is now the mainstay of therapy, controlling the disease in about 85% of patients. Rapid improvement can be expected when the procedure is performed properly. The mortality rates (historically about 30%) for percutaneous and open cholecystostomy appear to be similar, reflecting the severity of illness, but improved resuscitation and critical care may portend a decreased risk of death. Interval cholecystectomy is usually not indicated after acute acalculous cholecystitis in survivors; if the absence of gallstones is confirmed and the precipitating disorder has been controlled, the cholecystostomy tube can be pulled out after the patient has recovered. PMID:12864960

  7. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  8. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  9. Acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.S.; Wilk, P.J.; Weissmann, H.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Gliedman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty-eight patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were reviewed. The results of history and physical examinations were usually nondiagnostic. IDA cholescintigraphy (93 per cent accuracy rate) was the only reliable diagnostic modality. The results of oral cholecystography, intravenous cholangiography and ultrasonography were considerably less reliable. One-half of the patients had gangrenous cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy was the preferred operation with an over-all mortality of 9 per cent. IDA cholescintigraphy is an important new modality for the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis which, in the past, has often been difficult to diagnose.

  10. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  11. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. PMID:27343961

  12. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  13. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  14. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rosa damascena Hydroalcoholic Extract and its Essential Oil in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Ghannadi, Alireza; Hajiloo, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Extracts obtained from the petals of Rosa damascena (Rosaceae) are used in Iranian folk medicine as remedies for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases. In this study the hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of the plant were investigated for its possible anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The extract was administered at the doses (p.o.) of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg and the doses of essential oil were 100, 200 and 400 μL/kg. The acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin-induced paw licking time in the early and late phases and light tail flick test were used in mice to assess analgesic activity. For evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect carrageenan-induced paw edema served as a valid animal model in rats. The extract significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid and also showed potent analgesic effect in both phases of formalin test but not in light tail flick test. In addition, the higher dose of the extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. Essential oil of the plant at all administered doses failed to show any analgesic or anti-inflammatory effect in above mentioned tests. These results provide support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena in relieving inflammatory pain, and insight into the development of new agents for treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:24363723

  15. Mechanical properties, skin permeation and in vivo evaluations of dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Son, Mi Woon; Jang, Sun Woo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the gel properties, skin permeation and in vivo drug efficacy of a novel dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel for topical delivery. In this study, the dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel and ibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel were prepared with isopropanol, Tween 80, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate and carbopol. Their mechanical properties such as hardness and adhesiveness were assessed. Moreover, their skin permeation, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell with the hairless mouse skin, the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test and paw pressure test in rat's hind paws compared with the commercial hydrogel, respectively. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel and ibuprofen emulsion gel provided significantly higher hardness and adhesiveness than the commercial hydrogel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel enhanced skin permeability by about twofold and 3.5-fold without lag time compared to the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, respectively, suggesting its faster skin permeation. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory efficacy and alleviation in carrageenan-induced inflammation was in the order of dexibuprofen emulsion gel > commercial hydrogel > ibuprofen emulsion gel. The dexibuprofen emulsion gel furnished significantly higher nociceptive thresholds than the ibuprofen emulsion gel and the commercial hydrogel, leading to the most improved anti-nociceptive efficacy. Thus, this dexibuprofen-loaded emulsion gel with good mechanical property, rapid skin permeation and excellent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive efficacy would be a strong candidate for the topical delivery of anti-inflammatory dexibuprofen. PMID:24988989

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Flowers and Buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition and investigate the anti-inflammatory property of the supercritical-carbon dioxide extract from flowers and buds of C. indicum (CISCFE). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated in four animal models including xylene-induced mouse ear edema, acetic acid-induced mouse vascular permeability, carrageenan-induced mouse hind paw edema, and cotton pellet-induced rat granuloma formation. The results indicated that CISCFE significantly attenuated xylene-induced ear edema, decreased acetic acid-induced capillary permeability, reduced carrageenan-induced paw, and inhibited the cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation in a dose-dependent manner. Histopathologically, CISCFE abated inflammatory response of the edema paw. Preliminary mechanistic studies demonstrated that CISCFE decreased the MDA level via increasing the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx, and GRd), attenuated the productions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 and NO, and suppressed the activities of iNOS and COX-2. In phytochemical study, 35 compounds were identified by GC-MS, and 5 compounds (chlorogenic acid, luteolin-7-glucoside, linarin, luteolin and acacetin) were reconfirmed and quantitatively determined by HPLC-PAD. This paper firstly analyzed the chemical composition by combining GC-MS with HPLC-PAD and explored possible mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effect of CISCFE. PMID:24223056

  17. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  18. Acute coronary care 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Califf, R.M.; Wagner, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the titles are: The measurement of acute myocardial infarct size by CT; Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of myocardial ischemia and infarction; Poistron imaging in the evaluation of ischemia and myocardial infarction; and New inotropic agents.

  19. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  20. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  1. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  2. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  3. Acute hepatitis E complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiorgan dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Khan, Zohaib; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna; Rao, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    We report this rare case of a 27-year-old man who presented with acute hepatitis E and went on to develop acute epigastric pain. He was diagnosed to have acute severe pancreatitis with shock and acute renal failure due to hepatitis E. Such a phenomenon has rarely been reported in the literature, with patients following a benign course and complete recovery after conservative management and analgesia. Awareness of this potentially life-threatening complication, especially in young men from endemic areas with acute hepatitis E presenting with abdomen pain has been highlighted. PMID:24899005

  4. Toxicological Evaluation of Emblica officinalis Fruit Extract and its Anti-inflammatory and Free Radical Scavenging Properties

    PubMed Central

    Middha, Sushil Kumar; Goyal, Arvind Kumar; Lokesh, Prakash; Yardi, Varsha; Mojamdar, Lavanya; Keni, Deepthi Sudhir; Babu, Dinesh; Usha, Talambedu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emblica officinalis (Euphorbiaceae), popularly known as Indian gooseberry or “Amla” in India, is used in Ayurveda as “rejuvenating herb” since ancient times. Objective: This study was carried out to estimate toxicity, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative activities of the methanolic extract of Emblica officinalis fruit (MEO) in an animal model. Materials and Methods: Antioxidative property of MEO was assessed by in vitro assays such as phosphomolybdenum assay (total antioxidant capacity), free radical scavenging assays 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2’-azino-bis and 3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (DPPH and ABTS method) and lipid peroxidation assay (LPO). The anti-inflammatory property was evaluated by carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in rats by measuring rat paw volume at different time intervals and toxicological analysis using mice. Results and Discussion: High performance liquid chromatography studies revealed the presence of gallic acid (2.10%), mucic acid (4.90%), ellagic acid (2.10%), quercetin (28.00%), rutin (3.89%), and β-glucogallin (1.46%). MEO showed highest antioxidant activities by using DPPH (17.33–89.00%), ABTS (23.03–94.16%), nitric oxide scavenging activity (12.94–70.16%), LPO (56.54%), and phosphomolybdenum assay (142 ± 6.09 μg/ml). The LD50 was found to be approximately 1125 mg/kg (p.o). High dose of MEO showed significant reduction (72.71%) in the inflammation after 4 h of treatment, which was comparable to diclofenac (10 mg/kg) (61.57%) treated group. Significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) markers were also observed (57.25% and 35.41%, respectively) in serum of MEO treated animals as compared to control. Conclusion: Taken together, phenolic compounds of MEO may serve as a potential herbal drug for amelioration of acute inflammation due to their modulatory action on free radicals. SUMMARY The methanolic extract of Emblica

  5. The effectiveness of Echinacea extract or composite glucosamine, chondroitin and methyl sulfonyl methane supplements on acute and chronic rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Nadia Ms; Hamuda, Hayam M; Melek, Samuel T; Darwish, Sahar K

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of the oral administration for 15 days of either Echinacea (E) or genuphil (a composite of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine and methyl sulfonyl methane [GCM]) nutraceutical supplements on female rat model of acute or chronic arthritis induced by bacterial outer membrane protein (OMP) from faecal flora of healthy and rheumatic humans. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) values increased (p < 0.05) in both arthritic groups as compared to normal values. The rheumatic markers anti-CCP2, CRP and RF values decreased significantly in E- and GCM-treated groups compared to arthritic none-treated acute or chronic groups. The results of RF values of GCM-treated groups in acute and chronic models decreased exhibiting no statistical difference compared with the normal value. Histological examinations of the hind paw sections revealed moderate inflammation, oedema and mild proliferation of synovial cells in acute arthritic rats and more damage to cartilage and bone with severe inflammation in chronic ones. Echinacea acute treated group showed edema with proliferated synovial membrane and partial damage in cartilage and bone. While in the E-chronic treated group, rough edge with destructed cartilage and bone existed. However, the acute GCM group revealed mild cartilage damage. But the chronic GCM group showed mild synovial cells proliferation and revealed no inflammation with mild cartilage damage edge. Results demonstrated the OMP arthropathic property and through promising light on arthritis treatment using E- or GCM, with the advantage of GMC results over that of E-. The composite GCM is needed for further studies over the dose and duration to assess its preventive effects against the bacterial OMP arthrogenicity. PMID:22173958

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of Abutilon indicum extract.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Chauhan, N S; Patel, J R

    2012-01-01

    Abutilon indicum Linn. had been broadly used for its reported biological activities in indigenous system of medicine. The ethanolic extract of the whole plant of A. indicum Linn. was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity at doses 250, 500 and 750 mg kg⁻¹ using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema in healthy Wistar albino rats. Results of in vivo activity led to the conclusion that the ethanolic extract of A. indicum showed predominantly significant activity in a dose-dependent manner, which is comparable to the reference standard ibuprofen. The results prove the traditional use of plant in the treatment of inflammation. PMID:21999427

  7. Synthesis and biological activities of certain mesoionic sydnone compounds containing chalcone moiety.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Shreenivas R; Pai, K Vasantakumar

    2010-06-01

    In order to have antibacterial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity in the same molecule, 4-[1-oxo-3- (substituted aryl)-2-propenyl]-3-(4-chlorophenyl) sydnones were synthesized by condensing 4-acetyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)sydnone with various substituted aryl aldehydes and characterized by spectral studies; 4-acetyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)sydnone itself, was prepared by acetylation of 3-(4-chlorophenyl) sydnone. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities by cup plate and carrageenan induced rat paw edema methods respectively. Some of the compounds showed promising antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24825982

  8. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of bromelain by its encapsulation in katira gum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bernela, Manju; Ahuja, Munish; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Bromelain-loaded katira gum nanoparticles were synthesized using 3 level optimization process and desirability approach. Nanoparticles of the optimized batch were characterized using particle size analysis, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Investigation of their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by employing carrageenan induced rat-paw oedema method showed that encapsulation of bromelain in katira gum nanoparticles substantially enhanced its anti-inflammatory potential. This may be attributed to enhanced absorption owing to reduced particle size or to protection of bromelain from acid proteases. PMID:27083339

  9. SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF CERTAIN MESOIONIC SYDNONE COMPOUNDS CONTAINING CHALCONE MOIETY

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Shreenivas R.; Pai, K. Vasantakumar

    2010-01-01

    In order to have antibacterial, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity in the same molecule, 4-[1-oxo-3- (substituted aryl)-2-propenyl]-3-(4-chlorophenyl) sydnones were synthesized by condensing 4-acetyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)sydnone with various substituted aryl aldehydes and characterized by spectral studies; 4-acetyl-3-(4-chlorophenyl)sydnone itself, was prepared by acetylation of 3-(4-chlorophenyl) sydnone. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities by cup plate and carrageenan induced rat paw edema methods respectively. Some of the compounds showed promising antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities PMID:24825982

  10. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activity of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid from Annona reticulata L. bark.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Machindra J; Kolhe, Dinesh R; Wakte, Pravin S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2012-02-01

    Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was isolated from the bark of Annona reticulata and studied for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. Analgesic activity was assessed using the hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing, and the antiinflammatory activity using the carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg, exhibited significant (p < 0.05) analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. These activities were comparable to the standard drugs used, and furthermore the analgesic effect of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was blocked by naloxone (2 mg/kg) in both analgesic models. PMID:21674631

  11. Dimethyl-diphenyl-propanamide derivatives as nonsteroidal dissociated glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingwei V; Weinstein, David S; Doweyko, Lidia M; Gong, Hua; Vaccaro, Wayne; Huynh, Tram; Xiao, Hai-Yun; Doweyko, Arthur M; McKay, Lorraine; Holloway, Deborah A; Somerville, John E; Habte, Sium; Cunningham, Mark; McMahon, Michele; Townsend, Robert; Shuster, David; Dodd, John H; Nadler, Steven G; Barrish, Joel C

    2010-12-01

    A series of 2,2-dimethyl-3,3-diphenyl-propanamides as novel glucocorticoid receptor modulators is reported. SAR exploration led to the identification of 4-hydroxyphenyl propanamide derivatives displaying good agonist activity in GR-mediated transrepression assays and reduced agonist activity in GR-mediated transactivation assays. Compounds 17 and 30 showed anti-inflammatory activity comparable to prednisolone in the rat carrageenan-induced paw edema model, with markedly decreased side effects with regard to increases in blood glucose and expression of hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase. A hypothetical binding mode accounting for the induction of the functional activity by a 4-hydroxyl group is proposed. PMID:21073190

  12. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of polysaccharide from Chlorella stigmatophora and Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, S; Gato, A; Lamela, M; Freire-Garabal, M; Calleja, J M

    2003-06-01

    Crude polysaccharide extracts were obtained from aqueous extracts of the microalgae Chlorella stigmatophora and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The crude extracts were fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose columns. The molecular weights of the polysaccharides in each fraction were estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl columns. The crude polysaccharide extracts of both microalgae showed anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. In assays of effects on the delayed hyper-sensitivity response, and on phagocytic activity assayed in vivo and in vitro, the C. stigmatophora extract showed immunosuppressant effects, while the P. tricornutum extract showed immunostimulatory effects. PMID:12820237

  13. Acute gangrenous cholecystitis: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Ramanna, L.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-04-01

    Radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with Tc-99m IDA is a useful procedure for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gallbladder essentially rules out acute cholecystitis. Nonvisualization suggest acute cholecystitis but may also be associated with chronic gallbladder disease or other conditions. The authors recently observed five patients in whom a rim of increased parenchymal liver activity was seen adjacent to the gallbladder fossa. All five patients had acute gangrenous cholecystitis. The rim of increased activity appears to be a useful secondary sign of acute cholecystitis.

  14. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  15. Sustained inflation and incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a large porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muellenbach, Ralf M; Kredel, Markus; Zollhoefer, Bernd; Wunder, Christian; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Joerg

    2006-01-01

    Background To compare the effect of a sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial during conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation on oxygenation and hemodynamics in a large porcine model of early acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Severe lung injury (Ali) was induced in 18 healthy pigs (55.3 ± 3.9 kg, mean ± SD) by repeated saline lung lavage until PaO2 decreased to less than 60 mmHg. After a stabilisation period of 60 minutes, the animals were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 (Pressure controlled ventilation; PCV): FIO2 = 1.0, PEEP = 5 cmH2O, VT = 6 ml/kg, respiratory rate = 30/min, I:E = 1:1; group 2 (High-frequency oscillatory ventilation; HFOV): FIO2 = 1.0, Bias flow = 30 l/min, Amplitude = 60 cmH2O, Frequency = 6 Hz, I:E = 1:1. A sustained inflation (SI; 50 cmH2O for 60s) followed by an incremental mean airway pressure (mPaw) trial (steps of 3 cmH2O every 15 minutes) were performed in both groups until PaO2 no longer increased. This was regarded as full lung inflation. The mPaw was decreased by 3 cmH2O and the animals reached the end of the study protocol. Gas exchange and hemodynamic data were collected at each step. Results The SI led to a significant improvement of the PaO2/FiO2-Index (HFOV: 200 ± 100 vs. PCV: 58 ± 15 and TAli: 57 ± 12; p < 0.001) and PaCO2-reduction (HFOV: 42 ± 5 vs. PCV: 62 ± 13 and TAli: 55 ± 9; p < 0.001) during HFOV compared to lung injury and PCV. Augmentation of mPaw improved gas exchange and pulmonary shunt fraction in both groups, but at a significant lower mPaw in the HFOV treated animals. Cardiac output was continuously deteriorating during the recruitment manoeuvre in both study groups (HFOV: TAli: 6.1 ± 1 vs. T75: 3.4 ± 0.4; PCV: TAli: 6.7 ± 2.4 vs. T75: 4 ± 0.5; p < 0.001). Conclusion A sustained inflation followed by an incremental mean airway pressure trial in HFOV improved oxygenation at a lower mPaw than during conventional lung protective

  16. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  17. Acute Resistance Exercise Induces Antinociception by Activation of the Endocannabinoid System in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; da Silva, José Felippe Pinho; Aguiar, Daniele; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Methods Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase of endocannabinoid plasma levels. Conclusion The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception. PMID:24977916

  18. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  19. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  20. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  1. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  2. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  3. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  4. [Acute Chest Pain].

    PubMed

    Gmür, Christian

    2016-02-17

    Acute chest pain is a frequent consultation reason in general practice as well as in emergency departments. With the help of history, physical examination, ECG, laboratory and newly developed risk scores, potentially life-threatening diseases and high-risk patients may be detected and treated early, quickly and cost-effectively. New biomarkers and their combination with risk scores can increase the negative predictive value to exclude certain diseases. PMID:26886697

  5. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4000 million cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 1996, resulting in 2.5 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries traveling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, and oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution). PMID:19450323

  6. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  7. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Xue; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The objective of this review is to determine the effects and, when possible, the safety of acupuncture for the treatment of acute hordeola, in comparison to no specific treatment (e.g., observation), sham acupuncture, or other active treatments. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment also will be compared to that treatment alone. PMID:25214814

  8. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  9. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Lais Martins Moreira; Marcondes, Mariana Barros; Lima, Mariana Ferreira; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Okoshi, Marina Politi

    2014-07-01

    Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci) is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine. PMID:25229278

  10. [Acute coronary syndromes: epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Alev Arat

    2013-04-01

    Coronary heart disease is the main cause of death in the world as well as in Turkey. It's not only a health issue but also a social problem with a high economic burden and negative impact on quality of life. The majority of deaths are attributable to acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their complications.This review summarizes some important facts regarding ACS epidemiology in the world and in Turkey. PMID:27323430

  11. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Bi-yuan-ling granules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bing; Su, Han-Wen; Liu, Huan-Xiang; Yin, Xian; He, Feng; Ren, Yong-Shen; Dai, Kang; Xiang, Mei-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Bi-yuan-ling granule (BLG) is a traditional Chinese medicine compound composed mainly of baicalin and chlorogenic acid. It has been demonstrated to be clinically effective for various inflammatory diseases such as acute rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, atrophic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms of BLG against these diseases are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of BLG, and examine its protective effects on mouse acute lung injury (ALI). The hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing assay in Kunming mice were adopted to evaluate the pain-relieving effects of BLG. The anti-inflammatory activities of BLG were determined by examining the effects of BLG on xylene-caused ear swelling in Kunming mice, the cotton pellet-induced granuloma in rats, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. The results showed that BLG at 15.5 mg/g could significantly relieve the pain by 82.5% (P<0.01) at 1 h after thermal stimulation and 91.2% (P<0.01) at 2 h after thermal stimulation. BLG at doses of 7.75 and 15.5 mg/g reduced the writhing count up to 33.3% (P<0.05) and 53.4% (P<0.01), respectively. Additionally, the xylene-induced edema in mice was markedly restrained by BLG at 7.75 mg/g (P<0.05) and 15.5 mg/g (P<0.01). BLG at 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g significantly reduced paw edema by 34.8% (P<0.05) and 37.9% (P<0.05) at 5 h after carrageenan injection. The granulomatous formation of the cotton pellet was profoundly suppressed by BLG at 2.68, 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g by 15.4%, 38.2% (P<0.01) and 58.9% (P<0.001), respectively. BLG also inhibited lung W/D ratio and the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in ALI mice. In addition, the median lethal dose (LD50), median effective dose (ED50) and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of BLG were found to be 42.7, 3.2 and 12.33 mg/g, respectively. All the findings suggest that BLG has

  12. Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Tudorache, Elena; Bensman, Albert; Aoun, Bilal

    2012-07-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is a frequent cause of acute renal failure, characterised by the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate in the interstitium of the kidney. Immuno-allergic reaction to certain medications, mainly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics are by far the most important etiology for TIN today, but other situations such as infections, toxins, and vasculitis are known to induce TIN. Incidence of TIN is increasing, probably due to prescription habits and NSAID overuse, representing 3-7% of acute kidney injury in biopsies in children. Avoidance of the causal substance and rapid steroid therapy are hallmarks for patient care, but spontaneous initial recovery is very frequent and the general prognosis seems satisfactory. However, development of chronic TIN, without response to steroid or other immunosuppressive treatment, is possible. As the largest part of TIN is secondary to certain drugs, clear indications in particular for NSAID or antibiotics should be respected to reduce the number of TIN cases. PMID:21638156

  13. Acute lung injury review.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Kenji; King, Landon S; Aggarwal, Neil R; De Gorordo, Antonio; D'Alessio, Franco R; Kubo, Keishi

    2009-01-01

    The first report of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was published in 1967, and even now acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS are severe forms of diffuse lung disease that impose a substantial health burden all over the world. Recent estimates indicate approximately 190,000 cases per year of ALI in the United States each year, with an associated 74,500 deaths per year. Common causes of ALI/ARDS are sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, aspiration pneumonia, pancreatitis, and so on. Several pathologic stages of ALI/ARDS have been described: acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, fibroproliferative phase with hyaline membranes, with varying degrees of interstitial fibrosis, and resolution phase. There has been intense investigation into the pathophysiologic events relevant to each stage of ALI/ARDS, and much has been learned in the alveolar epithelial, endobronchial homeostasis, and alveolar cell immune responses, especially neutrophils and alveolar macrophages in an animal model. However, these effective results in the animal models are not equally adoptive to those in randomized, controlled trials. The clinical course of ALI/ARDS is variable with the likely pathophysiologic complexity of human ALI/ARDS. In 1994, the definition was recommended by the American-European Consensus Conference Committee, which facilitated easy nomination of patients with ALI/ARDS for a randomized, clinical trial. Here, we review the recent randomized, clinical trials of ALI/ARDS. PMID:19420806

  14. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of Scoparia dulcis L. and betulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Peng, Wen-Huang; Chiu, Tai-Hui; Lai, Shang-Chih; Lee, Chao-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study intended to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the 70% ethanol extract from Scoparia dulcis (SDE) and betulinic acid on λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of SDE and betulinic acid was examined by detecting the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the edema paw tissue and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRd) in the liver. The betulinic acid content in SDE was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the anti-inflammatory model, the results showed that SDE (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) and betulinic acid (20 and 40 mg/kg) reduced the paw edema at 3, 4 and 5 h after λ-carrageenan administration. Moreover, SDE and betulinic acid affected the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in the λ-carrageenan-induced edema paws. The activities of SOD, GPx and GRd in the liver tissue were increased and the MDA levels in the edema paws were decreased. It is suggested that SDE and betulinic acid possessed anti-inflammatory activities and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms appear to be related to the reduction of the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in inflamed tissues, as well as the inhibition of MDA level via increasing the activities of SOD, GPx and GRd. The analytical result showed that the content of betulinic acid in SDE was 6.25 mg/g extract. PMID:21905284

  16. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Cholescintigraphy in acute acalculous cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Brachman, M.B.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Berman, D.S.; Waxman, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a relatively rare but potentially lethal condition if not treated promptly. Since stones are not present, diagnostic procedures such as ultrasound or other radiological procedures are frequently not helpful. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid scan results were analyzed in 11 proven cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis. All had positive tests with nonvisualization of the gallbladder giving a sensitivity of 100%. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy is a highly reliable test and is easily performed even in acutely ill patients and should be the test of choice in all patients predisposed to and suspected of acute acalculous cholecystitis.

  18. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  19. [Acute toxic pneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Garnier, R

    1998-06-15

    The nature and extent of the acute injury due to toxic inhalants depend on the inhalant's solubility in water pH and chemical reactivity, on the aerodynamic diameter of particles (when the inhalant is an aerosol), and on the degree of exposure. Initial signs and symptoms indicate upper airways and bronchial irritation. Laryngeal oedema and (or) severe bronchospasm may be rapidly lethal. After cessation of exposure a transient improvement is generally observed; however a delayed pulmonary oedema may occur within the first 48 hours. On the following days, bacterial surinfection is a common complication. Possible long-term sequelae are reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and bronchiolitis obliterans. PMID:9781191

  20. Acute Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andrew H

    2016-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is a well-known pathophysiologic complication of trauma or tissue ischemia. ACS affects the appearance, function, and even the viability of the involved limb, and demands immediate diagnosis and treatment. However, ACS is difficult to diagnose and the only effective treatment is decompressive surgical fasciotomy. The clinical signs and symptoms may easily be attributed to other aspects of the injury, which further complicates the diagnosis. This article highlights the latest information regarding the diagnosis of ACS, how to perform fasciotomies, how to manage fasciotomy wounds, and also reviews complications and outcomes of ACS. PMID:27241376

  1. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP. PMID:26253266

  2. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. PMID:27373613

  3. Molecular modeling of lectin-like protein from Acacia farnesiana reveals a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism in Carrageenan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β -strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  4. Molecular Modeling of Lectin-Like Protein from Acacia farnesiana Reveals a Possible Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Vanessa Erika Ferreira; Matias da Rocha, Bruno Anderson; Batista da Nóbrega, Raphael; Silva-Filho, José Caetano; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; Ferreira, Sergio Henrique; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Delatorre, Plinio

    2013-01-01

    Acacia farnesiana lectin-like protein (AFAL) is a chitin-binding protein and has been classified as phytohaemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA). Legume lectins are examples for structural studies, and this family of proteins shows a remarkable conservation in primary, secondary, and tertiary structures. Lectins have ability to reduce the effects of inflammation caused by phlogistic agents, such as carrageenan (CGN). This paper explains the anti-inflammatory activity of AFAL through structural comparison with anti-inflammatory legume lectins. The AFAL model was obtained by molecular modeling and molecular docking with glycan and carrageenan were performed to explain the AFAL structural behavior and biological activity. Pisum sativum lectin was the best template for molecular modeling. The AFAL structure model is folded as a β sandwich. The model differs from template in loop regions, number of β strands and carbohydrate-binding site. Carrageenan and glycan bind to different sites on AFAL. The ability of AFAL binding to carrageenan can be explained by absence of the sixth β-strand (posterior β sheets) and two β strands in frontal region. AFAL can inhibit pathway inflammatory process by carrageenan injection by connecting to it and preventing its entry into the cell and triggers the reaction. PMID:24490151

  5. Pain Modulation by Lignans (Phyllanthin and Hypophyllanthin) and Tannin (Corilagin) Rich Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus in Carrageenan-induced Thermal and Mechanical Chronic Muscle Hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chopade, Atul R; Sayyad, F J

    2015-08-01

    The current study was aimed at evaluating the antihyperalgesic effects of lignans (phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin) and tannin (corilagin) rich three standardized extracts of Phyllanthus amarus in a model of chronic musculoskeletal inflammatory pain. Three percent carrageenan injected in the gastrocnemius muscle produced hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli ipsilaterally, which spreads to the contralateral side within 7 to 9 days. To investigate the effects on chronic thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity, three extracts of P. amarus in three doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) were administered to animals intraperitoneally from 14th day to 22nd day after intramuscular injection of carrageenan. It was observed that intraperitoneal administrations of Phyllanthus extracts showed antihyperalgesic activity, as they elevated thermal and mechanical threshold, which was supported by histopathological observations along with reduction in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration. In conclusion, we strongly suggest that the observed antihyperalgesic and antiinflammatory effects of P. amarus in current pain model are mediated via spinal or supraspinal neuronal mechanisms, mainly by inhibition of PGE2. Modulation of chronic muscular inflammation may be due to presence of phytoconstituents like phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, and corilagin, which offers a promising means for treatment of chronic muscle pain. PMID:25974715

  6. CARRAGEENAN-INDUCED NFκB ACTIVATION DEPENDS ON DISTINCT PATHWAYS MEDIATED BY REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND HSP27 OR BY BCL10

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Carrageenans are highly sulfated polysaccharides that are widely used as food additives due to their ability to improve food texture. They are also widely recognized for their ability to induce inflammation in animal models of colitis. Recently, we reported that carrageenan (CGN) activated a pathway of innate immunity in human colonic epithelial cells mediated by Bcl10 (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10). However, increases in phospho-IκBα and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were not completely inhibited by silencing Bcl10, suggesting that CGN also influenced another mechanism, or mechanisms, of inflammation. In this report, we demonstrate that CGN increases production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human colonic epithelial cells. The combination of ROS quenching by the free radical scavenger Tempol and of Bcl10 silencing by siRNA completely inhibited the CGN-induced increases in nuclear NFκB (p65), phospho-IκBα, and secretion of IL-8. The CGN-induced increase in ROS was associated with declines in phosphorylation of MAPK 12 (p38γ), MAPK 13 (p38δ), and heat-shock protein (Hsp) 27. The CGN-induced decline in phospho-Hsp27 was reversed by co-administration of Tempol (100nM), but unaffected by silencing Bcl10. Since Hsp27 phosphorylation is inversely associated with phosphorylation of the IκBα kinase (IKK) signalosome, CGN exposure appears to affect the IKK signalosome by both the catalytic component, mediated by ROS-phospho-Hsp27, and the regulatory component, mediated by Bcl10 interaction with IKKγ (Nemo). Hence, the CGN-activated inflammatory cascades related to innate immunity and to generation of ROS may be integrated at the level of the IKK signalosome. PMID:18452717

  7. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Activity and In-vitro Antioxidant Activity of Indian Mistletoe, the Hemiparasite Dendrophthoe falcate L. F. (Loranthaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Satish; Anarthe, Sneha; Jadhav, Ram; Surana, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Methanolic and aqueous extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata Linn. leaves which belongs to the Loranthaceae family, were evaluated through DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl -2-picryl-hydrazyl), antilipid peroxidation and nitric oxide scavenging methods to assess the antioxidant activity. Methanolic and aqueous extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves were also evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan and cotton pellet induced granuloma tests for their effect on the acute and chronic phase inflammation models in rats. It was found that the methanolic extract of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves demonstrates potent antioxidant activity as compared to aqueous extraction of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves for DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl) radical scavenging, anti-lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide scavenging activity respectively (having IC50 value 77.8, 79.36 and 86.2, 144, 87, 104). The maximum inhibition for aqueous extract of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves (30.95%) and methanolic extract of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves (23.41%) were obtained at a dose of 300 mg/Kg after 4h of drug treatment in carrageenan induced paw edema, whereas diclofenac sodium (standard drug) produced 42.85% inhibition. In the chronic model (cotton pellet induced granuloma), aqueous extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves and methanolic extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves (at doses of 300 mg/Kg), phenylbutazone as standard drug showed decreased formation of granuloma tissue by 51%, 48%, 53% respectively. In addition, the total phenolic and flavonoid content of aqueous extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves and methanolic extracts of Dendrophthoe falcata leaves were found to be 2.12 % w/w, 4.39 % w/w, 0.31 mg/g and 0.85 mg/g respectively. Thus the results indicate that methanolic and aqueous extracts of Dendrophthoe falcataleaves on animal models have potent anti-inflammatory and in-vitro antioxidant effects. PMID:24250351

  8. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory properties of some aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Akram; El-Khatib, Riyad; Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    2012-02-01

    A variety of novel aromatic and heterocyclic aromatic curcuminoids were synthesised, characterised and their anti-inflammatory activities (AIA) determined in vivo. Some of these compounds also were tested for inflammatory mediator production. The AIA of the main representatives of these compounds were assessed by oral administration to female Wistar rats using (a) acute carrageenan-induced paw oedema, (b) chronic adjuvant arthritis (therapeutic mode), and (c) anti-pyretic activity assessed in the yeast pyrexia. Gastric ulceration was determined in pre-inflamed rats. Natural curcumin showed modest aspirin-like anti-inflammatory activity which was enhanced when co-administered with the PGE(1) analogue misoprostol as a synergist. In contrast, four novel curcuminoids (RK-97, RK-103, RK-104 and RK-106) in which the bis-methoxy-phenyl group of curcumin was replaced with bis-dimethoxybutenolidyl-(ascorbate), bis-naphthyl, and bis-furanyl derivatives, respectively, had potent activity in the anti-arthritic assay with little gastric or systemic toxicity, compared with the vehicle-treated controls. Of the curcuminoids the furan RK-106 was the only compound to inhibit production of TNFα and IL-1β in a monocytic cell-line THP-1 in vitro. The inactivity of RK-106 on the production of PGE(2) may be related to its absence of gastrotoxicity. None of the curcuminoids exhibited anti-pyretic activity and this may also be related to its insensitivity to PGE(2). Thus, these novel curcuminoids, such as RK-106, may warrant the development of new low gastro-toxic anti-inflammatory agents with selective inhibitory activity of cytokine inflammatory mediators. PMID:22172598

  9. Design and characterization of diclofenac diethylamine transdermal patch using silicone and acrylic adhesives combination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study The objective of the study was to develop and characterize Diclofenac Diethylamine (DDEA) transdermal patch using Silicone and acrylic adhesives combination. Methods Modified solvent evaporation method was employed for casting of film over Fluoropolymer coated polyester release liner. Initial studies included solubilization of drug in the polymers using solubilizers. The formulations with combination of adhesives were attempted to combine the desirable features of both the adhesives. The effect of the permeation enhancers on the drug permeation were studied using pig ear skin. All the optimized patches were subjected to adhesion, dissolution and stability studies. A 7-day skin irritancy test on albino rabbits and an in vivo anti-inflammatory study on wistar rats by carrageenan induced paw edema method were also performed. Results The results indicated the high percent drug permeation (% CDP-23.582) and low solubility nature (1%) of Silicone adhesive and high solubility (20%) and low% CDP (10.72%) of acrylic adhesive. The combination of adhesives showed desirable characteristics for DDEA permeation with adequate % CDP and sufficient solubility. Release profiles were found to be dependent on proportion of polymer and type of permeation enhancer. The anti-inflammatory study revealed the sustaining effect and high percentage inhibition of edema of C4/OLA (99.68%). The acute skin irritancy studies advocated the non-irritant nature of the adhesives used. Conclusion It was concluded that an ideal of combination of adhesives would serve as the best choice, for fabrication of DDEA patches, for sustained effect of DDEA with better enhancement in permeation characteristics and robustness. PMID:23351568

  10. Safety and anti-ulcerogenic activity of a novel polyphenol-rich extract of clove buds (Syzygium aromaticum L).

    PubMed

    Issac, Abin; Gopakumar, G; Kuttan, Ramadasan; Maliakel, Balu; Krishnakumar, I M

    2015-03-01

    Despite the various reports on the pharmacology of Clove bud [Syzygium aromaticum]-derived essential oil and its major component eugenol, systematic information on the bioactivity of clove polyphenols is very limited. Clove buds being one of the richest sources of dietary polyphenols with many traditional medicinal uses, the present contribution attempted to derive their standardized polyphenol-rich extracts as a water soluble free flowing powder (Clovinol) suitable for functional food applications, without the issues of its characteristic pungency and aroma. The extract was characterized by electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS), and investigated for in vivo antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcerogenic activities. Clovinol showed significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects as measured by cellular antioxidant levels, and the ability to inhibit carrageenan-induced paw swelling in mice. Further investigations revealed its significant anti-ulcerogenic activity (>97% inhibition of ethanol-induced stomach ulcers in Wistar rats when orally administered at 100 mg per kg b.w.) and up regulation of in vivo antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), and catalase (CAT). Clovinol also reduced the extent of lipid peroxidation among ulcer induced rats, indicating its usefulness in ameliorating oxidative stress and improving gastrointestinal health, especially upon chronic alcohol consumption. The extract was also shown to be safe and suitable for further investigations and development upon acute toxicity studies at 5 g per kg body weight and 28 days of repeated dose toxicity studies at 2.5 g per kg b.w. PMID:25605463

  11. Evaluation of polyamidoamine dendrimers as potential carriers for quercetin, a versatile flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Madaan, Kanika; Lather, Viney; Pandita, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the potential of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as oral drug delivery carriers for quercetin, a Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class II molecule. The aqueous solubility of quercetin was investigated in different generations of dendrimers, i.e. G0, G1, G2 and G3, with varying concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 µM). Then, it was successfully incorporated in PAMAM dendrimers and they were characterized for incorporation efficacy, nature of nanoformulations, size, size distribution, surface morphology and stability. In vitro release characteristics of quercetin from all quercetin-PAMAM complexes were studied at 37 °C in phosphate buffer saline (PBS; pH 7.4). Furthermore, the efficacy of quercetin-loaded PAMAM dendrimer was assessed by pharmacodynamic experiment, namely, a carrageenan-induced paw edema model to evaluate the acute activity of this nanocarrier in response to inflammation. It was observed that both generation and the respective concentrations of PAMAM dendrimers showed potential positive effects on solubility enhancement of quercetin. All the quercetin-PAMAM complexes were found to be in nanometeric range (<100 nm) with narrow polydispersity index. In vitro study revealed a biphasic release pattern of quercetin which was characterized by an initial faster release followed by sustained release phase and pharmacodynamic study provided the preliminary proof of concept about the potential of quercetin-PAMAM complexes. The study concludes that the dendrimer-based drug delivery system for quercetin has enormous potential to resolve the drug delivery issues associated with it. PMID:24845475

  12. Pharmacological evaluation of extracts of Hedychium spicatum (Ham-ex-Smith) rhizome

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Hedychium spicatum (Ham-ex-Smith), known as Shati in Ayurvedic classics, is documented for the treatment of cough, hiccough, fever and asthma. The present study includes the evaluation of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the dried rhizome of H. spicatum for anti-histaminic and ulcer-protective activities in guinea pig (GP), anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in rat and acute toxicity in mouse. The extracts were administered orally, daily as suspension, in 1% carboxymethyl cellulose either for 7 days in GP studies or 60 min before or just before experiment in rats and mice. An initial dose-dependent anti-histaminic action of both the extracts (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) was performed against histamine-induced bronchospasm in GPs. The 200 mg/ kg dose of aqueous and ethanolic extracts was selected both in GP and rat for further studies. GPs treated with aqueous and ethanolic extracts showed gastric ulcer protection against histamine-induced gastric ulcer compared with the control group. Both the extracts also showed an anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats from 1 h onwards, and this was maximum at 3 h. Analgesic effect was determined by using hot plate and tail flick tests in rats, and both the extracts at 200 mg/kg showed a significant increase in the latent period from 30 min onwards till 120 min of their study period. Both the extracts did not show any toxic effect like increased motor activity, salivation, clonic convulsion, coma and death in mice even at the 2000 mg/kg dose (nearly 10 times of the optimal effective dose), indicating the safety of the extracts. The result confirms the indigenous use of this plant in respiratory disorders. PMID:23284217

  13. Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  14. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended. PMID:25592052

  15. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  16. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  17. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  18. Acute pyelonephritis in children.

    PubMed

    Morello, William; La Scola, Claudio; Alberici, Irene; Montini, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    Acute pyelonephritis is one of the most serious bacterial illnesses during childhood. Escherichia coli is responsible in most cases, however other organisms including Klebsiella, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, Proteus, and Pseudomonas species are being more frequently isolated. In infants, who are at major risk of complications such as sepsis and meningitis, symptoms are ambiguous and fever is not always useful in identifying those at high risk. A diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is initially made on the basis of urinalysis; dipstick tests for nitrites and/or leukocyte esterase are the most accurate indicators of infection. Collecting a viable urine sample for urine culture using clean voided methods is feasible, even in young children. No gold standard antibiotic treatment exists. In children appearing well, oral therapy and outpatient care is possible. New guidelines suggest less aggressive imaging strategies after a first infection, reducing radiation exposure and costs. The efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing recurrence is still a matter of debate and the risk of antibiotic resistance is a warning against its widespread use. Well-performed randomized controlled trials are required in order to better define both the imaging strategies and medical options aimed at preserving long-term renal function. PMID:26238274

  19. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  20. Acute diabetic abdomen in childhood.

    PubMed

    Valerio, D

    1976-01-10

    Three children presented as acute surgical emergencies due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Where diabetic ketoacidosis mimicks the acute abdomen three clinical features are important in reaching the right diagnosis-namely, a history of polydipsia, polyuria, and anorexia preceding the abdominal pain, the deep sighing and rapid respirations, and severe dehydration. PMID:54584

  1. Acute recurrent appendicitis with appendicolith.

    PubMed

    Hollerman, J J; Bernstein, M A; Kottamasu, S R; Sirr, S A

    1988-11-01

    Appendiceal disease can be acute, acute recurrent, or chronic. Acute appendicitis is the most common form. Acute recurrent appendicitis is more common than chronic appendicitis. In children the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are variable. Patients who have an appendicolith usually develop appendicitis, often with perforation. A case is presented of 3-year follow-up of a patient with an appendicolith and acute recurrent appendicitis. The literature about appendicoliths is reviewed. In the appropriate clinical setting, a history of prior episodes of similar right lower quadrant pain does not preclude the diagnosis of appendiceal disease. Awareness of the less common forms of appendicitis is important so that appropriate treatment is not delayed. PMID:3052484

  2. Cytokines in Acute Chikungunya

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Anuradha; Ghorpade, Ravi P.; Chopra, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute chikungunya (CHIKV) is predominantly an acute onset of excruciatingly painful, self-limiting musculoskeletal (MSK) arbovirus illness and this was further reported by us during the 2006 Indian epidemic [Chopra et al. Epidemiol Infect 2012]. Selected serum cytokines profile in subjects within one month of onset of illness is being presented. Methods Out of 509 clinical CHIKV cases (43% population) identified during a rural population survey, 225 subjects consented blood investigations. 132 examined within 30 days of febrile onset are the study cohort. Anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies tested by immunochromatography and indirect immunofluorescence respectively. Interferons (IFN)-α, -β and -γ, Interferon Gamma-Induced Protein-10 (CXCL-10/IP-10), Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), Interleukin–4 (IL-4) and Interleukin–10 (IL-10) performed by ELISA. Samples collected from neighboring community a year prior to the epidemic used as healthy controls. Results Seropositivity for anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG was 65% and 52% respectively. IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-1β showed intense response in early acute phase. Cytokines (particularly TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10) was maximum in extended symptomatic phase and remained elevated in recovered subjects. Higher (p<0.05) IFN and IL-4 seen in patients seropositive for anti-CHIKV IgG. Elderly cases (≥65 years) showed elevated cytokines (except IFN) and anti-CHIKV antibodies near similar to younger subjects. Significant correlations (p<0.05) found between cytokines and clinical features (fatigue, low back ache, myalgia) and anti-CHIKV antibodies. Conclusion An intense cytokine milieu was evident in the early and immediate persistent symptomatic phase and in recovered subjects. Early persistent IgM and lower IgG to anti-CHKV and intense Th2 cytokine phenotype seem to be

  3. Acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Sagar, Pallavi; Mueller, Peter R; Novelline, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Acute epiploic appendagitis most commonly manifests with acute lower quadrant pain. Its clinical features are similar to those of acute diverticulitis or, less commonly, acute appendicitis. The conditions that may mimic acute epiploic appendagitis at computed tomography (CT) include acute omental infarction, mesenteric panniculitis, fat-containing tumor, and primary and secondary acute inflammatory processes in the large bowel (eg, diverticulitis and appendicitis). Whereas the location of acute epiploic appendagitis is most commonly adjacent to the sigmoid colon, acute omental infarction is typically located in the right lower quadrant and often is mistaken for acute appendicitis. It is important to correctly diagnose acute epiploic appendagitis and acute omental infarction on CT images because these conditions may be mistaken for acute abdomen, and the mistake may lead to unnecessary surgery. The CT features of acute epiploic appendagitis include an oval lesion 1.5-3.5 cm in diameter, with attenuation similar to that of fat and with surrounding inflammatory changes, that abuts the anterior sigmoid colon wall. The CT features of acute omental infarction include a well-circumscribed triangular or oval heterogeneous fatty mass with a whorled pattern of concentric linear fat stranding between the anterior abdominal wall and the transverse or ascending colon. As CT increasingly is used for the evaluation of acute abdomen, radiologists are likely to see acute epiploic appendagitis and its mimics more often. Recognition of these conditions on CT images will allow appropriate management of acute abdominal pain and may help to prevent unnecessary surgery. PMID:16284132

  4. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Acute and persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, Keith; Forbes, David A

    2009-12-01

    Socially disadvantaged Indigenous infants and children living in western industrialized countries experience high rates of infectious diarrhea, no more so than Aboriginal children from remote and rural regions of Northern Australia. Diarrheal disease, poor nutrition, and intestinal enteropathy reflect household crowding, inadequate water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Acute episodes of watery diarrhea are often best managed by oral glucose-electrolyte solutions with continuation of breastfeeding and early reintroduction of feeding. Selective use of lactose-free milk formula, short-term zinc supplementation and antibiotics may be necessary for ill children with poor nutrition, persistent symptoms, or dysentery. Education, high standards of environmental hygiene, breastfeeding, and immunization with newly licensed rotavirus vaccines are all needed to reduce the unacceptably high burden of diarrheal disease encountered in young children from Indigenous communities. PMID:19962025

  6. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  7. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  8. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  9. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  10. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. PMID:26430191

  11. [Acute retinal necrosis].

    PubMed

    Lucke, K; Reinking, U; el-Hifnawi, E; Dennin, R H; Laqua, H

    1988-12-01

    The authors report on three patients with acute retinal necrosis who were treated with the virostatic agent Acyclovir and who underwent vitreoretinal surgery with silicone oil filling for total retinal detachment. In two eyes the retina was reattached, but useful vision was only preserved in one patient. Titers from blood and the vitreous, as well as microscopic findings in retinal biopsies, support the view that the necrosis is caused by a herpes simplex virus infection. After therapy with Acyclovir was instituted no further progression on the necrosis was observed. However, the development of retinal detachment could not be prevented. Early diagnosis and antiviral therapy are essential to improve the otherwise poor prognosis in this rare syndrome. PMID:3221657

  12. [Acute epiglottitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Castillo, A

    1992-09-01

    The author presents the clinical history of 14 patients, from 21 to 48 years of age, 10 men and 4 women, with a final diagnosis of acute epiglottitis who were hospitalized at Gorgas Army Hospital or at the San Fernando Clinic. All the patients had pharyngitis and dysphagia, a few with nasal voice, stridor and difficulty breathing, as the chief complaint. All the patients were initially intubated orally for diagnostic purposes and immediately after nasotracheal intubation was done until the patient improved in 2 or 3 days (one patient remained intubated for 5 days). All patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit and were treated with Ampicillin and Chloramphenicol IV and lately with a second generation cephalosporin (Cefamandole). The patients allergic to Penicillin were treated with Clindamycin and Chloramphenicol. Corticosteroids were not used in any of the patients. There were no sequelae and none of the patients expired. PMID:1439005

  13. Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of an extract, fractions, and compounds isolated from Gochnatia pulchra aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    Lucarini, R.; Tozatti, M.G.; Silva, M.L.A.; Gimenez, V.M.M.; Pauletti, P.M.; Groppo, M.; Turatti, I.C.C.; Cunha, W.R.; Martins, C.H.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the in vitro antibacterial and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties of a hydroethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Gochnatia pulchra (HEGP). It also describes the antibacterial activity of HEGP fractions and of the isolated compounds genkwanin, scutellarin, apigenin, and 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, as evaluated by a broth microdilution method. While HEGP and its fractions did not provide promising results, the isolated compounds exhibited pronounced antibacterial activity. The most sensitive microorganism was Streptococcus pyogenes, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 100, 50 and 25 µg/mL for genkwanin and the flavonoids apigenin and scutellarin, respectively. Genkwanin produced an MIC value of 25 µg/mL against Enterococcus faecalis. A paw edema model in rats and a pleurisy inflammation model in mice aided investigation of the anti-inflammatory effects of HEGP. This study also evaluated the ability of HEGP to modulate carrageenan-induced interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production. Orally administered HEGP (250 and 500 mg/kg) inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema. Regarding carrageenan-induced pleurisy, HEGP at 50, 100, and 250 mg/kg diminished leukocyte migration by 71.43%, 69.24%, and 73.34% (P<0.05), respectively. HEGP suppressed IL-1β and MCP-1 production by 55% and 50% at 50 mg/kg (P<0.05) and 60% and 25% at 100 mg/kg (P<0.05), respectively. HEGP abated TNF-α production by macrophages by 6.6%, 33.3%, and 53.3% at 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg (P<0.05), respectively. HEGP probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1. PMID:26200228

  14. Acute Methylenedioxypyrovalerone Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Blake A; Levine, Michael; Beuhler, Michael C; Judge, Bryan S; Moore, Philip W; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Mckeown, Nathanael J; Rosenbaum, Christopher D; Young, Amy C; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the acute clinical effects, laboratory findings, complications, and disposition of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing synthetic cathinone. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series of patients with synthetic cathinone abuse by searching for the terms bath salts, MDPV, methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, methcathinone, methylone, methedrone, and cathinone within the "agent" field of a national clinical toxicology database (ToxIC). The medical records of these patients were obtained and abstracted by investigators at each study site. Patients with confirmatory testing that identified a synthetic cathinone in either blood or urine were included in the series. Patients who had either an undetectable synthetic cathinone test or no confirmatory testing were excluded. A data abstraction sheet was used to obtain information on each patient. We entered data into an Excel spreadsheet and calculated descriptive statistics. We identified 23 patients with confirmed synthetic cathinone exposure--all were positive for methylenedioxyprovalerone (MDPV). Eighty-three percent were male and 74 % had recreational intent. The most common reported clinical effects were tachycardia (74 %), agitation (65 %), and sympathomimetic syndrome (65 %). Acidosis was the most common laboratory abnormality (43 %). Seventy-eight percent of patients were treated with benzodiazepines and 30 % were intubated. Ninety-six percent of patients were hospitalized and 87 % were admitted to the ICU. The majority (61 %) of patients was discharged home but 30 % required inpatient psychiatric care. There was one death in our series. The majority of patients presenting to the hospital after abusing MDPV have severe sympathomimetic findings requiring hospitalization. A number of these patients require inpatient psychiatric care after their acute presentation. PMID:25468313

  15. Asthma in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 10% of adults have suffered an attack of asthma, and up to 5% of these have severe disease that responds poorly to treatment. Patients with severe disease have an increased risk of death, but patients with mild to moderate disease are also at risk of exacerbations. Most guidelines about the management of asthma follow stepwise protocols. This review does not endorse or follow any particular protocol, but presents the evidence about specific interventions. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute asthma? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 100 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: beta2 agonists (plus ipratropium bromide, pressured metered-dose inhalers, short-acting continuous nebulised, short-acting intermittent nebulised, short-acting iv, and inhaled formoterol); corticosteroids (inhaled); corticosteroids (single oral, combined inhaled, and short courses); education about acute asthma; generalist care; helium–oxygen mixture (heliox); magnesium sulphate (iv and adding isotonic nebulised magnesium to inhaled beta2 agonists); mechanical ventilation; oxygen supplementation (controlled 28% oxygen and controlled 100% oxygen); and specialist care. PMID:21463536

  16. [Acute acromioclavicular dislocations].

    PubMed

    Riand, N; Sadowski, C; Hoffmeyer, P

    1999-12-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocations represent over 10% of acute traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle. The mechanism is usually a direct impact on the shoulder with the arm in adduction, producing rupture of the acromioclavicular (AC) ligaments, then of the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament, with displacement of the lateral end of the clavicle. Rockwood described 6 grades of injury. Physical examination usually provides the diagnosis, which is confirmed by radiological examination. X-rays centered on the AC joint, if necessary with forceful adduction of both shoulders or under traction, are useful to evaluate the severity of the lesion. Grade I and II lesions are usually treated conservatively by simply immobilizing the arm for 3 to 4 weeks. Surgical treatment is usually advocated for grade IV, V and VI lesions: AC or CC fixation, sometimes associated with ligament repair, depending on the surgeons. AC pinning or C-C screw fixation are the techniques most often used. Management of grade III lesions remains controversial. Some authors advocate immediate surgical treatment in young, active patients, in heavy laborers and even in slender individuals. The choice of the operative technique is controversial, as no single technique has clearly proved to be superior to others. Other authors advocate conservative treatment, which gives functional results which patients consider quite acceptable, with faster recovery; patients should be informed that results are essentially similar, whatever the treatment. The possibility of performing secondary operations with good results in cases with failure of conservative management is a further argument in favor of applying conservative therapy first in acute injuries. PMID:10675933

  17. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  18. Acute management of migraine.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    2010-04-01

    Migraine is a brain disease whose principal symptom is episodic intense throbbing pain in the head which is often accompanied by photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Primary objectives of migraine treatment are to abort the acute attacks, treat associated symptoms and prevent future attacks. With a majority of migraine patients being young, they will need a treatment plan to suit their professional work, leisure and reproductive concerns. Non specific anti-migraine drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-emetics, narcotics, and sympathomimetics are usually helpful in mild to moderate attacks. Specific drugs like triptans and ergots are useful for moderate to severe attacks. In step care approach, the patients are started with the simplest options like simple analgesics first followed by non-steroidal agents, then ergot preparations and eventually triptans if they do not respond. In stratified care approach, the attacks and the patients are stratified according to the severity and therapeutic response. Those with severe disabling episodes are given specific anti-migraine medications like triptans whereas patients with mild or low disability are treated with simple analgesics. Currently, the most favored acute anti-migraine medication is a triptan. At marketed doses all triptans are effective as compared to placebos and generally well tolerated. Amongst them however, rizatriptan 10 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg provide the highest likelihood of consistent success. Triptan related adverse events are usually short lived, mild and clinically insignificant. Ergots are slowly being replaced by triptans. This is because of their adverse side-effects, low bioavailability and high potential for abuse that can lead to overuse headache. PMID:21049703

  19. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure complicating doxylamine succinate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Deok; Lee, Soo Teik

    2002-06-01

    Doxylamine succinate is an antihistaminic drugwith additional hypnotic, anticholinergic and local anesthetic effects first described in 1948. In Korea and many other countries, it is a common-over-the counter medication frequently involved in overdoses. Clinical symtomatology of doxylamine succinate overdose includes somnolence, coma, seizures, mydriasis, tachycardia, psychosis, and rhabdomyolysis. A serious complication may be rhabdomyolysis with subsequent impairment of renal function and acute renal failure. We report a case of acute renal failure and acute pancreatitis complicating a doxylamine succinate intoxication. PMID:12046971

  20. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  1. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  2. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of boswellic acid-NSAID hybrid molecules as anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agents.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Suvarna; Kiran, K R; Kumar, Krishna; Diwakar, Latha; Reddy, G Chandrasekara

    2015-06-15

    Methyl esters of the β-boswellic acid (BA) and 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA) obtained from Boswellia serrata resin were subjected to Steglich esterification with the different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) viz., ibuprofen, naproxen, diclophenac and indomethacin. The novel hybrids of methyl boswellate (5-8) and that of methyl 11-keto boswellate (9-12) were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema model and anti-arthritic activity by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in Wister albino rat. Significant inhibition on carrageenan-induced paw edema has been observed with 5, 6 and 10 where as in CFA induced rats, hybrids 5, 8, 9 and 12 exhibited pronounced antiarthritic activity. Hybrid molecules 5 and 9 have been found to be more effective in inhibiting in-vivo COX-2 than ibuprofen by itself, thus showing the synergistic effect. Hybrid 5 and 9 tested for in-vitro lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 (LOX/COX-2) inhibitory activity. The studies revealed that both 5 and 9 inhibited COX-2 relatively better than LOX enzyme. PMID:26010018

  4. Pharmacological potential of Populus nigra extract as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular and hepatoprotective agent

    PubMed Central

    Debbache-Benaida, Nadjet; Atmani-Kilani, Dina; Schini-Keirth, Valérie Barbara; Djebbli, Nouredine; Atmani, Djebbar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and vasorelaxant activities of Populus nigra flower buds ethanolic extract. Methods Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extract were assessed using respectively the ABTS test and the animal model of carrageenan-induced paw edema. Protection from hepatic toxicity caused by aluminum was examined by histopathologic analysis of liver sections. Vasorelaxant effect was estimated in endothelium-intact and -rubbed rings of porcine coronary arteries precontracted with high concentration of U46619. Results The results showed a moderate antioxidant activity (40%), but potent anti-inflammatory activity (49.9%) on carrageenan-induced mice paw edema, and also as revealed by histopathologic examination, complete protection against AlCl3-induced hepatic toxicity. Relaxant effects of the same extract on vascular preparation from porcine aorta precontracted with high concentration of U46619 were considerable at 10−1 g/L, and comparable (P>0.05) between endothelium-intact (67.74%, IC50=0.04 mg/mL) and -rubbed (72.72%, IC50=0.075 mg/mL) aortic rings. Conclusions The extract exerted significant anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and vasorelaxant activities, the latter being endothelium-independent believed to be mediated mainly by the ability of components present in the extract to exert antioxidant properties, probably related to an inhibition of Ca2+ influx. PMID:23998009

  5. Observing Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Activities of Glycyrrhizin Through Regulating COX-2 and Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Expressions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ling; Li, Yu-Xiang; Niu, Ya-Ting; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Shi, Guang-Jiang; Ma, Lin; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of glycyrrhizin (GL) in mice and to explore the possible related mechanisms. Xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema and acetic acid-induced vascular permeability test were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activities of GL in mice. Anti-nociceptive effects of GL were assessed by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate test and formalin test, as well as evaluation of spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-6 and iNOS) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were explored by using real-time fluorogenic PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results showed that GL significantly reduced xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, and acetic acid-induced vascular permeation. Additionally, GL significantly inhibited the nociceptions induced by acetic acid and formalin. However, the nociceptions could not be decreased by GL in the hot plate test, and GL did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2 were significantly downregulated by GL. In conclusion, GL exerts significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities by attenuating the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:26178479

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ► Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ► MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ► MP and EP decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ► MP and EP reduced NF-κB expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ► MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  7. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Gulecha, Vishal; Sivakumar, T; Upaganlawar, Aman; Mahajan, Manoj; Upasani, Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods: The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FRII, FRIII, FRIV and FRV) of F. religiosa at the dose level of 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o were tested. Results: The fraction FRI (40 mg/kg, p.o.) and FRIII (40 mg/kg, p.o) were found to be more effective (P<0.01) in preventing carrageenan induced rat paw edema, cotton pellet granuloma formation, and acetic acid induced writhing compared to the other fractions. FRI (20 mg/kg, p.o.) and FRIII (20 mg/kg, p.o.) were also found to be more effective in increasing latency period in tail flick method. Conclusion: Out of five different fractions of F. religiosa leaves tested, FRI and FRIII possess potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities against different models of inflammation and pain. PMID:22144770

  8. Acute Legionella pneumophila infection masquerading as acute alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jonathan Michael; Chan, Julian; Reid, Angeline Louise; Tan, Chistopher

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged man had deteriorated rapidly in hospital after being misdiagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. Acute Legionnaires disease (Legionellosis) was subsequently diagnosed on rapid antigen urinary testing and further confirmed serologically. This led to appropriate antibiotic treatment and complete clinical resolution. Physicians caring for patients with alcohol-related liver disease should consider Legionella pneumophila in their differential diagnosis even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:23355576

  9. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Donald, Graciela Rocha; Fernandes, Patrícia Dias; Boylan, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP) is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO). The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%). Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP), with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan. PMID:27547225

  10. Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Activities of Ethanolic Extract and Fruticulin A from Salvia lachnostachys Leaves in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piccinelli, Ana Claudia; Figueiredo de Santana Aquino, Diana; Morato, Priscila Neder; Kuraoka-Oliveira, Ângela Midori; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; dos Santos, Élide Pereira; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the ethanolic extract (SLEE) and fruticulin A from the leaves of Salvia lachnostachys were evaluated in mice, using experimental models of inflammation (paw oedema and pleurisy induced by carrageenan injection) and hyperalgesia (electronic Von Frey). Oral administration of SLEE (30, 100, and 300 mg/kg) and fruticulin A (0.3 and 3.0 mg/kg) decreased the total leucocytes number in pleural lavage, protein extravasation, and paw oedema. SLEE (100 mg/kg) and fruticulin A (3 mg/kg) also exhibited antihyperalgesic activity in carrageenan induced mechanical hyperalgesia. In addition, fruticulin A (3 mg/kg) prevented mechanical hyperalgesia, inhibiting TNF but not L-DOPA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. In conclusion, SLEE and fruticulin A display anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Therefore, fruticulin A is at least partially responsible for the activity observed in the ethanolic extract of Salvia lachnostachys. PMID:25435893

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of dantrolene sodium in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2002-06-01

    Our study aimed at examining the possible anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of dantrolene sodium in rats and mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of dantrolene sodium (2.5, 5 and 10 mg kg (-1)) was investigated and compared with diclofenac sodium (5 mg kg (-1)) using the formalin-, histamine-, and carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma tests. Analgesic effects of dantrolene sodium were evaluated and compared with metamizol (200 mg kg (-1)) in acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced paw licking tests. It was found that dantrolene sodium significantly diminished the nociceptive response in mice, showing at the same time considerable anti-inflammatory properties in rats. PMID:12162945

  12. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory action of Opuntia elatior Mill fruits

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, Navin R.; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opuntia elatio Mill is a xerophytic plant with potentially active nutrients. It is traditionally appreciated for its pharmacological properties; however, the scientific information on this plant is insufficient. Objective: The present study evaluates the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action of prickly pear. Materials and Methods: Writhing and tail-immersion tests were carried out to evaluate analgesic action, while the carrageenan-induced paw edema and neutrophil adhesion tests were conducted in Albino wistar rats to assess anti-inflammatory action. Results: ED50 values of the fruit juice in writhing, tail immersion, and paw edema test were 0.919, 2.77, and 9.282 ml/kg, respectively. The fruits of Opuntia produced analgesic and anti-inflammatory action in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: The results establish the folklore use of prickly pear may be due to the presence of betacyanin and/or other phenolic compounds. PMID:26166996

  13. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Graciela Rocha; Fernandes, Patrícia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP) is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO). The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%). Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP), with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan. PMID:27547225

  14. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index < 2.2l/min/m(2). The process typically presents with hypotension (systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg or a decrease in mean arterial pressure > 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (< 0.5 ml/kg/h). The most common cause is left ventricular failure due to acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24930078

  15. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  16. Pipazethate--acute childhood poisoning.

    PubMed

    da Silva, O A; Lopez, M

    1977-01-01

    A previously healthy child who who had accidentally ingested an unknown quantity of 20-mg tablets of pipazethate developed severe acute poisoning with neurologic, metabolic, and cardiovascular disturbances. She recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy. PMID:589958

  17. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  18. Ultrasonography in acute gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Soiva, M; Pamilo, M; Päivänsalo, M; Taavitsainen, M; Suramo, I

    1988-01-01

    The files of patients with acute cholecystitis from two large university hospitals from the years 1978-1985 were employed to find the cases with acute gallbladder perforation for this study. Only those patients (n = 9) were selected for the analysis of sonographic signs of acute gallbladder perforation who had less than 48 hours of symptoms before sonography, and were operated upon within 24 hours of the sonography. Patients (n = 10) with non-complicated acute cholecystitis and identical in regard to the duration of the symptoms and the timing of the sonography and the operation formed a control group. The sonographic findings in patients with gallbladder perforation were pericholecystic fluid collections, free peritoneal fluid, disappearance of the gallbladder wall echoes, focal highly echogenic areas with acoustic shadows in the gallbladder, and an inhomogeneous, generally echo-poor gallbladder wall. PMID:2964842

  19. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after a respiratory infection, such as a cold, and can be ...

  20. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... that make headaches worse (or lead to decreased responsiveness to other drug therapies) Patient preference Goals of ... Reduce frequency, severity, and duration of attacks Improve responsiveness to treatment of acute attacks Reduce level of ...

  1. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years. PMID:27571467

  2. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  3. [Acute gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, Robert; Faiss, Siegbert; Cordruwisch, Wolfgang; Schrader, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common major emergency (Internal medical or gastroenterological or medical), approximately 85 % of which occur in the upper GI tract. It is estimated that about a half of upper GI bleeds are caused by peptic ulcers. Upper GI bleeds are associated with more severe bleeding and poorer outcomes when compared to middle or lower GI bleeds. Prognostic determinants include bleeding intensity, patient age, comorbid conditions and the concomitant use of anticoagulants. A focused medical history can offer insight into the bleeding intensity, location and potential cause (along with early risk stratification). Initial measures should focus on rapid assessment and resuscitation of unstable patients. The oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) is the gold standard method for localizing the source of bleeding and for interventional therapy. Bleeding as a result of peptic ulcers is treated endoscopically with mechanical and / or thermal techniques in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. When variceal bleeding is suspected, pre-interventional use of vasopressin analogues and antibiotic therapies are recommended. Endoscopically, the first line treatment of esophageal varices is endoscopic ligature therapy, whereas that for gastric varices is the use of Histoacryl injection sclerotherapy. When persistent and continued massive hemorrhage occurs in a patient with known or suspected aortic disease the possibility of an aorto-enteric fistula must be considered. PMID:27078246

  4. Acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Asim; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Gale, Rosemary E; Levine, Ross L; Jordan, Craig T; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bloomfield, Clara D; Estey, Eli; Burnett, Alan; Cornelissen, Jan J; Scheinberg, David A; Bouscary, Didier; Linch, David C

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a disorder characterized by a clonal proliferation derived from primitive haematopoietic stem cells or progenitor cells. Abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells results in a high level of immature malignant cells and fewer differentiated red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. The disease occurs at all ages, but predominantly occurs in older people (>60 years of age). AML typically presents with a rapid onset of symptoms that are attributable to bone marrow failure and may be fatal within weeks or months when left untreated. The genomic landscape of AML has been determined and genetic instability is infrequent with a relatively small number of driver mutations. Mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation are common and are early events in leukaemogenesis. The subclassification of AML has been dependent on the morphology and cytogenetics of blood and bone marrow cells, but specific mutational analysis is now being incorporated. Improvements in treatment in younger patients over the past 35 years has largely been due to dose escalation and better supportive care. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be used to consolidate remission in those patients who are deemed to be at high risk of relapse. A plethora of new agents - including those targeted at specific biochemical pathways and immunotherapeutic approaches - are now in trial based on improved understanding of disease pathophysiology. These advances provide good grounds for optimism, although mortality remains high especially in older patients. PMID:27159408

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  6. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  7. Acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. PMID:25618438

  8. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  9. Acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Saad; Chaudary, Adeel

    2014-01-01

    The paramedics brought a 60-year-old man to the emergency department after a sudden onset of shortness of breath with a subsequent drop in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). On arrival the patient looked peri-arrest. His O2 saturations were 84% on 15 L of oxygen. He had gasping breathing with a completely silent chest and the GCS was 6/15 (E=1, V=1, M=4). The blood gas revealed type-2 respiratory failure. The chest X-ray was unremarkable and ECG was not indicative for cardiac catheterisation lab activation. Bedside shock scan was done which showed global hypokinesia of the left ventricle. In spite of unconvincing ECG and chest X-ray, an acute cardiac event was diagnosed in view of an abnormal bedside echo. The patient was transferred to the cardiac catheterisation lab for urgent percutaneous coronary intervention which revealed critical stenosis of the left main stem coronary artery, which was successfully stented. The patient had a good recovery from the life-threatening event. PMID:24913081

  10. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD. PMID:26946776

  11. Uveitis (acute anterior)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anterior uveitis is rare, with an annual incidence of 12/100,000 population, although it is more common in Finland (annual incidence of 23/100,000), probably because of genetic factors, such as high frequency of HLA–B27 in the population. It is often self-limiting, but can, in some cases, lead to complications such as posterior synechiae, cataract, glaucoma, and chronic uveitis. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of anti-inflammatory eye drops on acute anterior uveitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: corticosteroids, mydriatics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops. PMID:21736765

  12. Acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Galetta, Steven L.; Villoslada, Pablo; Levin, Netta; Shindler, Kenneth; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Parr, Edward; Cadavid, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) most commonly presents as acute unilateral vision loss and eye pain and is frequently associated with multiple sclerosis. Although emphasis is often placed on the good recovery of high-contrast visual acuity, persistent deficits are frequently observed in other aspects of vision, including contrast sensitivity, visual field testing, color vision, motion perception, and vision-related quality of life. Persistent and profound structural and functional changes are often revealed by imaging and electrophysiologic techniques, including optical coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, and nonconventional MRI. These abnormalities can impair patients' abilities to perform daily activities (e.g., driving, working) so they have important implications for patients' quality of life. In this article, we review the sequelae from ON, including clinical, structural, and functional changes and their interrelationships. The unmet needs in each of these areas are considered and the progress made toward meeting those needs is examined. Finally, we provide an overview of past and present investigational approaches for disease modification in ON. PMID:26236761

  13. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  14. Acute Scorpion Pancreatitis in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Courtenay

    1970-01-01

    Over a two-month period 30 patients were admitted to hospital following stings of the scorpion of Trinidad, the Tityus trinitatis. In 24 cases acute pancreatitis developed soon after the sting, but in nine of these no abdominal pain occurred. All the patients made an uneventful recovery. Although such complications have been reported no pseudocyst formations or acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis occurred in this series. PMID:5443968

  15. Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Javier E; Mederos, Raul; Rivero, Haidy; Sendzischew, Morgan A; Soaita, Mauela; Robinson, Morton J; Sendzischew, Harry; Danielpour, Payman

    2007-11-01

    Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:17984748

  16. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  17. Anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, free-radical-scavenging, and antimicrobial activities of hawthorn berries ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Tadić, Vanja M; Dobrić, Silva; Marković, Goran M; Dordević, Sofija M; Arsić, Ivana A; Menković, Nebojsa R; Stević, Tanja

    2008-09-10

    Hawthorn [Crataegus monogyna Jacq. and Crataegus oxyacantha L.; sin. Crataegus laevigata (Poiret) DC., Rosaceae] leaves, flowers, and berries are used in traditional medicine in the treatment of chronic heart failure, high blood pressure, arrhythmia, and various digestive ailments, as well as geriatric and antiarteriosclerosis remedies. According to European Pharmacopoeia 6.0, hawthorn berries consist of the dried false fruits of these two species or their mixture. The present study was carried out to test free-radical-scavenging, anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, and antimicrobial activities of hawthorn berries ethanol extract. Phenolic compounds represented 3.54%, expressed as gallic acid equivalents. Determination of total flavonoid aglycones content yielded 0.18%. The percentage of hyperoside, as the main flavonol component, was 0.14%. With respect to procyanidins content, the obtained value was 0.44%. DPPH radical-scavenging capacity of the extract was concentration-dependent, with EC50 value of 52.04 microg/mL (calculation based on the total phenolic compounds content in the extract). Oral administration of investigated extract caused dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect in a model of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. The obtained anti-inflammatory effect was 20.8, 23.0, and 36.3% for the extract doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively. In comparison to indomethacin, given in a dose producing 50% reduction of rat paw edema, the extract given in the highest tested dose (200 mg/kg) showed 72.4% of its activity. Gastroprotective activity of the extract was investigated using an ethanol-induced acute stress ulcer in rats with ranitidine as a reference drug. Hawthorn extract produced dose-dependent gastroprotective activity (3.8 +/- 2.1, 1.9 +/- 1.7, and 0.7 +/- 0.5 for doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively), with the efficacy comparable to that of the reference drug. Antimicrobial testing of the extract revealed its moderate bactericidal

  18. Differential Action between Schisandrin A and Schisandrin B in Eliciting an Anti-Inflammatory Action: The Depletion of Reduced Glutathione and the Induction of an Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Leong, Pou Kuan; Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Chan, Wing Man; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrin A (Sch A) and schisandrin B (Sch B) are active components of Schisandrae Fructus. We compared the biochemical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of Sch A and Sch B, using cultured lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and concanavalin (ConA)-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Pre-incubation with Sch A or Sch B produced an anti-inflammatory action in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, as evidenced by the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory c-Jun N-terminal kinases/p38 kinase/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway as well as the suppression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors, with the extent of inhibition by Sch A being more pronounced. The greater activity of Sch A in anti-inflammatory response was associated with a greater decrease in cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and a greater increase in glutathione S-transferase activity than corresponding changes produced by Sch B. However, upon incubation, only Sch B resulted in the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like factor 2 and the induction of a significant increase in the expression of thioredoxin (TRX) in RAW264.7 cells. The Sch B-induced increase in TRX expression was associated with the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and effectors in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Studies in a mouse model of inflammation (carrageenan-induced paw edema) indicated that while long-term treatment with either Sch A or Sch B suppressed the extent of paw edema, only acute treatment with Sch A produced a significant degree of inhibition on the inflammatory response. Although only Sch A decreased the cellular GSH level and suppressed the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell proliferation in ConA-simulated splenocytes in vitro, both Sch A and Sch B treatments, while not altering cellular GSH levels, suppressed ConA-stimulated splenocyte proliferation ex vivo. These results suggest that Sch A and Sch B may act differentially on activating GST

  19. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  20. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, F R; Rowe, J M; Radich, J; Dick, J E

    2001-01-01

    Through the hard work of a large number of investigators, the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is becoming increasingly well understood, and as a consequence, new therapeutic targets have been identified and new model systems have been developed for testing novel therapies. How these new therapies can be most effectively studied in the clinic and whether they will ultimately improve cure rates are questions of enormous importance. In this article, Dr. Jacob Rowe presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art therapy for adult AML. His contribution emphasizes the fact that AML is not a single disease, but a number of related diseases each distinguished by unique cytogenetic markers which in turn help determine the most appropriate treatment. Dr. Jerald Radich continues on this theme, emphasizing how these cytogenetic abnormalities, as well as other mutations, give rise to abnormal signal transduction and how these abnormal pathways may represent ideal targets for the development of new therapeutics. A third contribution by Dr. Frederick Appelbaum describes how AML might be made the target of immunologic attack. Specifically, strategies using antibody-based or cell-based immunotherapies are described including the use of unmodified antibodies, drug conjugates, radioimmunoconjugates, non-ablative allogeneic transplantation, T cell adoptive immunotherapy and AML vaccines. Finally, Dr. John Dick provides a review of the development of the NOD/SCID mouse model of human AML emphasizing both what it has taught us about the biology of the disease as well as how it can be used to test new therapies. Taken together, these reviews are meant to help us understand more about where we are in the treatment of AML, where we can go and how we might get there. PMID:11722979

  2. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Bridelia retusa Methanolic Fruit Extract in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tekeshwar; Jain, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potentials of methanolic extract of Bridelia retusa fruit (BRME) were evaluated against different animal models in rodents. Antinociceptive effects of BRME were assessed in mice using the acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin test. Anti-inflammatory effects of BRME in three different doses, namely, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, were evaluated by utilizing different animal models representing various changes associated with inflammation, namely, carrageenan-induced paw oedema, histamine and serotonin-induced paw oedema, arachidonic acid-induced paw oedema, formalin-induced paw oedema, TPA-induced ear oedema, acetic acid-induced vascular permeability, total WBC count in paw fluid, and myeloperoxidase assay. Also BRME was phytochemically evaluated using chromatographic method. The BRME did not exhibit any signs of toxicity up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg. The extract showed statistical significant inhibition of induced nociception and inflammation in dose dependent manner. The higher dose of extract significantly inhibited pain and inflammation against control (P < 0.001). HPLC results revealed the presence of gallic acid and ellagic acid as phytoconstituents in BRME and it was proven as anti-inflammatory agents. The present study scientifically demonstrated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of fruit of B. retusa methanolic extract. These effects may be attributed to the presence of polyphenolic phytoconstituents in the extract. PMID:25506619

  3. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  4. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. [Acute and subacute chemical pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Andujar, P; Nemery, B

    2009-10-01

    Acute or subacute chemical-induced lung injury is rarely compound specific and is most often caused by an accidental occupational, domestic or environmental exposure to an inhaled chemical agent. The industrial disaster that happened in Bhopal in 1984, accidental poisoning with chlorine and petroleum hydrocarbons and also vesicant gases used during conflicts, are specific examples. Rarely, a chemical agent can cause lung damage by being ingested and reaching the lung through the systemic circulation (for example accidental or deliberate paraquat ingestion). Household accidents should not be underestimated. An important cause of household accidents is chlorine inhalation resulting from mixing bleach with acids such as the scale removers used to clean toilets. Chemical agents can provoke direct and/or indirect damage to the respiratory tract. The acute or subacute clinical manifestations resulting from inhalation of chemical agents are very varied and include inhalation fevers, acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, adult respiratory distress syndrome, reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and acute or subacute pneumonitis. The site and the severity of chemical-induced respiratory damage caused by inhaled chemical agents depend mainly on the nature and the amount of the agent inhaled. The immediate and long-term prognosis and possible sequelae are also variable. This review excludes infectious or immunologically induced acute respiratory diseases. PMID:19953031

  6. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy. 1991.

    PubMed

    Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Jampol, Lee M; Rabb, Maurice F; Sorenson, John A; Beyrer, Charles; Wilcox, Lloyd M

    2012-02-01

    This is a report of nine patients who experienced sudden, severe, unilateral central vision loss following a flulike illness. Each patient had an exudative detachment of the macula. All patients experienced a spontaneous resolution of the acute macular manifestations with near-complete recovery of vision. A characteristic "bull's-eye" appearance in the macula persisted. The acute manifestations of the disorder did not recur in any of the patients during the period of follow-up. The constellation of findings was suggestive of an inflammatory disease of the retinal pigment epithelium, but a specific causative agent could not be identified. The acute clinical and angiographic features, the natural course, and the residual pigment epithelial derangement were not consistent with any previously described disorder. PMID:22451959

  9. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  10. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  11. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  12. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  13. Acute Kidney Injury in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Karvellas, Constantine J; Durand, Francois; Nadim, Mitra K

    2015-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of end-stage liver disease, especially in those with acute-on-chronic liver failure, occurring in up to 50% of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. There is no specific blood or urine biomarker that can reliably identify the cause of AKI in cirrhotic patients. This review examines studies used to assess renal dysfunction in cirrhotic patients including new diagnostic criteria and potential novel biomarkers. Although biomarker development to differentiate the cause of AKI in cirrhosis has promise, the utility of biomarkers to determine irreversible renal dysfunction with liver transplant remains lacking, warranting further investigation. PMID:26410141

  14. Acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, G N; Prasad, Rajniti; Meena, Manoj; Hussain, Moosa

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of acute silicosis with bilateral pneumothorax of a 28-year-old man working at a stone crusher factory for 1 year. He presented to the emergency department with cough, respiratory distress and diffuse chest pain. The patient was managed with bilateral intercostal tube drainage under water seal, oxygen inhalation and conservative therapy. On follow-up he showed improvement of resting dyspnoea and was doing well. This case is being reported because of the rare complications of acute silicosis as bilateral pneumothorax. PMID:24862410

  15. Acute kidney injury in children.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Flechelles, O; Jouvet, P

    2012-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5% of critically ill hospitalized children and is a risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality. The current review focuses on new definitions of acute kidney injury, standardized to reflect the entire spectrum of the disease, as well as on ongoing research to identify early biomarkers of kidney injury. Its also provides an overview of current practice and available therapies, with emphasis on new strategies for the prevention and pharmacological treatment of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Furthermore, a decision-making algorithm is presented for the use of renal replacement therapies in critically ill children with AKI. PMID:22495187

  16. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  17. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  18. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  19. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  3. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  4. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, ...

  5. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  6. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  8. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  9. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  10. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  11. [Acute and transient psychotic disorders].

    PubMed

    Marneros, A; Pillmann, F; Haring, A; Balzuweit, S

    2000-04-01

    Psychotic disorders with acute onset, a dramatic and polymorphous symptomatology and rapid resolution have been described in different countries and by different psychiatric schools. They have been called cycloid psychosis, bouffée délirante, psychogenic psychosis or good prognosis schizophrenia. ICD-10 has given an operational definition under the name "acute and transient psychotic disorders" (F23). Their nosological status is unclear. The Halle-Study of acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD) has investigated in a prospective manner clinical, para-clinical features and course of illness in 42 patients with ATPD and matched controls with positive schizophrenia, bipolar schizoaffective disorders as well as mentally healthy patients with acute surgical conditions. First results of our study show that ATPD amount to 4% of psychotic in-patients, prefer female sex, show short prodromi, marked affective disturbances within the episode and much better outcome as schizophrenic psychoses according to psychopathological, social, psychological and biographical criteria. Though ATPD may still be an inhomogeneous group, their clinical delineation from schizophrenia seems justified. PMID:10907609

  12. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  13. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  14. Chest physiotherapy in acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Webb, M S; Martin, J A; Cartlidge, P H; Ng, Y K; Wright, N A

    1985-01-01

    Forty four children with acute bronchiolitis were given twice daily chest physiotherapy in addition to standard supportive measures and were compared with 46 controls who were not given physiotherapy. There was no clinically discernable benefit on the course of their illness. PMID:3907510

  15. Acute and dramatic saxophone penis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodrigo, Carlota Gutiérrez; Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Menis, Diana; Larráin, Hugo; Martínez, Lara Angulo

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of intense genital swelling because of a hereditary angioedema. This rare disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute and asymptomatic genital edema, because it may prevent future potentially life-threatening episodes of visceral angioedema. PMID:26752411

  16. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  17. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  18. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  19. [Radionuclide diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Mil'ko, V I; Moskalenko, N I; Tikhonenko, E P

    1986-01-01

    Nephroscintigraphy using a 67Ga-citrate complex and 99mTc-pyrophosphate was performed in 88 patients with acute pyelonephritis. Nuclide hyperfixation was revealed in 97.8% of the cases. Three groups of patients were singled out on the basis of the intensity of incorporation and nature of the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in the kidneys. In the 1st group the RP incorporation was insignificant but higher than normal values; the RP distribution in the affected kidney was diffuse-inhomogenous. These changes were considered to be typical of acute serous pyelonephritis. In the 2nd and 3rd groups a sharp rise of the RP accumulation was noted, being typical of acute purulent pyelonephritis. One could distinguish between diffuse and focal lesions by the picture of the RP distribution in the renal parenchyma. Diuresis stimulation made it possible to differentiate an actual nuclide fixation during inflammation from nuclide mechanical retention as a result of urine outflow disorder. According to the authors, both radiopharmaceuticals could be applied for the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis as well as for differential diagnosis of various forms of the disease. PMID:3001474

  20. Acute treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kowey, P R; Marinchak, R A; Rials, S J; Filart, R A

    1998-03-12

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common clinical entity, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but it also accounts for a large percentage of healthcare dollar expenditures. Efforts to treat this arrhythmia in the past have focused on subacute antithrombotic therapy and eventually use of antiarrhythmic drugs for maintenance of sinus rhythm. However, there has been a growing interest in the concept of acute electrical and pharmacologic conversion. This treatment strategy has a number of benefits, including immediate alleviation of patient symptoms, avoidance of antithrombotic therapy, and prevention of electrophysiologic remodeling, which is thought to contribute to the perpetuation of the arrhythmia. There is also increasing evidence that this is a cost-effective strategy in that it may obviate admission to the hospital and the cost of long-term therapy. This article represents a summary of the treatments that may be used acutely to control the ventricular response to AFib, prevent thromboembolic events, and provide for acute conversion either pharmacologically or electrically. It includes information on modalities that are currently available and those that are under active development. We anticipate that an active, acute treatment approach to AFib and atrial flutter will become the therapeutic norm in the next few years, especially as the benefits of these interventions are demonstrated in clinical trials. PMID:9525568