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Sample records for acute cerebellar ataxia

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol, medications, and insecticides Bleeding into the cerebellum Multiple sclerosis Strokes of the cerebellum Vaccination ... swelling (inflammation) of the cerebellum (such as from multiple sclerosis) Cerebellar ataxia caused by a recent viral infection ...

  2. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  3. Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system. PMID:6312442

  4. Decreased cerebellar blood flow in postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nagamitsu, S.; Matsuishi, T.; Ishibashi, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Nishimi, T.; Ichikawa, K.; Yamanishi, K.; Kato, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The aim of the present study was to evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Five children with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia and five control subjects were examined. The distribution of rCBF was measured by SPECT imaging after intravenous administration of 123I-IMP (111 MBq). The rCBF ratio—defined as the ratio of rCBF in the region of interest (ROI) to that in the occipital cortex—was calculated for each cortical and subcortical ROI. The mean rCBF ratio of each region was then compared between the ataxic and control subjects. These patients and all control subjects were also evaluated using MRI.
RESULTS—The rCBF ratio was significantly lower in the cerebellum of the ataxic patients than in the cerebellum of the control subjects (p<0.05). No abnormal cerebellar morphology and no abnormal signal intensities were found on MRI.
CONCLUSION—123I-IMP SPECT clearly demonstrated the decreased rCBF in the cerebellum of all patients with postinfectious acute cerebellar ataxia.

 PMID:10369834

  5. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  6. Typhoid fever presenting as acute cerebellar ataxia and severe thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, B M K

    2008-03-01

    Typhoid fever being a systemic infection can present in a multitude of ways, involving various systems. Here we describe a case of typhoid fever presenting with acute cerebellar ataxia and marked thrombocytopenia. This atypical presentation is not common in typhoid fever and can lead to misdiagnosis as well as a delay in the initiation of appropriate therapy. Prompt clinical improvement and the return of platelet counts to normal were noted after the patient was started on IV Ceftriaxone.

  7. Cerebellar Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perlman

    2000-05-01

    There is nothing more discouraging than for a patient to be given a specific diagnosis, then to be told that there is nothing that can be done. Physicians are equally disheartened to see exponential progress being made in the understanding of the pathophysiology of a complex disorder but few direct benefits resulting for their patients. Over the past 5 years, molecular genetic research has completely revolutionized the way in which the progressive cerebellar ataxias are classified and diagnosed, but it has yet to produce effective gene-based, neuroprotective, or neurorestorative therapies. The treatment of cerebellar ataxia remains primarily a neurorehabilitation challenge, employing physical, occupational, speech, and swallowing therapy; adaptive equipment; driver safety training; and nutritional counseling. Modest additional gains are seen with the use of medications that can improve imbalance, incoordination, or dysarthria (amantadine, buspirone, acetazolamide); cerebellar tremor (clonazepam, propranolol); and cerebellar or central vestibular nystagmus (gabapentin, baclofen, clonazepam). Many of the progressive cerebellar syndromes have associated features involving other neurologic systems (eg, spasticity, dystonia or rigidity, resting or rubral tremor, chorea, motor unit weakness or fatigue, autonomic dysfunction, peripheral or posterior column sensory loss, neuropathic pain or cramping, double vision, vision and hearing loss, dementia, and bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction), which can impede the treatment of the ataxic symptoms or can worsen with the use of certain drugs. Treatment of the associated features themselves may in turn worsen the ataxia either directly (as side effects of medication) or indirectly (eg, relaxation of lower limb spasticity that was acting as a stabilizer for an ataxic gait). Secondary complications of progressive ataxia can include deconditioning or immobility, weight loss or gain, skin breakdown, recurrent pulmonary and

  8. [Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is the most frequent recessive cerebral ataxia d should always be researched first. Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia have a specific treatment. Associated neurological signs such polyneuroapthy, ophtalmologic or oculomotor signs, pyramidal signs, and cerebellar MRI can lead to the etiological diagnosis. Biological tests should be: vitamin E, cholesterol, alpha-fetoprotein levels, acanthocytes, than phytanic acid, cholestanol, lysosomal enzymes. Numerous autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia remain without etiology.

  9. A case of midbrain infarction with acute bilateral cerebellar ataxia visualized by diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Maya, Yuka; Kawabori, Masahito; Oura, Daisuke; Niiya, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Motoyuki; Mabuchi, Shoji

    2016-08-31

    An 85-year-old woman with hypertension was admitted with a sudden onset of gait disturbance and dysarthria. On admission, the patient showed severe bilateral cerebellar ataxia with moderate right medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) syndrome. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an acute infarction in the lower and medial part of midbrain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) started from both cerebellar peduncles revealed that the lesion of the acute infarction matched the decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle where crossing of tract was seen and a part of its tract was interrupted at the site. Interruption of the cerebellum red nuclear path at the medial part of midbrain was considered to be the reason for bilateral cerebellar ataxia and visualization of cerebellum red nuclear path by DTI can give better understanding of the neurological symptom.

  10. Spontaneous thrombosis of developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with venous infarct and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-08-01

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA), formally known as venous angioma, is a congenital anatomic variant of the venous drainage of the brain. Although they typically have a benign clinical course and a low symptomatic rate, thrombosis of a drainage vein may occur, leading to potentially debilitating complications. We report a unique case of spontaneous thrombosis of a posterior fossa developmental venous anomaly with cerebellar infarct in a 61-year-old man who presented with acute onset cerebellar ataxia. DVA thrombosis was well-depicted on CT and MR studies. Patient was put on anticoagulant therapy and complete recanalization was seen on follow-up imaging.

  11. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  12. Acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia due to co-infection of human herpesvirus-6 and adenovirus mimicking myositis.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Aldo; Pala, Giovanna; Cresta, Federico; Finetti, Martina; Biancheri, Roberta; Renna, Salvatore

    2014-11-26

    Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is a relatively common neurological disease in children. Most common types of ACA are acute post-infectious (APCA) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Less common but important causes include opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and acute cerebellitis. Cerebellar neoplasms and acute hydrocephalus are additional causes of paediatric ataxia. APCA is the most common cause of ACA in children, comprising about 30-50% of total cases. This is a report about an immunocompetent 4-yrs-old male affected by APCA, due to co-infection by human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and adenovirus, with symptoms mimicking myositis.

  13. [Acute cerebellar ataxia in a 5-year-old boy. Clinical warnings].

    PubMed

    Mrozińska, M; Horwath, A; Ostoja-Chrzastowski, W

    1998-01-01

    A case of acute cerebellar ataxia caused by ECHO virus 30.5-year-old boy admitted to the Clinic of Gastroenterology and Nutrition in Warsaw, in September, 1996, complaining of headache, dizziness, weakness, somnolence, dysarthria and an unsteady walk. On neurological examination he had imparied coordination, rombergism, generalized hypotonia. There was no history of exposure to contagious diseases, ear discharge, convulsions, trauma. Parents suggested that the child could have swallowed an unidentified pill--toxicological tests ruled out poisoning. The diagnosis is based on the clinical examination and amplification ECHO virus from CSF.

  14. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  15. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  17. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  18. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Melberg, A; Hetta, J; Dahl, N; Nennesmo, I; Bengtsson, M; Wibom, R; Grant, C; Gustavson, K H; Lundberg, P O

    1995-12-01

    A new autosomal dominant syndrome in a Swedish pedigree is described. Five patients were affected with cerebellar ataxia and sensorineural deafness. Four of these patients had symptoms of narcolepsy. Optic atrophy, other neurological abnormalities and psychiatric symptoms developed with increasing disease duration. Three patients had non-neurological disease in addition, including diabetes mellitus in two and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in one. Autopsy with neuropathological examination was performed in one case. Molecular studies focused on the short arm of chromosome 6, including the HLA DR2 locus associated with narcolepsy and the (CAG)n repeat at the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) locus. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy of one case indicated mitochondrial dysfunction with selective decrease in ATP production for substrates that normally give the highest rates. The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was reduced, indicating a low mitochondrial density. We postulate an autosomal dominant genetic factor responsible for this syndrome. Linkage was excluded to HLA DR2, and a normal sized SCA1 repeat was observed. We conclude that a locus predisposing to ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy exists outside this region of chromosome 6.

  19. Differences in saccade dynamics between spinocerebellar ataxia 2 and late-onset cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Federighi, Pamela; Cevenini, Gabriele; Dotti, Maria T; Rosini, Francesca; Pretegiani, Elena; Federico, Antonio; Rufa, Alessandra

    2011-03-01

    The cerebellum is implicated in maintaining the saccadic subsystem efficient for vision by minimizing movement inaccuracy and by learning from endpoint errors. This ability is often disrupted in degenerative cerebellar diseases, as demonstrated by saccade kinetic abnormalities. The study of saccades in these patients may therefore provide insights into the neural substrate underlying saccadic motor control. We investigated the different extent of saccade dynamic abnormalities in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and late-onset cerebellar ataxias, genetically undefined and with prevalent cerebellar atrophy. Reflexive and voluntary saccades of different amplitude (10°-18°) were studied in seven patients with spinocerebellar ataxia 2, eight patients with late-onset cerebellar ataxia and 25 healthy controls. Quantitative analysis of saccade parameters and measures of saccade accuracy were performed. Detailed neurological, neurophysiological and magnetic resonance imaging assessment was obtained for each patient. Genetic and laboratory screening for spinocerebellar ataxias and other forms of late-onset cerebellar ataxias were also performed. A lower peak saccade velocity and longer duration was observed in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia 2 with respect to those with late-onset cerebellar ataxia and controls. Unlike subjects with spinocerebellar ataxia 2, patients with late-onset cerebellar ataxia showed main sequence relationships to similar saccades made by normal subjects. Saccades were significantly more inaccurate, namely hypometric, in late-onset cerebellar ataxia than in spinocerebellar ataxia 2 and inaccuracy increased with saccade amplitude. The percentage of hypometric primary saccades and of larger secondary corrective saccades were consistently higher in late-onset cerebellar ataxia than in spinocerebellar ataxia 2 and controls. No other significant differences were found between groups. Two different mechanisms were adopted to redirect the fovea as fast

  20. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  1. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  2. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  3. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  4. Arachnodactyly, aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, P. A.; Jagannathan, K.; Valmikinathan, K.

    1974-01-01

    Two male cousins are reported with arachnodactyly, selective aminoaciduria, congenital cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, and delayed developmental milestones, and a distant female relative with similar abnormalities. The syndrome is thought to be previously undescribed, though it has resemblances to Marinesco-Sjögren and Marfan's syndromes. Images PMID:4448994

  5. The cerebellar serotoninergic system and its possible involvement in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, P

    1993-05-01

    A review concerning the characteristics of the cerebellar serotoninergic system is presented. In rat, cat and oppossum, the perikarya of origin are located in the brain stem raphe nuclei and in other brainstem structures. The projections to the cerebellar layers and deep nuclei include synaptic connections, but also non synaptic terminals, especially in a diffuse cortical plexus. Serotoninergic receptors have been described: 5-HT1B in the molecular layer and 5-HT2 in the inferior olive. Serotonin exerts neurophysiological effects on several target cells, directly or indirectly, presynaptically or postsynaptically. A modulatory effect on Purkinje cells is well documented. In thiamine deprived animals, a specific serotoninergic cerebellar syndrome includes a selective degeneration of the serotoninergic cerebellar system, an increase of the 5-HIAA cerebellar values and an exaggerated serotoninergic turnover. In human heredoataxias (Friedreich's ataxia and cerebellar cortical atrophy), serotoninergic disturbances have been observed in the CSF, including low 5-HIAA values and an increased serotoninergic turnover. Therapeutic results have been obtained with L-5-HTP, a precursor of serotonin, in several conditions presenting cerebellar ataxia. L-5-HTP resistance of olivopontocerebellar atrophies may be explained by the destruction of serotonin-sensitive target cells, especially Purkinje cells.

  6. Survival and severity in dominant cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Marelli, Cecilia; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Charles, Perrine; Tallaksen, Chantal; Forlani, Sylvie; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are known to be genetically and clinically heterogeneous. Whether severity and survival are variable, however, is not known. We, therefore, studied survival and severity in 446 cases and 509 relatives with known mutations. Survival was 68 years [95% CI: 65–70] in 223 patients with polyglutamine expansions versus 80 years [73–84] in 23 with other mutations (P < 0.0001). Disability was also more severe in the former: at age 60, 30% were wheelchair users versus 3% with other SCAs (P < 0.001). This has implications for genetic counseling and the design of therapeutic trials. PMID:25750924

  7. Predicting and correcting ataxia using a model of cerebellar function

    PubMed Central

    Bhanpuri, Nasir H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar damage results in uncoordinated, variable and dysmetric movements known as ataxia. Here we show that we can reliably model single-joint reaching trajectories of patients (n = 10), reproduce patient-like deficits in the behaviour of controls (n = 11), and apply patient-specific compensations that improve reaching accuracy (P < 0.02). Our approach was motivated by the theory that the cerebellum is essential for updating and/or storing an internal dynamic model that relates motor commands to changes in body state (e.g. arm position and velocity). We hypothesized that cerebellar damage causes a mismatch between the brain’s modelled dynamics and the actual body dynamics, resulting in ataxia. We used both behavioural and computational approaches to demonstrate that specific cerebellar patient deficits result from biased internal models. Our results strongly support the idea that an intact cerebellum is critical for maintaining accurate internal models of dynamics. Importantly, we demonstrate how subject-specific compensation can improve movement in cerebellar patients, who are notoriously unresponsive to treatment. PMID:24812203

  8. Early Cerebellar Network Shifting in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Falcon, M I; Gomez, C M; Chen, E E; Shereen, A; Solodkin, A

    2016-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 6 (SCA6), an autosomal dominant degenerative disease, is characterized by diplopia, gait ataxia, and incoordination due to severe progressive degeneration of Purkinje cells in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum. Ocular motor deficits are common, including difficulty fixating on moving objects, nystagmus and disruption of smooth pursuit movements. In presymptomatic SCA6, there are alterations in saccades and smooth-pursuit movements. We sought to assess functional and structural changes in cerebellar connectivity associated with a visual task, hypothesizing that gradual changes would parallel disease progression. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data during a passive smooth-pursuit task in 14 SCA6 patients, representing a range of disease duration and severity, and performed a cross-sectional comparison of cerebellar networks compared with healthy controls. We identified a shift in activation from vermis in presymptomatic individuals to lateral cerebellum in moderate-to-severe cases. Concomitantly, effective connectivity between regions of cerebral cortex and cerebellum was at its highest in moderate cases, and disappeared in severe cases. Finally, we noted structural differences in the cerebral and cerebellar peduncles. These unique results, spanning both functional and structural domains, highlight widespread changes in SCA6 and compensatory mechanisms associated with cerebellar physiology that could be utilized in developing new therapies.

  9. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Watt, Alanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA684Q/+) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA684Q/84Q) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA684Q/84Q mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  10. Structural and functional MRI abnormalities of cerebellar cortex and nuclei in SCA3, SCA6 and Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Stefanescu, Maria R; Dohnalek, Moritz; Maderwald, Stefan; Thürling, Markus; Minnerop, Martina; Beck, Andreas; Schlamann, Marc; Diedrichsen, Joern; Ladd, Mark E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia are common hereditary ataxias. Different patterns of atrophy of the cerebellar cortex are well known. Data on cerebellar nuclei are sparse. Whereas cerebellar nuclei have long been thought to be preserved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, histology shows marked atrophy of the nuclei in Friedreich's ataxia and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. In the present study susceptibility weighted imaging was used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (n = 12, age range 41-76 years, five female), Friedreich's ataxia (n = 12, age range 21-55 years, seven female), spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (n = 10, age range 34-67 years, three female), and age- and gender-matched controls (total n = 23, age range 22-75 years, 10 female). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were used to calculate the volume of the cerebellum. In addition, ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with optimized normalization methods to assess function of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during simple hand movements. As expected, the volume of the cerebellum was markedly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, preserved in Friedreich's ataxia, and mildy reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. The volume of the cerebellar nuclei was reduced in the three patient groups compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.05; two-sample t-tests). Atrophy of the cerebellar nuclei was most pronounced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. On a functional level, hand-movement-related cerebellar activation was altered in all three disorders. Within the cerebellar cortex, functional magnetic resonance imaging signal was significantly reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and Friedreich's ataxia compared to matched controls (P-values < 0.001, bootstrap-corrected cluster-size threshold; two-sample t-tests). The difference missed significance in spinocerebellar ataxia

  11. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in a child with Ataxia-Telangiectasia showing unrelated cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Piane, Maria; Molinaro, Anna; Soresina, Annarosa; Costa, Silvia; Maffeis, Marianna; Germani, Aldo; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Meschini, Roberta; Plebani, Alessandro; Chessa, Luciana; Micheli, Roberto

    2016-12-15

    We report the case of a 6-year-old female patient with Ataxia Telangiectasia, an extremely rare condition, who developed in addition a left cerebellar astrocytoma and a right cerebellar infarction, considered as two independent events. Children with AT have an increased risk of developing cancer, but only few cases of glioma are reported and, at our knowledge, no other case of unrelated cerebellar glioma and cerebellar infarction in with the same AT patient have been described. The molecular analysis of ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) gene showed that the patient is compound heterozygote for two previously unreported mutations: c.3291delC (p.Phe1097fs) at exon 25 and c.8198A>C (p.Gln2733Pro) at exon 58. The role of the identified ATM gene mutations in the pathogenesis of Ataxia Telangiectasia and the coexisting cerebellar disorders is discussed.

  12. The use of muscle biopsy in the diagnosis of undefined ataxia with cerebellar atrophy in children

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Alessandra; Renaldo, Florence; Zanni, Ginevra; D’Amico, Adele; Pastore, Anna; Barresi, Sabina; Valente, Enza Maria; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Boldrini, Renata; Mercuri, Eugenio; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Childhood cerebellar ataxias, and particularly congenital ataxias, are heterogeneous disorders and several remain undefined. We performed a muscle biopsy in patients with congenital ataxia and children with later onset undefined ataxia having neuroimaging evidence of cerebellar atrophy. Significant reduced levels of Coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) were found in the skeletal muscle of 9 out of 34 patients that were consecutively screened. A mutation in the ADCK3/Coq8 gene (R347X) was identified in a female patient with ataxia, seizures and markedly reduced COQ10 levels. In a 2.5-years-old male patient with non syndromic congenital ataxia and autophagic vacuoles in the muscle biopsy we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation R111X mutation in SIL1 gene, leading to early diagnosis of Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome. We think that muscle biopsy is a valuable procedure to improve diagnostic assesement in children with congenital ataxia or other undefined forms of later onset childhood ataxia associated to cerebellar atrophy at MRI. PMID:21873089

  13. Contribution of Somatic and Dendritic SK Channels in the Firing Rate of Deep Cerebellar Nuclei: Implication in Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shahabi, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Loss of inhibitory output from Purkinje cells leads to hyperexcitability of the Deep Cerebellar Nuclei (DCN), which results in cerebellar ataxia. Also, inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel increases firing rate of DCN, which could cause cerebellar ataxia. Therefore, SK channel activators can be effective in reducing the symptoms of this disease, and used for the treatment of cerebellar ataxia. In this regard, we hypothesized that blockade of SK channels in different compartments of DCN would increase firing rate with different value. The location of these channels has different effects on increasing firing rate. Methods: In this study, multi-compartment computational model of DCN was used. This computational stimulation allowed us to study the changes in the firing activity of DCN neuron without concerns about interfering parameters in the experiment. Results: The simulation results demonstrated that blockade of somatic and dendritic SK channel increased the firing rate of DCN. In addition, after hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude increased with blocking SK channel, and its regularity and resting potential changed. However, action potentials amplitude and duration had no significant changes. The simulation results illustrated a more significant contribution of SK channels on the dendritic tree to the DCN firing rate. SK channels in the proximal dendrites have more impact on firing rate compared to distal dendrites. Discussion: Therefore, inhibition of SK channel in DCN can cause cerebellar ataxia, and SK channel openers can have a therapeutic effect on cerebellar ataxia. In addition, the location of SK channels could be important in therapeutic goals. Dendritic SK channels can be a more effective target compared to somatic SK channels. PMID:27303600

  14. SYNE1 ataxia is a common recessive ataxia with major non-cerebellar features: a large multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Smets, Katrien; Mallaret, Martial; Di Bella, Daniela; Gallenmüller, Constanze; Baets, Jonathan; Schulze, Martin; Magri, Stefania; Sarto, Elisa; Mustafa, Mona; Deconinck, Tine; Haack, Tobias; Züchner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar; Stendel, Claudia; Klopstock, Thomas; Durr, Alexandra; Tranchant, Christine; Sturm, Marc; Hamza, Wahiba; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Mariotti, Caterina; Koenig, Michel; Schöls, Ludger; Schüle, Rebecca; de Jonghe, Peter; Anheim, Mathieu; Taroni, Franco; Bauer, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the synaptic nuclear envelope protein 1 (SYNE1) gene have been reported to cause a relatively pure, slowly progressive cerebellar recessive ataxia mostly identified in Quebec, Canada. Combining next-generation sequencing techniques and deep-phenotyping (clinics, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, muscle histology), we here established the frequency, phenotypic spectrum and genetic spectrum of SYNE1 in a screening of 434 non-Canadian index patients from seven centres across Europe. Patients were screened by whole-exome sequencing or targeted panel sequencing, yielding 23 unrelated families with recessive truncating SYNE1 mutations (23/434 = 5.3%). In these families, 35 different mutations were identified, 34 of them not previously linked to human disease. While only 5/26 patients (19%) showed the classical SYNE1 phenotype of mildly progressive pure cerebellar ataxia, 21/26 (81%) exhibited additional complicating features, including motor neuron features in 15/26 (58%). In three patients, respiratory dysfunction was part of an early-onset multisystemic neuromuscular phenotype with mental retardation, leading to premature death at age 36 years in one of them. Positron emission tomography imaging confirmed hypometabolism in extra-cerebellar regions such as the brainstem. Muscle biopsy reliably showed severely reduced or absent SYNE1 staining, indicating its potential use as a non-genetic indicator for underlying SYNE1 mutations. Our findings, which present the largest systematic series of SYNE1 patients and mutations outside Canada, revise the view that SYNE1 ataxia causes mainly a relatively pure cerebellar recessive ataxia and that it is largely limited to Quebec. Instead, complex phenotypes with a wide range of extra-cerebellar neurological and non-neurological dysfunctions are frequent, including in particular motor neuron and brainstem dysfunction. The disease course in this multisystemic neurodegenerative disease can be fatal

  15. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  16. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  17. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Rebekah K.; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A.; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D.; Roslin, Nicole M.; Marshall, Christian R.; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  18. Does modulation of the endocannabinoid system have potential therapeutic utility in cerebellar ataxia?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebellar ataxias represent a spectrum of disorders which are, however, linked by common symptoms of motor incoordination and typically associated with deficiency in Purkinje cell firing activity and, often, degeneration. Cerebellar ataxias currently lack a curative agent. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes eCB compounds and their associated metabolic enzymes, together with cannabinoid receptors, predominantly the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) in the cerebellum; activation of this system in the cerebellar cortex is associated with deficits in motor coordination characteristic of ataxia, effects which can be prevented by CB1R antagonists. Of further interest are various findings that CB1R deficits may also induce a progressive ataxic phenotype. Together these studies suggest that motor coordination is reliant on maintaining the correct balance in eCB system signalling. Recent work also demonstrates deficient cannabinoid signalling in the mouse ‘ducky2J’ model of ataxia. In light of these points, the potential mechanisms whereby cannabinoids may modulate the eCB system to ameliorate dysfunction associated with cerebellar ataxias are considered. PMID:26970080

  19. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome: a slowly progressive disorder with stereotypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Daniele; Dalla Bella, Eleonora; Dacci, Patrizia; Mariotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a newly described condition with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive balance impairment and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, which can severely affect patients' quality of life. Its pathogenesis remains obscure and the diagnosis challenging. We described four patients complaining of slowly progressive gait unbalance and sensory disturbances at the feet followed, after a period ranging 2-6 years, by cerebellar dysfunction. All patients showed gait and limb ataxia, positive Romberg sign, cerebellar dysarthria, gaze-evoked nystagmus, absent deep tendon reflexes, and impaired vibratory sensation. Nerve conduction studies revealed axonal sensory neuropathy, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy, and otoneurological investigation demonstrated bilateral vestibular areflexia with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes. The diagnosis of CANVAS should be suspected on clinical ground based on homogeneous course of symptoms and signs, and addressed by video-oculography eye movement recording.

  20. Postural Ataxia in Cerebellar Downbeat Nystagmus: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive and Vestibular Signals and Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Helmchen, Christoph; Kirchhoff, Jan-Birger; Göttlich, Martin; Sprenger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background The cerebellum integrates proprioceptive, vestibular and visual signals for postural control. Cerebellar patients with downbeat nystagmus (DBN) complain of unsteadiness of stance and gait as well as blurred vision and oscillopsia. Objectives The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of visual input, gaze eccentricity, vestibular and proprioceptive input on the postural stability in a large cohort of cerebellar patients with DBN, in comparison to healthy age-matched control subjects. Methods Oculomotor (nystagmus, smooth pursuit eye movements) and postural (postural sway speed) parameters were recorded and related to each other and volumetric changes of the cerebellum (voxel-based morphometry, SPM). Results Twenty-seven patients showed larger postural instability in all experimental conditions. Postural sway increased with nystagmus in the eyes closed condition but not with the eyes open. Romberg’s ratio remained stable and was not different from healthy controls. Postural sway did not change with gaze position or graviceptive input. It increased with attenuated proprioceptive input and on tandem stance in both groups but Romberg’s ratio also did not differ. Cerebellar atrophy (vermal lobule VI, VIII) correlated with the severity of impaired smooth pursuit eye movements of DBN patients. Conclusions Postural ataxia of cerebellar patients with DBN cannot be explained by impaired visual feedback. Despite oscillopsia visual feedback control on cerebellar postural control seems to be preserved as postural sway was strongest on visual deprivation. The increase in postural ataxia is neither related to modulations of single components characterizing nystagmus nor to deprivation of single sensory (visual, proprioceptive) inputs usually stabilizing stance. Re-weighting of multisensory signals and/or inappropriate cerebellar motor commands might account for this postural ataxia. PMID:28056109

  1. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  2. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed Central

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease. PMID:27375960

  3. Cerebellar Dysfunction and Ataxia in Patients with Epilepsy: Coincidence, Consequence, or Cause?

    PubMed

    Marcián, Václav; Filip, Pavel; Bareš, Martin; Brázdil, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Basic epilepsy teachings assert that seizures arise from the cerebral cortex, glossing over infratentorial structures such as the cerebellum that are believed to modulate rather than generate seizures. Nonetheless, ataxia and other clinical findings in epileptic patients are slowly but inevitably drawing attention to this neural node. Tracing the evolution of this line of inquiry from the observed coincidence of cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar dysfunction (most apparently manifested as ataxia) in epilepsy to their close association, this review considers converging clinical, physiological, histological, and neuroimaging evidence that support incorporating the cerebellum into epilepsy pathology. We examine reports of still controversial cerebellar epilepsy, studies of cerebellar stimulation alleviating paroxysmal epileptic activity, studies and case reports of cerebellar lesions directly associated with seizures, and conditions in which ataxia is accompanied by epileptic seizures. Finally, the review substantiates the role of this complex brain structure in epilepsy whether by coincidence, as a consequence of deleterious cortical epileptic activity or antiepileptic drugs, or the very cause of the disease.

  4. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments. PMID:23331413

  5. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient’s age. Grade 2–3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2–3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate. PMID:27551274

  6. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Truncal Ataxia and HINTS as Cardinal Signs for Acute Vestibular Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Sergio; Martínez, Carlos; Zalazar, Guillermo; Moro, Marcela; Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Luis, Leonel; Gordon, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The head impulse, nystagmus type, test of skew (HINTS) protocol set a new paradigm to differentiate peripheral vestibular disease from stroke in patients with acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). The relationship between degree of truncal ataxia and stroke has not been systematically studied in patients with AVS. We studied a group of 114 patients who were admitted to a General Hospital due to AVS, 72 of them with vestibular neuritis (based on positive head impulse, abnormal caloric tests, and negative MRI) and the rest with stroke: 32 in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory (positive HINTS findings, positive MRI) and 10 in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory (variable findings and grade 3 ataxia, positive MRI). Truncal ataxia was measured by independent observers as grade 1, mild to moderate imbalance with walking independently; grade 2, severe imbalance with standing, but cannot walk without support; and grade 3, falling at upright posture. When we applied the HINTS protocol to our sample, we obtained 100% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity, similar to previously published findings. Only those patients with stroke presented with grade 3 ataxia. Of those with grade 2 ataxia (n = 38), 11 had cerebellar stroke and 28 had vestibular neuritis, not related to the patient's age. Grade 2-3 ataxia was 92.9% sensitive and 61.1% specific to detect AICA/PICA stroke in patients with AVS, with 100% sensitivity to detect AICA stroke. In turn, two signs (nystagmus of central origin and grade 2-3 Ataxia) had 100% sensitivity and 61.1% specificity. Ataxia is less sensitive than HINTS but much easier to evaluate.

  7. Physiotherapy in degenerative cerebellar ataxias: utilisation, patient satisfaction, and professional expertise.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Keus, Samyra H J; Verstappen, Carla C P; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2013-12-01

    Physiotherapy plays an important role in the management of patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. However, our insight in the quantity and quality of physiotherapy prescription in this group of patients is incomplete. The purposes of this study were to investigate the utilization of physiotherapy and patient satisfaction in patients with degenerative ataxias in The Netherlands and to examine the level of expertise and needs of physiotherapists treating ataxia patients. Questionnaires were sent to members of the Dutch association for patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias (n = 532). In addition, 181 questionnaires were sent to the physiotherapists who had recently treated the patients who responded. Eventually, 317 questionnaires from patients (60 %) and 114 questionnaires from physiotherapists (63 %) could be used for further analysis. Sixty-four percent of the patients were currently treated by a physiotherapist. Their median treatment duration was 5 years. Nineteen percent of the patients had never been referred, often despite the presence of limitations in daily activities. On the other hand, some participants without reported limitations had received physiotherapy. In general, participants were satisfied with their physiotherapist. The most reported treatment goals were improvement or maintenance of balance, general physical condition, and mobility. Physiotherapists reported lack of ataxia-specific expertise and expressed the need for education and evidence-based guidelines. Referral to and use of physiotherapy in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia in The Netherlands are currently inconsistent and not in agreement with the little scientific evidence available. Referral rates are high, but referrals and actual necessity are discrepant; treatment duration is long; and ataxia-specific expertise among physiotherapists is insufficient. Evidence-based recommendations and specific training of physiotherapists are needed.

  8. Identification of CHIP as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  9. Late-Onset Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cerebellar Ataxia as an Initial Symptom

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Jung-Min; Park, Hyeyoung; Moon, Kyung Chul; Jeon, Beomseok

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset progressive cerebellar ataxia is a diagnostic challenge because of a poor correlation between genotype and phenotype, and a broad range of secondary causes that extend beyond the neurological field. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman admitted after 2 years of slowly progressing cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and emotional instability. Notably, she was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus at the age of 35. As ‘idiopathic cerebellar ataxia’ was suspected, diagnostic tests, including genetic testing as well as serum and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. All results were normal except those of MRI, performed 9 months prior to admission, which showed multiple dot-like white matter lesions with unclear cause. On a repeated brain MRI, a new lesion presenting as a 1.5-cm-sized highly enhancing mass attached to the right frontal skull was found. A sharply marginated lytic skull defect was also evident on skull X-ray, which corresponded to the lesion mass. Given these new radiological findings, a systemic review of the patient's medical history for rare secondary causes of cerebellar ataxia was performed, with particular attention to her past ‘diabetes insipidus’. The mass, lytic lesion of the skull, white matter lesion, diabetes insipidus, and cerebellar ataxia all suggested a final diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which was confirmed histopathologically. This is a rare case of late-onset LCH with an unusual initial symptom which underlines the importance of carefully reviewing the patient's medical history and broadening the search for etiologies beyond the nervous system. PMID:27920713

  10. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: A review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) characterized by ataxia with other neurological signs, including oculomotor disturbances, cognitive deficits, pyramidal and extrapyramidal dysfunction, bulbar, spinal and peripheral nervous system involvement. The global prevalence of this disease is not known. The most common type I ADCA is SCA3 followed by SCA2, SCA1, and SCA8, in descending order. Founder effects no doubt contribute to the variable prevalence between populations. Onset is usually in adulthood but cases of presentation in childhood have been reported. Clinical features vary depending on the SCA subtype but by definition include ataxia associated with other neurological manifestations. The clinical spectrum ranges from pure cerebellar signs to constellations including spinal cord and peripheral nerve disease, cognitive impairment, cerebellar or supranuclear ophthalmologic signs, psychiatric problems, and seizures. Cerebellar ataxia can affect virtually any body part causing movement abnormalities. Gait, truncal, and limb ataxia are often the most obvious cerebellar findings though nystagmus, saccadic abnormalities, and dysarthria are usually associated. To date, 21 subtypes have been identified: SCA1-SCA4, SCA8, SCA10, SCA12-SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA17-SCA23, SCA25, SCA27, SCA28 and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Type I ADCA can be further divided based on the proposed pathogenetic mechanism into 3 subclasses: subclass 1 includes type I ADCA caused by CAG repeat expansions such as SCA1-SCA3, SCA17, and DRPLA, subclass 2 includes trinucleotide repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding regions of the disease gene including SCA8, SCA10 and SCA12. Subclass 3 contains disorders caused by specific gene deletions, missense mutation, and nonsense mutation and includes SCA13, SCA14, SCA15/16, SCA27 and SCA28. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, physical examination, genetic molecular

  11. Autopsy study of cerebellar degeneration in siblings with ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder.

    PubMed

    Oba, Daiju; Hayashi, Masaharu; Minamitani, Motoyuki; Hamano, Shinichiro; Uchisaka, Naoki; Kikuchi, Akira; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2010-04-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder (ATLD) is caused by mutations of the MRE11 gene and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, increased frequency of chromosomal translocations and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. ATLD is a rare genetic disease and the associated pathological changes in the brain are unclear. Here, we report the neuropathological findings in the first cases of genetically confirmed ATLD in a pair of Japanese male siblings. Magnetic resonance imaging studies performed during infancy revealed that both subjects had cerebellar atrophy. They died of pulmonary cancer at 9 and 16 years. The siblings had the same compound heterozygous mutations of the MRE11 gene. Brain autopsy demonstrated mild and severe cerebellar atrophy in the vermis and medial part of the hemispheres, oral to the horizontal fissure, respectively. Nuclear immunoreactivity for MRE11 was absent in neurons of cerebellar cortex, cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and midbrain, whereas being widespread in normal control brains. Immunoreactivity for the DNA oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, was identified in nuclei of granule cells and Bergmann glial cells. The combination of MRE11 deficiency and DNA oxidative injury might have led to selective cerebellar degeneration.

  12. Introducing treatment strategy for cerebellar ataxia in mutant med mice: combination of acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Samira; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sarbaz, Yashar

    2014-02-01

    Purkinje neurons are the sole output neuron of the cerebellar cortex, and they generate high-frequency action potentials. Electrophysiological dysfunction of Purkinje neurons causes cerebellar ataxia. Mutant med mice have the lack of expression of the Scn8a gene. This gene encodes the NaV1.6 protein. In med Purkinje neurons, regular high-frequency firing is slowed, and med mice are ataxic. The aim of this study was to propose the neuroprotective drugs which could be useful for ataxia treatment in med mice, and to investigate the neuroprotective effects of these drugs by simulation. Simulation results showed that Kv4 channel inhibitors and BK channel activators restored the normal electrophysiological properties of the med Purkinje neurons. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) and acetazolamide (ACTZ) were proposed as neuroprotective drugs for Kv4 channel inhibitor and BK channel activator, respectively.

  13. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R.

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Cerebellar TMS in Treatment of a Patient with Cerebellar Ataxia: Evidence from Clinical, Biomechanics and Neurophysiological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Faranak; Wu, Yunfen; Manor, Brad; Anastasio, Elana M.; Lough, Matthew; Novak, Vera; Greenstein, Patricia E.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    We describe a patient with a probable diagnosis of idiopathic late-onset cerebellar atrophy who shows improvement of limb coordination, speech and gait following 21 days of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to scalp regions presumably corresponding to the cerebellum. This case study provides, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of gait improvement in response to TMS therapy in ataxia, as well as neurophysiological evidence in support of modification of cerebello-cortical interaction that may underlie some of the improvements. PMID:23625327

  15. Two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rump, R; Hamel, B C; Pinckers, A J; van Dop, P A

    1997-01-01

    We describe two sibs with chorioretinal dystrophy, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, and cerebellar ataxia, Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome, a rare but distinct pleiotropic single gene disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The cases presented illustrate that this syndrome is still poorly recognised. We provide a review and analysis of previously reported cases and the differential diagnosis, which might aid in the identification of additional cases. Images PMID:9321767

  16. Autosomal-Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Is Caused by Mutations in Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Guergueltcheva, Velina; Azmanov, Dimitar N.; Angelicheva, Dora; Smith, Katherine R.; Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Bynevelt, Michael; Nguyen, Thai; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Bojinova, Veneta; Kaprelyan, Ara; Angelova, Lyudmila; Morar, Bharti; Chandler, David; Kaneva, Radka; Bahlo, Melanie; Tournev, Ivailo; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital cerebellar ataxia was identified in Roma patients originating from a small subisolate with a known strong founder effect. Patients presented with global developmental delay, moderate to severe stance and gait ataxia, dysarthria, mild dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria and tremors, intellectual deficit, and mild pyramidal signs. Brain imaging revealed progressive generalized cerebellar atrophy, and inferior vermian hypoplasia and/or a constitutionally small brain were observed in some patients. Exome sequencing, used for linkage analysis on extracted SNP genotypes and for mutation detection, identified two novel (i.e., not found in any database) variants located 7 bp apart within a unique 6q24 linkage region. Both mutations cosegregated with the disease in five affected families, in which all ten patients were homozygous. The mutated gene, GRM1, encodes metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, which is highly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and plays an important role in cerebellar development and synaptic plasticity. The two mutations affect a gene region critical for alternative splicing and the generation of receptor isoforms; they are a 3 bp exon 8 deletion and an intron 8 splicing mutation (c.2652_2654del and c.2660+2T>G, respectively [RefSeq accession number NM_000838.3]). The functional impact of the deletion is unclear and is overshadowed by the splicing defect. Although ataxia lymphoblastoid cell lines expressed GRM1 at levels comparable to those of control cells, the aberrant transcripts skipped exon 8 or ended in intron 8 and encoded various species of nonfunctional receptors either lacking the transmembrane domain and containing abnormal intracellular tails or completely missing the tail. The study implicates mGluR1 in human hereditary ataxia. It also illustrates the potential of the Roma founder populations for mutation identification by exome sequencing. PMID:22901947

  17. Endogenous cerebellar neurogenesis in adult mice with progressive ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Srivastava, Rupali; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transplanting exogenous neuronal progenitors to replace damaged neurons in the adult brain following injury or neurodegenerative disorders and achieve functional amelioration is a realistic goal. However, studies so far have rarely taken into consideration the preexisting inflammation triggered by the disease process that could hamper the effectiveness of transplanted cells. Here, we examined the fate and long-term consequences of human cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNP) transplanted into the cerebellum of Harlequin mice, an adult model of progressive cerebellar degeneration with early-onset microgliosis. Methods Human embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors expressing Atoh1, a transcription factor key to GNP specification, were generated in vitro and stereotaxically transplanted into the cerebellum of preataxic Harlequin mice. The histological and functional impact of these transplants was followed using immunolabeling and Rotarod analysis. Results Although transplanted GNPs did not survive beyond a few weeks, they triggered the proliferation of endogenous nestin-positive precursors in the leptomeninges that crossed the molecular layer and differentiated into mature neurons. These phenomena were accompanied by the preservation of the granule and Purkinje cell layers and delayed ataxic changes. In vitro neurosphere generation confirmed the enhanced neurogenic potential of the cerebellar leptomeninges of Harlequin mice transplanted with exogenous GNPs. Interpretation The cerebellar leptomeninges of adult mice contain an endogenous neurogenic niche that can be stimulated to yield mature neurons from an as-yet unidentified population of progenitors. The transplantation of human GNPs not only stimulates this neurogenesis, but, despite the potentially hostile environment, leads to neuroprotection and functional amelioration. PMID:25574472

  18. Cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) - a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Figura, Monika; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Kolasa, Anna; Janik, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    CANVAS (cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome) is a rare neurological syndrome of unknown etiology. The main clinical features include bilateral vestibulopathy, cerebellar ataxia and sensory neuropathy. An abnormal visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex is the hallmark of the disease. We present a case of 58-year-old male patient who has demonstrated gait disturbance, imbalance and paresthesia of feet for 2 years. On examination ataxia of gait, diminished knee and ankle reflexes, absence of plantar reflexes, fasciculations of thigh muscles, gaze-evoked downbeat nystagmus and abnormal visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex were found. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebellar atrophy. Vestibular function testing showed severely reduced horizontal nystagmus in response to bithermal caloric stimulation. Nerve conduction study revealed loss of upper and lower limb sensory nerve action potentials. The course of illness was progressive with ataxic gait and unsteadiness as the most disabling symptoms. We report 4-year follow-up of the patient since the beginning of the disease.

  19. The therapeutic mode of action of 4-aminopyridine in cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Alviña, Karina; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a hereditary cerebellar ataxia associated with mutations in the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Therapeutic approaches for treatment of EA2 are very limited. Presently, the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) constitutes the most promising treatment although its mechanism of action is not understood. Here we show that, in contrast to that commonly believed, therapeutic concentrations of 4-AP do not increase the inhibitory drive of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Instead, 4-AP restores the severely diminished precision of pacemaking in Purkinje cells of EA2 mutant mice by prolonging the action potential, and increasing the action potential afterhyperpolarization. Consistent with this mode of action, the therapeutic efficacy of 4-AP was comparable, and not additive, to chlorzoxazone, an activator of calcium-dependent potassium channels that also restores the precision of Purkinje cell pacemaking. The likely target of 4-AP at the concentrations used are the Kv1 family of potassium channels, possibly the Kv1.5 subtype. Because at higher concentrations 4-AP blocks a large array of potassium channels and is a pro-convulsant, use of selective Kv1 channel blockers is likely to be a safer substitute for treatment of cerebellar ataxia. PMID:20505092

  20. Cerebellar ataxias: β‐III spectrin's interactions suggest common pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Emma; Suminaite, Daumante

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders all characterised by postural abnormalities, motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. Animal and in vitro models have revealed β‐III spectrin, a cytoskeletal protein present throughout the soma and dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells, to be required for the maintenance of dendritic architecture and for the trafficking and/or stabilisation of several membrane proteins: ankyrin‐R, cell adhesion molecules, metabotropic glutamate receptor‐1 (mGluR1), voltage‐gated sodium channels (Nav) and glutamate transporters. This scaffold of interactions connects β‐III spectrin to a wide variety of proteins implicated in the pathology of many SCAs. Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding β‐III spectrin (SPTBN2) underlie SCA type‐5 whereas homozygous mutations cause spectrin associated autosomal recessive ataxia type‐1 (SPARCA1), an infantile form of ataxia with cognitive impairment. Loss‐of β‐III spectrin function appears to underpin cerebellar dysfunction and degeneration in both diseases resulting in thinner dendrites, excessive dendritic protrusion with loss of planarity, reduced resurgent sodium currents and abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission. The initial physiological consequences are a decrease in spontaneous activity and excessive excitation, likely to be offsetting each other, but eventually hyperexcitability gives rise to dark cell degeneration and reduced cerebellar output. Similar molecular mechanisms have been implicated for SCA1, 2, 3, 7, 13, 14, 19, 22, 27 and 28, highlighting alterations to intrinsic Purkinje cell activity, dendritic architecture and glutamatergic transmission as possible common mechanisms downstream of various loss‐of‐function primary genetic defects. A key question for future research is whether similar mechanisms underlie progressive cerebellar decline in normal ageing. PMID:26821241

  1. Mutations in GBA2 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia with Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Monia B.; Eleuch-Fayache, Ghada; Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Nehdi, Houda; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Arepalli, Sampath K.; Chong, Sean B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sailer, Anna; Liu, Guoxiang; Mistry, Pramod K.; Cai, Huaibin; Shrader, Ginamarie; Sassi, Celeste; Bouhlal, Yosr; Houlden, Henry; Hentati, Fayçal; Amouri, Rim; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders with more than 20 different forms currently recognized, many of which are also associated with increased tone and some of which have limb spasticity. Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a defect in the enzyme acid β-glucosidase 1. β-glucosidase 2 is an enzyme with similar glucosylceramidase activity but to date has not been associated with a monogenic disorder. We studied four unrelated consanguineous families of Tunisian decent diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia of unknown origin. We performed homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an attempt to identify the genetic origin of their disorder. We were able to identify mutations responsible for autosomal-recessive ataxia in these families within the gene encoding β-glucosidase 2, GBA2. Two nonsense mutations (c.363C>A [p.Tyr121∗] and c.1018C>T [p.Arg340∗]) and a substitution (c.2618G>A [p.Arg873His]) were identified, probably resulting in nonfunctional enzyme. This study suggests GBA2 mutations are a cause of recessive spastic ataxia and responsible for a form of glucosylceramide storage disease in humans. PMID:23332917

  2. Neuroprotective Role of Liver Growth Factor “LGF” in an Experimental Model of Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Reimers, Diana; Herranz, Antonio S.; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Díaz-Gil, Juan José; Casarejos, María José; Montero-Vega, María Teresa; Bazán, Eulalia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias (CA) comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by a lack of motor coordination. They are caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuitries, so the major therapeutic goal is to correct cerebellar dysfunction. Neurotrophic factors enhance the survival and differentiation of selected types of neurons. Liver growth factor (LGF) is a hepatic mitogen that shows biological activity in neuroregenerative therapies. We investigate the potential therapeutic activity of LGF in the 3-acetylpiridine (3-AP) rat model of CA. This model of CA consists in the lesion of the inferior olive-induced by 3-AP (40 mg/kg). Ataxic rats were treated with 5 µg/rat LGF or vehicle during 3 weeks, analyzing: (a) motor coordination by using the rota-rod test; and (b) the immunohistochemical and biochemical evolution of several parameters related with the olivo-cerebellar function. Motor coordination improved in 3-AP-lesioned rats that received LGF treatment. LGF up-regulated NeuN and Bcl-2 protein levels in the brainstem, and increased calbindin expression and the number of neurons receiving calbindin-positive projections in the cerebellum. LGF also reduced extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations and microglia activation in the cerebellum. In view of these results, we propose LGF as a potential therapeutic agent in cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25338046

  3. Acute Cerebellar Syndrome in Infectious Mononucleosis: Documentation of Two Cases With Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, David S.; Smitnik, Loretta M.; John, Kuruvilla; Drake, Miles E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia has been described occasionally with infectious mononucleosis. Two additional cases are reported with serologic identification of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. As with previously described cases, the outcome was benign, and examination and laboratory studies did not indicate diffuse neurologic involvement. Visual and brainstem auditory-evoked responses were normal. Electroencephalograms (EEG) demonstrated 14 and 6 per second positive spikes in both patients. This pattern is considered a normal variant and has been recorded from depth electrodes and reported with deep midline lesions. These cases support the prognosis of benign cerebellar involvement in infectious mononucleosis and suggest that evidence of EBV infection be sought in patients with acute ataxia. The significance of 14/sec and 6/sec positive EEG spikes is uncertain. PMID:2987517

  4. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Kornum, Birgitte R; Faraco, Juliette; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Melberg, Atle; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Urban, Alexander E; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Grubert, Fabian; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Hallmayer, Joachim; Strom, Tim M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-05-15

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT1 as the only gene with mutations found in all five affected individuals. Sanger sequencing confirmed the de novo mutation p.Ala570Val in one family, and showed co-segregation of p.Val606Phe and p.Ala570Val, with the ADCA-DN phenotype, in two other kindreds. An additional ADCA-DN kindred with a p.GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding to HDAC2. It is also highly expressed in immune cells and required for the differentiation of CD4+ into T regulatory cells. Mutations in exon 20 of this gene were recently reported to cause hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1). Our mutations are all located in exon 21 and in very close spatial proximity, suggesting distinct phenotypes depending on mutation location within this gene.

  5. Pathoanatomy of cerebellar degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and type 3 (SCA3).

    PubMed

    Scherzed, W; Brunt, E R; Heinsen, H; de Vos, R A; Seidel, K; Bürk, K; Schöls, L; Auburger, G; Del Turco, D; Deller, T; Korf, H W; den Dunnen, W F; Rüb, U

    2012-09-01

    The cerebellum is one of the well-known targets of the pathological processes underlying spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and type 3 (SCA3). Despite its pivotal role for the clinical pictures of these polyglutamine ataxias, no pathoanatomical studies of serial tissue sections through the cerebellum have been performed in SCA2 and SCA3 so far. Detailed pathoanatomical data are an important prerequisite for the identification of the initial events of the underlying disease processes of SCA2 and SCA3 and the reconstruction of its spread through the brain. In the present study, we performed a pathoanatomical investigation of serial thick tissue sections through the cerebellum of clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed SCA2 and SCA3 patients. This study demonstrates that the cerebellar Purkinje cell layer and all four deep cerebellar nuclei consistently undergo considerable neuronal loss in SCA2 and SCA3. These cerebellar findings contribute substantially to the pathogenesis of clinical symptoms (i.e., dysarthria, intention tremor, oculomotor dysfunctions) of SCA2 and SCA3 patients and may facilitate the identification of the initial pathological alterations of the pathological processes of SCA2 and SCA3 and reconstruction of its spread through the brain.

  6. Absence of PAX6 gene mutations in Gillespie syndrome (partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, T.; Maas, R.L. ); Ton, C.C.T.; Housman, D.E. ); Mueller, R.; Oliver, C. ); Petzl-Erler, M.L. ); Nevin, N.C. )

    1994-01-01

    The PAX6 gene is expressed at high levels in the developing eye and cerebellum and is mutated in patients with autosomal dominant aniridia. The authors have tested the role of PAX6 mutations in three families with Gillespie syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive condition consisting of partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of affected individuals revealed no alteration of PAX6 sequences. In two families, the disease trait segregates independently from chromosome 11p markers flanking PAX6. The authors conclude that Gillespie syndrome is genetically distinct from autosomal dominant aniridia. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4 (SCA4): Initial pathoanatomical study reveals widespread cerebellar and brainstem degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hellenbroich, Y; Gierga, K; Reusche, E; Schwinger, E; Deller, T; de Vos, R A I; Zühlke, C; Rüb, U

    2006-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4 (SCA4), also known as 'hereditary ataxia with sensory neuropathy', represents a very rare, progressive and untreatable form of an autosomal dominant inherited cerebellar ataxia (ADCA). Due to a lack of autopsy cases, no neuropathological or clinicopathological studies had yet been performed in SCA4. In the present study, the first available cerebellar and brainstem tissue of a clinically diagnosed and genetically-confirmed German SCA4 patient was pathoanatomically studied using serial thick sections. During this systematic postmortem investigation, along with an obvious demyelinization of cerebellar and brainstem fiber tracts we observed widespread cerebellar and brainstem neurodegeneration with marked neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, central raphe and pontine nuclei, all auditory brainstem nuclei, in the abducens, principal trigeminal, spinal trigeminal, facial, superior vestibular, medial vestibular, interstitial vestibular, dorsal motor vagal, hypoglossal, and prepositus hypoglossal nuclei, as well as in the nucleus raphe interpositus, all dorsal column nuclei, and in the principal and medial subnuclei of the inferior olive. Severe neuronal loss was seen in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum, in the cerebellar fastigial nucleus, in the red, trochlear, lateral vestibular, and lateral reticular nuclei, the reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, and the nucleus of Roller. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis using the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 failed to detect any polyglutamine-related immunoreactivity in the central nervous regions of this SCA4 patient studied. In view of the known functional role of affected nuclei and related fiber tracts, the present findings not only offer explanations for the well-known disease symptoms of SCA4 patients (i.e. ataxic symptoms, dysarthria and somatosensory deficits), but for the first time help to explain why diplopia, gaze-evoked nystagmus

  9. Ataxia and tremor due to lesions involving cerebellar projection pathways: a DTI tractographic study in six patients.

    PubMed

    Marek, M; Paus, S; Allert, N; Mädler, B; Klockgether, T; Urbach, H; Coenen, V A

    2015-01-01

    Focal lesions of brainstem, thalamus, and subcortical white matter may cause movement disorders that are clinically indistinguishable from cerebellar symptoms. It is suspected that ataxia in these cases is due to damage of efferent or afferent pathways of the cerebellum. However, the precise anatomical correlate often remains undefined. We used deterministic diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) tractography to study the anatomical relationship between lesions causing ataxia and efferent cerebellar pathways. Study subjects were six male patients with focal lesions of different etiology (demyelination, hemorrhage, ischemia, neoplasm) outside the cerebellum. Five patients had cerebellar-like ataxia with prominent contralateral upper limb involvement. One patient with an almost midline mesencephalic lesion had a symmetrical ataxic syndrome. We used 3T MRI (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands) and DTI tractography (32 directions, StealthViz DTI, Medtronic Navigation, Louisville, USA) to delineate the dentato-rubro-thalamo-cortical tract (DRT). In all patients, tractography demonstrated focal lesions affecting the DRT in different locations. We conclude that in vivo mapping of cerebral pathways using DTI tractography in patients with focal extracerebellar brain lesions may provide direct evidence of circumscribed damage to the DRT, causing unilateral cerebellar-like ataxia. Also, a unilateral mesencephalic lesion at the level of the crossing of the DRT may cause bilateral ataxia.

  10. Evaluation of the child with acute ataxia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Harry T; Verma, Sumit; Guo, Yan; Thabet, Farouq; Bozarth, Xiuhua; Nwosu, Michelle; Katyayan, Akshat; Parachuri, Venu; Spangler, Katie; Ruggeri, Barbara E; Srivatsal, Sindhu; Zhang, Guojun; Ashwal, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of acute ataxia in a child poses a dilemma for the clinician in determining the extent and timing of initial screening tests. This article reviews the evidence concerning the diagnostic yield of commonly ordered tests in evaluating the child with acute ataxia. The literature revealed the following frequencies of laboratory screening abnormalities in children with acute ataxia: CT (∼2.5%), MRI (∼5%), lumbar puncture (43%), EEG (42%), and toxicology (49%). In most studies, abnormalities detected by these screening tests were nondiagnostic. There are insufficient data to assess yields of testing for autoimmune disorders or inborn errors of metabolism. A toxicology screen should be considered in all children presenting with acute ataxia. Neuroimaging should be considered in all children with new onset ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis has limited diagnostic specificity unless clinically indicated. Studies to examine neurophysiology testing did have sufficient evidence to support their use. There is insufficient evidence to establish a role for autoantibody testing or for routine screening for inborn error of metabolism in children presenting with acute ataxia. Finally, in a child presenting with ataxia and opsoclonus myoclonus, urine catecholamine testing for occult neuroblastoma is recommended. Nuclear scan may be considered, however, there is insufficient evidence for additional body imaging.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cell technology for modelling and therapy of cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Lauren M.; Wong, Maggie M. K.; Becker, Esther B. E.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has emerged as an important tool in understanding, and potentially reversing, disease pathology. This is particularly true in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, in which the affected cell types are not readily accessible for study. Since the first descriptions of iPSC-based disease modelling, considerable advances have been made in understanding the aetiology and progression of a diverse array of neurodegenerative conditions, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To date, however, relatively few studies have succeeded in using iPSCs to model the neurodegeneration observed in cerebellar ataxia. Given the distinct neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with certain types of ataxia, iPSC-based models are likely to provide significant insights, not only into disease progression, but also to the development of early-intervention therapies. In this review, we describe the existing iPSC-based disease models of this heterogeneous group of conditions and explore the challenges associated with generating cerebellar neurons from iPSCs, which have thus far hindered the expansion of this research. PMID:26136256

  12. Joubert syndrome: congenital cerebellar ataxia with the “molar tooth”

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Marta; Micalizzi, Alessia; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a congenital cerebellar ataxia with autosomal recessive or X-linked inheritance, which diagnostic hallmark is a unique cerebellar and brainstem malformation recognizable on brain imaging, the “molar tooth sign”. Neurological signs are present from neonatal age and include hypotonia evolving into ataxia, global developmental delay, ocular motor apraxia and breathing dysregulation. These are variably associated with multiorgan involvement, mainly of the retina, kidneys, skeleton and liver. To date, 21 causative genes have been identified, all encoding for proteins of the primary cilium or its apparatus. This is a subcellular organelle that plays key roles in development and in many cellular functions, making JS part of the expanding family of ciliopathies. There is marked clinical and genetic overlap among distinct ciliopathies, which may co-occur even within families. Such variability is likely explained by an oligogenic model of inheritance, in which mutations, rare variants and polymorphisms at distinct loci interplay to modulate the expressivity of the ciliary phenotype. PMID:23870701

  13. Antagonism of ethanol ataxia by intracerebellar nicotine: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar nitric oxide and cGMP.

    PubMed

    Al-Rejaie, Salim; Dar, M Saeed

    2006-03-31

    We have reported previously that intracerebellar nicotine attenuates ethanol ataxia via nicotinic-cholinergic receptors. We report now that attenuation of ethanol ataxia by intracerebellar nicotine is modulated by cerebellar nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase (GC) messenger system. Intracerebellar microinfusion of SNP (sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor; 15, 30, and 60 pg) and SMT (S-methylisothiourea; 70, 140, and 280 fg; an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase), significantly enhanced and reduced, respectively, intracerebellar nicotine-induced attenuation of ethanol ataxia in a dose-related manner. Similarly, intracerebellar isoliquiritigenin (an activator of GC; 1, 2, and 4 pg) and ODQ (1H [1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of GC; 375, 750, and 1500 fg), significantly enhanced and reduced, respectively, intracerebellar nicotine-induced attenuation of ethanol ataxia in a dose-related fashion. These results suggest that the functional interaction between nicotine and ethanol may involve modulation by cerebellar nitric oxide and cGMP. Intracerebellar microinfusion of isoliquiritigenin (4, 8, and 16 pg) in the absence of nicotine significantly attenuated ethanol ataxia dose-dependently indicating a tonic involvement of cGMP in ethanol ataxia. Finally, intracerebellar nicotine (5 ng) significantly increased and ethanol 2 g/kg i.p. decreased levels of total cerebellar nitrite+nitrate (NOx) which were functionally correlated with ethanol ataxia and its attenuation by intracerebellar nicotine. The ethanol-induced decrease in NOx was significantly antagonized by intracerebellar nicotine. The NOx data further supported an involvement of nitric oxide in the behavioral interaction between nicotine and ethanol. Overall, the results of the present investigation demonstrate a functional correlation between cerebellar nitric oxide messenger system and the behavioral interaction between nicotine and ethanol.

  14. Mutations in SNX14 cause a distinctive autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia and intellectual disability syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anna C; Williams, Hywel; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Bacchelli, Chiara; Jenkins, Dagan; O'Sullivan, Mary; Mengrelis, Konstantinos; Ishida, Miho; Ocaka, Louise; Chanudet, Estelle; James, Chela; Lescai, Francesco; Anderson, Glenn; Morrogh, Deborah; Ryten, Mina; Duncan, Andrew J; Pai, Yun Jin; Saraiva, Jorge M; Ramos, Fabiana; Farren, Bernadette; Saunders, Dawn; Vernay, Bertrand; Gissen, Paul; Straatmaan-Iwanowska, Anna; Baas, Frank; Wood, Nicholas W; Hersheson, Joshua; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane; Scott, Richard; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Moore, Gudrun E; Sousa, Sérgio B; Stanier, Philip

    2014-11-06

    Intellectual disability and cerebellar atrophy occur together in a large number of genetic conditions and are frequently associated with microcephaly and/or epilepsy. Here we report the identification of causal mutations in Sorting Nexin 14 (SNX14) found in seven affected individuals from three unrelated consanguineous families who presented with recessively inherited moderate-severe intellectual disability, cerebellar ataxia, early-onset cerebellar atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and the distinctive association of progressively coarsening facial features, relative macrocephaly, and the absence of seizures. We used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a homozygous nonsense mutation and an in-frame multiexon deletion in two families. A homozygous splice site mutation was identified by Sanger sequencing of SNX14 in a third family, selected purely by phenotypic similarity. This discovery confirms that these characteristic features represent a distinct and recognizable syndrome. SNX14 encodes a cellular protein containing Phox (PX) and regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domains. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis predicts that SNX14 is highly coexpressed with genes involved in cellular protein metabolism and vesicle-mediated transport. All three mutations either directly affected the PX domain or diminished SNX14 levels, implicating a loss of normal cellular function. This manifested as increased cytoplasmic vacuolation as observed in cultured fibroblasts. Our findings indicate an essential role for SNX14 in neural development and function, particularly in development and maturation of the cerebellum.

  15. Linear and angular control of circular walking in healthy older adults and subjects with cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Adam D; Paquette, Caroline; Jones, Geoffrey Melvill; Block, Edward W; Fletcher, William A; Hu, Bin; Horak, Fay B

    2012-05-01

    Linear and angular control of trunk and leg motion during curvilinear navigation was investigated in subjects with cerebellar ataxia and age-matched control subjects. Subjects walked with eyes open around a 1.2-m circle. The relationship of linear to angular motion was quantified by determining the ratios of trunk linear velocity to trunk angular velocity and foot linear position to foot angular position. Errors in walking radius (the ratio of linear to angular motion) also were quantified continuously during the circular walk. Relative variability of linear and angular measures was compared using coefficients of variation (CoV). Patterns of variability were compared using power spectral analysis for the trunk and auto-covariance analysis for the feet. Errors in radius were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar damage as compared to controls. Cerebellar subjects had significantly larger CoV of feet and trunk in angular, but not linear, motion. Control subjects also showed larger CoV in angular compared to linear motion of the feet and trunk. Angular and linear components of stepping differed in that angular, but not linear, foot placement had a negative correlation from one stride to the next. Thus, walking in a circle was associated with more, and a different type of, variability in angular compared to linear motion. Results are consistent with increased difficulty of, and role of the cerebellum in, control of angular trunk and foot motion for curvilinear locomotion.

  16. Pathogenic Roles of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Autoantibodies in Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2017-01-01

    Reports suggesting a pathogenic role of autoantibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65Abs) in cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are reviewed, and debatable issues such as internalization of antibodies by neurons and roles of epitopes are discussed. GAD65 is one of two enzymes that catalyze the conversion of glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). A pathogenic role of GAD65Ab in CAs is suggested by in vivo and in vitro studies. (1) Intracerebellar administration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulins (IgGs) obtained from GAD65Ab-positive CA patients impairs cerebellar modulation of motor control in rats. (2) CSF IgGs act on terminals of GABAergic neurons and decrease the release of GABA in cerebellar slices from rats and mice. (3) Absorption of GAD65Ab by recombinant GAD65 diminishes the above effects, and monoclonal human GAD65Ab (b78) mimic the effects of CSF IgGs in vivo and in vitro. Studies using GAD65-KO mice confirm that the target molecule is GAD65. (4) Notably, the effects of GAD65Ab depend on the epitope specificity of the monoclonal GAD65Ab. Taken together, these results indicate that epitope-specific GAD65Ab-induced impairment of GABA release is involved in the pathogenesis of GAD65Ab-positive CA and support the early detection of GAD65Ab-associated CA to initiate immunotherapy before irreversible neuronal death in the cerebellum. PMID:28386570

  17. Approach to acute ataxia in childhood: diagnosis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2014-04-01

    Ataxia refers to motor incoordination that is usually most prominent during movement or when a child is attempting to maintain a sitting posture. The first part of the review focuses on the anatomic localization of ataxia--both within the nervous system and without--using a combination of historical features and physical findings. The remainder of the review discusses etiological considerations that vary depending on the age group under consideration. In infancy, certain specific diseases, such as opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome, must receive special mention because the underlying disease process may be amenable to surgical intervention. In the toddler- and school-age groups, certain conditions (such as stroke and acute cerebellitis) require immediate recognition and imaging, whereas others (such as post-infectious ataxia and concussion) require close follow-up. Finally, mention must be made of diseases outside of the central nervous system that can present with ataxia, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  18. Ataxia, intellectual disability, and ocular apraxia with cerebellar cysts: a new disease?

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Häusler, Martin; von Moers, Arpad; Baumgartner, Bastian; Zerres, Klaus; Klein, Andrea; Aiello, Chiara; Moro, Francesca; Zanni, Ginevra; Santorelli, Filippo M; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Weis, Joachim; Valente, Enza Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2014-02-01

    Cerebellar cysts are rare findings in pediatric neuroimaging and rather characteristic for dystroglycanopathies and GPR56-related encephalopathy. We aim to report on seven children with cerebellar cysts showing absence of weakness and ruling out mutations within eight dystroglycanopathy genes and GPR56. Data about neurological and ophthalmological features, outcome, and creatine kinase values were collected from clinical histories and follow-up examinations. All MR images were qualitatively evaluated for infra- and supratentorial abnormalities. A SNP 6.0-Array was performed in three children. The POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKRP, FKTN, LARGE, ISPD, B3GALNT2, and GPR56 genes were screened in all patients by Sanger sequencing. Seven children from five families were studied. Ataxia, intellectual disability, and language impairment were found in all patients, ocular motor apraxia in five, and severe myopia in three. None of the patients had weakness, only three a minimally increased creatine kinase value. Qualitative neuroimaging evaluation showed cerebellar cysts and dysplasia in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis in all children. Additional findings were an enlarged fourth ventricle in all children, vermian hypoplasia and brain stem morphological abnormalities in five. The SNP array showed no pathogenetic imbalances in all children evaluated. In all patients, no mutations were found in POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKRP, FKTN, LARGE, ISPD, B3GALNT2, and GPR56. The peculiar combination of the same clinical and neuroimaging findings in our patients highly suggests that this phenotype may represent a novel entity, possibly falling within the spectrum of dystroglycanopathies.

  19. Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Umar; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2015-02-01

    Ataxia is a disorder of balance and coordination resulted from dysfunctions involving cerebellum and its afferent and efferent connections. While a variety of disorders can cause secondary ataxias, the list of genetic causes of ataxias is growing longer. Genetic abnormalities may involve mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, abnormal mechanisms of DNA repair, possible protein misfolding, and abnormalities in cytoskeletal proteins. Few ataxias are fully treatable while hope for efficacious gene therapy and pharmacotherapy is emerging. A discussion of the ataxias is presented here with brief mention of acquired ataxias, and a greater focus on inherited ataxias.

  20. UBA5 Mutations Cause a New Form of Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Gehan; Li, Jia; Lin, Yunting; Guo, Jifeng; Wang, Junling; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Guanghui; Tang, Beisha

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia (ARCA) comprises a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. For many affected patients, the genetic cause remains undetermined. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 5 gene (UBA5) in two Chinese siblings presenting with ARCA. Moreover, copy number variations in UBA5 or ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 gene (UFM1) were documented with the phenotypes of global developmental delays and gait disturbances in the ClinVar database. UBA5 encodes UBA5, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of UFM1. However, a crucial role for UBA5 in human neurological disease remains to be reported. Our molecular study of UBA5-R246X revealed a dramatically decreased half-life and loss of UFM1 activation due to the absence of the catalytic cysteine Cys250. UBA5-K310E maintained its interaction with UFM1, although with less stability, which may affect the ability of this UBA5 mutant to activate UFM1. Drosophila modeling revealed that UBA5 knockdown induced locomotive defects and a shortened lifespan accompanied by aberrant neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Strikingly, we found that UFM1 and E2 cofactor knockdown induced markedly similar phenotypes. Wild-type UBA5, but not mutant UBA5, significantly restored neural lesions caused by the absence of UBA5. The finding of a UBA5 mutation in cerebellar ataxia suggests that impairment of the UFM1 pathway may contribute to the neurological phenotypes of ARCA. PMID:26872069

  1. A new mouse allele of glutamate receptor delta 2 with cerebellar atrophy and progressive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants.

  2. A New Mouse Allele of Glutamate Receptor Delta 2 with Cerebellar Atrophy and Progressive Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)–PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants. PMID

  3. Autonomic dysfunction is a major feature of cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, vestibular areflexia 'CANVAS' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teddy Y; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kilfoyle, Dean H; Smith, Andrew D; McGuinness, Ben J; Simpson, Mark P; Walker, Elizabeth B; Bergin, Peter S; Cleland, James C; Hutchinson, David O; Anderson, Neil E; Snow, Barry J; Anderson, Tim J; Paermentier, Laura A F; Cutfield, Nick J; Chancellor, Andrew M; Mossman, Stuart S; Roxburgh, Richard H

    2014-10-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a recently recognized neurodegenerative ganglionopathy. Prompted by the presence of symptomatic postural hypotension in two patients with CANVAS, we hypothesized that autonomic dysfunction may be an associated feature of the syndrome. We assessed symptoms of autonomic dysfunction and performed autonomic nervous system testing among 26 patients from New Zealand. After excluding three patients with diabetes mellitus, 83% had evidence of autonomic dysfunction; all patients had at least one autonomic symptom and 91% had more than two symptoms. We also found a higher rate of downbeat nystagmus (65%) than previously described in CANVAS. We confirmed that sensory findings on nerve conduction tests were consistent with a sensory ganglionopathy and describe two patients with loss of trigeminal sensation consistent with previous pathological descriptions of trigeminal sensory ganglionopathy. Our results suggest that autonomic dysfunction is a major feature of CANVAS. This has implications for the management of patients with CANVAS as the autonomic symptoms may be amenable to treatment. The findings also provide an important differential diagnosis from multiple system atrophy for patients who present with ataxia and autonomic failure.

  4. Cerebellar Expression of the Neurotrophin Receptor p75 in Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse.

    PubMed

    Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Jiao, Xiaodan; Ashtari, Niloufar; Afsharinezhad, Pegah; Ghavami, Saeid; Marzban, Hassan

    2016-01-15

    Spontaneous mutation in the lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) mouse (nax--naked-ataxia mutant mouse) correlates with severe cerebellar defects including ataxia, reduced size and abnormal lobulation as well as Purkinje cell (Pc) degeneration. Loss of Pcs in the nax cerebellum is compartmentalized and harmonized to the classic pattern of gene expression of the cerebellum in the wild type mouse. Usually, degeneration starts in the anterior and posterior zones and continues to the central and nodular zones of cerebellum. Studies have suggested that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (NTR) plays a role in Pc degeneration; thus, in this study, we investigated the p75NTR pattern and protein expression in the cerebellum of the nax mutant mouse. Despite massive Pc degeneration that was observed in the nax mouse cerebellum, p75NTR pattern expression was similar to the HSP25 pattern in nax mice and comparable with wild type sibling cerebellum. In addition, immunoblot analysis of p75NTR protein expression did not show any significant difference between nax and wild type sibling (p > 0.5). In comparison with wild type counterparts, p75NTR pattern expression is aligned with the fundamental cytoarchitecture organization of the cerebellum and is unchanged in the nax mouse cerebellum despite the severe neurodevelopmental disorder accompanied with Pc degeneration.

  5. Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q Deficiency through Loss of Unorthodox Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Stefely, Jonathan A; Licitra, Floriana; Laredj, Leila; Reidenbach, Andrew G; Kemmerer, Zachary A; Grangeray, Anais; Jaeg-Ehret, Tiphaine; Minogue, Catherine E; Ulbrich, Arne; Hutchins, Paul D; Wilkerson, Emily M; Ruan, Zheng; Aydin, Deniz; Hebert, Alexander S; Guo, Xiao; Freiberger, Elyse C; Reutenauer, Laurence; Jochem, Adam; Chergova, Maya; Johnson, Isabel E; Lohman, Danielle C; Rush, Matthew J P; Kwiecien, Nicholas W; Singh, Pankaj K; Schlagowski, Anna I; Floyd, Brendan J; Forsman, Ulrika; Sindelar, Pavel J; Westphall, Michael S; Pierrel, Fabien; Zoll, Joffrey; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Kannan, Natarajan; Bingman, Craig A; Coon, Joshua J; Isope, Philippe; Puccio, Hélène; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    The UbiB protein kinase-like (PKL) family is widespread, comprising one-quarter of microbial PKLs and five human homologs, yet its biochemical activities remain obscure. COQ8A (ADCK3) is a mammalian UbiB protein associated with ubiquinone (CoQ) biosynthesis and an ataxia (ARCA2) through unclear means. We show that mice lacking COQ8A develop a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia linked to Purkinje cell dysfunction and mild exercise intolerance, recapitulating ARCA2. Interspecies biochemical analyses show that COQ8A and yeast Coq8p specifically stabilize a CoQ biosynthesis complex through unorthodox PKL functions. Although COQ8 was predicted to be a protein kinase, we demonstrate that it lacks canonical protein kinase activity in trans. Instead, COQ8 has ATPase activity and interacts with lipid CoQ intermediates, functions that are likely conserved across all domains of life. Collectively, our results lend insight into the molecular activities of the ancient UbiB family and elucidate the biochemical underpinnings of a human disease.

  6. A multidimensional physical therapy program for individuals with cerebellar ataxia secondary to traumatic brain injury: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sartor-Glittenberg, Cecelia; Brickner, Lori

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this case series is to describe changes in impairments and activity limitations in three individuals with severe cerebellar ataxia from traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in a long-term, multidimensional physical therapy program. A secondary purpose is to document use of a climbing wall for these persons. Each of the individuals had a TBI, severe ataxia and was admitted to a transitional neuro-rehabilitation day treatment program. The first person, a 22-year-old, was 6 years post injury and had 127 individual physical therapy sessions over 12 months. The second person, a 16-year-old, was 5½ months post injury and had 187 individual therapy sessions over 19 months. The third person, a 20-year-old, was 6 months post injury and had 89 individual therapy sessions over 23 months. An integrative treatment approach was used, and the individuals participated in activities to minimize ataxia and improve mobility. Each of them made gains in coordination, balance, balance confidence, endurance and mobility. The three individuals with cerebellar ataxia participated in a long-term, individualized, multidimensional physical therapy treatment program, and made improvements in all areas of impairment and activity limitations. This study reinforces the need for long-term, multidimensional physical therapy for individuals with ataxia.

  7. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  8. Different subregional metabolism patterns in patients with cerebellar ataxia by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Oh, Minyoung; Kim, Jae Seung; Oh, Jungsu S; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun Ju

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated cerebellar subregional metabolic alterations in patients with cerebellar ataxia, a representative disease involving the spinocerebellum. We retrospectively analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) images in 44 patients with multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C), 9 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 2, and 14 patients with SCA type 6 and compared with 15 patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and 89 normal controls. Cerebellar subregional metabolism was assessed using 13 cerebellar subregions (bilateral anterior lobes [ANT], superior/mid/inferior posterior lobes [SUPP/MIDP/INFP], dentate nucleus [DN], anterior vermis [ANTV], and superior/inferior posterior vermis [SUPV/INFV]) to determine FDG uptake ratios. MSA-C and SCA type 2 showed severely decreased metabolic ratios in all cerebellar subregions compared to normal controls (ANT, 0.58 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07, respectively, p < 0.001). SCA type 6 showed lower metabolic ratios in almost all cerebellar subregions (ANT, 0.57 ± 0.06, p < 0.001) except INFV. Anterior-posterior lobe ratio measurements revealed that SCA type 2 (Right, 0.81 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.83 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p = 0.003) and SCA type 6 (Right, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) showed preferential hypometabolism in the anterior lobe compared to normal controls, which was not observed in CCD and MSA-C. Asymmetric indices were higher in CCD and MSA-C than in normal controls (p < 0.001), whereas such differences were not found in SCA types 2 and 6. In summary, quantitative analysis of cerebellar subregional metabolism ratios revealed preferential involvement of the anterior lobe, corresponding to the spinocerebellum, in patients with cerebellar ataxia, whereas patients with CCD and MSA-C exhibited more asymmetric hypometabolism in the posterior lobe.

  9. Different subregional metabolism patterns in patients with cerebellar ataxia by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Seung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Lee, Chong Sik; Chung, Sun Ju

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated cerebellar subregional metabolic alterations in patients with cerebellar ataxia, a representative disease involving the spinocerebellum. We retrospectively analyzed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) images in 44 patients with multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C), 9 patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 2, and 14 patients with SCA type 6 and compared with 15 patients with crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and 89 normal controls. Cerebellar subregional metabolism was assessed using 13 cerebellar subregions (bilateral anterior lobes [ANT], superior/mid/inferior posterior lobes [SUPP/MIDP/INFP], dentate nucleus [DN], anterior vermis [ANTV], and superior/inferior posterior vermis [SUPV/INFV]) to determine FDG uptake ratios. MSA-C and SCA type 2 showed severely decreased metabolic ratios in all cerebellar subregions compared to normal controls (ANT, 0.58 ± 0.08 and 0.50 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07, respectively, p < 0.001). SCA type 6 showed lower metabolic ratios in almost all cerebellar subregions (ANT, 0.57 ± 0.06, p < 0.001) except INFV. Anterior-posterior lobe ratio measurements revealed that SCA type 2 (Right, 0.81 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.83 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p = 0.003) and SCA type 6 (Right, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001; Left, 0.72 ± 0.05 vs. 0.88 ± 0.04, p < 0.001) showed preferential hypometabolism in the anterior lobe compared to normal controls, which was not observed in CCD and MSA-C. Asymmetric indices were higher in CCD and MSA-C than in normal controls (p < 0.001), whereas such differences were not found in SCA types 2 and 6. In summary, quantitative analysis of cerebellar subregional metabolism ratios revealed preferential involvement of the anterior lobe, corresponding to the spinocerebellum, in patients with cerebellar ataxia, whereas patients with CCD and MSA-C exhibited more asymmetric hypometabolism in the posterior lobe. PMID:28319124

  10. DTI fiber tractography of cerebro-cerebellar pathways and clinical evaluation of ataxia in childhood posterior fossa tumor survivors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myung Eun; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Koustenis, Elisabeth; Bruhn, Harald; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric posterior fossa (PF) tumor survivors experience long-term motor deficits. Specific cerebrocerebellar connections may be involved in incidence and severity of motor dysfunction. We examined the relationship between long-term ataxia as well as fine motor function and alteration of differential cerebellar efferent and afferent pathways using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography. DTI-based tractography was performed in 19 patients (10 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and 9 medulloblastoma patients (MB)) and 20 healthy peers. Efferent Cerebello-Thalamo-Cerebral (CTC) and afferent Cerebro-Ponto-Cerebellar (CPC) tracts were reconstructed and analyzed concerning fractional anisotropy (FA) and volumetric measurements. Clinical outcome was assessed with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS). Kinematic parameters of fine motor function (speed, automation, variability, and pressure) were obtained by employing a digitizing graphic tablet. ICARS scores were significantly higher in MB patients than in PA patients. Poorer ICARS scores and impaired fine motor function correlated significantly with volume loss of CTC pathway in MB patients, but not in PA patients. Patients with pediatric post-operative cerebellar mutism syndrome showed higher loss of CTC pathway volume and were more atactic. CPC pathway volume was significantly reduced in PA patients, but not in MB patients. Neither relationship was observed between the CPC pathway and ICARS or fine motor function. There was no group difference of FA values between the patients and healthy peers. Reduced CTC pathway volumes in our cohorts were associated with severity of long-term ataxia and impaired fine motor function in survivors of MBs. We suggest that the CTC pathway seems to play a role in extent of ataxia and fine motor dysfunction after childhood cerebellar tumor treatment. DTI may be a useful tool to identify relevant structures of the CTC pathway and possibly avoid surgically induced long

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 protein aggregates cause deficits in motor learning and cerebellar plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mark, Melanie D; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-06-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expressed P/Q-type channel protein fragments from two different human CT splice variants, as predicted from SCA6 patients, in PCs of mice using viral and transgenic approaches. These splice variants represent a short (CT-short without polyQs) and a long (CT-long with 27 polyQs) CT fragment. Our results show that the different splice variants of the CTs differentially distribute within PCs, i.e., the short CTs reveal predominantly nuclear inclusions, whereas the long CTs prominently reveal both nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates. Postnatal expression of CTs in PCs in mice reveals that only CT-long causes SCA6-like symptoms, i.e., deficits in eyeblink conditioning (EBC), ataxia, and PC degeneration. The physiological phenotypes associated specifically with the long CT fragment can be explained by an impairment of LTD and LTP at the parallel fiber-to-PC synapse and alteration in spontaneous PC activity. Thus, our results suggest that the polyQ carrying the CT fragment of the P/Q-type channel is sufficient to cause SCA6 pathogenesis in mice and identifies EBC as a new diagnostic strategy to evaluate Ca(2+) channel-mediated human diseases.

  12. Cerebellar mass as a location of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Ilaria; Canovetti, Silvia; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Caniglia, Michele; Ciancia, Eugenio; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Puglioli, Michele; Cosottini, Mirco

    2014-09-01

    A 22-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our observation for headache, cervical pain and sopor. A computed tomography study revealed triventricular obstructive hydrocephalus due to a left cerebellar hyperdense mass impinging on the fourth ventricle. A magnetic resonance study demonstrated an area of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, hypointensity on T1, restricted diffusivity and contrast enhancement involving the left hemispherical cerebellar cortex and the vermis and causing cerebellar herniation. After surgical excision of the lesion, histological examination revealed an infiltrate of lymphoblastic leukaemia with B cells. Leukaemic intracranial masses are rare. Our report describes a case presenting a cerebellar mass of leukaemic tissue characterized by high cellularity and low apparent diffusion coefficient value comparable to acute ischaemia. Therefore leukaemic intracranial mass has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebellar masses.

  13. Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Umar; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Balance and coordination are products of complex circuitry involving the basal ganglia, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, as well as peripheral motor and sensory pathways. Malfunction of any part of this intricate circuitry can lead to imbalance and incoordination, or ataxia, of gait, the limbs or eyes, or a combination thereof. Ataxia can be a symptom of a multisystemic disorder, or it can manifest as the major component of a disease process. Ongoing discoveries of genetic abnormalities suggest the role ofmitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, abnormal mechanisms of DNA repair, possible protein misfolding, and abnormalities in cytoskeletal proteins. Few ataxias are fully treatable, and most are symptomatically managed. A discussion of the ataxias is presented here with brief mention of acquired ataxias, and a greater focus on inherited ataxias. PMID:25432731

  14. Unusual phenotype of pathologically confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy with autonomic dysfunction and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Mensikova, Katerina; Tuckova, Lucie; Ehrmann, Jiri; Kanovsky, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Based on the results of recent multicenter clinical–pathological studies, it seems that the clinical heterogeneity of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is much broader than previously thought. We will report 2 cases of patients with unusual manifestation of pathologically confirmed PSP. Methods: Two female patients were diagnosed with the parkinsonian phenotype of multiple system atrophy (MSAP) according to current clinical diagnostic criteria at the ages of 55 and 60 years, respectively. The patients were followed up for the next 5 and 7 years. In both cases, a detailed neuropathological examination of the brain was conducted postmortem. Results: In the first case, the overall pathological picture corresponded with the diagnosis of 4R tauopathy. In the second case, the brain pathology corresponded with a combination of 4R tauopathy and neocortical amyloidopathy. Conclusion: Some of the main symptoms of MSA, such as cerebellar ataxia and orthostatic hypotension, are not rare parts of the clinical picture of PSP. PSP can thus be mistakenly diagnosed as MSA. In order to determine the most accurate clinical diagnosis of PSP, a revision of its current clinical diagnostic criteria seems appropriate. PMID:27861346

  15. A Missense Variant in KCNJ10 in Belgian Shepherd Dogs Affected by Spongy Degeneration with Cerebellar Ataxia (SDCA1)

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Nico; Kleiter, Miriam; Leschnik, Michael; Högler, Sandra; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Wiedmer, Michaela; Dietrich, Joëlle; Henke, Diana; Steffen, Frank; Schuller, Simone; Gurtner, Corinne; Stokar-Regenscheit, Nadine; O’Toole, Donal; Bilzer, Thomas; Herden, Christiane; Oevermann, Anna; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Leeb, Tosso

    2016-01-01

    Spongy degeneration with cerebellar ataxia (SDCA) is a severe neurodegenerative disease with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in Malinois dogs, one of the four varieties of the Belgian Shepherd breed. We performed a genetic investigation in six families and seven isolated cases of Malinois dogs with signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Linkage analysis revealed an unexpected genetic heterogeneity within the studied cases. The affected dogs from four families and one isolated case shared a ∼1.4 Mb common homozygous haplotype segment on chromosome 38. Whole genome sequence analysis of three affected and 140 control dogs revealed a missense variant in the KCNJ10 gene encoding a potassium channel (c.986T>C; p.Leu329Pro). Pathogenic variants in KCNJ10 were reported previously in humans, mice, and dogs with neurological phenotypes. Therefore, we consider KCNJ10:c.986T>C the most likely candidate causative variant for one subtype of SDCA in Malinois dogs, which we propose to term spongy degeneration with cerebellar ataxia 1 (SDCA1). However, our study also comprised samples from 12 Malinois dogs with cerebellar dysfunction which were not homozygous for this variant, suggesting a different genetic basis in these dogs. A retrospective detailed clinical and histopathological analysis revealed subtle neuropathological differences with respect to SDCA1-affected dogs. Thus, our study highlights the genetic and phenotypic complexity underlying cerebellar dysfunction in Malinois dogs and provides the basis for a genetic test to eradicate one specific neurodegenerative disease from the breeding population. These dogs represent an animal model for the human EAST syndrome. PMID:28007838

  16. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS): a review of the clinical features and video-oculographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Szmulewicz, David J; Waterston, John A; MacDougall, Hamish G; Mossman, Stuart; Chancellor, Andrew M; McLean, Catriona A; Merchant, Saumil; Patrikios, Peter; Halmagyi, G Michael; Storey, Elsdon

    2011-09-01

    The association of bilateral vestibulopathy with cerebellar ataxia was first reported in 1991 and delineated as a distinct syndrome with a characteristic and measurable clinical sign--an absent visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex--in 2004. We reviewed 27 patients with this syndrome and show that a non-length-dependent sensory deficit with absent sensory nerve action potentials is an integral component of this syndrome, which we now call "cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome" (CANVAS). All patients had brain MRI and 22/27 had evidence of cerebellar atrophy involving anterior and dorsal vermis, as well as the hemispheric crus I. Brain and temporal bone pathology in one patient showed marked loss of Purkinje cells and of vestibular, trigeminal, and facial ganglion cells, but not of spiral ganglion cells. There are two sets of sibling pairs, suggesting CANVAS is a late-onset recessive disorder. The characteristic clinical sign-the visual vestibulo-ocular reflex deficit-can be demonstrated and measured clinically using video-oculography.

  17. The tumour suppressor gene WWOX is mutated in autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Mallaret, Martial; Synofzik, Matthis; Lee, Jaeho; Sagum, Cari A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Drouot, Nathalie; Renaud, Mathilde; Klein, Fabrice A. C.; Anheim, Mathieu; Tranchant, Christine; Mignot, Cyril; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Bedford, Mark; Bauer, Peter; Salih, Mustafa A.; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Aldaz, C. Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We previously localized a new form of recessive ataxia with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and mental retardation to a 19 Mb interval in 16q21-q23 by homozygosity mapping of a large consanguineous Saudi Arabian family. We now report the identification by whole exome sequencing of the missense mutation changing proline 47 into threonine in the first WW domain of the WW domain containing oxidoreductase gene, WWOX, located in the linkage interval. Proline 47 is a highly conserved residue that is part of the WW motif consensus sequence and is part of the hydrophobic core that stabilizes the WW fold. We demonstrate that proline 47 is a key amino acid essential for maintaining the WWOX protein fully functional, with its mutation into a threonine resulting in a loss of peptide interaction for the first WW domain. We also identified another highly conserved homozygous WWOX mutation changing glycine 372 to arginine in a second consanguineous family. The phenotype closely resembled the index family, presenting with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy, mental retardation and ataxia, but also included prominent upper motor neuron disease. Moreover, we observed that the short-lived Wwox knock-out mouse display spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, a phenotype previously observed in the spontaneous Wwox mutant rat presenting with ataxia and epilepsy, indicating that homozygous WWOX mutations in different species causes cerebellar ataxia associated with epilepsy. PMID:24369382

  18. LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Erdei, Katalin; Kaszás, Nóra; Folyovich, András; Szücs, Anna; Barcs, Gábor; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Skaliczkis, József; Vadasdi, Károly; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-05-30

    Celiac disease--in its typical form--is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia of adult onset due to STUB1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Simonis, Nicolas; Rai, Myriam; van Heurck, Roxane; Abramowicz, Marc; D'Hooghe, Marc; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Autosomal recessive ataxias affect about 1 person in 20,000. Friedreich ataxia accounts for one-third of the cases in Caucasians; the others are due to a growing list of very rare molecular defects, including mild forms of metabolic diseases. In nearly 50%, the genetic cause remains undetermined.

  20. Verb Generation in Children and Adolescents with Acute Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, B.; Schoch, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Dimitrova, A.; Hovel, M.; Ziegler, W.; Gizewski, E. R.; Timmann, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine verb generation in a larger group of children and adolescents with acute focal lesions of the cerebellum. Nine children and adolescents with cerebellar tumours participated. Subjects were tested a few days after tumour surgery. For comparison, a subgroup was tested also 1 or 2 days before surgery. None…

  1. The chromosome 16q-linked autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA): A newly identified degenerative ataxia in Japan showing peculiar morphological changes of the Purkinje cell: The 50th Anniversary of Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-10-01

    The chromosome 16q22.1-linked autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia (16q-ADCA) is a form of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) common in Japan. It is clinically characterized by late-onset purely cerebellar ataxia. The neuropathologic hallmark of 16q-ADCA is degeneration of Purkinje cells accompanied by an eosinophilic structure which we named "halo-like amorphous materials". By immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the structure has been so far found to contain two components: the somatic sprouts from the Purkinje cells and presynaptic terminals of unknown origin. As far as we are aware, this peculiar morphological change of Purkinje cells has not been previously described. Further investigations may disclose unique pathological processes in SCA.

  2. Into the depths of ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Ataxia is a lethal neurological disease characterized by incoordination, postural abnormalities, difficulties with gait, and problems with clarity of speech. The etiology of ataxia is divided equally between hereditary and sporadic forms. Regardless of cause, the cerebellar cortex is often a target in ataxia. Thus, how a disruption in cerebellar cortex might lead to ataxia is of considerable interest. A report in this issue of the JCI links ataxia to enhanced hyperexcitability of neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei. PMID:14966557

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells rescue Purkinje cells and improve motor functions in a mouse model of cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan; Jaramillo-Merchán, Jesús; Bueno, Carlos; Pastor, Diego; Viso-León, Maricarmen; Martínez, Salvador

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been proven to be potentially effective in the treatment of a large variety of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Of these, cerebellar ataxia is a group of disorders characterized by the degeneration of the cerebellum, particularly the Purkinje cells, responsible for motor coordination and control of the motor functions. To analyze the possibility of using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in treating ataxia, we transplanted these cells in the cerebellum of newborn Lurcher mutant mice, a very aggressive mouse model characterized by the selective early post-natal death of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Two months after the surgical procedure, the treated mice presented significant improvements in the motor behavior tests performed. Histological analysis of the cerebellum indicated that the donor cells had migrated throughout the cerebellum, as well as a significant increase in the number of Purkinje cells. Many grafted stem cells were located adjacent to the Purkinje cell layer, and expressed BDNF, NT-3 or GDNF, neurotrophic factors implicated in Purkinje cell survival. Also, a small percentage of the grafted stem cells had fused with Purkinje cells. Thus, we have shown that mesenchymal stem cells are capable of integrating into the central nervous system, migrate towards the areas where neurodegenerative processes are occurring, and rescue the degenerating cells through cell trophic effects. This is an adequate and feasible model that could be translated into a therapeutic approach for clinical assays in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing of a 12.5 Mb homozygous region reveals ANO10 mutations in patients with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P P; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Schijvenaars, Mascha M V A P; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-12-10

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia.

  5. Vitamin B12 deficiency presenting as acute ataxia.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John Ross; Say, Daphne

    2013-03-26

    A previously healthy 7-year-old Caucasian boy was hospitalised for evaluation of acute ataxia and failure to thrive, initially suspicious for an intracranial mass. Weight and body mass index were below the third percentile and he demonstrated loss of joint position and vibratory sense on examination. Laboratory studies revealed megaloblastic anaemia while an initial MRI of the brain showed no evidence of mass lesions or other abnormalities. A dietary history revealed the child subscribed to a restrictive vegan diet with little to no intake of animal products or other fortified foods. The child was diagnosed with presumed vitamin B12 deficiency and was treated with intramuscular B12 injections. Neurological symptoms resolved promptly within several days after starting therapy. This case underlines the importance of assessing nutritional status in the evaluation of neurological dysfunction in the pediatric patient.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Stroke: Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Dysphagia Disease InfoSearch: Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 ...

  7. Fusion of Human Fetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells with “Degenerating” Cerebellar Neurons in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yiping; Suzuki, Mamiko; Konno, Ayumu; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) migrate to damaged tissues, where they participate in tissue repair. Human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs), compared with adult MSCs, have higher proliferation rates, a greater differentiation capacity and longer telomeres with reduced senescence. Therefore, transplantation of quality controlled hfMSCs is a promising therapeutic intervention. Previous studies have shown that intravenous or intracortical injections of MSCs result in the emergence of binucleated cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) containing an MSC-derived marker protein in mice, thus suggesting a fusion event. However, transdifferentiation of MSCs into PCs or transfer of a marker protein from an MSC to a PC cannot be ruled out. In this study, we unequivocally demonstrated the fusion of hfMSCs with murine PCs through a tetracycline-regulated (Tet-off) system with or without a Cre-dependent genetic inversion switch (flip-excision; FLEx). In the FLEx-Tet system, we performed intra-cerebellar injection of viral vectors expressing tetracycline transactivator (tTA) and Cre recombinase into either non-symptomatic (4-week-old) or clearly symptomatic (6–8-month-old) spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) mice. Then, the mice received an injection of 50,000 genetically engineered hfMSCs that expressed GFP only in the presence of Cre recombinase and tTA. We observed a significant emergence of GFP-expressing PCs and interneurons in symptomatic, but not non-symptomatic, SCA1 mice 2 weeks after the MSC injection. These results, together with the results obtained using age-matched wild-type mice, led us to conclude that hfMSCs have the potential to preferentially fuse with degenerating PCs and interneurons but not with healthy neurons. PMID:27802273

  8. Role of mouse cerebellar nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α(4)β(2)- and α(7) subtypes in the behavioral cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol-induced ataxia.

    PubMed

    Taslim, Najla; Soderstrom, Ken; Dar, M Saeed

    2011-03-01

    We have demonstrated that nicotine attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia via nicotinic-acetylcholine-receptor (nAChR) subtypes α(4)β(2) and α(7). In the present study, ethanol (2g/kg; i.p.)-induced ataxia was assessed by Rotorod performance following repeated intracerebellar infusion of α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists. Localization of α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChRs was confirmed immunohistochemically. Cerebellar NO(x) (nitrite+nitrate) was determined flurometrically. Repeated intracerebellar microinfusion of the α(4)β(2)-selective agonist, RJR-2403 (for 1, 2, 3, 5 or 7 days) or the α(7)-selective agonist, PNU-282987 (1, 2, 3 or 5 days), dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia. These results suggest the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol-induced ataxia and α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR agonists. With RJR-2403, the cross-tolerance was maximal after a 5-day treatment and lasted 48h. Cross-tolerance was maximal after a 1-day treatment with PNU-282987 and lasted 72h. Pretreatment with α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective antagonists, dihydro-β-erythroidine and methyllycaconitine, respectively, prevented the development of cross-tolerance confirming α(4)β(2) and α(7) involvement. Repeated agonist infusions elevated cerebellar NO(x) 16h after the last treatment while acute ethanol exposure decreased it. Pretreatment with repeated RJR-2403 or PNU-282987 reversed ethanol-induced decrease in NOx. The NO(x) data suggests the involvement of the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling pathway in the cross-tolerance that develops between α(4)β(2)- and α(7)-selective agonists and ethanol ataxia. Both α(4)β(2) and α(7) subtypes exhibited high immunoreactivity in Purkinje but sparse expression in molecular and granular cell layers. Our results support a role for α(4)β(2) and α(7) nAChR subtypes in the development of cross-tolerance between nicotine and ethanol with the NO signaling pathway as a potential mechanism.

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxias types 2 and 3: degeneration of the pre-cerebellar nuclei isolates the three phylogenetically defined regions of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rüb, U; Gierga, K; Brunt, E R; de Vos, R A I; Bauer, M; Schöls, L; Bürk, K; Auburger, G; Bohl, J; Schultz, C; Vuksic, M; Burbach, G J; Braak, H; Deller, T

    2005-11-01

    The pre-cerebellar nuclei act as a gate for the entire neocortical, brainstem and spinal cord afferent input destined for the cerebellum. Since no pathoanatomical studies of these nuclei had yet been performed in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) or type 3 (SCA3), we carried out a detailed postmortem study of the pre-cerebellar nuclei in six SCA2 and seven SCA3 patients in order to further characterize the extent of brainstem degeneration in these ataxic disorders. By means of unconventionally thick serial sections through the brainstem stained for lipofuscin pigment and Nissl material, we could show that all of the pre-cerebellar nuclei (red, pontine, arcuate, prepositus hypoglossal, superior vestibular, lateral vestibular, medial vestibular, interstitial vestibular, spinal vestibular, vermiform, lateral reticular, external cuneate, subventricular, paramedian reticular, intercalate, interfascicular hypoglossal, and conterminal nuclei, pontobulbar body, reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, inferior olive, and nucleus of Roller) are among the targets of both of the degenerative processes underlying SCA2 and SCA3. These novel findings are in contrast to the current neuropathological literature, which assumes that only a subset of pre-cerebellar nuclei in SCA2 and SCA3 may undergo neurodegeneration. Widespread damage to the pre-cerebellar nuclei separates all three phylogenetically and functionally defined regions of the cerebellum, impairs their physiological functions and thus explains the occurrence of gait, stance, limb and truncal ataxia, dysarthria, truncal and postural instability with disequilibrium, impairments of the vestibulo-ocular reaction and optokinetic nystagmus, slowed and saccadic smooth pursuits, dysmetrical horizontal saccades, and gaze-evoked nystagmus during SCA2 and SCA3.

  10. Kv3.3 channels harbouring a mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 alter excitability and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Sekino, Yuko; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum plays crucial roles in controlling sensorimotor functions. The neural output from the cerebellar cortex is transmitted solely by Purkinje cells (PCs), whose impairment causes cerebellar ataxia. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease, and SCA13 patients exhibit cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar symptoms. Recent studies have shown that missense mutations in the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.3 are responsible for SCA13. In the rodent brain, Kv3.3 mRNAs are expressed most strongly in PCs, suggesting that the mutations severely affect PCs in SCA13 patients. Nevertheless, how these mutations affect the function of Kv3.3 in PCs and, consequently, the morphology and neuronal excitability of PCs remains unclear. To address these questions, we used lentiviral vectors to express mutant mouse Kv3.3 (mKv3.3) channels harbouring an R424H missense mutation, which corresponds to the R423H mutation in the Kv3.3 channels of SCA13 patients, in mouse cerebellar cultures. The R424H mutant-expressing PCs showed decreased outward current density, broadened action potentials and elevated basal [Ca(2+)]i compared with PCs expressing wild-type mKv3.3 subunits or those expressing green fluorescent protein alone. Moreover, expression of R424H mutant subunits induced impaired dendrite development and cell death selectively in PCs, both of which were rescued by blocking P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels in the culture conditions. We therefore concluded that expression of R424H mutant subunits in PCs markedly affects the function of endogenous Kv3 channels, neuronal excitability and, eventually, basal [Ca(2+)]i, leading to cell death. These results suggest that PCs in SCA13 patients also exhibit similar defects in PC excitability and induced cell death, which may explain the pathology of SCA13.

  11. [Study of cerebellar infarction with isolated vertigo].

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Ai; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kimura, Yu; Koizuka, Izumi; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-07-01

    Isolated vertigo is generally attributed to labyrinthine disease, but may also signal otherwise asymptomatic cerebellar infarction. Of 309 subjects admitted between April 2004 and March 2009 for the single symptom of acute vertigo initially thought to be labyrinthine, four were found to have cerebellar infarction of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery area (PICA). All were over 60 years old and had risk factors including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, arrhythmia, and/or hyperlipidemia. Two had trunk ataxia, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing infarction within a few days. The other two could walk without apparent trunk ataxia, however, it took 4 to 7 days to find the infarction, mainly through neurological, neurootological, and MRI findings. Neurologically, astasia, dysbasia or trunk ataxia were important signs. Neurootologically, nystagmus and electronystagmographic testing involving eye tracking, saccade, and optokinetic patttens were useful.

  12. 'Medusa-head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 1: Anti-mGluR1, anti-Homer-3, anti-Sj/ITPR1 and anti-CARP VIII.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa-head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook.

  13. 'Medusa head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 2: Anti-PKC-gamma, anti-GluR-delta2, anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 and anti-VGCC.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa head antibodies' due their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects, and provides a summary and outlook.

  14. Segmentation of the Cerebellar Peduncles Using a Random Forest Classifier and a Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model: Application to Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuyang; Yang, Zhen; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2015-07-01

    The cerebellar peduncles, comprising the superior cerebellar peduncles (SCPs), the middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and the inferior cerebellar peduncles (ICPs), are white matter tracts that connect the cerebellum to other parts of the central nervous system. Methods for automatic segmentation and quantification of the cerebellar peduncles are needed for objectively and efficiently studying their structure and function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides key information to support this goal, but it remains challenging because the tensors change dramatically in the decussation of the SCPs (dSCP), the region where the SCPs cross. This paper presents an automatic method for segmenting the cerebellar peduncles, including the dSCP. The method uses volumetric segmentation concepts based on extracted DTI features. The dSCP and noncrossing portions of the peduncles are modeled as separate objects, and are initially classified using a random forest classifier together with the DTI features. To obtain geometrically correct results, a multi-object geometric deformable model is used to refine the random forest classification. The method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on five control subjects and four patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). It was then used to evaluate group differences in the peduncles in a population of 32 controls and 11 SCA6 patients. In the SCA6 group, we have observed significant decreases in the volumes of the dSCP and the ICPs and significant increases in the mean diffusivity in the noncrossing SCPs, the MCP, and the ICPs. These results are consistent with a degeneration of the cerebellar peduncles in SCA6 patients.

  15. Clinical exome sequencing for cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia uncovers novel gene–disease associations and unanticipated rare disorders

    PubMed Central

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Schouten, Meyke I; de Bot, Susanne T; Vermeer, Sascha; Meijer, Rowdy; Pennings, Maartje; Gilissen, Christian; Willemsen, Michèl AAP; Scheffer, Hans; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are two of the most prevalent motor disorders with extensive locus and allelic heterogeneity. We implemented clinical exome sequencing, followed by filtering data for a ‘movement disorders' gene panel, as a generic test to increase variant detection in 76 patients with these disorders. Segregation analysis or phenotypic re-evaluation was utilized to substantiate findings. Disease-causing variants were identified in 9 of 28 CA patients, and 8 of 48 HSP patients. In addition, possibly disease-causing variants were identified in 1 and 8 of the remaining CA and HSP patients, respectively. In 10 patients with CA, the total disease-causing or possibly disease-causing variants were detected in 8 different genes, whereas 16 HSP patients had such variants in 12 different genes. In the majority of cases, the identified variants were compatible with the patient phenotype. Interestingly, in some patients variants were identified in genes hitherto related to other movement disorders, such as TH variants in two siblings with HSP. In addition, rare disorders were uncovered, for example, a second case of HSP caused by a VCP variant. For some patients, exome sequencing results had implications for treatment, exemplified by the favorable L-DOPA treatment in a patient with HSP due to ATP13A2 variants (Parkinson type 9). Thus, clinical exome sequencing in this cohort of CA and HSP patients suggests broadening of disease spectra, revealed novel gene–disease associations, and uncovered unanticipated rare disorders. In addition, clinical exome sequencing results have shown their value in guiding practical patient management. PMID:27165006

  16. Ectopic expression of the striatal-enriched GTPase Rhes elicits cerebellar degeneration and an ataxia phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Supriya; Chen, Youjun; Pryor, William M; Shahani, Neelam; Page, Damon T; Subramaniam, Srinivasa

    2015-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein (mHtt) that invokes early and prominent damage of the striatum, a region that controls motor behaviors. Despite its ubiquitous expression, why certain brain regions, such as the cerebellum, are relatively spared from neuronal loss by mHtt remains unclear. Previously, we implicated the striatal-enriched GTPase, Rhes (Ras homolog enriched in the striatum), which binds and SUMOylates mHtt and increases its solubility and cellular cytotoxicity, as the cause for striatal toxicity in HD. Here, we report that Rhes deletion in HD mice (N171-82Q), which express the N-terminal fragment of human Htt with 82 glutamines (Rhes(-/-)/N171-82Q), display markedly reduced HD-related behavioral deficits, and absence of lateral ventricle dilatation (secondary to striatal atrophy), compared to control HD mice (N171-82Q). To further validate the role of GTPase Rhes in HD, we tested whether ectopic Rhes expression would elicit a pathology in a brain region normally less affected in HD. Remarkably, ectopic expression of Rhes in the cerebellum of N171-82Q mice, during the asymptomatic period led to an exacerbation of motor deficits, including loss of balance and motor incoordination with ataxia-like features, not apparent in control-injected N171-82Q mice or Rhes injected wild-type mice. Pathological and biochemical analysis of Rhes-injected N171-82Q mice revealed a cerebellar lesion with marked loss of Purkinje neuron layer parvalbumin-immunoreactivity, induction of caspase 3 activation, and enhanced soluble forms of mHtt. Similarly reintroducing Rhes into the striatum of Rhes deleted Rhes(-/-)Hdh(150Q/150Q) knock-in mice, elicited a progressive HD-associated rotarod deficit. Overall, these studies establish that Rhes plays a pivotal role in vivo for the selective toxicity of mHtt in HD.

  17. Whole-genome sequencing identifies a novel ABCB7 gene mutation for X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia in a large family of Mongolian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Protasova, Maria S; Grigorenko, Anastasia P; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Reshetov, Denis A; Gusev, Fedor E; Laptenko, Alexander E; Kuznetsova, Irina L; Goltsov, Andrey Y; Klyushnikov, Sergey A; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2016-01-01

    X-linked congenital cerebellar ataxia is a heterogeneous nonprogressive neurodevelopmental disorder with onset in early childhood. We searched for a genetic cause of this condition, previously reported in a Buryat pedigree of Mongolian ancestry from southeastern Russia. Using whole-genome sequencing on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, we found a missense mutation in the ABCB7 (ABC-binding cassette transporter B7) gene, encoding a mitochondrial transporter, involved in heme synthesis and previously associated with sideroblastic anemia and ataxia. The mutation resulting in a substitution of a highly conserved glycine to serine in position 682 is apparently a major causative factor of the cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy found in affected individuals of a Buryat family who had no evidence of sideroblastic anemia. Moreover, in these affected men we also found the genetic defects in two other genes closely linked to ABCB7 on chromosome X: a deletion of a genomic region harboring the second exon of copper-transporter gene (ATP7A) and a complete deletion of PGAM4 (phosphoglycerate mutase family member 4) retrogene located in the intronic region of the ATP7A gene. Despite the deletion, eliminating the first of six metal-binding domains in ATP7A, no signs for Menkes disease or occipital horn syndrome associated with ATP7A mutations were found in male carriers. The role of the PGAM4 gene has been previously implicated in human reproduction, but our data indicate that its complete loss does not disrupt male fertility. Our finding links cerebellar pathology to the genetic defect in ABCB7 and ATP7A structural variant inherited as X-linked trait, and further reveals the genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cerebellar disorders. PMID:26242992

  18. A VARIANT OF NESPRIN1 GIANT DEVOID OF KASH DOMAIN UNDERLIES THE MOLECULAR ETIOLOGY OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE CEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE I

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Hodzic, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense mutations across the whole coding sequence of Syne1/ Nesprin1 have been linked to Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Type I (ARCA1). However, nothing is known about the molecular etiology of this late-onset debilitating pathology. In this work, we report that Nesprin1 giant is specifically expressed in CNS tissues. We also identified a CNS-specific splicing event that leads to the abundant expression of a KASH-LESS variant of Nesprin1giant (KLNes1g) in the cerebellum. KLNes1g displayed a noncanonical localization at glomeruli of cerebellar mossy fibers whereas Nesprin2 exclusively decorated the nuclear envelope of all cerebellar neurons. In immunogold electron microscopy, KLNes1g colocalized both with synaptic vesicles within mossy fibers and with dendritic membranes of cerebellar granule neurons. We further identified vesicle- and membrane-associated proteins in KLNes1g immunoprecipitates. Together, our results suggest that the loss of function of KLNes1g resulting from Nesprin1 nonsense mutations underlie the molecular etiology of ARCA1. PMID:25843669

  19. [A 29-year-old man with diabetes insipidus and cerebellar ataxia and development of spinal cord swelling 15 years after the onset].

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Y; Sato, K; Ohtomo, T; Ohishi, H; Mitsuoka, H; Mori, H; Hirai, S; Takubo, H; Takeda, N; Sato, K; Mizuno, Y

    1997-05-01

    We report a 29-year-old man with diabetes insipidus and cerebellar ataxia who developed spinal cord swelling 15 years after the onset. He was well until 14 years of the age when he noted dizziness. Two years after there was an onset of gait disturbance and slurred speech. He also noted polydipsia and polyuria. He was evaluated at the neurosurgery service of our hospital when he was 17 years of the age. Neurologic examination at that time revealed memory loss, horizontal nystagmus, cerebellar ataxic gait, dysmetria and decomposition more on the left. Cranial CT scan revealed a mass lesion involving the left subthalamic region and the head of the caudate area. Spinal fluid was unremarkable, however, human chorionic gonadotropin was increased to 27 mIU/ml. He was treated by radiation therapy (3,000 rads for total brain area and 5,460 rads for focal region). His CT scan and memory loss improved, however, cerebellar ataxia was unchanged. Three years after the radiation, he started to show choreic movement in his neck and left upper extremity. He was admitted to our service in August 14, 1995 when he was 29 years of the age. On admission, he was alert but disoriented to time; calculation was also poor. Higher cerebral functions were intact. The optic fundi were normal without papilledema. Visual field appeared intact. Gaze nystagmus was observed in all the directions, but more prominent in the horizontal direction. Speech was slurred. Otherwise, cranial nerves were unremarkable. Motor wise, he showed marked truncal and gait ataxia; he was unable to walk because of ataxia. Muscle atrophy and marked weakness was noted in both upper extremities more on the left side. Deep tendon reflexes were diminished in the upper extremities but active in the lower extremities. He was polyuric; urinary specific gravity was low. Spinal fluid contained 6 cells/cmm and 113 mg/ dl of protein; Queckenstedt was positive. MRI revealed swelling of the cervical cord; in addition, the entire

  20. Eye Position Feedback in a Model of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex for Spino-Cerebellar Ataxia 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    neurodegenerative diseases characterized by progressive instability of posture and gait, incoordination, ocular motor dysfunction, and dysarthria ...characterized by progressive instability of posture and gait, incoordination, ocular motor dysfunction, and dysarthria due to degeneration of cerebellar

  1. Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by a novel ADCK3 mutation that elongates the protein: clinical, genetic and biochemical characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Hersheson, Joshua; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Duberley, Kate E C; Preza, Elisavet; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chalasani, Annapurna; Laurá, Matilde; Wood, Nick W; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Background The autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The large number of ARCA genes leads to delay and difficulties obtaining an exact diagnosis in many patients and families. Ubiquinone (CoQ10) deficiency is one of the potentially treatable causes of ARCAs as some patients respond to CoQ10 supplementation. The AarF domain containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3) is one of several genes associated with CoQ10 deficiency. ADCK3 encodes a mitochondrial protein which functions as an electron-transfer membrane protein complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Methods We report two siblings from a consanguineous Pakistani family who presented with cerebellar ataxia and severe myoclonus from adolescence. Whole exome sequencing and biochemical assessment of fibroblasts were performed in the index patient. Results A novel homozygous frameshift mutation in ADCK3 (p.Ser616Leufs*114), was identified in both siblings. This frameshift mutation results in the loss of the stop codon, extending the coding protein by 81 amino acids. Significant CoQ10 deficiency and reduced MRC enzyme activities in the index patient's fibroblasts suggested that the mutant protein may reduce the efficiency of mitochondrial electron transfer. CoQ10 supplementation was initiated following these genetic and biochemical analyses. She gained substantial improvement in myoclonic movements, ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after treatment. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of diagnosing ADCK3 mutations and the potential benefit of treatment for patients. The identification of this new mutation broadens the phenotypic spectrum associated with ADCK3 mutations and provides further understanding of their pathogenic mechanism. PMID:24218524

  2. Identification and localization of ataxin-7 in brain and retina of a patient with cerebellar ataxia type II using anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed

    Mauger, C; Del-Favero, J; Ceuterick, C; Lübke, U; van Broeckhoven, C; Martin, J

    1999-12-10

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCAs) are a complex group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive degeneration of the cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord. The spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is associated with pigmentary macular dystrophy and retinal degeneration leading to blindness caused by a CAG/polyglutamine (polyGln) expansion in the coding region of the SCA7 gene/protein. The SCA7 gene codes for ataxin-7, a protein of unknown function. To investigate its cellular and subcellular localization, we have developed a sequence-specific polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal part of the protein. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that ataxin-7 accumulates as single nuclear inclusion (NI) in the cells of the brain and retina of a SCA7 patient but not of controls. The 1C2 antibody, directed against expanded polyGln, confirmed the aggregation of mutant ataxin-7 in these NIs. Furthermore, ubiquitin was found in these aggregates, suggesting that mutant ataxin-7 is a target for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis, but resistant to removal. Electron microscopic studies using immunogold labeling showed that ataxin-7 immunoreactive NIs appear as dense aggregates containing a mixture of granular and filamentary structures. Together, these data confirm the presence of NIs in brain and retina of a SCA7 patient, a common characteristic of disorders caused by expanded CAG/polyGln repeats.

  3. Clinical and molecular studies of 73 Italian families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I: SCA1 and SCA2 are the most common genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D; Gellera, C; Castellotti, B; Antonelli, A; Riggio, M C; Mazzucchelli, F; Girotti, F; Pietrini, V; Mariotti, C; Di Donato, S

    1999-05-01

    We clinically and genetically evaluated 73 Italian families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) type I. Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 1 was the most common genotype (SCA1), accounting for 41% of cases (30 families), SCA2 was slightly less frequent (29%, 21 families), and the remaining families were negative for the SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3 mutations. Among the positively genotyped families, SCA1 was found most frequently in families from northern Italy (50%), while SCA2 was the most common mutation in families from the southern part of the country (56%). Slow saccades and decreased deep tendon reflexes were observed significantly more frequently in SCA2 patients, while increased deep tendon reflexes and nystagmus were more common in SCA1. In SCA1 and SCA2 families there was a significant inverse correlation between expansion size and age at onset. Analysis of triplet repeat numbers in parent-offspring pairs showed greater meiotic instability, which was associated with an earlier onset of the disease in SCA2 families than in SCA1 families.

  4. Uncloned expanded CAG/CTG repeat sequences in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) detected by the repeat expansion detection (RED) method.

    PubMed Central

    Pujana, M A; Volpini, V; Gratacós, M; Corral, J; Banchs, I; Sánchez, A; Genís, D; Cervera, C; Estivill, X

    1998-01-01

    In some neurodegenerative diseases, genetic anticipation correlates with expansions of the CAG/CTG repeat sequence above the normal range through the generations of a pedigree. Among these neurodegenerative diseases are late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA). ADCA are genetically heterogeneous disorders with different cloned genes for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), type 2 (SCA2), type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), and type 6 (SCA6). Another related dominant ataxia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), also shows CAG/CTG repeat expansions. Genetic anticipation has been reported for all of them except for the recently cloned SCA6 gene. Other, as yet undetected SCA genes may show the same features. We have used the repeat expansion detection (RED) method to detect repeat expansions directly in DNA samples from ADCA patients not resulting from known genes. Our sample consists of 19 affected index cases, corresponding to 52.8% of our ADCA families without CAG/CTG repeat expansions in the SCA1, SCA2, SCA3/MJD, SCA6, or DRPLA genes. Eighty-nine percent of the index cases had expansions of a CAG/CTG sequence greater than 40 repeats by RED, while these were observed in only 26.9% of 78 healthy subjects from the general population (p < 0.0001). The distribution of RED fragments in controls and ADCA patients also shows significant differences with the Mann-Whitney U test (U = 376.5, p = 0.0007). Moreover, there was a significant inverse correlation between the size of expansion and the age of onset (r = -0.54, p = 0.018). These results show CAG/CTG repeat expansions of over 40 repeats in our sample of ADCA families not resulting from known SCA genes. Images PMID:9507387

  5. Humor, laughter, and the cerebellum: insights from patients with acute cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Andrzejewski, K; Göricke, S; Wondzinski, E; Siebler, M; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2013-12-01

    Extent of cerebellar involvement in cognition and emotion is still a topic of ongoing research. In particular, the cerebellar role in humor processing and control of laughter is not well known. A hypermetric dysregulation of affective behavior has been assumed in cerebellar damage. Thus, we aimed at investigating humor comprehension and appreciation as well as the expression of laughter in 21 patients in the acute or subacute state after stroke restricted to the cerebellum, and in the same number of matched healthy control subjects. Patients with acute and subacute cerebellar damage showed preserved comprehension and appreciation of humor using a validated humor test evaluating comprehension, funniness and aversiveness of cartoons ("3WD Humor Test"). Additionally, there was no difference when compared to healthy controls in the number and intensity of facial reactions and laughter while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, or video sketches measured by the Facial Action Coding System. However, as depression scores were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar stroke, a concealing effect of accompanying depression cannot be excluded. Current findings add to descriptions in the literature that cognitive or affective disorders in patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum, even in the acute state after damage, are frequently mild and might only be present in more sensitive or specific tests.

  6. Secondary orthostatic tremor in the setting of cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sarva, Harini; Severt, William Lawrence; Jacoby, Nuri; Pullman, Seth L; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) and cerebellar ataxia are uncommon and difficult to treat. We present two patients with OT and cerebellar degeneration, one of whom had spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and a good treatment response.

  7. Ataxia in acute mountain sickness does not improve with short-term oxygen inhalation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ralf W; Bärtsch, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Stability of stance declines at high altitude in subjects with and without acute mountain sickness (AMS), suggesting that postural ataxia might result from different hypoxia-related mechanisms than those causing the signs and symptoms of AMS. The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term oxygen inhalation improves stability of stance assessed by static posturography and/or the symptoms of AMS. Twenty male volunteers with cerebral AMS scores above 0.70 were investigated the first or second morning of their stay at an altitude of 4559 m. Posturographic parameters remained unchanged, whereas cerebral AMS scores decreased (p < 0.001) after inhalation of 3 L/min of oxygen for at least 10 min. We conclude that ataxia of stance assessed by posturography may result from different hypoxia-triggered mechanisms that need more time for recovery than those causing AMS.

  8. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Mang, Cameron S; Brown, Katlyn E; Neva, Jason L; Snow, Nicholas J; Campbell, Kristin L; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to "prime" M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings.

  9. Promoting Motor Cortical Plasticity with Acute Aerobic Exercise: A Role for Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Mang, Cameron S.; Brown, Katlyn E.; Neva, Jason L.; Snow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute aerobic exercise facilitated long-term potentiation-like plasticity in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Here, we investigated the effect of acute aerobic exercise on cerebellar circuits, and their potential contribution to altered M1 plasticity in healthy individuals (age: 24.8 ± 4.1 years). In Experiment   1, acute aerobic exercise reduced cerebellar inhibition (CBI) (n = 10, p = 0.01), elicited by dual-coil paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. In Experiment   2, we evaluated the facilitatory effects of aerobic exercise on responses to paired associative stimulation, delivered with a 25 ms (PAS25) or 21 ms (PAS21) interstimulus interval (n = 16 per group). Increased M1 excitability evoked by PAS25, but not PAS21, relies on trans-cerebellar sensory pathways. The magnitude of the aerobic exercise effect on PAS response was not significantly different between PAS protocols (interaction effect: p = 0.30); however, planned comparisons indicated that, relative to a period of rest, acute aerobic exercise enhanced the excitatory response to PAS25 (p = 0.02), but not PAS21 (p = 0.30). Thus, the results of these planned comparisons indirectly provide modest evidence that modulation of cerebellar circuits may contribute to exercise-induced increases in M1 plasticity. The findings have implications for developing aerobic exercise strategies to “prime” M1 plasticity for enhanced motor skill learning in applied settings. PMID:27127659

  10. Acute fatal parainfectious cerebellar swelling in two children. A rare or an overlooked situation?

    PubMed

    Roulet Perez, E; Maeder, P; Cotting, J; Eskenazy-Cottier, A C; Deonna, T

    1993-12-01

    We report 2 previously healthy children who developed sudden unexpected respiratory arrest and brain death, during a presumed Epstein-Barr meningitis in one case and a multisystemic infection of unknown etiology in the other. Diffuse swelling of the cerebellum with upward transtentorial and downward tonsillar herniation, shown by brain CT-scan and MRI obtained after the acute event, was the most probable cause of death. Review of CT images performed before or at the onset of deterioration already showed discrete signs of early upward herniation of the cerebellar vermis that were initially overlooked. At autopsy in the first case, an acute lymphomonocytic meningoencephalitis with predominant involvement of the cerebellum was observed. Few similar cases were found in the literature, indicating that acute cerebellar swelling is either a very rare or an unrecognized, possibly preventable cause of death in acute inflammatory or non-inflammatory encephalopathies in children.

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 - A review.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Arruda, Walter O; Raskin, Salmo; Werneck, Lineu César; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2011-11-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is an autosomal dominant inherited ataxia caused by an expanded ATTCT pentanucleotide repeat in intron 9 of the ATXN10 gene, on chromosome 22q13.3. SCA10 represents a rare form of SCA, until now only described in Latin America, particularly in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela. In Mexico and Brazil SCA10 represents the second most common type of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia. The phenotype described in Mexico, is characterized by the association of cerebellar ataxia with epilepsy, while in Brazil the SCA10 phenotype is that of a pure cerebellar ataxia. As yet unidentified genotypic variables may account for this phenotypic difference.

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia--type 6.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, P K; Ghosh, B; Roy, T; Basu, N; Basu, N; Bhattacharya, N P

    2001-06-01

    Fifty six years lady presented with pure cerebellar ataxia with positive family history from paternal side presented to our clinic. DNA screening found to be SCA6. This is the first case report of SCA6 from India.

  13. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL.

  14. Acetazolamide-responsive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Vikas

    2012-11-01

    Acetazolamide-responsive ataxia represents a unique collection of genetically distinct episodic ataxia (EA) disorders associated with paroxysmal cerebellar symptoms many of which are responsive to medical treatment with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Among all of the subtypes of episodic ataxia, types 2 (EA2), 3 (EA3), and 5 (EA5) are thought be the most medication responsive. Some patients with episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) will also describe improvement with acetazolamide. Each of these individual genetic syndromes is characterized by its own unique mechanism and clinical presentation. In this review, the author provides an overview of the pathophysiology of acetazolamide-responsive ataxia, its natural history, and its clinical management.

  15. The patient with ataxia.

    PubMed

    Maggs, F G

    2014-01-01

    In this article we look at the causes of ataxia, and how the patient presenting with ataxia should be managed. One of the difficulties in managing the patient with ataxia is that acute ataxia has many causes, but usually these can be teased out by means of a careful history and examination. Investigations can then be targeted at confirming or disproving the differential diagnosis. Some patients with ataxia need to be managed in hospital, but many can be investigated, and receive therapy, as an outpatient.

  16. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  17. 'Medusa head ataxia': the expanding spectrum of Purkinje cell antibodies in autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Part 3: Anti-Yo/CDR2, anti-Nb/AP3B2, PCA-2, anti-Tr/DNER, other antibodies, diagnostic pitfalls, summary and outlook.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B

    2015-09-17

    Serological testing for anti-neural autoantibodies is important in patients presenting with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, since these autoantibodies may indicate cancer, determine treatment and predict prognosis. While some of them target nuclear antigens present in all or most CNS neurons (e.g. anti-Hu, anti-Ri), others more specifically target antigens present in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Purkinje cells (PC). In this series of articles, we provide a detailed review of the clinical and paraclinical features, oncological, therapeutic and prognostic implications, pathogenetic relevance, and differential laboratory diagnosis of the 12 most common PC autoantibodies (often referred to as 'Medusa head antibodies' due to their characteristic somatodendritic binding pattern when tested by immunohistochemistry). To assist immunologists and neurologists in diagnosing these disorders, typical high-resolution immunohistochemical images of all 12 reactivities are presented, diagnostic pitfalls discussed and all currently available assays reviewed. Of note, most of these antibodies target antigens involved in the mGluR1/calcium pathway essential for PC function and survival. Many of the antigens also play a role in spinocerebellar ataxia. Part 1 focuses on anti-metabotropic glutamate receptor 1-, anti-Homer protein homolog 3-, anti-Sj/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor- and anti-carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (ACA); part 2 covers anti-protein kinase C gamma-, anti-glutamate receptor delta-2-, anti-Ca/RhoGTPase-activating protein 26- and anti-voltage-gated calcium channel-associated ACA; and part 3 reviews the current knowledge on anti-Tr/delta notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor-, anti-Nb/AP3B2-, anti-Yo/cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2- and Purkinje cell antibody 2-associated ACA, discusses differential diagnostic aspects and provides a summary and outlook.

  18. Linkage disequilibrium at the Machado-Joseph disease spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 locus: Evidence for a common founder effect in French and Portuguese-Brazilian families as well as a second ancestral Portuguese-Azorean mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanin, G.; Cancel, G.; Didierjean, O.

    1995-11-01

    Spinal cerebellar ataxia 3 (SCA3) is a genetic subtype of the type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. SCA3 was mapped in French families to chromosome 14q24.3-qter in the same region as the gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), which was classified as a form of ADCA type I on the basis of similarities in the clinical presentation of individual patients. The MJD gene was recently identified in Japanese kindreds, and the mutation was characterized as an unstable CAG repeat that is expanded in affected individuals. The same mutation is observed in families of Portuguese-Azorean ancestry, as well as in French SCA3 kindreds. In other disorders caused by unstable and expanded triplet repeats, such as fragile X syndrome (FRA-X), myotonic dystrophy (MD), Huntington disease (HD), and SCA1, linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the mutation and closely linked polymorphic markers was detected, suggesting that there were only one or a few founders or predisposing haplotypes. In the present study, 29 families of different geographical origins were tested for LD between the MJD/SCA3 mutation and four flanking microsatellite markers. 27 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Neurochondrin is a neuronal target antigen in autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Miske, Ramona; Gross, Catharina C.; Scharf, Madeleine; Golombeck, Kristin S.; Hartwig, Marvin; Bhatia, Urvashi; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Bönte, Kathrin; Strippel, Christine; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Lohmann, Hubertus; Dettmann, Inga Madeleine; Deppe, Michael; Mindorf, Swantje; Warnecke, Tobias; Denno, Yvonne; Teegen, Bianca; Probst, Christian; Brakopp, Stefanie; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Wiendl, Heinz; Stöcker, Winfried; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a novel neuronal target antigen in 3 patients with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration. Methods: Three patients with subacute to chronic cerebellar ataxia and controls underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessment together with quantitative high-resolution structural MRI. Sera and CSF were subjected to comprehensive autoantibody screening by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunoblot. Immunoprecipitation with lysates of hippocampus and cerebellum combined with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the autoantigen, which was verified by recombinant expression in HEK293 cells and use in several immunoassays. Multiparameter flow cytometry was performed on peripheral blood and CSF, and peripheral blood was subjected to T-cell receptor spectratyping. Results: Patients presented with a subacute to chronic cerebellar and brainstem syndrome. MRI was consistent with cortical and cerebellar gray matter atrophy associated with subsequent neuroaxonal degeneration. IFA screening revealed strong immunoglobulin G1 reactivity in sera and CSF with hippocampal and cerebellar molecular and granular layers, but not with a panel of 30 recombinantly expressed established neural autoantigens. Neurochondrin was subsequently identified as the target antigen, verified by IFA and immunoblot with HEK293 cells expressing human neurochondrin as well as the ability of recombinant neurochondrin to neutralize the autoantibodies' tissue reaction. Immune phenotyping revealed intrathecal accumulation and activation of B and T cells during the acute but not chronic phase of the disease. T-cell receptor spectratyping suggested an antigen-specific T-cell response accompanying the formation of antineurochondrin autoantibodies. No such neurochondrin reactivity was found in control cohorts of various neural autoantibody-associated neurologic syndromes, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, cerebellar type of multiple system atrophy, hereditary

  20. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in acute ischemic stroke: Impact on morphologic and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Wolfgang G; Sommer, Wieland H; Höhne, Christopher; Fabritius, Matthias P; Schuler, Felix; Dorn, Franziska; Othman, Ahmed E; Meinel, Felix G; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Reiser, Maximilian F; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Thierfelder, Kolja M

    2017-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is the phenomenon of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism of the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere caused by dysfunction of the related supratentorial region. Our aim was to analyze its influence on morphologic and functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke. Subjects with stroke caused by a large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation were selected from an initial cohort of 1644 consecutive patients who underwent multiparametric CT including whole-brain CT perfusion. Two experienced readers evaluated the posterior fossa in terms of CCD absence (CCD-) or presence (CCD+). A total of 156 patients formed the study cohort with 102 patients (65.4%) categorized as CCD- and 54 (34.6%) as CCD+. In linear and logistic regression analyses, no significant association between CCD and final infarction volume (β = -0.440, p = 0.972), discharge mRS ≤ 2 (OR = 1.897, p = 0.320), or 90-day mRS ≤ 2 (OR = 0.531, p = 0.492) was detected. CCD+ patients had larger supratentorial cerebral blood flow deficits (median: 164 ml vs. 115 ml; p = 0.001) compared to CCD-patients. Regarding complications, CCD was associated with a higher rate of parenchymal hematomas (OR = 4.793, p = 0.035). In conclusion, CCD is frequently encountered in acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. CCD was associated with the occurrence of parenchymal hematoma in the ipsilateral cerebral infarction but did not prove to significantly influence patient outcome.

  1. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  2. Case Report: Acute Cerebellar Thrombosis in an Adult Patient with IgM Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Cherry, Mariyam; Awar, Melina

    2015-01-01

    IgM nephropathy is a relatively rare cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.1 It was initially described by van de Putte,2 then by Cohen and Bhasin in 1978, as a distinctive feature of mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis.2 It is typically characterized by diffuse IgM deposits on the glomeruli and diffuse mesangial hypercellularity. Little is known about the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.1,3 We describe a patient who presented with nonspecific symptoms of epigastric pain, nausea, and early satiety. Abdominal imaging and endoscopies were unremarkable. She was found to have significant proteinuria (6.4 g/24 hours), hyperlipidemia, and edema consistent with a diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome. Kidney biopsy was performed and confirmed an IgM nephropathy. Less than 2 weeks after her diagnosis of IgM nephropathy, she presented with an acute cerebellar stroke. Thrombophilia is a well-known complication of nephrotic syndrome, but a review of the literature failed to show an association between IgM nephropathy and acute central nervous system thrombosis. PMID:27057296

  3. Cerebellar haemorrhage mimicking acute peripheral vestibulopathy: the role of the video head impulse test in differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Armato, E; Ferri, E; Pinzani, A; Ulmer, E

    2014-08-01

    Dizziness and vertigo without neurological signs are typically due to a peripheral vestibular disease. Although the most common causes are benign, differential diagnosis must include potentially life-threatening central diseases such as cerebrovascular pathologies. A systemic clinical approach needs a careful work-up, bedside examination and appropriate instrumental investigation. The head impulse test (HIT) allows qualitative clinical assessment of canalar function; it has some limitations such as subjective evaluation, mainly in patients with a spontaneous nystagmus. A new device has been recently developed consisting of an infrared video camera (video-HIT) to provide quantitative instrumental assessment of the high-frequency vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) gain. By reporting a case of cerebellar haemorrhage mimicking an acute peripheral vestibulopathy, the authors suggest that video-HIT may be considered a useful tool in differential diagnosis between vestibular neuritis and cerebellar vascular disease in patients with severe acute vertigo without central signs.

  4. [Therapeutic developments in chronic ataxias].

    PubMed

    Buompadre, María Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias belong to a broader group of disorders known as inherited ataxias. In most cases onset occurs before the age of 20. These neurological disorders are characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of the cerebellum and spinal cord. Currently, specific treatment is only available for some of the chronic ataxias, more specifically those related to a known metabolic defect, such as abetalipoproteinemia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency, and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. Treatment based on a diet with reduced intake of fat, supplementation of oral vitamins E and A, and the administration of chenodeoxycholic acid could modify the course of the disease. Although for most of autosomal recessive ataxias there is no definitive treatment, iron chelators and antioxidants have been proposed to reduce the mitochondrial iron overload in Friederich's ataxia patients. Corticosteroids have been used to reduce ataxia symptoms in ataxia telangiectasia. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency associated with ataxia may be responsive to Co Q10 or ubidecarenone supplementations. Early treatment of these disorders may be associated with a better drug response.

  5. Mutations in the Cacnl1a4 calcium channel gene are associated with seizures, cerebellar degeneration, and ataxia in tottering and leaner mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Doyle, J; Ren, X; Lennon, G; Stubbs, L

    1997-02-01

    Tottering and leaner, two mutations of the mouse tottering locus, have been studied extensively as models for human epilepsy. Here we describe the isolation, mapping, and expression analysis of Cacnl1a4, a gene encoding the alpha subunit of a proposed P-type calcium channel, and also report the physical mapping and expression patterns of the orthologous human gene. DNA sequencing and gene expression data demonstrate that Cacnl1a4 mutations are the primary cause of seizures and ataxia in tottering and leaner mutant mice, and suggest that tottering locus mutations and human diseases, episodic ataxia 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine, represent mutations in mouse and human versions of the same channel-encoding gene.

  6. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    SciTech Connect

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  7. Friedreich's Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes. The disorder does not affect thinking and reasoning abilities (cognitive functions). Friedreich’s ataxia is caused by ... A diagnosis of Friedreich's ataxia requires a careful clinical examination, which includes a medical history and a ...

  8. Friedreich's Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that damages your nervous system. The damage affects your spinal cord and the ... of 5 and 15. The main symptom is ataxia, which means trouble coordinating movements. Specific symptoms include ...

  9. Ataxia - telangiectasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001394.htm Ataxia - telangiectasia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ataxia-telangiectasia is a rare childhood disease. It affects ...

  10. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    MedlinePlus

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare, inherited disease. It affects the nervous system, immune system, and ... young children, usually before age 5. They include Ataxia - trouble coordinating movements Poor balance Slurred speech Tiny, ...

  11. Acute and chronic administration of ibogaine to the rat results in astrogliosis that is not confined to the cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Rogers, T S; Rodman, L E; Page, J G

    1996-10-31

    Acute administration of high doses of ibogaine (IBG) to the male rat results in degeneration of Purkinje cells and reactive gliosis in the cerebellar vermis. We examined whether acute and chronic administration of IBG to male and female rats results in gliosis as determined by quantification of the astroglial intermediate filament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). After acute administration of IBG, rats of both sexes showed dose-related increases in GFAP that were not confined to the cerebellar vermis. After chronic administration of IBG, female, but not male rats, showed large (as much as 200% of control), dose-related increases in GFAP in hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, brain stem and striatum, but not cerebellum. In hippocampus, the cytoskeletal proteins, neurofilament 68 (NF-68) and beta-tubulin were increased in females treated chronically with IBG, findings consistent with a damage-induced sprouting response. Together, the data indicate that IBG damages areas of the brain outside the cerebellum and that the sites damaged are dependent on sex and dosage regimen.

  12. The Yield of Neuroimaging in Children Presenting to the Emergency Department With Acute Ataxia in the Post-Varicella Vaccine Era.

    PubMed

    Rudloe, Tiffany; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Gorman, Mark P; Nigrovic, Lise E; Harper, Marvin B; Landschaft, Assaf; Kimia, Amir A

    2015-09-01

    To determine the yield of neuroimaging in children presenting to the emergency department with acute ataxia in the post-varicella vaccine era, we conducted a cross-sectional study between 1995 and 2013 at a single pediatric tertiary care center. We included children aged 1-18 years evaluated for acute ataxia of <7 days' duration. The main outcome was clinically urgent intracranial pathology defined as a radiologic finding that changed initial management. We identified 364 children, among whom neuroimaging was obtained in 284 (78%). Forty-two children had clinically urgent intracranial pathology (13%, 95% confidence interval 9%-17%); tumors and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis were the leading findings. Age ≤3 years and symptoms ≤3 days of duration were predictors of low risk (0.7%, 95% confidence interval 0%-4.4%). In conclusion, neuroimaging may be indicated for most patients presenting with acute ataxia. Neuroimaging may be deferred in younger children with short duration of symptoms contingent on close follow-up.

  13. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  14. Anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies associated with cerebellar atrophy and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Doss, Sarah; Nümann, Astrid; Ziegler, Annerose; Siebert, Eberhard; Borowski, Kathrin; Stöcker, Winfried; Prüss, Harald; Wildemann, Brigitte; Endres, Matthias; Jarius, Sven

    2014-02-15

    Recently, we identified a novel Purkinje cell-specific autoantibody (termed anti-Ca) targeting rhoGTPase-activating-protein-26 (ARHGAP26) in a patient with cerebellar ataxia. Here we describe a new case of anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia. Cerebellar ataxia was associated with signs of possible limbic encephalitis in this case. The 24-year-old man presented with subacute pancerebellar ataxia, flattened affect, and cognitive decline. Neuropsychological testing revealed working memory deficits, compromised verbal learning and recall, attention deficits, slowed information processing, interference difficulty, and reduced spatial recognition. MRI showed severe pancerebellar atrophy. Serological examinations revealed high-titre anti-Ca/anti-ARHGAP26 antibodies. The antibodies belonged to the IgG1 subclass and were produced intrathecally. This case further corroborates the association of anti-Ca antibodies with cerebellar ataxia, expands the clinical spectrum, and highlights the necessity of antigen-specific diagnostic testing in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxia.

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 without retinal degeneration: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Chae; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Beom S.

    2002-01-01

    A 60-yr-old man developed progressive gait disturbance and limb ataxia at the age of 52. Family history was absent for neurological disorders. Examinations showed pure cerebellar syndrome. There was no retinal degeneration for 7 yr. A brain MRI done at the age of 56 showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Genetic test confirmed the spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 with CAG repeat number of 42. PMID:12172062

  16. Writer's cramp in spinocerebellar ataxia Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Geeta Anjum; Srivastava, Abhilekh; Ghuge, Vijay Vishwanath; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia can be encountered in a small subset of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), but task specific dystonia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 48-year-old male with confirmed SCA Type 1 (SCA1) with mild progressive cerebellar ataxia and a prominent and disabling Writer's cramp. This case highlights the ever-expanding phenotypic heterogeneity of the SCA's in general and SCA1 in particular. PMID:27695243

  17. A Case of Ataxia with Isolated Vitamin E Deficiency Initially Diagnosed as Friedreich's Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Michael; Ray, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Ataxia with isolated vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive condition that is caused by a mutation in the alpha tocopherol transfer protein gene. It is almost indistinguishable clinically from Friedreich's ataxia but with appropriate treatment its devastating neurological features can be prevented. Patients can present with a progressive cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal spasticity, and evidence of a neuropathy with absent deep tendon reflexes. It is important to screen for this condition on initial evaluation of a young patient presenting with progressive ataxia and it should be considered in patients with a long standing ataxia without any diagnosis in view of the potential therapeutics and genetic counselling. In this case report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia but was later found to have AVED. PMID:26989534

  18. Anti-Yo antibody-mediated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a female patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Meydan, Nezih; Barutca, Sabri; Ozsan, Nazan; Gurel, Duygu; Veral, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic complication of malignancies. It presents with acute or subacute onset of ataxia, dysarthria and intention tremor. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly associated with malignancies of the ovary, breast and lung. The anti-Yo (anti-Purkinje cells) antibodies that specifically damage the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum are found in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is most commonly found in women with gynecological and breast cancers, but it is reported in other malignancies. Patients with paraneoplastic syndromes most often present with neurologic symptoms before an underlying cancer is detected. We report a case of anti-Yo-related paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with pleural malignant mesothelioma in a 51-year-old female patient. She presented to our department with a 2-week history after the last chemotherapy of progressive dizziness related to head movement, nausea, vomiting, ataxia and unsteady gait. A western blot assay was negative for anti-Hu, anti-Ri, anti-Ma2, anti-CV2 and anti-amphiphysin paraneoplastic antibody markers but positive for anti-Yo. In conclusion, we report a case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma because of the rarity of this neurologic presentation after the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma and of the association with anti-Yo antibodies.

  19. Frontal lobe ataxia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    The precise anatomy and physiology of human walking remains poorly understood. The frontal lobes appear crucial, and, on the basis of clinical observation, contribute to the control of truncal motion, postural responses, and the maintenance of equilibrium and locomotion. The rich repertoire of frontal gait disorders gives some indication of this complexity. Variable combinations of disequilibrium with a wide stance base, increased body sway and falls, loss of control of truncal motion, locomotor disability with gait ignition failure, start hesitation, shuffling, and freezing are encountered in diseases of the frontal lobes. Furthermore, the pattern of gait may change as the frontal disease progresses. The slowness of walking, lack of heel-shin or upper limb ataxia, dysarthria or nystagmus distinguishes the wide stance base from cerebellar gait ataxia. A lively facial expression, normal voluntary movements of the upper limbs, upper motor neuron signs, and the absence of a rest tremor distinguish the hypokinetic elements from Parkinson's disease. Poor truncal mobility, impaired postural responses, and falls after the slightest perturbation eventually make walking impossible even though simple leg movements may still be possible while seated or lying. One or more of these features usually predominates in the initial presentation of a frontal gait syndrome. Accordingly, there is considerable variation in the manner of presentation and evolution of frontal gait disorders. The gait syndrome is accompanied by frontal motor and cognitive changes, which may be subtle or overshadowed by the gait disorder. This complexity of clinical presentation accounts for the plethora of descriptions from "frontal ataxia" to "gait apraxia". As suggested in the original descriptions of frontal ataxia, the spectrum of gait disturbance is likely to be due to damage to frontal cortex and its connections with subcortical structures including the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and the brainstem.

  20. Genes and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Sandford, Erin; Burmeister, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes. PMID:25055202

  1. Genes and genetic testing in hereditary ataxias.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Erin; Burmeister, Margit

    2014-07-22

    Ataxia is a neurological cerebellar disorder characterized by loss of coordination during muscle movements affecting walking, vision, and speech. Genetic ataxias are very heterogeneous, with causative variants reported in over 50 genes, which can be inherited in classical dominant, recessive, X-linked, or mitochondrial fashion. A common mechanism of dominant ataxias is repeat expansions, where increasing lengths of repeated DNA sequences result in non-functional proteins that accumulate in the body causing disease. Greater understanding of all ataxia genes has helped identify several different pathways, such as DNA repair, ubiquitination, and ion transport, which can be used to help further identify new genes and potential treatments. Testing for the most common mutations in these genes is now clinically routine to help with prognosis and treatment decisions, but next generation sequencing will revolutionize how genetic testing will be done. Despite the large number of known ataxia causing genes, however, many individuals with ataxia are unable to obtain a genetic diagnosis, suggesting that more genes need to be discovered. Utilization of next generation sequencing technologies, expression studies, and increased knowledge of ataxia pathways will aid in the identification of new ataxia genes.

  2. Acute hemicerebellitis in a young adult: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Nakamura, Toshiki; Numao, Ayaka; Fujita, Hiroaki; Komagamine, Tomoko; Nagashima, Takahide; Asakawa, Yohei; Watanabe, Yuji; Takekawa, Hidehiro; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-12-15

    Acute hemicerebellitis, marked by headache with or without cerebellar signs, is a rare clinical entity involving a unilateral cerebellar hemisphere. The pathogenesis of acute hemicerebellitis remains unclear, and the disease rarely occurs in adults. Here, we report an 18-year-old woman who presented with a lack of coordination of the right hand and leg lasting longer than one week, following a pulsatile headache. A neurological examination disclosed ocular dysmetria, right-sided limb ataxia and slight truncal ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed mononuclear pleocytosis. The serology and autoimmune studies were unremarkable. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a focal signal change in the right cerebellar hemisphere and vermis. Acute hemicerebellitis was diagnosed, and the patient was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate and acyclovir. Subsequently, the headache resolved, and the cerebellar signs were markedly improved. Twenty days after admission, she became asymptomatic and brain MRI showed resolution of cerebellar hyperintensity on the right side. In conclusion, we identified only 6 additional patients with adult-onset acute hemicerebellitis from previous reports, highlighting the importance of recognizing this rare clinical entity. Its clinical outcome is usually favorable, but in the acute phase, attention should be directed toward clinical symptoms that are suggestive of increased intracranial pressure.

  3. Prism adaptation in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Velásquez-Perez, Luis; Díaz, Rosalinda; Drucker-Colín, René; Pérez-González, Ruth; Canales, Nalia; Sánchez-Cruz, Gilberto; Martínez-Góngora, Edilberto; Medrano, Yaquelín; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis; Seifried, Carola; Auburger, Georg

    2007-09-20

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), develop severe pontine nuclei, inferior olives, and Purkinje cell degeneration. This form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is accompanied by progressive ataxia and dysarthria. Although the motor dysfunction is well characterized in these patients, nothing is known about their motor learning capabilities. Here we tested 43 SCA2 patients and their matched controls in prism adaptation, a kind of visuomotor learning task. Our results show that their pattern of brain damage does not entirely disrupt motor learning. Rather, patients had impaired adaptation decrement, but surprisingly a normal aftereffect. Moreover, the mutation degree could discriminate the degree of adaptation. This pattern could reflect the net contribution of two adaptive mechanisms: strategic control and spatial realignment. Accordingly, SCA2 patients show an impaired strategic control that affects the adaptation rate, but a normal spatial realignment measured through the aftereffect. Our results suggest that the neural areas subserving spatial realignment are spared in this form of spinocerebellar ataxia.

  4. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... parent; and autosomal recessive, in which both parents pass on a copy of the faulty gene. Among ... parent; and autosomal recessive, in which both parents pass on a copy of the faulty gene. Among ...

  5. Effects of ethanol on sensory stimulus-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Song-Biao; Cui, Bai-Ri; Liu, Heng; Wu, Mao-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Hua; Bian, Jin-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2014-08-08

    Overdose intake of ethanol can impair cerebellar cortical neurons to integrate and transfer external information, resulting in a dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation or cerebellar ataxia. However, the mechanisms underlying ethanol-impaired transfer of sensory information from cerebellar cortical molecular layer neurons remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar molecular layer of urethane-anesthetized mice, by electrophysiological and pharmacological methods. Our results demonstrated that air-puff stimulation (30 ms, 50-60 psi) of the ipsilateral whisker-pad evoked field potential responses in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex folium Crus II, which expressed a negative component (N1) followed by a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABAA)-mediated positive component (P1). Cerebellar surface perfusion of ethanol between 2 and 5mM did not change the latency of the evoked responses and the amplitude of N1, but enhanced the amplitude and the area under the curve of P1. Interestingly, high concentrations (>20mM) of ethanol induced a significantly decrease in the amplitude and area under the curve of P1. Furthermore, high concentration ethanol (300 mM) significantly decreased the rise in tau and tau decay value of P1, whereas low concentration ethanol (2-5mM) significantly increased these values of P1. Inhibition of GABAA receptor activity reversed P1 and also abolished the effects of ethanol on sensory stimulation-evoked responses. These results indicated that ethanol induced a bidirectional effect on the sensory stimulation-evoked GABAergic responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer, suggesting that acute alcohol intake impacted the sensory information processing of cerebellar cortex.

  6. The effectiveness of allied health care in patients with ataxia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Keus, Samyra H J; Verstappen, Carla C P; Schöls, Ludger; de Groot, Imelda J M; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2014-02-01

    Many patients with cerebellar ataxia have serious disabilities in daily life, while pharmacological treatment options are absent. Therefore, allied health care is considered to be important in the management of these patients. The goal of this review is to evaluate scientific evidence for allied health care in cerebellar ataxia, to identify effective treatment strategies, and to give recommendations for clinical practice and further research. A systematic search for clinical trials concerning allied health care in cerebellar ataxias was conducted using the electronic databases of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cinahl and Pedro, and references lists of articles, in the time period from 1980 up to and including December 2011 in English and Dutch. We identified 14 trials, of which the four best studies were formally of moderate methodological quality. There was a wide variation in disease entities and interventions. The combined data indicate that physical therapy may lead to an improvement of ataxia symptoms and daily life functions in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia (level 2), and in other diseases causing cerebellar ataxia (level 3). When added to physical therapy, occupational therapy might improve global functional status, and occupational therapy alone may diminish symptoms of depression (level 3). There are insufficient data for speech and language therapy. Despite the widespread use of allied health care interventions in cerebellar ataxia, there is a lack of good quality studies that have evaluated such interventions. We found some support for the implementation of physical therapy and occupational therapy, but more research is needed to develop recommendations for clinical practice.

  7. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  8. Trial in Adult Subjects With Spinocerebellar Ataxia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Spinocerebellar Ataxias; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 8; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10

  9. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  10. Myocarditis along with acute ischaemic cerebellar, pontine and lacunar infarction following viper bite.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Alok; Menon, Aravind Ajakumar; Bhat, Rama; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu

    2013-09-06

    Cerebrovascular complications are rare following viper bites. A 65-year-old man presented with loss of consciousness and developed haemiparesis following a viper bite. Coagulation parameters were severely deranged. MRI showed acute ischaemic infarction on the left side in the precentral and postcentral gyrus, hemipons and cerebellum. Troponin T was elevated and transient left bundle branch block was seen. The patient had a good outcome following treatment with Anti Snake Venom and supportive therapy. Possible mechanisms of infarction are discussed.

  11. Gluten-related disorders: gluten ataxia.

    PubMed

    Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Sanders, David D; Aeschlimann, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    The term gluten-related disorders (GRD) refers to a spectrum of diverse clinical manifestations triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. They include both intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Gluten ataxia (GA) is one of the commonest neurological manifestations of GRD. It was originally defined as otherwise idiopathic sporadic ataxia in the presence of circulating antigliadin antibodies of IgA and/or IgG type. Newer more specific serological markers have been identified but are not as yet readily available. GA has a prevalence of 15% amongst all ataxias and 40% of all idiopathic sporadic ataxias. It usually presents with gait and lower limb ataxia. It is of insidious onset with a mean age at onset of 53 years. Up to 40% of patients have evidence of enteropathy on duodenal biopsy. Gastrointestinal symptoms are seldom prominent and are not a reliable indicator for the presence of enteropathy. Furthermore, the presence of enteropathy does not influence the response to a gluten-free diet. Most patients will stabilise or improve with strict adherence to gluten-free diet depending on the duration of the ataxia prior to the treatment. Up to 60% of patients with GA have evidence of cerebellar atrophy on MR imaging, but all patients have spectroscopic abnormalities primarily affecting the vermis. Recent evidence suggests that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease presenting to the gastroenterologists have abnormal MR spectroscopy at presentation associated with clinical evidence of subtle cerebellar dysfunction. The advantage of early diagnosis and treatment (mean age 42 years in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms vs. 53 years in patients presenting with ataxia) may protect the first group from the development and/or progression of neurological dysfunction.

  12. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  13. Ataxia induced by small amounts of alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Setta, F; Jacquy, J; Hildebrand, J; Manto, M

    1998-01-01

    A patient is described who exhibited cerebellar ataxia after drinking small amounts of alcohol. Intake of 5 g alcohol induced a gaze evoked nystagmus, a scanning speech, a body sway after eye closure, and bilateral postural leg tremor. Kinematic and EMG analysis of fast wrist movements showed normal movements before and marked hypermetria after alcohol intake. Dysmetria was due to abnormal programming of antagonist muscle activity.

 PMID:9728953

  14. Determination of Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics of Friedreich’s Ataxia and Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 1, 2, 3, and 6

    PubMed Central

    BOZ, Pınar Bengi; KOÇ, Filiz; KOCATÜRK SEL, Sabriye; GÜZEL, Ali İrfan; KASAP, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to analyze the genotypic characteristics of Friedreich’s ataxia (FA) and autosomal dominant ataxias [such as spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 1, 2, 3, and 6] using molecular and biological methods in hereditary cerebellar ataxia considering both clinical and electrophysiological findings. Methods The study included 129 indexed cases, who applied to the neurology department and were diagnosed with hereditary cerebellar ataxia through clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological findings, and 15 sibling patients who were diagnosed through family scanning (144 cases in total); their genetic analyses were also performed. Detailed physical and neurological examinations, pedigree analyses, electroneurography, evoked potentials, cerebral–spinal magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiographic analyses were performed for all cases. Blood samples were collected from patients, and the genotypic characteristics of autosomal dominant SCA types 1, 2, 3, and 6 were investigated. Statistical analyses were performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc; Chicago, IL, USA) 17.0. Results Almost 50% of patients were defined as FA. Moreover, two SCA1 cases and one SCA6 case were detected. Conclusion In our study, 47.2% of patients with FA had developed hereditary cerebellar ataxia. Ground and autosomal dominant-linked SCA1 and SCA6 were each detected in one family. These data suggest that patients with cerebellar ataxia of hereditary origin should be primarily examined for FA. PMID:28360782

  15. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population.

  16. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lihua; Cui, Jingkun; Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng; Han, Fujun

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  17. Time-resolved functional analysis of acute impairment of frataxin expression in an inducible cell model of Friedreich ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Poburski, Dörte; Boerner, Josefine Barbara; Koenig, Michel; Ristow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a GAA triplet repeat expansion in the first intron of the frataxin gene, which results in reduced expression levels of the corresponding protein. Despite numerous animal and cellular models, therapeutic options that mechanistically address impaired frataxin expression are lacking. Here, we have developed a new mammalian cell model employing the Cre/loxP recombination system to induce a homozygous or heterozygous frataxin knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Induction of Cre-mediated disruption by tamoxifen was successfully tested on RNA and protein levels. After loss of frataxin protein, cell division, aconitase activity and oxygen consumption rates were found to be decreased, while ROS production was increased in the homozygous state. By contrast, in the heterozygous state no such changes were observed. A time-resolved analysis revealed the loss of aconitase activity as an initial event after induction of complete frataxin deficiency, followed by secondarily elevated ROS production and a late increase in iron content. Initial impairments of oxygen consumption and ATP production were found to be compensated in the late state and seemed to play a minor role in Friedreich ataxia pathophysiology. In conclusion and as predicted from its proposed role in iron sulfur cluster (ISC) biosynthesis, disruption of frataxin primarily causes impaired function of ISC-containing enzymes, whereas other consequences, including elevated ROS production and iron accumulation, appear secondary. These parameters and the robustness of the newly established system may additionally be used for a time-resolved study of pharmacological candidates in a HTS manner. PMID:27106929

  18. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Ullal, Jagdeesh; Vinik, Aaron I

    2008-01-01

    This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia. PMID:21197340

  19. A 70-year-old male with peripheral neuropathy, ataxia and antigliadin antibodies shows improvement in neuropathy, but not ataxia, after intravenous immunoglobulin and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Ullal, Jagdeesh; Vinik, Aaron I

    2008-10-01

    This is a case of a 70-year-old man with severe peripheral neuropathy, type 2 diabetes and progressively worsening cerebellar ataxia. He was found to have circulating antigliadin and antireticulin antibodies compatible with celiac disease in the absence of intestinal pathology. The peripheral neuropathy improved with a gluten-free diet, antioxidants and intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas the ataxia did not. This case illustrates the need to test for celiac disease in patients with idiopathic ataxia and peripheral neuropathy and the need for alternative therapies for ataxia.

  20. Diagnostic Approach to Childhood-onset Cerebellar Atrophy: A 10-Year Retrospective Study of 300 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; Yoon, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias associated with cerebellar atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders. Selection of appropriate clinical and genetic tests for patients with cerebellar atrophy poses a diagnostic challenge. Neuroimaging is a crucial initial investigation in the diagnostic evaluation of ataxia in childhood, and the presence of cerebellar atrophy helps guide further investigations. We performed a detailed review of 300 patients with confirmed cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging over a 10-year period. A diagnosis was established in 47% of patients: Mitochondrial disorders were most common, followed by the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, ataxia telangectasia, and late GM2-gangliosidosis. We review the common causes of cerebellar atrophy in childhood and propose a diagnostic approach based on correlating specific neuroimaging patterns with clinical and genetic diagnoses. PMID:22764178

  1. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold is increased in patients with cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Fiore; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Pisciotta, Chiara; Antenora, Antonella; Nolano, Maria; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Berardelli, Alfredo; Santoro, Lucio

    2013-08-01

    Processing of time in the millisecond range seems to depend on cerebellar function and it can be assessed by using the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold testing. No studies have yet investigated this temporal discrimination task in patients with cerebellar atrophy. Eleven patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 11 controls underwent somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold evaluation. The degree of cerebellar dysfunction was measured by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold was higher in patients compared to controls for each stimulated site (hand, neck, and eye). Age, disease duration, and International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale scores were not correlated to somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold is abnormal in patients with cerebellar atrophy. These findings suggest that the cerebellum plays a role in modulating the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold and confirm the role of cerebellum in the processing of time in the millisecond range.

  2. ‘Costa da Morte’ ataxia is spinocerebellar ataxia 36: clinical and genetic characterization

    PubMed Central

    García-Murias, María; Quintáns, Beatriz; Arias, Manuel; Seixas, Ana I.; Cacheiro, Pilar; Tarrío, Rosa; Pardo, Julio; Millán, María J.; Arias-Rivas, Susana; Blanco-Arias, Patricia; Dapena, Dolores; Moreira, Ramón; Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; Sequeiros, Jorge; Carracedo, Ángel; Silveira, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 36 has been recently described in Japanese families as a new type of spinocerebellar ataxia with motor neuron signs. It is caused by a GGCCTG repeat expansion in intron 1 of NOP56. Family interview and document research allowed us to reconstruct two extensive, multigenerational kindreds stemming from the same village (Costa da Morte in Galicia, Spain), in the 17th century. We found the presence of the spinocerebellar ataxia 36 mutation co-segregating with disease in these families in whom we had previously identified an ∼0.8 Mb linkage region to chromosome 20 p. Subsequent screening revealed the NOP56 expansion in eight additional Galician ataxia kindreds. While normal alleles contain 5–14 hexanucleotide repeats, expanded alleles range from ∼650 to 2500 repeats, within a shared haplotype. Further expansion of repeat size was frequent, especially upon paternal transmission, while instances of allele contraction were observed in maternal transmissions. We found a total of 63 individuals carrying the mutation, 44 of whom were confirmed to be clinically affected; over 400 people are at risk. We describe here the detailed clinical picture, consisting of a late-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar syndrome with variable eye movement abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. There were signs of denervation in the tongue, as well as mild pyramidal signs, but otherwise no signs of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were consistent with the clinical course, showing atrophy of the cerebellar vermis in initial stages, later evolving to a pattern of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. We estimated the origin of the founder mutation in Galicia to have occurred ∼1275 years ago. Out of 160 Galician families with spinocerebellar ataxia, 10 (6.3%) were found to have spinocerebellar ataxia 36, while 15 (9.4%) showed other of the routinely tested dominant spinocerebellar ataxia types. Spinocerebellar ataxia

  3. Spontaneous downbeat nystagmus as a clue for the diagnosis of ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Pedroso, José Luiz; Alquéres, Rafaela Almeida; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2015-12-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid to the neurotransmitter gamma-amino butyric acid. Antibodies against GAD (anti-GAD-Ab) are associated with an array of autoimmune-related neurological conditions, such as stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. The clinical spectrum of ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab comprises slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia syndrome evolving in months or years, associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI. There are few reports of patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab presenting with abnormal ocular movements, such as downbeat nystagmus (DBN).We present two patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab from a large series of ataxic subjects who presented with cerebellar ataxia combined with spontaneous DBN. All patients underwent a thorough neurological evaluation with the use of ataxia scales, brain MRI scans, cerebrospinal fluid examination, 18FDG-PET/CT scans, laboratory work-up with on coneural and immune encephalitis antibodies, serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of anti-GAD-Ab, and the antibody specificity index to measure the intrathecal synthesis of anti-GAD-Ab. All patients were treated with cycles of intravenous immunoglobulin and had mild/partial ataxia improvement and no improvement of DBN. The finding of DBN may work as a diagnostic clue in the context of adult-onset non-hereditary ataxias.

  4. Speech Characteristics Associated with Three Genotypes of Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Ahn, Ji Sook; Gomez, Christopher; Sidtis, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in neurobiology are providing new opportunities to investigate the neurological systems underlying motor speech control. This study explores the perceptual characteristics of the speech of three genotypes of spino-cerebellar ataxia (SCA) as manifest in four different speech tasks. Methods: Speech samples from 26 speakers with SCA…

  5. Progressive Ataxia and Palatal Tremor: Think about POLG Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Delorme, Cécile; Lenglet, Timothée; Jardel, Claude; Vignal, Catherine; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive ataxia and palatal tremor (PAPT) can be observed in both acquired brainstem or cerebellar lesions and genetic disorders. Phenomenology shown PAPT due to mutation in POLG, the gene encoding the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Educational value POLG mutation should be considered in patients with PAPT, particularly when additional clues such as a sensory neuronopathy or an ophthalmoplegia are present. PMID:27351300

  6. Cochlear implantation following cerebellar surgery.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Shahad; Mawman, Deborah; Green, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Cochlear implantation in patients with known central nervous system conditions can result in wide-ranging outcomes. The aim of this study is to report two cases of cochlear implantation outcomes in patients with acquired cerebellar ataxia following cerebellar surgery. The first is a female implanted with the Nucleus 24 implant in September 2000 and the second is a male implanted with a MED-EL Sonata Flexsoft electro-acoustic stimulation in July 2009. Programming these patients resulted in significant non-auditory stimulation which resulted in less than optimum map fittings. The patients did not gain any open set speech perception benefit although both of them gained an awareness of sound with the device. However, patient 2 elected to become a non-user because of the limited benefit.

  7. Assessing the efficacy of specific cerebellomodulatory drugs for use as therapy for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Nag, Nupur; Tarlac, Volga; Storey, Elsdon

    2013-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias are autosomal dominant diseases, associated in some types with a CAG repeat expansion, and characterised by a progressive loss of motor function. Currently, as there is no cure for most ataxias, treatment predominantly involves physical therapy. Various symptomatic drug treatments have been tried; however, published clinical studies have provided inconsistent results, likely due to small sample sizes, mixed patient populations and insensitive or subjective assessment scales. SCA1(154Q) transgenic mice display motor function impairments and ultimately a reduced number of cerebellar Purkinje neurons-characteristics comparable to most forms of sporadic and hereditary ataxias. We monitored motor function in SCA1(154Q) mice from 5 to 20 weeks of age and assessed the efficacy of four potential cerebellar modulatory drugs in attenuating deficits in rotor-rod performance. The drugs riluzole, amantadine, zolpidem and buspirone were selected based on their different mechanisms of action and their Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration approval for other indications. SCA1(154Q) and C57/Bl6 wild-type mice were administered with four ascending acute doses of each drug, over 2 days. Following each dose, mice were assesed for motor function on the accelerating rotor-rod. None of the four drugs attenuated motor deficts in SCA1(154Q) mice at any dose; at FDA equivalent and higher dose administration of zolpidem and buspirone led to sedation in both strains. Our results suggest that the aforementioned drugs are likely to be ineffective for symptomatic treatment of SCA1 and most other ataxic patients and emphasise the need for comphrehensive drug studies prior to clinical use.

  8. Isolated cerebellar toxoplasmosis as a complication of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pott, H; Castelo, A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination. The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location. This case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion among HIV-infected patients with neurological manifestations and suspicious neuroimaging findings.

  9. Primary cerebellopontine progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy diagnosed premortem by cerebellar biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, H R; Hedley-Whyte, E T; Freidberg, S R; Kelleher, J E; Krolikowski, J

    1982-02-01

    A subacute progressive cerebellar brainstem syndrome developed in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus in remission. Cerebellar biopsy documented the diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Data from this patient and 10 others in the literature emphasize the need to consider this diagnosis when ataxia develops in any patient with underlying malignancy, chronic infection, or other disease that involves immunological incompetence. Although the ataxic form of PML is not of nosological relevance, early diagnosis may eventually have therapeutic importance.

  10. Compression of the medulla oblongata and acute respiratory failure caused by rupture of a thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanahashi, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with an extremely rare case of a ruptured thrombosed large aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in which a local hematoma compressed the medulla oblongata and caused acute respiratory failure. She first presented with dizziness, general fatigue, and nausea 2 months before admission. She was hospitalized for intense general fatigue, nausea, and occipitalgia. Computed tomography and T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a heterogeneous lesion around the right cerebello-medullary cistern. Angiography revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the right AICA. Asphyxia occurred 4 days after admission and the patient underwent an emergency operation. No subarachnoid hematoma was present, but a hematoma around the ruptured portion markedly compressed the medulla oblongata. The medulla oblongata was adequately decompressed after subtotal removal of the aneurysm. The patient's respiratory status and consciousness level recovered after the operation.

  11. Anti-Yo positive paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in the setting of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bruhnding, Aubree; Notch, Derek; Beard, Albertine

    2017-02-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are a rare complication of malignancy. Subacute cerebellar ataxia, or paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, usually presents in women with a subcate onset of gait instability, followed by progressive limb and trunk ataxia, dysarthria, diplopia, and dysphagia that occurs in the setting of, or precedes the diagnosis of, a gynecologic or breast malignancy and clinically stabilizes within six months. The most common autoantibody associated with PCD is purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1, also known as anti-Yo. Here we describe the first reported case of a man with anti-Yo positive paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in the setting of occult cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  13. From Mild Ataxia to Huntington Disease Phenocopy: The Multiple Faces of Spinocerebellar Ataxia 17

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Marios; Paraskevas, George P.; Bougea, Anastasia M.; Karadima, Georgia; Kapaki, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Spinocerebellar ataxia 17 (SCA 17) is a rare autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) caused by a CAG/CAA expansion in the TBP gene, reported from a limited number of countries. It is a very heterogeneous ADCA characterized by ataxia, cognitive decline, psychiatric symptoms, and involuntary movements, with some patients presenting with Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies. The SCA 17 expansion is stable during parent-child transmission and intrafamilial phenotypic homogeneity has been reported. However, significant phenotypic variability within families has also been observed. Report of the Family. We presently report a Greek family with a pathological expansion of 54 repeats at the SCA 17 locus that displayed remarkable phenotypic variability. Among 3 affected members, one presented with HD phenocopy; one with progressive ataxia, dementia, chorea, dystonia, and seizures, and one with mild slowly progressive ataxia with minor cognitive and affective symptoms. Conclusions. This is the first family with SCA 17 identified in Greece and highlights the multiple faces of this rare disorder, even within the same family. PMID:25349749

  14. Speech and Language Findings Associated with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paslawski, Teresa; Duffy, Joseph R.; Vernino, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is an autoimmune disease that can be associated with cancer of the breast, lung, and ovary. The clinical presentation of PCD commonly includes ataxia, visual disturbances, and dysarthria. The speech disturbances associated with PCD have not been well characterized, despite general acceptance that…

  15. Distinct critical cerebellar subregions for components of verbal working memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between cognitive performance and cerebellar integrity in a specific degeneration of the cerebellar cortex: Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 6 (SCA6). The results demonstrate a critical relationship between verbal working memory and grey matter density in superior (bilateral lobules VI and crus I of lobule VII) and inferior (bilateral lobules VIIIa and VIIIb, and right lobule IX) parts of the cerebellum. We demonstrate that distinct cerebellar regions subserve different components of the prevalent psychological model for verbal working memory based on a phonological loop. The work confirms the involvement of the cerebellum in verbal working memory and defines specific subsystems for this within the cerebellum. PMID:22133495

  16. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome: An under-recognised cause of tremor and ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kalus, Sarah; King, John; Lui, Elaine; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a progressive degenerative movement disorder resulting from a fragile X "premutation", defined as 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The FMR1 premutation occurs in 1/800 males and 1/250 females, with FXTAS affecting 40-45% of male and 8-16% of female premutation carriers over the age of 50. FXTAS typically presents with kinetic tremor and cerebellar ataxia. FXTAS has a classical imaging profile which, in concert with clinical manifestations and genetic testing, participates vitally in its diagnosis. The revised FXTAS diagnostic criteria include two major radiological features. The "MCP sign", referring to T2 hyperintensity in the middle cerebellar peduncle, has long been considered the radiological hallmark of FXTAS. Recently included as a major radiological criterion in the diagnosis of FXTAS is T2 hyperintensity in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Other imaging features of FXTAS include T2 hyperintensities in the pons, insula and periventricular white matter as well as generalised brain and cerebellar atrophy. FXTAS is an under-recognised and misdiagnosed entity. In patients with unexplained tremor, ataxia and cognitive decline, the presence of middle cerebellar peduncle and/or corpus callosum splenium hyperintensity should raise suspicion of FXTAS. Diagnosis of FXTAS has important implications not only for the patient but also, through genetic counselling and testing, for future generations.

  17. Sustained antagonism of acute ethanol-induced ataxia following microinfusion of cyclic AMP and cpt-cAMP in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2011-05-01

    Ataxia is a conspicuous physical manifestation of alcohol consumption in humans and laboratory animals. Previously we reported possible involvement of cAMP in ethanol-induced ataxia. We now report a sustained antagonism of ataxia due to multiple ethanol injections following intracerebellar (ICB) cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion. Adenylyl cyclase drugs cAMP, cpt-cAMP, Sp-cAMP, Rp-cAMP, adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) and GABA(A) agonist muscimol were directly microinfused into the cerebellum of CD-1 male mice to evaluate their effect on ethanol (2 g/kg; i.p.) ataxia. Drug microinfusions were made via stereotaxically implanted stainless steel guide cannulas. Rotorod was used to evaluate the ethanol's ataxic response. Intracerebellar cAMP (0.1, 1, 10 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (0.5, 1, 2 fmol) 60 min before ethanol treatment, dose-dependently attenuated ethanol-induced ataxia in general agreement with previous observations. Intracerebellar microinfusion of cAMP (100 fmol) or cpt-cAMP (2 fmol) produced a sustained attenuation of ataxia following ethanol administration at 1, 4, 7 and 25 h or 31 h post-cAMP/cpt-cAMP microinfusion. At 31 h post-cAMP, the ataxic response of ethanol reappeared. Additionally, marked antagonism to the accentuation of ethanol-induced ataxia by adenosine A₁ and GABA(A) agonists, CHA (34 pmol) and muscimol (88 pmol), respectively, was noted 24h after cAMP and cpt-cAMP treatment. This indicated possible participation of AC/cAMP/PKA signaling in the co-modulation of ethanol-induced ataxia by A₁ adenosinergic and GABAergic systems. No change in normal motor coordination was noted when cAMP or cpt-cAMP microinfusion was followed by saline. Finally, Rp-cAMP (PKA inhibitor, 22 pmol) accentuated ethanol-induced ataxia and antagonized its attenuation by cAMP whereas Sp-cAMP (PKA activator, 22 pmol) produced just the opposite effects, further indicating participation of cAMP-dependent PKA downstream. Overall, the results support a role of

  18. Pitch discrimination in cerebellar patients: evidence for a sensory deficit.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lawrence M; Petacchi, Augusto; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Bower, James M

    2009-12-15

    In the last two decades, a growing body of research showing cerebellar involvement in an increasing number of nonmotor tasks and systems has prompted an expansion of speculations concerning the function of the cerebellum. Here, we tested the predictions of a hypothesis positing cerebellar involvement in sensory data acquisition. Specifically, we examined the effect of global cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory sensory function by means of a pitch discrimination task. The just noticeable difference in pitch between two tones was measured in 15 healthy controls and in 15 high functioning patients afflicted with varying degrees of global cerebellar degeneration caused by hereditary, idiopathic, paraneoplastic, or postinfectious pancerebellitis. Participants also performed an auditory detection task assessing sustained attention, a test of verbal auditory working memory, and an audiometric test. Patient pitch discrimination thresholds were on average five and a half times those of controls and were proportional to the degree of cerebellar ataxia assessed independently. Patients and controls showed normal hearing thresholds and similar performance in control tasks in sustained attention and verbal auditory working memory. These results suggest there is an effect of cerebellar degeneration on primary auditory function. The findings are consistent with other recent demonstrations of cerebellar-related sensory impairments, and with robust cerebellar auditorily evoked activity, confirmed by quantitative meta-analysis, across a range of functional neuroimaging studies dissociated from attention, motor, affective, and cognitive variables. The data are interpreted in the context of a sensory hypothesis of cerebellar function.

  19. Cbln1 regulates rapid formation and maintenance of excitatory synapses in mature cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Miura, Eriko; Emi, Kyoichi; Matsuda, Keiko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2008-06-04

    Although many synapse-organizing molecules have been identified in vitro, their functions in mature neurons in vivo have been mostly unexplored. Cbln1, which belongs to the C1q/tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is the most recently identified protein involved in synapse formation in the mammalian CNS. In the cerebellum, Cbln1 is predominantly produced and secreted from granule cells; cbln1-null mice show ataxia and a severe reduction in the number of synapses between Purkinje cells and parallel fibers (PFs), the axon bundle of granule cells. Here, we show that application of recombinant Cbln1 specifically and reversibly induced PF synapse formation in dissociated cbln1-null Purkinje cells in culture. Cbln1 also rapidly induced electrophysiologically functional and ultrastructurally normal PF synapses in acutely prepared cbln1-null cerebellar slices. Furthermore, a single injection of recombinant Cbln1 rescued severe ataxia in adult cbln1-null mice in vivo by completely, but transiently, restoring PF synapses. Therefore, Cbln1 is a unique synapse organizer that is required not only for the normal development of PF-Purkinje cell synapses but also for their maintenance in the mature cerebellum both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, our results indicate that Cbln1 can also rapidly organize new synapses in adult cerebellum, implying its therapeutic potential for cerebellar ataxic disorders.

  20. Gene Testing for Hereditary Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a family history of ataxia, but diagnostic tests for known ataxia genes cannot explain the ataxia in their family. In recent years, scientists have developed technologies to sequence thousands of genes at the same ...

  1. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2): a clinical report with review of previous cases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Faruq, Mohammed; Mukerji, Mitali; Dwivedi, Manish Kumar; Pruthi, Sumit; Kapoor, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is a heterogeneous group of spinocerebellar ataxias with variable neurologic presentations, with age of onset varying from infancy to adulthood. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type I is composed mainly of 3 prevalent spinocerebellar ataxia types with different pathogenic loci, specifically spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (6p24-p23), spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (12q24.1), and spinocerebellar ataxia 3 (14q32.1). The shared pathogenic mutational event is the expansion of the CAG repeat that results in polyglutamine extended stretches in the encoded proteins. CAG repeat disorders generally show the phenomenon of anticipation, which is more often associated with paternal transmission. In this report, we describe a patient with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (~320 CAG repeat) who inherited the disease from his father (47 CAG repeats). We have summarized the clinical, neuroimaging, electroencephalographic (EEG), and molecular data of previous cases and attempt to highlight the most consistent findings. Our intent is to help treating clinicians to suspect this disorder and to offer timely genetic counseling for a currently potentially untreatable disorder.

  2. A comprehensive clinical and genetic study of a large Mexican population with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, L; Cerecedo-Zapata, C M; Hernández-Hernández, O; Martínez-Cruz, E; Tapia-Guerrero, Y S; González-Piña, R; Salas-Vargas, J; Rodríguez-Labrada, R; Gurrola-Betancourth, R; Leyva-García, N; Cisneros, B; Magaña, J J

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia associated with macular degeneration. We recently described one of the largest series of patients with SCA7 that originated from a founder effect in a Mexican population, which allowed us to perform herein the first comprehensive clinical, neurophysiological, and genetic characterization of Mexican patients with SCA7. In this study, 50 patients, categorized into adult or early phenotype, were clinically assessed using standard neurological exams and genotyped using fluorescent PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Patients with SCA7 exhibited the classical phenotype of the disease characterized by cerebellar ataxia and visual loss; however, we reported, for the first time, frontal-executive disorders and altered sensory-motor peripheral neuropathy in these patients. Semiquantitative analysis of ataxia-associated symptoms was performed using Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS) scores, while extracerebellar features were measured employing the Inventory of Non-ataxia Symptoms (INAS) scale. Ataxia rating scales confirmed the critical role size of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeat size on age at onset and disease severity, while analysis of CAG repeat instability showed that paternal rather than maternal transmission led to greater instability.

  3. Medications for Ataxia Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Namenda) NATIONAL ATAXIA FOUNDATION Muscle cramps or spasms : Baclofen, Tizanidine (Zanaflex) Muscle strength : Creatine Myofascial pain : Cymbalta, Lyrica, Gabapentin Neuropathy : Cymbalta, Lyrica; as well ...

  4. [Chronic ataxia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Erazo Torricelli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ataxias are an heterogeneous group of disorders that affect the child at different ages. Thus, the congenital forms, generally non progressive are observed from first months of life and are expressed by hypotonia and motor delay long before the ataxia became evident. The cerebral magnetic resonance images (MRI) may be diagnostic in some pictures like Joubert syndrome. The group of progressive hereditary ataxias, usually begin after the infant period. The clinical signs are gait instability and ocular apraxia that can be associated with oculocutaneous telangiectasias (ataxia-telangiesctasia) or with sensory neuropathy (Friedreich ataxia). In this review are briefly described congenital ataxias and in more detailed form the progressive hereditary ataxias autosomal recessive, autosomal dominants and mitochondrials. The importance of genetic study is emphasized, because it is the key to obtain the diagnosis in the majority of these diseases. Although now there are no treatments for the majority of progressive hereditary ataxias, some they have like Refsum disease, vitamine E deficiency, Coenzyme Q10 deficiency and others, thus the diagnosis in these cases is even more important. At present the diagnosis of childhood hereditary ataxia not yet treatable is fundamental to obtain suitable handling, determine a precise outcome and to give to the family an opportune genetic counseling.

  5. The genetics of ataxia: through the labyrinth of the Minotaur, looking for Ariadne's thread.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, M; Orsucci, D; Siciliano, G; Bonuccelli, U

    2014-09-01

    Among the hereditary cerebellar ataxias (CAs), there are at least 36 different forms of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCAs), 20 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCAs), two X-linked ataxias, and several forms of ataxia associated with mitochondrial defects. Despite the steady increase in the number of newly discovered CA genes, patients, especially those with putative ARCAs, cannot yet be genotyped. Moreover, in daily clinical practice, ataxia may present as an isolated cerebellar syndrome or, more often, it is associated with a broad spectrum of neurological manifestations including pyramidal, extrapyramidal, sensory, and cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, non-neurological symptoms may also coexist. A close integration between clinical records, neurophysiological, neuroradiological and, in some instances, biochemical findings will help physicians in the diagnostic work-up (including selection of the correct genetic tests) and may lead to timely therapy. Some inherited CAs are in fact potentially treatable, and the efficacy of the therapy is directly related to the severity of the cerebellar atrophy and to the time of onset of the disease. Most cases of CA are sporadic, and the diagnostic work-up remains a challenge. Detailed anamnesis and deep investigation of the family pedigree are usually enough to discriminate between acquired and genetic conditions. In the case of ADCA, molecular testing should be guided by taking into account the main associated symptoms. In sporadic cases, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed and should consider the following points: (1) onset and clinical course; (2) associated features; (3) neurophysiological parameters, with special attention to the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy; (4) neuroimaging results; and (5) laboratory findings. A late-onset sporadic ataxia, in which other possible causes have been excluded by following the proposed steps, might be attributable to metabolic disorders, which in some

  6. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  7. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  8. Diagnosis of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by postal mail: National Ataxia Foundation 2600 Fernbrook Lane Suite 119 Minneapolis, MN 55447-4752 Phone: (763) ... 2006-2017 NAF • National Ataxia Foundation • 2600 Fernbrook Lane Suite 119 • Minneapolis, MN 55447 • 763.553.0020 ...

  9. GD1b-specific antibodies may bind to complex of GQ1b and GM1, causing ataxia.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Nobuhiro; Fukami, Yuki; Yanaka, Chiaki; Koike, Saiko; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    Monospecific IgG antibodies to GD1b ganglioside (GD1b-specific antibodies) have been found in patients with acute ataxic neuropathy and Guillain-Barré syndrome, but the association of the GD1b-specific antibodies with specific neurological conditions has yet to be established. We tested sera from more than 10,000 patients with various neurological disorders, and found six sera, which contained IgG antibodies to GD1b, but not to LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GT1a, GT1b and GQ1b. All six patients who carried GD1b-specific antibodies presented with acute onset of ataxia and monophasic course of the illness, of whom five demonstrated cerebellar-like ataxia. Four patients had antecedent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. The six patients demonstrated areflexia, and four complained of distal numbness. All the six patients who had the GD1b-specific antibodies carried IgG antibodies to complex of GQ1b/GM1 and GT1a/GM1. GD1b-specific antibodies were significantly absorbed by GQ1b/GM1 and GT1a/GM1 and anti-GQ1b/GM1 and -GT1a/GM1 antibodies were absorbed by GD1b. In conclusion, the GD1b-specific antibodies, which recognizes GQ1b/GM1 or GT1a/GM1 complex, are associated with acute ataxia.

  10. Comparison of three clinical rating scales in Friedreich ataxia (FRDA).

    PubMed

    Bürk, Katrin; Mälzig, Ulrike; Wolf, Stefanie; Heck, Suzette; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Hering, Sascha; Lindig, Tobias M; Haug, Verena; Timmann, Dagmar; Degen, Ingrid; Kruse, Bernd; Dörr, Jan-Markus; Ratzka, Susanne; Ivo, Anja; Schöls, Ludger; Boesch, Sylvia; Klockgether, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Jörg B

    2009-09-15

    To test the validity and reliability of the scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA) in Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). SARA is limited to eight items and can be performed rapidly. Ninety-six patients with a molecular genetic diagnosis of FRDA were rated using three different clinical scales, the FRDA Rating Scale (FARS), the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), and SARA. Despite considerable discrepancies in scale size and subscale structure, SARA total scores were significantly correlated with ICARS (r = 0.953, P < 0.0001) and FARS (r = 0.938, P < 0.0001) total scores. SARA total scores also correlated with the activities of daily living (ADL, r = 0.929, P < 0.0001). Although originally developed for the use in dominantly inherited ataxias, which are primarily ataxias of the cerebellar type, SARA can also be used successfully to assess afferent ataxia, which is the predominant form in FRDA. Because SARA is characterized by high interrater reliability and practicability, SARA is applicable and well suited forclinical trials of FRDA.

  11. Ataxia in patients with brain infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Louis R

    2012-01-01

    Gait and limb incoordination and ataxia are most often found in patients with brainstem and cerebellar infarcts and hemorrhages. Lesions involving the thalamus and the deep portions of the cerebral hemispheres also may cause ataxia accompanied by weakness and sensory symptoms. Patients who have lesions in the lateral medulla and inferior cerebellum often topple, lean, or veer when attempting to sit, stand, or walk. They list to the side or abruptly veer when walking. The affected limbs are often hypotonic. In pontine lesions, ataxia is accompanied by weakness and pyramidal tract signs as part of an ataxic hemiparesis syndrome. In lesions affecting the superior cerebellum and the brachium conjunctivum, limb dysmetria and overshoot and dysarthria predominate and gait ataxia is absent or slight and transient. Infarcts affecting the thalamus can cause gait instability and astasia with ataxia. Lateral thalamic lesions are characterized by hemisensory symptoms, extrapyramidal limb postures and dysfunction, and gait ataxia. Lesions that affect the posterior limb of the internal capsule and its afferent and efferent projections may also cause an ataxic hemiparesis syndrome, often with accompanying hemisensory abnormalities.

  12. Friedreich ataxia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Delatycki, M.; Williamson, R.; Forrest, S.

    2000-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, is the most common of the inherited ataxias. The recent discovery of the gene that is mutated in this condition, FRDA, has led to rapid advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of Friedreich ataxia. About 98% of mutant alleles have an expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in intron 1 of the gene. This leads to reduced levels of the protein, frataxin. There is mounting evidence to suggest that Friedreich ataxia is the result of accumulation of iron in mitochondria leading to excess production of free radicals, which then results in cellular damage and death. Currently there is no known treatment that alters the natural course of the disease. The discovery of the FRDA gene and its possible function has raised hope that rational therapeutic strategies will be developed.


Keywords: Friedreich ataxia; FRDA gene PMID:10633128

  13. Infantile childhood onset of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Santorelli, Filippo; Bertini, Enrico; Balestri, Martina; Cursi, Laura; Tessa, Alessandra; Pierelli, Francesco; Casali, Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a late-onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia caused by triplet CAG/CTG expansion in the ATX2 gene. The initial symptoms usually appear when subjects are in their 30s.Pediatric onset is less common and usually associated with larger triplet expansions. We here report the case of a 1-year-old girl who presented with facial dysmorphism,dystonic features, developmental delay, and retinitis pigmentosa.She was diagnosed as carrying an expanded CAG/CTG tract (92 repeats) before a molecular diagnosis of SCA2 was made in her father. Facial dysmorphism associated with developmental delay and retinitis pigmentosa in early childhood should prompt a careful family investigation for ataxia and study of ATX2.

  14. Clinical variability in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Ebba; Krüger, Stefanie; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Guven, Gamze; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan; Biskup, Saskia; Gasser, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease characterized by progressive childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, choreoathetosis and telangiectasias of the conjunctivae. Further symptoms may be immunodeficiency and frequent infections, and an increased risk of malignancy. As well as this classic manifestation, several other non-classic forms exist, including milder or incomplete A-T phenotypes caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATM gene. Recently, ATM mutations have been found in 13 Canadian Mennonites with early-onset, isolated, predominantly cervical dystonia, in a French family with generalized dystonia and in an Indian family with dopa-responsive cervical dystonia. In this article, we will describe a Turkish family with three affected sibs. Their phenotypes range from pure cervical dystonia associated with hand tremor to truncal and more generalized dystonic postures. Exome sequencing has revealed the potentially pathogenic compound heterozygous variants p.V2716A and p.G301VfsX19 in the ATM gene. The variants segregated perfectly with the phenotypes within the family. Both mutations detected in ATM have been shown to be pathogenic, and the α-fetoprotein, a marker of ataxia telangiectasia, was found to be increased. This report supports recent literature showing that ATM mutations are not exclusively associated with A-T but may also cause a more, even intra-familial variable phenotype in particular in association with dystonia.

  15. Longitudinal cerebral blood flow changes during speech in hereditary ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Groshung, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron Emission Tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a group of seven right-handed subjects with hereditary ataxia (6 females and 1 male, 3 SCA1 and 4 SCA5, aged 38.3 +/− 18.9 years). The decline in blood flow was greatest in cerebellar regions. In contrast, blood flow actually increased during speech production in the classic speech area (Broca’s area) but not in its right hemisphere homologue at the second evaluation. This increase in cortical flow may have been compensatory for cerebellar degeneration as speech intelligibility did not decline significantly during this period. Compensation was not complete, though, as syllable timing shifted in the direction of equal syllable duration, one of the characteristics of ataxic dysarthria. These results are consistent with previous functional imaging studies of ataxia demonstrating a pattern of brain activity that reflects both loss of function and relative compensation when clinical signs and symptoms are still mild. The combination of disease-relevant tasks, behavioral measurement, and functional imaging may provide insight into the early changes associated with neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20417959

  16. Nutritional cerebellar degeneration, with comments on its relationship to Wernicke disease and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Laureno, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional cerebellar degeneration occurs in alcoholism and other states that predispose to malnutrition, such as gastric bypass surgery. Gait ataxia is the principal clinical manifestation. Ataxia of the lower limbs is not uncommon, but upper extremity ataxia and nystagmus are rare. Atrophy of the anterior superior vermis is the primary pathological manifestation in established disease. Typically, the onset is subacute. This cerebellar disease is part of the spectrum of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, i.e. the cerebellar manifestation of Wernicke disease. It may occur with other lesions of Wernicke disease or in isolation. Rarely, with florid disease, lesions may be hemorrhagic. Active disease should be treated with thiamine in the same way that one treats Wernicke disease. Clinicopathologic correlation in this disease has provided the best evidence that the anterior superior vermis is important in coordinating bipedal locomotion.

  17. Hypocupremia: A Possible Association with Late Cortical Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Machado, Duarte G.

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a patient, diagnosed with late cortical cerebellar atrophy, who had persistent low serum copper levels. Case report A 48-year-old male developed progressive difficulty with balance, frequent falls, and dysarthric speech, which worsened over a short time span. He had an extensive ataxia work-up, which was unremarkable except for persistent low serum copper levels despite adequate supplementation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed marked cerebellar atrophy. The patient experienced progressive worsening of symptoms, which did not improve with either oral or parenteral copper supplementation. Discussion To our knowledge, ours is the first case report of late cortical cerebellar atrophy in the setting of low serum copper levels. The current report should trigger further research in mechanisms leading to copper deficiency and its possible role in cerebellar disease. PMID:25247109

  18. Progressive gait ataxia following deep brain stimulation for essential tremor: adverse effect or lack of efficacy?

    PubMed

    Reich, Martin M; Brumberg, Joachim; Pozzi, Nicolò G; Marotta, Giorgio; Roothans, Jonas; Åström, Mattias; Musacchio, Thomas; Lopiano, Leonardo; Lanotte, Michele; Lehrke, Ralph; Buck, Andreas K; Volkmann, Jens; Isaias, Ioannis U

    2016-09-21

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation is a mainstay treatment for severe and drug-refractory essential tremor, but postoperative management may be complicated in some patients by a progressive cerebellar syndrome including gait ataxia, dysmetria, worsening of intention tremor and dysarthria. Typically, this syndrome manifests several months after an initially effective therapy and necessitates frequent adjustments in stimulation parameters. There is an ongoing debate as to whether progressive ataxia reflects a delayed therapeutic failure due to disease progression or an adverse effect related to repeated increases of stimulation intensity. In this study we used a multimodal approach comparing clinical stimulation responses, modelling of volume of tissue activated and metabolic brain maps in essential tremor patients with and without progressive ataxia to disentangle a disease-related from a stimulation-induced aetiology. Ten subjects with stable and effective bilateral thalamic stimulation were stratified according to the presence (five subjects) of severe chronic-progressive gait ataxia. We quantified stimulated brain areas and identified the stimulation-induced brain metabolic changes by multiple (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography performed with and without active neurostimulation. Three days after deactivating thalamic stimulation and following an initial rebound of symptom severity, gait ataxia had dramatically improved in all affected patients, while tremor had worsened to the presurgical severity, thus indicating a stimulation rather than disease-related phenomenon. Models of the volume of tissue activated revealed a more ventrocaudal stimulation in the (sub)thalamic area of patients with progressive gait ataxia. Metabolic maps of both patient groups differed by an increased glucose uptake in the cerebellar nodule of patients with gait ataxia. Our data suggest that chronic progressive gait ataxia in essential tremor is a reversible cerebellar

  19. Causes of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Type 2 (AOA1 and AOA2). Affects the Nervous System The various abnormal genes that cause ataxia have ... cord. The details of which parts of the nervous system are most affected vary with the different types ...

  20. Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cookies ? Yes Wait Leave Provided by OpenGlobal E-commerce Please wait while your page loads ... FARA Cure ... Help Ways to Donate rideATAXIA Team FARA FARA Energy Ball Grassroots Fundraising Fundraising Tools Raising Awareness Advocacy ...

  1. National Ataxia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in San Antonio! Charity Navigator Awards NAF Four-Star Rating Charity Navigator, America’s premier charity evaluator, has ... Ataxia Foundation received a four out of four star rating. This is the fourth consecutive year NAF ...

  2. Cerebellar Degeneration as Presenting Symptom of Recurrent Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma with Sex-Cord Elements

    PubMed Central

    Gliem, Michael; Panayotopoulos, Dimitris; Feindt, Peter; Heikaus, Sebastian; Fleisch, Markus C.; Seitz, Rüdiger J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a 66-year-old woman with slowly progressive ataxia due to cerebellar atrophy. Imaging studies revealed multiple lesions in both the lungs and dorsal subpleural space. A biopsy identified the lesions as metastases of a low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma containing sex-cord elements. The histological appearance was identical to a uterine tumor the patient was treated for with hysterectomy 16 years before. The metastases were removed surgically, and after 3 months ataxia had regressed. We conclude that the presenting cerebellar degeneration in this patient resulted from the metastatic recurrence of the endometrial tumor. PMID:21490714

  3. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tracey D; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K; Griggs, Robert C; Bundy, Brian N; Jen, Joanna C; Baloh, Robert W; Hanna, Michael G

    2014-04-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15-65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0-40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0-14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean=50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1 phenocopies

  4. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Tracey D.; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F.; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K.; Griggs, Robert C.; Bundy, Brian N.; Jen, Joanna C.; Baloh, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15–65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0–40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0–14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean = 50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1

  5. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  6. [Anatomical and clinical correlations in the cerebellar eredodegeneration].

    PubMed

    Pea, Umberto; de Luca, Francesco; Nicola, Massimiliano; Galli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Spinocerebellar hereditary degeneration makes up a heterogeneous group of diseases headed by Strumpell-Lorrain syndrome and Friedreich's disease. They are a heterogeneous group characterized by spasticity and paraplegia and related to demyelinization of the pyramidal tract and of the posterior cordons. During a 4-year period, we studied 14 patients (42-61 years old) suffering cerebellar eredodegeneration (hereditary ataxia). The aim of our work was to correlate anatomopathological findings with clinical signs. The important role played by the cerebellum in vesicosphincterial coordination was shown; in particular severe alteration of the ponto-cerebellar bundles could be cause of the abnormal behaviour of the detrusor.

  7. The spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus is located within a 3-cm interval on chromosome 12q23-24.1

    SciTech Connect

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Cemal, C.

    1995-07-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a predominantly cerebellar syndrome of onset with gait ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria, and dysdiadochokinesia. Pathologically, the disorders are characterized by premature neuronal loss in the cerebellar cortex and the inferior olivary and pontine nuclei, with degeneration of the spinal cord. We have previously assigned the spinocerebellar ataxia 2 locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1, within a 31-cM interval flanked by the loci D12S58 and PLA2. Linkage to SCA2 has been demonstrated in pedigrees from Europe, Japan, and North America, the latter serving to refine the candidate region to a 16-cM interval. We report here genetic analysis undertaken between SCA2 and nine microsatellite loci known to span 8 cM within this interval. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A case report of patient with cerebellar variant of stiff person syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maludzińska, Ewa; Rudzińska, Monika; Stępień, Artur; Szczudlik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurological disorder with antibodies against antigens involved in neurotransmission of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). About 10% of patients with SPS may develop ataxia. This cerebellar variant is a distinct subset of SPS with more severe and complex clinical phenotype. We report the clinical, neuropsychological and neuroradiological findings in a 39-year-old female with cerebellar variant of SPS.

  9. Impact of cerebellar atrophy on cortical gray matter and cerebellar peduncles as assessed by voxel-based morphometry and high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Michael; Olivito, Giusy; Molinari, Marco; Cercignani, Mara; Bozzali, Marco; Leggio, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary In recent years the cerebellum has been attributed a more important role in higher-level functions than previously believed. We examined a cohort of patients suffering from cerebellar atrophy resulting in ataxia, with two main objectives: first to investigate which regions of the cerebrum were affected by the cerebellar degeneration, and second to assess whether diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) metrics within the medial (MCP) and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) – namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) – could be used as a biomarker in patients with this condition. Structural and dMRI data of seven patients with cerebellar atrophy (2 with spinocerebellar atrophy type 2, 1 with Friedreich’s ataxia, 4 with idiopathic cerebellar ataxia) and no visible cortical lesions or cortical atrophy were investigated with Freesurfer and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter (GM) as well as MCP and SCP FA maps. Correlations of MCP and SCP mean FA with ataxia scores and subscores were also evaluated. Freesurfer showed that patients had significantly reduced volume of the thalamus, ventral diencephalon and pallidum. VBM also demonstrated significantly lower local GM volumes in patients, notably in the head of the caudate nucleus, posterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally, as well as in Broca’s area in the left hemisphere, and a significant increase in RD in the MCP and SCP of both hemispheres. A significant correlation was found between MCP mean FA and total ataxia score (R=−0.7, p=0.03), and subscores for kinetic functions (R=−0.74, p=0.03) and oculomotor disorders (R=−0.70, p=0.04). The regions of the cerebrum found to have significantly lower local GM volumes have been described to be involved in higher-level cerebellar functions such as initiation of voluntary movements, emotional control, memory retrieval and general cognition. Our findings corroborate recent research pointing to a more

  10. Ataxia Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 in the Siblings of a Family: A Novel Mutation

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; KHAYATZADEH KAKHKI, Simin; ESMAIL NEJAD, Shaghayegh Sadat; HOUSHMAND, Masood; GHOFRANI, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Although AOA1 (ataxia oculomotor apraxia1) is one of the most common causes of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias in Japanese population, it is reported from all over the world. The clinical manifestations are similar to ataxia telangiectasia in which non-neurological manifestations are absent and include almost 10% of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias. Dysarthria and gait disorder are the most two common and typical manifestations. Oculomotor apraxia is usually seen a few years after the manifestations start. APTX gene on 9p13.3 chromosome is expressed in the cells of all human body tissues and different mutations had been discovered. Here we report two siblings (a girl and a boy) of consanguineous parents visited at Mofid Pediatrics Hospital in 2015, with history of gait ataxia, titubation, tremor, and oculomotor apraxia around five yr old and after that. The brother showed symptoms of disease earlier and more severe than his sister did. After ruling out the common etiologies of progressive ataxia, we did genetic study for AOA1 that showed a homozygous frameshift mutation as c.418_418 del was found. This mutation was not reported before so this was a new mutation in APTX gene. PMID:28277561

  11. Severe ataxia due to injuries of neural tract detected by diffusion tensor tractography in a patient with pontine hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We examined injuries of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract (DRTT), cortico-ponto-cerebellar tract (CPCT), dorsal spinocerebellar tract (SCT), and inferior cerebellar peduncle (ICP) in a patient with severe ataxia following bilateral tegmental pontine hemorrhage (PH), using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: A 75-year-old female patient underwent conservative management for bilateral tegmental PH. She presented with moderate motor weakness, severe resting and intentional tremor on both hands, and severe truncal ataxia (Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia [25 points/0–40 points: a higher score indicates a worse state]), and she was not able to sit independently. Diagnoses and outcomes: On DTT taken at 2 weeks after initial presentation, both DRTTs and the left dorsal SCT were not reconstructed, whereas the CPCTs showed thinning of the entire pathways between the primary sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum in both hemispheres. The right ICP was discontinued at the transverse cerebellar branch of the ICP and thinning of the left ICP was observed in the vertical and transverse cerebellar branch of the ICP. Lessons: Using DTT, concurrent injuries of the DRTT, CPCT, dorsal SCT, and ICP were demonstrated in a patient with severe ataxia following PH. Our result suggests the necessity of evaluation of these neural tracts in patients who develop ataxia after brain injury. PMID:27977594

  12. What Is Ataxia-Telangiectasia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... what led to naming this disease "ataxia-telangiectasia." Immune System Problems... For most (about 70 percent) of children ... A-T patients, the combination of a weakened immune system and the progressive ataxia can ultimately lead to ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ebers GC. A genome-wide screen and linkage mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia. Neurology. ... investigators. Primary episodic ataxias: diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment. Brain. 2007 Oct;130(Pt 10):2484-93. Epub ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  15. A comprehensive review of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Julio Cesar; Almaguer-Mederos, Luis Enrique; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel

    2011-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia characterized by a progressive cerebellar syndrome associated to saccadic slowing, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive disorders, and other multisystem features. SCA2 is caused by the abnormal expansion of cytosine-adenine-guanine triplet repeats in the encoding region of the ATXN2 gene and therefore the expression of toxic polyglutamine expansions in the ataxin 2 protein, which cause progressive neuronal death of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and several pontine, mesencephalic, and thalamic neurons among other cells. Worldwide, SCA2 is the second most frequent type of spinocerebellar ataxia, only surpassed by SCA3. Nevertheless, in Holguin, Cuba, the disease reaches the highest prevalence, resulting from a putative foundational effect. This review discusses the most important advances in the genotypical and phenotypical studies of SCA2, highlighting the comprehensive characterization reached in Cuba through clinical, neuroepidemiological, neurochemical, and neurophysiological evaluation of SCA2 patients and pre-symptomatic subjects, which has allowed the identification of new disease biomarkers and therapeutical opportunities. These findings provide guidelines, from a Cuban viewpoint, for the clinical management of the disease, its diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapeutical options through rehabilitative therapy and/or pharmacological options.

  16. MME mutation in dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with neuropathy (SCA43)

    PubMed Central

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Rai, Myriam; Wang, François Charles; Manto, Mario; Simonis, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the causative gene mutation in a 5-generation Belgian family with dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia and polyneuropathy, in which known genetic etiologies had been excluded. Methods: We collected DNA samples of 28 family members, including 7 living affected individuals, whose clinical records were reviewed by a neurologist experienced in ataxia. We combined linkage data of 21 family members with whole exome sequencing in 2 affected individuals to identify shared heterozygous variants mapping to potentially linked regions. Variants were screened for rarity and for predicted damaging effect. A candidate mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and tested for cosegregation with the disease. Results: Affected individuals presented with late-onset sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy; all but one also had cerebellar ataxia. We identified a variant in the MME gene, p.C143Y, that was absent from control databases, cosegregated with the phenotype, and was predicted to have a strong damaging effect on the encoded protein by all algorithms we used. Conclusions: MME encodes neprilysin (NEP), a zinc-dependent metalloprotease expressed in most tissues, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. The mutated cysteine 143 forms a disulfide bridge, which is 100% conserved in NEP and in similar enzymes. The recent identification of recessive MME mutations in 10 unrelated individuals from Japan with axonal polyneuropathy further supports the causality of the mutation, despite the dominant mode of inheritance and the presence of cerebellar involvement in our study family. Functional studies are needed to identify the mechanisms underlying these differences. PMID:27583304

  17. The first knockin mouse model of episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Kriener, Lisa H; Heinzer, Ann K; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Hess, Ellen J

    2014-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with attacks of ataxia that are typically precipitated by stress, ethanol, caffeine or exercise. EA2 is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the α1A subunit of the CaV2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. To better understand the pathomechanisms of this disorder in vivo, we created the first genetic animal model of EA2 by engineering a mouse line carrying the EA2-causing c.4486T>G (p.F1406C) missense mutation in the orthologous mouse Cacna1a gene. Mice homozygous for the mutated allele exhibit a ~70% reduction in CaV2.1 current density in Purkinje cells, though surprisingly do not exhibit an overt motor phenotype. Mice hemizygous for the knockin allele (EA2/- mice) did exhibit motor dysfunction measurable by rotarod and pole test. Studies using Cre-flox conditional genetics explored the role of cerebellar Purkinje cells or cerebellar granule cells in the poor motor performance of EA2/- mice and demonstrate that manipulation of either cell type alone did not cause poor motor performance. Thus, it is possible that subtle dysfunction arising from multiple cell types is necessary for the expression of certain ataxia syndromes.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Dupré N, Gros-Louis F, Chrestian N, Verreault S, Brunet D, de Verteuil D, Brais B, Bouchard ... F, Dupré N, Dion P, Fox MA, Laurent S, Verreault S, Sanes JR, Bouchard JP, Rouleau GA. Mutations in ...

  19. Quantitative analysis of upper-limb ataxia in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Naohisa; Hakii, Yasuhito; Koyano, Shigeru; Higashiyama, Yuichi; Joki, Hideto; Baba, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yume; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-07-01

    Spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which cerebellar ataxia causes motor disability. There are no widely applicable methods for objective evaluation of ataxia in SCD. An objective system to evaluate ataxia is necessary for use in clinical trials of newly developed medication and rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to quantify the degree of upper-limb ataxia. Forty-nine patients with SCD participated in this study. Patients were instructed to trace an Archimedean spiral template, and the gap between the template spiral and the drawn spiral (gap area; GA) was measured using Image J software. Ataxia was rated using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and cerebellar volume was evaluated in 37 patients using an axial cross-section of magnetic resonance images that were obtained within 6 months of clinical evaluation. Regression analysis was performed to assess the relation between GA and patient age, disease duration, SARA score, and cerebellar volume. GA was significantly related to total SARA score (r = 0.660, p < 0.001), the posture and gait (r = 0.551, p < 0.001), speech (r = 0.527, p < 0.001), hand movements (r = 0.553, p < 0.001), and heel-shin slide (r = 0.367, p = 0.036) SARA subscores, and cerebellar volume (r = 0.577, p < 0.001) but was not related to patient age (r = 0.176, p = 0.227) or disease duration (r = 0.236, p = 0.103). GA is a simple, useful method to objectively quantify the degree of cerebellar ataxia, especially upper-limb ataxia, and can be widely adopted in various settings, including clinical trials.

  20. Principal component analysis of cerebellar shape on MRI separates SCA types 2 and 6 into two archetypal modes of degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jung, Brian C; Choi, Soo I; Du, Annie X; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Geng, Zhuo Z; Ying, Howard S; Perlman, Susan L; Toga, Arthur W; Prince, Jerry L; Ying, Sarah H

    2012-12-01

    Although "cerebellar ataxia" is often used in reference to a disease process, presumably there are different underlying pathogenetic mechanisms for different subtypes. Indeed, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 2 and 6 demonstrate complementary phenotypes, thus predicting a different anatomic pattern of degeneration. Here, we show that an unsupervised classification method, based on principal component analysis (PCA) of cerebellar shape characteristics, can be used to separate SCA2 and SCA6 into two classes, which may represent disease-specific archetypes. Patients with SCA2 (n=11) and SCA6 (n=7) were compared against controls (n=15) using PCA to classify cerebellar anatomic shape characteristics. Within the first three principal components, SCA2 and SCA6 differed from controls and from each other. In a secondary analysis, we studied five additional subjects and found that these patients were consistent with the previously defined archetypal clusters of clinical and anatomical characteristics. Secondary analysis of five subjects with related diagnoses showed that disease groups that were clinically and pathophysiologically similar also shared similar anatomic characteristics. Specifically, Archetype #1 consisted of SCA3 (n=1) and SCA2, suggesting that cerebellar syndromes accompanied by atrophy of the pons may be associated with a characteristic pattern of cerebellar neurodegeneration. In comparison, Archetype #2 was comprised of disease groups with pure cerebellar atrophy (episodic ataxia type 2 (n=1), idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxias (n=3), and SCA6). This suggests that cerebellar shape analysis could aid in discriminating between different pathologies. Our findings further suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a promising imaging biomarker that could aid in the diagnosis and therapeutic management in patients with cerebellar syndromes.

  1. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration.

  2. Biallelic mutations in SNX14 cause a syndromic form of cerebellar atrophy and lysosome-autophagosome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Akizu, Naiara; Cantagrel, Vincent; Zaki, Maha S.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wang, Xin; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Dikoglu, Esra; Gelot, Antoinette Bernabe; Rosti, Basak; Vaux, Keith K.; Scott, Eric M.; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Schroth, Jana; Copeland, Brett; Schaffer, Ashleigh E.; Gordts, Philip; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Buschman, Matthew D.; Fields, Seth J.; Napolitano, Gennaro; Ozgul, R. Koksal; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Azam, Matloob; Ismail, Samira; Aglan, Mona; Selim, Laila; Gamal, Iman; Hadi, Sawsan Abdel; El Badawy, Amera; Sadek, Abdelrahim A.; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Kayserili, Hulya; Masri, Amira; Bastaki, Laila; Temtamy, Samia; Müller, Ulrich; Desguerre, Isabelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Dursun, Ali; Gunel, Murat; Gabriel, Stacey B.; de Lonlay, Pascale; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric-onset ataxias often present clinically with developmental delay and intellectual disability, with prominent cerebellar atrophy as a key neuroradiographic finding. Here we describe a novel clinically distinguishable recessive syndrome in 12 families with cerebellar atrophy together with ataxia, coarsened facial features and intellectual disability, due to truncating mutations in sorting nexin 14 (SNX14), encoding a ubiquitously expressed modular PX-domain-containing sorting factor. We found SNX14 localized to lysosomes, and associated with phosphatidyl-inositol (3,5)P2, a key component of late endosomes/lysosomes. Patient cells showed engorged lysosomes and slower autophagosome clearance rate upon starvation induction. Zebrafish morphants showed dramatic loss of cerebellar parenchyma, accumulated autophagosomes, and activation of apoptosis. Our results suggest a unique ataxia syndrome due to biallelic SNX14 mutations, leading to lysosome-autophagosome dysfunction. PMID:25848753

  3. Friedreich's Ataxia (FA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Friedreich’s Ataxia Updated December 2009 Michelle Moffitt Smith Michelle and James Smith at their wedding Dear Friends: W hen I ... for a doctorate. I met my husband, James Smith, through MDA’s magazine, Quest. He also has a ...

  4. Location of lesion determines motor vs. cognitive consequences in patients with cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, Catherine J; MacMore, Jason P; Makris, Nikos; Sherman, Janet C; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar lesions can cause motor deficits and/or the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS; Schmahmann's syndrome). We used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to test the hypothesis that the cerebellar motor syndrome results from anterior lobe damage whereas lesions in the posterolateral cerebellum produce the CCAS. Eighteen patients with isolated cerebellar stroke (13 males, 5 females; 20-66 years old) were evaluated using measures of ataxia and neurocognitive ability. Patients showed a wide range of motor and cognitive performance, from normal to severely impaired; individual deficits varied according to lesion location within the cerebellum. Patients with damage to cerebellar lobules III-VI had worse ataxia scores: as predicted, the cerebellar motor syndrome resulted from lesions involving the anterior cerebellum. Poorer performance on fine motor tasks was associated primarily with strokes affecting the anterior lobe extending into lobule VI, with right-handed finger tapping and peg-placement associated with damage to the right cerebellum, and left-handed finger tapping associated with left cerebellar damage. Patients with the CCAS in the absence of cerebellar motor syndrome had damage to posterior lobe regions, with lesions leading to significantly poorer scores on language (e.g. right Crus I and II extending through IX), spatial (bilateral Crus I, Crus II, and right lobule VIII), and executive function measures (lobules VII-VIII). These data reveal clinically significant functional regions underpinning movement and cognition in the cerebellum, with a broad anterior-posterior distinction. Motor and cognitive outcomes following cerebellar damage appear to reflect the disruption of different cerebro-cerebellar motor and cognitive loops.

  5. [Adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia. A clinical and therapeutic observation].

    PubMed

    Gazulla, J; Benavente, I; Sarasa Barrio, M

    2006-10-01

    A case of adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is presented, with debut at the age of 18 years and survival into the fourth decade. The clinical picture included cerebellar ataxia, distal weakness and hypopalesthesia in the lower limbs, oculomotor apraxia, dysarthria, and conjunctival telangiectasiae. Carcinoembrionic antigen was raised in plasma. MR imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and thinning of the spinal cord. Deficiencies of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate have been found in the cerebellar cortex in a case of AT. These were attributed to the loss of Purkinje cells and granule cells. In spite of some ataxias having improved with the gabaergic drugs gabapentin and tiagabine, the administration of gabapentin, acetazolamide and a placebo, did not benefit this patient. Pregabalin, 225 mg/day, ameliorated the ataxia unexpectedly, with further improvement after the addition of tiagabine. The authors suggest that the beneficial effect observed might have been due, either to the higher affinity of pregabalin towards alpha2-delta, a subtype of the alpha2-delta subunit which forms part of the voltage-gated calcium channel; either to the profusion of this subtype in the Purkinje cell layer, or to its larger capacity to let calcium into the neuron; or to the combination of these. These differences with gabapentin could explain the higher power of pregabalin in the stimulation of the cerebellar structures, thus justifying the improvement of ataxia in this case of AT. A synergistic effect with pregabalin is proposed as the cause of the improvement obtained with the addition of tiagabine.

  6. Childhood Ataxia: Clinical Features, Pathogenesis, Key Unanswered Questions, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Claire N.; Hoang, Kelly D.; Lynch, David R.; Perlman, Susan L.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood ataxia is characterized by impaired balance and coordination primarily due to cerebellar dysfunction. Friedreich ataxia, a form of childhood ataxia, is the most common multisystem autosomal recessive disease. Most of these patients are homozygous for the GAA repeat expansion located on the first intron of the frataxin gene on chromosome 9. Mutations in the frataxin gene impair mitochondrial function, increase reactive oxygen species, and trigger redistribution of iron in the mitochondria and cytosol. Targeted therapies for Friedreich ataxia are undergoing testing. In addition, a centralized database, patient registry, and natural history study have been launched to support clinical trials in Friedreich ataxia. The 2011 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 40th annual Child Neurology Society meeting, aimed to (1) describe clinical features surrounding Friedreich ataxia, including cardiomyopathy and genetics; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of Friedreich ataxia and developments of clinical trials; (3) review new investigations of characteristic symptoms; (4) establish clinical and biochemical overlaps in neurodegenerative diseases and possible directions for future basic, translational, and clinical studies. PMID:22859693

  7. The inherited ataxias: genetic heterogeneity, mutation databases, and future directions in research and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hersheson, Joshua; Haworth, Andrea; Houlden, Henry

    2012-09-01

    The inherited cerebellar ataxias are a diverse group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. Inheritance patterns of these disorders can be complex with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance demonstrated by one or more ataxic syndromes. The broad range of mutation types found in inherited ataxia contributes to the complex genetic etiology of these disorders. The majority of inherited ataxias are caused by repeat expansions; however, conventional mutations are important causes of the rarer dominant and recessive ataxias. Advances in sequencing technology have allowed for much broader testing of these rare ataxia genes. This is relevant to the aims of the Human Variome Project, which aims to collate and store gene variation data through mutation databases. Variant data is currently located in a range of public and commercial resources. Few locus-specific databases have been created to catalogue variation in the dominant ataxia genes although there are several databases for some recessive genes. Developing these resources will facilitate a better understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype relationships in these disorders and assist interpretation of gene variants as testing for rarer ataxia genes becomes commonplace.

  8. TMEM240 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 21 with mental retardation and severe cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Delplanque, Jérôme; Devos, David; Huin, Vincent; Genet, Alexandre; Sand, Olivier; Moreau, Caroline; Goizet, Cyril; Charles, Perrine; Anheim, Mathieu; Monin, Marie Lorraine; Buée, Luc; Destée, Alain; Grolez, Guillaume; Delmaire, Christine; Dujardin, Kathy; Dellacherie, Delphine; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Strubi-Vuillaume, Isabelle; Dürr, Alexandra; Sablonnière, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia corresponds to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that primarily affect the cerebellum. Here, we report the identification of the causative gene in spinocerebellar ataxia 21, an autosomal-dominant disorder previously mapped to chromosome 7p21.3-p15.1. This ataxia was firstly characterized in a large French family with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, accompanied by severe cognitive impairment and mental retardation in two young children. Following the recruitment of 12 additional young family members, linkage analysis enabled us to definitively map the disease locus to chromosome 1p36.33-p36.32. The causative mutation, (c.509C>T/p.P170L) in the transmembrane protein gene TMEM240, was identified by whole exome sequencing and then was confirmed by Sanger sequencing and co-segregation analyses. Index cases from 368 French families with autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia were also screened for mutations. In seven cases, we identified a range of missense mutations (c.509C>T/p.P170L, c.239C>T/p.T80M, c.346C>T/p.R116C, c.445G>A/p.E149K, c.511C>T/p.R171W), and a stop mutation (c.489C>G/p.Y163*) in the same gene. TMEM240 is a small, strongly conserved transmembrane protein of unknown function present in cerebellum and brain. Spinocerebellar ataxia 21 may be a particular early-onset disease associated with severe cognitive impairment.

  9. Parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synaptic impairment in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 27

    PubMed Central

    Tempia, Filippo; Hoxha, Eriola; Negro, Giulia; Alshammari, Musaad A.; Alshammari, Tahani K.; Panova-Elektronova, Neli; Laezza, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Genetically inherited mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) gene lead to spinocerebellar ataxia type 27 (SCA27), an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by heterogeneous motor and cognitive impairments. Consistently, genetic deletion of Fgf14 in Fgf14−/− mice recapitulates salient features of the SCA27 human disease. In vitro molecular studies in cultured neurons indicate that the FGF14F145S SCA27 allele acts as a dominant negative mutant suppressing the FGF14 wild type function and resulting in inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels. To gain insights in the cerebellar deficits in the animal model of the human disease, we applied whole-cell voltage-clamp in the acute cerebellar slice preparation to examine the properties of parallel fibers (PF) to Purkinje neuron synapses in Fgf14−/− mice and wild type littermates. We found that the AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by PF stimulation (PF-EPSCs) were significantly reduced in Fgf14−/− animals, while short-term plasticity, measured as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), was enhanced. Measuring Sr2+-induced release of quanta from stimulated synapses, we found that the size of the PF-EPSCs was unchanged, ruling out a postsynaptic deficit. This phenotype was corroborated by decreased expression of VGLUT1, a specific presynaptic marker at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses. We next examined the mGluR1 receptor-induced response (mGluR1-EPSC) that under normal conditions requires a gradual build-up of glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, and found no changes in these responses in Fgf14−/− mice. These results provide evidence of a critical role of FGF14 in maintaining presynaptic function at PF-Purkinje neuron synapses highlighting critical target mechanisms to recapitulate the complexity of the SCA27 disease. PMID:26089778

  10. Postinfectious Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome in a 41-Year-Old Patient-Visualizing Hyperactivation in Deep Cerebellar Nuclei by Cerebral [(18) F]-FDG- PET.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mona; Levin, Johannes; Schöberl, Florian; Rominger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman presented with acute onset headache, vertigo, nausea, and gait disorder, initially interpreted as a common cold. Within 2 weeks, she developed a severe opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome with truncal ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and serological findings suggested a recent infection with Coxsackie B3 virus. [(18) F]-FDG-PET proved to be the only imaging tool to identify the underlying pathology depicting hyperactivation in the vestibulo- and spinocerebellum as well as hyperactivation of the ocular muscles. At the clinical follow-up 4 months later, the patient's symptoms were considerably improved with only intermittent low-frequency opsoclonus. Corresponding PET findings were able to depict the response to therapy in the ocular muscles and the inferior vermis, whereas the deep cerebellar nuclei were still hyperactivated, however, to a lesser extent. This finding highlights the usefulness of functional/metabolic brain imaging to study the pathophysiology of this type of disorder.

  11. Sensorimotor processing for balance in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Bunn, Lisa M.; Marsden, Jonathan F.; Voyce, Daniel C.; Giunti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated whether balance impairments caused by cerebellar disease are associated with specific sensorimotor processing deficits that generalize across all sensory modalities. Experiments focused on the putative cerebellar functions of scaling and coordinate transformation of balance responses evoked by stimulation of single sensory channels. Methods Vestibular, visual, and proprioceptive sensory channels were stimulated in isolation using galvanic vestibular stimulation, moving visual scenery, and muscle vibration, respectively, in 16 subjects with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and 16 matched healthy controls. Two polarities of each stimulus type evoked postural responses of similar form in the forward and backward directions. Disease severity was assessed using the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. Results Impaired balance of SCA6 subjects during unperturbed stance was reflected in faster than normal body sway (P = 0.009), which correlated with disease severity (r = 0.705, P < 0.001). Sensory perturbations revealed a sensorimotor processing abnormality that was specific to response scaling for the visual channel. This manifested as visually evoked postural responses that were approximately three times larger than normal (backward, P < 0.001; forward P = 0.005) and correlated with disease severity (r = 0.543, P = 0.03). Response direction and habituation properties were no different from controls for all three sensory modalities. Conclusion Cerebellar degeneration disturbs the scaling of postural responses evoked by visual motion, possibly through disinhibition of extracerebellar visuomotor centers. The excessively high gain of the visuomotor channel without compensatory decreases in gains of other sensorimotor channels provides a potential mechanism for instability of the balance control system in cerebellar disease. © 2015 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  12. A new autosomal recessive spastic ataxia associated with frequent white matter changes maps to 2q33-34.

    PubMed

    Thiffault, I; Rioux, M F; Tetreault, M; Jarry, J; Loiselle, L; Poirier, J; Gros-Louis, F; Mathieu, J; Vanasse, M; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J P; Lesage, J; Brais, B

    2006-09-01

    Recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of diseases. We identified a group of 23 French-Canadian cases belonging to 17 families affected by an autosomal recessive spastic ataxia associated with frequent white matter changes. The fact that 59% of these families have a genealogical relationship to the Portneuf County of Quebec suggests that this is a new form of ataxia with a regional founder effect. All cases present with cerebellar ataxia and spasticity. There is great intrafamilial and interfamilial variability, as illustrated by the spectrum of age of diagnosis (range: 2-59 years, mean: 15.0) and the presence of white matter changes on MRI in 52.4% of cases. The more severe cases have spasticity from birth, scoliosis, dystonia and cognitive impairment and were considered cases of cerebral palsy. Brain MRI constantly shows cerebellar atrophy, which in some cases may be associated with cortical atrophy, leucoencephalopathy and corpus callosum thinning. A genome wide scan uncovered linkage of three families to marker D2S2321 localized on chromosome 2q33-34. Linkage analysis confirmed that all families are linked to the same region [multipoint log of the odds (LOD) score of 5.95]. Haplotype analysis and allele sharing suggest that one common mutation may account for 97% of carrier chromosomes in Quebec. The uncovering of the mutated gene may point to a common pathway for pyramidal and cerebellar degeneration as both are often observed in recessive ataxias and complicated paraplegias.

  13. Antibodies to dendritic neuronal surface antigens in opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Jessica A; Anand, Ronan; Dalmau, Josep; Lynch, David R

    2015-09-15

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMAS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by rapid, random, conjugate eye movements (opsoclonus), myoclonus, and ataxia. Given these symptoms, autoantibodies targeting the cerebellum or brainstem could mediate the disease or be markers of autoimmunity. In a subset of patients with OMAS, we identified such autoantibodies, which bind to non-synaptic puncta on the surface of live cultured cerebellar and brainstem neuronal dendrites. These findings implicate autoimmunity to a neuronal surface antigen in the pathophysiology of OMAS. Identification of the targeted antigen(s) could elucidate the mechanisms underlying OMAS and provide a biomarker for diagnosis and response to therapy.

  14. Broad distribution of ataxin 1 silencing in rhesus cerebella for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Davidson, Beverly L

    2015-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is one of nine polyglutamine expansion diseases and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and neuronal degeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Currently, there are no effective therapies for this disease. Previously, we have shown that RNA interference mediated silencing of ATXN1 mRNA provides therapeutic benefit in mouse models of the disease. Adeno-associated viral delivery of an engineered microRNA targeting ATXN1 to the cerebella of well-established mouse models improved motor phenotypes, neuropathy, and transcriptional changes. Here, we test the translatability of this approach in adult rhesus cerebella. Nine adult male and three adult female rhesus macaque were unilaterally injected with our therapeutic vector, a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1 (rAAV1) expressing our RNAi trigger (miS1) and co-expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rAAV1.miS1eGFP) into the deep cerebellar nuclei using magnetic resonance imaging guided techniques combined with a Stealth Navigation system (Medtronics Inc.). Transduction was evident in the deep cerebellar nuclei, cerebellar Purkinje cells, the brainstem and the ventral lateral thalamus. Reduction of endogenous ATXN1 messenger RNA levels were ≥30% in the deep cerebellar nuclei, the cerebellar cortex, inferior olive, and thalamus relative to the uninjected hemisphere. There were no clinical complications, and quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that this therapeutic intervention strategy and subsequent reduction of ATXN1 is well tolerated. Collectively the data illustrate the biodistribution and tolerability of rAAV1.miS1eGFP administration to the adult rhesus cerebellum and are supportive of clinical application for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

  15. Cerebellar network plasticity: from genes to fast oscillation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Servais, L; Dan, B

    2008-04-22

    The role of the cerebellum has been increasingly recognized not only in motor control but in sensory, cognitive and emotional learning and regulation. Purkinje cells, being the sole output from the cerebellar cortex, occupy an integrative position in this network. Plasticity at this level is known to critically involve calcium signaling. In the last few years, electrophysiological study of genetically engineered mice has demonstrated the topical role of several genes encoding calcium-binding proteins (calretinin, calbindin, parvalbumin). Specific inactivation of these genes results in the emergence of a fast network oscillation (ca. 160 Hz) throughout the cerebellar cortex in alert animals, associated with ataxia. This oscillation is produced by synchronization of Purkinje cells along the parallel fiber beam. It behaves as an electrophysiological arrest rhythm, being blocked by sensorimotor stimulation. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the oscillation is blocked by GABA(A) and NMDA antagonists as well as gap junction blockers. This cerebellar network oscillation has also been documented in mouse models of human conditions with complex developmental cerebellar dysfunction, such as Angelman syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome. Recent evidence suggests a relationship between fast oscillation and cerebellar long term depression (LTD). This may have major implications for future therapeutic targeting.

  16. A gene for nystagmus-associated episodic ataxia maps to chromosome 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.L.; Root, D.; Gancher, S.

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by attacks of generalized ataxia and relatively normal neurological function between attacks. Onset occurs in childhood or adolescence and persists through adulthood. Penetrance is nearly complete. EA is clinically heterogeneous, including at least two distinct entities: (1) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting hours to days, generally with interictal nystagmus (MIM 108500); (2) episodes of ataxia and dysarthria lasting only minutes, with interictal myokymia (MMM 160120). The EA/nystagmus patients sometimes develop persistent ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Previously we reported linkage in four EA/myokymia families to a K{sup +} channel gene on chromosome 12p. We excluded this region in a large family with EA/nystagmus. We now report evidence for linkage to chromosome 19p in this and in one other EA/nystagmus family, based on eight microsatellite markers which span approximately 30 cM. The region is flanked distally by D19S209 and proximally by D19S226. All six markers within this region gave positive evidence for linkage; the highest total two-point lod scores occurred wtih D19S221 (3.98 at theta = 0.10) and D19S413 (3.37 at theta = 0.05). Interestingly, Joutel et al. (1993) mapped a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) to the region around D19S221. Some individuals in these families have ataxia, cerebellar atrophy and interictal nystagmus, but no episodic ataxia. These results demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity in EA reflects underlying genetic hetreogeneity. In addition, they suggest that EA/nystagmus and some FHM may represent different mutations in the same gene locus on chromosome 19p.

  17. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Pope, Paul A; Miall, R Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed "non-invasive brain stimulation" as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo-cortical disturbances.

  18. Non-invasive cerebellar stimulation--a consensus paper.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Argyropoulos, G P; Boehringer, A; Celnik, P; Edwards, M J; Ferrucci, R; Galea, J M; Groiss, S J; Hiraoka, K; Kassavetis, P; Lesage, E; Manto, M; Miall, R C; Priori, A; Sadnicka, A; Ugawa, Y; Ziemann, U

    2014-02-01

    The field of neurostimulation of the cerebellum either with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS; single pulse or repetitive (rTMS)) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; anodal or cathodal) is gaining popularity in the scientific community, in particular because these stimulation techniques are non-invasive and provide novel information on cerebellar functions. There is a consensus amongst the panel of experts that both TMS and tDCS can effectively influence cerebellar functions, not only in the motor domain, with effects on visually guided tracking tasks, motor surround inhibition, motor adaptation and learning, but also for the cognitive and affective operations handled by the cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Verbal working memory, semantic associations and predictive language processing are amongst these operations. Both TMS and tDCS modulate the connectivity between the cerebellum and the primary motor cortex, tuning cerebellar excitability. Cerebellar TMS is an effective and valuable method to evaluate the cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop functions and for the study of the pathophysiology of ataxia. In most circumstances, DCS induces a polarity-dependent site-specific modulation of cerebellar activity. Paired associative stimulation of the cerebello-dentato-thalamo-M1 pathway can induce bidirectional long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity-like changes of corticospinal excitability. However, the panel of experts considers that several important issues still remain unresolved and require further research. In particular, the role of TMS in promoting cerebellar plasticity is not established. Moreover, the exact positioning of electrode stimulation and the duration of the after effects of tDCS remain unclear. Future studies are required to better define how DCS over particular regions of the cerebellum affects individual cerebellar symptoms, given the topographical organization of cerebellar symptoms. The long-term neural consequences of non

  19. Speech prosody in Friedreich's and olivo-ponto cerebellar atrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    2004-05-01

    A critical issue in the study of speech motor control is the identification of the mechanisms that generate the temporal flow of serially ordered articulatory events. Two staged models of serial ordered events (Lashley, 1951; Lindblom, 1963) claim that time controls events whereas dynamic models predict a relative relation between time and space. Each of these models predicts a different relation between the acoustic measures of formant frequency and segmental duration. The most recent method described herein provides a sensitive index of speech deterioration which is both acoustically robust and phonetically systematic. Both acoustic and magnetic resonance imaging measures were used to describe the speech disturbance in two neurologically distinct groups of cerebellar ataxia: Friedreich's ataxia and olivo-ponto cerebellar ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four prosodic contrasts. All subjects read the same syllable embedded in a sentence, under six different prosodic conditions. Pair-wise comparisons derived from the six conditions were used to describe (1) final lengthening, (2) phrasal accent, (3) nuclear accent and (4) syllable reduction. An estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual and normal subects' acoustic values of syllable duration, formant and fundamental frequencies was used in correlation analyses with magnetic resonance imaging ratings.

  20. Parahippocampal gray matter alterations in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 identified by voxel based morphometry.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Hernández-Castillo, Carlos Roberto; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Pasaye, Erick H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2014-12-15

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a genetic disorder causing cerebellar degeneration that result in motor and cognitive alterations. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses have found neurodegenerative patterns associated to SCA2, but they show some discrepancies. Moreover, behavioral deficits related to non-cerebellar functions are scarcely discussed in those reports. In this work we use behavioral and cognitive tests and VBM to identify and confirm cognitive and gray matter alterations in SCA2 patients compared with control subjects. Also, we discuss the cerebellar and non-cerebellar functions affected by this disease. Our results confirmed gray matter reduction in the cerebellar vermis, pons, and insular, frontal, parietal and temporal cortices. However, our analysis also found unreported loss of gray matter in the parahippocampal gyrus bilaterally. Motor performance test ratings correlated with total gray and white matter reductions, but executive performance and clinical features such as CAG repetitions and disease progression did not show any correlation. This pattern of cerebellar and non-cerebellar morphological alterations associated with SCA2 has to be considered to fully understand the motor and non-motor deficits that include language production and comprehension and some social skill changes that occur in these patients.

  1. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst.

  2. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  3. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    .g., chronic progressive limbic Encephalitis, Paraneoplastic Encephalitis or Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis), Schizophrenia, Mania, Stroke, or Sjorgen syndrome. In some patients, the anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are present in both the serum and the CSF. Some of the anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies cross-react with dsDNA, while others do not. Some of the anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies associate with neuropsychiatric/cognitive/behavior/mood impairments in SLE patients, while others do not. The anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies can undoubtedly be very pathogenic, since they can kill neurons by activating NMDA receptors and inducing 'Excitotoxicity', damage the brain, cause dramatic decrease of membranal NMDA receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons, and also induce behavioral cognitive impairments in animal models. Yet, the concentration of the anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies seems to determine if they have positive or negative effects on the activity of glutamate receptors and on the survival of neurons. Thus, at low concentration, the anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies were found to be positive modulators of receptor function and increase the size of NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials, whereas at high concentration they are pathogenic as they promote 'Excitotoxcity' through enhanced mitochondrial permeability transition. (4) Anti-mGluR1 antibodies were found thus far in very few patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Ataxia, and in these patients they are produced intrathecally and therefore present in much higher levels in the CSF than in the serum. The anti-mGluR1 antibodies can be very pathogenic in the brain since they can reduce the basal neuronal activity, block the induction of long-term depression of Purkinje cells, and altogether cause cerebellar motor coordination deficits by a combination of rapid effects on both the acute and the plastic responses of Purkinje cells, and by chronic degenerative effects. Strikingly, within 30 min after injection of anti-mGluR1

  4. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  5. Measuring Inhibition and Cognitive Flexibility in Friedreich Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Corben, Louise A; Klopper, Felicity; Stagnitti, Monique; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Bradshaw, John L; Rance, Gary; Delatycki, Martin B

    2017-02-22

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with subtle impact on cognition. Inhibitory processes and cognitive flexibility were examined in FRDA by assessing the ability to suppress a predictable verbal response. We administered the Hayling Sentence Completion Test (HSCT), the Trail Making Test, and the Stroop Test to 43 individuals with FRDA and 42 gender- and age-matched control participants. There were no significant group differences in performance on the Stroop or Trail Making Test whereas significant impairment in cognitive flexibility including the ability to predict and inhibit a pre-potent response as measured in the HSCT was evident in individuals with FRDA. These deficits did not correlate with clinical characteristics of FRDA (age of disease onset, disease duration, number of guanine-adenine-adenine repeats on the shorter or larger FXN allele, or Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale score), suggesting that such impairment may not be related to the disease process in a straightforward way. The observed specific impairment of inhibition and predictive capacity in individuals with FRDA on the HSCT task, in the absence of impairment in associated executive functions, supports cerebellar dysfunction in conjunction with disturbance to cortico-thalamo-cerebellar connectivity, perhaps via inability to access frontal areas necessary for successful task completion.

  6. A case of cerebellar dysarthria as the presenting symptom of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Zeba; Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, Jalees; Dey, Rahul; Kazmi, Khursheed

    2014-08-01

    A 37 year old man presented with progressive dysarthria for 2 weeks. A week later he developed ataxia and bilateral cerebellar signs including intention tremors, dysmetria and dysdiadokokinesia. During evaluation for aetiology of cerebellar dysarthria, MRI brain revealed asymmetric altered signal intensities in bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and right side of pons suggesting demyelinating lesions. ELISA for Human Immune Deficiency virus-1 was positive. We kept a presumptive diagnosis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) on the basis of clinico-radiological picture. PML is an under investigated and under diagnosed CNS infection seen in HIV patients with advanced disease. We present an unusual case report where isolated cerebellar involvement occurred as the first AIDS defining event in the absence of appreciable immunodeficiency in a patient with previously undiagnosed HIV infection.

  7. Cerebellar Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent Advances The molecular control of cell type specification within the developing cerebellum as well as the genetic causes of the most common human developmental cerebellar disorders have long remained mysterious. Recent genetic lineage and loss-of-function data from mice have revealed unique and non-overlapping anatomical origins for GABAergic neurons from ventricular zone precursors and glutamatergic cell from rhombic lip precursors, mirroring distinct origins for these neurotransmitter-specific cell types in the cerebral cortex. Mouse studies elucidating the role of Ptf1a as a cerebellar ventricular zone GABerigic fate switch were actually preceded by the recognition that PTF1A mutations in humans cause cerebellar agenesis, a birth defect of the human cerebellum. Indeed, several genes for congenital human cerebellar malformations have recently been identified, including genes causing Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation and Ponto-cerebellar hypoplasia. These studies have pointed to surprisingly complex roles for transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial function and neuronal cilia in patterning, homeostasis and cell proliferation during cerebellar development. Together mouse and human studies are synergistically advancing our understanding of the developmental mechanisms that generate the uniquely complex mature cerebellum. PMID:18513948

  8. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  9. Deep brain stimulation or thalamotomy in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome? Case report.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Gertrúd; Kovács, Norbert; Varga, Noémi Ágnes; Barsi, Péter; Erőss, Loránd; Molnár, Mária Judit; Balás, István

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 66-year-old man who has been treated for essential tremor since the age of 58. He developed mild cerebellar gait ataxia seven years after tremor onset. Moderate, global brain atrophy was identified on MRI scans. At the age of 68, only temporary tremor relief could be achieved by bilateral deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermedius nucleus of the thalamus. Bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus also resulted only in transient improvement. In the meantime, progressive gait ataxia and tetraataxia developed accompanied by other cerebellar symptoms, such as nystagmus and scanning speech. These correlated with progressive development of bilateral symmetric hyperintensity of the middle cerebellar peduncles on T2 weighted MRI scans. Genetic testing revealed premutation of the FMR1 gene, establishing the diagnosis of fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. Although this is a rare disorder, it should be taken into consideration during preoperative evaluation of essential tremor. Postural tremor ceased two years later after thalamotomy on the left side, while kinetic tremor of the right hand also improved.

  10. Progression of Brain Atrophy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: A Longitudinal Tensor-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Mascalchi, Mario; Diciotti, Stefano; Giannelli, Marco; Ginestroni, Andrea; Soricelli, Andrea; Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Tessa, Carlo; Galli, Lucia; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Piacentini, Silvia; Salvatore, Elena; Toschi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM) and cortical gray matter (GM) in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials. PMID:24586758

  11. SCA28: Novel Mutation in the AFG3L2 Proteolytic Domain Causes a Mild Cerebellar Syndrome with Selective Type-1 Muscle Fiber Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Aidt, Frederik; Rostgaard, Nina; Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Law, Ian; Vissing, John; Roos, Peter; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2017-02-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of rare inherited neurodegenerative diseases characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, resulting in unsteady gait, clumsiness, and dysarthria. The disorders are predominantly inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Mutations in the gene AFG3L2 that encodes a subunit of the mitochondrial m-AAA protease have previously been shown to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28). Here, we present the clinical phenotypes of three patients from a family with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia and show by molecular genetics and in silico modelling that this is caused by a novel missense mutation in the AFG3L2 gene. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scans of the brain and selective type I fiber atrophy of skeletal muscle of SCA28 patients indicating non-nervous-system involvement in SCA28 as well.

  12. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P < 0.001), anterior vermis (40%, P < 0.001) and fusiform gyrus (20%, P < 0.001) compared with controls or siblings, and lower metabolism in hippocampus (12%, P = 0.05) compared with controls, and showed significant intersubject variability (decreases in vermis ranged from 18% to 60%). Participants with ataxia-telangiectasia also had higher metabolism in globus pallidus (16%, P = 0.05), which correlated negatively with motor performance. Asymptomatic relatives had lower metabolism in anterior vermis (12%; P = 0.01) and hippocampus (19%; P = 0.002) than controls. Our results indicate that, in addition to the expected decrease in cerebellar metabolism, participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had widespread changes in metabolic

  13. HIV-related opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome: report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Kanjanasut, Natlada; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2010-09-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia (OMA) syndrome is a rare neurological disorder, characterized by a rapid onset of generalized myoclonus in association with chaotic multi-directional eye movements and, less frequently, cerebellar ataxia. OMA is commonly related to a paraneoplastic process, specifically neuroblastoma in children and lung or breast cancer in adults. Nevertheless, OMA may occur in association with various infectious agents, such as Coxsackie virus B3, Epstein-Barr virus, mumps, enterovirus, and streptococcus. We recently encountered two cases of HIV-related OMA syndrome. The first patient developed a sudden onset of OMA at the time of HIV seroconversion. The second patient experienced severe ataxia with a mild degree of myoclonus and opsoclonus, associated with an elevated CD4 count following the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We suggest that OMA syndrome may be another rare manifestation of HIV infection at the time of seroconversion or during an immune restoration period.

  14. Distribution of cerebello-olivary degeneration in idiopathic late cortical cerebellar atrophy: clinicopathological study of four autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ota, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Anno, Midori; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2008-02-01

    Late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA) is a neurodegenerative disease which presents with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia as a prominent symptom and is characterized neuropathologically by a limited main lesion to the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus. To elucidate the features of lesions in the cerebellar cortex and inferior olivary nucleus, four autopsy cases suffering from idiopathic LCCA without other cortical cerebellar atrophies, such as alcoholic cerebellar degeneration, phenytoin intoxication, or hereditary cerebellar atrophy including spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, were examined. All affected patients had identical distinct features of cerebellar cortical lesions. In all four cases, the most obvious pathological finding throughout the cerebellum was loss of Purkinje cells, but the rarefaction of granular cell layers was observed only where loss of Purkinje cells was very severe, and thinning of the molecular layer was seen only where the rarefaction of granular cell layers was moderate to severe. Two patients presented with vermis dominant cerebellar cortical lesions, but the other two patients showed hemispheric dominant pathological changes. Neuronal loss of the inferior olivary nucleus was observed in the three autopsy cases. Two of the three cases had a prominent lesion in the dorsal part of the inferior olive and the cerebellar cortical lesion disclosed the vermis dominance, but the other patient, showing prominent neuronal loss in the ventral olivary nucleus, had a cerebellar hemisphere dominant lesion. The patient without neuronal loss in the inferior olivary nucleus had suffered from a shorter period of disease than the others and the rarefaction of granular cell layers and narrowing of the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex were mild. Therefore, it is obvious that there are two types of cerebellar cortex lesions in idiopathic LCCA; one is vermis dominant and the other is cerebellar hemispheric dominant. The lesion of the

  15. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process. PMID:28362824

  16. Late-onset spastic ataxia phenotype in a patient with a homozygous DDHD2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroshi; Ushiyama, Masao; Baba, Takashi; Tani, Katsuko; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Miyatake, Satoko; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Yoshida, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegias (ARHSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurological disorders. Herein we describe Japanese siblings with a midlife-onset, slowly progressive type of cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, without intellectual disability. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense mutation in DDHD2, whose mutations were recently identified as the cause of early-onset ARHSP with intellectual disability. Brain MRI of the patient showed a thin corpus callosum. Cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an abnormal lipid peak in the basal ganglia, which has been reported as the hallmark of DDHD2-related ARHSP (SPG 54). The mutation caused a marked reduction of phospholipase A1 activity, supporting that this mutation is the cause of SPG54. Our cases indicate that the possibility of SPG54 should also be considered when patients show a combination of adult-onset spastic ataxia and a thin corpus callosum. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of patients with spastic ataxia phenotype. PMID:25417924

  17. Antibodies to inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 in patients with cerebellar disease

    PubMed Central

    Fouka, Penelope; Alexopoulos, Harry; Chatzi, Ioanna; Dedos, Skarlatos G.; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Politis, Panagiotis; Tzioufas, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe newly identified autoantibodies associated with cerebellar disorders. Design/Methods: We first screened the sera of 15 patients with cerebellar ataxia, without any known associated autoantibodies, with immunocytochemistry on mouse brain. After characterization and validation of a newly identified antibody, 85 additional patients with suspected autoimmune cerebellar disease were screened using a cell-based assay. Results: Immunoglobulin G from one of the first 15 patients demonstrated a distinct staining pattern on Purkinje neurons. This autoantibody, as characterized further by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, was binding inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1), an intracellular channel that mediates the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Anti-IP3R1 specificity was then validated with a cell-based assay. On this basis, screening of 85 other patients with cerebellar disease revealed 2 additional IP3R1-positive patients. All 3 patients presented with cerebellar ataxia; the first was eventually diagnosed with primary progressive multiple sclerosis, the second had a homozygous CAG insertion at the gene TBP, and the third was thought to have a neurodegenerative disease. Conclusions: We independently identified an autoantibody against IP3R1, a protein highly expressed in Purkinje neurons, confirming an earlier report. Because a mouse knockout model for IP3R1 exhibits ataxia and epilepsy, this autoantibody may have a functional role. The heterogeneity of the antibody-positive patients suggests that this antibody may either have a direct involvement in disease pathogenesis or it is a surrogate marker secondary to cerebellar injury. Anti-IP3R1 antibodies should be further explored in various ataxic and epileptic syndromes as they may denote a marker of response to immunotherapies. PMID:27957507

  18. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  19. Purkinje cell apoptosis in arabian horses with cerebellar abiotrophy.

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Moyano, R; Vivo, J; Flores-Acuña, R; Molina, A; Blanco, C; Monterde, J G

    2006-08-01

    Purkinje cerebellar cells were studied in three Arabian horses aged between 6 and 8 months with clinical disorders in their movements, tremors and ataxia; the occurrence of apoptosis in this cell population was investigated by the (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Both optical and electron microscopical images showed a scant number of Purkinje cells, most of them with morphological features of apoptosis such as condensation of the nucleus and cytoplasm as well as segregation and fragmentation of the nucleus into apoptotic bodies. The TUNEL technique revealed a substantial number (65%) of positive immunoreactive Purkinje cells.

  20. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Patients In Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal recessive ataxias represent a group of clinically overlapping disorders. These include ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD). Patients are mainly characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. Although these forms are not quite distinctive phenotypically, different genes have been linked to these disorders. Mutations in the APTX gene were reported in AOA1 patients, mutations in SETX gene were reported in patients with AOA2 and mutations in MRE11 were identified in ATLD patients. In the present study we describe in detail the clinical features and results of genetic analysis of 9 patients from 4 Saudi families with ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. Methods This study was conducted in the period between 2005-2010 to clinically and molecularly characterize patients with AOA phenotype. Comprehensive sequencing of all coding exons of previously reported genes related to this disorder (APTX, SETX and MRE11). Results A novel nonsense truncating mutation c.6859 C > T, R2287X in SETX gene was identified in patients from one family with AOA2. The previously reported missense mutation W210C in MRE11 gene was identified in two families with autosomal recessive ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. Conclusion Mutations in APTX , SETX and MRE11 are common in patients with autosomal recessive ataxia and oculomotor apraxia. The results of the comprehensive screening of these genes in 4 Saudi families identified mutations in SETX and MRE11 genes but failed to identify mutations in APTX gene. PMID:21324166

  1. The role of Kv3-type potassium channels in cerebellar physiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Joho, Rolf H; Hurlock, Edward C

    2009-09-01

    Different subunits of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) are expressed in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the cerebellum. Behavioral phenotypes in Kv3-null mutant mice such as ataxia with prominent hypermetria and heightened alcohol sensitivity are characteristic of cerebellar dysfunction. Here, we review how the unique biophysical properties of Kv3-type potassium channels, fast activation and fast deactivation that enable cerebellar neurons to generate brief action potentials at high frequencies, affect firing patterns and influence cerebellum-mediated behavior.

  2. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  3. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  4. Ataxia-Telangiectasia Children's Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... find a cure Our RESEARCH Focusing innovative scientific strategies Ataxia-telangiectasia a RARE disease striving for BIG results via the A-T Clinical Center at Johns Hopkins and global research initiatives Upcoming Events Swingin' for Emily Golf ...

  5. Cardiac transplantation in Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Grace; Soman, Teesta; Wilson, Judith; George, Kristen; Mital, Seema; Dipchand, Anne I; McCabe, Jane; Logan, William; Kantor, Paul

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we describe a 14-year-old boy with a confirmed diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia who underwent cardiac transplantation for left ventricular failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy with restrictive physiology. His neurological status prior to transplantation reflected early signs of neurological disease, with evidence of dysarthria, weakness, mild gait impairment, and limb ataxia. We review the ethical issues considered during the process leading to the decision to offer cardiac transplantation.

  6. Asterixis as a Presentation of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Di Benedetto, Olindo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Asterixis is not yet considered a common neurological sign of cerebellum infarction, and the pathogenic mechanism for asterixis remains elusive. We report a 58-year-old male with moderate hypertension who presented to our emergency department for acute headache in both cervical and occipital regions of the left side. About 2 hours later the patient developed ipsilateral asterixis in the upper left limb; 3 days later the asterixis disappeared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed cerebellar infarctions at the left superior cerebellar artery. In conclusion, we observed that a transitory asterixis associated with ipsilateral headache can be an initial clinical manifestation of ipsilateral cerebellar infarctions in the superior cerebellar artery area. PMID:23359270

  7. Molecular, clinical and peripheral neuropathy study of Tunisian patients with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency.

    PubMed

    El Euch-Fayache, Ghada; Bouhlal, Yosr; Amouri, Rim; Feki, Moncef; Hentati, Fayçal

    2014-02-01

    Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia caused by mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein coding gene localized on chromosome 8q, leading to lower levels of serum vitamin E. More than 91 patients diagnosed with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency have been reported worldwide. The majority of cases originated in the Mediterranean region, and the 744delA was the most common mutation among the 22 mutants previously described. We examined the clinical and molecular features of a large cohort of 132 Tunisian patients affected with ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Of these patients, nerve conduction studies were performed on 45, and nerve biopsy was performed on 13. Serum vitamin E was dramatically reduced for 105 of the patients analysed. Molecular analysis revealed that 91.7% of the patients (n = 121) were homozygous for the 744delA mutation. Three other mutations were detected among the remaining patients (8.3%, n = 11) in the homozygous state. Two were previously reported (400C>T and 205-1G>T), and one was novel (553+1T>A). Age of onset was 13.2 ± 5.9 years, with extremes of 2 and 37 years. All described patients exhibited persistent progressive cerebellar ataxia with generally absent tendon reflexes. Deep sensory disturbances, pyramidal syndrome and skeletal deformities were frequent. Head tremor was present in 40% of the patients. Absence of neuropathy or mild peripheral neuropathy was noted in more than half of the cohort. This is the largest study of the genetic, clinical and peripheral neuropathic characteristics in patients with ataxia and vitamin E deficiency. The 744delA mutation represents the most common pathological mutation in Tunisia and worldwide, likely because of a Mediterranean founder effect. Our study led us to suggest that any patient displaying an autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia phenotype with absent tendon reflexes and minor nerve abnormalities should first be screened for the 744delA mutation

  8. A G301R Na+/K+ -ATPase mutation causes familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 with cerebellar signs.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Maria; Ursu, Simona; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Veneziano, Liana; Liana, Veneziano; Antonini, Giovanni; Giovanni, Antonini; Giunti, Paola; Paola, Giunti; Frontali, Marina; Jurkat-Rott, Karin

    2004-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is an autosomal dominant subtype of migraine with hemiparesis during the aura. In over 50% of cases the causative gene is CACNA1A (FHM1), which in some cases produces a phenotype with cerebellar signs, including ataxia and nystagmus. Recently, mutations in ATP1A2 on chromosome 1q23 encoding a Na+/K+ -ATPase subunit were identified in four families (FHM2). We now describe an FHM2 pedigree with a fifth ATP1A2 mutation coding for a G301R substitution. The phenotype was particularly severe and included hemiplegic migraine, seizure, prolonged coma, elevated temperature, sensory deficit, and transient or permanent cerebellar signs, such as ataxia, nystagmus, and dysarthria. A mild crossed cerebellar diaschisis during an attack further supported the clinical evidence of a cerebellar deficit. This is the first report suggesting cerebellar involvement in FHM2. A possible role for CACNA1A in producing the phenotype in this family was excluded by linkage studies to the FHM1 locus. The study of this family suggests that the absence of cerebellar signs may not be a reliable indicator to clinically differentiate FHM2 from FHM1.

  9. ANO10 mutations cause ataxia and coenzyme Q₁₀ deficiency.

    PubMed

    Balreira, Andrea; Boczonadi, Veronika; Barca, Emanuele; Pyle, Angela; Bansagi, Boglarka; Appleton, Marie; Graham, Claire; Hargreaves, Iain P; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Lochmüller, Hanns; Griffin, Helen; Taylor, Robert W; Naini, Ali; Chinnery, Patrick F; Hirano, Michio; Quinzii, Catarina M; Horvath, Rita

    2014-11-01

    Inherited ataxias are heterogeneous disorders affecting both children and adults, with over 40 different causative genes, making molecular genetic diagnosis challenging. Although recent advances in next-generation sequencing have significantly improved mutation detection, few treatments exist for patients with inherited ataxia. In two patients with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency in muscle, whole exome sequencing revealed mutations in ANO10, which encodes anoctamin 10, a member of a family of putative calcium-activated chloride channels, and the causative gene for autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-10 (SCAR10). Both patients presented with slowly progressive ataxia and dysarthria leading to severe disability in the sixth decade. Epilepsy and learning difficulties were also present in one patient, while retinal degeneration and cataract were present in the other. The detection of mutations in ANO10 in our patients indicate that ANO10 defects cause secondary low CoQ10 and SCAR10 patients may benefit from CoQ10 supplementation.

  10. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  11. Localization of the candidate gene d-amino acid oxidase outside the refined 1-cM region of spinocerebellar ataxia 2

    SciTech Connect

    Auburger, G.; Gispert, S.; Lunkes, A.

    1995-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is one form of the neurodegenerative autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias and has been linked to chromosome 12q in 25 previously described and 13 new families from a founder collective of {ge}500 patients in Holguin, Cuba. Although SCA2 in most patients cannot be distinguished from other spinocerebellar ataxias by clinical criteria, in some patients it exhibits a particular phenotype with early neuropathy/late slow saccades and late myoclonus. Autopsy in 11 patients demonstrated olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy with a selective sparing of the dentate nucleus. Complete allelic association within the Holguin population was established with the microsatellite D12S105, and the candidate region was determined to be within a 6-cM region distal to the marker D12S84, contrasting previous reports by Pulst and Lopes-Cendes and according to preliminary data between D12S84 and D12S1329. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Natural History of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 31: a 4-Year Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuya; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Matsushima, Akira; Shimizu, Yusaku; Sato, Shunichi; Yahikozawa, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Shinji; Yazawa, Masanobu; Ushiyama, Masao; Sato, Mitsuto; Morita, Hiroshi; Inoue, Atsushi; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 31 (SCA31) is known as a late-onset, relatively pure cerebellar form of ataxia, but a longitudinal prospective study on the natural history of SCA31 has not been done yet. In this prospective cohort study, we enrolled 44 patients (mean ± standard deviation 73.6 ± 8.5 years) with genetically confirmed SCA31 from 10 ataxia referral centers in the Nagano area, Japan. Patients were evaluated every year for 4 years using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and the Barthel Index (BI). Of the 176 follow-up visits (91.5%), 161 were completed in this study. Five patients (11.4%) died during the follow-up period, and two patients (4.5%) were lost to follow-up. The annual progression of the SARA score was 0.8 ± 0.1 points/year and that of the BI was -2.3 ± 0.4 points/year (mean ± standard error). Shorter disease duration at baseline was associated with faster progression of the SARA score. Our study indicated the averaged clinical course of SCA31 as follows: the patients develop ataxic symptoms at 58.5 ± 10.3 years, become wheelchair bound at 79.4 ± 1.7 years, and died at 88.5 ± 0.7 years. Our prospective dataset provides important information for clinical trials of forthcoming disease-modifying therapies for cerebellar ataxia. It also represents a useful resource for SCA31 patients and their family members in genetic counseling sessions.

  13. Friedreich Ataxia in Classical Galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Neville, Siobhán; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; Sweeney, Bronagh; Lynch, Bryan; Hanrahan, Donncha; Knerr, Ina; Lynch, Sally Ann; Crushell, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders such as ataxia are a recognized complication of classical galactosaemia, even in diet-compliant patients. Here, we report the coexistence of classical galactosaemia and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) in nine children from seven Irish Traveller families. These two autosomal recessive disorders, the loci for which are located on either side of the centromere of chromosome 9, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium in this subgroup. Both conditions are known to occur with increased frequency amongst the Irish Traveller population.Each member of our cohort had been diagnosed with galactosaemia in the neonatal period, and all are homozygous for the common Q188R mutation in the GALT gene. Eight of the nine patients later presented with progressive ataxia, between the ages of 5-13 years. Another child presented in cardiac failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy at 7 years of age. He was not ataxic at presentation and, one year from diagnosis, his neurological examination remains normal. The diagnosis of FRDA was confirmed by detecting the common pathogenic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene (FXN) in each patient.Neurological symptoms are easily attributed to an underlying diagnosis of galactosaemia. It is important to consider a diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia in a child from the Irish Traveller population with galactosaemia who presents with ataxia or cardiomyopathy.

  14. Impaired Spatio-Temporal Predictive Motor Timing Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Abdelgabar, Abdel R.; Owens, Cullen B.; Picard, Samuel; Willems, Jessica; Boele, Henk-Jan; Gazzola, Valeria; Van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Many daily life activities demand precise integration of spatial and temporal information of sensory inputs followed by appropriate motor actions. This type of integration is carried out in part by the cerebellum, which has been postulated to play a central role in learning and timing of movements. Cerebellar damage due to atrophy or lesions may compromise forward-model processing, in which both spatial and temporal cues are used to achieve prediction for future motor states. In the present study we sought to further investigate the cerebellar contribution to predictive and reactive motor timing, as well as to learning of sequential order and temporal intervals in these tasks. We tested patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and healthy controls for two related motor tasks; one requiring spatio-temporal prediction of dynamic visual stimuli and another one requiring reactive timing only. We found that healthy controls established spatio-temporal prediction in their responses with high temporal precision, which was absent in the cerebellar patients. SCA6 patients showed lower predictive motor timing, coinciding with a reduced number of correct responses during the ‘anticipatory’ period on the task. Moreover, on the task utilizing reactive motor timing functions, control participants showed both sequence order and temporal interval learning, whereas patients only showed sequence order learning. These results suggest that SCA6 affects predictive motor timing and temporal interval learning. Our results support and highlight cerebellar contribution to timing and argue for cerebellar engagement during spatio-temporal prediction of upcoming events. PMID:27571363

  15. Clinical, neuroradiological and molecular characterization of cerebellar dysplasia with cysts (Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Marta; Ginevrino, Monia; Mazza, Tommaso; Aiello, Chiara; Zanni, Ginevra; Baumgartner, Bastian; Borgatti, Renato; Brockmann, Knut; Camacho, Ana; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Haeusler, Martin; Hikel, Christiane; Klein, Andrea; Mandrile, Giorgia; Mercuri, Eugenio; Rating, Dietz; Romaniello, Romina; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Schimmel, Mareike; Spaccini, Luigina; Teber, Serap; von Moers, Arpad; Wente, Sarah; Ziegler, Andreas; Zonta, Andrea; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysplasia with cysts and abnormal shape of the fourth ventricle, in the absence of significant supratentorial anomalies and of muscular involvement, defines recessively inherited Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome (PBS). Clinical features comprise non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability of variable degree, language impairment, ocular motor apraxia and frequent occurrence of myopia or retinopathy. Recently, loss-of-function variants in the LAMA1 gene were identified in six probands with PBS. Here we report the detailed clinical, neuroimaging and genetic characterization of 18 PBS patients from 15 unrelated families. Biallelic LAMA1 variants were identified in 14 families (93%). The only non-mutated proband presented atypical clinical and neuroimaging features, challenging the diagnosis of PBS. Sixteen distinct variants were identified, which were all novel. In particular, the frameshift variant c.[2935delA] recurred in six unrelated families on a shared haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. No LAMA1 variants could be detected in 27 probands with different cerebellar dysplasias or non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, confirming the strong correlate between LAMA1 variants and PBS. PMID:26932191

  16. Clinical, neuroradiological and molecular characterization of cerebellar dysplasia with cysts (Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome).

    PubMed

    Micalizzi, Alessia; Poretti, Andrea; Romani, Marta; Ginevrino, Monia; Mazza, Tommaso; Aiello, Chiara; Zanni, Ginevra; Baumgartner, Bastian; Borgatti, Renato; Brockmann, Knut; Camacho, Ana; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Haeusler, Martin; Hikel, Christiane; Klein, Andrea; Mandrile, Giorgia; Mercuri, Eugenio; Rating, Dietz; Romaniello, Romina; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Schimmel, Mareike; Spaccini, Luigina; Teber, Serap; von Moers, Arpad; Wente, Sarah; Ziegler, Andreas; Zonta, Andrea; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar dysplasia with cysts and abnormal shape of the fourth ventricle, in the absence of significant supratentorial anomalies and of muscular involvement, defines recessively inherited Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome (PBS). Clinical features comprise non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability of variable degree, language impairment, ocular motor apraxia and frequent occurrence of myopia or retinopathy. Recently, loss-of-function variants in the LAMA1 gene were identified in six probands with PBS. Here we report the detailed clinical, neuroimaging and genetic characterization of 18 PBS patients from 15 unrelated families. Biallelic LAMA1 variants were identified in 14 families (93%). The only non-mutated proband presented atypical clinical and neuroimaging features, challenging the diagnosis of PBS. Sixteen distinct variants were identified, which were all novel. In particular, the frameshift variant c.[2935delA] recurred in six unrelated families on a shared haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. No LAMA1 variants could be detected in 27 probands with different cerebellar dysplasias or non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, confirming the strong correlate between LAMA1 variants and PBS.

  17. Neurogenin 2 regulates progenitor cell-cycle progression and Purkinje cell dendritogenesis in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Florio, Marta; Leto, Ketty; Muzio, Luca; Tinterri, Andrea; Badaloni, Aurora; Croci, Laura; Zordan, Paola; Barili, Valeria; Albieri, Ilaria; Guillemot, François; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, G Giacomo

    2012-07-01

    By serving as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, integrating a myriad of afferent stimuli, Purkinje cells (PCs) constitute the principal neuron in cerebellar circuits. Several neurodegenerative cerebellar ataxias feature a selective cell-autonomous loss of PCs, warranting the development of regenerative strategies. To date, very little is known as to the regulatory cascades controlling PC development. During central nervous system development, the proneural gene neurogenin 2 (Neurog2) contributes to many distinct neuronal types by specifying their fate and/or dictating development of their morphological features. By analyzing a mouse knock-in line expressing Cre recombinase under the control of Neurog2 cis-acting sequences we show that, in the cerebellar primordium, Neurog2 is expressed by cycling progenitors cell-autonomously fated to become PCs, even when transplanted heterochronically. During cerebellar development, Neurog2 is expressed in G1 phase by progenitors poised to exit the cell cycle. We demonstrate that, in the absence of Neurog2, both cell-cycle progression and neuronal output are significantly affected, leading to an overall reduction of the mature cerebellar volume. Although PC fate identity is correctly specified, the maturation of their dendritic arbor is severely affected in the absence of Neurog2, as null PCs develop stunted and poorly branched dendrites, a defect evident from the early stages of dendritogenesis. Thus, Neurog2 represents a key regulator of PC development and maturation.

  18. Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Report of Two Cases of Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    GÜNDÜZ, Hasan Burak; YASSA, Mustafa İlker Kuntay; OFLUOĞLU, Ali Ender; POSTALCI, Lütfü; EMEL, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism is a type of syndrome including decreased speech, hypotonia, ataxia and emotional instability which occurs after posterior fossa surgery. It has been first reported by Rekate et al. and Yonemasu in 1985. It is well known that long tract signs and lower cranial nerve involvement are not seen with this syndrome and understanding is preserved. However, the pathophysiology of cerebellar mutism has not been well clarified yet. It is mainly seen in patients with medulloblastoma and brainstem involvement. In this report, we present two extraordinary cases of cerebellar mutism after posterior fossa surgery. They were considered extraordinary because their hystopathological analysis results yielded pilocytic astrocytoma which is out of the predefined risk factors.

  19. [A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 presenting with a clinical course similar to spastic paraparesis].

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Yosuke; Doi, Hiroshi; Koyano, Shigeru; Baba, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yume; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-09-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman with an unremarkable birth and developmental history, and with no family history of neurological disorders. The patient had a 6-year history of progressive cervical dystonia, oral dyskinesia, and hyperreflexia. She was initially considered to have spastic paraparesis of unknown cause. Because brain MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellar vermis, genetic analysis for spinocerebellar ataxia types 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 12, and 17, and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy was performed. The results revealed an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats (38 repeats) in one allele of ATXN2, and the patient was diagnosed with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). She had no major clinical features of SCA2 such as cerebellar ataxia, slow saccade, or hyporeflexia. Recent reports have shown the CAG repeat expansion in ATXN2 to be detected in patients with familial L-dopa-responsive parkinsonism. The present case suggests that CAG repeat expansion in ATXN2 may be detected in some patients with spastic paraparesis, and that wide variations of clinical manifestations exist in SCA2.

  20. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is associated with Parkinsonism and Lewy body pathology.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Aoyama, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kinya; Sakiyama, Yoshio; Yomono, Harumi; Saito, Yuko; Kurisaki, Hiroshi; Mihara, Ban; Murayama, Shigeo

    2011-04-01

    Clinical phenotype of individuals with spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is characterised by cerebellar ataxia and cognitive impairment. Although L-dopa-responsive Parkinsonism is considered as a rare clinical presentation in SCA2, it has been brought to the attention of many neurologists in several studies. The authors report an autopsy case of SCA2 with Parkinsonism from a Japanese family using archival materials of our Brain Bank to describe unique neuropathologic findings. The individual clinically showed Parkinsonism as a predominant phenotype instead of cerebellar ataxia. Besides the classic SCA2 neuropathologic alterations, Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites were present in the brainstem nuclei. Genetic analysis revealed shorter abnormal expansion of CAG repeats (less than 39). In contrast, the authors could not find α-synuclein pathology in two SCA2 cases without Parkinsonism. The present case will provide a neuropathologic evidence of correlation between α-synucleinopathy and Parkinsonism of SCA2 as well as shed light on understanding the pathomechanism of Parkinsonism in SCA2.

  1. Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix Saguenay (ARSACS): expanding the genetic, clinical and imaging spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in SACS, leading to autosomal-recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS), have been identified as a frequent cause of recessive early-onset ataxia around the world. Here we aimed to enlarge the spectrum of SACS mutations outside Quebec, to establish the pathogenicity of novel variants, and to expand the clinical and imaging phenotype. Methods Sequencing of SACS in 22 patients with unexplained early-onset ataxia, assessment of novel SACS variants in 3.500 European control chromosomes and extensive phenotypic investigations of all SACS carriers. Results We identified 11 index patients harbouring 17 novel SACS variants. 9/11 patients harboured two variants of at least probable pathogenicity which were not observed in controls and, in case of missense mutations, were located in highly conserved domains. These 9 patients accounted for at least 11% (9/83) in our series of unexplained early onset ataxia subjects. While most patients (7/9) showed the classical ARSACS triad, the presenting phenotype reached from pure neuropathy (leading to the initial diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) in one subject to the absence of any signs of neuropathy in another. In contrast to its name “spastic ataxia”, neither spasticity (absent in 2/9=22%) nor extensor plantar response (absent in 3/9=33%) nor cerebellar ataxia (absent in 1/9=11%) were obligate features. Autonomic features included urine urge incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Apart from the well-established MRI finding of pontine hypointensities, all patients (100%) showed hyperintensities of the lateral pons merging into the (thickened) middle cerebellar peduncles. In addition, 63% exhibited bilateral parietal cerebral atrophy, and 63% a short circumscribed thinning of the posterior midbody of the corpus callosum. In 2 further patients with differences in important clinical features, VUS class 3 variants (c.1373C>T [p.Thr458Ile] and c.2983 G>T [p.Val995Phe]) were identified

  2. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Mijke M M; Martin, Jean-Jacques; van Deuren, Marcel; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Weemaes, Corry M R; Kremer, Berry H P H; Taylor, Malcolm A R; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Lammens, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated α-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms, instead of cerebellar ataxia, tend to be the dominating feature and other classical disease hallmarks, like telangiectasia, appear later or even may be absent. Some patients with variant disease have clinically pronounced anterior horn cell degeneration. Neuropathological studies of genetically proven A-T patients are lacking. The aims of our study were to describe the neuropathology of three A-T patients; in two of them the diagnosis was genetically confirmed. The neuropathological findings were compared with those of all known published autopsy findings in A-T patients up to now. Two classical A-T patients aged 19 and 22 and a 33-year-old patient with variant disease were autopsied. In line with previous reports, our patients had severe cerebellar atrophy, less pronounced degeneration of the dentate nucleus and inferior olive, degeneration of the posterior columns and neurogenic muscular atrophy. In addition, all three had anterior horn cell degeneration, which was most prominent at the lumbar level. Compared to the literature, the degenerative changes in the brain stem of the variant A-T patient were somewhat less than anticipated for his age. Degenerative changes in the cerebellum and spinal cord were comparable with those in the literature. Progeric changes were lacking. In conclusion, compared to classical A-T, the variant A-T patient showed essentially the same, only slightly milder neuropathological abnormalities, except for anterior horn degeneration.

  3. Congenital ataxia, mental retardation, and dyskinesia associated with a novel CACNA1A mutation.

    PubMed

    Blumkin, Lubov; Michelson, Marina; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Kivity, Sara; Lev, Dorit; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2010-07-01

    The CACNA1A gene encodes the pore forming alpha-1A subunit of neuronal voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca( 2+) channels. Mutations in this gene result in clinical heterogeneity, and present with either chronic progressive symptoms, paroxysmal events, or both, with clinical overlap among the different phenotypes. The authors describe a seven year-old boy with mental retardation and congenital cerebellar ataxia that developed dyskinesia at the age of a few months, and recurrent episodes of coma following mild head trauma associated with motor and autonomic signs, from the second year of life. An extensive metabolic evaluation, interictal electroencephalography (EEG), and muscle biopsy were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during one of these episodes revealed edema of the right hemisphere and cerebellar atrophy. Genetic testing revealed a R1350Q mutation in the CACNA1A gene. This is a novel de novo mutation.Congenital cerebellar ataxia can be a result of CACNA1A mutations, especially when associated with recurrent unexplained coma.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  5. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Paul J; Hagerman, Randi J

    2015-03-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects some but not all carriers of small, noncoding CGG-repeat expansions (55-200 repeats; premutation) within the fragile X gene (FMR1). Principal features of FXTAS include intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, memory and executive function deficits, autonomic dysfunction, brain atrophy with white matter disease, and cognitive decline. Although FXTAS was originally considered to be confined to the premutation range, rare individuals with a gray zone (45-54 repeats) or an unmethylated full mutation (>200 repeats) allele have now been described, the constant feature of the disorder remaining the requirement for FMR1 expression, in contradistinction to the gene silencing mechanism of fragile X syndrome. Although transcriptional activity is required for FXTAS pathogenesis, the specific trigger(s) for FXTAS pathogenesis remains elusive, highlighting the need for more research in this area. This need is underscored by recent neuroimaging findings of changes in the central nervous system that consistently appear well before the onset of clinical symptoms, thus creating an opportunity to delay or prevent the appearance of FXTAS.

  6. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten; Skovby, Flemming; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2013-06-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes leading to pathogenic expansions of polyglutamine stretches in the encoded proteins. In general, unstable CAG repeats have an uninterrupted CAG repeat, whereas stable CAG repeats are either short or interrupted by CAA codons, which - like CAG codons - code for glutamine. Here we report on an infantile SCA2 patient who, due to germ-line CAG repeat instability in her father, inherited an extremely expanded CAG repeat in the SCA2 locus. Surprisingly, the expanded allele of the father was an interrupted CAG repeat sequence. Furthermore, analyses of single spermatozoa showed a high frequency of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.

  7. A missense mutation in PIK3R5 gene in a family with ataxia and oculomotor apraxia.

    PubMed

    Al Tassan, Nada; Khalil, Dania; Shinwari, Jameela; Al Sharif, Latifa; Bavi, Prashant; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Abu Dhaim, Nada; Magrashi, Amna; Bobis, Steve; Ahmed, Hala; Alahmed, Samaher; Bohlega, Saeed

    2012-02-01

    Autosomal recessive ataxias are heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by cerebellar atrophy and peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy. Molecular characterization of this group of disorders identified a number of genes contributing to these overlapping phenotypes. Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is an autosomal recessive form of ataxia caused by mutations in the SETX gene. We report on a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive inheritance and clinical characteristics of AOA2, and no mutations in the SETX gene. We mapped the AOA locus in this family to chromosome 17p12-p13. Sequencing of all genes in the refined region identified a homozygous missense mutation in PIK3R5 that was absent in 477 normal controls. Our characterization of the PIK3R5 protein and findings suggest that it may play a role in the development of the cerebellum and vermis.

  8. More Than Ataxia: Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders in Childhood Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The autosomal recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by complex neurological features in addition to progressive ataxia. Hyperkinetic movement disorders occur in a significant proportion of patients, and may sometimes be the presenting motor symptom. Presentations with involuntary movements rather than ataxia are diagnostically challenging, and are likely under-recognized. Methods A PubMed literature search was performed in October 2015 utilizing pairwise combinations of disease-related terms (autosomal recessive ataxia, ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), Friedreich ataxia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and symptom-related terms (movement disorder, dystonia, chorea, choreoathetosis, myoclonus). Results Involuntary movements occur in the majority of patients with ataxia–telangiectasia and AOA1, and less frequently in patients with AOA2, Friedreich ataxia, and ataxia with vitamin E deficiency. Clinical presentations with an isolated hyperkinetic movement disorder in the absence of ataxia include dystonia or dystonia with myoclonus with predominant upper limb and cervical involvement (ataxia–telangiectasia, ataxia with vitamin E deficiency), and generalized chorea (ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1, ataxia-telangiectasia). Discussion An awareness of atypical presentations facilitates early and accurate diagnosis in these challenging cases. Recognition of involuntary movements is important not only for diagnosis, but also because of the potential for effective targeted symptomatic treatment. PMID:27536460

  9. Cognitive Functions in Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Klivényi, Peter; Nemeth, Dezso; Sefcsik, Tamas; Janacsek, Karolina; Hoffmann, Ildiko; Haden, Gabor Peter; Londe, Zsuzsa; Vecsei, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia, and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels. The disease is caused by a recessive mutation in the senataxin gene. Since it is a very rare cerebellar disorder, no detailed examination of cognitive functions in AOA2 has been published to date. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuropsychological profile of a 54-year-old patient with AOA2. Methods: A broad range of neuropsychological examination protocol was administered including the following domains: short-term, working- and episodic-memories, executive functions, implicit sequence learning, and the temporal parameters of speech. Results: The performance on the Listening Span, Letter Fluency, Serial Reaction Time Task, and pause ratio in speech was 2 or more standard deviations (SD) lower compared to controls, and 1 SD lower on Backward Digit Span, Semantic Fluency, articulation rate, and speech tempo. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the pathogenesis of the cerebrocerebellar circuit in AOA2 is responsible for the weaker coordination of complex cognitive functions such as working memory, executive functions, speech, and sequence learning. PMID:23015802

  10. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment.

  11. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components.

  12. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2): identification of early brain degeneration in one monozygous twin in the initial disease stage.

    PubMed

    Hoche, Franziska; Balikó, Laszlo; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Steinecker, Katalin; Bartos, Laszlo; Sáfrány, Eniko; Auburger, Georg; Deller, Thomas; Korf, Horst-Werner; Klockgether, Thomas; Rüb, Udo; Melegh, Bela

    2011-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a progressive autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia and is assigned to the CAG repeat or polyglutamine diseases. Recent morphological studies characterized the pathoanatomical features in heterozygous SCA2 patients and revealed severe neuronal loss in a large variety of cerebellar and extra-cerebellar brain sites. In the present study, we examined the brain pathoanatomy of a monozygous twin of a large Hungarian SCA2 family with pathologically extended CAG repeats in both SCA2 alleles. This unique patient was in the initial clinical stage of SCA2 and died almost 3 years after SCA2 onset. Upon pathoanatomical investigation, we observed loss of giant Betz pyramidal cells in the primary motor cortex, degeneration of sensory thalamic nuclei, the Purkinje cell layer, and deep cerebellar nuclei, as well as select brainstem nuclei (i.e., substantia nigra, oculomotor nucleus, reticulotegmental nucleus of the pons, facial, lateral vestibular, and raphe interpositus nuclei, inferior olive). All of these degenerated brain gray matter structures are known as consistent targets of the underlying pathological process in heterozygous SCA2 patients. Since they were already involved in our patient within 3 years after disease onset, we think that we were for the first time able to identify the early brain targets of the pathological process of SCA2.

  13. Masseter reflex in the study of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and type 3.

    PubMed

    García, Antonio; Alvarez, Silvia; Infante, Jon; Berciano, José

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation we assess the utility of the masseter reflex for diagnostic purposes in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. We studied the masseter reflex electrophysiologically in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2, 10 patients) and type 3 (SCA3/MJD, 13 patients). In SCA2, the masseter reflex was abnormal in 9 (90%) patients. In SCA3/MJD, the masseter reflex was normal in all 13 patients. Our findings suggest that the masseter reflex is a reliable test that provides additional data prior to molecular study in the differentiation between SCA2 and SCA3/MJD. Masseter reflex abnormalities in SCA2 patients could be better explained by dysfunction of the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus/tract.

  14. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2): clinical features and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutesa, Léon; Pierquin, Geneviève; Segers, Karin; Vanbellinghen, Jean François; Gahimbare, Laetitia; Bours, Vincent

    2008-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that results from the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding for a polyglutamine tract. In normal individuals, alleles contain between 14 and 31 CAG repeats, whereas the pathological alleles have more than 35 CAG repeats. The clinical phenotype of SCA2 includes a progressive cerebellar ataxia with additional features such as ophthalmoplegia, extra-pyramidal or pyramidal signs and peripheral neuropathy. We report a SCA2 large African family with several affected individuals. A major pathological allele carrying 43 CAG repeats was identified in the proband. To our knowledge, this is a first report of a SCA disorder described in Central African patients, thus indicating the need to consider this diagnosis in young African ataxic patients.

  15. Supratentorial and infratentorial damage in spinocerebellar ataxia 2: a diffusion-weighted MRI study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Elena; Tedeschi, Enrico; Mollica, Carmine; Vicidomini, Caterina; Varrone, Andrea; Coda, Anna Rita Daniela; Brunetti, Arturo; Salvatore, Marco; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Pappatà, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal-dominant degenerative disorder that is neuropathologically characterized primarily by infratentorial damage, although less severe supratentorial involvement may contribute to the clinical manifestation. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of SCA2 have enabled in vivo quantification of neurodegeneration in infratentorial regions, whereas supratentorial regions have been explored less thoroughly. We measured microstructural changes in both infratentorial and supratentorial regions in 13 SCA2 patients (9 men, 4 women; mean age, 50 ± 12 years) and 15 controls (10 men, 5 women; mean age, 49 ± 14 years) using DWI-MRI and correlated the DWI changes with disease severity and duration. Disease severity was evaluated using the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale. Cerebral diffusion trace ( D¯) values were generated, and regions of interest (ROIs) and voxel-based analysis with Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) were used for data analysis. In SCA2 patients, ROI analysis and SPM confirmed significant increases in D¯ values in the pons, cerebellar white matter (CWM) and middle cerebellar peduncles. Moreover, SPM analysis revealed increased D¯ values in the right thalamus, bilateral temporal cortex/white matter, and motor cortex/pyramidal tract regions. Increased diffusivity in the frontal white matter (FWM) and the CWM was significantly correlated with ataxia severity. DWI-MRI revealed that both infratentorial and supratentorial microstructural changes may characterize SCA2 patients in the course of the disease and might contribute to the severity of the symptoms.

  16. Gait and Functional Mobility Deficits in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Robertson-Dick, Erin E; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) results from a "premutation" (PM) size CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Cerebellar gait ataxia is the primary feature in some FXTAS patients causing progressive disability. However, no studies have quantitatively characterized gait and mobility deficits in FXTAS. We performed quantitative gait and mobility analysis in seven FMR1 PM carriers with FXTAS and ataxia, six PM carriers without FXTAS, and 18 age-matched controls. We studied four independent gait domains, trunk range of motion (ROM), and movement transitions using an instrumented Timed Up and Go (i-TUG). We correlated these outcome measures with FMR1 molecular variables and clinical severity scales. PM carriers with FXTAS were globally impaired in every gait performance domain except trunk ROM compared to controls. These included total i-TUG duration, stride velocity, gait cycle time, cadence, double-limb support and swing phase times, turn duration, step time before turn, and turn-to-sit duration, and increased gait variability on several measures. Carriers without FXTAS did not differ from controls on any parameters, but double-limb support time was close to significance. Balance and disability scales correlated with multiple gait and movement transition parameters, while the FXTAS Rating Scale did not. This is the first study to quantitatively examine gait and movement transitions in FXTAS patients. Gait characteristics were consistent with those from previous cohorts with cerebellar ataxia. Sensitive measures like the i-TUG may help determine efficacy of interventions, characterize disease progression, and provide early markers of disease in FXTAS.

  17. Familial Aggregation of the Cerebellar Signs in Familial Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Hernandez, Nora; Chen, Karen P.; Naranjo, Kelly V.; Park, Jemin; Clark, Lorraine N.; Ottman, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the hallmark feature of essential tremor (ET) is kinetic tremor, patients may exhibit additional motor features (e.g., intention tremor and mild gait ataxia) that are markers of an underlying abnormality of cerebellar function. ET is also a highly familial disorder, but we do not know whether the presence and expression of cerebellar signs are similar across family members. There are simply no published data. The alternative possibility is that these features are not heritable. We tested the specific hypothesis that the presence of cerebellar signs (i.e., intention tremor, tandem gait difficulty) ran in ET families. Methods ET probands and relatives enrolled in a genetic study at Yale and Columbia universities underwent a detailed videotaped neurological examination. Results There were 187 enrollees (59 probands, 128 affected relatives). In a bivariate logistic regression model, the presence of intention tremor in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of intention tremor in the relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28–1.27, p = 0.18). In a similar model, the presence of greater tandem gait difficulty (i.e., a tandem gait score in the upper quartile) in the proband was not a predictor of the presence of such difficulty in the relatives (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.41–3.66, p = 0.73). Discussion The presence of cerebellar signs did not aggregate in families with ET. In the current dataset, these did not seem to be disease features that were heritable. PMID:28176975

  18. Pathogenesis of severe ataxia and tremor without the typical signs of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; King, Annesha; Lin, Tao; Miterko, Lauren N.; Gebre, Samrawit A.; Sillitoe, Roy V.

    2015-01-01

    Neurological diseases are especially devastating when they involve neurodegeneration. Neuronal destruction is widespread in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s and regionally localized in motor disorders such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and ataxia. But, surprisingly, the onset and progression of these diseases can occur without neurodegeneration. To understand the origins of diseases that do not have an obvious neuropathology, we tested how loss of CAR8, a regulator of IP3R1-mediated Ca2+-signaling, influences cerebellar circuit formation and neural function as movement deteriorates. We found that faulty molecular patterning, which shapes functional circuits called zones, leads to alterations in cerebellar wiring and Purkinje cell activity, but not to degeneration. Rescuing Purkinje cell function improved movement and reducing their Ca2+ influx eliminated ectopic zones. Our findings in Car8wdl mutant mice unveil a pathophysiological mechanism that may operate broadly to impact motor and non-motor conditions that do not involve degeneration. PMID:26586559

  19. Pathogenesis of severe ataxia and tremor without the typical signs of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    White, Joshua J; Arancillo, Marife; King, Annesha; Lin, Tao; Miterko, Lauren N; Gebre, Samrawit A; Sillitoe, Roy V

    2016-02-01

    Neurological diseases are especially devastating when they involve neurodegeneration. Neuronal destruction is widespread in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's and regionally localized in motor disorders such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, and ataxia. But, surprisingly, the onset and progression of these diseases can occur without neurodegeneration. To understand the origins of diseases that do not have an obvious neuropathology, we tested how loss of CAR8, a regulator of IP3R1-mediated Ca(2+)-signaling, influences cerebellar circuit formation and neural function as movement deteriorates. We found that faulty molecular patterning, which shapes functional circuits called zones, leads to alterations in cerebellar wiring and Purkinje cell activity, but not to degeneration. Rescuing Purkinje cell function improved movement and reducing their Ca(2+) influx eliminated ectopic zones. Our findings in Car8(wdl) mutant mice unveil a pathophysiological mechanism that may operate broadly to impact motor and non-motor conditions that do not involve degeneration.

  20. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT–MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT–MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  1. Gravity-dependent nystagmus and inner-ear dysfunction suggest anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Miller, Benjamin R; Sundararajan, Sophia; Katirji, Bashar

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar lesions may present with gravity-dependent nystagmus, where the direction and velocity of the drifts change with alterations in head position. Two patients had acute onset of hearing loss, vertigo, oscillopsia, nausea, and vomiting. Examination revealed gravity-dependent nystagmus, unilateral hypoactive vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and hearing loss ipsilateral to the VOR hypofunction. Traditionally, the hypoactive VOR and hearing loss suggest inner-ear dysfunction. Vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and nystagmus may suggest peripheral or central vestibulopathy. The gravity-dependent modulation of nystagmus, however, localizes to the posterior cerebellar vermis. Magnetic resonance imaging in our patients revealed acute cerebellar infarct affecting posterior cerebellar vermis, in the vascular distribution of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). This lesion explains the gravity-dependent nystagmus, nausea, and vomiting. Acute onset of unilateral hearing loss and VOR hypofunction could be the manifestation of inner-ear ischemic injury secondary to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) compromise. In cases of combined AICA and PICA infarction, the symptoms of peripheral vestibulopathy might masquerade the central vestibular syndrome and harbor a cerebellar stroke. However, the gravity-dependent nystagmus allows prompt identification of acute cerebellar infarct.

  2. MRI shows a region-specific pattern of atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Brian C; Choi, Soo I; Du, Annie X; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Ying, Howard S; Landman, Bennett A; Perlman, Susan L; Baloh, Robert W; Zee, David S; Toga, Arthur W; Prince, Jerry L; Ying, Sarah H

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we used manual delineation of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the spatial and temporal characteristics of the cerebellar atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). Ten subjects with SCA2 were compared to ten controls. The volume of the pons, the total cerebellum, and the individual cerebellar lobules were calculated via manual delineation of structural MRI. SCA2 showed substantial global atrophy of the cerebellum. Furthermore, the degeneration was lobule specific, selectively affecting the anterior lobe, VI, Crus I, Crus II, VIII, uvula, corpus medullare, and pons, while sparing VIIB, tonsil/paraflocculus, flocculus, declive, tuber/folium, pyramis, and nodulus. The temporal characteristics differed in each cerebellar subregion: (1) duration of disease: Crus I, VIIB, VIII, uvula, corpus medullare, pons, and the total cerebellar volume correlated with the duration of disease; (2) age: VI, Crus II, and flocculus correlated with age in control subjects; and (3) clinical scores: VI, Crus I, VIIB, VIII, corpus medullare, pons, and the total cerebellar volume correlated with clinical scores in SCA2. No correlations were found with the age of onset. Our extrapolated volumes at the onset of symptoms suggest that neurodegeneration may be present even during the presymptomatic stages of disease. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the cerebellar degeneration in SCA2 are region specific. Furthermore, our findings suggest the presence of presymptomatic atrophy and a possible developmental component to the mechanisms of pathogenesis underlying SCA2. Our findings further suggest that volumetric analysis may aid in the development of a non-invasive, quantitative biomarker.

  3. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Galvez, Victor; Mercadillo, Roberto; Diaz, Rosalinda; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo. Methods Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment. Results Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle. Conclusion Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2. PMID:26263162

  4. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 neurodegeneration differentially affects error-based and strategic-based visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Díaz, Rosalinda; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Medrano-Montero, Jacqeline; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimé; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2013-12-01

    There are different types of visuomotor learning. Among the most studied is motor error-based learning where the sign and magnitude of the error are used to update motor commands. However, there are other instances where individuals show visuomotor learning even if the sign or magnitude of the error is precluded. Studies with patients suggest that the former learning is impaired after cerebellar lesions, while basal ganglia lesions disrupt the latter. Nevertheless, the cerebellar role is not restricted only to error-based learning, but it also contributes to several cognitive processes. Therefore, here, we tested if cerebellar ataxia patients are affected in two tasks, one that depends on error-based learning and the other that prevents the use of error-based learning. Our results showed that cerebellar patients have deficits in both visuomotor tasks; however, while error-based learning tasks deficits correlated with the motor impairments, the motor error-dependent task did not correlate with any motor measure.

  5. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with vitamin E deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions ataxia with vitamin E deficiency ataxia with vitamin E deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency is a disorder that impairs the body's ability ...

  7. Episodic ataxia type 2 manifests as epileptiform electroencephalographic activity with no epileptic attacks in two family members.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Misako; Furuta, Mitsuru; Nakamori, Masayuki; Yuasa, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2016-04-28

    Here, we report two cases of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) in a 63-year-old woman and her 36-year-old daughter. The mother experienced recurrent attacks of cerebellar dysfunction lasting 4 to 5 hours since the age of 41 years. On several occasions, she was admitted to the emergency room, where she was diagnosed with epilepsy or stroke. Based on these diagnoses, she was treated with antiepileptic or anticoagulant drugs, but both treatments were eventually discontinued. The frequency of the attacks increased after the patient reached the age of 62. Interictal neurological examination demonstrated signs of slight cerebellar ataxia, i.e. saccadic eye movements, gaze-directed nystagmus, and mild truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebellar vermis atrophy. Electroencephalography (EEG) revealed various spike and wave patterns: solitary spikes, spike-and-slow wave complexes, and slow wave bursts. Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) type 3 was also observed. Treatment with acetazolamide abolished the patient's attacks almost completely. The daughter started experiencing 5- to 10-minute ataxic episodes at the age of 16 years. Based on her epileptiform EEG activities with PPR (type 2), antiepileptic drugs (valproate and zonisamide) were prescribed. Despite pharmacological treatment, the attacks recurred; however, their frequency gradually decreased with time, until they almost entirely disappeared when the patient was 33. Unfortunately, migraine-like headaches arose instead. Subtle truncal ataxia was observed during interictal periods. Sanger sequencing of the exons of the CACNA1A gene revealed a novel single base deletion (c.3575delA) in both patients. Despite the difference in age of onset and clinical course, both patients showed clearly epileptiform EEG activities without experiencing the concurrent epileptic episodes. Thus, EA2 is a disease that may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or stroke in the field of emergency medicine.

  8. [A case of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration associated with small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, N; Takayama, K; Nakanishi, Y; Ishihara, S; Tanaka, T; Kaneko, Y; Takano, K; Inoue, K; Hara, N

    1999-02-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a clinical syndrome and known to be occasionally associated with small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC). PCD usually affects patients before the cancer is evident. The disorder evolves subacutely, and causes severe pancerebellar dysfunction. In this paper, we report a case of PCD associated with SCLC. A 65-year-old man presenting with 2 weeks of progressive vertigo, gait ataxia, and speech disturbance, was readmitted to our hospital. He had earlier been given a diagnosis of SCLC, oat cell carcinoma, and had undergone high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation during his first admission. Following that treatment regimen, the tumor disappeared completely and the patient had been in remission. Based on neurological findings and the presence of anti-neuronal antibodies a diagnosis of PCD was made. Although cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2) was administered, the patient experienced no relief of his cerebellar ataxia. Six months afer readmission, he died of cardiac tamponade due to malignant pericarditis. A histological examination at autopsy found few Purkinje cells and a proliferation of Bergmann's astrocytes in the cerebellar cortex. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of PCD.

  9. Gait adaptability training improves obstacle avoidance and dynamic stability in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Heeren, Anita; Engels, Jasper-Jan C; Boer, Jasper J Den; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Balance and gait problems in patients with cerebellar degeneration lead to reduced mobility, loss of independence, and frequent falls. It is currently unclear, however, whether balance and gait capacities can be improved by training in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of gait adaptability training on obstacle avoidance and dynamic stability during adaptive gait. Ten patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxia received 10 protocolized gait adaptability training sessions of 1 h each during 5 weeks. Training was performed on a treadmill with visual stepping targets and obstacles projected on the belt's surface. As the primary outcome, we used an obstacle avoidance task while walking on a treadmill. We determined avoidance success rates, as well as dynamic stability during the avoidance manoeuvre. Clinical ratings included the scale for the assessment of ataxia (SARA), 10 m walking test, timed up-and-go test, berg balance scale, and the obstacle subtask of the emory functional ambulation profile (EFAP). Following the intervention, success rates on the obstacle avoidance task had significantly improved compared to pre-intervention. For successful avoidance, participants allowed themselves smaller stability margins in the sagittal plane in the (shortened) pre-crossing step. However, in the subsequent steps they returned to baseline stability values more effectively than before training. SARA scores and the EFAP obstacle subtask improved significantly as well. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence of a beneficial effect of gait adaptability training on obstacle avoidance capacity and dynamic stability in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

  10. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) with massive macrophage infiltration in the ponto-cerebellar afferent system.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Teruo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Horiuchi, Emiko; Yagishita, Saburou

    2007-08-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is characterized pathologically by a systemic degeneration of the olivopontocerebellar (OPC), striatonigral (SN) and autonomic systems. Massive glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) are specific for this disease. Massive lipid-laden macrophage infiltration in the degenerating tracts has not been described up to now. We here report a case of MSA with this rare event in the ponto-cerebellar (cerebellopetal) fibers. The patient, 54-year-old housewife, developed ataxia. At the age of 55 years, she was diagnosed as having MSA by cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal signs, autonomic failure and Horner syndrome. She died from asphyxia at the age of 57. The autopsy revealed OPC and SN system atrophy, degeneration and numerous GCIs, compatible with MSA. Numerous lipid-laden macrophages were seen in the pontine nuclei and its transverse fibers including the white matter of the cerebellum, which has not been reported up to now. There was no macrophage infiltration in the other areas. Transient ischemia, infarction and wallerian degeneration do not account for this rare event. The ponto-cerebellar (cerebellopetal) tract pathology, as observed by postmortem neuropathological study, may occur in the context of MSA.

  11. Middle cerebellar peduncles: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Tomsick, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), offering a systematic approach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities (e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases. PMID:26751508

  12. Modulation of error-sensitivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hanajima, Ritsuko; Shadmehr, Reza; Ohminami, Shinya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Shirota, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terao, Yasuo; Tsuji, Shoji; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Uchimura, Motoaki; Inoue, Masato; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    Cerebellar damage can profoundly impair human motor adaptation. For example, if reaching movements are perturbed abruptly, cerebellar damage impairs the ability to learn from the perturbation-induced errors. Interestingly, if the perturbation is imposed gradually over many trials, people with cerebellar damage may exhibit improved adaptation. However, this result is controversial, since the differential effects of gradual vs. abrupt protocols have not been observed in all studies. To examine this question, we recruited patients with pure cerebellar ataxia due to cerebellar cortical atrophy (n = 13) and asked them to reach to a target while viewing the scene through wedge prisms. The prisms were computer controlled, making it possible to impose the full perturbation abruptly in one trial, or build up the perturbation gradually over many trials. To control visual feedback, we employed shutter glasses that removed visual feedback during the reach, allowing us to measure trial-by-trial learning from error (termed error-sensitivity), and trial-by-trial decay of motor memory (termed forgetting). We found that the patients benefited significantly from the gradual protocol, improving their performance with respect to the abrupt protocol by exhibiting smaller errors during the exposure block, and producing larger aftereffects during the postexposure block. Trial-by-trial analysis suggested that this improvement was due to increased error-sensitivity in the gradual protocol. Therefore, cerebellar patients exhibited an improved ability to learn from error if they experienced those errors gradually. This improvement coincided with increased error-sensitivity and was present in both groups of subjects, suggesting that control of error-sensitivity may be spared despite cerebellar damage.

  13. Modulation of error-sensitivity during a prism adaptation task in people with cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Reza; Ohminami, Shinya; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Shirota, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terao, Yasuo; Tsuji, Shoji; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Uchimura, Motoaki; Inoue, Masato; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar damage can profoundly impair human motor adaptation. For example, if reaching movements are perturbed abruptly, cerebellar damage impairs the ability to learn from the perturbation-induced errors. Interestingly, if the perturbation is imposed gradually over many trials, people with cerebellar damage may exhibit improved adaptation. However, this result is controversial, since the differential effects of gradual vs. abrupt protocols have not been observed in all studies. To examine this question, we recruited patients with pure cerebellar ataxia due to cerebellar cortical atrophy (n = 13) and asked them to reach to a target while viewing the scene through wedge prisms. The prisms were computer controlled, making it possible to impose the full perturbation abruptly in one trial, or build up the perturbation gradually over many trials. To control visual feedback, we employed shutter glasses that removed visual feedback during the reach, allowing us to measure trial-by-trial learning from error (termed error-sensitivity), and trial-by-trial decay of motor memory (termed forgetting). We found that the patients benefited significantly from the gradual protocol, improving their performance with respect to the abrupt protocol by exhibiting smaller errors during the exposure block, and producing larger aftereffects during the postexposure block. Trial-by-trial analysis suggested that this improvement was due to increased error-sensitivity in the gradual protocol. Therefore, cerebellar patients exhibited an improved ability to learn from error if they experienced those errors gradually. This improvement coincided with increased error-sensitivity and was present in both groups of subjects, suggesting that control of error-sensitivity may be spared despite cerebellar damage. PMID:26311179

  14. [Synchronous appearance and improvement with anticancer chemotherapy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome complicated with small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Haruki; Kyoraku, Itaru; Yamashita, Shuichi; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old man who had suffered from instability of gait and double vision for two months was admitted to our hospital because of weakness of the extremities and ataxia of the extremities and trunk. Chest X-rays and CT scans showed enlargement of the left hilar lymph nodes and a nodular shadow in the left lung. Transbronchial biopsy revealed small cell lung cancer. We diagnosed the patient with two conditions: paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD), based on cerebellar ataxia, the presence of Hu antineuronal antibodies, and the absence of cerebellar atrophy and malignancy; and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), based on weakness of the extremities, the presence of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies, and waxing in the evoked electromyogram. Anticancer chemoradiation therapy that was started within three months of symptom onset resulted in reductions in size of the hilar lymph nodes and the nodule. Concurrently, cerebellar ataxia, weakness of the extremities, and double vision all disappeared. Anticancer chemotherapy is effective against LEMS while usually less effective against PCD. Early commencement of anticancer chemotherapy is recommended for the treatment of PCD with LEMS.

  15. Pontocerebellar volume deficits and ataxia in alcoholic men and women: no evidence for “telescoping”

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Brain volume shrinkage is common in treatment-seeking patients with alcohol use disorders. Whether women are more vulnerable to brain dysmorphology than men despite lower alcohol consumption levels or shorter dependency (“telescoping effect”) remains controversial and has not been considered with respect to infratentorial structures or their potential contribution to ataxia. Methods The 200 participants included 64 men and 31 women with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition alcohol dependence and 105 controls. An infratentorial region (pons, cerebellar hemispheres, vermis (anterior, posterior, and inferior sectors), fissures, cisterns, fourth ventricle) was quantified with atlas-based parcellation. To enable comparison of men and women, regional tissue volumes were expressed as ratios of tissue in the volume. Participants also completed quantitative ataxia testing. Results Total infratentorial and vermian tissue ratios were significantly smaller in alcoholics than controls; alcoholic women did not show disproportionately greater volume deficits than alcoholic men. A re-analysis including alcoholic men and women matched in alcohol consumption, onset age, abstinence duration, and age revealed again that alcoholic women did not have disproportionately greater regional vermian volume deficits than alcoholic men. Alcoholic men and women were impaired in all measures of ataxia, which correlated with low infratentorial tissue ratios in men. Discussion Alcoholic men showed deficits of pontocerebellar volume ratios, yet alcoholic women did not display signs of “telescoping”. Further, alcoholic men and women both showed signs of ataxia of gait and balance, related to affected pontocerebellar systems in the men but not the women, suggesting the need to consider other neural substrates for ataxia in women. PMID:19943036

  16. Redistribution of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Bell, R.

    1989-04-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis refers to a functional decrease in blood flow to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the infarcted or ischemic cerebral hemisphere. This phenomenon can be depicted using PET as well as using SPECT. This condition, seen on early I-123 IMP brain scans, can show redistribution on the three hour delayed scan, presumably due to normal non-specific amine receptor sites of the affected cerebellum. One such case is reported.

  17. The scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia correlates with dysarthria assessment in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Eigentler, Andreas; Rhomberg, Johanna; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Ritzer, Irmgard; Poewe, Werner; Boesch, Sylvia

    2012-03-01

    Dysarthria is an acquired neurogenic sensorimotor speech symptom and an integral part within the clinical spectrum of ataxia syndromes. Ataxia measurements and disability scores generally focus on the assessment of motor functions. Since comprehensive investigations of dysarthria in ataxias are sparse, we assessed dysarthria in ataxia patients using the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment is a ten-item validated test in which eight items focus on the observation of oral structures and speech functions. Fifteen Friedreich's ataxia patients and 15 healthy control individuals were analyzed using clinical and logopedic methodology. All patients underwent neurological assessment applying the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. In Friedreich's ataxia patients, the Frenchay sub-item voice showed to be most affected compared to healthy individuals followed by items such as reflexes, palate, tongue, and intelligibility. Scoring of lips, jaw, and respiration appeared to be mildly affected. Ataxia severity in Friedreich's ataxia patients revealed a significant correlation with the Frenchay dysarthria sum score. The introduction of a binary Adapted Dysarthria Score additionally allowed allocation to distinct dysarthria pattern in ataxias. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment proved to be a valid dysarthria measure in Friedreich's ataxia. Its availability in several languages provides a major advantage regarding the applicability in international clinical studies. Shortcomings of the Frenchay test are the multiplicity of items tested and its alphabetic coding. Numerical scoring and condensation of assessments in a modified version may, however, provide an excellent clinical tool for the measurement and scoring of dysarthria in ataxic speech disorders.

  18. Selective positive modulator of calcium-activated potassium channels exerts beneficial effects in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Kasumu, Adebimpe W; Hougaard, Charlotte; Rode, Frederik; Jacobsen, Thomas A; Sabatier, Jean Marc; Eriksen, Birgitte L; Strøbæk, Dorte; Liang, Xia; Egorova, Polina; Vorontsova, Dasha; Christophersen, Palle; Rønn, Lars Christian B; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2012-10-26

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion within the Ataxin-2 (Atxn2) protein. Purkinje cells (PC) of the cerebellum fire irregularly and eventually die in SCA2. We show here that the type 2 small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK2) play a key role in control of normal PC activity. Using cerebellar slices from transgenic SCA2 mice we demonstrate that SK channel modulators restore regular pacemaker activity of SCA2 PCs. Furthermore, we also show that oral delivery of a more selective positive modulator of SK2/3 channels (NS13001) alleviates behavioral and neuropathological phenotypes of aging SCA2 transgenic mice. We conclude that SK2 channels constitute a therapeutic target for SCA2 treatment and that the developed selective SK2/3 modulator NS13001 holds promise as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCA2 and possibly other cerebellar ataxias.

  19. FGF14 regulates the intrinsic excitability of cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed

    Shakkottai, Vikram G; Xiao, Maolei; Xu, Lin; Wong, Michael; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M; Yamada, Kelvin A

    2009-01-01

    A missense mutation in the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14) gene underlies SCA27, an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia in humans. Mice with a targeted disruption of the Fgf14 locus (Fgf14(-/-)) develop ataxia resembling human SCA27. We tested the hypothesis that loss of FGF14 affects the firing properties of Purkinje neurons, which play an important role in motor control and coordination. Current clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons in cerebellar slices revealed attenuated spontaneous firing in Fgf14(-/-) neurons. Unlike in the wild type animals, more than 80% of Fgf14(-/-) Purkinje neurons were quiescent and failed to fire repetitively in response to depolarizing current injections. Immunohistochemical examination revealed reduced expression of Nav1.6 protein in Fgf14(-/-) Purkinje neurons. Together, these observations suggest that FGF14 is required for normal Nav1.6 expression in Purkinje neurons, and that the loss of FGF14 impairs spontaneous and repetitive firing in Purkinje neurons by altering the expression of Nav1.6 channels.

  20. Progress in pathogenesis studies of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C J; Orr, H T; Zoghbi, H Y

    1999-06-29

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by progressive loss of coordination, motor impairment and the degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells, spinocerebellar tracts and brainstem nuclei. Many dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases share the mutational basis of SCA1: the expansion of a translated CAG repeat coding for glutamine. Mice lacking ataxin-1 display learning deficits and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity but none of the abnormalities seen in human SCA1; mice expressing ataxin-1 with an expanded CAG tract (82 glutamine residues), however, develop Purkinje cell pathology and ataxia. These results suggest that mutant ataxin-1 gains a novel function that leads to neuronal degeneration. This novel function might involve aberrant interaction(s) with cell-specific protein(s), which in turn might explain the selective neuronal pathology. Mutant ataxin-1 interacts preferentially with a leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein that is abundantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and other brain regions affected in SCA1. Immunolocalization studies in affected neurons of patients and SCA1 transgenic mice showed that mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single, ubiquitin-positive nuclear inclusion (NI) that alters the distribution of the proteasome and certain chaperones. Further analysis of NIs in transfected HeLa cells established that the proteasome and chaperone proteins co-localize with ataxin-1 aggregates. Moreover, overexpression of the chaperone HDJ-2/HSDJ in HeLa cells decreased ataxin-1 aggregation, suggesting that protein misfolding might underlie NI formation. To assess the importance of the nuclear localization of ataxin-1 and its role in SCA1 pathogenesis, two lines of transgenic mice were generated. In the first line, the nuclear localization signal was mutated so that full-length mutant ataxin-1 would remain in the cytoplasm; mice from this line did not develop any ataxia or pathology. This

  1. Expanding the spectrum of PEX10-related peroxisomal biogenesis disorders: slowly progressive recessive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Mallaret, Martial; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Cheillan, David; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Claustres, Mireille; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs) consist of a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive diseases, in which peroxisome assembly and proliferation are impaired leading to severe multisystem disease and early death. PBDs include Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) with a relatively mild clinical phenotype caused by PEX1, (MIM# 602136), PEX2 (MIM# 170993), PEX6 (MIM# 601498), PEX10 (MIM# 602859), PEX12 (MIM# 601758), and PEX16 (MIM# 603360) mutations. Three adult patients are reported belonging to a non-consanguineous French family affected with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and pyramidal signs. Mental retardation and diabetes mellitus were optional. The age at onset was in childhood or in adolescence (3-15 years). Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy. Biochemical blood analyses suggested a mild peroxisomal defect. With whole exome sequencing, two mutations in PEX10 were found in the three patients: c.827G>T (novel) causing the missense change p.Cys276Phe and c.932G>A causing the missense change p.Arg311Gln. The phenotypic spectrum related to PEX10 mutations includes slowly progressive, syndromic recessive ataxia.

  2. Influence of visual and proprioceptive afferences on upper limb ataxia in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Quintern, J; Immisch, I; Albrecht, H; Pöllmann, W; Glasauer, S; Straube, A

    1999-02-01

    Our objective was to investigate how cooling of the arm and vision influence pointing movements in healthy subjects and patients with cerebellar limb ataxia due to clinically proven multiple sclerosis. An infrared video motion analysis system was used to record the unrestricted, horizontal pointing movements toward a target under three different conditions involving a moving, stationary, or imaginary target; a visual, or acoustic trigger; and vision or memory guidance. All three tasks were performed before and after cooling the arm in ice water. Patients had more hypermetric and slower pointing movements than controls under all tested conditions. Patients also had significantly larger three-dimensional finger sway paths during the postural phase and larger movement angles of the wrist joint. Memory-guided movements were the most hypermetric recorded in both groups. Cooling of the limb had no effect on amplitude or peak velocity of the pointing movement in either group under all tested conditions, but significantly reduced the three-dimensional finger sway path during the postural phase in patients with limb ataxia. Cooling-induced reduction of the finger sway was largest in those patients with the largest finger sway before cooling. In conclusion, the cooling-induced reduction of the proprioceptive afferent inflow, most probably of group I spindle afferents, reduces postural tremor of patients with cerebellar dysfunction.

  3. Clinical manifestation, imaging, and genotype analysis of two pedigrees with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Peipei, Liu; Yang, Liu; Weihong, Gu; Xiaonan, Song

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestation, imaging characteristics, genotype, and the relationship between the three aforementioned parameters in two pedigrees suffering from spinocerebellar ataxia. To evaluate the clinical manifestation of the two pedigrees and to compare the characteristics, we performed the MRI analysis of some patients from both pedigrees, while 2 ml of the peripheral blood sample was collected for gene analysis. The gene analysis data showed that pedigree 1 was certified spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2); the CAG repeats in the proband, proband's mother, and proband's brother were 44, 36, and 38, respectively. The MRI revealed brainstem cerebellar atrophy and "cross sign" and "ordinate sign" of pons. Pedigree 2 was certified SCA1; the CAG repeats of the proband, proband's aunt, and proband's asymptomatic cousin were 60, 51, and 52, respectively. The MRI revealed cerebellar atrophy in these individuals. We, therefore, concluded that it was difficult to diagnose the SCA subset solely through the clinical manifestation. The imaging characteristics analysis and final diagnosis depended basically on gene analysis data.

  4. NAD(+) Replenishment Improves Lifespan and Healthspan in Ataxia Telangiectasia Models via Mitophagy and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Kassahun, Henok; Croteau, Deborah L; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Marosi, Krisztina; Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Kalyanasundaram, Sumana; Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Wilson, Mark A; Iser, Wendy B; Wollman, Bradley N; Morevati, Marya; Li, Jun; Kerr, Jesse S; Lu, Qiping; Waltz, Tyler B; Tian, Jane; Sinclair, David A; Mattson, Mark P; Nilsen, Hilde; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-10-11

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and cerebellar ataxia. A-T is causally linked to defects in ATM, a master regulator of the response to and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The molecular basis of cerebellar atrophy and neurodegeneration in A-T patients is unclear. Here we report and examine the significance of increased PARylation, low NAD(+), and mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient neurons, mice, and worms. Treatments that replenish intracellular NAD(+) reduce the severity of A-T neuropathology, normalize neuromuscular function, delay memory loss, and extend lifespan in both animal models. Mechanistically, treatments that increase intracellular NAD(+) also stimulate neuronal DNA repair and improve mitochondrial quality via mitophagy. This work links two major theories on aging, DNA damage accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction through nuclear DNA damage-induced nuclear-mitochondrial signaling, and demonstrates that they are important pathophysiological determinants in premature aging of A-T, pointing to therapeutic interventions.

  5. Change in the cortical complexity of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 appears earlier than clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Jao, Chii-Wen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Wang, Po-Shan; Wu, Yu-Te

    2015-01-01

    Patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) have exhibited cerebral cortical involvement and various mental deficits in previous studies. Clinically, conventional measurements, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and electroencephalography (EEG), are insensitive to cerebral cortical involvement and mental deficits associated with SCA3, particularly at the early stage of the disease. We applied a three-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD) method, which can be used to quantify the shape complexity of cortical folding, in assessing cortical degeneration. We evaluated 48 genetically confirmed SCA3 patients by employing clinical scales and magnetic resonance imaging and using 50 healthy participants as a control group. According to the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the SCA3 patients were diagnosed with cortical dysfunction in the cerebellar cortex; however, no significant difference in the cerebral cortex was observed according to the patients' MMSE ratings. Using the 3D-FD method, we determined that cortical involvement was more extensive than involvement of traditional olivopontocerebellar regions and the corticocerebellar system. Moreover, the significant correlation between decreased 3D-FD values and disease duration may indicate atrophy of the cerebellar cortex and cerebral cortex in SCA3 patients. The change of the cerebral complexity in the SCA3 patients can be detected throughout the disease duration, especially it becomes substantial at the late stage of the disease. Furthermore, we determined that atrophy of the cerebral cortex may occur earlier than changes in MMSE scores and EEG signals.

  6. Lipids and lipoproteins in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J L; Chamberlain, S; Robinson, N

    1980-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessively inherited disease affecting the nervous system with a high incidence of heart involvement. Abnormalities of lipid metabolism are known to be associated with several progressive ataxic conditions. In this study of 46 Friedreich's ataxia patients, serum lipids, fatty acids and lipoproteins were assayed and compared with some earlier findings on Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders. Abnormalities of low and high density lipoproteins suggestive of a major defect have been reported; in the present study the level and chemical composition of high density lipoprotein has been assessed in 20 Friedreich's ataxia patients but previous abnormalities could not be substantiated. Lipid compositional analysis of Friedreich's ataxia central nervous tissue and heart, which has not been previously reported, did not markedly differ from control tissue. PMID:7359148

  7. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK) is caused by heterozygous KCNC1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Fábio A; Andrade, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a distinct group of seizure disorders characterized by gradual neurological decline with ataxia, myoclonus and recurring seizures. There are several forms of PME, among which the most recently described is MEAK - myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation. This particular subtype is caused by a recurrent de novo heterozygous mutation (c.959G>A, p.Arg320His) in the KCNC1 gene, which maps to chromosome 11 and encodes for the Kv3.1 protein (a subunit of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels). Loss of Kv3 function disrupts the firing properties of fast-spiking neurons, affects neurotransmitter release and induces cell death. Specifically regarding Kv3.1 malfunctioning, the most affected neurons include inhibitory GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar neurons. Impairment of the former cells is believed to contribute to myoclonus and seizures, whereas dysfunction of the latter to ataxia and tremor. Phenotypically, MEAK patients generally have a normal early development. At the age of 6 to 14 years, they present with myoclonus, which tends to progressively worsen with time. Tonic-clonic seizures may or may not be present, and some patients develop mild cognitive impairment following seizure onset. Typical electroencephalographic features comprise generalized epileptiform discharges and, in some cases, photosensitivity. Brain imaging is either normal or shows cerebellar atrophy. The identification of MEAK has both expanded the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of PME and established an emerging role for de novo mutations in PME.

  8. Friedreich's ataxia 1979: an overview.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, A

    1979-05-01

    This overview summarizes the investigations carried out during the second part of Phase Two of the Quebec Cooperative Study of Friedreich's Ataxia. These investigations outline in more details the fundamental role played by an abnormality in the fatty acid composition (deficient linoleic acid, 18:2) of the cholesterol esters of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in the phenotypic expression of the disease. They postulate a defective incorporation of linoleic acid to surface phosphatidylcholine of chylomicrons and consequent relative and absolute decreases in lipoprotein protein components because of overpacking with defective cholesteryl esters. Secondarily to these changes, the postulated lack of activation of the lipoamide dehydrogenase (LAD) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex could result in slow pyruvate oxidation, glucose intolerance, deficient synthesis of acetylcholine, and depletion of glutamic and aspartic acid pools. In parallel, abnormal phosphatidyl-choline molecules could be incorporated to membranes, resulting in specific defects in some functions of these membranes, including transport of calcium and/or taurine and myelinization. The framework of an understanding of Friedreich's ataxia is now available, but much fundamental and clinical work remains to be done to fill in and prove each one of these postulated steps.

  9. An autopsy case of an aged patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Chiho; Komai, Kiyonobu; Yonezawa, Kohei; Sakajiri, Ken-Ichi; Nitta, Eishun; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a woman who developed limb clumsiness in her fifties and gait disturbance in her sixties. She was bedridden after bone fractures at age 75 and showed disorientation, slow eye movement, gaze palsy, ataxic speech, muscle atrophy and weakness, and areflexia with pathological reflex. She died of respiratory failure at age 85. This patient was diagnosed genetically as having spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), and the number of expanded CAG repeats was 41. At autopsy, the brain weighed 965 g, and the brainstem, cerebellum, frontal convexity and spinal cord were atrophic. Neuronal loss and gliosis were severe in the pontine nucleus, inferior olivary nucleus, cerebellar cortex, gracile and cuneate nuclei and moderate in the substantia nigra, cerebellar dentate nucleus, anterior horns of the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Axonal loss was observed in the middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles, pyramidal tract and posterior column of the spinal cord. Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were diffusely found in the cerebrum (plaque stage C; NFT stage IV). Expanded polyglutamine-immunoreactive inclusions in the neuronal cytoplasm were widely distributed in the CNS, and neuronal intranuclear inclusions were observed in the pontine nucleus and cerebral cortex. This patient in this autopsy case is a late-onset and aged patient with SCA2, and this is the first report of SCA2 combined with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Neuropathological findings in this patient, except for AD pathology, were consistent with those of reported SCA2 cases. However, the olivo-ponto-cerebellar system of this patient was relatively preserved and the cerebellar dentate nucleus was more involved as compared with previously reported cases. These results suggest that age at onset or the number of CAG repeat expansions could correlate with the distribution pattern of SCA2 neurodegeneration.

  10. Cerebellar mutism caused by primary varicella infection in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) is a common childhood infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which is often self-limiting and usually benign. Although uncommon, neurologic complications of varicella have been documented that include postinfectious cerebellar ataxia, meningoencephalitis, Reye syndrome, myelitis, optic neuritis, stroke, Guillain-Barré syndrome, seventh cranial nerve palsy, and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. In this case study, the authors describe a 7-year-old girl who presented with varicella skin rash with unsteady gait and anarthria on day 2, and her condition was attributed to cerebellar mutism. To date, this complication has never been reported in a child with primary varicella infection. Therefore, this case study documents a rare but serious complication of childhood chickenpox.

  11. Acute tinnitus and permanent audiovestibular damage after hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    DeJonckere, P H; de Surgères, G G

    2001-01-01

    Yeast-derived recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine usage has been widely accepted since the early 1990s, especially for high-risk patients. Severe adverse effects have been reported infrequently. Certain neurological complications raise concern for hepatitis B vaccine: central nervous system demyelination, acute myelitis, acute cerebellar ataxia, and various peripheral mononeuropathies. Case reports on tinnitus, hearing loss, and vestibular damage are extremely scarce. The case presented here concerns a professionally active nurse, born in 1953, with a medical history of progressive renal failure and hemodialysis. Eleven hours after a second injection of the hepatitis B vaccine Engerix B, an acute left-sided tinnitus occurred and, a few hours later, severe left hearing loss and intense vertigo. Tinnitus and the sensation of vertigo regressed fairly quickly, but the hearing loss and the vestibular paresis were permanent. Increased interpeak intervals on auditory brain responses and lack of recruitment suggested that the lesion probably is located at the level of cranial nerve VIII. From a medicolegal point of view, this audiovestibular damage had to be considered an accident at work and not as an occupational disease.

  12. Peripheral Neuropathy in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1, 2, 3, and 6.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Christoph; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Rakowicz, Maryla; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Szymanski, Sandra; Berciano, Jose; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Pedersen, Karine; Depondt, Chantal; Rola, Rafal; Klockgether, Thomas; García, Antonio; Mutlu, Gurkan; Schöls, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are characterized by autosomal dominantly inherited progressive ataxia but are clinically heterogeneous due to variable involvement of non-cerebellar parts of the nervous system. Non-cerebellar symptoms contribute significantly to the burden of SCAs, may guide the clinician to the underlying genetic subtype, and might be useful markers to monitor disease. Peripheral neuropathy is frequently observed in SCA, but subtype-specific features and subclinical manifestations have rarely been evaluated. We performed a multicenter nerve conduction study with 162 patients with genetically confirmed SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, and SCA6. The study proved peripheral nerves to be involved in the neurodegenerative process in 82 % of SCA1, 63 % of SCA2, 55 % of SCA3, and 22 % of SCA6 patients. Most patients of all subtypes revealed affection of both sensory and motor fibers. Neuropathy was most frequently of mixed type with axonal and demyelinating characteristics in all SCA subtypes. However, nerve conduction velocities of SCA1 patients were slower compared to other genotypes. SCA6 patients revealed less axonal damage than patients with other subtypes. No influence of CAG repeat length or biometric determinants on peripheral neuropathy could be identified in SCA1, SCA3, and SCA6. In SCA2, earlier onset and more severe ataxia were associated with peripheral neuropathy. We proved peripheral neuropathy to be a frequent site of the neurodegenerative process in all common SCA subtypes. Since damage to peripheral nerves is readily assessable by electrophysiological means, nerve conduction studies should be performed in a longitudinal approach to assess these parameters as potential progression markers.

  13. Comprehensive study of early features in spinocerebellar ataxia 2: delineating the prodromal stage of the disease.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Cruz-Rivas, Edilia M; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Vaca-Palomares, Israel; Lilia-Campins, Jandy; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Peña-Acosta, Arnoy; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimeé; Diaz, Rosalinda; Magaña-Aguirre, Jonathan J; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; Estupiñán-Rodríguez, Annelié; Laffita-Mesa, José M; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Canales-Ochoa, Nalia; González-Zaldivar, Yanetza

    2014-10-01

    The prodromal phase of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) has not been systematically studied. Main findings come from a homogeneous SCA type 2 (SCA2) population living in Cuba. The aim of this study was to characterize extensively the prodromal phase of SCA2 by several approaches. Thirty-seven non-ataxic SCA2 mutation carriers and its age- and sex-matched controls underwent clinical assessments, including standardized neurological exam, structured interviews and clinical scales, and looking for somatic and autonomic features, as well as a neuropsychological battery, antisaccadic recordings, and MRI scans. Main clinical somatic features of non-ataxic mutation carriers were cramps, sensory symptoms, sleep disorders, and hyperreflexia, whereas predominating autonomic symptoms were pollakiuria/nocturia, constipation, and frequent throat clearing. Cognitive impairments included early deficits of executive functions and visual memory, suggesting the involvement of cerebro-cerebellar-cerebral loops and/or reduced cholinergic basal forebrain input to the cortex. Antisaccadic task revealed impaired oculomotor inhibitory control but preserved ability for error correction. Cognitive and antisaccadic deficits were higher as carriers were closer to the estimated onset of ataxia, whereas higher Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) scores were associated most notably to vermis atrophy. The recognition of early features of SCA2 offers novel insights into the prodromal phase and physiopathological base of the disease, allowing the assessment of its progression and the efficacy of treatments, in particular at early phases when therapeutical options should be most effective.

  14. Loss of the golgin GM130 causes Golgi disruption, Purkinje neuron loss, and ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyi; Mei, Mei; Li, Qiuling; Pang, Qianqian; Ying, Zhengzhou; Gao, Fei; Lowe, Martin; Bao, Shilai

    2017-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus lies at the heart of the secretory pathway where it is required for secretory trafficking and cargo modification. Disruption of Golgi architecture and function has been widely observed in neurodegenerative disease, but whether Golgi dysfunction is causal with regard to the neurodegenerative process, or is simply a manifestation of neuronal death, remains unclear. Here we report that targeted loss of the golgin GM130 leads to a profound neurological phenotype in mice. Global KO of mouse GM130 results in developmental delay, severe ataxia, and postnatal death. We further show that selective deletion of GM130 in neurons causes fragmentation and defective positioning of the Golgi apparatus, impaired secretory trafficking, and dendritic atrophy in Purkinje cells. These cellular defects manifest as reduced cerebellar size and Purkinje cell number, leading to ataxia. Purkinje cell loss and ataxia first appear during postnatal development but progressively worsen with age. Our data therefore indicate that targeted disruption of the mammalian Golgi apparatus and secretory traffic results in neuronal degeneration in vivo, supporting the view that Golgi dysfunction can play a causative role in neurodegeneration. PMID:28028212

  15. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  16. A new model to study neurodegeneration in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Becherel, Olivier J.; Sun, Jane; Yeo, Abrey J.; Nayler, Sam; Fogel, Brent L.; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Wolvetang, Ernst; Lavin, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) is a rare autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. Recent evidence suggests that the protein defective in this syndrome, senataxin (SETX), functions in RNA processing to protect the integrity of the genome. To date, only patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells, fibroblasts and SETX knockdown cells were available to investigate AOA2. Recent disruption of the Setx gene in mice did not lead to neurobehavioral defects or neurodegeneration, making it difficult to study the etiology of AOA2. To develop a more relevant neuronal model to study neurodegeneration in AOA2, we derived neural progenitors from a patient with AOA2 and a control by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming of fibroblasts. AOA2 iPSC and neural progenitors exhibit increased levels of oxidative damage, DNA double-strand breaks, increased DNA damage-induced cell death and R-loop accumulation. Genome-wide expression and weighted gene co-expression network analysis in these neural progenitors identified both previously reported and novel affected genes and cellular pathways associated with senataxin dysfunction and the pathophysiology of AOA2, providing further insight into the role of senataxin in regulating gene expression on a genome-wide scale. These data show that iPSCs can be generated from patients with the autosomal recessive ataxia, AOA2, differentiated into neurons, and that both cell types recapitulate the AOA2 cellular phenotype. This represents a novel and appropriate model system to investigate neurodegeneration in this syndrome. PMID:26231220

  17. Mutations in PNKP cause recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 4.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Alonso, Isabel; Barbot, Clara; Costa, Maria Manuela; Darwent, Lee; Orme, Tatiana; Sequeiros, Jorge; Hardy, John; Coutinho, Paula; Guerreiro, Rita

    2015-03-05

    Hereditary autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to study a cohort of nine Portuguese families who were identified during a nationwide, population-based, systematic survey as displaying a consistent phenotype of recessive ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA). The integration of data from these analyses led to the identification of the same homozygous PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) mutation, c.1123G>T (p.Gly375Trp), in three of the studied families. When analyzing this particular gene in the exome sequencing data from the remaining cohort, we identified homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in five other families. PNKP is a dual-function enzyme with a key role in different pathways of DNA-damage repair. Mutations in this gene have previously been associated with an autosomal-recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly; early-onset, intractable seizures; and developmental delay (MCSZ). The finding of PNKP mutations associated with recessive AOA extends the phenotype associated with this gene and identifies a fourth locus that causes AOA. These data confirm that MCSZ and some forms of ataxia share etiological features, most likely reflecting the role of PNKP in DNA-repair mechanisms.

  18. Spinocerebellar ataxias in Venezuela: genetic epidemiology and their most likely ethnic descent.

    PubMed

    Paradisi, Irene; Ikonomu, Vassiliki; Arias, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Dominantly inherited ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias, SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of neurologic diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar and spinal tract degeneration with ataxia and other signs, common to all known subtypes. Several types are relatively frequent worldwide, but in several countries, one specific SCA may show a higher prevalence owing to founder phenomena. In Venezuela, genetic epidemiological features of SCAs have been assessed during the last 30 years; mutations in ATXN1 (SCA1), ATXN2 (SCA2), ATXN3 (SCA3), CACNA1A (SCA6), ATXN7 (SCA7), ATXN8 (SCA8), ATXN10 (SCA10), TBP (SCA17) and ATN1 (dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy, DRPLA) loci were searched among 115 independent families. SCA7 was the most frequent subtype (26.6%), followed by SCA3 (25.0%), SCA2 (21.9%), SCA1 (17.2%), SCA10 (4.7%) and DRPLA (3.1%); in 43% of the families, the subtype remained unidentified. SCA7 mutations displayed strong geographic aggregation in two independent founder foci, and SCA1 showed a very remote founder effect for a subset of families. SCA10 families were scattered across the country, but all had an identical in-phase haplotype carried also by Mexican, Brazilian and Sioux patients, supporting a very old common Amerindian origin. Prevalence for dominant SCAs in Venezuela was estimated as 1:25 000 nuclear families, provenances of which are either Caucasoid, African or Amerindian.

  19. Abnormal N400 word repetition effects in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olichney, John M; Chan, Shiaohui; Wong, Ling M; Schneider, Andrea; Seritan, Andreea; Niese, Adam; Yang, Jin-Chen; Laird, Kelsey; Teichholtz, Sara; Khan, Sara; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi

    2010-05-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, a neurodegenerative disorder associated with premutation alleles (55-200 CGG repeats) of the FMR1 gene, affects many carriers in late-life. Patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome typically have cerebellar ataxia, intranuclear inclusions in neurons and astrocytes, as well as cognitive impairment. Dementia can also be present with cognitive deficits that are as severe as in Alzheimer's disease, however frontosubcortical type impairment is more pronounced in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. We sought to characterize the P600 and N400 word repetition effects in patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, using an event-related potential word repetition paradigm with demonstrated sensitivity to very early Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome-affected participants with poor declarative verbal memory would have pronounced abnormalities in the P600 repetition effect. In the event-related potential experiment, subjects performed a category decision task whilst an electroencephalogram was recorded. Auditory category statements were each followed by an associated visual target word (50% 'congruous' category exemplars, 50% 'incongruous' nouns). Two-thirds of the stimuli (category statement-target word pairs) were repeated, either at short-lag (approximately 10-40 s) or long-lag (approximately 100-140 s). The N400 and P600 amplitude data were submitted to split-plot analyses of variance. These analyses of variance showed a highly significant reduction of the N400 repetition effect (F = 22.5, P < 0.001), but not of the P600 repetition effect, in mild fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (n = 32, mean age = 68.7, mean Mini-Mental State Examination score = 26.8). Patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome had significantly smaller late positive amplitude (550-800 ms post-stimulus onset) to congruous words (P = 0

  20. Familial Alzheimer’s disease–associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia with unclear pathophysiology. A Colombian kindred carrying the PS1-E280A mutation is the largest known cohort of PS1-FAD patients. Here, we investigated PS1-E280A–associated cerebellar dysfunction and found that it occurs early in PS1-E208A carriers, while cerebellar signs are highly prevalent in patients with dementia. Postmortem analysis of cerebella of PS1-E280A carrier revealed greater Purkinje cell (PC) loss and more abnormal mitochondria compared with controls. In PS1-E280A tissue, ER/mitochondria tethering was impaired, Ca2+ channels IP3Rs and CACNA1A were downregulated, and Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial transport proteins MIRO1 and KIF5C were reduced. Accordingly, expression of PS1-E280A in a neuronal cell line altered ER/mitochondria tethering and transport compared with that in cells expressing wild-type PS1. In a murine model of PS1-FAD, animals exhibited mild ataxia and reduced PC simple spike activity prior to cerebellar β-amyloid deposition. Our data suggest that impaired calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction in PS1-FAD PCs reduces their activity and contributes to motor coordination deficits prior to Aβ aggregation and dementia. We propose that PS1-E280A affects both Ca2+ homeostasis and Aβ precursor processing, leading to FAD and neurodegeneration. PMID:24569455

  1. Chronic THC intake modifies fundamental cerebellar functions

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nephi

    2013-01-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal bioactive component in the Cannabis plant, is truly a captivating drug. Acute and chronic THC intake produces a spectrum of biological effects ranging from transient psychotropic effects to prolonged medicinal benefits, many of which have been fostered for centuries by our society. In the July 2013 issue of the JCI, Cutando et al. combined mouse genetics with classic mouse behavioral analysis to deepen our understanding of the physiological consequence of subchronic THC intake on eyeblink reflexes, a fundamental neuronal adaptive response, revealing that this regimen leads to downregulation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (referred to as CB1 in the Cutando et al. article) in cerebellar stress fibers and the activation of microglia, raising provocative new questions about the safety profile of regimented THC intake. PMID:23863631

  2. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as prodromal symptom of anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Martines, Francesco; Dispenza, Francesco; Gagliardo, Cesare; Martines, Enrico; Bentivegna, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a clinical condition characterized by a sudden onset of unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. In recent years sudden deafness has been frequently described in association with anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction generally presenting along with other brainstem and cerebellar signs such as ataxia, dysmetria and peripheral facial palsy. The authors report a rare clinical case of a 53-year-old man who suddenly developed hearing loss and tinnitus without any brainstem or cerebellar signs. Computed tomography of his brain was normal, and the audiological results localized the lesion causing deafness to the inner ear. Surprisingly, magnetic resonance imaging showed an ischemic infarct in the right AICA territory. This case represents the fifth in the literature to date but it confirms that AICA occlusion can cause sudden deafness even without brainstem or cerebellar signs. Therefore, we recommend submitting the patient for neuroimaging, as an emergency, in order to exclude infarction of the AICA territory. By doing this, it may be possible to limit the extent of the lesion by commencing early therapy.

  3. Adaptation and aftereffects of split-belt walking in cerebellar lesion patients

    PubMed Central

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Sunaert, Stefan; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    To walk efficiently and stably on different surfaces under various constrained conditions, humans need to adapt their gait pattern substantially. Although the mechanisms behind locomotor adaptation are still not fully understood, the cerebellum is thought to play an important role. In this study we aimed to address the specific localization of cerebellar involvement in split-belt adaptation by comparing performance in patients with stable focal lesions after cerebellar tumor resection and in healthy controls. We observed that changes in symmetry of those parameters that were most closely related to interlimb coordination (such as step length and relative double stance time) were similar between healthy controls and cerebellar patients during and after split-belt walking. In contrast, relative stance times (proportions of stance in the gait cycle) were more asymmetric for the patient group than for the control group during the early phase of the post-split-belt condition. Patients who walked with more asymmetric relative stance times were more likely to demonstrate lesions in vermal lobules VI and Crus II. These results confirm that deficits in gait adaptation vary with ataxia severity and between patients with different types of cerebellar damage. PMID:26203113

  4. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  5. Assessment of ataxia phenotype in a new mouse model of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wyman; Caston, Rose; Balakrishnan, Bijina; Siddiqi, Anwer; Parmar, Kamalpreet; Tang, Manshu; Feng, Merry; Lai, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Despite adequate dietary management, patients with classic galactosemia continue to have increased risks of cognitive deficits, speech dyspraxia, primary ovarian insufficiency, and abnormal motor development. A recent evaluation of a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT)-deficient mouse model revealed reduced fertility and growth restriction. These phenotypes resemble those seen in human patients. In this study, we further assess the fidelity of this new mouse model by examining the animals for the manifestation of a common neurological sequela in human patients: cerebellar ataxia. The balance, grip strength, and motor coordination of GALT-deficient and wild-type mice were tested using a modified rotarod. The results were compared to composite phenotype scoring tests, typically used to evaluate neurological and motor impairment. The data demonstrated abnormalities with varying severity in the GALT-deficient mice. Mice of different ages were used to reveal the progressive nature of motor impairment. The varying severity and age-dependent impairments seen in the animal model agree with reports on human patients. Finally, measurements of the cerebellar granular and molecular layers suggested that mutant mice experience cerebellar hypoplasia, which could have resulted from the down-regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  6. Compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations cause Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome with late-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Deik, A; Johannes, B; Rucker, J C; Sánchez, E; Brodie, S E; Deegan, E; Landy, K; Kajiwara, Y; Scelsa, S; Saunders-Pullman, R; Paisán-Ruiz, C

    2014-12-01

    PNPLA6 mutations, known to be associated with the development of motor neuron phenotypes, have recently been identified in families with Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome. Boucher-Neuhäuser is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by the co-occurrence of cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and chorioretinal dystrophy. Gait ataxia in Boucher-Neuhäuser usually manifests before early adulthood, although onset in the third or fourth decade has also been reported. However, given the recent identification of PNPLA6 mutations as the cause of this condition, the determining factors of age of symptom onset still need to be established. Here, we have identified a sporadic Boucher-Neuhäuser case with late-onset gait ataxia and relatively milder retinal changes due to compound heterozygous PNPLA6 mutations. Compound heterozygosity was confirmed by cloning and sequencing the patient's genomic DNA from coding exons 26-29. Furthermore, both mutations (one novel and one known) fell in the phospholipase esterase domain, where most pathogenic mutations seem to cluster. Taken together, we herein confirm PNPLA6 mutations as the leading cause of Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome and suggest inquiring about a history of hypogonadism or visual changes in patients presenting with late-onset gait ataxia. We also advocate for neuroophthalmologic evaluation in suspected cases.

  7. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  8. [Pathophysiology of Ataxia in Fisher Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Fisher syndrome is regarded as a peculiar inflammatory neuropathy associated with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. The disorder is associated with preceding infection, cerebrospinal fluid albumino-cytological dissociation, and spontaneous recovery, and regarded as a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The discovery of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies led to dramatic advances in understanding the pathophysiology of Fisher syndrome. The lesions in Fisher syndrome are determined by expression of ganglioside GQ1b in the human nervous system. This review article focuses on the pathophysiology of ataxia in Fisher syndrome. Current evidence suggests that antibody attack on Group Ia neurons in the dorsal root ganglia is mainly responsible for the sensory ataxia. Involvement of the muscle spindles might also contribute to the development of ataxia.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia with oculomotor apraxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... high amounts of a protein called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in their blood. (An increase in the level ... tissue. The effect of abnormally high levels of AFP or CPK in people with ataxia with oculomotor ...

  10. Transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells improves motor coordination and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease mice.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Liliana S; Nóbrega, Clévio; Hirai, Hirokazu; Kaspar, Brian K; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2015-02-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is a neurodegenerative disease without effective treatment. Patients with Machado-Joseph disease exhibit significant motor impairments such as gait ataxia, associated with multiple neuropathological changes including mutant ATXN3 inclusions, marked neuronal loss and atrophy of the cerebellum. Thus, an effective treatment of symptomatic patients with Machado-Joseph disease may require cell replacement, which we investigated in this study. For this purpose, we injected cerebellar neural stem cells into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice and assessed the effect on the neuropathology, neuroinflammation mediators and neurotrophic factor levels and motor coordination. We found that upon transplantation into the cerebellum of adult Machado-Joseph disease mice, cerebellar neural stem cells differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, cerebellar neural stem cell transplantation mediated a significant and robust alleviation of the motor behaviour impairments, which correlated with preservation from Machado-Joseph disease-associated neuropathology, namely reduction of Purkinje cell loss, reduction of cellular layer shrinkage and mutant ATXN3 aggregates. Additionally, a significant reduction of neuroinflammation and an increase of neurotrophic factors levels was observed, indicating that transplantation of cerebellar neural stem cells also triggers important neuroprotective effects. Thus, cerebellar neural stem cells have the potential to be used as a cell replacement and neuroprotective approach for Machado-Joseph disease therapy.

  11. Failure of Fixation Suppression of Spontaneous Nystagmus in Cerebellar Infarction: Frequency, Pattern, and a Possible Structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Yi, Hyon-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of failure of the fixation suppression (FFS) of spontaneous nystagmus (SN) in unilateral cerebellar infarction, and to identify the structure responsible for FFS, 29 patients with acute, mainly unilateral, isolated cerebellar infarction who had SN with a predominantly horizontal component were enrolled in this study. The ocular fixation index (OFI) was defined as the mean slow phase velocity (SPV) of the horizontal component of SN with fixation divided by the mean SPV of the horizontal component of SN without fixation. The OFI from age- and sex-matched patients with vestibular neuritis was calculated and used as the control data. The FFS of SN was only found in less than half (41 %, 12/29) of the patients. Approximately 65 % (n = 7) of the patients with isolated anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS, whereas only a quarter (n = 3) of the patients with isolated posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territory cerebellar infarction showed FFS. The proportion of gaze-evoked nystagmus (6/12 [50 %] vs. 2/17 [12 %], p = 0.04) and deficient gain of ipsilesional pursuit (10/12 [83 %] vs. 6/17 [35 %], p = 0.05) was more frequent in the FFS group than in the group without FFS. Lesion subtraction analysis in isolated PICA territory cerebellar infarction revealed that the nodulus was commonly damaged in patients with FFS, compared to that of patients without FFS. Our study shows that FFS of SN due to acute cerebellar infarction is less common than previously thought and the nodulus may be an important structure for the suppression of SN in humans.

  12. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  13. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cécile; Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-08-01

    SEE MUTHURAMAN ET AL DOI101093/AWW164 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects.

  14. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  15. Cerebellar lesions and prism adaptation in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Baizer, J S; Kralj-Hans, I; Glickstein, M

    1999-04-01

    If a laterally displacing prism is placed in front of one eye of a person or monkey with the other eye occluded, they initially will point to one side of a target that is located directly in front of them. Normally, people and monkeys adapt easily to the displaced vision and correct their aim after a few trials. If the prism then is removed, there is a postadaptation shift in which the subject misses the target and points in the opposite direction for a few trials. We tested five Macaque monkeys for their ability to adapt to a laterally displacing prism and to show the expected postadaptation shift. When tested as normals, all five animals showed the typical pattern of adaptation and postadaptation shift. Like human subjects, the monkeys also showed complete interocular transfer of the adaptation but no transfer of the adaptation between the two arms. When preoperative training and testing was complete, we made lesions of various target areas on the cerebellar cortex. A cerebellar lesion that included the dorsal paraflocculus and uvula abolished completely the normal prism adaptation for the arm ipsilateral to the lesion in one of the five monkeys. The other four animals retained the ability to prism-adapt normally and showed the expected postadaptation shift. In the one case in which the lesion abolished prism adaptation, the damage included Crus I and II, paramedian lobule and the dorsal paraflocculus of the cerebellar hemispheres as well as lobule IX, of the vermis. Thus in this case, the lesion included virtually all the cerebellar cortex that receives mossy-fiber visual information relayed via the pontine nuclei from the cerebral cortex. The other four animals had damage to lobule V, the classical anterior lobe arm area and/or vermian lobules VI/VII, the oculomotor region. When tested postoperatively, some of these animals showed a degree of ataxia equivalent to that of the case in which prism adaptation was affected, but prism adaptation and the

  16. Non-motor and Extracerebellar Features in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Escorcio-Bezerra, Marcio Luiz; Abrahão, Agessandro; de Albuquerque, Marcus Vinicius Cristino; Filho, Flavio Moura Rezende; de Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi; de Rezende Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira; Borges, Franklin Roberto Pereira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2017-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant degenerative disease. Pathological studies have demonstrated not only cerebellar and brainstem atrophy, but substantia nigra, motoneurons, basal ganglia, thalamus, and peripheral nerves involvement. These findings may explain non-motor and extra-cerebellar features in SCA2. We accessed the non-motor symptoms and extra-cerebellar signs in SCA2 patients in order to provide a better understanding on pathophysiological mechanisms and natural history of brain degeneration in the disease. Thirty-three SCA2 patients were evaluated and compared with 26 healthy subjects. We investigated the following variables: sleep disorders, cognitive deficit, olfactory impairment, urinary dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, cramps, pain, movement disorders, and weight loss. SCA2 had a high frequency of REM sleep behavior disorder (48.48 %, N = 16) as well as excessive daytime sleepiness (42.42 %, N = 14). Chorea was present in 15.15 % (N = 5), dystonia in 27.27 % (N = 9), and parkinsonism in 27.27 % (N = 9). Slow saccadic pursuit was present in 87.87 % (N = 29) and ophtalmoparesis in 78.78 % (N = 26) of patients. Regarding sleep disorders, 18.18 % (N = 6) of patients had restless leg syndrome. Dysphagia was present in 39.39 % (N = 13), weight loss 24.24 % (N = 8), and urinary dysfunction 27.27 % (N = 9). Cramps was present in only 6 % of patients (N = 2). This study highlighted the high frequency of non-motor symptoms and extra-cerebellar signs in SCA2. Our findings demonstrate the widespread of nervous system involvement in SCA2 patients and contribute to better understand the natural history of brain degeneration in this genetic condition.

  17. Ataxia and Encephalitis in a Young Adult with EBV Mononucleosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rashid S.; Hussain, Naaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurological manifestations of mononucleosis are extremely rare, occurring in about 1% of all cases. However, when they occur, appropriate treatment must be undertaken to ensure appropriate symptomatic management and reduce morbidity. We present the case of a 25-year-old graduate student with weeklong complaints of fever, sore throat, fatigue, nausea, and “dizziness.” She later developed increased sleep requirements, ataxia, vertigo, and nystagmus with a positive EBV IgM titer confirming acute infectious mononucleosis. The patient was clinically diagnosed with EBV-associated cerebellitis and encephalitis, displaying neurological and psychiatric impairment commonly seen in postconcussion syndrome. MRI showed no acute changes. She was started on valacyclovir and a prednisone taper, recovering by the end of twelve weeks. Though corticosteroids and acyclovir are not recommended therapy in patients presenting with EBV-associated ataxia, clinicians may want to keep a low threshold to start these medications in case more serious neurological sequelae develop. PMID:23781357

  18. HLA-DR3-DQ2 mice do not develop ataxia in the presence of high titre anti-gliadin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tarlac, Volga; Kelly, Louise; Nag, Nupur; Allen-Graham, Judy; Anderson, Robert P; Storey, Elsdon

    2013-06-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that anti-gliadin antibodies (αGAb) may produce "gluten ataxia", even in the absence of celiac disease enteropathy. αGAb are reportedly present in 12-50 % of patients with sporadic ataxia, but also in 12 % of the general population, such that the importance of αGAb as a cause of sporadic ataxia is not conclusively settled. We aimed to determine whether mice transgenic for HLA-DR3-DQ2 and immunised with gliadin to achieve high titres of αGAb would develop ataxia and/or cerebellar damage. From 6 weeks of age, HLA-DR3-DQ2 transgenic mice were immunised fortnightly with gliadin (n = 10) or a saline control (n = 6) in adjuvant. Serum titres were measured by αGAb enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 24 weeks of age, mice were tested for locomotor function using the accelerating rotarod, ledged beam, ink-paw gait, and several neurological severity score subtests. Brains were then collected and processed for immunohistochemistry. Sections were analysed for lymphocytic infiltration, changes in morphology and Purkinje cell (PC) dendritic volume and the number of PCs counted via unbiased stereology. Gliadin-immunised mice developed high αGAb titres while controls did not. There was no statistically significant difference between the gliadin and sham-immunised HLA-DR3-DQ2 mice on any of the tests of motor coordination, in lymphocytic infiltration, PC number or in dendritic volume. High levels of αGAb are not sufficient to produce ataxia or cerebellar damage in HLA-DR3-DQ2 transgenic mice.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions NARP neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa ( NARP ) is a condition that causes a variety ...

  20. Nonsurgical cerebellar mutism (anarthria) in two children.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kadhim, Hazim; Christophe, Catherine; Christiaens, Florence J; Dan, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Cerebellar mutism (anarthria) is a well-described complication of posterior fossa tumor resection. It is accompanied by a characteristic behavior including irritability and autistic features. This syndrome is typically reversible within days to months. Underlying pathophysiology is unknown. We describe two children who presented with a similar clinical finding after nonsurgical cerebellar involvement, hemolytic-uremic syndrome in one and cerebellitis in the other. Postmortem pathologic findings in the first patient indicated cerebellar ischemic necrosis. Single-photon emission computed tomography in the second patient revealed diffuse cerebellar hypoperfusion with no supratentorial abnormalities, refuting a phenomenon of diaschisis between cerebellar and frontal connections. These findings confirm that this clinical syndrome may occur in a nonsurgical, nontraumatic context. They are consistent with recent integrative hypotheses explaining cerebellar anarthria.

  1. Truncal ataxia from infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Ryoo, Sookyung; Moon, So Young; Seo, Sand Won; Na, Duk L

    2012-08-01

    Truncal ataxia in medullary infarction may be caused by involvement of the lateral part of the medulla; however, truncal ataxia in infarction involving the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has received comparatively little attention. We report a patient with truncal ataxia due to medial medullary infarction located in the ION. A lesion in the ION could produce a contralateral truncal ataxia due to increased inhibitory input to the contralesional vestibular nucleus from the contralesional flocculus.

  2. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome with autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexiou, Eleni; Xifaras, Michael; Gekas, Georgios; Rombos, Antonios

    2008-06-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder of probably autoimmune origin. Most cases are associated with a remote neoplasm or a viral infection; however in some instances no underlying aetiology can be demonstrated. We report the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (anti-GAD Abs) in the serum and CSF of a patient with idiopathic OMS. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin led to a remarkable clinical improvement with parallel reduction of anti-GAD titers. Anti-GAD Abs have been associated with several neurological syndromes. They could also be responsible for the clinical triad of OMS, by impairing GABAergic transmission in specific brainstem and cerebellar circuits. We propose that testing for anti-GAD Abs should be performed in OMS, especially when no other aetiological association can be demonstrated.

  3. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas

    PubMed Central

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Del Sette, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. PMID:26005350

  4. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description VLDLR -associated cerebellar hypoplasia is an inherited condition that affects the development ...

  5. Progressive cerebellar, auditory, and esophageal dysfunction caused by targeted disruption of the frizzled-4 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huso, D; Cahill, H; Ryugo, D; Nathans, J

    2001-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and in synapse formation during neural development, and these actions are presumed to be mediated by frizzled receptors. In this paper we report the phenotype of mice carrying a targeted deletion of the frizzled-4 (fz4) gene. fz4(-/-) mice exhibit three distinct defects: (1) progressive cerebellar degeneration associated with severe ataxia, (2) absence of a skeletal muscle sheath around the lower esophagus associated with progressive esophageal distension and dysfunction, and (3) progressive deafness caused by a defect in the peripheral auditory system unaccompanied by loss of hair cells or other auditory neurons. As assayed using a lacZ knock-in reporter, fz4 is widely expressed within the CNS. In particular, fz4 is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, esophageal skeletal muscle, and cochlear inner hair cells, and the absence of Fz4 in these cells is presumed to account for the fz4(-/-) phenotype. In contrast to the early cell proliferation and patterning effects classically ascribed to Wnts, the auditory and cerebellar phenotypes of fz4(-/-) mice implicate Frizzled signaling in maintaining the viability and integrity of the nervous system in later life.

  6. Three spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 siblings with ataxia, parkinsonism, and motor neuronopathy.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Noriko; Nagai, Masahiro; Tsujii, Tomoaki; Tanabe, Nachi; Takashima, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) represents a family of dominant neurodegenerative disorders that results from CAG expansion repeat mutations. The phenotype consists of some common features, most notably progressive ataxia. We describe three siblings with SCA2, manifesting parkinsonism and ataxia in the first sibling, juvenile parkinsonism in the second and motor neuronopathy in the third. Genetic examination revealed expansion to 42, 43, and 42 CAG repeats. There was no relationship between the number of repeats and phenotype. The SCA2 gene should be studied in families with heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders, including motor neuron disease.

  7. Neuroligins Are Selectively Essential for NMDAR Signaling in Cerebellar Stellate Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that contribute to synapse specification. However, many other postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules are known and the relative contributions of neuroligins versus other such molecules in different types of synapses and neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the role of neuroligins in cerebellar stellate interneurons that participate in a well defined circuit that converges on Purkinje cells as the major output neurons of cerebellar cortex. By crossing triple conditional knock-out (cKO) mice targeting all three major neuroligins [neuroligin-1 to neuroligin-3 (NL123)] with parvalbumin-Cre (PV-Cre) transgenic mice, we deleted neuroligins from inhibitory cerebellar interneurons and Purkinje cells, allowing us to study the effects of neuroligin deletions on cerebellar stellate cell synapses by electrophysiology in acute slices. PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice did not exhibit gross alterations of cerebellar structure or cerebellar interneuron morphology. Strikingly, electrophysiological recordings in stellate cells from these PV-Cre/NL123 cKO mice revealed a large decrease in NMDAR-mediated excitatory synaptic responses, which, in stellate cells, are largely extrasynaptic, without a change in AMPA-receptor-mediated responses. Parallel analyses in PV-Cre/NL1 mice that are single NL1 cKO mice uncovered the same phenotype, demonstrating that NL1 is responsible for recruiting extrasynaptic NMDARs. Moreover, we observed only a modest impairment in inhibitory synaptic responses in stellate cells lacking NL123 despite a nearly complete suppression of inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells by the same genetic manipulation. Our results suggest that, unlike other types of neurons investigated, neuroligins are selectively essential in cerebellar stellate interneurons for enabling the function of extrasynaptic NMDARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules genetically linked to

  8. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Elkamil, Areej; Johansen, Krisztina K.; Aasly, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects) found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years) and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA). All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits. PMID:25614784

  9. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  10. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Snively, Beverly M.; Cook, Jared F.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Markello, Thomas C.; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient’s ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative. PMID:26990090

  11. ATP1A3 Mutation in Adult Rapid-Onset Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sweadner, Kathleen J; Toro, Camilo; Whitlow, Christopher T; Snively, Beverly M; Cook, Jared F; Ozelius, Laurie J; Markello, Thomas C; Brashear, Allison

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year old male presented with ataxia and dysarthria that had appeared over a period of months. Exome sequencing identified a de novo missense variant in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na,K-ATPase. Several lines of evidence suggest that the variant is causative. ATP1A3 mutations can cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism (RDP) with a similar age and speed of onset, as well as severe diseases of infancy. The patient's ATP1A3 p.Gly316Ser mutation was validated in the laboratory by the impaired ability of the expressed protein to support the growth of cultured cells. In a crystal structure of Na,K-ATPase, the mutated amino acid was directly apposed to a different amino acid mutated in RDP. Clinical evaluation showed that the patient had many characteristics of RDP, however he had minimal fixed dystonia, a defining symptom of RDP. Successive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed progressive cerebellar atrophy, explaining the ataxia. The absence of dystonia in the presence of other RDP symptoms corroborates other evidence that the cerebellum contributes importantly to dystonia pathophysiology. We discuss the possibility that a second de novo variant, in ubiquilin 4 (UBQLN4), a ubiquitin pathway component, contributed to the cerebellar neurodegenerative phenotype and differentiated the disease from other manifestations of ATP1A3 mutations. We also show that a homozygous variant in GPRIN1 (G protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1) deletes a motif with multiple copies and is unlikely to be causative.

  12. Analysis of Transcriptional Profiles and Functional Clustering of Global Cerebellar Gene Expression in PCD3J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Gregory D.; Ford, Byron D.; Steele, Ernest C.; Gates, Alicia; Hood, Darryl; Matthews, Mika A.B.; Mirza, Sophia; MacLeish, Peter R.

    2008-01-01

    The Purkinje cell degeneration (PCD) mutant mouse is characterized by a degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells and progressive ataxia. To identify the molecular mechanisms that lead to the death of Purkinje neurons in PCD mice, we used Affymetrix microarray technology to compare cerebellar gene expression profiles in pcd3J mutant mice 14 days of age (prior to Purkinje cell loss) to unaffected littermates. Microarray analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) software were used to identify biological and molecular pathways implicated in the progression of Purkinje cell degeneration. IPA analysis indicated that mutant pcd3J mice showed dysregulation of specific processes that may lead to Purkinje cell death, including several molecules known to control neuronal apoptosis such as Bad, CDK5 and PTEN. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of these powerful microarray analysis tools and have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of selective neuronal death and for developing therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:18930027

  13. Homozygous Deletion of the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Causes Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Cerebral Gyral Simplification

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym M.; Flavelle, Shauna; Bureau, Alexandre; Glass, Hannah C.; Fujiwara, T. Mary; Wirrell, Elaine; Davey, Krista; Chudley, Albert E.; Scott, James N.; McLeod, D. Ross; Parboosingh, Jillian S.

    2005-01-01

    An autosomal recessive syndrome of nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation is associated with inferior cerebellar hypoplasia and mild cerebral gyral simplification in the Hutterite population. An identity-by-descent mapping approach using eight patients from three interrelated Hutterite families localized the gene for this syndrome to chromosome region 9p24. Haplotype analysis identified familial and ancestral recombination events and refined the minimal region to a 2-Mb interval between markers D9S129 and D9S1871. A 199-kb homozygous deletion encompassing the entire very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was present in all affected individuals. VLDLR is part of the reelin signaling pathway, which guides neuroblast migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this syndrome represents the first human lipoprotein receptor malformation syndrome and the second human disease associated with a reelin pathway defect. PMID:16080122

  14. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-03-03

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  15. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  16. The visuospatial functions in children after cerebellar low-grade astrocytoma surgery: A contribution to the pediatric neuropsychology of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Milczarek, Olga; Kwiatkowski, Stanisław

    2015-12-07

    The aim of this study was to specify whether cerebellar lesions cause visuospatial impairments in children. The study sample consisted of 40 children with low-grade cerebellar astrocytoma, who underwent surgical treatment and 40 healthy controls matched with regard to age and sex. Visuospatial abilities were tested using the spatial WISC-R subtests (Block Design and Object Assembly), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, PEBL Mental Rotation Task, and Benton Visual Retention Test. To exclude general diffuse intellectual dysfunction, the WISC-R Verbal Intelligence IQ, Performance IQ, and Full-Scale IQ scores were analysed. Post-surgical medical consequences were measured with the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Compared to controls, the cerebellar group manifested problems with mental rotation of objects, visuospatial organization, planning, and spatial construction processes which could not be explained by medical complications or general intellectual retardation. The intensity of visuospatial syndrome highly depends on cerebellar lesion side. Patients with left-sided cerebellar lesions display more severe spatial problems than those with right-sided cerebellar lesions. In conclusion, focal cerebellar lesions in children affect their visuospatial ability. The impairments profile is characterized by deficits in complex spatial processes such as visuospatial organization and mental rotation, requiring reconstruction of visual stimuli using the imagination, while elementary sensory analysis and perception as well as spatial processes requiring direct manipulation of objects are relatively better preserved. This pattern is analogous to the one previously observed in adult population and appears to be typical for cerebellar pathology in general, regardless of age.

  17. Ethanol attenuates sensory stimulus-evoked responses in cerebellar granule cells via activation of GABA(A) receptors in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guang; Liu, Heng; Jin, Juan; Hong, Lan; Lan, Yan; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2014-02-21

    Acute alcohol intoxication affects cerebellar motor regulation possibly by altering the transfer and integration of external information in cerebellar cortical neurons, resulting in a dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation or a cerebellar atexia. However, the synaptic mechanisms of ethanol induced impairments of sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical neurons are not fully understand. In the present study, we used electrophysiological and pharmacological methods to study the effects of ethanol on the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in cerebellar granule cells (GCs) in vivo in urethane anesthetized mice. Air-puff stimulation of the ipsilateral whisker-pad evoked stimulus-on (P1) and stimulus-off responses (P2) in GCs of cerebellar Crus II. Cerebellar surface perfusion of ethanol did not alter the onset latency of the sensory stimulation-evoked responses, but reversible reduced the amplitude of P1 and P2. The ethanol-induced reduction of the GCs sensory responses was concentration-dependent. In the presence of ethanol, the mean half-width, area under curve, rise Tau and decay Tau of P1 were significantly decreased. Blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors activity induced an increase in amplitude of P1, and abolished the ethanol induced inhibition of the GCs sensory responses. These results indicate that ethanol inhibits the tactile evoked responses in cerebellar GCs through enhancement of GABA(A) receptors activity.

  18. The Role of the DNA Damage Response Kinase Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Marinoglou, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimated that a human cell is confronted with 1 million DNA lesions every day, one fifth of which may originate from the activity of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) alone [1,2]. Terminally differentiated neurons are highly active cells with, if any, very restricted regeneration potential [3]. In addition, genome integrity and maintenance during neuronal development is crucial for the organism. Therefore, highly accurate and robust mechanisms for DNA repair are vital for neuronal cells. This requirement is emphasized by the long list of human diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, which are either caused by or associated with impaired function of proteins involved in the cellular response to genotoxic stress [4-8]. Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), one of the major kinases of the DNA Damage Response (DDR), is a node that links DDR, neuronal development, and neurodegeneration [2,9-12]. In humans, inactivating mutations of ATM lead to Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) disease [11,13], which is characterized by severe cerebellar neurodegeneration, indicating an important protective function of ATM in the nervous system [14]. Despite the large number of studies on the molecular cause of A-T, the neuroprotective role of ATM is not well established and is contradictory to its general proapoptotic function. This review discusses the putative functions of ATM in neuronal cells and how they might contribute to neuroprotection. PMID:23239948

  19. Genetic and clinical analysis in a Chinese parkinsonism-predominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 family.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Satake, Wataru; Zhang, Changjun; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Tian, Youyong; Fu, Shouzhi; Yu, Jiankun; Qian, Yaping; Qian, Yuan; Chu, Jiayou; Toda, Tatsushi

    2011-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative central nervous system disorder that often impairs motor skills, speech and other functions. We discovered a large Chinese family showing primarily parkinsonism symptoms with autosomal dominant inheritance. Six affected individuals in the family showed typical parkinsonism symptoms, including pill-rolling tremor. Two other affected individuals showed cerebellar ataxia symptoms. A whole-genome scan using the 50K single nucleotide polymorphism array with three different linkage methods detected two positive regions on chromosome 12q24.1 and 5q13.3. The ATXN2 gene, responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) was located precisely in the center of the positive region on chromosome 12. Further analysis of SCA2 revealed heterozygous pathological CAG expansions in the family. The affected individuals' symptoms were typical of parkinsonism, but complex. Inverse correlation between CAG repeat size and age of onset is not obvious in this pedigree. This parkinsonism-predominant SCA2 family shared the same disease gene locus with other 'standard' SCA2 families, but it is possible that variations in one or more modifier genes might account for the parkinsonism-predominant SCA2 predisposition observed in this pedigree.

  20. Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) Motor Dysfunction Modeled in Mice.

    PubMed

    Foote, Molly; Arque, Gloria; Berman, Robert F; Santos, Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects some carriers of the fragile X premutation (PM). In PM carriers, there is a moderate expansion of a CGG trinucleotide sequence (55-200 repeats) in the fragile X gene (FMR1) leading to increased FMR1 mRNA and small to moderate decreases in the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. The key symptoms of FXTAS include cerebellar gait ataxia, kinetic tremor, sensorimotor deficits, neuropsychiatric changes, and dementia. While the specific trigger(s) that causes PM carriers to progress to FXTAS pathogenesis remains elusive, the use of animal models has shed light on the underlying neurobiology of the altered pathways involved in disease development. In this review, we examine the current use of mouse models to study PM and FXTAS, focusing on recent advances in the field. Specifically, we will discuss the construct, face, and predictive validities of these PM mouse models, the insights into the underlying disease mechanisms, and potential treatments.

  1. Oculopalatal tremor, facial myokymia and truncal ataxia in a patient with neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Sripathi, Naganand; Nasrallah, Khalil; Mitsias, Panayiotis

    2014-12-01

    Symptomatic palatal tremor (SPT) is the result of a structural lesion, in the form of stroke, trauma or demyelinating disease. SPT is due to contractions of the levator veli palatini and can be accompanied by simultaneous movements of the facial and ocular muscles. Facial myokymia (FM) is a persistent quivering of the facial muscles. FM is usually encountered with conditions involving the pontine tegmentum. We report, to our knowledge, the first patient with neurosarcoidosis with simultaneous SPT and FM. A 49-year-old African American woman, with non-caseating granulomas in a paratracheal lymph node biopsy, presented with progressive gait disturbances for the last 3 years. Neurological examination revealed ataxic speech, bilateral rotatory nystagmus, myokymia of the chin and perioral muscles, palatal tremor without ear click and marked truncal ataxia. MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the facial nucleus and the right middle cerebellar peduncle. Based on exclusion of alternative etiologies, a diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis was made and the patient was started on methotrexate for 9 months, with minimal improvement. She was then switched to intravenous infliximab without major adverse events. The patient's speech and gait ataxia improved and follow up MRI demonstrated resolution of the enhancing lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the combination of palatal tremor and FM due to neurosarcoidosis. Methotrexate may fail to produce clinical or radiographic response in up to 39% of patients. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, such as infliximab, should be considered in refractory cases.

  2. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Karen N; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A G; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed "ATCCT interruptions," experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confer a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling.

  3. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  4. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-10-03

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  5. A case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration successfully treated with antitumor and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Yajima, Ryuji; Higuchi, You; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kawachi, Izumi; Koyama, Yu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-07-28

    We report a case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) with breast cancer in a 54-year-old woman. The symptoms of limb and truncal ataxia, and dysarthria gradually progressed during the course of 1 year, and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score was 2. A mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection was performed for the breast cancer. No malignant cells were found on histopathological examination of the lymph node. Combination chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) prevented neurologic deterioration. However, subsequent treatment with trastuzumab and paclitaxel did not prevent progression of the symptoms (mRS score 3). Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres without brain stem atrophy. Anti-Yo antibody was detected in the serum, which led to a diagnosis of anti-Yo-associated PCD. We resected an enlarged axillary lymph node, which was found on computed tomography. The histopathological analysis of the lymph node revealed foreign body granuloma, which suggested an association with necrotic malignant tissue. Following additional tegafur-uracil therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the cerebellar signs and symptoms gradually improved (mRS score 2). The clinical course shows that PCD can present as a slowly progressive cerebellar symptom. We propose an active treatment for anti-Yo-associated PCD consisting of tumor resection, combined chemotherapy, and IVIg.

  6. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 with positional vertigo and acetazolamide responsive episodic ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jen, J.; Yue, Q.; Karrim, J.; Nelson, S.; Baloh, R.

    1998-01-01

    The SCA6 mutation, a small expansion of a CAG repeat in a calcium channel gene CACNA1A, was identified in three pedigrees. Point mutations in other parts of the gene CACNA1A were excluded and new clinical features of SCA6 reported—namely, central positional nystagmus and episodic ataxia responsive to acetazolamide. The three allelic disorders, episodic ataxia type 2, familial hemiplegic migraine, and SCA6, have overlapping clinical features.

 PMID:9771787

  7. Mutation analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) in a large Iakut kinship of Eastern Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, L.G.; Lunkes, A.; Vaconcelos, O.

    1994-09-01

    We have studied 131 patients with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia clinically and pathologically expressed as olivopontocerebellar atrophy. The disease in this Siberian kinship has been genetically linked to the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p, and the pedigree was screened for the recently described CAG repeat expansion in this gene using the GeneScan program (ABI). The normal allele in the affected individuals had 26 to 32 repeats, and among 424 analyzed normal alleles of the unaffected members of the kinship, unrelated controls and patients with other neurological disorders, the range of repeat numbers was 26 to 37, with 92% within 28 to 30 repeats. All 65 normal alleles in which the repeat area has been sequenced show a CAT or CATCAGCAT interruption between the first and the second stretches of 10 to 17 CAG repeats. The SCA1 allele was extended to 39 to 60 uninterrupted repeats in all fifty-nine analyzed ataxia patients. Repeat numbers of 40 to 55 were also found in thirty-nine of 105 tested unaffected first and second degree relatives. Two patients and an unaffected child were homozygous for the elongated allele. In seven of 10 paternal transmissions an increase of 2 to 11 repeats have occurred; in nine maternal transmissions the repeat numbers remained the same or grew for just one repeat. Mutation analysis provides new opportunities in diagnosis and risk assessment of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about Friedreich's Ataxia (FRDA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has partnered with the Coordination of 2600 Fernbrook Lane Suite 119 Rare Diseases at Sanford (CoRDS) national ... CoRDS/CoRD- SRegistryForm/ National Ataxia Foundation 2600 Fernbrook Lane, Suite 119 • Minneapolis, MN 55447-4752 Phone: (763) ...

  9. Friedreich ataxia: dysarthria profile and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Bettina; Ackermann, Hermann; Berg, Daniela; Lindig, Tobias; Schölderle, Theresa; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most frequent recessive ataxia in the Western world. Dysarthria is a cardinal feature of FRDA, often leading to severe impairments in daily functioning, but its exact characteristics are only poorly understood so far. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of dysarthria severity and the profile of speech motor deficits in 20 patients with a genetic diagnosis of FRDA based on a carefully selected battery of speaking tasks and two widely used paraspeech tasks, i.e., oral diadochokinesis and sustained vowel productions. Perceptual ratings of the speech samples identified respiration, voice quality, voice instability, articulation, and tempo as the most affected speech dimensions. Whereas vocal instability predicted ataxia severity, tempo turned out as a significant correlate of disease duration. Furthermore, articulation predicted the overall intelligibility score as determined by a systematic speech pathology assessment tool. In contrast, neurologists' ratings of intelligibility--a component of the "Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia"--were found to be related to perceived speech tempo. Obviously, clinicians are more sensitive to slowness of speech than to any other feature of spoken language during dysarthria evaluation. Our results suggest that different components of speech production and trunk/limb motor functions are differentially susceptible to FRDA pathology. Furthermore, evidence emerged that paraspeech tasks do not allow for an adequate scaling of speech deficits in FRDA.

  10. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 presenting with cognitive regression in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ramocki, Melissa B; Chapieski, Lynn; McDonald, Ryan O; Fernandez, Fabio; Malphrus, Amy D

    2008-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 typically presents in adulthood with progressive ataxia, dysarthria, tremor, and slow saccadic eye movements. Childhood-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is rare, and only the infantile-onset form has been well characterized clinically. This article describes a girl who met all developmental milestones until age 3(1/2) years, when she experienced cognitive regression that preceded motor regression by 6 months. A diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 was delayed until she presented to the emergency department at age 7 years. This report documents the results of her neuropsychologic evaluation at both time points. This case broadens the spectrum of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 presentation in childhood, highlights the importance of considering a spinocerebellar ataxia in a child who presents with cognitive regression only, and extends currently available clinical information to help clinicians discuss the prognosis in childhood spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

  11. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (p<0.001) and right superior cerebellar (output) peduncle (p<0.001) compared to controls; but no difference in the input tracts. Severity of social impairment, as measured by the Autistic Diagnostic Interview, was negatively correlated with diffusion anisotropy in the fibres of the left superior cerebellar peduncle. These findings suggest a vulnerability of specific cerebellar neural pathways in people with Asperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  12. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  13. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutation that is associated with disease onset in infancy disrupts axonal pathfinding during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi A; Mock, Allan F; Sagasti, Alvaro; Papazian, Diane M

    2012-11-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) channel. SCA13 exists in two forms: infant onset is characterized by severe cerebellar atrophy, persistent motor deficits and intellectual disability, whereas adult onset is characterized by progressive ataxia and progressive cerebellar degeneration. To test the hypothesis that infant- and adult-onset mutations have differential effects on neuronal development that contribute to the age at which SCA13 emerges, we expressed wild-type Kv3.3 or infant- or adult-onset mutant proteins in motor neurons in the zebrafish spinal cord. We characterized the development of CaP (caudal primary) motor neurons at ∼36 and ∼48 hours post-fertilization using confocal microscopy and 3D digital reconstruction. Exogenous expression of wild-type Kv3.3 had no significant effect on CaP development. In contrast, CaP neurons expressing the infant-onset mutation made frequent pathfinding errors, sending long, abnormal axon collaterals into muscle territories that are normally innervated exclusively by RoP (rostral primary) or MiP (middle primary) motor neurons. This phenotype might be directly relevant to infant-onset SCA13 because interaction with inappropriate synaptic partners might trigger cell death during brain development. Importantly, pathfinding errors were not detected in CaP neurons expressing the adult-onset mutation. However, the adult-onset mutation tended to increase the complexity of the distal axonal arbor. From these results, we speculate that infant-onset SCA13 is associated with marked changes in the development of Kv3.3-expressing cerebellar neurons, reducing their health and viability early in life and resulting in the withered cerebellum seen in affected children.

  14. Gray and white matter alterations in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7: an in vivo DTI and VBM study.

    PubMed

    Alcauter, Sarael; Barrios, Fernando A; Díaz, Rosalinda; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and visual loss. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the gene encoding the ataxin 7 protein. Visual loss is due to a progressive atrophy of photoreceptor cells that results in macular degeneration in more advanced stages. Initial semiautomatic measures in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on the brain stem have shown a diminished volume mainly in the cerebellum and pons, while T2 images have shown hyperintensities in transverse fibers at the pons. Neuropathological research, however, has shown more widespread brain damage including loss of myelinated fibers. In this study we decided to take advantage of recent MRI methodological advances to further explore the gray and white matter changes that occur in SCA7 patients. We studied nine genetically confirmed SCA7 patients and their matched controls using voxel based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics. As expected, we found significant bilateral gray matter volume reductions (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons) in patients' cerebellar cortex. However, we also found significant bilateral gray matter reductions in pre and postcentral gyrus, inferior and medial frontal, parietal inferior, parahippocampal and occipital cortices. The analysis also showed a decrement in fractional anisotropy (p<0.05, corrected) of SCA7 patients in the cerebellum's white matter, brainstem, cerebellar and cerebral peduncles, midbrain, anterior and posterior internal capsule, external/extreme capsule, corpus callosum, corona radiata, optical radiations, and the occipital, temporal and frontal lobe's white matter. These results confirm previous evidence of widespread damage beyond the cerebellum and the pons in SCA7 patients. They also confirmed previous results that had been only detectable through neuropathological analyses and, more importantly, identified new regions affected by the disease that

  15. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  16. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Elsegood, Kelly J.; Welch, John L.; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test). The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance. PMID:20714057

  17. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S.; Kovács, Attila D.; Meyerholz, David K.; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Weber, Krystal L.; White, Katherine A.M.; Rheeden, Richard V.; Kruer, Michael C.; Dacken, Brian A.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Rohret, Judy A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Rohret, Frank A.; Weimer, Jill M.; Pearce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions. PMID:26374845

  18. The contribution of the cerebellum to cognition in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Freya E; Grube, Manon; Elsegood, Kelly J; Welch, John L; Kelly, Thomas P; Chinnery, Patrick F; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2010-01-01

    This study sought evidence for a specific cerebellar contribution to cognition by characterising the cognitive phenotype of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 (SCA-6); an autosomal dominant genetic disease which causes a highly specific late-onset cerebellar degeneration. A comprehensive neuropsychological assessment was administered to 27 patients with genetically confirmed SCA-6. General intellectual ability, memory and executive function were examined using internationally standardised tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Wechsler Memory Scale-III, Delis and Kaplan Executive Function System, Brixton Spatial Anticipation test). The patient group showed no evidence of intellectual or memory decline. However, tests of executive function involving skills of cognitive flexibility, inhibition of response and verbal reasoning and abstraction demonstrated significant impairment at the group level with large effect sizes. The results demonstrate an executive deficit due to SCA-6 that can be conceptualised as parallel to the motor difficulties suffered by these patients: the data support a role for the cerebellum in the regulation and coordination of cognitive, as well as motor processes that is relevant to individual performance.

  19. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola; Bestmann, Sven; Rothwell, John C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-12-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence of these paroxysms, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Normal ion channels are crucial for coordinating neuronal firing in response to facilitatory input. Thus, we hypothesized that channel dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine may impair the ability to adjust cerebral excitability after facilitatory events. We tested this hypothesis in patients with episodic ataxia type 2 (n = 6), patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 13). All subjects received a high-frequency burst (10 pulses at 20 Hz) of transcranial magnetic stimulation to transiently increase the excitability of the motor cortex. Acute burst-induced excitability changes were probed at 50, 250, 500 and 1000 ms after the end of the burst. This was done using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess corticospinal excitability, and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation at an interstimulus interval of 2 and 10 ms to assess intracortical inhibition and facilitation, respectively. The time course of burst-induced excitability changes differed between groups. Healthy controls showed a short-lived increase in excitability that was only present 50 ms after the burst. In contrast, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 showed an abnormally prolonged increase in corticospinal excitability that was still present 250 ms after the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst. Furthermore, while controls showed a decrease in intracortical facilitation during the 1 s period following the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 had increased intracortical facilitation 1000 ms after the burst

  20. A novel missense mutation in CACNA1A evaluated by in silico protein modeling is associated with non-episodic spinocerebellar ataxia with slow progression.

    PubMed

    Bürk, Katrin; Kaiser, Frank J; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Schöls, Ludger; Kreuz, Friedmar R; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Büttner, Thomas; Hollstein, Ronja; Braunholz, Diana; Plaschke, Jens; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Zühlke, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) are allelic disorders of the gene CACNA1A encoding the P/Q subunit of a voltage gated calcium channel. While SCA6 is related to repeat expansions affecting the C-terminal part of the protein, EA2 and FHM phenotypes are usually associated with nonsense and missense mutations leading to impaired channel properties. In three unrelated families with dominant cerebellar ataxia, symptoms cosegregated with CACNA1A missense mutations of evolutionary highly conserved amino acids (exchanges p.E668K, p.R583Q and p.D302N). To evaluate pathogenic effects, in silico, protein modeling analyses were performed which indicate structural alterations of the novel mutation p.E668K within the homologous domain 2 affecting CACNA1A protein function. The phenotype is characterised by a very slowly progressive ataxia, while ataxic episodes or migraine are uncommon. These findings enlarge the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations.

  1. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    PubMed

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset.

  2. Brain and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells as an in vitro model of neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Carlessi, Luigi; Fusar Poli, Elena; Delia, Domenico

    2013-03-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is a key transducer of the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks and its deficiency causes ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a pleiotropic genetic disorder primarily characterized by cerebellar neuropathy, immunodeficiency and cancer predisposition. While enormous progress has been achieved in elucidating the biochemical and functional regulation of ATM in DNA damage response, and more recently in redox signalling and antioxidant defence, the factors that make neurons in A-T extremely vulnerable remain unclear. Given also that ATM knockout mice do not recapitulate the central nervous system phenotype, a number of human neural stem cell (hNSC) model systems have been developed to provide insights into the mechanisms of neurodegeneration associated with ATM dysfunction. Here we review the hNSC systems developed by us an others to model A-T.

  3. Acute childhood hemiplegia associated with chickenpox and elevated anticardiolipin antibody.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Kursad; Sert, Ahmet; Ati Güzeş, Eylem; Kireşi, Demet A

    2006-10-01

    Chickenpox is a common infection of childhood. Central nervous system complications, such as cerebellar ataxia and meningoencephalitis, are estimated to occur in less than 1% of cases of chickenpox. Although transverse myelitis and hemiplegia have also, although rarely, been reported, hemiplegia associated with chickenpox and elevated anticardiolipin antibody has not been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 2.5-year-old boy who developed a right hemiplegia 3 weeks after the onset of a primary varicella infection. The serum level of anticardiolipin antibody IgG was markedly elevated. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an infarction involving the left globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, and posterior leg of the internal capsule. Laboratory studies ruled out all known causes of stroke. Neurologic signs and symptoms slowly improved with supportive treatment. Varicella infection should be considered one of the possible causes of acute ischemic strokes in children. Usually, two or more risk factors are detected in children with ischemic strokes, and we suggest that all possible causes of strokes be investigated in children with ischemic strokes.

  4. ADCK3, an Ancestral Kinase, Is Mutated in a Form of Recessive Ataxia Associated with Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Tazir, Meriem; López, Luis Carlos; Quinzii, Catarina M.; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Busso, Cleverson; Makri, Samira; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Benhassine, Traki; Anheim, Mathieu; Lynch, David R.; Thibault, Christelle; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Tranchant, Christine; Poch, Olivier; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Barros, Mario H.; Hirano, Michio; Koenig, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Muscle coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone) deficiency has been identified in more than 20 patients with presumed autosomal-recessive ataxia. However, mutations in genes required for CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway have been identified only in patients with infantile-onset multisystemic diseases or isolated nephropathy. Our SNP-based genome-wide scan in a large consanguineous family revealed a locus for autosomal-recessive ataxia at chromosome 1q41. The causative mutation is a homozygous splice-site mutation in the aarF-domain-containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3). Five additional mutations in ADCK3 were found in three patients with sporadic ataxia, including one known to have CoQ10 deficiency in muscle. All of the patients have childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia with slow progression, and three of six have mildly elevated lactate levels. ADCK3 is a mitochondrial protein homologous to the yeast COQ8 and the bacterial UbiB proteins, which are required for CoQ biosynthesis. Three out of four patients tested showed a low endogenous pool of CoQ10 in their fibroblasts or lymphoblasts, and two out of three patients showed impaired ubiquinone synthesis, strongly suggesting that ADCK3 is also involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis. The deleterious nature of the three identified missense changes was confirmed by the introduction of them at the corresponding positions of the yeast COQ8 gene. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis shows that ADCK3 belongs to the family of atypical kinases, which includes phosphoinositide and choline kinases, suggesting that ADCK3 plays an indirect regulatory role in ubiquinone biosynthesis possibly as part of a feedback loop that regulates ATP production. PMID:18319074

  5. [Memory transfer in cerebellar motor learning].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Most of our motor skills are acquired through learning. Experiments of gain adaptation of ocular reflexes have consistently suggested that the memory of adaptation is initially formed in the cerebellar cortex, and is transferred to the cerebellar (vestibular) nuclei for consolidation to long-term memory after repetitions of training. We have recently developed a new system to evaluate the motor learning in human subjects using prism adaptation of hand reaching movement, by referring to the prism adaptation of dart throwing of Martin et al. (1996). In our system, the subject views the small target presented in the touch-panel screen, and touches it with his/her finger without direct visual feedback. After 15-30 trials of touching wearing prisms, an adaptation occurs in healthy subjects: they became able to touch the target correctly. Meanwhile, such an adaptation was impaired in patients of cerebellar disease. We have proposed a model of human prism adaptation that the memory of adaptation is initially encoded in the cerebellar cortex, and is later transferred to the cerebellar nuclei after repetitions of training. The memory in the cerebellar cortex may be formed and extinguished independently of the memory maintained in the cerebellar nuclei, and these two memories work cooperatively.

  6. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions.

  7. A voxel-based morphometry study of grey matter loss in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryu-ichiro; Javan, Alireza K; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J; Rivera, Susan M

    2011-03-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome is a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects older male premutation carriers of the fragile X mental retardation gene. Although its core symptoms are mainly characterized by motor problems such as intention tremor and gait ataxia, cognitive decline and psychiatric problems are also commonly observed. Past radiological and histological approaches have focused on prominent neurodegenerative changes in specific brain structures including the cerebellum and limbic areas. However, quantitative investigations of the regional structural abnormalities have not been performed over the whole brain. In this study, we adopted the voxel-based morphometry method together with regions of interest analysis for the cerebellum to examine the pattern of regional grey matter change in the male premutation carriers with and without fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. In a comparison with healthy controls, we found striking grey matter loss of the patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome in multiple regions over the cortical and subcortical structures. In the cerebellum, the anterior lobe and the superior posterior lobe were profoundly reduced in both vermis and hemispheres. In the cerebral cortex, clusters of highly significant grey matter reduction were found in the extended areas in the medial surface of the brain, including the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. The other prominent grey matter loss was found in the lateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and insula. Although the voxel-wise comparison between the asymptomatic premutation group and healthy controls did not reach significant difference, a regions of interest analysis revealed significant grey matter reduction in anterior subregions of the cerebellar vermis and hemisphere in the asymptomatic premutation group. Correlation analyses using behavioural scales of the premutation groups showed

  8. [Case of anti-TPO/gliadin antibody-positive cerebellar atrophy that responded to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy begun 16 years after onset].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Otake, Hiroaki; Ito, Suguru; Niiyama, Kazuhide; Nanri, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of slowly progressive gait ataxia with a 16-year history in an 87-year-old woman. In 1994 she became aware of a slight unsteadiness while walking and cortical cerebellar atrophy was diagnosed. She had no familial history of neurological disorders. In 2007, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was diagnosed. The symptoms gradually worsened, and she was admitted in 2010 because she could not walk without support. MRI voxel-based morphometry (VBM) imaging showed atrophy of the entire cerebellum, and SPECT using eZIS showed reduced perfusion in the same regions. Her blood was positive for both anti-TPO antibody (42 IU/ml) and anti-gliadin antibody (20.2 EU). We therefore diagnosed autoimmune cerebellar atrophy. The patient showed a positive response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) and regained the ability to walk unassisted. Her posture and gait disturbance scores on the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale had improved from 20 to 9. Even 16 years after onset, intravenous immunoglobulins were effective. In cases of prolonged disease, immunotherapy can be effective in autoimmune cerebellar atrophy and should not be excluded from the treatment choices.

  9. Massilia timonae gen. nov., sp. nov., Isolated from Blood of an Immunocompromised Patient with Cerebellar Lesions

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Birtles, Richard J.; Mallet, Marie-Noëlle; Raoult, Didier

    1998-01-01

    A fastidious, slowly growing, strictly aerobic, gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a culture of blood from a 25-year-old man with common variable immunodeficiency. The man had been admitted to hospital with febrile progressive cerebellar ataxia. The use of standard phenotypic schemes did not lead to identification, but sequence analysis demonstrated that the 16S rRNA gene of the isolate was most similar to those of the environmental bacteria Duganella zoogloeoides (formerly Zoogloea ramigera 115) and Telluria mixta. Further characterization of the bacterium by biochemical analysis, electron microscopy, G+C content estimation, and fatty acid analysis demonstrated significant differences between the bacterium and D. zoogloeoides and Telluria species; thus, we propose it as a new taxon with the name Massilia timonae gen. nov., sp. nov. PMID:9738031

  10. Multilobular tumour of the caudal cranium causing severe cerebral and cerebellar compression in a dog.

    PubMed

    Psychas, Vassilios; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Polizopoulou, Zoe S; Sofianidis, Georgios

    2009-03-01

    Multilobular tumour of bone (MTB) is an uncommon tumour and is usually located in the skull. A 13-year-old mixed breed dog was presented with a two-week history of progressively worsening vestibular dysfunction and cognitive abnormalities; it appeared demented and showed asymmetric ataxia and hypermetria of all limbs. The owner opted to have the animal euthanised. Necropsy revealed a large mass occupying the right occipital, parietal and temporal bones, severely compressing the cerebellum and the right occipital lobe. Histologically, it was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage and separated by fibrous septae, features typical of MTB. Lung metastases were evident. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MTB causing both severe cerebral and cerebellar compression and the second detailed report of an MTB of the occipital bone. MTB should be included in the differential diagnosis of bone tumours as well as in cases with central vestibular disease.

  11. Thiamine and spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonio; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Colangeli, Marco; Savelli, Serena

    2013-01-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is a genetic disorder characterised by the degeneration of the cerebellum, its connections and degeneration in brainstem areas. Some observations indicate that high doses of thiamine may lead to the partial regression of the symptoms. One patient was under rehabilitative treatment from June 2011 to July 2012. We assessed the level of fatigue using the Fatigue Severity Scale. We performed the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia and Robertson Profile for Dysarthria (Italian version). Thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels in the blood were within the healthy reference range. We started a parenteral therapy with 100 mg intramuscular every 7 days. The therapy led to a partial regression of fatigue within a few days. After about 3 months, a discreet improvement of motor symptoms especially in speech was observed. The symptoms could derive from a focal thiamine deficiency that could determine a selective neuronal loss.

  12. Episodic Ataxias: Clinical and Genetic Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by recurrent spells of truncal ataxia and incoordination lasting minutes to hours. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. To date, 8 subtypes have been defined according to clinical and genetic characteristics, and five genes are known to be linked to EAs. Both EA1 and EA2, which are caused by mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A, account for the majority of EA, but many patients with no identified mutations still exhibit EA-like clinical features. Furthermore, genetically confirmed EAs have mostly been identified in Caucasian families. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the clinical and genetic characteristics of EAs. Additionally, we summarize the phenotypic features of the genetically confirmed EA2 families in Korea. PMID:27667184

  13. Cystic cerebellar astrocytomas in childhood.

    PubMed

    Griffin, T W; Beaufait, D; Blasko, J C

    1979-07-01

    Thirty-nine patients with low grade cystic cerebellar astrocytomas were treated at the University of Washington and Children's Orthopedic Hospital in Seattle, Washington, between 1955 and 1977; 29 were treated with partial or complete resection alone, and 10 received radiation therapy after various types of surgical procedures. With a mean follow-up time of 7 years, the survival rate for patients who had complete resections of their primary disease was 100%. The relapse-free survival rate was 82%. The relapse-free survival rate for patients treated primarily with partial resection alone was 36%. Postoperative irradiation after partial resection for both primary and recurrent disease resulted in a relapse-free survival rate of 83%. If complete tumor excision is not possible, postoperative radiation therapy is recommended following partial resection.

  14. Morphine-induced changes in cerebral and cerebellar nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Leza, J C; Lizasoain, I; San-Martín-Clark, O; Lorenzo, P

    1995-10-04

    The effect of acute and chronic morphine treatment on nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity (determined by the rate of conversion of [14C]arginine into [14C]citrulline) on mouse brain was studied. Acute morphine treatment induced an increased in Ca2+ -dependent NO synthase in cerebellum. This effect was blocked by coadministration with naloxone. Chronic morphine treatment (by s.c. pellet) also produced an increase in cerebellar NO synthase, with a maximum on the second day of implantation. No significant changes were found in frontal cortex and forebrain during acute or chronic morphine treatment. The relationship between opiate effects and the L-arginine: NO pathway is discussed.

  15. Early onset autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia with miosis: four cases.

    PubMed

    Timby, Niklas; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Kristiansen, Ingela; Eriksson, Urban; Erikson, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Previously, at least 29 different forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been described. We describe a family with four members through three generations with autosomal dominant ataxia in combination with miosis and hyperreflexia. This family's ataxia does not match any of the previously described SCAs and is probably a novel form of SCA. To continue with the search for the genetic background of this disease, more cases are needed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia PRICKLE1-related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description PRICKLE1 -related progressive myoclonus epilepsy with ataxia is a rare inherited condition characterized ...

  17. Comparison of an expanded ataxia interactome with patient medical records reveals a relationship between macular degeneration and ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Juliette J.; Gulbahce, Natali; Shaw, Chad A.; Lim, Janghoo; Hill, David E.; Barabási, Albert-László; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2011-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias 6 and 7 (SCA6 and SCA7) are neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats encoding polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in CACNA1A, the alpha1A subunit of the P/Q-type calcium channel, and ataxin-7 (ATXN7), a component of a chromatin-remodeling complex, respectively. We hypothesized that finding new protein partners for ATXN7 and CACNA1A would provide insight into the biology of their respective diseases and their relationship to other ataxia-causing proteins. We identified 118 protein interactions for CACNA1A and ATXN7 linking them to other ataxia-causing proteins and the ataxia network. To begin to understand the biological relevance of these protein interactions within the ataxia network, we used OMIM to identify diseases associated with the expanded ataxia network. We then used Medicare patient records to determine if any of these diseases co-occur with hereditary ataxia. We found that patients with ataxia are at 3.03-fold greater risk of these diseases than Medicare patients overall. One of the diseases comorbid with ataxia is macular degeneration (MD). The ataxia network is significantly (P= 7.37 × 10−5) enriched for proteins that interact with known MD-causing proteins, forming a MD subnetwork. We found that at least two of the proteins in the MD subnetwork have altered expression in the retina of Ataxin-7266Q/+ mice suggesting an in vivo functional relationship with ATXN7. Together these data reveal novel protein interactions and suggest potential pathways that can contribute to the pathophysiology of ataxia, MD, and diseases comorbid with ataxia. PMID:21078624

  18. [Acute vertigo of neurological origin].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Højgaard, Joan L Sunnleyg; Kondziella, Daniel

    2013-11-04

    Acute vertigo of neurological origin may be caused by haemorrhages and tumours in the posterior fossa and, most frequently, by ischaemic infarction in the vertebrobasilar circulation. Urgent diagnosis is necessary to avoid further ischaemic episodes, herniation due to cerebellar oedema and/or fatal brainstem infarction. The history should focus on accompanying neurological symptoms. However, vertigo with cerebellar lesions may be monosymptomatic and then bedside evaluation of oculomotor function is the key to correct diagnosis. This paper discusses the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical evaluation of acute vertigo of neurological origin.

  19. Cerebellar white matter abnormalities following primary blast injury in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Mac Donald, Christine; Johnson, Ann; Cooper, Dana; Malone, Thomas; Sorrell, James; Shimony, Joshua; Parsons, Matthew; Snyder, Abraham; Raichle, Marcus; Fang, Raymond; Flaherty, Stephen; Russell, Michael; Brody, David L

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of blast exposure on the human brain in the absence of head impact. Clinical reports, experimental animal studies, and computational modeling of blast exposure have suggested effects on the cerebellum and brainstem. In US military personnel with isolated, primary blast-related 'mild' traumatic brain injury and no other known insult, we found diffusion tensor MRI abnormalities consistent with cerebellar white matter injury in 3 of 4 subjects. No abnormalities in other brain regions were detected. These findings add to the evidence supporting the hypothesis that primary blast exposure contributes to brain injury in the absence of head impact and that the cerebellum may be particularly vulnerable. However, the clinical effects of these abnormalities cannot be determined with certainty; none of the subjects had ataxia or other detected evidence of cerebellar dysfunction. The details of the blast events themselves cannot be disclosed at this time, thus additional animal and computational modeling will be required to dissect the mechanisms underlying primary blast-related traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, the effects of possible subconcussive impacts and other military-related exposures cannot be determined from the data presented. Thus many aspects of topic will require further investigation.

  20. Decreased tonic inhibition in cerebellar granule cells causes motor dysfunction in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Kiyoshi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Inoue, Koichi; Takayama, Masakazu; Takayama, Chitoshi; Saitoh, Shinji; Kishino, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2012-12-05

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the UBE3A gene encoding a ubiquitin E3 ligase. Motor dysfunction is a characteristic feature of Angelman syndrome, but neither the mechanisms of action nor effective therapeutic strategies have yet been elucidated. We report that tonic inhibition is specifically decreased in cerebellar granule cells of Ube3a-deficient mice, a model of Angelman syndrome. As a mechanism underlying this decrease in tonic inhibition, we show that Ube3a controls degradation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) and that deficiency of Ube3a induces a surplus of GAT1 that results in a decrease in GABA concentrations in the extrasynaptic space. Administering low doses of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a selective extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist, improves the abnormal firing properties of a population of Purkinje cells in cerebellar brain slices and reduces cerebellar ataxia in Ube3a-deficient mice in vivo. These results suggest that pharmacologically increasing tonic inhibition may be a useful strategy for alleviating motor dysfunction in Angelman syndrome.

  1. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  2. Changes in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuit in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; An, Jie; Tan, Xin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Qiu, Shijun; Hu, Dewen

    2017-01-11

    Currently, 422 million adults suffer from diabetes worldwide, leading to tremendous disabilities and a great burden to families and society. Functional and structural MRIs have demonstrated that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibit abnormalities in brain regions in the cerebral cortex. However, the changes of cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients remains unclear. In the current study, diffusion tensor imaging deterministic tractography and statistical analysis were employed to investigate abnormal cerebellar anatomical connections in diabetic patients. This is the first study to investigate the altered cerebellar anatomical connectivity in T2DM patients. Decreased anatomical connections were found in the cerebellar and cerebro-cerebellar circuits of T2DM patients, providing valuable new insights into the potential neuro-pathophysiology of diabetes-related motor and cognitive deficits.

  3. Friedreich's ataxia--a case of aberrant transcription termination?

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Napierala, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein Frataxin (FXN) is the underlying cause of Friedreich's ataxia. We propose a model of premature termination of FXN transcription induced by pathogenic expanded GAA repeats that links R-loop structures, antisense transcription, and heterochromatin formation as a novel mechanism of transcriptional repression in Friedreich's ataxia.

  4. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  5. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  6. Ionic mechanisms of autorhythmic firing in rat cerebellar Golgi cells

    PubMed Central

    Elisabetta Cesana, Lia Forti; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2006-01-01

    Although Golgi cells (GoCs), the main type of inhibitory interneuron in the cerebellar granular layer (GL), are thought to play a central role in cerebellar network function, their excitable properties have remained unexplored. GoCs fire rhythmically in vivo and in slices, but it was unclear whether this activity originated from pacemaker ionic mechanisms. We explored this issue in acute cerebellar slices from 3-week-old rats by combining loose cell-attached (LCA) and whole-cell (WC) recordings. GoCs displayed spontaneous firing at 1–10 Hz (room temperature) and 2–20 Hz (35–37°C), which persisted in the presence of blockers of fast synaptic receptors and mGluR and GABAB receptors, thus behaving, in our conditions, as pacemaker neurons. ZD 7288 (20 μm), a potent hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) blocker, slowed down pacemaker frequency. The role of subthreshold Na+ currents (INa,sub) could not be tested directly, but we observed a robust TTX-sensitive, non-inactivating Na+ current in the subthreshold voltage range. When studying repolarizing currents, we found that retigabine (5 μm), an activator of KCNQ K+ channels generating neuronal M-type K+ (IM) currents, reduced GoC excitability in the threshold region. The KCNQ channel antagonist XE991 (5 μm) did not modify firing, suggesting that GoC IM has low XE991 sensitivity. Spike repolarization was followed by an after-hyperpolarization (AHP) supported by apamin-sensitive Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (Iapa). Block of Iapa decreased pacemaker precision without altering average frequency. We propose that feed-forward depolarization is sustained by Ih and INa,sub, and that delayed repolarizing feedback involves an IM-like current whose properties remain to be characterized. The multiple ionic mechanisms shown here to contribute to GoC pacemaking should provide the substrate for fine regulation of firing frequency and precision, thus influencing the cyclic inhibition exerted by GoCs onto the cerebellar GL

  7. Seeking a unified framework for cerebellar function and dysfunction: from circuit operations to cognition

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Casali, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Following the fundamental recognition of its involvement in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum is now also believed to take part in the processing of cognition and emotion. This hypothesis is recurrent in numerous papers reporting anatomical and functional observations, and it requires an explanation. We argue that a similar circuit structure in all cerebellar areas may carry out various operations using a common computational scheme. On the basis of a broad review of anatomical data, it is conceivable that the different roles of the cerebellum lie in the specific connectivity of the cerebellar modules, with motor, cognitive, and emotional functions (at least partially) segregated into different cerebro-cerebellar loops. We here develop a conceptual and operational framework based on multiple interconnected levels (a meta-levels hypothesis): from cellular/molecular to network mechanisms leading to generation of computational primitives, thence to high-level cognitive/emotional processing, and finally to the sphere of mental function and dysfunction. The main concept explored is that of intimate interplay between timing and learning (reminiscent of the “timing and learning machine” capabilities long attributed to the cerebellum), which reverberates from cellular to circuit mechanisms. Subsequently, integration within large-scale brain loops could generate the disparate cognitive/emotional and mental functions in which the cerebellum has been implicated. We propose, therefore, that the cerebellum operates as a general-purpose co-processor, whose effects depend on the specific brain centers to which individual modules are connected. Abnormal functioning in these loops could eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of major brain pathologies including not just ataxia but also dyslexia, autism, schizophrenia, and depression. PMID:23335884

  8. Cerebellar defects in Pdss2 conditional knockout mice during embryonic development and in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Song; Lu, Lin-Yu; Liu, Meng-Fei; Yuan, Qiu-Ju; Sham, Mai-Har; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2012-01-01

    PDSS2 is a gene that encodes one of the two subunits of trans-prenyl diphosphate synthase that is essential for ubiquinone biosynthesis. It is known that mutations in PDSS2 can cause primary ubiquinone deficiency in humans and a similar disease in mice. Cerebellum is the most often affected organ in ubiquinone deficiency, and cerebellar atrophy has been diagnosed in many infants with this disease. In this study, two Pdss2 conditional knockout mouse lines directed by Pax2-cre and Pcp2-cre were generated to investigate the effect of ubiquinone deficiency on cerebellum during embryonic development and in adulthood, respectively. The Pdss2(f/-); Pax2-cre mouse recapitulates some symptoms of ubiquinone deficiency in infants, including severe cerebellum hypoplasia and lipid accumulation in skeletal muscles at birth. During early cerebellum development (E12.5-14.5), Pdss2 knockout initially causes the delay of radial glial cell growth and neuron progenitor migration, so the growth of mutant cerebellum is retarded. During later development (E15.5-P0), increased ectopic apoptosis of neuroblasts and impaired cell proliferation result in the progression of cerebellum hypoplasia in the mutant. Thus, the mutant cerebellum contains fewer neurons at birth, and the cells are disorganized. The developmental defect of mutant cerebellum does not result from reduced Fgf8 expression before E12.5. Electron microscopy reveals mitochondrial defects and increased autophagic-like vacuolization that may arise in response to abnormal mitochondria in the mutant cerebellum. Nevertheless, the mutant mice die soon after birth probably due to cleft palate and micrognathia, which may result from Pdss2 knockout caused by ectopic Pax2-cre expression in the first branchial arch. On the other hand, the Pdss2(f/-); Pcp2-cre mouse is healthy at birth but gradually loses cerebellar Purkinje cells and develops ataxia-like symptoms at 9.5 months; thus this conditional knockout mouse may serve as a model for

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: clinical presentation, molecular mechanisms, and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Magaña, J J; Velázquez-Pérez, L; Cisneros, B

    2013-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by cerebellar dysfunction associated with slow saccades, early hyporeflexia, severe tremor of postural or action type, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive disorders, and other multisystemic features. SCA2, one of the most common ataxias worldwide, is caused by the expansion of a CAG triplet repeat located in the N-terminal coding region of the ATXN2 gene, which results in the incorporation of a segment of polyglutamines in the mutant protein, being longer expansions associated with earlier onset and more sever disease in subsequent generations. In this review, we offer a detailed description of the clinical manifestations of SCA2 and compile the experimental evidence showing the participation of ataxin-2 in crucial cellular processes, including messenger RNA maturation and translation, and endocytosis. In addition, we discuss in the light of present data the potential molecular mechanisms underlying SCA2 pathogenesis. The mutant protein exhibits a toxic gain of function that is mainly attributed to the generation of neuronal inclusions of phosphorylated and/or proteolytic cleaved mutant ataxin-2, which might alter normal ataxin-2 function, leading to cell dysfunction and death of target cells. In the final part of this review, we discuss the perspectives of development of therapeutic strategies for SCA2. Based on previous experience with other polyglutamine disorders and considering the molecular basis of SCA2 pathogenesis, a nuclei-acid-based strategy focused on the specific silencing of the dominant disease allele that preserves the expression of the wild-type allele is highly desirable and might prevent toxic neurodegenerative sequelae.

  10. Functional Analysis Helps to Define KCNC3 Mutational Spectrum in Dutch Ataxia Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fokkens, Michiel R.; Meijer, Michel; Boerrigter, Melissa; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Dooijes, Dennis; Boddeke, Erik; Sinke, Richard J.; Verbeek, Dineke S.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder of the cerebellum caused by mutations in the voltage gated potassium channel KCNC3. To identify novel pathogenic SCA13 mutations in KCNC3 and to gain insights into the disease prevalence in the Netherlands, we sequenced the entire coding region of KCNC3 in 848 Dutch cerebellar ataxia patients with familial or sporadic origin. We evaluated the pathogenicity of the identified variants by co-segregation analysis and in silico prediction followed by biochemical and electrophysiological studies. We identified 19 variants in KCNC3 including 2 non-coding, 11 missense and 6 synonymous variants. Two missense variants did not co-segregate with the disease and were excluded as potentially disease-causing mutations. We also identified the previously reported p.R420H and p.R423H mutations in our cohort. Of the remaining 7 missense variants, functional analysis revealed that 2 missense variants shifted Kv3.3 channel activation to more negative voltages. These variations were associated with early disease onset and mild intellectual disability. Additionally, one other missense variant shifted channel activation to more positive voltages and was associated with spastic ataxic gait. Whereas, the remaining missense variants did not change any of the channel characteristics. Of these three functional variants, only one variant was in silico predicted to be damaging and segregated with disease. The other two variants were in silico predicted to be benign and co-segregation analysis was not optimal or could only be partially confirmed. Therefore, we conclude that we have identified at least one novel pathogenic mutation in KCNC3 that cause SCA13 and two additionally potential SCA13 mutations. This leads to an estimate of SCA13 prevalence in the Netherlands to be between 0.6% and 1.3%. PMID:25756792

  11. Disruption of visual and motor connectivity in spinocerebellar ataxia type 7.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Alcauter, Sarael; Galvez, Victor; Barrios, Fernando A; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Garcia, Lizbeth; Diaz, Rosalinda; Gao, Wei; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive ataxia and retinal dystrophy. It is caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the ataxin7 gene. Anatomical studies have shown severe cerebellar degeneration and region-specific neocortical atrophy in SCA7 patients. However, the impact of the neurodegeneration on the functional integration of the remaining tissue is still unknown. The aim of this study was to examine functional connectivity abnormalities in areas with significant gray matter atrophy in SCA7 patients and their relationship with number of CAG repeats. Using a combination of voxel-based morphometry and resting-state fMRI, we studied 26 genetically confirmed SCA7 patients and aged-matched healthy controls. In SCA7 patients we found reduced functional interaction between the cerebellum and the middle and superior frontal gyri, disrupted functional connectivity between the visual and motor cortices, and increased functional coordination between atrophied areas of the cerebellum and a range of visual cortical areas compared with healthy controls. The degree of mutation expansion showed a negative effect on both the functional interaction between the right anterior cerebellum and the left superior frontal gyrus and the connectivity between the right anterior cerebellum and left parahippocampal gyrus. We found abnormal functional connectivity patterns, including both hypo- and hyperconnectivity, compared with controls. These abnormal patterns show reasonable association with the severity of gene mutation. Our findings suggest that aberrant changes are prevalent in both motor and visual systems, adding significantly to our understanding of the pathophysiology of SCA7.

  12. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  13. Regionalization of the isthmic and cerebellar primordia.

    PubMed

    Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Louvi, Angeliki; Alexandre, Paula; Wassef, Marion

    2005-01-01

    The complex migrations of neurons born in the dorsal neural tube of the isthmic and rhombomere l (rl) domains complicate the delineation of the cerebellar primordium. We show that Purkinje cells (P) are likely generated over a wide territory before gathering in the future cerebellar primordium under the developing external granular layer. Later expansion of the cerebellum over a restricted ependymal domain could rely on mutual interations between P cells and granule cell progenitors (GCP). P are attracted by GCP and in turn stimulate their proliferation, increasing the surface of the developing cortex. At later stages, regionalization of the developing and adult cerebellar cortex can be detected through regional variations in the distribution of several P cell markers. Whether and how the developmental and adult P subtypes are related is still unknown and it is unclear if they delineate the same sets of cerebellar subdivisions. We provide evidence that the early P regionalization is involved in intrinsic patterning of the cerebellar primordium, in particular it relate to the organization of the corticonuclear connection. We propose that the early P regionalization provides a scaffold to the mature P regionalization but that the development of functional afferent connections induces a period of P plasticity during which the early regional identity of P could be remodeled.

  14. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  15. [Atrophy of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex in patients with nonlymphoblastic leukemia treated with cytosine arabinoside].

    PubMed

    Nowacki, P; Dolińska, D; Honczarenko, K; Zyluk, B

    1992-01-01

    The reported analysis comprised 81 patients dying of acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia type M1, M2, M4 and blastic crises in chronic myelocytic leukaemia. It was observed that the number of cases of cerebellar granular layer atrophy rose markedly in the years 1984-1990 as compared with 1976-1983 (45.4% vs 16.2%). It is suggested that this was due to the introduction of cytostatic treatment schedules with higher doses of cytosine arabinoside (ARAC), especially TAD (6-thioguanine, ARAC, daunorubicin). Cerebellar granular layer atrophy seems to be dependent rather on the cumulative dose of ARAC and not on a single high dose of that drug.

  16. Selective vulnerability of cerebellar granule neuroblasts and their progeny to drugs with abuse liability

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F.; Khurdayan, Valeriya K.; Goody, Robin J.; Nath, Avindra; Saria, Alois; Pauly, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar development is shaped by the interplay of genetic and numerous environmental factors. Recent evidence suggests that cerebellar maturation is acutely sensitive to drugs with abuse liability including alcohol, opioids, and nicotine. Assuming substance abuse disrupts cerebellar maturation, a central question is to what are the basic mechanisms underlying potential drug-induced developmental defects. Evidence reviewed herein suggests that the maturation of granule neurons and their progeny are intrinsically affected by several classes of substances with abuse liability. Although drug abuse is also likely to target directly other cerebellar neuron and glial types, such as Purkinje cells and Bergmann glia, findings in isolated granule neurons suggest that they are often the principle target for drug actions. Developmental events that are selectively disrupted by drug abuse in granule neurons and/or their neuroblast precursors include proliferation, migration, differentiation (including neurite elaboration and synapse formation), and programmed cell death. Moreover, different classes of drugs act through distinct molecular mechanisms thereby disrupting unique aspects of development. For example, drug-induced perturbations in (i) neurotransmitter biogenesis, (ii) ligand and ion-gated receptor function and their coupling to intracellular effectors, (iii) neurotrophic factor biogenesis and signaling, and (iv) intercellular adhesion are all likely to have significant effects in shaping developmental outcome. In addition to identifying therapeutic strategies for drug abuse intervention, understanding the mechanisms by which drugs affect cellular maturation is likely to provide a better understanding of the neurochemical events that normally shape central nervous system development. PMID:14509568

  17. Friedreich`s ataxia in American families

    SciTech Connect

    D`Costa, A.; Maguire, B.A.; Sylvester, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Freidreich`s ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder presenting with dysarthia, loss of tendon reflexes, and ataxic gait. Both diabetes mellitus and cardiomyopathy are frequently found associated with the disease. The gene, FRDA, has been localized to 9q13-21. Recent reports of recombination events in individuals homozygous by descent have positioned the gene to a 450 KB region in the FRDA locus centromeric to the original markers. Candidate cDNA`s have been isolated from part of this region, and characterized, but not shown to be responsible for the disease. We have performed linkage analysis on 46 American families with markers in the FRDA region. A recombination has been detected in a family which has the phenotypic criteria for Friedreich`s; none of the three affected exhibit signs of cardiomyopathy which is a required diagnostic criteria. Since this recombination lies within the now excluded D9S5/D9S15 region, it is being tested for linkage to the {open_quotes}ataxia with selective vitamin E deficiency{close_quotes} (AVED) locus on chromosome 8q. Our lab has work in progress to subclone appropriate regions from YACs in order to identify expressed sequences and nucleotide variations (by SSCP) in the FRDA locus.

  18. Otoneurological Abnormalities in Patients with Friedreich's Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Mesti, Juliana Cristina; Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Cardoso, Rafaella Cardosa; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Friedreich's ataxia is a neurodegenerative disease and progressive by nature. It has autosomal recessive inheritance and early onset in most cases. Nystagmus and hearing loss (in some cases) make up some of the common symptoms seen in this disorder. Objective The objective of this study is to examine vestibular disorders in patients with Friedreich ataxia. Methods We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study. We evaluated 30 patients with ages ranging from six to 72 years (mean age of 38.6 ( ±  14.7). The patients underwent the following procedures: anamnesis, ENT, and vestibular evaluations. Results Clinically, the patients commonly had symptoms of incoordination of movement (66.7%), gait disturbances (56.7%), and dizziness (50%). In vestibular testing, alterations were predominantly evident under caloric testing (73.4%), gaze nystagmus testing (50.1%), rotational chair testing (36.7%), and optokinetic nystagmus testing (33.4%). The presence of alterations occurred under examination in 90% of subjects, with the majority occurring in those with central vestibular dysfunction (70% of the examinations). Conclusion The most evident neurotological symptoms were incoordination of movement, gait disturbances, and dizziness. Alterations in vestibular examinations occurred in 90% of patients, mostly in the caloric test, with a predominance of deficient central vestibular system dysfunction. PMID:28050212

  19. Pharmacometabolomic Signature of Ataxia SCA1 Mouse Model and Lithium Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wikoff, William R.; Gatchel, Jennifer R.; Wang, Lu; Barupal, Dinesh K.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Fiehn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    We have shown that lithium treatment improves motor coordination in a spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) disease mouse model (Sca1154Q/+). To learn more about disease pathogenesis and molecular contributions to the neuroprotective effects of lithium, we investigated metabolomic profiles of cerebellar tissue and plasma from SCA1-model treated and untreated mice. Metabolomic analyses of wild-type and Sca1154Q/+ mice, with and without lithium treatment, were performed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and BinBase mass spectral annotations. We detected 416 metabolites, of which 130 were identified. We observed specific metabolic perturbations in Sca1154Q/+ mice and major effects of lithium on metabolism, centrally and peripherally. Compared to wild-type, Sca1154Q/+ cerebella metabolic profile revealed changes in glucose, lipids, and metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and purines. Fewer metabolic differences were noted in Sca1154Q/+ mouse plasma versus wild-type. In both genotypes, the major lithium responses in cerebellum involved energy metabolism, purines, unsaturated free fatty acids, and aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids. The largest metabolic difference with lithium was a 10-fold increase in ascorbate levels in wild-type cerebella (p<0.002), with lower threonate levels, a major ascorbate catabolite. In contrast, Sca1154Q/+ mice that received lithium showed no elevated cerebellar ascorbate levels. Our data emphasize that lithium regulates a variety of metabolic pathways, including purine, oxidative stress and energy production pathways. The purine metabolite level, reduced in the Sca1154Q/+ mice and restored upon lithium treatment, might relate to lithium neuroprotective properties. PMID:23936457

  20. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant’s routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients’ medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients’ testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives’ testimonies indicate patients’ lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients’ alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to

  1. Social and Cultural Elements Associated with Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 Patients.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto Emmanuele; Galvez, Víctor; Díaz, Rosalinda; Paredes, Lorena; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2 (SCA2) is a rare genetic disorder producing cerebellar degeneration and affecting motor abilities. Neuroimaging studies also show neurodegeneration in subcortical and cortical regions related to emotional and social processes. From social neuroscience, it is suggested that motor and social abilities can be influenced by particular cultural dynamics so, culture is fundamental to understand the effect of brain-related alterations. Here, we present the first analysis about the cultural elements related to the SCA2 disorder in 15 patients previously evaluated with neuroimaging and psychometric instruments, and their nuclear relationships distributed in six geographical and cultural regions in Mexico. Ethnographic records and photographic and video archives about the quotidian participant's routine were obtained from the patients, their relatives and their caregivers. The information was categorized and interpreted taking into consideration cultural issues and patients' medical files. Our analyses suggest that most of the participants do not understand the nature of the disease and this misunderstanding favors magic and non-medical explanations. Patients' testimonies suggest a decrease in pain perception as well as motor alterations that may be related to interoceptive dysfunctions. Relatives' testimonies indicate patients' lack of social and emotional interests that may be related to frontal, temporal, and cerebellar degeneration. In general, participants use their religious beliefs to deal with the disease and only a few of them trust the health system. Patients and their families are either openly rejected and ignored, tolerated or even helped by their community accordingly to different regional traits. We propose that ethnography can provide social representations to understand the patients' alterations, to formulate neurobiological hypotheses, to develop neurocognitive interventions, and to improve the medical approach to the disease.

  2. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  3. A novel mutation m.8561C>G in MT-ATP6/8 causing a mitochondrial syndrome with ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Kytövuori, Laura; Lipponen, Joonas; Rusanen, Harri; Komulainen, Tuomas; Martikainen, Mika H; Majamaa, Kari

    2016-11-01

    Defects in the respiratory chain or mitochondrial ATP synthase (complex V) result in mitochondrial dysfunction that is an important cause of inherited neurological disease. Two of the subunits of complex V are encoded by MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 in the mitochondrial genome. Pathogenic mutations in MT-ATP6 are associated with the Leigh syndrome, the syndrome of neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), as well as with non-classical phenotypes, while MT-ATP8 is less frequently mutated in patients with mitochondrial disease. We investigated two adult siblings presenting with features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, sensorineural hearing impairment, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. As the phenotype was suggestive of mitochondrial disease, mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and a novel heteroplasmic mutation m.8561C>G in the overlapping region of the MT-ATP6 and MT-ATP8 was found. The mutation changed amino acids in both subunits. Mutation heteroplasmy correlated with the disease phenotype in five family members. An additional assembly intermediate of complex V and increased amount of subcomplex F1 were observed in myoblasts of the two patients, but the total amount of complex V was unaffected. Furthermore, intracellular ATP concentration was lower in patient myoblasts indicating defective energy production. We suggest that the m.8561C>G mutation in MT-ATP6/8 is pathogenic, leads biochemically to impaired assembly and decreased ATP production of complex V, and results clinically in a phenotype with the core features of cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism.

  4. RNAi silencing of P/Q-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons of adult mouse leads to episodic ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Julie; Bertaso, Federica; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Metz, Alexandra; Lemmers, Céline; Ango, Fabrice; Fagni, Laurent; Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Episodic ataxia type-2 (EA2) is a dominantly inherited human neurological disorder caused by loss of function mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the CaV2.1 subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels. It remains however unknown whether the deficit of cerebellar CaV2.1 in adult is in direct link with the disease. To address this issue, we have used lentiviral based-vector RNA interference (RNAi) to knock-down CaV2.1 expression in the cerebellum of adult mice. We show that suppression of the P/Q-type channels in Purkinje neurons induced motor abnormalities, such as imbalance and ataxic gait. Interestingly, moderate channel suppression caused no basal ataxia, while β-adrenergic activation and exercise mimicked stress induced motor disorders. Moreover, stress-induced ataxia was stable, non-progressive and totally abolished by acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used to treat EA2. Altogether, these data reveal that P/Q-type channel suppression in adult mice supports the episodic status of EA2 disease.

  5. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  6. Simultaneous occurrence of internal capsule infarct and cerebellar haemorrhage in a patient with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Pande, Nikhil; Vivek, Ganapathiraman; Hande, Manjunath; Acharya, Vasudeva

    2014-01-09

    A 68-year-old woman with hypertension with no history of cerebrovascular events presented with a left-sided hemiplegia which had developed acutely 2 days ago. She was not on maintenance therapy with antiplatelets or anticoagulants. A CT scan showed acute ischaemic infarction of the right internal capsule and cerebellar haemorrhage. Cardiac evaluation was normal. Doppler ultrasonography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries showed diffuse arteriosclerotic changes, but did not reveal any haemodynamic occlusion. The simultaneous development of dual strokes was considered to be an extension of the same arteriosclerotic process to the intracranial carotid and basilar arteries.

  7. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Silva, Rodrigo Alencar E; Cunningham, Mauro César Quintão E Silva; Maia, Débora Palma; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Cardoso, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with AIDS who developed opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome during a period different from other cases reported in literature. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome had already been reported as the initial neurological presentation of AIDS, as well as at the time of HIV-seroconversion and immune reconstitution syndrome. Our case is unique since the patient had an elevated CD4 count and negative viral load in the period when the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome occurred.

  8. Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency associated with deafness.

    PubMed

    Kara, Bülent; Uzümcü, Abdullah; Uyguner, Oya; Rosti, Rasim Ozgür; Koçbaş, Ayça; Ozmen, Meral; Kayserili, Hülya

    2008-01-01

    Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, usually with a phenotype resembling Friedreich ataxia, caused by selective impairment of gastrointestinal vitamin E absorption. Vitamin E supplementation improves symptoms and prevents disease progress. In North Africa and Southern Europe, AVED is as common as Friedreich ataxia. There are no reported cases from Turkey. We herein report a 16-year-old Turkish girl with AVED, who was found to have total deletion of the TTPA gene as well as sensorineural deafness, and we present her follow-up data after vitamin E therapy.

  9. Animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Hick, Aurore; Puccio, Hélène; Pook, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The development and use of animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are essential requirements for the understanding of FRDA disease mechanisms and the investigation of potential FRDA therapeutic strategies. Although animal and cellular models of lower organisms have provided valuable information on certain aspects of FRDA disease and therapy, it is intuitive that the most useful models are those of mammals and mammalian cells, which are the closest in physiological terms to FRDA patients. To date, there have been considerable efforts put into the development of several different FRDA mouse models and relevant FRDA mouse and human cell line systems. We summarize the principal mammalian FRDA models, discuss the pros and cons of each system, and describe the ways in which such models have been used to address two of the fundamental, as yet unanswered, questions regarding FRDA. Namely, what is the exact pathophysiology of FRDA and what is the detailed genetic and epigenetic basis of FRDA?

  10. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  11. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  12. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  13. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  14. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  15. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Plassard, Andrew J; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L; Claassen, Daniel O; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-02-27

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  16. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the express