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Sample records for acute cerebral hemorrhage

  1. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  2. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X.; Wan, Z.B.; Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y.; Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S.; Zhao, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units. PMID:24519130

  3. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  4. Acute-phase proteins in stroke: influences of its cause (cerebral hemorrhage or infarction), of the cerebral site of infarction, and of the sex of patients.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, D A; Haţegan, D; Jipescu, I; Steinbruch, L; Scu, M G

    1991-01-01

    In most of the 129 patients with a recent stroke by cerebral hemorrhage or infarction a note-worthy acute-phase response was found, as demonstrated by important quantitative alterations of blood levels of several acute-phase proteins (APP). These alterations were different in patients with cerebral hemorrhage as compared to those with cerebral infarction. The alterations due to cerebral infarction were not different according to the site of the infarction in brain, i.e. in the brain territories irrigated by the carotid artery system or by the basilar artery system. The APP alterations do not depend on the sex of patients or on the time elapsed from stroke-onset to blood collection.

  5. Intensive Blood-Pressure Lowering in Patients with Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Barsan, William G; Hanley, Daniel F; Hsu, Chung Y; Martin, Renee L; Moy, Claudia S; Silbergleit, Robert; Steiner, Thorsten; Suarez, Jose I; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wang, Yongjun; Yamamoto, Haruko; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-15

    Background Limited data are available to guide the choice of a target for the systolic blood-pressure level when treating acute hypertensive response in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We randomly assigned eligible participants with intracerebral hemorrhage (volume, <60 cm(3)) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5 or more (on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating worse condition) to a systolic blood-pressure target of 110 to 139 mm Hg (intensive treatment) or a target of 140 to 179 mm Hg (standard treatment) in order to test the superiority of intensive reduction of systolic blood pressure to standard reduction; intravenous nicardipine to lower blood pressure was administered within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was death or disability (modified Rankin scale score of 4 to 6, on a scale ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) at 3 months after randomization, as ascertained by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment assignments. Results Among 1000 participants with a mean (±SD) systolic blood pressure of 200.6±27.0 mm Hg at baseline, 500 were assigned to intensive treatment and 500 to standard treatment. The mean age of the patients was 61.9 years, and 56.2% were Asian. Enrollment was stopped because of futility after a prespecified interim analysis. The primary outcome of death or disability was observed in 38.7% of the participants (186 of 481) in the intensive-treatment group and in 37.7% (181 of 480) in the standard-treatment group (relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.27; analysis was adjusted for age, initial GCS score, and presence or absence of intraventricular hemorrhage). Serious adverse events occurring within 72 hours after randomization that were considered by the site investigator to be related to treatment were reported in 1.6% of the patients in the intensive-treatment group and in 1.2% of those in the standard-treatment group. The rate of renal adverse events

  6. Intensive Blood-Pressure Lowering in Patients with Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Barsan, William G; Hanley, Daniel F; Hsu, Chung Y; Martin, Renee L; Moy, Claudia S; Silbergleit, Robert; Steiner, Thorsten; Suarez, Jose I; Toyoda, Kazunori; Wang, Yongjun; Yamamoto, Haruko; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-15

    Background Limited data are available to guide the choice of a target for the systolic blood-pressure level when treating acute hypertensive response in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods We randomly assigned eligible participants with intracerebral hemorrhage (volume, <60 cm(3)) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5 or more (on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating worse condition) to a systolic blood-pressure target of 110 to 139 mm Hg (intensive treatment) or a target of 140 to 179 mm Hg (standard treatment) in order to test the superiority of intensive reduction of systolic blood pressure to standard reduction; intravenous nicardipine to lower blood pressure was administered within 4.5 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was death or disability (modified Rankin scale score of 4 to 6, on a scale ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) at 3 months after randomization, as ascertained by an investigator who was unaware of the treatment assignments. Results Among 1000 participants with a mean (±SD) systolic blood pressure of 200.6±27.0 mm Hg at baseline, 500 were assigned to intensive treatment and 500 to standard treatment. The mean age of the patients was 61.9 years, and 56.2% were Asian. Enrollment was stopped because of futility after a prespecified interim analysis. The primary outcome of death or disability was observed in 38.7% of the participants (186 of 481) in the intensive-treatment group and in 37.7% (181 of 480) in the standard-treatment group (relative risk, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.85 to 1.27; analysis was adjusted for age, initial GCS score, and presence or absence of intraventricular hemorrhage). Serious adverse events occurring within 72 hours after randomization that were considered by the site investigator to be related to treatment were reported in 1.6% of the patients in the intensive-treatment group and in 1.2% of those in the standard-treatment group. The rate of renal adverse events

  7. [Glial fibrillary acidic protein in patients with symptoms of acute stroke: diagnostic marker of cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Foerch, C; Pfeilschifter, W; Zeiner, P; Brunkhorst, R

    2014-08-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a highly brain-specific protein that is expressed in large quantities in astrocytes and has important functions in terms of maintaining and stabilizing the cytoskeleton. Acute intracerebral hemorrhage leads to an immediate mechanical destruction of astroglial cells with the subsequent release of GFAP into the extracellular space and the bloodstream. On the other hand, necrosis, cytolysis and GFAP release does not occur before 6-12 h after symptom onset in ischemic stroke. Thus, in the early hours after stroke increased GFAP values could indicate intracerebral hemorrhage. This review article describes the underlying pathophysiology of the test and guides the reader through the available data. Potential implications regarding the prehospital triage of acute stroke patients are discussed, including the possibility to initiate hyperacute treatment, such as blood pressure reduction in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Other areas of interest for a potential GFAP test include traumatic brain injury and malignant gliomas.

  8. Atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute cerebral hemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Matano, Fumihiro; Murai, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kato, Taisei; Kitamura, Takayuki; Sekine, Tetsuro; Takagi, Ryo; Teramoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) associated with mild anemia is commonly observed on radiological examination, and there are several reports of ruptured aneurysms occurring with ICH but without accompanying subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the relationship among computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and intraoperative findings of ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in patients with severe chronic anemia has been rarely reported and is poorly understood. Here, we report atypical radiological and intraoperative findings of acute ICH caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic anemia. A 64-year-old man with anemia was admitted to our hospital after he experienced left hemiparesis and a disturbance of consciousness. At a referring institution, he showed evidence of macrocytic anemia (white blood cell count, 9,000/μL; red blood cell count, 104×10(4)/μL; hemoglobin, 4.0 g/dL; hematocrit, 12.2%; and platelet count, 26.6×10(4)/μL). Both CT and MRI showed a right frontal ICH. The outer ring of the hematoma appeared as low-density area on CT, a low-intensity area on T1-weighted MRI, and a high-intensity area on T2-weighted MRI with a serous component. The patient received a blood transfusion and underwent surgical removal of the hematoma the following day. The white serous effusion visualized with CT and MRI was identified as a blood clot in the hematoma cavity. The blood that leaks from blood vessels appears as a high-intensity area on CT because it undergoes plasma absorption in a solidification shrinkage process, and is, therefore, concentrated. Although we did not examine the white effusion to determine if serous components were present, we speculated that the effusion may have contained serous components. Therefore, we removed the part of the effusion that appeared as a low-density area on CT. The presence of ICH without subarachnoid hemorrhage suggested the possible adhesion and rupture of a previous

  9. Angiographic findings in 2 children with cerebral paragonimiasis with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jingyu; Miao, Hongpin; Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang

    2013-05-01

    Hemorrhagic events associated with cerebral paragonimiasis are not rare, especially in children and adolescents; however, angiographic evidence of cerebrovascular involvement has not been reported. The authors describe angiographic abnormalities of the cerebral arteries seen in 2 children in whom cerebral paragonimiasis was associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The patients presented with acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a beaded appearance and long segmental narrowing of arteries, consistent with arteritis. In both patients, involved vessels were seen in the area of the hemorrhage. The vascular changes and the hemorrhage, together with new lesions that developed close to the hemorrhage and improved after praziquantel treatment, were attributed to paragonimiasis. Further study of the frequency and mechanism of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular complications associated with cerebral paragonimiasis is needed.

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  11. The acute effects of hemorrhagic shock on cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygen tension, and spreading depolarization following penetrating ballistic-like brain injury.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lai Yee; Wei, Guo; Shear, Deborah A; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often occurs in conjunction with additional trauma, resulting in secondary complications, such as hypotension as a result of blood loss. This study investigated the combined effects of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) on physiological parameters, including acute changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), brain tissue oxygen tension (P(bt)O₂), and cortical spreading depolarizations (CSDs). All recordings were initiated before injury (PBBI/HS/both) and maintained for 2.5 h. Results showed that PBBI alone and combined PBBI and HS produced a sustained impairment of ipsilateral rCBF that decreased by 70% from baseline (p<0.05). Significant and sustained reductions in P(bt)O₂ (50% baseline; p<0.05) were also observed in the injured hemisphere of the animals subjected to both PBBI and HS (PBBI+HS). In contrast, PBBI alone produced smaller, more transient reductions in P(bt)O₂ levels. The lower limit of cerebral autoregulation was significantly higher in the PBBI+HS group (p<0.05, compared to HS alone). Critically, combined injury resulted in twice the number of spontaneous CSDs as in PBBI alone (p<0.05). It also lowered the propagation speed of CSD and the threshold of CSD occurrence [induced CSD at higher mean arterial pressure (MAP)]. However, rCBF and P(bt)O₂ were not responsive to the depolarizations. Our data suggest that PBBI together with HS causes persistent impairment of CBF and brain tissue oxygen tension, increasing the probability of CSDs that likely contribute to secondary neuropathology and compromise neurological recovery. PMID:23461630

  12. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Yee; Liu, Jia-Shou; Lai, Shung-Lon; Wu, Hsiu-Shan; Lan, Min-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Nattokinase is used as a health-promoting medicine for preventing thrombosis due to its fibrinolytic activity. Cerebral microbleed is remnant of blood extravasations from the damaged vessels related to cerebral microangiopathies. We report a patient, having used aspirin for secondary stroke prevention, who had an acute cerebellar hemorrhage after taking nattokinase 400 mg daily for 7 consecutive days. In addition to the hemorrhagic lesion, multiple microbleeds were demonstrated on brain MR images. We suggest that nattokinase may increase risk of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients who have bleeding-prone cerebral microangiopathy and are receiving other antithrombotic agent at the same time.

  13. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  14. [Cerebral hemorrhage associated with the use phenylpropanolamine].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, F; Méndez, A; Vega, F

    1990-10-01

    Phenylpropanolamine is a sympatheticomimetic agent which is widely used in pharmacologic preparations to treat nasal congestion, and to produce and anorexigenic or stimulant action. In the last years complications affecting the nervous system or the general condition have been reported. There is still controversy with regard to the safety of this pharmacologic agent. In this study we report two cases of parenchymal cerebral hemorrhage secondary to phenylpropanolamine administration. In the second case we observed angiographic findings of a reversible vasculopathy.

  15. [Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milojević, T M; Baljozović, B V; Rakić, M Lj; Nestorović, B D; Dostanić, M M; Milaković, B D; Kojić, Z Z; Repac, N R; Cvrkota, I S

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm causes permanent neurolological deficit or death occurance in 13% of clinical cases. Peak frequency is from 8-10th day after SAH. The purpose of this study is factor analysis that may have influence on vasospasm development , as well as predictor determination. The study is prospective and analysis 192 patients treated in Institute of Neurosurgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. The majority of patients were admitted in hospital in first four days after SAH, and 184 had GCS over 7. Univariate methods of factor analysis were used, and for significance of predictors influence testing multivariante regression analysis was used. Vasospasm occurred in 22,40% of all cases. No relationships have been found between sex, age, previous hypertension, timing of surgery, appearance of hydrocephalus and intracerebral hematoma, hypertermia or mean arterial blood pressure, with occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. Factors with significantly associated with the occurance of vasospasm were: hearth disease, hypernatriemia, Hct, clinical grade on admission as well as preoperative clinical grade and Fisher CT scan grade. In the first four days after SAH, Fisher scan grade, preoperative clinical grade and Hct, appeared as predictors. After four days, clinical grade on admission and hypernatiemia, showed as poredictors. PMID:18792575

  16. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  17. [Intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhages after administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in a patient with acute ischemicstroke due to anterior cerebral artery dissection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Ken; Koyama, Seigo; Nakamura, Ryoichi

    2011-06-01

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of right hemiparesis. At admission, he was alert and well oriented. His verbal comprehension seemed good, but his speech was not fluent. He could not stand or walk owing to the right hemiparesis, which was severe in the lower extremity. Computed tomographic (CT) scans on admission showed no abnormality. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed after the CT showed a high-intensity lesion in the left cingulate gyrus. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed occlusion and irregularity of the left A2 portion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). At 1 h 50 min after the onset of the hemiparesis, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA; 0.6 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. At 1 h after the administration of rt-PA, he became drowsy and his right hemiparesis deteriorated. CT scans performed again showed a hematoma in the left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the anterior interhemispheric fissure. He was treated conservatively. MRA performed on the 18th day after admission showed recanalization of the left ACA and abnormal dilatation of the left A2 segment. The abnormal dilatation was also depicted by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) performed on the 26th day after admission and even on the 33rd and 77th days. As seen in our case, the definite diagnosis of dissection confined to the ACA frequently needs serial angiographies; therefore, its diagnosis immediately after the onset is often difficult. Thrombolytic therapy by intravenous administration of rt-PA for cerebral infarction caused by dissection of the ACA may recanalize the occluded site and facilitate the progression of the dissection, resulting in intracerebral and/or subarachnoid hemorrhages. In patients with cerebral infarction due to ACA dissection, strict control of blood pressure and careful observation are necessary after thrombolytic therapy by rt-PA.

  18. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  19. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  20. How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    “How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art” examines how a massive stroke affected my art practice. The paralysis that ensued forced me to switch hands and become a left-handed painter. It was postulated by several neuroscientists that the “interpreter” in my brain was severely damaged during my CVA. This has had a profoundly liberating effect on my work. Whereas my pre-stroke period had the tendency to be over-intellectualized and forced, my post-stroke art is less self-conscious, more urgent and expressive. The primary subject matter of both periods is the brain. In my practice as an artist, my stroke is a challenge and an opportunity rather than a loss. PMID:22493572

  1. Modulating the Immune Response Towards a Neuroregenerative Peri-injury Milieu After Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin; Flores, Jerry J; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages account for 15-20 % of stroke sub-types and have very poor prognoses. The mortality rate for cerebral hemorrhage patients is between 40 and 50 %, of which at least half of the deaths occur within the first 2 days, and 75 % of survivors are incapable of living independently after 1 year. Current emergency interventions involve lowering blood pressure and reducing intracranial pressure by controlled ventilations or, in the worst case scenarios, surgical intervention. Some hemostatic and coagulatherapeutic interventions are being investigated, although a few that were promising in experimental studies have failed in clinical trials. No significant immunomodulatory intervention, however, exists for clinical management of cerebral hemorrhage. The inflammatory response following cerebral hemorrhage is particularly harmful in the acute stage because blood-brain barrier disruption is amplified and surrounding tissue is destroyed by secreted proteases and reactive oxygen species from infiltrated leukocytes. In this review, we discuss both the destructive and regenerative roles the immune response play following cerebral hemorrhage and focus on microglia, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes as the primary agents directing the response. Microglia, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes each have sub-types that significantly influence the over-arching immune response towards either a pro-inflammatory, destructive, or an anti-inflammatory, regenerative, state. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies of cerebral hemorrhages that selectively target these immune cells are reviewed and we suggest immunomodulatory therapies that reduce inflammation, while augmenting neural repair, will improve overall cerebral hemorrhage outcomes. PMID:25946986

  2. A schizophrenic patient with cerebral infarctions after hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohara, Keiichiro; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the fourth case of cerebral infarction, concomitant with hemorrhagic shock, in English literature. A 33-year-old male, who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and given a prescription for Olanzapine, was discovered with multiple self-inflicted bleeding cuts on his wrist. On arrival, he was in hemorrhagic shock without verbal responsiveness, but his vital signs were normalized following infusion of Lactate Ringer's solution. The neuroradiological studies revealed multiple cerebral ischemic lesions without any vascular abnormality. He was diagnosed with speech apraxia, motor aphasia, and dysgraphia, due to multiple cerebral infarctions. As there was no obvious causative factor with regard to the occurrence of cerebral infarction in the patient, the hypoperfusion due to hemorrhagic shock, and the thromboembolic tendency due to Olanzapine, might have acted together to lead to the patient's cerebral ischemia. PMID:23493336

  3. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  4. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  5. Digitally quantifying cerebral hemorrhage using Photoshop and Image J.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xian Nan; Berman, Ari Ethan; Swanson, Raymond Alan; Yenari, Midori Anne

    2010-07-15

    A spectrophotometric hemoglobin assay is widely used to estimate the extent of brain hemorrhage by measuring the amount of hemoglobin in the brain. However, this method requires using the entire brain sample, leaving none for histology or other assays. Other widely used measures of gross brain hemorrhage are generally semi-quantitative and can miss subtle differences. Semi-quantitative brain hemorrhage scales may also be subject to bias. Here, we present a method to digitally quantify brain hemorrhage using Photoshop and Image J, and compared this method to the spectrophotometric hemoglobin assay. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received varying amounts of autologous blood injected into the cerebral hemispheres in order to generate different sized hematomas. 24h later, the brains were harvested, sectioned, photographed then prepared for the hemoglobin assay. From the brain section photographs, pixels containing hemorrhage were identified by Photoshop and the optical intensity was measured by Image J. Identification of hemorrhage size using optical intensities strongly correlated to the hemoglobin assay (R=0.94). We conclude that our method can accurately quantify the extent of hemorrhage. An advantage of this technique is that brain tissue can be used for additional studies.

  6. Spreading Depolarizations: A Therapeutic Target Against Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chung, David Y; Oka, Fumiaki; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-06-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia is the most feared cause of secondary injury progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Initially thought to be a direct consequence of large artery spasm and territorial ischemia, recent data suggests that delayed cerebral ischemia represents multiple concurrent and synergistic mechanisms, including microcirculatory dysfunction, inflammation, and microthrombosis. Among these mechanisms, spreading depolarizations (SDs) are arguably the most elusive and underappreciated in the clinical setting. Although SDs have been experimentally detected and examined since the late 1970s, their widespread occurrence in human brain was not unequivocally demonstrated until relatively recently. We now know that SDs occur with very high incidence in human brain after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and trauma, and worsen outcomes by increasing metabolic demand, decreasing blood supply, predisposing to seizure activity, and possibly worsening brain edema. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of SDs in injured brain. Although much of our mechanistic knowledge comes from experimental models of focal cerebral ischemia, clinical data suggest that the same principles apply regardless of the mode of injury (i.e., ischemia, hemorrhage, or trauma). The hope is that a better fundamental understanding of SDs will lead to novel therapeutic interventions to prevent SD occurrence and its adverse consequences contributing to injury progression in subarachnoid hemorrhage and other forms of acute brain injury. PMID:27258442

  7. The return of an old worm: cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2012-11-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.

  8. The Return of an Old Worm: Cerebral Paragonimiasis Presenting with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes. PMID:23166429

  9. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kitulwatte, Indira D; Kim, Patrick J H; Pollanen, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalomyelitis in a man with viral myocarditis. A 48-year-old previously healthy male was found dead in his locked apartment. At autopsy he was found to be malnourished, and his lungs showed gross evidence of bilateral pneumonia with abscess formation and bullous emphysema. Multiple petechial hemorrhages were observed in the brain and mainly involved white matter in the cerebral hemispheres including the corpus callosum and internal capsule, as well as the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. Microscopy of the brain and spinal cord revealed perivenular hemorrhages, central microthrombi in venules with fibrin exudation into the subcortical white matter, and early perivenular demyelination associated with scanty mixed cellular infiltrates. Other microscopic features included widespread diffuse viral myocarditis, extensive suppurative bronchopneumonia, and chronic bronchitis. This case illustrates the death of a man with a rare fatal disease associated with two other potentially lethal diseases. The case also illustrates the importance of a holistic approach when determining the cause of death, especially when there are competing causes of death. PMID:26148811

  10. [A case of left occipital lobe hemorrhage in a patient with progressive systemic sclerosis: evaluation of cerebral angiography and histology].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, H; Kubo, Y; Otawara, Y; Kudo, A; Tomitsuka, N; Yoshida, K; Ogawa, A; Kurose, K; Suzuki, M; Chiba, S

    2000-11-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is uncommon in progressive systemic sclerosis, with only 2 reported cases associated with intracerebral hemorrhage detected by neuroimaging. A 55-year-old woman with a 10-year history of scleroderma presented with left occipital lobe hemorrhage manifesting as headache and vomiting. She had no signs of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia. CT and MRI, on admission, showed left occipital lobe hemorrhage with ventricular rupture and acute left subdural hematoma. Serial cerebral angiography was performed on day 0, day 7 and day 14, and found no evidence of aneurysm, arteriovenous multiformation or tumor stain in the left occipital lobe. However, the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries showed increasing segmental narrowing suggestive of vasculitis. Histological examination of a section from the brain cortex adjacent to the hemorrhage revealed no evidence of vasculitis, fibrinoid degeneration or amyloid deposition. Focal vasculitis may have occurred secondary to the homorrhagic lesion.

  11. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery presenting subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction: a case report].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, K; Sakata, K; Gondo, G; Kanno, H; Yamamoto, I

    2001-04-01

    A case is reported of anterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. A 50-year-old man presented with sudden onset of weakness of the left lower limb was admitted to our hospital. CT scan on admission showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and CT on the 6th day demonstrated a cerebral infarction on the right medial frontal lobe. A carotid angiogram 12 hours after the onset showed no aneurysmal lesion, but, the angiogram repeated 11 days after the onset revealed an aneurysmal dilatation with distal narrowing at the right A2-A3 segment. To prevent rebleeding, we performed a wrapping procedure through the interhemispheric route on the 18th day after onset. The postoperative course was uneventful. We reviewed 27 previously reported cases with symptomatic dissecting aneurysm confined to the anterior cerebral artery.

  12. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  13. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552–632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500–2,500 m (5,000–8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient’s acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  14. A case of cerebral aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with air travel.

    PubMed

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    During air travel, passengers are exposed to unique conditions such as rapid ascent and descent that can trigger significant physiological changes. In addition, the cabins of commercial aircraft are only partially pressured to 552-632 mmHg or the equivalent terrestrial altitudes of 1,500-2,500 m (5,000-8,000 feet) above sea level. While studies in high-altitude medicine have shown that all individuals experience some degree of hypoxia, cerebral edema, and increased cerebral blood flow, the neurological effects that accompany these changes are otherwise poorly understood. In this study, we report a case of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm associated with travel on commercial aircraft. We then review relevant cases of neurological incidents with possible air travel-related etiology and discuss the physiological factors that may have contributed to the patient's acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the future, this report may serve as reference for more detailed and conservative medical guidelines and recommendations regarding air travel. PMID:27147875

  15. Early Blood Pressure Lowering Does Not Reduce Growth of Intraventricular Hemorrhage following Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Results of the INTERACT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward; Anderson, Craig S.; Wang, Xia; Arima, Hisatomi; Saxena, Anubhav; Moullaali, Tom J.; Delcourt, Candice; Wu, Guojun; Wang, Jinchao; Chen, Guofang; Lavados, Pablo M.; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Chalmers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) extension is common following acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with poor prognosis. Aim To determine whether intensive blood pressure (BP)-lowering therapy reduces IVH growth. Methods Pooled analyses of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trials (INTERACT1 and INTERACT2) computed tomography (CT) substudies; multicenter, open, controlled, randomized trials of patients with acute spontaneous ICH and elevated systolic BP, randomly assigned to intensive (<140 mm Hg) or guideline-based (<180 mm Hg) BP management. Participants had blinded central analyses of baseline and 24-hour CT. Association of BP lowering to IVH growth was assessed in analysis of covariance. Results There was no significant difference in adjusted mean IVH growth following intensive (n = 228) compared to guideline-recommended (n = 228) BP treatment (1.6 versus 2.2 ml, respectively; p = 0.56). Adjusted mean IVH growth was nonsignificantly greater in patients with a mean achieved systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg over 24 h (3.94 ml; p trend = 0.26). Conclusions Early intensive BP-lowering treatment had no clear effect on IVH in acute ICH. PMID:27603933

  16. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  17. Acute and Chronic Fetal Anemia as a Result of Fetomaternal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal anemia such as right ventricular enlargement, diminished cerebral vascular resistance, and elevated middle cerebral artery end-diastolic velocity. On the other hand, signs of acute fetal decompensation such as deterioration of the fetal heart tracing, diminished biophysical score, decreased cord pH, and increased cord base deficit were noted. Following delivery, the neonate's initial hemoglobin was 4.0 g/dL and the maternal KB ratio was 0.015 indicative of a significant fetomaternal hemorrhage. Discussion. One should consider FMH as part of the differential diagnosis for fetal or immediate neonatal anemia. We describe a unique case of FMH that demonstrated both acute and chronic clinical features. It is our hope that this case will assist practitioners in differentiating acute FMH that may require emergent delivery from chronic FMH which may be able to be expectantly managed. PMID:24804127

  18. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. PMID:24220549

  19. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Thrombosis of Cerebral Veins and Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergey Borisovich; Bocharov, Aleksei Vasilievich; Mikeladze, Ketevan; Gasparian, Sergey Surenovich; Serova, Natalia Konstantinovna; Shakhnovich, Alexander Romanovich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses (ATCVS) is a multifactorial disease with grave consequences. Because of its rare occurrence there are no proven treatment guidelines. Sixteen patients with ATCVS were treated. The final diagnosis was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography. Sinus catheterization was performed via transfemoral venous access. Treatment included mechanical manipulation of thrombi and thrombolytic therapy. A regression of clinical symptoms with a concomitant decrease of intracranial hypertension was achieved in all patients. Long-term results were studied in eight patients: none presented clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. Endovascular transvenous recanalization is an effective treatment for acute thrombosis of cerebral veins and sinuses. Along with the local thrombolysis, significant potential in the treatment of this complex pathology lies in the transvenous endovascular techniques of mechanical thrombus extraction, especially in patients with intracranial hemorrhage for whom the use of thrombolytic agents is restricted. PMID:25196622

  1. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome due to hemorrhagic brain infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a condition featuring hyponatremia and dehydration caused by head injury, operation on the brain, subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor and so on. However, there are a few reports of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by cerebral infarction. We describe a patient with cerebral infarction who developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. Case presentation A 79-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension and arrhythmia was admitted to our hospital for mild consciousness disturbance, conjugate deviation to right, left unilateral spatial neglect and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a broad ischemic change in right middle cerebral arterial territory. She was diagnosed as cardiogenic cerebral embolism because atrial fibrillation was detected on electrocardiogram on admission. She showed hyponatremia accompanied by polyuria complicated at the same time with the development of hemorrhagic transformation on day 14 after admission. Based on her hypovolemic hyponatremia, she was evaluated as not having syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone but cerebral salt-wasting syndrome. She fortunately recovered with proper fluid replacement and electrolyte management. Conclusions This is a rare case of cerebral infarction and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. It may be difficult to distinguish cerebral salt-wasting syndrome from syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, however, an accurate assessment is needed to reveal the diagnosis of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome because the recommended fluid management is opposite in the two conditions. PMID:25055823

  2. Detection of Cerebral Hemorrhage in Rabbits by Time-Difference Magnetic Inductive Phase Shift Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wencai; Yan, Qingguang; Qin, Mingxin; Jin, Gui; Sun, Jian; Ning, Xu; Zhuang, Wei; Peng, Bin; Li, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage, a difficult issue in clinical practice, is often detected and studied with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, these expensive devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions, and hence are unable to provide bedside and emergency on-site monitoring. The magnetic inductive phase shift (MIPS) is an emerging technology that may become a new tool to detect cerebral hemorrhage and to serve as an inexpensive partial substitute to medical imaging. In order to study a wider band of cerebral hemorrhage MIPS and to provide more useful information for measuring cerebral hemorrhage, we established a cerebral hemorrhage magnetic induction phase shift spectroscopy (MIPSS) detection system. Thirteen rabbits with five cerebral hemorrhage states were studied using a single coil-coil within a 1 MHz-200 MHz frequency range in linear sweep. A feature band (FB) with the highest detection sensitivity and the greatest stability was selected for further analysis and processing. In addition, a maximum conductivity cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI was performed to verify and interpret the MIPSS result. The average phase shift change induced by a 3 ml injection of autologous blood under FB was -7.7503° ± 1.4204°, which was considerably larger than our previous work. Data analysis with a non-parametric statistical Friedman M test showed that in the FB, MIPSS could distinguish the five states of cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits, with a statistical significance of p<0.05. A B-F distribution profile was designed according to the MIPSS under FB that can provide instantaneous diagnostic information about the cerebral hemorrhage severity from a single set of measurements. The results illustrate that the MIPSS detection method is able to provide a new possibility for real-time monitoring and diagnosis of the severity of cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26001112

  3. New auto-segment method of cerebral hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijiang; Shen, Tingzhi; Dang, Hua

    2007-12-01

    A novel method for Computerized tomography (CT) cerebral hemorrhage (CH) image automatic segmentation is presented in the paper, which uses expert system that models human knowledge about the CH automatic segmentation problem. The algorithm adopts a series of special steps and extracts some easy ignored CH features which can be found by statistic results of mass real CH images, such as region area, region CT number, region smoothness and some statistic CH region relationship. And a seven steps' extracting mechanism will ensure these CH features can be got correctly and efficiently. By using these CH features, a decision tree which models the human knowledge about the CH automatic segmentation problem has been built and it will ensure the rationality and accuracy of the algorithm. Finally some experiments has been taken to verify the correctness and reasonable of the automatic segmentation, and the good correct ratio and fast speed make it possible to be widely applied into practice.

  4. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  5. Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An important cause of cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bano, Shahina; Yadav, Sachchida Nand; Garga, Umesh Chandra; Chaudhary, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) in the elderly. Although there are no pathognomic clinical features of CAA-related PICH, the association of white matter changes with lobar, recurrent, or multiple simultaneous hemorrhages in older patients should raise the suspicion of its diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of CAA requires pathologic examination of the affected tissue. However, with modern imaging techniques, it is possible to diagnose the "probable CAA" in patients presenting with PICH. Gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging is a very sensitive, noninvasive technique for identifying microhemorrhages in life. The diagnosis of CAA is important because of the likely implication it has on future management targeted to reduce risk of future bleeding. PMID:21716867

  6. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  7. Association of CVD Candidate Gene Polymorphisms with Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Hemorrhage in Chinese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yue; Li, Jiana; He, Lingbin; Yuan, Yuan; Tan, Xuerui; Liu, Lisheng; Zhao, Jingbo; Wang, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Contribution of cardiovascular disease related genetic risk factors for stroke are not clearly defined. We performed a genetic association study to assess the association of 56 previously characterized gene variants in 34 candidate genes from cardiovascular disease related biological pathways with ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage in a Chinese population. Methods There were 1280 stroke patients (1101 with ischemic stroke and 179 with cerebral hemorrhage) and 1380 controls in the study. The genotypes for 56 polymorphisms of 34 candidate genes were determined by the immobilized probe approach and the associations of gene polymorphisms with ischemic stroke and cerebral hemorrhage were performed by logistic regression under an allelic model. Results After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and hypertension status by logistic regression analysis, we found that NPPA rs5063 was significantly associated with both ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 0.90; P = 0.006) and cerebral hemorrhage(OR = 0.39; 95%CI, 0.19 to 0.78; P = 0.007). In addition, MTHFR rs1801133 also was associated with cerebral hemorrhage (OR = 1.48; 95%CI, 1.16 to1.89; P = 0.001) but not with ischemic stroke (OR = 1.08; 95%CI, 0.96 to1.22; P = 0.210). After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, the association of NPPA rs5063 and MTHFR rs1801133 with cerebral hemorrhage remained significant. Conclusions The NPPA rs5063 is associated with reduced risk for cerebral hemorrhage and MTHFR rs1801133 is associated with increased risk of cerebral hemorrhage in a Chinese population. PMID:25144711

  8. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  9. Acute pediatric facial nerve paralysis as the first indication for familial cerebral cavernoma: case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rohani, Pooyan; McRackan, Theodore R; Aulino, Joseph M; Wanna, George B

    2014-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernoma is an autosomal dominant phenotype with incomplete clinical and neuroimaging penetrance. The most common clinical manifestations include seizures and cerebral hemorrhage. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy who developed acute onset facial nerve paralysis secondary to previously unknown familial cerebral cavernoma. Genetic workup revealed a KRIT1 gene deletion which was later confirmed in the patient's asymptomatic father and younger brother.

  10. [Medical therapy for intracranial hemorrhage: update blood pressure management for prevention and acute treatment].

    PubMed

    Koga, Masatoshi; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common stroke subtype in Japan. Hypertension is the leading cause. Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study (PROGRESS) revealed that blood pressure (BP) lowering could reduce stroke recurrence by 28% (ICH recurrence by 49%). The guideline for the management of hypertension (JSH2009) recommends BP control of ≤ 140/90 mm Hg for patients with prior stroke. BP is frequently elevated in acute ICH, although BP management strategy is controversial. The guideline from the American Stroke Association suggests if systolic BP (SBP) >180 mm Hg and there is no evidence of elevated intracranial pressure, then consider a modest reduction of BP. A nationwide survey revealed that SBP lowering to ≤ 160 mm Hg using intravenous nicardipine in acute ICH is a major strategy in Japan, and the safety was confirmed by a multicenter, prospective, observational study. Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT) and Antihypertensive Treatment of Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage (ATACH) showed the feasibility and safety of early rapid BP lowering to 140 mm Hg. INTERACT2 and ATACH II are the randomized trials to compare the guideline-based control (<180 mm Hg) and strict control (<140 mm Hg). We have just started to enroll patients to ATACH II from Japan on February 2012.

  11. Cerebral hemorrhagic lesions produced by Paragonimus mexicanus. Report of three cases in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Brenes Madrigal, R; Rodríguez-Ortiz, B; Vargas Solano, G; Ocamp Obando, E M; Ruiz Sotela, P J

    1982-05-01

    Three cases of cerebral lesions due to Paragonimus mexicanus in Costa Rica are reported, two of which were fatal. At autopsy a hemorrhagic, well circumscribed lesion was found in the hemispheres which microscopically consisted of a recent hemorrhage surrounded by a halo of eosinophils, with giant cell granulomas and Charcot-Leyden crystals. Eggs of P. mexicanus outside the brain were demonstrated in both fatal cases--in an eosinophilic pericarditis in one and in the other in multiple lesions of the liver and lungs. The third patient had a hemorrhagic cerebral lesion which was surgically evacuated; the patient recovered. Eggs were demonstrated in serial sections of the material resected.

  12. Noonan phenotype associated with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral vascular anomalies: case report.

    PubMed

    Hara, T; Sasaki, T; Miyauchi, H; Takakura, K

    1993-01-01

    A case of a 19-year-old man with multiple characteristics of the Noonan phenotype and a massive intracerebral hemorrhage in the left putaminal region is presented. The hemorrhage was removed surgically, and the patient made a good recovery and was finally able to walk unassisted. Postoperative cerebral angiograms revealed various vascular anomalies, including a small aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second detailed case report of an association of the Noonan phenotype with cerebral vascular anomalies presenting intracerebral hemorrhage. The etiology of this syndrome remains unknown but the possible causes of this rare association are discussed.

  13. Is the rate of cerebral hemorrhages declining among stroke patients in South America?

    PubMed

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

    2014-02-01

    Recent stroke registries suggest that the rate of cerebral hemorrhages is declining among stroke patients in South America. High rates of cerebral hemorrhages (approaching 40% of stroke cases) reported in pioneer registries during the 1990s have not been duplicated in more recent studies. In contrast, almost all studies recruiting patients from 2003 on, reported less than 20% of cerebral hemorrhages among their stroke patients. Intermediate rates of hemorrhagic strokes (from 25% to 27%) were noted among registries recruiting patients by the end of the 20th century and the start of the new Millennium. We also noted a significant declining rate of hemorrhagic stroke over the past 20 years at our Institution. In a series of 651 consecutive first-ever stroke patients included in the Hospital-Clínica Kennedy stroke registry (Guayaquil), cerebral hemorrhages accounted for 26·3% of patients recruited between 1990 and 1994 but for only 16·5% of those seen between 2005 and 2009 (P = 0·03). More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine whether the reported declining rate of hemorrhagic strokes in South America is related to increase life expectancy of the population, or to changes in lifestyle, dietary habits, or some other specific stroke risk factors not well evaluated so far.

  14. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-07-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value.

  15. [Hemorrhagic Cerebral Infarction after Right Segmental Lung Resection;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Kazuki; Shiono, Satoshi; Katahira, Masato; Yarimizu, Kei; Abiko, Masami; Sato, Toru

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative hemorrhagic cerebral infarction is rare but fatal complication. We report a case of hemorrhagic cerebral infarction after lung cancer surgery without a history of atrial fibrillation and cerebrovascular disease. A 58-year-old man who have a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia underwent right segmental lung resection. During surgery, he had no atrial fibrillation episode. On postoperative day 1, he presented a slight consciousness disturbance. On the day 2, he suffered from a headache and nausea. Brain computed tomography demonstrated a hemorrhagic infarction at the right posterior cerebral artery territory. Transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance angiography did not show the thrombus. The symptoms were gradually improved with intensive medical therapy, and he was discharged with a left homonymous hemianopsia. Although a diagnosis of the consciousness disturbance in the early-phase postoperative period is difficult, perioperative cerebral infarction should be recognized as a postoperative complication. PMID:26759957

  16. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  17. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  18. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  19. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  20. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  1. Mutation of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid gene in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage, Dutch type.

    PubMed

    Levy, E; Carman, M D; Fernandez-Madrid, I J; Power, M D; Lieberburg, I; van Duinen, S G; Bots, G T; Luyendijk, W; Frangione, B

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  2. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy and common mimics.

    PubMed

    Homme, James L; Block, Jason M

    2016-05-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare acute benign cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis affecting children younger than 24 months of age. Its presentation can be confused with those of urticaria, erythema multiforme, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, idiopathic thrombocytopenia,meningococcemia, Kawasaki disease, and drug rash. We present 2 cases of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, discuss the characteristics of AHEI, and compare and contrast AHEI with similar dermatologic presentations. This review provides emergency physicians with the basic knowledge necessary to easily recognize AHEI as a distinct clinical entity. The patients were 19- and 23-month-old females who presented to the pediatric emergency department at St Mary's Hospital,Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, with impressive purpuric rashes and edema of the hands and feet after preceding upper respiratory tract infections. Both children had benign courses with complete resolution of clinical findings. These 2 cases typify the presentation of AHEI.Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy presents with characteristic purpuric lesions and extremity edema. The emergency physician's recognition of these presenting characteristics will help diagnose AHEI, avoid unnecessary procedures and tests, and aid in counseling the patient's parents.

  3. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a normotensive demented patient: A probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chitsaz, Ahmad; Norouzi, Rasul; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Fard, Salman Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the most common cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Repeated bleeding may be presented with vascular dementia. We have reported a 68-year-old normotensive demented patient with probable CAA presented with hemiparesia, headache and vomiting. According to the experience of this case, it is recommended to consider CAA for normotensive elderly patients presented with multiple and superficial intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:23248664

  4. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a normotensive demented patient: A probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chitsaz, Ahmad; Norouzi, Rasul; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Fard, Salman Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the most common cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Repeated bleeding may be presented with vascular dementia. We have reported a 68-year-old normotensive demented patient with probable CAA presented with hemiparesia, headache and vomiting. According to the experience of this case, it is recommended to consider CAA for normotensive elderly patients presented with multiple and superficial intracerebral hemorrhage.

  5. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a normotensive demented patient: A probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chitsaz, Ahmad; Norouzi, Rasul; Marashi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Salimianfard, Marzieh; Fard, Salman Abbasi

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the most common cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage. Repeated bleeding may be presented with vascular dementia. We have reported a 68-year-old normotensive demented patient with probable CAA presented with hemiparesia, headache and vomiting. According to the experience of this case, it is recommended to consider CAA for normotensive elderly patients presented with multiple and superficial intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:23248664

  6. Effect of fasudil hydrochloride, a protein kinase inhibitor, on cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemic symptoms after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jizong; Zhou, Dingbiao; Guo, Jing; Ren, Zyuan; Zhou, Liangfu; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Bainan; Wang, Renzhi

    2006-09-01

    The efficacy and safety of fasudil hydrochloride, a novel protein kinase inhibitor, were evaluated for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm and associated cerebral ischemic symptoms in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysm. This randomized open trial with nimodipine as the control included 72 patients who underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery for ruptured cerebral aneurysm of Hunt and Hess grades I to IV. For 14 days following surgery, patients were administered either 30 mg of fasudil hydrochloride by intravenous injection over a period of 30 minutes three times a day or 1 mg/hr of nimodipine by continuous intravenous infusion. Fasudil hydrochloride and nimodipine both showed inhibitory effects on cerebral vasospasm. The incidence of symptomatic vasospasm was five of 33 patients in the fasudil group and nine of 32 patients in the nimodipine group. Good recovery evaluated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale was achieved by 23 of 33 patients in the fasudil group and 19 of 34 patients in the nimodipine group. Both drugs significantly improved consciousness levels and neurological deficits such as aphasia. However, fasudil hydrochloride improved motor disturbance more than nimodipine. Adverse reactions occurred in 13 of 37 patients receiving fasudil hydrochloride and 15 of 35 patients receiving nimodipine. There were no serious adverse events in the fasudil group. The results of this clinical trial indicate that fasudil hydrochloride is a safe and efficient agent for suppressing cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery for ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  7. Acute quadriplegia due to bilateral cerebral metastases.

    PubMed

    Levine, D N; Black, P M; Kleinman, G M; Ojemann, R

    1981-03-01

    A 51-year-old man developed severe quadriparesis without sensory loss after a fall on the occiput. When he was treated with corticosteroids, the weakness worsened slightly for 2 days, but he then progressively improved and ultimately walked unassisted. Two months later, postmortem examination disclosed metastatic tumors in the superior portion of each precentral gyrus. The subjacent white matter was edematous. No spinal cord abnormalities were found. The clinical, radiologic, and neuropathologic findings suggest that the quadriplegia resulted from these bilateral cerebral lesions and not from spinal cord dysfunction. The rapid development of cerebral edema, perhaps precipitated by trauma, seemed to account for the acute onset of symptoms in this case.

  8. Gallic acid exhibits risks of inducing muscular hemorrhagic liposis and cerebral hemorrhage--its action mechanism and preventive strategy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Lin, Chien-Hong; Wang, Hui-Er; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y

    2015-02-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) (GA) occurs in many plants. The adverse effects of GA are seldom cited. GA (6-14 μM) provoked the hemorrhagic liposis of the cervical muscles and intracranial hemorrhage. The cause of these pathological events and the method for prevention are still lacking. Using the chicken embryo model and some selected nutraceutics such as folate, glutathione (GSH), N-acetylcysteine, and vitamin E (Vit E), we carried out this study. Results revealed that the action mechanism of GA involved (i) inducing hypoxia with upregulated gene hif-1α and downregulated ratio vegf-r2/vegf-a, leading to dys-vascularization and myopathy; (ii) impairing cytochrome c oxidase; (iii) stimulating creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase release; (iv) eliciting carnitine accumulation and liposis via downregulating gene CPT1; (v) suppressing superoxide dismutase and stimulating NO, H2O2, and malondialdehyde; and (vi) depleting erythrocytic and tissue GSH, resulting in hemorrhage. When both Vit E and GSH were applied to the day 1 chicks, a better alleviation effect was revealed. Conclusively, GA potentially exhibits adverse effect by eliciting hemorrhagic liposis of cervical muscles and cerebral hemorrhage. Supplementation with GSH, Vit E, and N-acetylcysteine is able to ameliorate these adverse effects, warranting the importance of restricting the clinical phytotherapeutic doses of GA and related compounds.

  9. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  10. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  11. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine.

  12. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy after MMR vaccine.

    PubMed

    Binamer, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a rare type of leuckocytoclastic vasculitis. It affects mainly children less than two years of age. Many precipitating factors have been reported, including infectious etiology and vaccination. We are reporting a two-year-old boy with AHEI after measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. To our knowledge this is the second reported case after an MMR vaccine. PMID:26409801

  13. Induced hypertension for the treatment of cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Direct effect on cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Muizelaar, J.P.; Becker, D.P.

    1986-04-01

    The best treatment for symptomatic cerebral ischemia from presumed vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage remains a matter of controversy. A direct effect of any treatment modality on regional cerebral blood flow has never been documented. In a series of 43 patients operated on for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysms, five patients (11.6%) developed clinical signs of cerebral ischemia postoperatively. In four of those patients, the diagnosis of vasospasm was made with measurements of cerebral blood flow (133Xe inhalation or intravenous injection, 10-16 detectors, cerebral blood flow infinity). Treatment with induced arterial hypertension with phenylephrine was instituted. Hemodilution was instituted in one patient; the other three patients already had hematocrits in the range of 33. Within 1 hour, the cerebral blood flow measurement was repeated to document the effect of treatment. The average pretreatment hemispherical blood flow on the operated side was 18.8 mL/100 g per minute, on the contralateral side 21.0 mL/100 g per minute. With treatment these flows increased to 30.8 and 35.8 mL/100 g per minute, respectively. There was also an immediate and obvious positive clinical effect in all patients. The role of measurement of cerebral blood flow in the clinical management of vasospasm is discussed. We stress the theoretical and practical advances of measurements of cerebral blood flow over cerebral angiography, especially in comatose patients.

  14. Hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Down syndrome and the Boston criteria.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębski, Karol; Kacperska, Magdalena Justyna; Majos, Agata; Grodzka, Magdalena; Głąbiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A stroke, or a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is a life-threatening condition which often results in permanent or significant disability in the adult population. Several classifications of CVAs exist, one of them being based on the mechanism of injury of brain tissue: ischemic (85-90%) and hemorrhagic (10-15%). In a hemorrhagic stroke an intercranial bleeding occurs, leading to the formation of a focal hematoma typically located in the basal ganglia of the brain (approx. 45% of cases). A common yet underestimated cause of intracerebral hemorrhage is cerebral small vessel disease with microhemorrhages, including the cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). This condition is associated with the deposition of amyloid-beta in arterial walls (in soft meninges, subcortical areas and the cerebral cortex). Research has shown that causes of hemorrhagic changes in the brain include genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome. The association is caused by the so-called 'gene dosage effect', as the gene for the precursor protein for amyloid-beta is located in chromosome 21. We wish to present the case of a 60 year old patient with Down syndrome who suffered a hemorrhagic stroke without antecedent hypertension. Based on the history taken, diagnostic imaging and the source literature, a diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the source of the bleeding was made (however it must be noted that without a full post-mortem examination, the Boston criteria allow only for a 'probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy' diagnosis to be made). The authors hereby also report the need to modify the Boston criteria for cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  15. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Marak, Creticus P; Joy, Parijat S; Gupta, Pragya; Bukovskaya, Yana; Guddati, Achuta K

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR) has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH.

  16. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation on Arterial Thrombolysis in Treating Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Baozhong; Liu, Qingan; Gu, Yingli; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhuobo

    2015-11-01

    there was no recovery at all of the muscle strength in 4 patients after operation. In total, 59 out of 63 patients with aphasia had improved their language function, while 19 patients with disturbance of consciousness turned for the better after arterial thrombolysis. Only one patient experienced the cerebral hemorrhage, and 14 cases had gingival bleeding, oral mucosa bleeding, and urethrorrhagia. The overall effective rates of intra-arterial thrombolysis in treating the acute cerebral infarction by reteplase had no significant differences compared to those by rt-PA, and there were no hemorrhagic complications. It is safe and effective if the arterial thrombolysis using reteplase is performed within a few hours after acute cerebral infarction onset because reteplase has a higher clinical efficacy and lower hemorrhagic transformation, which suggests that it may become a new feasible option for clinical arterial thrombolysis. PMID:27352315

  17. Mycotic brain aneurysm and cerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Lisboa, Lurdes; Sarmento, António; Almeida, Jorge; Mota, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. is rare and often associated with negative blood cultures, infection relapse, and high rates of treatment failure and mortality (Lainscak et al., J Heart Valve Dis 14(1):33-36, 2005). The authors describe a case of an adolescent with cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to mycotic brain aneurysm rupture.

  18. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  19. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  20. [Congenital afibrinogenemia complicated by spontaneous cerebral hemorrhages: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tovone, X G; Rasamoelisoa, J M; Rakotomalala, S; Rabesiaka, F; Rakotoarimanana, D R; Ramialiharisoa, A

    1999-01-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by markedly reduced or absent synthesis of fibrinogen. Consanguinity is common in affected family. Clinical manifestations range to minimal or moderate bleeding to catastrophic haemorrhage. Bleedings are often post-traumatic, sometimes spontaneous. Diagnosis is established by laboratory tests presenting trace or absence of fibrinogen. Substitutive treatment with fibrinogen concentrates or fresh frozen plasma is used. The authors reported the case of a 41-year-old male with congenital afibrinogenemia with fatal spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage. Diagnosis was made upon history, bleeding history, clinical examination, blood coagulation tests and radiography. Cerebral haemorrhage must be suspected in any patient presenting blood coagulation disorders with bleeding history. Drug therapy must be installed immediately and continued before obtention of specific radiology images which are often late in relation to clinical signs.

  1. Experimental animal models and inflammatory cellular changes in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tao; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Stroke, including cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, is the leading cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Animal models have greatly contributed to our understanding of the risk factors and the pathophysiology of stroke, as well as the development of therapeutic strategies for its treatment. Further development and investigation of experimental models, however, are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of stroke and to enhance and expand novel therapeutic targets. In this article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of commonly-used animal models of stroke and focus on the inflammatory responses to cerebral stroke, which may provide insights into a framework for developing effective therapies for stroke in humans. PMID:26625873

  2. Cerebral proliferative angiopathy with tumor-like hemorrhage: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bilaj, Fatmir; Rroji, Arben; Enesi, Eugen; Ruka, Maren; Petrela, Mentor

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is defined as a rare vascular disorder, characterized by diffuse arterial proliferation and distinctive angiogenetic features. Complication with hemorrhage is exceedingly rare, but once the bleeding occurs, the chance of re-bleeding is increased. Here we report a case of a patient with CPA complicated with bleeding and re-bleeding, and imaging findings mimicking a brain tumor, which has not been reported in the literature so far. PMID:27325612

  3. Hemorrhagic collision metastasis in a cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    PubMed Central

    Sundarakumar, Dinesh K; Marshall, Desiree A; Keene, C Dirk; Rockhill, Jason K; Margolin, Kim A; Kim, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old patient with recurrent choriocarcinoma of the testis presented with headache and progressive left homonymous hemianopsia. On initial MRI a grade 4 arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was identified in the right occipital lobe, which was further characterized by catheter angiography. Continued worsening of the headache in the following days prompted a follow-up MRI, which revealed a new T2 hypointense nodule and adjacent vasogenic edema in the periphery of the AVM. A follow-up MRI showed a marked increase in the size of the nodule with intrinsic enhancement and worsening perilesional edema. Based on the imaging evolution, the nodule was diagnosed as a metastasis and the patient was started on chemotherapy and radiotherapy. One week after the MRI he developed a sudden hemorrhage within the mass requiring decompression craniectomy and resection of both AVM and tumor. The histopathology of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of choriocarcinoma metastasis to the AVM. PMID:25239982

  4. Hemorrhagic collision metastasis in a cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Sundarakumar, Dinesh K; Marshall, Desiree A; Keene, C Dirk; Rockhill, Jason K; Margolin, Kim A; Kim, Louis J

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old patient with recurrent choriocarcinoma of the testis presented with headache and progressive left homonymous hemianopsia. On initial MRI a grade 4 arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was identified in the right occipital lobe, which was further characterized by catheter angiography. Continued worsening of the headache in the following days prompted a follow-up MRI, which revealed a new T2 hypointense nodule and adjacent vasogenic edema in the periphery of the AVM. A follow-up MRI showed a marked increase in the size of the nodule with intrinsic enhancement and worsening perilesional edema. Based on the imaging evolution, the nodule was diagnosed as a metastasis and the patient was started on chemotherapy and radiotherapy. One week after the MRI he developed a sudden hemorrhage within the mass requiring decompression craniectomy and resection of both AVM and tumor. The histopathology of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of choriocarcinoma metastasis to the AVM. PMID:25239982

  5. Hemorrhagic collision metastasis in a cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Sundarakumar, Dinesh K; Marshall, Desiree A; Keene, C Dirk; Rockhill, Jason K; Margolin, Kim A; Kim, Louis J

    2015-10-01

    A 26-year-old patient with recurrent choriocarcinoma of the testis presented with headache and progressive left homonymous hemianopsia. On initial MRI a grade 4 arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was identified in the right occipital lobe, which was further characterized by catheter angiography. Continued worsening of the headache in the following days prompted a follow-up MRI, which revealed a new T2 hypointense nodule and adjacent vasogenic edema in the periphery of the AVM. A follow-up MRI showed a marked increase in the size of the nodule with intrinsic enhancement and worsening perilesional edema. Based on the imaging evolution, the nodule was diagnosed as a metastasis and the patient was started on chemotherapy and radiotherapy. One week after the MRI he developed a sudden hemorrhage within the mass requiring decompression craniectomy and resection of both AVM and tumor. The histopathology of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of choriocarcinoma metastasis to the AVM. PMID:25261441

  6. Electrophysiological measures of acute cerebral ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferree, T. C.; Hwa, R. C.

    2005-09-01

    A method of EEG analysis is described which provides new insights into EEG pathology in cerebral ischaemia. The method is based on a variant of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), which reduces short (10 s) segments of spontaneous EEG time series to two dimensionless scaling exponents. The spatial variability of each exponent is expressed in terms of its statistical moments across EEG channels. Linear discriminant analysis combines the moments into concise indices, which distinguish normal and stroke groups remarkably well. On average over the scalp, stroke patients have larger fluctuations on the longest time scales. This is consistent with the notion of EEG slowing, but extends that notion to a wider range of time scales. The higher moments show that stroke patients have markedly reduced variability over the scalp. This contradicts the notion of a purely focal EEG scalp topography and argues instead for a highly distributed effect. In these indices, subacute patients appear further from normal than acute patients.

  7. Predictors of Hemorrhagic Complications from Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, José A; Llibre, Juan Carlos; Vázquez, Frank; Rodríguez, Raúl; Prince, José A.; Ugarte, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Summary Post-embolization hemorrhage is the most severe, dramatic and morbidity-mortality-related complication in the treatment of endovascular arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The objective of this study was to determine predictive factors of post-embolization hemorrhage. This is a retrospective study in 71 patients with cerebral AVMs having undergone 147 embolization sessions with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (n-BCA), carried out between 2006 and 2011. Clinical-demographic, morphological and treatment data as well as results were recorded. The relationship of post-procedure hemorrhage with demographic and morphological factors, percentage devascularization per session, venous drainage and whether or not post-procedure hypotension had been induced was investigated. Six post-embolization hemorrhages occurred, all in sessions characterized by extensive devascularization without the induction of post-procedure hypotension; which disappeared after a limit to the extent of devascularization per session and post-procedure hypotension were introduced. In the multivariate analysis, hemorrhage predictors were: nidus diameter < 3 cm (OR= 45.02; CI=95%:1.17-203.79; P=0.005); devascularization > 40% (OR=32.4; CI=95%: 3.142- 518.6; P=0.009) per session; intranidal aneurysms (OR=7.5; CI=95%:1.19-341.3; P=0.041) and lack of post-procedure hypotension (OR=16.51; CI=95%:1.81-324.4; P=0.049) and the association of sessions with devascularization exceeding 40% with lack of post-procedure hypotension, showed an increase in the risk of hemorrhage (OR=36.4; CI=95%:3.67–362.4; P=0.002). Extensive devascularization and the absence of post-procedure hypotension increase the risk of hemorrhage. We suggest partial, 25-30%, devascularization per session and the induction of post-procedure hypotension, which produces a 20% decrease of the basal mean arterial pressure (MAP). PMID:24556303

  8. A Case of Cerebral Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Fabry's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Youn Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrage (SAH) with Fabry's disease. A 42-year-old woman presented with aneurysmal SAH originated from a saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The patient was treated by an endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm. Postoperatively the patient recovered favorably without any neurological deficit. During her admission, the patient had a sign of proteinuria in urine analysis. The pathologic findings of kidney needle biopsy implied nephrosialidosis (mucolipidosis of lysosomal stroage disease), which is consistent with a Fabry's disease. It is uncommon that Fabry's disease is presented with aneurysmal SAH, especially in middle-aged patients, but could be a clinical concern. Further investigations are needed to reveal risk factors, vascular anatomy, and causative mechanisms of Fabry's disease with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:23634271

  9. The Importance of Cerebral Aneurysms in Childhood Hemorrhagic Stroke: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Lori C.; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Wu, Yvonne W.; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior population-based studies of pediatric hemorrhagic stroke (HS) had too few incident cases to assess predictors of cerebral aneurysms, a HS etiology that requires urgent intervention. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of HS (intracerebral [ICH], subarachnoid [SAH], and intraventricular hemorrhage [IVH]) using the population of all children <20 years of age enrolled in a large Northern Californian health care plan (1/1993–12/2003). Cases were identified through electronic searches and confirmed through independent chart review by two neurologists, with adjudication by a third; traumatic hemorrhages were excluded. Logistic regression was used to examine potential predictors of underlying aneurysm. Results Within a cohort of 2.3 million children followed for a mean of 3.5 years, we identified 116 cases of spontaneous HS (overall incidence, 1.4 per 100,000 person-years). Cerebral aneurysms were identified in 15 (13%) of HS cases. Among 21 children with pure SAH, 57% were found to have an underlying aneurysm, compared to only 2% of 58 children with pure ICH and 5% of 37 children with a mixed pattern of hemorrhage (ICH and SAH). Independent predictors of an underlying aneurysm included pure SAH (OR 76; 95% CI: 9–657, p<0.001) and late adolescent age (15–19 years vs. younger age groups; OR 6.4; 95% CI: 1.0–40, p=0.047). Conclusions Cerebral aneurysms cause the majority of spontaneous SAH in children, and account for more than 10% of childhood HS overall. Children, and particularly teenagers, presenting with spontaneous SAH should be promptly evaluated with cerebrovascular imaging. PMID:19023102

  10. CCM3 Mutations Are Associated with Early-Onset Cerebral Hemorrhage and Multiple Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Riant, F.; Bergametti, F.; Fournier, H.-D.; Chapon, F.; Michalak-Provost, S.; Cecillon, M.; Lejeune, P.; Hosseini, H.; Choe, C.; Orth, M.; Bernreuther, C.; Boulday, G.; Denier, C.; Labauge, P.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of CCM3/PDCD10 cause 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. The phenotypic characterization of CCM3-mutated patients has been hampered by the limited number of patients harboring a mutation in this gene. This is the first report on molecular and clinical features of a large cohort of CCM3 patients. Molecular screening for point mutations and deletions was used to identify 54 CCM3-mutated index patients. Age at referral and clinical onset, type of inaugural events and presence of extra-axial lesions were investigated in these 54 index patients and 22 of their mutated relatives. Mean age at clinical onset was 23.0 ± 16 years. Clinical onset occurred before 10 years in 26% of the patients, and cerebral hemorrhage was the initial presentation in 72% of these patients. Multiple extra-axial, dural-based lesions were detected in 7 unrelated patients. These lesions proved to be meningiomas in 3 patients who underwent neurosurgery and pathological examination. This ‘multiple meningiomas’ phenotype is not associated with a specific CCM3 mutation. Hence, CCM3 mutations are associated with a high risk of early-onset cerebral hemorrhage and with the presence of multiple meningiomas. PMID:23801932

  11. The emerging role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenxing; Wu, Guiling; Fan, Chongxi; Xu, Jing; Jiang, Shuai; Yan, Xiaolong; Di, Shouyin; Ma, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wei; Yang, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) comprise a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors that mediate intracellular signaling. This signaling is typically generated at cell surface receptors, the activation of which results in the translocation of STATs to the nucleus. STATs are involved in biological events as diverse as embryonic development, programmed cell death, organogenesis, innate immunity, adaptive immunity and cell growth regulation in organisms ranging from slime molds to insects to humans. Numerous studies have demonstrated the activation of STAT3 in neurological diseases, particularly in cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Additionally, STAT3 has also been reported to play a critical role in neuroprotective therapies. In light of the pleiotropic effects of STAT3 on the nervous system, we present the elaborate network of roles that STAT3 plays in cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage in this review. First, we introduce basic knowledge regarding STAT3 and briefly summarize the activation, inactivation, and regulation of the STAT3 pathway. Next, we describe the activation of STAT3 following cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage. Subsequently, we discuss the physiopathological roles of STAT3 in cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage. Moreover, we summarize several significant cerebral ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke treatments that target the STAT3 signaling pathway, including pharmacological and physical therapies. Finally, we highlight research progress on STAT3 in stroke. This review presents the important roles of STAT3 in the nervous system and may contribute to the promotion of STAT3 as a new therapeutic target. PMID:26738445

  12. Correlation of pressure measurements with angiographic characteristics predisposing to hemorrhage and steal in cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Norbash, A.M.; Marks, M.P.; Lane, B.

    1994-05-01

    To determine whether there is a physiologic explanation for the predisposition of patients with certain angiographic characteristics to symptoms of hemorrhage and steal. Superselective transcatheter feeding arterial pressure and mean arterial pressure measurements were obtained before embolotherapy in 32 patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Pressures were correlated with previously described angioarchitectural characteristics predisposing to hemorrhage and steal. These included size of the arteriovenous malformation, feeding artery length, venous drainage pattern, and angiomatous change. The feeding arterial pressure and feeding arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure ratios were significantly decreased in patients with angiomatous change. Feeding arterial pressure and feeding arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure ratios progressively decreased as lesions went from peripheral, to mixed, to central venous drainage. A trend for lower feeding arterial pressure was also demonstrated with greater feeding pedicle length. A statistically significant correlation could not be demonstrated between feeding arterial pressure or feeding arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure ratios and size of the arteriovenous malformation, hemorrhage, or symptoms of steal. Feeding arterial pressure measurements help provide a physiologic basis for the relationship between certain angiographic characteristics and hemorrhage and steal symptoms in patients with arteriovenous malformation. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  14. Role of nitric oxide and mechanisms involved in cerebral injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage: is nitric oxide a possible answer to cerebral vasospasm?

    PubMed

    Crobeddu, Emanuela; Pilloni, Giulia; Tardivo, Valentina; Fontanella, Marco M; Panciani, Pier P; Spena, Giannantonio; Fornaro, Riccardo; Altieri, Roberto; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ajello, Marco; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Garbossa, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral vasospasm represents the most critical event that could occur after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Therapy is only partially effective because cerebral arterial constriction is not fully understood yet. One of the most important biological messenger associated to SAH is nitric oxide (NO), that is considered local regulator of cerebral blood flow. Different nitric oxide synthase (NOS) forms play a role in different biological processes, one of which is to link neuronal activity to blood flow in cerebral cortex. We performed a reassessment of the literature to summarize the role of NO as the main inflammatory pathway activated after SAH to clarify its importance for treatment of vasospasm.

  15. Mathematical Modelling of Cerebral Blood Circulation and Cerebral Autoregulation: Towards Preventing Intracranial Hemorrhages in Preterm Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Botkin, Nikolai; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Impaired cerebral autoregulation leads to fluctuations in cerebral blood flow, which can be especially dangerous for immature brain of preterm newborns. In this paper, two mathematical models of cerebral autoregulation are discussed. The first one is an enhancement of a vascular model proposed by Piechnik et al. We extend this model by adding a polynomial dependence of the vascular radius on the arterial blood pressure and adjusting the polynomial coefficients to experimental data to gain the autoregulation behavior. Moreover, the inclusion of a Preisach hysteresis operator, simulating a hysteretic dependence of the cerebral blood flow on the arterial pressure, is tested. The second model couples the blood vessel system model by Piechnik et al. with an ordinary differential equation model of cerebral autoregulation by Ursino and Lodi. An optimal control setting is proposed for a simplified variant of this coupled model. The objective of the control is the maintenance of the autoregulatory function for a wider range of the arterial pressure. The control can be interpreted as the effect of a medicament changing the cerebral blood flow by, for example, dilation of blood vessels. Advanced numerical methods developed by the authors are applied for the numerical treatment of the control problem. PMID:25126111

  16. Mathematical modelling of cerebral blood circulation and cerebral autoregulation: towards preventing intracranial hemorrhages in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Renée; Botkin, Nikolai; Turova, Varvara; Blumenstein, Tobias; Alves-Pinto, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Impaired cerebral autoregulation leads to fluctuations in cerebral blood flow, which can be especially dangerous for immature brain of preterm newborns. In this paper, two mathematical models of cerebral autoregulation are discussed. The first one is an enhancement of a vascular model proposed by Piechnik et al. We extend this model by adding a polynomial dependence of the vascular radius on the arterial blood pressure and adjusting the polynomial coefficients to experimental data to gain the autoregulation behavior. Moreover, the inclusion of a Preisach hysteresis operator, simulating a hysteretic dependence of the cerebral blood flow on the arterial pressure, is tested. The second model couples the blood vessel system model by Piechnik et al. with an ordinary differential equation model of cerebral autoregulation by Ursino and Lodi. An optimal control setting is proposed for a simplified variant of this coupled model. The objective of the control is the maintenance of the autoregulatory function for a wider range of the arterial pressure. The control can be interpreted as the effect of a medicament changing the cerebral blood flow by, for example, dilation of blood vessels. Advanced numerical methods developed by the authors are applied for the numerical treatment of the control problem.

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused by polyarteritis nodosa. Case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun C; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Iihara, Koji; Sakai, Hideki; Higashi, Toshio; Kogure, Shuji; Taniguchi, Ayumi; Ueda, Hatsue I; Nagata, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing arteritis that involves small- and medium-sized arteries in various organs. Although aneurysm formation in visceral arteries is a typical finding in PAN, intracranial aneurysms are much less common, and only a few cases of aneurysm rupture associated with this disease have been documented. In this paper, the authors report on a ruptured PAN aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery; the lesion was trapped and resected. On histological examination, extensive fibrinoid necrosis and an inflammatory infiltration of leukocytes were seen in the aneurysm wall. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a histologically confirmed PAN aneurysm.

  18. Cerebral venous circulatory disturbance as an informative prognostic marker for neonatal hemorrhagic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Pavlov, Alexey; Navolokin, Nikita; Lychagov, Vladislav; Abdurashitov, Arkady; Zinchenko, Ekaterina; Gekaluk, Artemiy; Zhu, Dan; Shi, Rui; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal hemorrhagic stroke (NHS) is a major problem of future generation's health due to the high rate of death and cognitive disability of newborns after NHS. The incidence of NHS in neonates cannot be predicted by standard diagnostic methods. Therefore, the identification of prognostic markers of NHS is crucial. There is evidence that stress-related alterations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) may contribute to NHS. Here, we assessed the stroke-associated CBF abnormalities for high prognosis of NHS using a new model of NHS induced by sound stress in the pre- and post-stroke state. With this aim, we used interdisciplinary methods such as a histological assay of brain tissues, laser speckle contrast imaging and Doppler coherent tomography to monitor cerebral circulation. Our results suggest that the venous stasis with such symptoms as progressive relaxation of cerebral veins, decrease the velocity of blood flow in them are prognostic markers for a risk of NHS and are an informative platform for a future study of corrections of cerebral venous circulatory disturbance related to NHS.

  19. Effects of Topical Administration of Nimodipine on Cerebral Blood Flow following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Yin, Yu-hua; Jia, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We sought to explore whether topical administration of nimodipine improves the abnormal cerebral perfusion following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in pigs. Fourteen pigs were randomly divided into three groups: sham (n=4), SAH (n=5), or SAH + nimodipine (n=5). The SAH model was established by injecting fresh autologous nonheparinized arterial blood into the suprasellae cistern. Nimodipine or saline placebo (0.04 g/mL) were administered to the operative area on the fourth day after the SAH model was established. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured 60 min after topical administration of nimodipine by cranial SPECT/CT scans with 5 mCi 99mTc-ECD injected intravenously. The CCR (corticocebellar ratio) was calculated by dividing the counts/voxel of the whole cerebral hemisphere by the average count/voxel in the cerebellar region of reference and RD (relative dispersion). A predictor for impaired autoregulation of CBF was calculated by dividing standard deviation (SD) of regional perfusion by mean perfusion (RD=SD/Mean). CCR and RD were applied to describe hemisphere CBF and perfusion heterogeneity. Cerebral perfusion significantly decreased in the SAH group (CCR: 1.382±0.192, RD: 0.417±0.015) compared to sham (CCR: 1.988±0.346, RD 0.389±0.015) (p<0.05). Abnormal cerebral perfusion status, however, was not significantly improved in the nimodipine + SAH group (CCR: 1.503±0.107, RD: 0.425±0.018) compared to the SAH group (p>0.05). Topical administration of nimodipine did not significantly improve CBF following SAH. These findings were not consistent with our previous data demonstrating that the topical administration of nimodipine significantly alleviates cerebral vasospasm following SAH detected by TCD. Potential mechanisms governing these disparate outcomes require further investigation. PMID:19558207

  20. Effects of topical administration of nimodipine on cerebral blood flow following subarachnoid hemorrhage in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yin, Yu-hua; Jia, Feng; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2013-04-01

    We sought to explore whether topical administration of nimodipine improves the abnormal cerebral perfusion following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in pigs. Fourteen pigs were randomly divided into three groups: sham (n=4), SAH (n=5), or SAH + nimodipine (n=5). The SAH model was established by injecting fresh autologous nonheparinized arterial blood into the suprasellae cistern. Nimodipine or saline placebo (0.04 g/mL) were administered to the operative area on the fourth day after the SAH model was established. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured 60 min after topical administration of nimodipine by cranial SPECT/CT scans with 5 mCi 99mTc-ECD injected intravenously. The CCR (corticocebellar ratio) was calculated by dividing the counts/voxel of the whole cerebral hemisphere by the average count/voxel in the cerebellar region of reference and RD (relative dispersion). A predictor for impaired autoregulation of CBF was calculated by dividing standard deviation (SD) of regional perfusion by mean perfusion (RD=SD/Mean). CCR and RD were applied to describe hemisphere CBF and perfusion heterogeneity. Cerebral perfusion significantly decreased in the SAH group (CCR: 1.382±0.192, RD: 0.417±0.015) compared to sham (CCR: 1.988±0.346, RD 0.389±0.015) (p<0.05). Abnormal cerebral perfusion status, however, was not significantly improved in the nimodipine + SAH group (CCR: 1.503±0.107, RD: 0.425±0.018) compared to the SAH group (p>0.05). Topical administration of nimodipine did not significantly improve CBF following SAH. These findings were not consistent with our previous data demonstrating that the topical administration of nimodipine significantly alleviates cerebral vasospasm following SAH detected by TCD. Potential mechanisms governing these disparate outcomes require further investigation.

  1. Efficacy of Solitaire™ Stent Arterial Embolectomy in Treating Acute Cardiogenic Cerebral Embolism in 17 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maolin; He, Wenqin; Dai, Weizheng; Ye, Yingan; Ruan, Zhifang; Wang, Shuanghu; Xie, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis with rtPA is the only accepted drug therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Since acute cerebral stroke is so pervasive, newly developed recanalization methods have the potential for wide-ranging impacts on patient health and safety. We explored the efficacy and safety of Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy in the treatment of acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Material/Methods Between October 2012 and June 2015, 17 patients underwent Solitaire stent arterial embolectomy, either alone or in combination with rtPA intravenous thrombolysis, to treat acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Sheath placement time, vascular recanalization time, number of embolectomy attempts, and IV rtPA dose and time were recorded. Success and safety of the recanalization procedure, as well as clinical outcomes, were assessed. These results were compared to 16 control patients who were treated using only rtPA IV thrombolysis. Results Full recanalization of the occluded arteries was achieved in 15 (88.2%) of the Solitaire stent patients. NIH Stroke Scale scores of embolectomy patients improved by an average of 12.59±8.24 points between admission and discharge, compared to 5.56±5.96 in the control group (P<0.05). Glasgow Coma Score improvement between admission and discharge was also significantly higher in the embolectomy group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, high perfusion encephalopathy, incidence of hernia, or mortality between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Solitaire stent embolectomy is a safe and effective alternative to simple venous thrombolytic therapy, and it can significantly improve short-term neurological function and long-term prognosis in acute cardiogenic cerebral embolism. PMID:27090916

  2. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  3. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in

  4. Magnesium sulfate reverses experimental delayed cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Z; Sadeh, M; Shacked, I; Sahar, A; Hadani, M

    1991-07-01

    We induced experimental delayed cerebral vasospasm by the intracisternal injection of greater than 0.5 ml blood in 30 rats. Seventy-two hours later the basilar artery was exposed via the transclival approach and photographed at high-power magnification through an operating microscope. We then evaluated the effect of topical (n = 30) and intravenous (n = 20) magnesium sulfate on the spastic artery by computerized image analysis. A greater than 50% reduction in baseline diameter of the basilar artery was observed in the rats subjected to subarachnoid hemorrhage compared with the 10 controls (p less than 0.0001). Intravenous magnesium sulfate dilated the spastic artery to approximately 75% of the baseline diameter in control rats (p less than 0.0001). Topical magnesium sulfate caused dramatic dilation of the basilar artery in both the control and the subarachnoid hemorrhage groups to near 150% of the baseline diameter in the controls (p less than 0.001). All rats receiving intravenous magnesium sulfate reached therapeutic plasma levels of the ion. Hemodynamic effects were mild and immediately reversible upon cessation of magnesium sulfate administration. We suggest that magnesium has a role in the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm in humans.

  5. Intracranial chordoma presenting as acute hemorrhage in a child: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kenneth A.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Shah, Sanket U.; Abdulkader, Marwah M.; Bonnin, Jose M.; Ackerman, Laurie L.; Shaikh, Kashif A.; Kralik, Stephen F.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chordomas are rare, slow-growing malignant neoplasms derived from remnants of the embryological notochord. Pediatric cases comprise only 5% of all chordomas, but more than half of the reported pediatric chordomas are intracranial. For patients of all ages, intracranial chordomas typically present with symptoms such as headaches and progressive neurological deficits occurring over several weeks to many years as they compress or invade local structures. There are only reports of these tumors presenting acutely with intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients. Case Description: A 10-year-old boy presented with acute onset of headache, emesis, and diplopia. Head computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of brain were suspicious for a hemorrhagic mass located in the left petroclival region, compressing the ventral pons. The mass was surgically resected and demonstrated acute intratumoral hemorrhage. Pathologic examination was consistent with chordoma. Conclusion: There are few previous reports of petroclival chordomas causing acute intracranial hemorrhage. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of a petroclival chordoma presenting as acute intracranial hemorrhage in a pediatric patient. Although uncommon, it is important to consider chordoma when evaluating a patient of any age presenting with a hemorrhagic lesion of the clivus. PMID:25949851

  6. Current concepts of pathophysiology and management of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Findlay, J M; Macdonald, R L; Weir, B K

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 10 in 100,000 persons suffer rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm annually, and roughly 60% of these will survive the initial catastrophe in reasonable neurological condition. Of the many ensuing complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most frustrating continues to be a form of delayed-onset cerebral arterial narrowing known as vasospasm. Because it is caused by thick subarachnoid blood clots coating the adventitial surface of cerebral arteries, the distribution and severity of vasospasm correlates closely with location and volume of subarachnoid hematoma as visualized on computed tomography (CT). Critical vasospasm causes cerebral ischemia and infarction: the "second stroke." It is now know that vasospasm represents sustained arterial contraction rather than structural thickening of the vessel wall with lumen encroachment. A large body of evidence points to oxyhemoglobin, released from lysing erythrocytes, as the principal component of blood clot responsible for this contraction. The precise mechanism by which oxyhemoglobin causes prolonged vascular smooth muscle cell constriction has not yet been established, but possibilities include secondary generation of vasoactive free radicals, lipid peroxides, eicosanoids, bilirubin, and endothelin. Vasospasm treatments are directed at preventing or reversing arterial narrowing, or at preventing or reversing cerebral ischemia. Several treatments from the latter category, namely, hypertensive, hypervolemic hemodilutional therapy and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, have proven moderately effective and are in widespread clinical use. It has also been possible to mechanically dilate vasospastic vessels with transluminal angioplasty improving cerebral blood flow to ischemic brain. However we are still in need of an effective agent to prevent arterial narrowing, and several hopeful candidates in this category of treatment are clot lytic agent tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) and

  7. Minocycline Reduces Spontaneous Hemorrhage in Mouse Models of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Xiao, Qingli; Kraft, Andrew; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ron; Greenberg, Steven M.; Holtzman, David; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA) is a common cause of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly. Previous studies have shown that CAA induces inflammation and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (gelatinases) in amyloid-laden vessels. Here, we inhibited both using minocycline in CAA mouse models to determine if spontaneous ICH could be reduced. Methods Tg2576 (n=16) and 5×FAD/ApoE4 knock-in mice (n=16), aged to 17 and 12 months, respectively, were treated with minocycline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline every other day for two months. Brains were extracted and stained with X-34 (to quantify amyloid), Perl’s blue (to quantify hemorrhage), and immunostained to examined Aβ load, gliosis (GFAP, Iba-1), and vascular markers of blood-brain-barrier integrity (ZO-1 and collagen IV). Brain extracts were used to quantify mRNA for a variety of inflammatory genes. Results Minocycline treatment significantly reduced hemorrhage frequency in the brains of Tg2576 and 5×FAD/ApoE4 mice relative to the saline-treated mice, without affecting CAA load. Gliosis (GFAP and Iba-1 immunostaining), gelatinase activity, and expression of a variety of inflammatory genes (MMP-9, Nox4, CD45, S-100b, Iba-1) were also significantly reduced. Higher levels of microvascular tight junction and basal lamina proteins were found in the brains of minocycline-treated Tg2576 mice relative to saline-treated controls. Conclusions Minocycline reduced gliosis, inflammatory gene expression, gelatinase activity, and spontaneous hemorrhage in two different mouse models of CAA, supporting the importance of MMP-related and inflammatory pathways in ICH pathogenesis. As an FDA-approved drug, minocycline might be considered for clinical trials to test efficacy in preventing CAA-related ICH. PMID:25944329

  8. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study. PMID:27660569

  9. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  10. Fluctuating Electrocardiographic Changes Predict Poor Outcomes After Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; El-Hadi, Sherif; Provencio, Javier; Tetzlaff, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been well documented. Evidence suggests that ECG changes and cardiac dysfunction worsen outcome. Determining which patients are at most risk is unclear but important to ascertain. Methods: We prospectively studied clinical markers, cardiac abnormalities, and clinical outcomes in 20 patients admitted within 48 hours of aneurysmal SAH. All patients had ECGs prior to surgical clipping, during the clipping surgery, and during the postoperative period. Results: The aneurysm was located in the anterior circulation in 17 patients (85%) and in the posterior circulation in 3 patients (15%). Abnormal ECG changes in patients with acute SAH were observed, with a total incidence rate of 65%. The incidence of T wave abnormalities was 53.8% among the patients with ECG changes, 46.2% had ST segment change, and 30.8% had QT interval prolongation. Of the 13 patients with ECG changes, 4 (30.8%) had fluctuating ECG abnormalities (an abnormality that presented and disappeared during the study period or changed in character). All 4 patients with fluctuating ECG changes had a poor outcome (100%) compared to 3 of the 9 patients (33.3%) patients with fixed abnormalities (P<0.05). Conclusion: The unique finding in this study that has not been reported previously in the literature is the contribution of dynamic ECG changes to the prognosis for good recovery from aneurysmal SAH. In our group, all the patients who had ECG changes that fluctuated from one abnormal change to another had a poor outcome. The etiology of this finding is not clear but may open the door to further study into the pathogenesis of cardiac changes in aneurysmal SAH. The clinical utility of the variability of ECG abnormalities needs to be validated in a larger cohort of patients with longer follow-up than was possible in this study.

  11. Personalized Medicine in Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery: Precision Neurosurgical Management of Cerebral Aneurysms and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Achrol, Achal Singh; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are common vascular lesions. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these lesions and the process by which they destabilize and progress to rupture. Treatment decisions are motivated by a desire to prevent rupture and the devastating morbidity and mortality associated with resulting subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For patients presenting with SAH, urgent intervention is required to stabilize the lesion and prevent re-rupture. Those patients fortunate enough to survive a presenting SAH and subsequent securing of their aneurysm must still face a spectrum of secondary sequelae, which can include cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemia, seizures, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and endocrinologic and catecholamine-induced systemic dysfunction in cardiac, pulmonary, and renal systems. Increased focus on understanding the pathophysiology and molecular characteristics of these secondary processes will enable the development of targeted therapeutics and novel diagnostics for improved patient selection in personalized medicine trials for SAH. In unruptured cerebral aneurysms, treatment decisions are less clear and currently based solely on treating larger lesions, using rigid aneurysm size cutoffs generalized from recent studies that are the subject of ongoing controversy. Further compounding this controversy is the fact that the vast majority of aneurysms that come to clinical attention at the time of a hemorrhagic presentation are of smaller size, suggesting that small aneurysms are indeed not benign lesions. As such, patient-specific biomarkers that better predict which aneurysms represent high-risk lesions that warrant clinical intervention are of vital importance. Recent advancements in genomic and proteomic technologies have enabled the identification of molecular characteristics that may prove useful in tracking aneurysm growth and progression and identifying targets for prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Novel quantitative neuroimaging

  12. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Replacement Reduces Delayed Cerebral Vasospasm After Embolization of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Liming; Ma, Fei; Liu, Yun; Mu, Yanchun; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a leading cause of poor prognosis and death in SAH patients. Effective management to reduce DCVS is needed. A prospective controlled trial was conducted to determine if massive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement (CR) could reduce DCVS occurrence and improve the clinical outcome after aneurysmal SAH treated with endovascular coiling. Material/Methods Patients treated with endovascular coiling after aneurysmal SAH were randomly divided into a control group receiving regular therapy alone (C group, n=42) and a CSF replacement group receiving an additional massive CSF replacement with saline (CR group, n=45). CSF examination, head CT, DCVS occurrence, cerebral infarction incidence, Glasgow Outcome Scale prognostic score, and 1-month mortality were recorded. Results The occurrence of DCVS was 30.9% in the C group and 4.4% in the CR group (P<0.005). The cerebral infarction incidences in the C and CR groups were 19.0% and 2.2% (P<0.05), respectively, 1 month after the treatments. Mortality was not significantly different between the 2 groups during the follow-up period. Conclusions Massive CR after embolization surgery for aneurysmal SAH can significantly reduce DCVS occurrence and effectively improve the outcomes. PMID:27394187

  13. Possible overlap between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and symptomatic vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Forget, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; van de Wyngaert, Françoise; Raftopoulos, Christian; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a previous history of severe headache ("thunderclap") was admitted with a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient developed symptomatic vasospasm on day 5 that resolved rapidly after having increased arterial blood pressure. She experienced also short-lasting excruciating headache. On day 12, while velocities had normalised, as revealed by transcranial Doppler (TCD), for more than 48 h, she developed aphasia and right hemiplegia associated with diffuse segmental vasospasm on the left middle cerebral artery. Intra-arterial infusion of vasodilatory agents was required. Recurrence of symptomatic vasospasm was noted on day 25, with a great number of territories involved as shown in the cerebral angiogram. A second intra-arterial treatment was needed. The patient complained of multiple episodes of extremely severe headache ("thunderclap"), with also transient dysarthria and hemiparesia on day 30. She was discharged on day 38 after full recovery. The clinical and TCD/radiological findings were consistent with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome overlapping SAH related symptomatic vasospasm. PMID:19381433

  14. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  15. Percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection for the treatment of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mafeld, Sebastian; McNeill, Michael; Haslam, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy is a valuable diagnostic approach. While commonly safe, it is not without risk and the most feared vascular complications include hemorrhage, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula formation. We report a case of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy that was immediately identified by ultrasonography and successfully treated with percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection. This technique may prove a useful addition to the armamentarium of any operator performing renal biopsies.

  16. Percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection for the treatment of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Mafeld, Sebastian; McNeill, Michael; Haslam, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy is a valuable diagnostic approach. While commonly safe, it is not without risk and the most feared vascular complications include hemorrhage, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula formation. We report a case of acute hemorrhage after renal biopsy that was immediately identified by ultrasonography and successfully treated with percutaneous perirenal thrombin injection. This technique may prove a useful addition to the armamentarium of any operator performing renal biopsies. PMID:26809832

  17. Mechanisms of murine cerebral malaria: Multimodal imaging of altered cerebral metabolism and protein oxidation at hemorrhage sites

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Mark J.; Aitken, Jade B.; El-Assaad, Fatima; McQuillan, James A.; Carter, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Helen J.; Tobin, Mark J.; Paterson, David; de Jonge, Martin D.; Siegele, Rainer; Cohen, David D.; Vogt, Stefan; Grau, Georges E.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Lay, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Using a multimodal biospectroscopic approach, we settle several long-standing controversies over the molecular mechanisms that lead to brain damage in cerebral malaria, which is a major health concern in developing countries because of high levels of mortality and permanent brain damage. Our results provide the first conclusive evidence that important components of the pathology of cerebral malaria include peroxidative stress and protein oxidation within cerebellar gray matter, which are colocalized with elevated nonheme iron at the site of microhemorrhage. Such information could not be obtained previously from routine imaging methods, such as electron microscopy, fluorescence, and optical microscopy in combination with immunocytochemistry, or from bulk assays, where the level of spatial information is restricted to the minimum size of tissue that can be dissected. We describe the novel combination of chemical probe–free, multimodal imaging to quantify molecular markers of disturbed energy metabolism and peroxidative stress, which were used to provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria. In addition to these mechanistic insights, the approach described acts as a template for the future use of multimodal biospectroscopy for understanding the molecular processes involved in a range of clinically important acute and chronic (neurodegenerative) brain diseases to improve treatment strategies. PMID:26824064

  18. Effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LIN, CHENG; ZHAO, YUANLI; WAN, GANG; ZHU, ANLIN; WANG, HAO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to observe the effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rabbits. A total of 48 New Zealand white rabbits were allocated at random into four groups (control, SAH, SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups; n=12 each). The rabbit model of DCVS was established using a double hemorrhage method, which involved injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna in the SAH groups. The SAH + simvastatin group was administered oral simvastatin (5 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. The SAH + taurine group was administered oral taurine (50 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. Starch (50 mg/kg) was administered orally to the animals in the other two groups (control and SAH groups). The control group were not subjected to any other injections or treatment. The internal diameter and internal diameter/wall thickness of the basilar artery (BA) were measured. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were determined using immunohistochemical and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods following the sacrifice of all animals on day 7. The activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the BA was also measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The BA walls in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups exhibited reduced narrowing and corrugation of the tunica elastica interna compared with the SAH group. At the protein and cDNA levels, it was found that cerebral vasospasm of the BA in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups was alleviated, as indicated by the reduced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and NF-κB compared with the SAH group (P<0.05). In conclusion, simvastatin and taurine reduced DCVS following SAH in rabbits, which suggests that these compounds may exert anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27073449

  19. [Two children with cerebral and retinal hemorrhages: do not diagnose shaken baby syndrome too rapidly].

    PubMed

    Botte, A; Mars, A; Wibaut, B; De Foort-Dhellemmes, S; Vinchon, M; Leclerc, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on 2 cases associating retinal (RH) and cerebral hemorrhages (CH), which first suggested the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome (SBS). After an etiologic search, the diagnosis was corrected: the first case was a late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and the second case hemophilia A. RH is a major feature of SBS, although not pathognomonic. There is no specific RH of SBS but they usually affect the posterior retinal pole. Typically, RHs of SBS are present in both eyes, although unilateral RHs do not exclude the diagnosis of SBS. The relationship between RH and CH has been reported in SBS but also in other diseases. Thus, one must search for hemostasis abnormalities, even though the clinical presentation suggests SBS. Ignoring SBS as well as coming to the conclusion of SBS too quickly should be avoided. Diagnostic difficulties may be related to the number of physicians involved and their interpretation of the facts. These 2 cases underline the need for working as a team that includes hematologists able to interpret coagulation parameters.

  20. [Anterior Communicating Artery Dissection Presenting with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Cerebral Infarction].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takahiro; Sato, Yuiko; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-03-01

    We describe the case of subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction that developed simultaneously and was caused by suspected dissection of the anterior communicating artery. A 65-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of headache and nausea. Head computed tomography(CT)and magnetic resonance imaging revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the interhemispheric fissure and a spotty ischemic lesion in the right frontal cortex. Both, CT angiography and angiography with arterial catheterization showed an aneurysmal dilatation of the anterior communicating artery. A repeated CT angiography nine days later demonstrated enlargement of the aneurysmal dilatation. The patient underwent craniotomy under general anesthesia. Under the microscope, a thick hematoma was seen infero-dorsally from the anterior communicating artery. Two fenestrations of the anterior communicating artery were identified. After removal of the hematoma, a fusiform dilatation of the anterior communicating artery with a firm and reddish wall was confirmed. The lesion was coated with a teflon sponge and fibrin glue. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. A follow-up CT angiography two months after surgery revealed shrinkage of the lesion, when compared with preoperative images.

  1. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. PMID:27181339

  2. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  3. A model of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury in Landrace-Large White Swine.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace-Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases-stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation-after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace-Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury.

  4. A Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Acute Lung Injury in Landrace–Large White Swine

    PubMed Central

    Xanthos, Theodoros T; Balkamou, Xanthippi A; Stroumpoulis, Kostantinos I; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Rokas, Georgios I; Agrogiannis, Georgios D; Troupis, Georgios T; Demestiha, Theano D; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death worldwide for people between 5 and 44 y of age, and it accounts for 10% of all deaths. The incidence of acute lung injury, a life-threatening complication in severely injured trauma patients remains between 30% and 50%. This study describes an experimental protocol of volume-controlled hemorrhage in Landrace–Large White swine. The experimental approach simulated the clinical situation associated with hemorrhagic shock in the trauma patient while providing controlled conditions to maximize reproducibility. The duration of the protocol was 8 h and was divided into 5 distinct phases—stabilization, hemorrhage, maintenance, resuscitation, and observation—after which the swine were euthanized. Lung tissue samples were analyzed histologically. All swine survived the protocol. The hemodynamic responses accurately reflected those seen in humans, and the development of acute lung injury was consistent among all swine. This experimental protocol of hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation in Landrace–Large White swine may be useful for future study of hemorrhagic shock and acute lung injury. PMID:21535927

  5. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  6. Massive Hemorrhage from Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Successfully Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with Assessment of Regional Cerebral Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kakizawa, Hideaki Toyota, Naoyuki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-05-15

    A 54-year-old male presented with intermittent massive hemorrhage from recurrent oropharyngeal cancer. The angiogram showed the encasements at the main trunk of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA). Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of the ECA with gelatin sponge particles and microcoils was performed. However, hemorrhage recurred several hours after the initial TAE. The second angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the ICA developing at the encasement on the initial angiogram. As a simple neurologic test, regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO{sub 2}) was assessed with and without manual compression of the common carotid artery (CCA). With compression of the left CCA, the rSO{sub 2} did not change. We therefore performed isolation of the pseudoaneurysm. We embolized proximally and distally to the ICA pseudoaneurysm with microcoils and the pseudoaneurysm disappeared. No major complications occurred and no massive hemorrhage recurred until death from the cancer. TAE was an effective treatment for massive hemorrhage caused by tumor invasion to ICA. Assessment of rSO{sub 2} was a simple and useful neurologic test predicting the cerebral blood flow to prevent complications of TAE.

  7. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage as the initial presentation of acute lymphocytic leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashikant; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Thakur, Jai Deep; Khan, Imad Saeed; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic complications of acute leukemia are well described and are a common cause of mortality in these patients. However, to our knowledge, fatal intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) as an initial presentation of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has only been reported once. We report a case of previously undiagnosed ALL presenting with ICH. Our patient is a 17-year old male who was found unresponsive several hours after complaining of headache. Initial emergency room evaluation found the patient to have anisocoria with a fixed and dilated right pupil and demonstrated evidence of decorticate posturing. Imaging revealed a large right-sided intraparenchymal hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, midline shift, and uncal herniation. Laboratory evaluation showed marked leukocytosis with blastic predominance and evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Emergent surgical intervention was performed. However, despite evacuation of the hematoma, the patient eventually progressed to clinical brain death. Usually, ICH is seen in ALL patients after the diagnosis has been made. We report a unique case of fatal intracranial hemorrhage as the initial presentation of ALL and discuss the possible management dilemmas to treat such entities. ALL should be kept in the broad differential diagnosis of spontaneous ICH, especially in a young patient with evidence of severe coagulopathy.

  8. High-volume hemofiltration and prone ventilation in subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Rodrigo; Romero, Carlos; Ugalde, Diego; Bustos, Patricio; Diaz, Gonzalo; Galvez, Ricardo; Llanos, Osvaldo; Tobar, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful treatment of two patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage complicated by severe respiratory failure and refractory septic shock using simultaneous prone position ventilation and high-volume hemofiltration. These rescue therapies allowed the patients to overcome the critical situation without associated complications and with no detrimental effects on the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Prone position ventilation is now an accepted therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and high-volume hemofiltration is a non-conventional hemodynamic support that has several potential mechanisms for improving septic shock. In this manuscript, we briefly review these therapies and the related evidence. When other conventional treatments are insufficient for providing safe limits of oxygenation and perfusion as part of basic neuroprotective care in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, these rescue therapies should be considered on a case-by-case basis by an experienced critical care team. PMID:25028955

  9. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H. Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  10. Acute Onset of Intracerebral Hemorrhage due to Autonomic Dysreflexia.

    PubMed

    Eker, Amber; Yigitoglu, Pembe Hare; Ipekdal, H Ilker; Tosun, Aliye

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a clinical emergency syndrome of uncontrolled sympathetic output that can occur in patients who have a history of spinal cord injury. Despite its frequency in spinal cord injury patients, central nervous system complications are very rare. We report a man with traumatic high level incomplete spinal cord injury who suffered hypertensive right thalamic hemorrhage secondary to an episode of autonomic dysreflexia. Prompt recognition and removal of the triggering factor, the suprapubic catheter obstruction which led to hypertensive attack, the patient had a favorable functional outcome after the resorption of the hematoma and effective rehabilitation programme. PMID:25132935

  11. Cerebral venous thrombosis in a patient with acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Morkhandikar, S.; Priyamvada, P. S.; Srinivas, B. H.; Parameswaran, S.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of the cerebral venous sinuses (CVT) is described in nephrotic syndrome. A 13-year-old girl was admitted with acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (APIGN). Subsequently she developed recurrent seizures with focal neurological deficits. On evaluation, she was found to have CVT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CVT in APIGN. Identifying this complication is imperative, as timely diagnosis and treatment could be lifesaving. PMID:27194837

  12. Acute confusional states with right middle cerebral artery infarctions.

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, M M; Waxman, S G; Geschwind, N; Sabin, T D

    1976-01-01

    Three patients presenting predominantly with acute confusional states (ACS) are shown to have infarctions in the distribution of the right middle cerebral artery. It is suggested that the main deficit in ACS is in the function of selective attention. On the basis of cortical connections of homologous areas in the monkey brain, it is argued that this deficit arises from lesions in convergence areas for association cortex. Images PMID:1255216

  13. The detection of chronic cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin; Wan, Zibing; Wang, Jinbao; ChaoWang; Guo, Wanyou; Xu, Lin; Ning, Xu; Xu, Jia; Pu, Xianjie; Chen, Mingsheng; Zhao, Hongmei

    2012-12-01

    Chronic cerebral hemorrhage (CCH) in the brain is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as MRI and PET, which are not readily available in low economical resource parts of the world. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of CCH in the brain. The system measures the phase shift between the electromagnetic signals on the two coils. CCH was induced in the brain of rabbits by stereotactic method. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and Electrocardiograph (ECG) of subjects were monitored for 1.5h. Signals were continuously monitored up to t=1.5h at exciting frequency 10.7MHz. From 0.8 to 2.4 ml of autologous blood was injected (each injection quantity of 0.8 ml, the interval time for 30 minutes). The results show significant phase shifts increase as a function of injection volume. ICP and phase shift were directly proportional to the related, while HRV were stable around 200beats*min-1. Our system has high sensitivity that even 0.8 ml can also be detected. In this study, the curves of inductive phase shift are significantly related to ICP. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable, in addition to continuous monitoring, also for early warning in emergency medicine and critical care units.

  14. Vasopressin, renin, and cortisol responses to hemorrhage during acute blockade of cardiac nerves in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) on the increases in plasma renin activity (PRA), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and cortisol in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage was determined in conscious dogs (n = 9). Procaine was infused into the pericardial space to produce acute reversible CNB, or saline was infused in the control hemorrhage. Blood was removed from the inferior vena cava at a rate of 1 ml.kg-1.min-1. In the control hemorrhage, plasma AVP increased from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 219 +/- 66 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.63 +/- 0.20 to 3.08 +/- 0.91 ng angiotensin I (ANG I).ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.4 +/- 0.2 to 4.0 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dl. When the hemorrhage was repeated during acute CNB, plasma AVP increased from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 185 +/- 59 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.44 +/- 0.14 to 2.24 +/- 0.27 ng ANG I.ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.6 micrograms/dl, and none of the increases differed significantly from the responses during the control hemorrhage. Left atrial pressure fell significantly after removal of 6 ml/kg of blood, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at control levels until blood loss reached 20 ml/kg during pericardial infusion of either saline or procaine. The declines in MAP at the 30 ml/kg level of hemorrhage in both treatments were similar. These results demonstrate that acutely blocking input from cardiac receptors does not reduce the increases in plasma AVP, cortisol, and PRA in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that input from cardiac receptors is required for a normal AVP response to hemorrhage and suggest that other receptors, presumably arterial baroreceptors, can stimulate AVP and cortisol secretion in the absence of signals from the heart.

  15. Spontaneous rupture and hemorrhage of adrenal pseudocyst presenting with acute abdomen and shock.

    PubMed

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Valizadeh, Neda

    2011-12-01

    Adrenal gland pseudocysts are not common conditions, and most of them are nonfunctional and asymptomatic. However, large pseudocysts may causes abdominal discomfort and have compressive effects on adjacent organs. They may rupture spontaneously or after trauma, and lead to retroperitoneal hemorrhage and surgical emergency. Herein, we report a case of 21-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous rupture of adrenal pseudocyst. She was treated successfully by open surgery, removal of adrenal pseudocyst and unilateral adrenalectomy.

  16. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  17. Thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction complicating diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Sim, Ming-Ming; Smith, Eric E

    2006-10-01

    Diagnostic and interventional percutaneous coronary catheterization is associated with stroke. Many of such strokes are asymptomatic, but some are devastating. Once the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction is confirmed, thrombolytic therapy should be administrated within the time window of 3 hours. We report a 61-year-old woman who suffered from an acute cerebral infarction during diagnostic cardiac catheterization for unstable angina, which manifested as sudden onset of global aphasia, right hemiplegia and gaze preponderance to the left side. Computed tomography of the head performed immediately after recognition of the symptoms showed a hyperdense middle cerebral artery (MCA) sign. Following prompt recognition and diagnosis, intravenous thrombolytic therapy was administered 2 hours after symptom onset. The patient had a favorable outcome. Initially, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 21, and 24 hours later it improved to 9. The hyperdense MCA lesion had resolved on the 24-hour follow-up scan. This case illustrates the clinical benefit of thrombolytic therapy in the setting of acute stroke associated with cardiac catheterization.

  18. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Park, David Jaehyun; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  19. Acute Paraplegia as a Result of Hemorrhagic Spinal Ependymoma Masked by Spinal Anesthesia: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumors in adults. Although a hemorrhage within spinal ependymoma on imaging studies is not uncommon, it has rarely been reported to bea cause of acute neurological deficit. In the present report, we describe a case of a 24-year-old female patient who developed acute paraplegia as a result of hemorrhagic spinal ependymoma immediately after a cesarean delivery under spinal regional anesthesia. We review the literature of hemorrhagic spinal ependymomas presenting with acute neurological deficit and discuss the most appropriate treatment for a good neurological recovery. PMID:27195260

  20. Association of deep venous thrombosis with calf vein diameter in acute hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyasu; Yasaka, Masahiro; Wakugawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitazono, Takanari; Okada, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the association between the development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and calf vein diameter in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. We measured the maximum diameter of paralytic side posttibial veins (PTVs) and peroneal veins (PVs) in 49 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage on admission and at 2 weeks after stroke onset by ultrasonography. We also examined for the presence or absence of DVT, and then analyzed the association of DVT with the maximum vein diameter. At 2 weeks after stroke, DVTs were detected in PTVs in 7 patients and in PVs in 6 patients. The maximum calf vein diameters at 2 weeks were significantly greater in patients with DVT compared with those without DVT (PTV, P = .033; PV, P = .015). Although calf vein diameter at admission did not influence the future incidence of DVT in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, the presence of DVT was associated with calf vein dilatation.

  1. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  2. Effects of batroxobin with continuous transcranial Doppler monitoring in patients with acute cerebral stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yitao, He; Kefu, Ma; Bingshan, Tang; Xuejun, Fu; Ying, Zhan; Zhili, Cai; Xin, Jiang; Guo, Yi

    2014-11-01

    Our objective was to determine whether continuous transcranial Doppler (TCD) monitoring could safely enhance the efficacy of batroxobin, a thrombin-like enzyme extracted from Bothrops atrox moojeni venom, in the treatment for acute cerebral stroke beyond the thrombolytic time window. Ninety patients suffering an acute cerebral stroke were recruited into the study within 12 hours after the onset of symptoms. Patients were randomized to receive batroxobin with (target group) or without 1 hour of continuous TCD monitoring (control group). Clinical evaluation of stroke was based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, Barthel index (BI), Thrombolysis in Brain Ischemia score (TIBI), the incidence of advancing stroke, and the recurrence of cerebral infarction. The patients receiving continuous TCD monitoring showed significant improvement in NIHSS score at 57 days post treatment compared with the control. Similarly, patients receiving continuous TCD monitoring also showed significant improvement in BI at 3 months compared with the controls. Consistently, both the incidence of advancing stroke after 1 week and the incidence of stroke recurrence after 3 months were significantly lower in TCD monitored group than control group. Moreover, the safety of the employment of TCD monitoring in the treatment of these patients was confirmed as there was no significant difference of the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage at 1 week after the treatment between the target and control groups. Taken together, our study showed that batroxobin, in combination with continuous TCD monitoring at the middle cerebral artery, reduced the incidence of advancing stroke and stroke recurrence after treatment without adverse effects in terms of poststroke intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:24684297

  3. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  4. A Novel Rhabdovirus Associated with Acute Hemorrhagic Fever in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J. Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B.; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W.; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S.; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Leroy, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09×106 RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ∼140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1∶1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa. PMID:23028323

  5. A novel rhabdovirus associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in central Africa.

    PubMed

    Grard, Gilda; Fair, Joseph N; Lee, Deanna; Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D; Chiu, Charles Y; Leroy, Eric M

    2012-09-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09 × 10(6) RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ≈ 140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1:1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa.

  6. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report

    PubMed Central

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection. PMID:25628207

  7. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy presenting with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and interval development of neurological deficits: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Bai, Harrison X; Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Yanqiao; Tan, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA) is a cerebrovascular disease that occurs during the postpartum period. It is characterized by reversible multifocal vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. We report a patient with PCA proven by cerebral angiography that revealed multifocal, segmental narrowing of the cerebral arteries and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient suddenly deteriorated with focal neurological deficits on the 5 th day of hospitalization. She was treated with calcium-channel blockers and monitored with daily transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Her symptoms gradually improved and she was discharged on the 11 th day of hospitalization. At 1-month follow-up, patient was completely symptom-free with no neurological deficits.

  8. Pre-critical MRI findings of an Alzheimer's disease patient with pathologically proven cerebral amyloid angiopathy related lobar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Toshihiro; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Ide, Toshihiro; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideo

    2016-05-31

    An 85-year-old woman with untreated hypertension was admitted with a disturbance of consciousness. On admission, brain CT revealed a lobar intracerebral hemorrhage with a midline shift. An intracranial hematoma was evacuated via a life-saving craniotomy. Definite pathological findings of amyloid-β deposition in the excised hematoma (strong in anti-amyloid β40 immunostain, but weak in anti- amyloid β42) indicated cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease at a regional memory clinic one month before symptom onset based on MRI findings of medial temporal lobe atrophy as well as CAA-related features of multiple strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds in the occipital lobe, cortical superficial siderosis and >20 enlarged perivascular spaces in the centrum semiovale. This experience suggests that comprehensive interpretation of such CAA-related findings on MRI might help to improve the management of cardiovascular risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27151228

  9. [A Case of Aplastic or Twig-Like Middle Cerebral Artery Presenting with an Intracranial Hemorrhage Two Years after a Transient Ischemic Attack].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taku; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Koguchi, Motofumi; Tajima, Yutaka; Suzuyama, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Aplastic or twig-like middle cerebral artery (Ap/T-MCA) is a rare anatomical anomaly, which can be associated with intracranial hemorrhage and cerebral ischemia. A 52-year-old woman who presented with sudden headache was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormality; however, magnetic resonance angiogram revealed an occlusion or severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. Three-dimensional CT angiography demonstrated severe stenosis in the left middle cerebral artery. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit; however, she subsequently complained of temporary weakness in the right hand. It was possibly due to a transient ischemic attack; therefore, cilostazol 200 mg/day was administered for prevention of cerebral ischemia. Single photon emission computed tomography(with or without administration of acetazolamide)showed neither significant decrease in the cerebral blood flow nor cerebrovascular reactivity; hence, surgical revascularization was not performed. However, two years after the initial admission, she was urgently admitted to our hospital with sudden headache and nausea followed by aphasia and weakness of the right extremities. CT images showed diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporo-parietal lobe. Cerebral angiography revealed that the left middle cerebral artery was Ap/T-MCA without cerebral aneurysms. The patient was treated conservatively, and she eventually recovered without any neurological deficit except mild aphasia. Since Ap/T-MCA is associated with both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, antiplatelet therapy should be administered carefully. Moreover, it is necessary to consider extracranial-intracranial bypass to reduce hemodynamic stress on the abnormal vessels.

  10. Medical Management of Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Review of Current and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Peter; He, Shuhan; Amar, Arun Paul; Mack, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Evidence suggests a multifactorial etiology and this concept remains supported by the assortment of therapeutic modalities under investigation. The authors provide an updated review of the literature for previous and recent clinical trials evaluating medical treatments in patients with cerebral vasospasm secondary to aSAH. Currently, the strongest evidence supports use of prophylactic oral nimodipine and initiation of triple-H therapy for patients in cerebral vasospasm. Other agents presented in this report include magnesium, statins, endothelin receptor antagonists, nitric oxide promoters, free radical scavengers, thromboxane inhibitors, thrombolysis, anti-inflammatory agents and neuroprotectants. Although promising data is beginning to emerge for several treatments, few prospective randomized clinical trials are presently available. Additionally, future investigational efforts will need to resolve discrepant definitions and outcome measures for cerebral vasospasm in order to permit adequate study comparisons. Until then, definitive recommendations cannot be made regarding the safety and efficacy for each of these therapeutic strategies and medical management practices will continue to be implemented in a wide-ranging manner.

  11. Changes in the cerebral blood flow in newborn rats assessed by LSCI and DOCT before and after the hemorrhagic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.; Lychagov, V. V.; Abdurashitov, A. S.; Sindeeva, O. V.; Sindeev, S. S.; Zinchenko, E. M.; Kajbeleva, E. I.; Pavlov, A. N.; Kassim, M.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of perinatal hemorrhagic stroke (HS) is very similar to that in the elderly and produces a significant morbidity and long-term neurologic and cognitive deficits. There is strong evidence that cerebral blood flow (CBF) abnormalities make considerable contribution to HS development. However, the mechanisms responsible for pathological changes in CBF in infants with HS are not established. Therefore, quantitative assessment of CBF may significantly advance the understanding of the nature of neonatal stroke. The aim of this investigation was to determine the particularities of alterations in macro- microcirculation in the brain of newborn rats in the different stages of stress-related development of HS using three-dimensional Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI).Our results show that cerebral veins are more sensitive to harmful effect of stress compared with microcirculatory vessels. Stress-induced progressive dilation of cerebral veins with the fall of blood flow velocity precedes HS while pathological changes in microcirculatory vessels are accompanied by development of HS. The further detailed study of cerebral venous and microcirculatory circulation would be a significant advance in development of prognostic criteria for a HS risk during the first days after birthday.

  12. Acute ethanol effects on focal cerebral ischemia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Yang, G Y; Ben-Joseph, O; Ross, B D; Chenevert, T L; Domino, E F

    1998-05-01

    The effects of acute ethanol intoxication were investigated in a rat model of unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Groups of 5 to 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 hr of left middle cerebral artery occlusion. All groups were deprived of food overnight and were pretreated intraperitoneally with 5% dextrose solution (10 ml/kg), 20% ethyl alcohol in 5% dextrose solution (2 g/kg), or 30% ethyl alcohol in a 5% dextrose solution (3 g/kg) 1 hr before middle cerebral artery occlusion. Regional cerebral blood flow during ipsilateral occlusion was approximately 9.1 to 10% of baseline in all groups. The mean % brain water content in control, 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups, and 3 g/kg ethanol-treated groups were: in the ischemic core--81.6, 81.2, and 82.4; intermediate zone--80.5, 80.6, and 81.7; and outer zone--79.7, 79.7, and 80.8, respectively. Brain Na+ and K+ content in the three groups was related to water content, but much greater with ethanol pretreatment. The water content of the intermediate zones in the 3 g/kg ethanol-treated animals was significantly greater than in the control (p < 0.01 and 0.001) and the 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant dose-effect relationship in which the lower dose of ethanol tended to reduce ischemic core water content, and the larger dose increased ischemic core water, compared with the control. None of the overnight fasted groups had any significant hyperglycemia. The group given 3 g/kg i.p. ethanol 1 hr before had exacerbated edema formation with a mean whole blood level of ethanol of approximately 230 mg/dl. The neurotoxic effects of high concentrations of ethanol were unrelated to any change in plasma glucose concentrations.

  13. Acute Cardioembolic and Thrombotic Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusions Have Different Morphological Susceptibility Signs on T2 (∗) -Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mei; Fan, Dong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Presence of susceptibility sign on middle cerebral artery (MCA) in T2 (∗) -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images has been reported to detect acute MCA thromboembolic occlusion. However, the pathophysiologic course of thrombotic MCA occlusion differs from embolic occlusion, which might induce different imaging characters. Our study found that the occurrence rate of the MCA susceptibility sign in cardioembolism (CE) patients was significantly higher than in large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) patients, and the diameter of the MCA susceptibility sign for CE was greater than for LAA. Moreover, the patients with hemorrhagic transformation had MCA susceptibility signs with a significant larger mean diameter than patients without hemorrhagic transformation. Therefore, we hypothesized that the morphology of susceptibility signs could be used to differentiate acute cardioembolic and thrombotic MCA occlusions, which helped to select appropriate treatment strategies for different patients. PMID:26543869

  14. Natural history of premacular hemorrhage due to severe acute anemia: clinical and anatomical features in two untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia Del; La Spina, Carlo; Mantovani, Elena; Gagliardi, Marco; Lattanzio, Rosangela; Pierro, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Premacular retrohyaloid hemorrhage is a rare complication of acute severe anemia. The authors report two cases of premacular hemorrhage in which no treatment other than clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography observation was performed. The natural history of this condition reveals that complete clinical resolution is not accompanied by full anatomical restoration. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:E5-E7.]. PMID:24496165

  15. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure. PMID:25876581

  16. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a patient with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis caused by impetigo.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Kei; Hamaguchi, Akihiko; Ogura, Makoto; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of pulmonary renal syndrome with nephritis in a 17-year-old boy with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). The patient exhibited hemoptysis two weeks after developing impetigo, and DAH was diagnosed on bronchoscopy. Respiratory failure progressed, and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy was administered; the respiratory failure regressed immediately after the onset of therapy. Streptococcus pyogenes was detected in an impetigo culture, and, together with the results of the renal biopsy, a diagnosis of APSGN was made. This case demonstrates the effects of high-dose methylprednisolone therapy in improving respiratory failure.

  17. Imaging manifestations and diagnosis of a case of adult cerebral paragonimiasis with the initial symptom of hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Shao, Bei

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the clinical features, neuroimaging and diagnosis of adult cerebral paragonimiasis. One case of patient with cerebral paragonimiasis as retrospectively analyzed in this study. Analysis included medical history, clinical manifestations and neuroimaging. Blood test, body fluid examination, immunological test, stool examination and imaging examination were performed. Many symptoms such as headache, hemiplegia, chest pain, cough, and pleural effusion were detected in the patient. The features of “tunnel-like shape” and “ring-like shape”, the intracranial hemorrhage and edema were shown by CT and MRI imaging. Chest CT examination revealed pleural effusion. Eosinophil count of peripheral blood and pleural effusion increased. Lung fluke ELISA test was positive and anti-parasitic treatment was effective. The typical clinical manifestations of MRI of cerebral paragonimiasis, such as the “tunnel-like shape” and “ring-like shape”, were of high diagnostic value. And, blood eosinophil count examination and paragonimiasis antibody test could also help the diagnosis value. PMID:26309598

  18. Astrocytes and microglia in acute cerebral injury underlying cerebral palsy associated with preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Mallard, Carina; Davidson, Joanne O; Tan, Sidhartha; Green, Colin R; Bennet, Laura; Robertson, Nicola J; Gunn, Alistair Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is one of the most devastating consequences of brain injury around the time of birth, and nearly a third of cases are now associated with premature birth. Compared with term babies, preterm babies have an increased incidence of complications that may increase the risk of disability, such as intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis. The response to injury is highly dependent on brain maturity, and although cellular vulnerability is well documented, there is now evidence that premyelinating axons are also particularly sensitive to ischemic injury. In this review, we will explore recent evidence highlighting a central role for glia in mediating increased risk of disability in premature infants, including excessive activation of microglia and opening of astrocytic gap junction hemichannels in spreading injury after brain ischemia, in part likely involving release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and overactivation of purinergic receptors, particularly in white matter. We propose the hypothesis that inflammation-induced opening of connexin hemichannels is a key regulating event that initiates a vicious circle of excessive ATP release, which in turn propagates activation of purinergic receptors on microglia and astrocytes. This suggests that developing effective neuroprotective strategies for preterm infants requires a detailed understanding of glial responses.

  19. Association between retinal hemorrhagic pattern and macular perfusion status in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Muraoka, Yuki; Uji, Akihito; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ooto, Sotaro; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Ayako; Iida, Yuto; Miwa, Yuko; Hata, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study included 63 eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) to evaluate the retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior poles and explore their clinical relevance in macular perfusion differentiation. Retinal hemorrhagic patterns and macular perfusion status were evaluated via fundus photography and fluorescein angiography, respectively. Macular perfusion was judged as nonischemic in 30, ischemic in 28, and undeterminable in 5 among the 63 eyes. Predominant hemorrhagic patterns were flame-shaped in 39 (67.2%) and non-flame-shaped in 19 (32.8%) eyes. All 39 eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage showed a nonischemic macula. Of the 19 eyes classified as having a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage, 13 (68.4%) had an ischemic macula and 6 (31.6%) had a nonischemic macula (P < 0.001). Parallelism in eyes with a flame-shaped hemorrhage was higher than in those with a non-flame-shaped hemorrhage (P < 0.001), and in those with a nonischemic macula versus those with an ischemic macula (P < 0.001). The area under the curve for parallelism was 0.975 (P < 0.001), suggesting an accurate diagnostic parameter for macular perfusion differentiation. In conclusion, we objectively evaluated retinal hemorrhagic patterns at the posterior pole in BRVO using the parallelism method, which was useful in differentiating macular perfusion status. PMID:27334338

  20. Alterations of caveolin-1 expression in a mouse model of delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Wang, Xue-Min; Zhong, Ming; Li, Ze-Qun; Wang, Zhi; Tian, Zuo-Fu; Zheng, Kuang; Tan, Xian-Xi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression levels of caveolin-1 in the basilar artery following delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), in order to investigate the association between caveolin-1 and DCVS, and its potential as a treatment for DCVS of SAH. A total of 150 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated into blank, saline and SAH groups. The SAH and saline groups were subdivided into days 3, 5, 7 and 14 following the establishment of the model. The murine model of SAH was established by double injection of autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magana and DCVS was detected using Bederson neurological severity scores. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the inner perimeter of the basilar artery pipe and variations in the thickness of the basilar artery wall. Alterations in the levels of caveolin-1 protein in the basilar artery were measured using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis; whereas alterations in the mRNA expression levels of caveolin-1 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the present study, 15 mice succumbed to SAH-induced DCVS in the day 3 (n=3), 5 (n=5) and 7 (n=2) groups. No mortality was observed in the blank control and saline groups during the process of observation in the SAH group, All mice in the SAH groups exhibited Bederson neurological severity scores ≥1; whereas no neurological impairment was detected in the blank and normal saline groups, demonstrating the success of the model. HE staining was used to assess vasospasm and the results demonstrated that the inner perimeter of the basal artery pipe decreased at day 3 in the SAH group; whereas values peaked in the day 7 group. The thickness of the basal artery wall significantly increased (P<0.05), as compared with the blank and saline groups, in which no significant alterations in the wall thickness and the inner perimeter of the basal artery pipe

  1. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  2. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman presenting with acute epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Yasuomi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    A 26-year-old woman in week 31 of pregnancy presented to the emergency room with acute onset of paraplegia. Her medical history was unremarkable. Neurological examination revealed complete paraplegia, total sensory loss below the T7 dermatome, and significant vesicorectal dysfunction. MRI revealed an intraspinal mass from T3 to T4, which was hyperintense on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Blood examination found no abnormality. She underwent emergent hemilaminectomy and removal of the hematoma. Intraoperatively, unusually ectatic venous vessels were found adhered to the lower surface of the epidural clot. No concurrent vascular malformations were identified and the dura mater was intact. The histological diagnosis was angiolipoma. Postoperatively her neurological deficits showed remarkable improvement, and she gave birth to a healthy baby. Spinal angiolipoma in a pregnant woman may be complicated with acute epidural hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation can be performed safely with a good functional prognosis.

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in Trauma Patients Using Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Wille, R. Heiss, P.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M. Schreyer, A. G. Hamer, O. W. Rennert, J. Hoffstetter, P. Stroszczynski, C.; Zorger, N.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the feasibility and efficacy of endovascular embolization with liquid embolic agent ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx) in patients with acute traumatic arterial bleeding. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 patients (9 men and 4 women; mean age 45 years) with severe trauma who underwent embolotherapy using Onyx from November 2003 to February 2009. Bleeding was located in the pelvis (5 patients), kidney (3 patients), mesenteric region (2 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), neck (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). In three cases (23.1%), Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. We evaluate the technical and clinical success, procedural and embolization time, occurrence of rebleeding, and embolotherapy-related complications, such as necrosis or migration of Onyx into nontarget vessels. Results: In all patients, embolotherapy was technically and clinically successful on the first attempt. Control of bleeding could be reached with a mean time of 19 (range, 4-63) min after correct placement of the microcatheter in the feeding artery. No recurrent bleeding was detected. No unintended necrosis or migration of Onyx into a nontarget region was observed. During the follow-up period, three patients (23.1%) died due to severe intracranial hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, and sepsis. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization with new liquid embolic agent Onyx is technically feasible and effective in trauma patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  4. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Fu; Hsu, Sanford P. C.; Lin, Chung Jung; Guo, Wan Yuo; Liao, Chih Hsiang; Chu, Wei Fa; Hung, Sheng Che; Shih, Yang Shin; Lin, Yen Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT) and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP) to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT) was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak) between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2) and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2). The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT) were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated. Results Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8–6.4 s) except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4% Conclusion CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH. PMID:26986626

  5. Follow-up of Large Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization at an Acute Stage in Patients with Poor-Grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S.; Tanaka, N.; Tani, S.; Nakamura, S.; Ohbuchi, H.; Hirota, K.; Iwabuchi, S.; Kasuya, H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated the clinical and angiographic outcome of large aneurysms treated with coil embolization at an acute stage in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2004, eight consecutive WFNS grade 5 patients with large aneurysms (15~23mm) were treated with endovascular coil embolization within two days and followed for at least 30 months. There were three middle cerebral and five internal carotid artery aneurysms. No patients were treated by craniotomy and none survived without treatment. Two patients died of primary brain damage or cerebral vasospasm within one month. One patient died of pneumonia at 24 months. Four patients were alive with good recovery or moderate disability at the time of final follow-up (30~66 months). Angiography immediately after the procedure showed complete occlusion in three, neck remnant in four, and body filling in one patient. No complication was seen related to the procedure. Three aneurysms that were initially neck remnant developed body filling due to coil compaction. Two were re-treated with coils at six and 12 months and resulted in neck remnant. One patient refused re-treatment and died of re-bleeding. Endovascular coil embolization can be selected at an acute stage for the treatment of aneurysms in patients with poor-grade SAH without intraparenchymal hematoma even if the aneurysm is large. Serial follow up by MRA/angiography is necessary for at least 12 months. PMID:20465928

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  7. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in cerebral vasospasm, and as a therapeutic approach to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kokkoris, Stelios; Andrews, Peter; Webb, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most potent microvascular vasodilators identified to date. Vascular relaxation and vasodilation is mediated via activation of the CGRP receptor. This atypical receptor is made up of a G protein-coupled receptor called calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a single transmembrane protein called receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP), and an additional protein that is required for Gas coupling, known as receptor component protein (RCP). Several mechanisms involved in CGRP-mediated relaxation have been identified. These include nitric oxide (NO)-dependent endothelium-dependent mechanisms or cAMP-mediated endothelium-independent pathways; the latter being more common. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with cerebral vasoconstriction that occurs several days after the hemorrhage and is often fatal. The vasospasm occurs in 30–40% of patients and is the major cause of death from this condition. The vasoconstriction is associated with a decrease in CGRP levels in nerves and an increase in CGRP levels in draining blood, suggesting that CGRP is released from nerves to oppose the vasoconstriction. This evidence has led to the concept that exogenous CGRP may be beneficial in a condition that has proven hard to treat. The present article reviews: (a) the pathophysiology of delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after SAH (b) the basics of the CGRP receptor structure, signal transduction, and vasodilatation mechanisms and (c) the studies that have been conducted so far using CGRP in both animals and humans with SAH. PMID:23162536

  8. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Transseptal Orbital Decompression in Treating Acute Retrobulbar Hemorrhage and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerer, Rüdiger; Schattmann, Katrin; Essig, Harald; Jehn, Philipp; Metzger, Marc; Kokemüller, Horst; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Tavassol, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing visual acuity secondary to orbital trauma may be caused by sudden space-occupying or expanding intraorbital lesions, including retrobulbar hemorrhage (RBH), herniation, or swelling. RBH must be diagnosed and treated immediately. This article addresses the efficacy of transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression in a combination with a systematic review of the literature for a comparison of this method with existing treatment options. For this study the department's database was retrospectively screened for patients with acute RBH who were treated between 2009 and 2011 using the authors' approach. Patients presenting with RBH were classified into RBH classes I to III according to three different clinical and radiological manifestations of acute RBH. The efficacy of transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression was assessed by postoperative visual acuities. The literature review was performed by using the MEDLINE database. The time period for the study was between 2009 and 2011 during which 10 patients were diagnosed with suspected RBH and 9 were treated with the authors' technique. Visual acuities were reconstituted or maintained in almost 86% of patients who were diagnosed and treated according to the authors approach and who survived initial trauma. It was concluded that transcutaneous transseptal orbital decompression provides an efficient and rapid approach for treating patients with acute RBH. By distinguishing three different manifestations of acute RBH, the authors present a diagnostic tool that may facilitate classification of RBH and determination of treatment options. PMID:24624253

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever patients with acute abdomen: clinical experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Khor, Boon-Siang; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Kuender D

    2006-05-01

    Among 328 patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), 14 (4 men and 10 women, median age 44 years) had acute abdomen. DHF/DSS was initially suspected in only 2 of these 14 patients. Presumptive diagnoses of acute cholecystitis (6 acalculus and 4 calculus cholecystitis) were made in 10 patients, non-specific peritonitis in three patients, and acute appendicitis in one patients. Cholecystectomy, percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage, and appendectomy were performed in three patients. Transfused blood in the three patients who underwent invasive procedures and the 11 patients who received supportive treatment included packed red blood cells (24 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), fresh frozen plasma (84 versus 0 units; P = 0.048), and platelets (192 versus 180 units; P = 0.003). Patients who underwent invasive procedures also had prolonged time in the hospital (median = 11 versus 7 days; P = 0.015). To avoid unnecessary invasive procedure-related morbidity and mortality, this report underscores the importance of a careful differential diagnosis in patients with acute abdomen in a dengue-endemic setting.

  10. [Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on cerebral oxygenation, metabolism and oxidative stress in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Solodov, A A; Petrikov, S S; Klychnikova, E V; Tazina, E V; Krylov, V V; Godkov, M A; Khamidova, L T

    2013-01-01

    The development of cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to cerebral aneurysms rupture results in cerebral circulation disturbances. Application of normobaric hyperoxia can be an effective way for improving of oxygen delivery to injured brain tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess of normobaric hyperoxia influence on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and metabolism, oxidative stress and endogenous factors of vascular regulation in II critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture. Increase of FiO2 from 0.3 to 0.5 and 1.0 was accompanied with brain oxygen tension (PbrO2) increase and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen (O2ER) decrease. Application of normobaric hyperoxia had no effect on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial blood pressure and cerebral metabolism. The results obtained from patients with nontraumatic SAH showed an evident increase of oxidative stress which had a significant effect on vascular endothelial function, causing an imbalance in the endogenous regulation of vascular tone. Application of normobaric hyperoxia was not accompanied by an increase of free-radical processes in critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition reduces cerebral vasospasm following a subarachnoid hemorrhage injury in canines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguang; Khatibi, Nikan H; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yan, Junhao; Chen, Chunhua; Hu, Qin; Meng, Haiwei; Han, Hongbin; Liu, Shuwei; Zhou, Changman

    2012-02-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a vital role in regulating growth, proliferation, survival, and protein synthesis among cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the mTOR pathway following subarachnoid hemorrhage brain injury--specifically investigating its ability to mediate the activation of cerebral vasospasm. Additionally, we investigated whether key signaling pathway molecules such as the mTOR, P70S6K1, and 4E-BP1 play a role in the process. Thirty dogs were randomly divided into 5 groups: sham, SAH (subarachnoid hemorrhage), SAH+DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), SAH+Rapamycin and SAH+AZD8055. An established canine double-hemorrhage model of SAH was used by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna on days 0 and 2. Angiography was performed at days 0 and 7. Clinical behavior, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot of mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) in the basilar arteries were examined. In the SAH and SAH+DMSO groups, severe angiographic vasospasm was obtained (34.3±19.8%, 38.4±10.3) compared with that in Sham (93.9±5.0%) respectively. mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA increased in the sample of spastic basilar arteries (p<0.05). In the SAH+RAPA and SAH+AZD8055 groups, Rapamycin and AZD8055 attenuated angiographic vasospasm (62.3±15.9% and 65.2±10.3%) while improving appetite and activity scores (p<0.05) on days 5 through 7. Rapamycin and AZD8055 significantly reduced the level and expression of mTOR, P70S6K1, 4E-BP1 and PCNA (p<0.05). In conclusion, our study suggests that the mTOR molecular signaling pathway plays a significant role in cerebral vasospasm following SAH, and that inhibition of the mTOR pathway has the potential to become an attractive strategy to treat vasospasm following SAH. PMID:22177999

  12. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14−30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in

  13. [Increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as a predictor of cerebral salt wasting syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Shinichiro; Takayama, Katsutoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is considered to correlate with delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) induced by cerebral vasospasm; however, its exact mechanism is still not well-known. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between hyponatremia caused by CSWS and the increase of the urinary sodium excretion in early phase following SAH. Fifty-four patients with SAH were divided into 2 groups, normonatremia group and hyponatremia group which suffered hyponatremia after SAH. The hyponatremia group comprise 14 patients (26%) in whom the hyponatremia developed of the SAH. In this group, the serum level of sodium significantly decreased 7 days after SAH and then gradually normalised. Further, excretion of sodium in the urine tended to increase 3 days after SAH and significantly increased 7 days after SAH. In conclusion, the increased urinary sodium excretion in the early phase of SAH would serve as a predictive factor for CSWS after SAH. We consider that it is important to start sodium and fluid supplementation and inhibit natriuresis by fludrocortisone acetate administration before hyponatremia occurs in order to prevention delayed ischemic neurological deficits in SAH patients.

  14. Choriocarcinoma of unknown origin with multiple organ metastasis and cerebral hemorrhage: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    WEI, HONGTAO; ZHANG, TIANPENG; LIU, BING; XUE, XIAOWEI; WANG, GUOXING

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old man was admitted to Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University (Beijing, China) with a 4-day history of headache, moderate fever and numbness in the right upper limb. Prior to this, the patient had been diagnosed with cerebral hemorrhage by computed tomography (CT) scan upon visiting a local hospital. Chest X-ray revealed multiple lesions in the lungs. Following referral, no abnormalities were found elsewhere, including in the testes, during a physical examination. Additional examination of other tumor biomarkers was unremarkable, and the initial suspicion of parasitic infection was ruled out. Tests revealed extremely high levels of β-human chorionic gonadotropin (>200,000 mIU/ml). In addition, CT scans showed multiple metastases in the head, lungs, liver and kidneys. An ultrasound-guided Tru-Cut biopsy of the liver was performed in order to form a definitive diagnosis. Although the patient was treated with mannitol to reduce intracranial pressure, and with cefoperazone sodium and sulbactam sodium to fight infection, the patient succumbed to a cerebral hernia on the fourth day of hospitalization. Following this, the ultrasound-guided Tru-Cut liver biopsy result was received, which suggested a diagnosis of choriocarcinoma. PMID:27313687

  15. Acute myocardial/cerebral infarction as first/relapse manifestation in one acute promyelocytic leukemia patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Suo, Shanshan; Mao, Liping; Wang, Lei; Yang, Chunmei; Xu, Weilai; Lou, Yinjun; Mai, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    In the clinical setting, bleeding is a common manifestation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), whereas thrombosis is relatively rare, especially as an initial symptom. Here, we report an unusual case of APL with acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation and cerebral infarction as the relapse manifestation in a healthy young woman. This unique case emphasizes that a thrombotic event could be the first manifestation of an underlying hematological disorder such as APL and could also be a sign of relapse. Rapid detection of the underlying disorder and the timely use of anticoagulation therapy and ATRA are crucial for preventing further deterioration of the disease and saving the patient’s life. PMID:26550398

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Relative Impact of Obesity on Hemodynamic Stability During Acute Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah A.; Jones, Alan E.; Coleman, Thomas G.; Summers, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that morbid obesity may be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. Objectives: In this study, a theoretic analysis using a derivation of the Guyton model of cardiovascular physiology examines the expected impact of obesity on hemodynamic changes in Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) and Cardiac Output (CO) during Hemorrhagic Shock (HS). Patients and Methods: Computer simulation studies were used to predict the relative impact of increasing Body Mass Index (BMI) on global hemodynamic parameters during HS. The analytic procedure involved recreating physiologic conditions associated with changing BMI for a virtual subject in an In Silico environment. The model was validated for the known effect of a BMI of 30 on iliofemoral venous pressures. Then, the relative effect of changing BMI on the outcome of target cardiovascular parameters was examined during simulated acute loss of blood volume in class II hemorrhage. The percent changes in these parameters were compared between the virtual nonobese and obese subjects. Model parameter values are derived from known population distributions, producing simulation outputs that can be used in a deductive systems analysis assessment rather than traditional frequentist statistical methodologies. Results: In hemorrhage simulation, moderate increases in BMI were found to produce greater decreases in MAP and CO compared to the normal subject. During HS, the virtual obese subject had 42% and 44% greater falls in CO and MAP, respectively, compared to the nonobese subject. Systems analysis of the model revealed that an increase in resistance to venous return due to changes in intra-abdominal pressure resulting from obesity was the critical mechanism responsible for the differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that obese patients in HS may have a higher risk of hemodynamic instability compared to their nonobese counterparts primarily due to obesity

  17. Detection of multiple intracranial hemorrhages in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) by susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI).

    PubMed

    Kullnig, Petra E; Rauscher, Alexander; Witoszynskyj, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Kentouche, Karim; Reichenbach, Juergen R; Mentzel, Hans Joachim; Kaiser, Werner Alois

    2007-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) combines magnitude and phase information from a high-resolution, fully velocity compensated, three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence. We report on the use of this MRI technique in a young patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and demonstrate a higher detection rate of hemorrhagic lesion in comparison with other T2*-weighted sequences.

  18. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  19. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:27621950

  20. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  1. Renal Subcapsular Hematoma after Intravenous Thrombolysis in a Patient with Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    La, Yun Kyung; Kim, Ji Hwa; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2016-09-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute cerebral infarction was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Subsequent percutaneous transfemoral angiography and mechanical thrombectomy were performed due to a right middle cerebral artery occlusion, which was successfully recanalized. Two days after treatment, the patient complained of vague right abdominal pain and a laboratory test showed anemia. Abdominal computed tomography showed a right renal subcapsular hematoma. After conservative management, the patient was discharged without complications. We report a rare complication after intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with acute cerebral infarction.

  2. Acute hemoptysis and pulmonary hemorrhage after judo as presentation of intralobar sequestration.

    PubMed

    Kleffner, Tim; Holzer, Matthias; Hülskamp, Georg; Feindt, Peter; Groetzner, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Intralobar sequestration (ILS) is a rare anomaly that is usually diagnosed with symptoms of cough, expectoration, or recurrent pneumonia in children. We experienced a case of an 11-year-old boy with massive hemoptysis after judo sports. He was admitted to hospital and intubated due to respiratory failure. His chest computed tomography (CT) scan which was performed without contrast agent revealed a large intrapulmonary hematoma or tumor, mimicking traumatic hemothorax. Due to blood loss and circulatory instability, emergency thoracotomy was performed and a massive intralobar hemorrhage due to a ruptured ILS artery was found. After lobectomy including resection of the ILS, the patient was stabilized and extubated. Aspergillus was detected in the resected lobe and postoperatively acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and invasive aspergillosis occurred and was treated specifically. However, the young patient was discharged home 3 weeks later. In young patients with hemoptysis and intrapulmonary hemorrhage after trauma, the possibility of ruptured ILS should be kept in mind. This report shows that ILS can have a dramatic course of disease, and for this reason a nonurgent resection should be considered in all patients when this diagnosis is made. PMID:22535674

  3. [Successful induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia complicated with brain hemorrhage and hyperleukocytosis].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takuya; Abe, Nana; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koyama, Satoshi; Miyashita, Kazuho; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yuki; Tachibana, Takayoshi; Kamijo, Aki; Tomita, Naoto; Ishigastubo, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Adequate management of hyperleukocytosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is essential for the prevention of life-threatening complications related to leukostasis and tumor lysis syndrome, but the optimal therapeutic strategy remains unclear. We report a 15-year-old girl with newly diagnosed AML who had extreme hyperleukocytosis (leukocyte count at diagnosis, 733,000/μl) leading to a brain hemorrhage. She was initially treated with hydroxyurea, but presented with brain hemorrhage due to leukostasis and underwent leukapheresis emergently with intensive care and mechanical ventilation. Full-dose standard induction chemotherapy was initiated after achieving gradual cytoreduction (leukocyte count, 465,000/μl) within five days after the initiation of therapy with hydroxyurea and leukapheresis. These treatments were successful and she experienced no complications. The patient ultimately recovered fully and was discharged with complete remission of AML. Although the effects of hydroxyurea and leukapheresis in the setting of hyperleukocytosis are still controversial, these initial treatments may contribute to successful bridging therapy followed by subsequent induction chemotherapy, especially in AML cases with extreme hyperleukocytosis or life-threatening leukostasis. PMID:26935637

  4. Demonstration of focal hyperemia in acute cerebral infarction with iodine-123 iodoamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Gupta, S.; Mlcoch, A.G.; Romyn, A.; Barnes, W.E.; Kaplan, E.

    1987-12-01

    Focal hyperemia is known to occur in regions of acute cerebral infarction. Presented here are two cases in which SPECT images with /sup 123/I-labeled iodoamphetamine demonstrated focal areas of increased tracer concentration associated with cerebral infarction. These results may have important implications regarding the physiology of iodoamphetamine in cerebral infarction and, in particular, whether the distribution of this tracer is related to regional blood flow in this setting. In addition, interpretation of iodoamphetamine images in cerebral infarction should include consideration of this finding.

  5. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (<3 days from ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  6. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy: an unusual diagnosis for the general pediatrician

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Diego Fontana Siqueira; Darcie, Ana Letícia Fornazieri; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Hein, Noely; Lo, Denise Swei; Yoshioka, Cristina Ryoka Miyao; Hirose, Maki; Cardoso, Debora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy (AHEI) is a rare leukocytoclastic vasculitis, clinically characterized by the classical triad: palpable purpuric skin lesions, edema and fever, and is commonly misdiagnosed as Henoch-Schönlein purpura. In addition to its sudden onset, AHEI is also characterized by its self-limited course with complete and spontaneous recovery occurring between 1 and 3 weeks. Because of the scarcity of studies on therapy with corticosteroids, the conservative approach is usually recommended. The authors report an unusual case of an one-year-old boy who presented with typical cutaneous rash of AHEI and orchitis, the latter showing complete resolution after less than 24 hours of prednisolone therapy. The authors call attention to this entity mainly as a differential diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and to the importance of new studies to establish the benefits of corticosteroid therapy for AHEI. PMID:26558246

  7. Blood soluble drag-reducing polymers prevent lethality from hemorrhagic shock in acute animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Kameneva, Marina V; Wu, Zhongjun J; Uraysh, Arkady; Repko, Brandon; Litwak, Kenneth N; Billiar, Timothy R; Fink, Mitchell P; Simmons, Richard L; Griffith, Bartley P; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past several decades, blood-soluble drag reducing polymers (DRPs) have been shown to significantly enhance hemodynamics in various animal models when added to blood at nanomolar concentrations. In the present study, the effects of the DRPs on blood circulation were tested in anesthetized rats exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock. The animals were acutely resuscitated either with a 2.5% dextran solution (Control) or using the same solution containing 0.0005% or 5 parts per million (ppm) concentration of one of two blood soluble DRPs: high molecular weight (MW=3500 kDa) polyethylene glycol (PEG-3500) or a DRP extracted from Aloe vera (AVP). An additional group of animals was resuscitated with 0.0075% (75 ppm) polyethylene glycol of molecular weight of 200 kDa (PEG-200), which possesses no drag-reducing ability. All of the animals were observed for two hours following the initiation of fluid resuscitation or until they expired. We found that infusion of the DRP solutions significantly improved tissue perfusion, tissue oxygenation, and two-hour survival rate, the latter from 19% (Control) and 14% (PEG-200) to 100% (AVP) and 100% (PEG-3500). Furthermore, the Control and PEG-200 animals that survived required three times more fluid to maintain their blood pressure than the AVP and PEG-3500 animals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying these observed beneficial hemodynamic effects of DRPs are discussed. Our findings suggest that the drag-reducing polymers warrant further investigation as a potential clinical treatment for hemorrhagic shock and possibly other microcirculatory disorders.

  8. The radical scavenger edaravone improves neurologic function and perihematomal glucose metabolism after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hanbing; Cui, Derong; Yang, Dehua; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Weifeng; Zhao, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative injury caused by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the progression of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced secondary brain injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that the free radical scavenger edaravone may prevent neuronal injury and brain edema after ICH. However, the influence of edaravone on cerebral metabolism in the early stages after ICH and the underlying mechanism have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of edaravone on perihematomal glucose metabolism using (18)F-fluorordeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Additionally, the neurologic deficits, brain edemas, and cell death that followed ICH were quantitatively analyzed. After blood infusion, the rats treated with edaravone showed significant improvement in both forelimb placing and corner turn tests compared with those treated with vehicle. Moreover, the brain water content of the edaravone-treated group was significantly decreased compared with that of the vehicle group on day 3 after ICH. PET/CT images of ICH rats exhibited obvious decreases in FDG standardized uptake values in perihematomal region on day 3, and the lesion-to-normal ratio of the edaravone-treated ICH rats was significantly increased compared with that of the control rats. Calculation of the brain injury volumes from the PET/CT images revealed that the volumes of the blood-induced injuries were significantly smaller in the edaravone group compared with the vehicle group. Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assays performed 3 days after ICH revealed that the numbers of apoptotic cells in perihematomal region of edaravone-treated ICH rats were decreased relative to the vehicle group. Thus, the present study demonstrates that edaravone has scavenging properties that attenuate neurologic behavioral deficits and brain edema in the early period of ICH. Additionally, edaravone may improve

  9. Detection of CT occult aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage using a novel spectrophotometric analysis of cerebral spinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Bhadri, Prashant R.; Huang, Jian; Kumar, Alla S.; Pyne, Gail J.; Caffery, James, Jr.; Clark, Joseph F.; Shukla, Rakesh; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    In North America, approximately 30,000 people annually suffer an aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Using computerized tomography (CT), the blood is generally not visible after 12 hours. Currently lumbar puncture (LP) results are equivocal for diagnosing SAH largely because of technical limitations in performing a quick and objective evaluation. Having ruptured once, an aneurysm is statistically more likely to rupture again. Therefore, for those individuals with a sentinel (or warning) hemorrhage, detection within the first 12 hours is paramount. We present a diagnostic technology based on visible spectroscopy to quickly and objectively assess low-blood volume SAH from a diagnostic spinal tap. This technology provides clinicians, with the resources necessary for assessing patients with suspected aneurismal SAH beyond the current 12-hour limitation imposed by CT scans. This aids in the improvement of patient care and results in rapid and appropriate treatment of the patient. To perform this diagnosis, we quantify bilirubin and hemoglobin in human CSF over a range of concentrations. Because the bilirubin and hemoglobin spectra overlap quantification is problematic. To solve this problem, two algorithmic approaches are presented: a statistical or a random stochastic component known as Partial Least Square (PLS) and a control theory based mathematical model. These algorithms account for the noise and distortion from blood in CSF leading to the quantification of bilirubin and methemoglobin spectroscopically. The configurations for a hardware platform is introduced, that is portable and user-friendly composed of specific components designed to have the sensitivity and specificity required. This aids in measuring bilirubin in CSF, hemorrhagic-CSF and CSF-like solutions. The prototype uses purpose built algorithms contained within the platform, such that physicians can use it in the hospital and lab as a point of care diagnostic test.

  10. [Systemic complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage from spontaneous rupture of a cerebral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Fàbregas Julià, N; Ingelmo Ingelmo, I; Hernández-Palazón, J

    2010-12-01

    Systemic complications secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm are common (40%) and the mortality attributable to them (23%) is comparable to mortality from the primary lesion, rebleeding, or vasospasm. Although nonneurologic medical complications are avoidable, they worsen the prognosis, lengthen the hospital stay, and generate additional costs. The prevention, early detection, and appropriate treatment of systemic complications will be essential for managing the individual patient's case. Treatment should cover major symptoms (headache, nausea, and dizziness) and ambient noise should be reduced, all with the aim of achieving excellence and improving the patient's perception of quality of care.

  11. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery that simultaneously presented with cerebral infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage, successfully treated with conservative management: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nanbara, Sho; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Takahata, Hideaki; Fujimoto, Takashi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Ono, Tomonori; Toda, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2012-07-01

    We recently encountered a rare case of anterior cerebral artery dissection (ACAD) that accompanied fresh cerebral infarction (CI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). An initial head CT showed a thin SAH in the interhemispheric cistern and cortical sulcus of the left frontal surface. Subsequent MRI performed 10 min after head CT scan revealed a fresh infarction in the left ACA region. MR-and digital subtraction angiograms demonstrated a dissection in the A2 portion of the left ACA with a leak of contrast media around the left A3 portion, suggesting that the bleeding occurred in a distal portion of the main dilation. Without anti-thrombotic therapy, the patient recovered without complications by blood pressure control and administration of brain-function protection therapies. We found 11 cases similar to the present case in the literature. All cases presented with lower-extremity dominant hemiparesis; however, sudden onset headache was rare. Blood pressure was not well-controlled in 4 out of the 6 known hypertensive cases. Main sites of dissection were located at the A2 portion in all cases except one A3 lesion, and extended to A3 in 2 cases. Conservative therapy led to favorable outcome in 8 cases, while 4 cases underwent surgical interventions for increasing risk of aneurysm rupture after initial observational therapies. Re-bleeding did not occur in any of the 12 cases reviewed. These data suggest that conservative treatment can be considered for an initial management of ACAD with simultaneous CI and SAH. More evidence needs to be accumulated to establish the optimal therapeutic approach for ACAD associated with CI and SAH.

  12. [Massive natriuresis and polyuria after triple craniocervical subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral salt wasting syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Berendes, E; Scherer, R; Schuricht, G; Rol, R; Hengst, K

    1992-11-01

    A thirty-year-old male patient suffered subarachnoidal haemorrhage from an angioma positioned in the cranio-cervical transition. After rebleeding twice the patient developed a hydrocephalus internus malresorptivus and excessive natriuresis and polyuria, accompanied by depressed renin activity and extremely low aldosterone plasma levels. Neither fluid restriction and sodium substitution, nor administration of hydro-chlorothiazide/indomethacin affected natriuresis and polyuria. It was only after treatment with fludrocortisone-acetate/hydrocortisone that hyponatraemia and polyuria were resolved. At the same time a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was applied. Differential diagnosis excluded the syndromes of inadequate antidiuretic hormone secretion, renal and cerebral diabetes insipidus, osmotic receptor hypofunction, chronic renal dysfunction and tubular necrosis. Natriuresis and polyuria developed under dexamethasone therapy. Since patient history, physical examination and laboratory criteria could not explain the electrolyte and fluid imbalance, this might be attributed to the hydrocephalus. Similar disturbances have been reported from other patients with intracranial disorders. Mechanical pressure exercised on the hypothalamus might cause the disturbance of fluid and sodium balance. Assuming a cerebral salt wasting syndrome, a putative natriuretic factor coming from the brain or an imbalance in the cerebral renin-angiotensin-system, as described in rats and dogs, must be discussed.

  13. Characterization of neonatal patients with intraventricular hemorrhage using 3D ultrasound cerebral ventricle volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Jessica; Fenster, Aaron; Lee, David S. C.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    One of the major non-congenital cause of neurological impairment among neonates born very preterm is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) - bleeding within the lateral ventricles. Most IVH patients will have a transient period of ventricle dilation that resolves spontaneously. However, those patients most at risk of long-term impairment are those who have progressive ventricle dilation as this causes macrocephaly, an abnormally enlarged head, then later causes increases intracranial pressure (ICP). 2D ultrasound (US) images through the fontanelles of the patients are serially acquired to monitor the progression of the ventricle dilation. These images are used to determine when interventional therapies such as needle aspiration of the built up CSF might be indicated for a patient. Initial therapies usually begin during the third week of life. Such interventions have been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality in IVH patients; however, this comes with risks of further hemorrhage or infection; therefore only patients requiring it should be treated. Previously we have developed and validated a 3D US system to monitor the progression of ventricle volumes (VV) in IVH patients. This system has been validated using phantoms and a small set of patient images. The aim of this work is to determine the ability of 3D US generated VV to categorize patients into those who will require interventional therapies, and those who will have spontaneous resolution. Patients with higher risks could therefore be monitored better, by re-allocating some of the resources as the low risks infants would need less monitoring.

  14. Preventing cerebral oedema in acute liver failure: the case for quadruple-H therapy.

    PubMed

    Warrillow, S J; Bellomo, R

    2014-01-01

    Severe cerebral oedema is a life-threatening complication of acute liver failure. Hyperammonaemia and cerebral hyperaemia are major contributing factors. A multimodal approach, which incorporates hyperventilation, haemodiafiltration, hypernatraemia and hypothermia (quadruple-H therapy), may prevent or attenuate severe cerebral oedema. This approach is readily administered by critical care clinicians and is likely to be more effective than the use of single therapies. Targeting of PaCO2 in the mild hyperventilation range, as seen in acute liver failure patients before intubation, aims to minimise hyperaemic cerebral oedema. Haemodiafiltration aims to achieve the rapid control of elevated blood ammonia concentrations by its removal and to reduce production via the lowering of core temperature. The administration of concentrated saline increases serum tonicity and further reduces cerebral swelling. In addition, the pathologically increased cerebral blood-flow is further attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia. The combination of all four treatments in a multimodal approach may be a safe and effective means of attenuating or treating the cerebral oedema of acute liver failure and preventing death from neurological complications. PMID:24471667

  15. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  16. Haptoglobin phenotype predicts the development of focal and global cerebral vasospasm and may influence outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jenna L; Blackburn, Spiros; Neal, Dan; Mendez, Nicholas V; Wharton, Jeffrey A; Waters, Michael F; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-27

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) and the resulting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) significantly contribute to poor outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Free hemoglobin (Hb) within the subarachnoid space has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CV. Haptoglobin (Hp) binds free pro-oxidant Hb, thereby modulating its harmful effects. Humans can be of three Hp phenotypes: Hp1-1, Hp2-1, or Hp2-2. In several disease states, the Hp2-2 protein has been associated with reduced ability to protect against toxic free Hb. We hypothesized that individuals with the Hp2-2 phenotype would have more CV, DCI, mortality, and worse functional outcomes after aSAH. In a sample of 74 aSAH patients, Hp2-2 phenotype was significantly associated with increased focal moderate (P = 0.014) and severe (P = 0.008) CV and more global CV (P = 0.014) after controlling for covariates. Strong trends toward increased mortality (P = 0.079) and worse functional outcomes were seen for the Hp2-2 patients with modified Rankin scale at 6 wk (P = 0.076) and at 1 y (P = 0.051) and with Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended at discharge (P = 0.091) and at 1 y (P = 0.055). In conclusion, Hp2-2 phenotype is an independent risk factor for the development of both focal and global CV and also predicts poor functional outcomes and mortality after aSAH. Hp phenotyping may serve as a clinically useful tool in the critical care management of aSAH patients by allowing for early prediction of those patients who require increased vigilance due to their inherent genetic risk for the development of CV and resulting DCI and poor outcomes.

  17. [Targets of treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Fukuuchi, Y; Nogawa, S; Ito, D; Suzuki, S; Dembo, T; Kosakai, A

    2001-12-01

    In the acute phase of cerebral infarction, many experimental data suggest that free radicals including superoxide, hydroxy radical and nitric oxide are one of the most important factors to cause brain damage. We have clearly detected nitrotyrosine (a marker of endogenous production of peroxynitrite, which is readily produced from superoxide and nitric oxide) in neurons and intraparenchymal vascular walls during post-ischemic reperfusion. Free radical scavengers thus seem to be very promising tools of treatment, and one of them (edaravone) has recently been approved for clinical use in Japan. CREB (cyclic AMP response element binding protein) is a DNA-binding transcription factor, and its function is activated by phosphorylation of Ser133 residue. CREB plays important roles in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and regeneration. We have found that phosphorylation of CREB is significantly and persistently increased in surviving neurons and oligodendrocytes in post-ischemic brain, while this phosphorylation is only transiently increased in neurons and oligodendrocytes which eventually die. These data suggest that CREB phosphorylation plays an important role in protection of ischemic brain tissue. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) remain abundant throughout the adult brain, and retain their ability to become not only mature oligodendrocytes, but also neurons. We have recently found that OPC are significantly activated and proliferate in the peri-infarct area at 1-2 weeks after ischemia, suggesting that OPC may be involved in the repair mechanisms of ischemic brain. Future targets of stroke treatment should include enhancement of intrinsic protection mechanisms such as CREB phosphorylation and activation of progenitors cells. PMID:12235793

  18. Is the circulating plasma volume sufficiently maintained? Fluid management of an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuro; Katayama, Yoichi; Igarashi, Takahiro; Moro, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Jun; Hirayama, Teruyasu

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known cause of mortality and morbidity following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Prevention of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm is the basic management after SAH. Numerous pharmaceutical therapies and endovascular treatments are available against cerebral vasospasm, but none of them have so far proven to improve the outcome. We have focused on maintaining the circulation volume in order to prevent cerebral vasospasm. But to maintain the central venous pressure, huge infusion volume was required, and hyponatremia was frequently observed due to natriuresis and osmotic diuresis. Excessive natriuresis and diuresis cannot be managed through sodium and water replacement, since sodium replacement induces further natriuresis and diuresis (desalination), and water replacement induces hyponatremia. We therefore administered fludrocortisone and hydrocortisone to inhibit excessive natriuresis and diuresis. The efficacy of sodium reabsorption therapy is extremely high to maintain the circulation volume that might have a therapeutic effect to prevent cerebral vasospasm. In this article, we review our institution's experience regarding the management of patients with aneurysmal SAH and also discuss the importance of water and sodium balance when managing such patients.

  19. Reevaluation of the linkage between acute hemorrhagic shock and bacterial translocation in the rat.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, M T; Rodriguez, L F; Chen, C Y; Smith, G S; Russell, D H; Myers, S I; Cocanour, C S; Reed, R L; Miller, T A

    1993-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the conditions under which acute periods of hemorrhagic shock induce bacterial translocation. Rats (at least six per group) were anesthetized intraperitoneally with the barbiturate, pentobarbital (50 or 65 mg/kg), or the inhalation anesthetic methoxyflurane. Following anesthesia, the femoral artery was catheterized, from which blood was withdrawn to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mmHg for 30, 60, or 90 min, followed by reinfusion of shed blood. Instrumented, but nonshocked animals served as controls. Rats were sacrificed at 0, 2, or 24 hr postshock, and quantitative bacterial cultures of the mesenteric lymph node complex (MLN), liver, and spleen were made. Within groups, the effects of heparinization were also determined. In pentobarbital-treated animals, regardless of the extent of heparinization, consistent translocation to both MLN and distant organs occurred when shock was prolonged for 90 min, and assessment of translocation was made 24 hr after reinfusion of shed blood. Furthermore, a mortality rate of approximately 30% was found in rats subjected to this protocol. The magnitude of translocation was less consistent, and did not differ from that in sham shock controls, under other conditions of shock and evaluation. In rats anesthetized with methoxyflurane, no mortality occurred, and no statistical significance between the incidence or degree of translocation in shocked animals vs. sham shock controls could be demonstrated, regardless of the shock protocol. In additional studies, effects of these anesthetics on intestinal morphology and superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) flow in the context of hemorrhagic shock were assessed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8348683

  20. Patient-tailored multimodal neuroimaging, visualization and quantification of human intra-cerebral hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Sheng-Yang M.; Irimia, Andrei; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.

    2016-03-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the heterogeneity of lesion sizes and types necessitates a variety of imaging modalities to acquire a comprehensive perspective on injury extent. Although it is advantageous to combine imaging modalities and to leverage their complementary benefits, there are difficulties in integrating information across imaging types. Thus, it is important that efforts be dedicated to the creation and sustained refinement of resources for multimodal data integration. Here, we propose a novel approach to the integration of neuroimaging data acquired from human patients with TBI/ICH using various modalities; we also demonstrate the integrated use of multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data for TBI analysis based on both visual observations and quantitative metrics. 3D models of healthy-appearing tissues and TBIrelated pathology are generated, both of which are derived from multimodal imaging data. MRI volumes acquired using FLAIR, SWI, and T2 GRE are used to segment pathology. Healthy tissues are segmented using user-supervised tools, and results are visualized using a novel graphical approach called a `connectogram', where brain connectivity information is depicted within a circle of radially aligned elements. Inter-region connectivity and its strength are represented by links of variable opacities drawn between regions, where opacity reflects the percentage longitudinal change in brain connectivity density. Our method for integrating, analyzing and visualizing structural brain changes due to TBI and ICH can promote knowledge extraction and enhance the understanding of mechanisms underlying recovery.

  1. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  2. Urea for treatment of acute SIADH in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia occurring as a result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The efficacy and safety of urea as treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia has not been reported in this population. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of all patients admitted to our department for nontraumatic SAH between January 2003 and December 2008 (n = 368). All patients with SIADH-induced hyponatremia (plasma sodium < 135 mEq/L, urine sodium > 20 mEq/L, and osmolality > 200 mOsm/kg; absence of overt dehydration or hypovolemia; no peripheral edema or renal failure; no history of adrenal or thyroid disease) routinely received urea per os when hyponatremia was associated with clinical deterioration or remained less than 130 mEq/L despite saline solution administration. Results Forty-two patients developed SIADH and were treated with urea. Urea was started after a median of 7 (IQR, 5–10) days and given orally at doses of 15–30 g tid or qid for a median of 5 (IQR, 3–7) days. The median plasma sodium increase over the first day of treatment was 3 (IQR, 1–6) mEq/L. Hyponatremia was corrected in all patients, with median times to Na+ >130 and >135 mEq/L of 1 (IQR, 1–2) and 3 (IQR, 2–4) days, respectively. Urea was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were reported. Conclusions Oral urea is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for SIADH-induced hyponatremia in SAH patients. PMID:22647340

  3. Balloon-Expandable Stent Placement in Patients with Immediate Reocclusion after Initial Successful Thrombolysis of Acute middle Cerebral Arterial Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.K.; Kwak, H.S.; Chung, G.H.; Hwang, S.B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present the results of our approach for treating 12 consecutive cases of acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke by performing balloon-expandable stent (BES) placement after immediate reocclusion due to the underlying stenosis after intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of 12 patients with acute MCA stroke who underwent recanalization by BES placement in an underlying stenosis after IAT. The time to treatment, urokinase dose, duration of the procedure, recanalization rates and symptomatic hemorrhage were analyzed. Clinical outcome measures were assessed on admission and at discharge (the National Institutes of Health stroke scores [NIHSS]) as well as three months after treatment (modified Rankin scales [mRS]). The median NIHSS score on admission was 8.6. Four patients received IV rtPA. The median time from symptom onset to IAT was 236 minutes and the median duration of IAT was 62 minutes. The median dose of urokinase was 140,000 units. Initial recanalization after stent deployment (thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia attack grade of II or III) was achieved in all patients. Two patients died in the hospital due to aspiration pneumonia during medical management. In two patients, in-stent reocclusion occurred within 48 hours after stent deployment. At discharge, the median NIHSS score in ten patients (including the patients with reobstruction) was 2.4. The three-month outcome was excellent (mRS, 0-1) in eight patients. In this study, BES deployment was safe and effective in patients with an immediately reoccluded MCA after successful IAT. PMID:22440605

  4. Acute hyponatraemia secondary to cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ti, L K; Kang, S C; Cheong, K F

    1998-08-01

    A 30-year-old HIV-positive man presented with acute hydrocephalus secondary to tuberculous meningitis, for which an external ventricular drain was inserted. He developed marked natriuresis in the postoperative period, which resulted in acute hyponatraemia (131 to 122 mmol/l) and a contraction of his intravascular volume. A diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was made, and he responded to sodium and fluid loading. This case highlights the differentiation of cerebral salt wasting syndrome from the more commonly occurring syndrome of inappropriate anti-diuretic hormone secretion as the aetiology of the hyponatraemia.

  5. Life-threatening Cerebral Edema Caused by Acute Occlusion of a Superior Vena Cava Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sofue, Keitaro Takeuchi, Yoshito Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-02-15

    A71-year-old man with advanced lung cancer developed a life-threatening cerebral edema caused by the acute occlusion of a superior vena cava (SVC) stent and was successfully treated by an additional stent placement. Although stent occlusion is a common early complication, no life-threatening situations have been reported until now. Our experience highlights the fact that acute stent occlusion can potentially lead to the complete venous shutdown of the SVC, resulting in life-threatening cerebral edema, after SVC stent placement. Immediate diagnosis and countermeasures are required.

  6. [Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis: diagnosis by magnetic resonance angiography].

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Pedraza, S; Méndez, J; Trujillo, A

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal cerebral venous thrombosis (NCVT) is a rare, severe neuropathology of multiple etiology and variable clinical presentation. We describe the case of a 25-day-old infant that presented with a tonic convulsion. Ultrasound examination showed tetraventricular hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the presence of acute thrombosis of the deep and superficial venous systems associated to a hemorrhagic infarct of the left thalamus. Coagulation study revealed a deficit of protein C. Thrombosis of deep cerebral veins must be ruled out as a cause of a neonatal convulsive crisis. The presence of a hemorrhagic thalamic lesion supports the diagnosis of NCVT, which must in turn be confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).

  7. Acute abdomen and hemorrhagic shock caused by spontaneous rupture of renal cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yaman, İsmail; Sağlam, İsmet; Kurt, Kamile

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is an important cause of end stage renal failure. Rarely, these patients may present with hemorrhagic shock caused by rupture of the renal cyst. The aim of this study was to report a rare case of a patient who arrived at the emergency department with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. A 58-year-old male with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain and hemorrhagic shock. The patient was admitted to the Department of Surgery with diagnosis of acute abdomen and perirenal hematoma. Although the patient was on conservative treatment, his symptoms did not improve and the patient was operated emergently. During exploration, there was bleeding from the right polycystic kidney, which was 30×20 cm in dimension. The patient underwent nephrectomy and drainage of the hematoma, and was discharged on the fifth postoperative day without any problems. Bleeding due to rupture of a cyst in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease occurs rarely but it may be life threatening. Although conservative methods are often preferable in treatment, surgery can be life saving for patients in whom the clinical situation does not improve.

  8. Studies on porcine pancreatic elastase activity. II. Immunoreactive elastase level during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Matsuno, S; Noto, N; Saitoh, Y; Sato, T

    1980-06-01

    Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis was produced in pig to study serum concentration of elastase and its physiological role. Pancreatitis was induced in two groups of young pigs by the injection of autologous bile. One group was injected with autologous bile (0.5 ml/kg) at high pressure, and the second group was injected as low pressure (100 cm H2O). Then femoral blood, portal blood and thoracic lymph were sampled at scheduled time intervals. The control level of immunoreactive elastase was around 90 ng/ml in each site, which significantly increased beginning 15 min after bile injection; the level of immunoreactive elastase was higher in the thoracic lymph duct than in the femoral and portal vein. The total and free elastase of both groups in pancreatic tissue were significantly decreased in pancreatitis, and an abundance of immunoreactive elastase was found in the ascites. The increasing pattern of immunoreactive elastase and amylase after bile injection was very similar. Therefore, the level of immunoreactive elastase was considered to be inadequate to determine the grade of severity of pancreatitis as well as the level of amylase which is already known.

  9. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Namas, R; Ghuma, A; Hermus, L; Zamora, R; Okonkwo, DO; Billiar, TR; Vodovotz, Y

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and regeneration. The inflammatory response is driven by cytokines and chemokines and is partially propagated by damaged tissue-derived products (Damage-associated Molecular Patterns; DAMP's). DAMPs perpetuate inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but may also inhibit anti-inflammatory cytokines. Various animal models of T/HS in mice, rats, pigs, dogs, and non-human primates have been utilized in an attempt to move from bench to bedside. Novel approaches, including those from the field of systems biology, may yield therapeutic breakthroughs in T/HS and TBI in the near future. PMID:21483522

  10. Acute myocarditis in dengue hemorrhagic fever: a case report and review of cardiac complications in dengue-affected patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Lee, Wen-Huei; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) complicated by acute myocarditis and review the literature. A 65-year-old woman experienced DHF due to dengue virus serotype 3, complicated with acute myocarditis and acute pulmonary edema. Clinically this masqueraded as acute myocardial infarction, with an electrocardiographically depressed ST segment in precordial leads and elevated serum cardiac-specific troponin I level. Under supportive management, the patient recovered 3 days later. A total of 18 pertinent articles involving 339 dengue-affected patients with cardiac complications were found by PubMed search. Clinical manifestations of cardiac complications varied considerably, from self-limiting tachy-brady arrhythmia to severe myocardial damage, leading to hypotension and pulmonary edema. Although rare, a fatal outcome was reported in some cases of dengue with cardiac complications. To avoid otherwise preventable morbidity and mortality, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for cardiac complications in patients with dengue illness and should manage this accordingly.

  11. [Acute epidural hematoma with extravasation on cerebral angiogram in an infant (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Oseki, J; Oana, K; Kobayashi, T; Kawada, Y; Kanaya, H

    1977-03-01

    The authors recently operated on a boy four years of age with acute epidural hematoma showing an extravasation on the cerebral angiogram. The hematoma (hematoma volume 125 ml) was evacuated 7 hours after the head injury. The postoperative course was quite uneventful, and he was discharged a month after surgery without any neurologic deficits. The authors reviewed the literature and found 4 cases of acute epidural hematoma with extravasations in infants and children. In all cases the operative results were good. The age incidence and frequency of occurence overall for acute epidural hematomas, extravasations on cerebral angiograms and their mechanism, and the length of time from injury to operation were also discussed. It should be emphasized that, for acute epidural hematoma in infants and children, the early diagnosis and early surgery are essential to save the patients.

  12. Prion Protein-Hemin Interaction Upregulates Hemoglobin Synthesis: Implications for Cerebral Hemorrhage and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ajai K; Singh, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Hemin is known to induce endocytosis of prion-protein (PrP(C)) from the neuronal plasma membrane, potentially limiting propagation of the disease causing PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc)) isoform. Hemin is therefore an attractive disease-modifying option for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a human prion disorder with no effective treatment. The hemin-PrP(C) interaction is also of interest in cerebral-hemorrhage (CH), a condition where potentially toxic hemin molecules come in contact with neuronal PrP(C). Interestingly, PrP(C) is upregulated in penumbric neurons surrounding CH and is known to confer neuroprotection in a dose-dependent manner. The underlying mechanism, however, is not clear. Here, we report that hemin binds PrP(C) on diverse cell lines, resulting in its aggregation or degradation in a cell-type specific manner. Surprisingly, the hemin-PrP(C) interaction upregulates Hb synthesis in hematopoietic cells, a response reversed by deleting the hemin-binding octa-peptide repeat region of PrP(C). A similar response is noted in brain organotypic cultures where exposure to hemin induces significantly more α-globin in wild-type (PrP(+/+)) relative to PrP-knock-out (PrP(-/-)) samples. Furthermore, red blood cells and brain tissue from PrP(-/-) mice show significantly less α-globin relative to PrP(+/+) controls, indicating a positive effect of PrP(C) on Hb synthesis under physiological conditions as well. Surprisingly, levels of α-globin are significantly higher in sCJD brain tissue relative to controls, suggesting compensatory upregulation of Hb synthesis by surviving neurons or misregulation in diseased brains. These observations reveal a unique function of PrP(C) that is likely to impact the therapeutic management of CH and sCJD. PMID:26836195

  13. 807C/T polymorphism of platelet glycoprotein Ia gene is associated with cerebral hemorrhage in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping; Yang, Qidong; Ma, Mingming; Liu, Baoqiong; Xia, Jian; Xu, Hongwei; Liu, Yunhai; Du, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    Platelet glycoprotein (GP) mediated the role of platelet in coagulation. Platelet GP Ia 807C/T is the only GP polymorphism associated with the expression levels of GP Ia/IIa (the platelet collagen receptor). Recently, the GP Ia 807C/T polymorphism has been reported to have no association with cerebral hemorrhage (CH) in two studies pertained to Caucasian populations. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between platelet GP Ia 807C/T polymorphism and CH in a Han Chinese population. We performed genotype analysis for platelet GP Ia 807C/T polymorphism in a case-control study involving 195 patients with CH and 116 age- and sex-matched controls. In contrast to previous reports, we found that the frequencies of GP Ia 807C/T T allele, CT and TT genotype were much higher in CH patients than in controls (33.9% vs. 22.8%, p = 0.004; 45.5% and 11.1% vs. 40.4% and 2.6%, p = 0.022). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of GP Ia 807C/T C allele and CC genotype were both associated with a decreased risk of CH compared with T allele, CT and TT genotypes, respectively (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.565, 95% CI: 0.384-0.887, p = 0.005; adjusted OR = 0.172, 95% CI: 0.043-0.639, p = 0.009; adjusted OR = 0.254, 95% CI: 0.085-0.961, p = 0.041, respectively). These findings indicated that platelet GP Ia 807C/T polymorphism could be a protective factor of CH in the Chinese population.

  14. Early whole-brain CT perfusion for detection of patients at risk for delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Dolatowski, Karoline; Schramm, Peter; Moerer, Onnen; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT This prospective study investigated the role of whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) studies in the identification of patients at risk for delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) and of tissue at risk for delayed cerebral infarction (DCI). METHODS Forty-three patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were included in this study. A CTP study was routinely performed in the early phase (Day 3). The CTP study was repeated in cases of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD)-measured blood flow velocity (BFV) increase of > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours and/or on Day 7 in patients who were intubated/sedated. RESULTS Early CTP studies revealed perfusion deficits in 14 patients, of whom 10 patients (72%) developed DIND, and 6 of these 10 patients (60%) had DCI. Three of the 14 patients (21%) with early perfusion deficits developed DCI without having had DIND, and the remaining patient (7%) had neither DIND nor DCI. There was a statistically significant correlation between early perfusion deficits and occurrence of DIND and DCI (p < 0.0001). A repeated CTP was performed in 8 patients with a TCD-measured BFV increase > 50 cm/sec within 24 hours, revealing a perfusion deficit in 3 of them (38%). Two of the 3 patients (67%) developed DCI without preceding DIND and 1 patient (33%) had DIND without DCI. In 4 of the 7 patients (57%) who were sedated and/or comatose, additional CTP studies on Day 7 showed perfusion deficits. All 4 patients developed DCI. CONCLUSIONS Whole-brain CTP on Day 3 after aSAH allows early and reliable identification of patients at risk for DIND and tissue at risk for DCI. Additional CTP investigations, guided by TCD-measured BFV increase or persisting coma, do not contribute to information gain.

  15. Partial Aortic Occlusion and Cerebral Venous Steal: Venous Effects of Arterial Manipulation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke therapy emphasizes early arterial clot lysis or removal. Partial aortic occlusion has recently emerged as an alternative hemodynamic approach to augment cerebral perfusion in acute ischemic stroke. The exact mechanism of cerebral flow augmentation with partial aortic occlusion remains unclear and may involve more than simple diversion of arterial blood flow from the lower body to cerebral collateral circulation. The cerebral venous steal hypothesis suggests that even a small increase in tissue pressure in the ischemic area will divert blood flow to surrounding regions with lesser tissue pressures. This may cause no-reflow (absence of flow after restoration of arterial patency) in the ischemic core and “luxury perfusion” in the surrounding regions. Such maldistribution may be reversed with increased venous pressure titrated to avoid changes in intracranial pressure. We propose that partial aortic occlusion enhances perfusion in the brain by offsetting cerebral venous steal. Partial aortic occlusion redistributes blood volume into the upper part of the body, manifest by an increase in central venous pressure. Increased venous pressure recruits the collapsed vascular network and, by eliminating cerebral venous steal, corrects perifocal perfusion maldistribution, analogous to positive end expiratory pressure recruitment of collapsed airways to decrease ventilation/perfusion mismatch in the lungs. PMID:21441149

  16. εPKC confers acute tolerance to cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Rachel; Sun, Guo-Hua; Yenari, Midori A.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2008-01-01

    In response to mild ischemic stress, the brain elicits endogenous survival mechanisms to protect cells against a subsequent lethal ischemic stress, referred to as ischemic tolerance. The molecular signals that mediate this protection are thought to involve the expression and activation of multiple kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). Here we demonstrate that εPKC mediates cerebral ischemic tolerance in vivo. Systemic delivery of ψεRACK, an εPKC-selective peptide activator, confers neuroprotection against a subsequent cerebral ischemic event when delivered immediately prior to stroke. In addition, activation of εPKC by ψεRACK treatment decreases vascular tone in vivo, as demonstrated by a reduction in microvascular cerebral blood flow. Here we demonstrate the role of acute and transient εPKC in early cerebral tolerance in vivo and suggest that extra-parenchymal mechanisms, such as vasoconstriction, may contribute to the conferred protection. PMID:18586397

  17. Multiple major cerebral artery thromboses with profound thrombocytopenia in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sims, D G; Scott, D J; Noble, T C

    1976-01-01

    A child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated by prolonged gastrointestinal and skin haemorrhages due to profound thrombocytopenia finally died of thrombotic occlusions of major cerebral arteries due to mucormycosis. Biopsy of any suspect lesion is needed urgently before prolonged therapy with amphotericin B is started. So far there have been no cures in childhood.

  18. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging following major ozonated autohemotherapy for treatment of acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Zhen-Sheng; Xiang, Wei; Du, Wei-Qing; Yang, Hong-Jun; Xiong, Tie-Gen; Deng, Wen-Ting; Peng, Kai-Run; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-07-01

    Major ozonated autohemotherapy has been shown to promote recovery of upper limb motor function in patients with acute cerebral infarction, but whether major ozonated autohemotherapy affects remote injury remains poorly understood. Here, we assumed that major ozonated autohemotherapy contributes to recovery of clinical function, possibly by reducing remote injury after acute cerebral infarction. Sixty acute cerebral infarction patients aged 30-80 years were equally and randomly allocated to ozone treatment and control groups. Patients in the ozone treatment group received medical treatment and major ozonated autohemotherapy (47 mg/L, 100 mL ozone) for 10 ± 2 days. Patients in the control group received medical treatment only. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, modified Rankin scale score, and reduced degree of fractional anisotropy values of brain magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging were remarkably decreased, brain function improved, clinical efficiency significantly increased, and no obvious adverse reactions detected in the ozone treatment group compared with the control group. These findings suggest that major ozonated autohemotherapy promotes recovery of neurological function in acute cerebral infarction patients by reducing remote injury, and additionally, exhibits high safety. PMID:27630695

  19. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging following major ozonated autohemotherapy for treatment of acute cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-na; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiao-yan; Li, Zhen-sheng; Xiang, Wei; Du, Wei-qing; Yang, Hong-jun; Xiong, Tie-gen; Deng, Wen-ting; Peng, Kai-run; Pan, Su-yue

    2016-01-01

    Major ozonated autohemotherapy has been shown to promote recovery of upper limb motor function in patients with acute cerebral infarction, but whether major ozonated autohemotherapy affects remote injury remains poorly understood. Here, we assumed that major ozonated autohemotherapy contributes to recovery of clinical function, possibly by reducing remote injury after acute cerebral infarction. Sixty acute cerebral infarction patients aged 30–80 years were equally and randomly allocated to ozone treatment and control groups. Patients in the ozone treatment group received medical treatment and major ozonated autohemotherapy (47 mg/L, 100 mL ozone) for 10 ± 2 days. Patients in the control group received medical treatment only. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, modified Rankin scale score, and reduced degree of fractional anisotropy values of brain magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging were remarkably decreased, brain function improved, clinical efficiency significantly increased, and no obvious adverse reactions detected in the ozone treatment group compared with the control group. These findings suggest that major ozonated autohemotherapy promotes recovery of neurological function in acute cerebral infarction patients by reducing remote injury, and additionally, exhibits high safety. PMID:27630695

  20. Medullary Hemorrhage after Ischemic Wallenberg's Syndrome in a Patient with Cavernous Angioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Background The main complication of cerebral cavernous angioma is hemorrhage. Ischemic stroke as a complication of cerebral cavernous angioma has rarely been described, and hemorrhage after ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome has not been reported before. Case Report A 45-year-old woman presented with perioral numbness, hoarseness, dysphagia, and worsening of her previous sensory symptoms. The patient had been taking aspirin for 3 years after suffering from ischemic Wallenberg's syndrome with left paresthesia as a residual symptom. Brain computed tomography revealed an acute medullary hematoma in the previously infarcted area. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cavernous angioma in the right medulla. Conclusions We presume that cerebral cavernous angioma was responsible for both the ischemia and the hemorrhage, and we also cautiously speculate that the aspirin contributed to the development of hemorrhage in the previously infarcted area. PMID:21264204

  1. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Raquel; Casado-Flores, Juan; Nieto, Monserrat; García-Teresa, María Angeles

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the causes, clinical pattern, and treatment of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in children with acute central nervous system injury. This retrospective study focused on patientscerebral salt wasting syndrome, over a period of 7 years, in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. Selection criteria included evidence of hyponatremia (serum sodium<130 mEq/L), polyuria, elevated urine sodium (>120 mEq/L), and volume depletion. Fourteen patients were identified with cerebral salt wasting syndrome, 12 after a neurosurgical procedure (8 brain tumor, 4 hydrocephalus) and 2 after severe brain trauma. In 11 patients the cerebral salt wasting syndrome was diagnosed during the first 48 hours of admission. Prevalence of cerebral salt wasting syndrome in neurosurgical children was 11.3/1000 surgical procedures. The minimum sodium was 122+/-7 mEq/L, the maximum urine osmolarity 644+/-59 mOsm/kgH2O. The maximum sodium supply was 1 mEq/kg/h (range, 0.1-2.4). The mean duration of cerebral salt wasting syndrome was 6+/-5 days (range 1-9). In conclusion, cerebral salt wasting syndrome can complicate the postoperative course of children with brain injury; it is frequently present after surgery for brain tumors and hydrocephalus and in patients with severe head trauma. Close monitoring of salt and fluid balance is essential to prevent severe neurologic and hemodynamic complications.

  2. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  3. Acute headache at emergency department: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome complicated by subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yger, M; Zavanone, C; Abdennour, L; Koubaa, W; Clarençon, F; Dupont, S; Samson, Y

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is becoming widely accepted as a rare cause of both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and should be evocated in case of thunderclap headaches associated with stroke. We present the case of a patient with ischemic stroke associated with cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) and reversible diffuse arteries narrowing, leading to the diagnosis of reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. Case Report. A 48-year-old woman came to the emergency department because of an unusual thunderclap headache. The computed tomography of the brain completed by CT-angiography was unremarkable. Eleven days later, she was readmitted because of a left hemianopsia. One day after her admission, she developed a sudden left hemiparesis. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobe and diffuse cSAH. The angiography showed vasoconstriction of the right anterior cerebral artery and stenosis of both middle cerebral arteries. Nimodipine treatment was initiated and vasoconstriction completely regressed on day 16 after the first headache. Conclusion. Our case shows a severe reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome where both haemorrhagic and ischemic complications were present at the same time. The history we reported shows that reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is still underrecognized, in particular in general emergency departments.

  4. Perfusion Imaging in the 3 Hour Time Window Predicts a tPA-Associated Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Edwards, Adam; Dehkharghani, Seena; Nahab, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    Perfusion imaging is being evaluated in acute ischemic stroke patients to identify those who may benefit from reperfusion therapies beyond standard thrombolytic time windows but limited data is available on its utility in patients presenting within standard thrombolytic time windows. We report a case of a patient presenting within the 3 hour time window where computerized tomographic perfusion imaging before intravenous thrombolysis identified a large volume of severely ischemic tissue and where intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration subsequently resulted in a fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Whether perfusion imaging can predict an increased risk of tPA-associated symptomatic hemorrhage in patients presenting within standard thrombolytic time windows requires further study. PMID:25692511

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Panax notoginseng Saponin Therapy for Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Meta-Analysis, and Mini Review of Potential Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongying; Huang, Ping; Yu, Zhaosheng; Xing, Daniel H.; Ouyang, Shuai; Xing, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial/intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a leading cause of death and disability in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke. No proven drug is available for ICH. Panax notoginseng (total saponin extraction, PNS) is one of the most valuable herb medicines for stroke and cerebralvascular disorders in China. We searched for randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) involving PNS injection to treat cerebral hemorrhage for meta-analysis from various databases including the Chinese Stroke Trials Register, the trials register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Chinese BioMedical disk, and China Doctorate/Master Dissertations Databases. The quality of the eligible trials was assessed by Jadad’s scale. Twenty (20) of the 24 identified randomized controlled trials matched the inclusive criteria including 984 ICH patients with PNS injection and 907 ICH patients with current treatment (CT). Compared to the CT groups, PNS-treated patients showed better outcomes in the effectiveness rate (ER), neurological deficit score, intracranial hematoma volume, intracerebral edema volume, Barthel index, the number of patients died, and incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: PNS injection is superior to CT for acute ICH. A review of the literature shows that PNS may exert multiple protective mechanisms against ICH-induced brain damage including hemostasis, anti-coagulation, anti-thromboembolism, cerebral vasodilation, invigorated blood dynamics, anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and anti-hyperglycemic effects. Since vitamin C and other brain cell activators (BCA) that are not considered common practice were also used as parts of the CT in several trials, potential PNS and BCA interactions could exist that may have made the effect of PNS therapy less or more impressive than by PNS therapy alone. Future PNS trials with and without the inclusion of such controversial BCAs as part of the CT could

  6. A hypothesis on possible neurochemical mechanisms of action of cervical spinal cord stimulation in prevention and treatment of cerebral arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, D; Slavin, K V

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with the high incidence of development of cerebral vasospasm that results in morbidity and mortality due to delayed cerebral ischemia. So far there are no consistently effective therapies for treatment of vasospasm in patients suffering from SAH. It is well known that cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can induce vasodilatation and increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). Based on the experiments in animals and the studies in humans, we have proposed the possibility to use SCS as a therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. However, the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS in this regard are poorly understood. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of vasospasm after SAH may provide insight into the role of SCS in such conditions. We hypothesize that effect of SCS on vasodilatation may be related to modulation of activity of phosphodiesterases 5 (PDE-5) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), resulting in enhancement of nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, which may help prevent and/or treat vasospasm after SAH. Further investigations on the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS would be necessary to support this hypothesis. PMID:26141634

  7. Cerebral artery blood velocity in normal subjects during acute decreases in barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Taubøll, E; Sorteberg, W; Owe, J O; Lindegaard, K F; Rusten, K; Sorteberg, A; Gjerstad, L

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the effect of acute changes in barometric pressure on regional cerebral perfusion we studied the middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood velocity in five healthy male volunteers by means of a low-pressure chamber. The MCA blood velocity, arterial blood and respiratory gases were measured at the barometric pressures of 1, 0.8, 0.65, and 0.5 atmospheres. The observed blood velocity (Vo) showed no systematic changes. Decreases in barometric pressure induced hypoxia and hypocapnia. When normalizing the MCA blood velocity (Vn) to a standard P(CO2) (5.3 kPa), thereby correcting for the hypoxic induced hypocapnia, we obtained an inverse relationship between cerebral artery blood velocity and arterial blood oxygen content (CaO2). The oxygen supply to the brain, estimated as the product of Vo and CaO2, decreased with lowering of the barometric pressure. However, the product of Vn and CaO2 remained constant. This suggests the existence of a regulatory mechanism attempting to maintain a constant oxygen supply to the brain during acute changes in CaO2, if the hyperventilation induced decrease in PCO2 can be omitted. In the artificial situation of a low pressure chamber, our findings are quite similar to those obtained at sea level. This indicates that the underlying mechanisms of control of cerebral blood flow do not change during acute exposure to altitude.

  8. Protective effect of crocetin on hemorrhagic shock-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Yan, Junling; Xi, Liang; Qian, Zhiyu; Wang, Zhenghong; Yang, Lina

    2012-07-01

    Multiple organ failure is a common outcome of hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation, and the kidney is one of the prime target organs involved. The main objective of the study was to evaluate whether crocetin, a natural product from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, has beneficial effects on renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Anesthetized rats were bled to reduce mean arterial blood pressure to 35 (SD, 5) mmHg for 60 min and then were resuscitated with their withdrawn shed blood and normal saline. Crocetin was administered via the duodenum at a dose of 50 mg/kg 40 min after hemorrhage. The increase in creatinine and blood urea nitrogen was significantly reduced at 2 h after hemorrhage and resuscitation in crocetin-treated rats. The increases in renal nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 were also attenuated by crocetin. Hemorrhagic shock resulted in a significant elevation in malondialdehyde production and was accompanied by a reduction in total superoxide dismutase activity, activation of nuclear factor κB, and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These changes were significantly attenuated by crocetin at 2 h after resuscitation. These results suggested that crocetin blocks inflammatory cascades by inhibiting production of reactive oxygen species and restoring superoxide dismutase activity to ameliorate renal dysfunction caused by hemorrhage shock and resuscitation. PMID:22576007

  9. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3).

    PubMed

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  10. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3)

    PubMed Central

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML. PMID:26744658

  11. [Morpho-biophysical research of erythrocytes of intact and vagotomized rats in various terms after the acute hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Tsibulevsky, A Yu; Dubovaya, T K; Maksina, A G; Sokolinsky, B Z; Pyatnitsky, A M; Medovy, V S; Anisimova, V E

    2013-01-01

    The acute massive hemorrhage (35-37% of the blood volume) at rats is accompanied by changes of morphological (diameter, the area, polarizations, the form-factor, integrated and specific absorbency) and biophysical (a relief of a surface and microviscosity of a lipid phase of plasmolemma) characteristics of erythrocytes. Thus character and dynamics of response of erythron initially intact and vagotomized (14 days after operation) animals essentially differ: the former demonstrate significant changes in 3-10 h and 240 h and the latter--in 0.5 h and 96 h. PMID:23805715

  12. Intrathecal application of the nimodipine slow-release microparticle system eg-1962 for prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia and improvement of outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Etminan, Nima; Macdonald, R Loch; Davis, Cara; Burton, Kevin; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The effective reduction of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), a main contributor for poor outcome following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), remains challenging. Previous clinical trials on systemic pharmaceutical treatment of SAH mostly failed to improve outcome, probably because of insensitive pharmaceutical targets and outcome measures, small sample size, insufficient subarachnoid drug concentrations and also detrimental, systemic effects of the experimental treatment per se. Interestingly, in studies that are more recent, intrathecal administration of nicardipine pellets following surgical aneurysm repair was suggested to have a beneficial effect on DCI and neurological outcome. However, this positive effect remained restricted to patients who were treated surgically for a ruptured aneurysm. Because of the favorable results of the preclinical data on DCI and neurological outcome in the absence of neurotoxicity or systemic side effects, we are initiating clinical trials. The PROMISE (Prolonged Release nimOdipine MIcro particles after Subarachnoid hemorrhage) trial is designed as an unblinded, nonrandomized, single-center, single-dose, dose-escalation safety and tolerability phase 1 study in patients surgically treated for aSAH and will investigate the effect of intracisternal EG-1962 administration. The NEWTON (Nimodipine microparticles to Enhance recovery While reducing TOxicity after subarachNoid hemorrhage) trial is a phase 1/2a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label, dose-escalation, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study comparing EG-1962 and nimodipine in patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  13. A polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is related to hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mallolas, Judith; Rodríguez, Rocío; Gubern, Carme; Camós, Susanna; Serena, Joaquín; Castellanos, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) of cerebral infarction is a common and serious occurrence following acute ischemic stroke. The expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, has been shown to increase after cerebral ischemia. This protein has been mainly located at the microvasculature within the infarcted and peri-infarcted area, so we aimed to investigate whether survivin gene polymorphisms, also known as BIRC5 gene, were associated with HT of cerebral infarction. Polymorphism screening of the BIRC5 gene was performed in 107 patients with a hemispheric ischemic stroke and 93 controls by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing analysis. Genotype-phenotype correlation was performed in patients. MRI was carried out within 12 h of symptoms onset and at 72 ± 12 h. The presence of HT was determined on the second DWI sequence and classified according to ECASS II criteria. MMP-9 levels were analyzed at admission. Forty-nine patients (45.8%) had HT. The -241 C/T (rs17878467) polymorphism was identified in the promoter region of the survivin gene. The prevalence of the mutant allele (T) was similar in patients and controls (14 vs. 16%, respectively; P = 0.37). However, 9 (29%) patients with allele T had HT compared to 40 (52.6%) of wild-type (P = 0.021). Logistic regression analysis showed that the polymorphism was associated with a lower risk of HT (OR 0.16; 95% CI 0.04-0.65; P = 0.01). The -241 C/T polymorphism in the promoter region of the survivin gene is associated with a lower risk of HT in patients with ischemic stroke. It has recently been reported that the -241 C/T polymorphism increases survivin promoter activity, reinforcing the hypothesis that patients with the mutant allele may have increased survivin expression in the brain. Different mechanisms, including BBB protection by the inhibition or activation of different angiogenic growth factors and the inhibition of apoptosis during

  14. Gastroprotection Studies of Schiff Base Zinc (II) Derivative Complex against Acute Superficial Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A; Majid, Nazia Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v), orally. Ethanol (95% v/v) was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10−5 M/kg) was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II) complex (2.181×10−5 and 4.362×10−5 M/kg) protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10−5 M/kg). Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism. PMID:24058648

  15. Effect of an acute increase in central blood volume on cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Raven, Peter B; Rebuffat, Thomas; Denise, Pierre; Lericollais, Romain; Sugawara, Jun; Normand, Hervé

    2015-10-15

    Systemic blood distribution is an important factor involved in regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, the effect of an acute change in central blood volume (CBV) on CBF regulation remains unclear. To address our question, we sought to examine the CBF and systemic hemodynamic responses to microgravity during parabolic flight. Twelve healthy subjects were seated upright and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. During the brief periods of microgravity, mean arterial pressure was decreased (-26 ± 1%, P < 0.001), despite an increase in cardiac output (+21 ± 6%, P < 0.001). During microgravity, central arterial pulse pressure and estimated carotid sinus pressure increased rapidly. In addition, this increase in central arterial pulse pressure was associated with an arterial baroreflex-mediated decrease in heart rate (r = -0.888, P < 0.0001) and an increase in total vascular conductance (r = 0.711, P < 0.001). The middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean) remained unchanged throughout parabolic flight (P = 0.30). During microgravity the contribution of cardiac output to MCA Vmean was gradually reduced (P < 0.05), and its contribution was negatively correlated with an increase in total vascular conductance (r = -0.683, P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the acute loading of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors by increases in CBV during microgravity results in acute and marked systemic vasodilation. Furthermore, we conclude that this marked systemic vasodilation decreases the contribution of cardiac output to CBF. These findings suggest that the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex-mediated peripheral vasodilation along with dynamic cerebral autoregulation counteracts a cerebral overperfusion, which otherwise would occur during acute increases in CBV. PMID:26310936

  16. Acute and chronic head-down tail suspension diminishes cerebral perfusion in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, M. Keith; Colleran, Patrick N.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regional brain blood flow and vascular resistance are altered by acute and chronic head-down tail suspension (HDT). Regional cerebral blood flow, arterial pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance were measured in a group of control rats during normal standing and following 10 min of HDT and in two other groups of rats after 7 and 28 days of HDT. Heart rate was not different among conditions, whereas mean arterial pressure was elevated at 10 min of HDT relative to the other conditions. Total brain blood flow was reduced from that during standing by 48, 24, and 27% following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively. Regional blood flows to all cerebral tissues and the eyes were reduced with 10 min of HDT and remained lower in the eye, olfactory bulbs, left and right cerebrum, thalamic region, and the midbrain with 7 and 28 days of HDT. Total brain vascular resistance was 116, 44, and 38% greater following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively, relative to that during control standing. Vascular resistance was elevated in all cerebral regions with 10 min of HDT and remained higher than control levels in most brain regions. These results demonstrate that HDT results in chronic elevations in total and regional cerebral vascular resistance, and this may be the underlying stimulus for the HDT-induced smooth muscle hypertrophy of cerebral resistance arteries.

  17. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  18. Experience with 123I-iomazenil SPECT in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Müller, V; Saur, D; Klutmann, S; Weiller, C; Röther, J; Clausen, M

    2002-12-01

    Neuronal cells are susceptible to cerebral ischaemia. As gamma-aminobutyric acid(A) (GABA(A)) receptors are specific for neurones, functional receptor imaging using I-iomazenil (IMZ), a ligand to the GABA benzodiazepine receptor, has been proposed as an imaging modality for the assessment of neuronal integrity. However, there is only limited experience with IMZ in patients with acute cerebral infarction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate IMZ single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia. IMZ SPECT was performed in 21 patients with acute cerebral infarction 7-10 days after stroke onset. Eleven patients underwent systemic thrombolysis within 6 h after symptom onset (group 1), whereas 10 patients were treated conservatively (group 2). IMZ (150-200 MBq) was injected intravenously and imaging was performed using a dedicated four-head SPECT camera at 5 min (perfusion) and 90 min (receptor distribution) post-injection, with an acquisition time of 50 min each. Images were analysed by visual inspection. Four patients showed normal IMZ distribution, and 17 patients showed abnormalities of IMZ uptake on both early and late images. In six patients with regional uptake deficits, a crossed cerebellar diaschisis was observed on early images. Cerebellar inhomogeneity of tracer uptake was absent at the time of late images in all six patients. In eight patients, areas of hypoperfusion corresponded exactly to the regions of receptor deficiency (match). In five patients, preserved neuronal integrity was present in hypoperfused areas (mismatch). In four patients, normally or even hyperperfused areas exhibited regional receptor deficiency (inverse mismatch). In conclusion, IMZ SPECT demonstrated differences between regional perfusion and receptor distribution in about one-half of patients 7-10 days after acute cerebral ischaemia. Interesting patterns between the early phase (perfusion) and the late phase (receptor

  19. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Nazarbaghi, Surena; Ahmadi-Salmasi, Babak; Mokari, Tayebeh; Tahamtan, Urya; Rezaei, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23) or normal saline alone (n=23) adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI) of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008) and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001). The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05). One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%). Conclusion Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. PMID:25516711

  20. Dopamine D2-Receptor-Mediated Increase in Vascular and Endothelial NOS Activity Ameliorates Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Caudell, Danielle N.; Cooper, Matthew; Clark, Joseph F.; Shutter, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious complication resulting in delayed neurological deficit, increased morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stays, and rehabilitation time. It afflicts approximately 35 per 100,000 Americans per year, and there is currently no effective therapy. We present in vitro data suggesting that increasing intrinsic nitric oxide relaxation pathways in vascular smooth muscle via dopaminergic agonism ameliorates cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with cerebral vasospasm after SAH (CSFV) was used to induce vasospasm in porcine carotid artery in vitro. Dopamine was added to test its ability to reverse spasm, and specific dopamine receptor antagonists were used to determine which receptor mediated the protection. Immunohistochemical techniques confirmed the presence of dopamine receptor subtypes and the involvement of NOS in the mechanism of dopamine protection. Results Dopamine receptor 1, 2, and 3 subtypes are all present in porcine carotid artery. Dopamine significantly reversed spasm in vitro (67% relaxation), and this relaxation was prevented by Haloperidol, a D2R antagonist (10% relaxation, P < 0.05), but not by D1 or D3-receptor antagonism. Both eNOS and iNOS expression were increased significantly in response to CSFV alone, and this was significantly enhanced by addition of dopamine, and blocked by Haloperidol. Conclusion Cerebral vasospasm is significantly reversed in a functional measure of vasospasm in vitro by dopamine, via a D2R-mediated pathway. The increase in NOS protein seen in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle in response to CSFV is enhanced by dopamine, also in a D2R-dependent mechanism. PMID:18807216

  1. The TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fang; Wang, Jun; Sayeed, Iqbal; Ishrat, Tauheed; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2009-12-18

    TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TRIF) is an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. Activation of TRIF leads to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). While studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and in neuroprotection against ischemia afforded by preconditioning, little is known about TRIF's role in the pathological process following cerebral I/R. The present study investigated the role that TRIF may play in acute cerebral I/R injury. In a mouse model of cerebral I/R induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we examined the activation of NF-{kappa}B and IRF3 signaling in ischemic cerebral tissue using ELISA and Western blots. Neurological function and cerebral infarct size were also evaluated 24 h after cerebral I/R. NF-{kappa}B activity and phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) increased in ischemic brains, but IRF3, inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase complex-{epsilon} (IKK{epsilon}), and TANK-binding kinase1 (TBK1) were not activated after cerebral I/R in wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, TRIF deficit did not inhibit NF-{kappa}B activity or p-I{kappa}B{alpha} induced by cerebral I/R. Moreover, although cerebral I/R induced neurological and functional impairments and brain infarction in WT mice, the deficits were not improved and brain infarct size was not reduced in TRIF knockout mice compared to WT mice. Our results demonstrate that the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for the activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling and brain injury after acute cerebral I/R.

  2. [Brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a surgical case report].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-05-01

    We report a rare case of brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 79-year-old woman presented with sudden headache and monoplegia of the right upper limb 10 years after diagnosis of thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma. Despite the known metastatic lesions in the cervical lymph nodes and lungs, she had been well for 10 years since thyroidectomy, focal irradiation and internal radiation of 131I. CT demonstrated intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity. She underwent radical surgery on the day of the onset and the histological diagnosis was metastatic brain tumor of thyroid papillary carcinoma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the monoplegia was improved. Papillary thyroid carcinoma has a relatively benign course, and surgical removal of the brain metastasis is able to contribute to longer survival times for patients.

  3. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  4. Efficacy of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective study examined the effectiveness of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The 189 subjects ranged in age from 31 to 95 years and included 57 with small-artery occlusion, 107 with large-artery atherothrombosis, and 25 with other disorders. Patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism or preexisting pneumonia at the time of hospital admission were excluded from the analysis. Neurologic symptoms, cognitive function, and swallowing function were assessed at the first clinical examination, and the ability to perform activities of daily living was assessed at both hospital admission and discharge. Outcome and food intake status were also assessed at hospital discharge. Pneumonia was detected in 27 of 189 subjects (14.3%), in 20 subjects during nasogastric tube feeding implemented because of oral intake difficulties (fasting group) and in 7 subjects after initiation of oral feeding (oral intake group). Cilostazol was administered to 48 of the 189 subjects (25.4%). The incidence of pneumonia was 6.3% (3 of 48) in patients who received cilostazol, compared with 17% (24 of 141) in those who did not receive cilostazol. Our data suggest that cilostazol appears to prevent the occurrence of pneumonia in both the chronic and acute stages of cerebral infarction.

  5. Single-cell resolution mapping of neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia using thallium autometallography.

    PubMed

    Stöber, Franziska; Baldauf, Kathrin; Ziabreva, Iryna; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Neubert, Jenni; Reymann, Klaus G; Scheich, Henning; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Schröder, Ulrich H; Wunder, Andreas; Goldschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal damage shortly after onset or after brief episodes of cerebral ischemia has remained difficult to assess with clinical and preclinical imaging techniques as well as with microscopical methods. We here show, in rodent models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), that neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia can be mapped with single-cell resolution using thallium autometallography (TlAMG), a histochemical technique for the detection of the K(+)-probe thallium (Tl(+)) in the brain. We intravenously injected rats and mice with thallium diethyldithiocarbamate (TlDDC), a lipophilic chelate complex that releases Tl(+) after crossing the blood-brain barrier. We found, within the territories of the affected arteries, areas of markedly reduced neuronal Tl(+) uptake in all animals at all time points studied ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours after MCAO. In large lesions at early time points, areas with neuronal and astrocytic Tl(+) uptake below thresholds of detection were surrounded by putative penumbral zones with preserved but diminished Tl(+) uptake. At 24 hours, the areas of reduced Tl(+)uptake matched with areas delineated by established markers of neuronal damage. The results suggest the use of (201)TlDDC for preclinical and clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of hyperacute alterations in brain K(+) metabolism and prediction of tissue viability in cerebral ischemia.

  6. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: a 5-year experience with new antileukemic agents and a new approach to preventing fatal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Feldman, E J; Arlin, Z A; Ahmed, T; Mittelman, A; Ascensao, J L; Puccio, C A; Coombe, N; Baskind, P

    1989-01-01

    Forty-six induction courses were administered to 32 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. There were 28 males and 18 females with a median age of 39.5 (range 19-68). Twelve patients were previously untreated, 32 were in relapse, and 2 were refractory to primary induction chemotherapy. Heparin 7.5-10 units/kg/h by continuous infusion, 4-6 units of platelets and 1-2 units of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) every 12 h were given to all patients. Previously untreated patients received either daunorubicin, idarubicin or mitoxantrone in combination with cytarabine (Ara-C). For relapsed and refractory patients, regimens included amsacrine with high-dose cytarabine (Amsa/HiDac), homoharringtonine (HHT) alone, or with Ara-C, mitoxantrone and bisantrene. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in only 1 out of 46 courses (2%). Complete remission rates (CR) were as follows: previously untreated 83% (10/12), relapsed 66% (21/32), primary refractory 50% (1/2). Amsa/HiDac resulted in a 71% (10/14) CR and HHT-based regimens achieved a 46% (6/13) CR. These regimens are effective and the value of their incorporation into primary therapy should be studied. The use of heparin with platelet and FFP transfusions every 12 h reduces the risk of hemorrhage during induction therapy.

  7. Promoting blood circulation for removing blood stasis therapy for acute intracerebral hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-qin; Wei, Jing-jing; Xia, Wan; Li, Ji-huang; Liu, Ai-ju; Yin, Su-bing; Wang, Chen; Song, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Guo-qing; Fan, Ji-ping

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the current evidence available regarding the promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis (PBCRBS) therapy for Chinese patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: Six databases were searched from their inception to November 2013. The studies assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' were selected for detailed assessment and meta-analysis. The herbal compositions for PBCRBS therapy for acute ICH patients were also assessed. Results: From the 6 databases, 292 studies claimed randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Nine studies with 798 individuals were assessed in ≥4 domains with 'yes' by using the Cochrane RoB tool. Meta-analysis showed that PBCRBS monotherapy and adjuvant therapy for acute ICH could improve the neurological function deficit, reduce the volume of hematoma and perihematomal edema, and lower the mortality rate and dependency. Moreover, there were fewer adverse effects when compared with Western conventional medication controls. Xueshuantong Injection and Fufang Danshen Injection, Buyang Huanwu Decoction and Liangxue Tongyu formula, and three herbs (danshen root, sanqi and leech) were the most commonly used Chinese herbal patent injections, herbal prescriptions and single herbs, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the apparently positive findings, it is premature to conclude that there is sufficient efficacy and safety of PBCRBS for ICH because of the high clinical heterogeneity of the included studies and small number of trials in the meta-analysis. Further large sample-sizes and rigorously designed RCTs are needed. PMID:25960132

  8. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  9. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  10. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:26498936

  11. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  12. Glial reactions and the clearance of amyloid beta protein in the brains of patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type.

    PubMed

    Maat-Schieman, Marion L C; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid M; Welling-Graafland, Corrie; Natté, Remco; Roos, Raymund A C; van Duinen, Sjoerd G

    2004-05-01

    Although the amyloid beta protein (Abeta) E693Q mutation enhances Abeta fibrillization in vitro and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in vivo, brain parenchymal Abeta deposition and tau pathology in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D) are limited. To evaluate whether clearance of Abeta by glial cells may play a role in this regard, this immunohistochemical study of frontal cortex of 14 HCHWA-D autopsy brains was performed using double staining with glial markers and end-specific antibodies to Abetax-42 (Abeta42) and Abetax-40 (Abeta40). Tau pathology was also assessed. Numerous microglia and/or astrocytes carrying cytoplasmic Abeta42(+)40(-) granules were scattered among non-fibrillar (Congo red-negative) Abeta deposits, i.e., clouds, fine diffuse plaques, and Abeta42(+)40(-) dense diffuse plaques. On the other hand, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes associated with fibrillar (Congo red-positive) Abeta deposition, i.e., Abeta42(+)40(+) dense diffuse plaques and CAA invading the parenchyma, were virtually devoid of Abeta granules. Tau pathology was scant and most frequently associated with CAA. These results suggest that relatively non-fibrillar parenchymal Abeta deposits may be liable to glial clearance. Abeta sequestration by glial cells may be a factor limiting the levels of neurotoxic soluble Abeta oligomers in HCHWA-D brain.

  13. Lethal hypoplasia and developmental anomalies of the lungs in a newborn with intrauterine adrenal hemorrhage and cerebral infarcts: a proposed pulmonary disruption sequence.

    PubMed

    Lertsburapa, Terakeith; Vargas, Diana; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Gündoğan, Füsun; DeLaMonte, Suzanne; Coyle, Mara G; De Paepe, Monique E

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 31-week-gestation male newborn who died soon after birth from intractable respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The pregnancy had been complicated by intermittent bleeding between 13 and 20 weeks' gestation, attributed to peripheral placental separation, as well as bilateral fetal adrenal hemorrhage, first detected at 17 weeks' gestation. Postmortem examination revealed small, calcified adrenal glands as well as several remote cerebral and cerebellar infarcts. The lungs were hypoplastic (lung weight/body weight ratio: 1.64%; 10th percentile for 28-36 weeks' gestation: 2.27%) and distorted by exaggerated lobulation. Microscopically, the lungs exhibited several developmental anomalies, including focal acinar dysgenesis suggestive of arrested development in the pseudoglandular stage of development (8-16 weeks' gestation) (mainly in the upper lobes), and features of bronchial obstruction, including focal lobular hyperplasia and microcystic maldevelopment (mainly in the lower lobes). The adrenal and cerebral findings were consistent with a severe early-gestation hypoxic-ischemic insult, likely related to peripheral placental separation and chronic abruption. The co-occurrence and timing of these well-recognized hypoxic lesions provide further evidence that certain developmental lung anomalies, such as focal acinar dysplasia, focal lobular hyperplasia, and microcystic maldevelopment, may, at least in some cases, have a hypoxic/ischemic etiology.

  14. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a cause of an extensive brain hemorrhage in adult patient with Down's syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Tadeusz; Bertrand, Ewa; Szpak, Grażyna M; Stępień, Tomasz; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    A case of 54-year old woman who deceased due to consequence of extensive brain hemorrhage is presented. The patient was admitted to our Department of Neurology due to progressive quadriparesis as a complication of the cervical spinal cord compressive myelopathy. On the third day after neurosurgical decompression of the spinal cord sudden worsening of neurological and general condition was observed, finally caused death. An autopsy study revealed an extensive brain lobar hemorrhage and a dorsal-ventral compression of the cervical spinal cord. Alzheimer's disease-type degenerative changes with concomitant CAA were seen in light microscope examination. Extensive foci of demyelination were found especially in dorsal funiculi of the cervical spinal cord. Smaller foci of demyelination were present in anterior funiculi due to the stenosis of vertebral canal.

  15. Parameters of diffusional kurtosis imaging for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction in different brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue-Lin; Li, Su-Juan; Zhang, Zhong-Ping; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Gui-Shan; Yan, Gen; Wang, Yan-Ting; Rao, Hai-Bing; Zheng, Wen-Bin; Wu, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a new type diffusion-weighted sequence which measures the non-Gaussianity of water diffusion. The present study aimed to investigate whether the parameters of DKI could distinguish between differences in water molecule diffusion in various brain regions under the conditions of acute infarction and to identify the optimal DKI parameter for locating ischemic lesions in each brain region. A total of 28 patients with acute ischemic stroke in different brain regions were recruited for the present study. The relative values of DKI parameters were selected as major assessment indices, and the homogeneity of background image and contrast of adjacent structures were used as minor assessment indices. According to the brain region involved in three DKI parametric maps, including mean kurtosis (MK), axial kurtosis (Ka) and radial kurtosis (Kr), 112 groups of regions of interest were outlined in the following regions: Corpus callosum (n=17); corona radiata (n=26); thalamus (n=21); subcortical white matter (n=24); and cerebral cortex (n=24). For ischemic lesions in the corpus callosum and corona radiata, significant increases in relative Ka were detected, as compared with the other parameters (P<0.05). For ischemic lesions in the thalamus, subcortical white matter and cerebral cortices, an increase in the three parameters was detected, however this difference was not significant. Minor assessment indices demonstrated that Ka lacked tissue contrast and the background of Kr was heterogeneous; thus, MK was the superior assessment parameter for ischemic lesions in these regions. In conclusion, Ka is better suited for the diagnosis of acute ischemic lesions in highly anisotropic brain regions, such as the corpus callosum and corona radiate. MK may be appropriate for the lesions in low anisotropic or isotropic brain regions, such as the thalamus, subcortical white matter and cerebral cortices. PMID:27446298

  16. Acromegaly With Cardiomyopathy, Cardiac Thrombus and Hemorrhagic Cerebral Infarct: A Case Report of Therapeutic Dilemma With Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Erick; Malong, Chandy Lou; Tanchee-Ngo, Mary Jane; Mercado-Asis, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure (CHF) is a rare complication of growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma occurring in 3% of cases. We report a case of acromegaly complicated not only by CHF but also by the presence of intracardiac thrombus and cardioembolic stroke with hemorrhagic formation. Case Presentation: A 46-year-old Filipino female presented with amenorrhea, progressive coarsening of facial features, deepening of voice and enlargement of digits. She experienced easy fatigability, orthopnea and bipedal edema. The cardiac apex beat was sustained and displaced. Growth hormone was nonsuppressible. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed pituitary macroadenoma with hemorrhage. Incidentally, there was a left frontal lobe cortical infarct with hemorrhagic component. The echocardiogram demonstrated cardiomyopathic changes with a left ventricular thrombus. Conclusions: The primary treatment for GH-producing adenoma is surgery; however, this patient has high surgical risk from her severe cardiomyopathy. Radiotherapy poses a greater risk because of increased cerebrovascular mortality. Somatostatin receptor ligands are significantly associated with improvement of cardiovascular and hemodynamic parameters. Dopamine agonists must be considered regardless of prolactin level and immunostaining. The risks and benefits of any treatment must be emphasized in the presence of conflicting clinical features such as in the case reported. PMID:25926851

  17. Calculation of the Residual Blood Volume after Acute, Non-Ongoing Hemorrhage Using Serial Hematocrit Measurements and the Volume of Isotonic Fluid Infused: Theoretical Hypothesis Generating Study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won Sup; Chon, Sung-Bin

    2016-05-01

    Fluid resuscitation, hemostasis, and transfusion is essential in care of hemorrhagic shock. Although estimation of the residual blood volume is crucial, the standard measuring methods are impractical or unsafe. Vital signs, central venous or pulmonary artery pressures are inaccurate. We hypothesized that the residual blood volume for acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage was calculable using serial hematocrit measurements and the volume of isotonic solution infused. Blood volume is the sum of volumes of red blood cells and plasma. For acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage, red blood cell volume would not change. A certain portion of the isotonic fluid would increase plasma volume. Mathematically, we suggest that the residual blood volume after acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage might be calculated as 0·25N/[(Hct1/Hct2)-1], where Hct1 and Hct2 are the initial and subsequent hematocrits, respectively, and N is the volume of isotonic solution infused. In vivo validation and modification is needed before clinical application of this model.

  18. Calculation of the Residual Blood Volume after Acute, Non-Ongoing Hemorrhage Using Serial Hematocrit Measurements and the Volume of Isotonic Fluid Infused: Theoretical Hypothesis Generating Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation, hemostasis, and transfusion is essential in care of hemorrhagic shock. Although estimation of the residual blood volume is crucial, the standard measuring methods are impractical or unsafe. Vital signs, central venous or pulmonary artery pressures are inaccurate. We hypothesized that the residual blood volume for acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage was calculable using serial hematocrit measurements and the volume of isotonic solution infused. Blood volume is the sum of volumes of red blood cells and plasma. For acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage, red blood cell volume would not change. A certain portion of the isotonic fluid would increase plasma volume. Mathematically, we suggest that the residual blood volume after acute, non-ongoing hemorrhage might be calculated as 0·25N/[(Hct1/Hct2)–1], where Hct1 and Hct2 are the initial and subsequent hematocrits, respectively, and N is the volume of isotonic solution infused. In vivo validation and modification is needed before clinical application of this model. PMID:27134507

  19. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  20. Transient ischemic cerebral lesions during induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pihko, H; Tyni, T; Virkola, K; Valanne, L; Sainio, K; Hovi, L; Saarinen, U M

    1993-11-01

    Ninety children were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma during 1986 through 1992 in the Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, in Finland. During induction chemotherapy, nine of the children had visual hallucinations progressing to confusion and seizure. The symptoms were often preceded by severe constipation and significantly elevated blood pressure. Neuroradiologic examinations showed bilateral cortical or subcortical white matter lesions. Despite the stroke like manifestations, the lesions were reversible. The triangular shape and location of the lesions in the watershed areas between the major cerebral arteries suggest vascular ischemia as the cause.

  1. Blood volume of nonsplenectomized and splenectomized cats before and after acute hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breznock, E.M.; Strack, D.

    1982-10-01

    Blood volume (BV) was determined in awake, nonsplenectomized (NSPX) and splenectomized (SPX) cats before and after hemorrhage (6 ml/kg). Each NSPX cat had a determined BV at least 10 ml/kg greater than the same cat after splenectomy. The mean BV of SPX cats was 43.4 +/- 8.94. ml kg (4.3% of body weight). The calculated RBC masses of NSPX and SPX cats were 17.0 +/- 4.07 and 12.2 +/- 1.12 ml/kg, respectively. Each NSPX cat had apparent RBC masses of 5 ml/kg greater than that of the same cat after splenectomy was done. At 1 hour after a hemorrhage, the BV and RBC masses determined in SPX cats were 46.7 +/- 12.1 and 9.7 +/- 1.90 ml/kg, respectively. Extravascular-to-intravascular fluid flux (calculated from RBC masses and plasma protein dilution) was approximately 0.80% of body weight. The indirect method with /sup 51/Cr-labeled RBC for BV determination was accurate and precise in awake, SPX cats; in awake, NSPX cats, the /sup 51/Cr-labeled RBC dilution method was precise, but not accurate. The spleen in the cat resulted in marked overestimations of BV and RBC masses.

  2. Ultrastructural mitochondria changes in perihematomal brain and neuroprotective effects of Huperzine A after acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiying; Jiang, Mei; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Guo; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to observe the ultrastructural changes of neuronal mitochondria in perihematomal brain tissue and assess the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A (HA, a mitochondrial protector) following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Brain hemorrhage was induced in adult Sprague Dawley rats by injecting autologous blood into the striatum and then removing the brains 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 hours later to analyze mitochondrial ultrastructure in a blinded manner. Parallel groups of ICH rats were treated with HA or saline immediately after ICH. Perihematomal apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation were tracked by immunoblots, and neurobehavioral test results were compared between the groups. Results Mitochondria in perihematomal neurons demonstrated dramatic changes including mitochondrial swelling, intracristal dilation, and decreased matrix density. HA treatment decreased mitochondrial injury and apoptosis, inhibited caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation, and improved behavioral recovery. Conclusion These data show that ICH induces dramatic mitochondrial damage, and HA exhibits protective effects possibly through ameliorating mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest a new direction for novel therapeutics. PMID:26508860

  3. Effects of hyperbaric oxygenation on oxidative stress in acute transient focal cerebral ischemic rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ray-Yau; Chang, Heng-Chih; Chen, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wei; Yang, Yea-Ru

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) after brain ischemia. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) procedure was used to induce the brain ischemia. Rats were assigned to control or HBO group after brain ischemia. In order to examine the role of glutathione after HBO treatment, another group of brain ischemic rats were included to receive the glutathione synthesis inhibitor and HBO treatment. HBO was administered at a pressure of 3 atmospheres absolute for 1 h with 100% oxygen, starting at 3 h post brain ischemia in HBO groups. Animals in control group were placed in their home cage and exposed to normobaric room air. The infarct volume (IV), activation of astrocyte, and level of total glutathione and lipid peroxidation (LP) were assessed 24 h post-reperfusion. Significant reduction in IV was noted in HBO group when compared with control group. The activation of astrocyte was significantly increased in the right cerebral cortex and right striatum in the HBO group when compared with those of the control group. The glutathione level was higher with lower LP level in right cortex and right striatum after HBO as compared with those of the control. However, such effects of HBO treatment were markedly reduced by glutathione synthesis inhibitor administration. These results show that inhibiting glutathione synthesis dramatically reduces the effectiveness of HBO in acute transient focal cerebral ischemia.

  4. Methylene Blue Reduces Acute Cerebral Ischemic Injury via the Induction of Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Di, Yao; He, Yun-Ling; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kui-Wu; Liu, Shu-Hong; Zhao, Yong-Qi; Fan, Ming; Wu, Li-Ying; Zhu, Ling-Ling

    2015-05-19

    The treatment of stroke is limited by a short therapeutic window and a lack of effective clinical drugs. Methylene blue (MB) has been used in laboratories and clinics since the 1890s. Few studies have reported the neuroprotective role of MB in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, whether and how MB protects against acute cerebral ischemia (ACI) injury was unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of MB on this injury and revealed that MB protected against ACI injury by augmenting mitophagy. Using a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, we demonstrated that MB improved neurological function and reduced the infarct volume and necrosis after ACI injury. These improvements depended on the effect of MB on mitochondrial structure and function. ACI caused the disorder and disintegration of mitochondrial structure, while MB ameliorated the destruction of mitochondria. In addition, mitophagy was inhibited at 24 h after stroke and MB augmented mitophagy. In an oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model in vitro, we further revealed that the elevation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by MB under OGD conditions mediated the augmented mitophagy. In contrast, exacerbating the decline of MMP during OGD abolished the MB-induced activation of mitophagy. Taken together, MB promotes mitophagy by maintaining the MMP at a relatively high level, which contributes to a decrease in necrosis and an improvement in neurological function, thereby protecting against ACI injury.

  5. Pravastatin acute neuroprotective effects depend on blood brain barrier integrity in experimental cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Carone, D; Librizzi, L; Cattalini, A; Sala, G; Conti, E; Cuccione, E; Versace, A; Cai, R; Monza, L; de Curtis, M; Ferrarese, C; Beretta, S

    2015-07-30

    Statins have since long been reported to exert acute neuroprotection in experimental stroke models. However, crucial questions still need to be addressed as far as the timing of their cerebral effects after intravascular administration and the role played by the blood brain barrier (BBB) crossing properties. We tested the effects of an hydrophilic statin (pravastatin, 100 nM), which poorly crosses BBB under physiological conditions. Pravastatin was administered either 90 min before or immediately after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain preparation. A multi-modal outcome assessment was performed, through electrophysiological and cerebral vascular tone recordings, MAP-2 immunohistochemistry, BBB evaluation via ZO-1/FITC-albumin analysis, AKT and ERK activation and whole-cell antioxidant capacity. Pravastatin pre-ischemic administration did not produce any significant effect. Pravastatin post-ischemic administration significantly prevented MAP-2 immunoreactivity loss in ischemic areas, increased ERK phosphorylation in the ischemic hemisphere and enhanced whole-cell antioxidant capacity. Electrophysiological parameters, vascular tone and AKT signaling were unchanged. In all tested ischemic brains, ZO-1 fragmentation and FITC albumin extravasation was observed, starting 30 min from ischemia onset, indicating loss of BBB integrity. Our findings indicate that the rapid anti-ischemic effects of intravascular pravastatin are highly dependent on BBB increased permeability after stroke.

  6. Acute stress disorder modifies cerebral activity of amygdala and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Emmanuelle; Guedj, Eric; Trousselard, Marion; El Khoury-Malhame, Myriam; Zendjidjian, Xavier; Fakra, Eric; Souville, Marc; Nazarian, Bruno; Blin, Olivier; Canini, Frédéric; Khalfa, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis constraint of acute stress disorder (ASD), consisting of testing individuals in the month following trauma exposure, limits research on the very early and initial stage of the disease. In this regard, this work aims to explore the cerebral mechanism of ASD in a population of fire-fighters before and after trauma exposure. Thirty-six healthy non-traumatized male fire-fighters were explored by an fMRI emotional face-matching task to evaluate the cerebral substrate of emotional recognition. During the two years of the follow-up, two subjects were traumatized, and thus retested, as were 10 non-traumatized subjects among the initial non-exposed ones. In comparison to non-exposed subjects, fire-fighters with ASD had enhanced amygdala, orbitofrontal, and dorsolateral prefrontal BOLD responses to fearful and angry faces (p < .05, FDR-corrected). These results shed new light on the cerebral mechanism associated with ASD. We observed for the first time the existence of an altered fear processing pathway in ASD that is mediated by amygdala and prefrontal cortex hyperactivity, which might be at the core of the disorder. PMID:25599382

  7. A case of cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as acute reversible visual loss: a rarely reported association.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sayantan; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Sonthalia, Nikhil; Saha, Manjari; Talukdar, Arunansu

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is not an uncommon cause of stroke but very often unrecognized at initial presentation due to lack of clinical suspicion and thus frequently left untreated. CVST is a potentially serious condition which manifests with diverse clinical manifestations, from isolated headache to focal neurological signs and even coma. CVST usually takes place either an inherited thrombophilia or any acquired hyperviscosity state and thus prompting anticoagulation was regimen as is the cornerstone of successful treatment. We describe a 47-year-old woman who presented with recurrent bouts of vomiting in the post-operative period and later developed cortical blindness and asymmetric limb weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensity involving bilateral parieto-occipital corticomedullary junction. MR venography showed signal void in the superior sagittal sinus. She was diagnosed as CVST and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Bilateral occipital infarction as a consequence of cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare cause of visual loss. Thrombosis in the superior sagittal sinus was related to her cortical blindness and weakness. This case illustrates that cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of occipital vascular lesions leading to acute painless loss of vision prompting anticoagulation therapy which can improve the outcome significantly. Dehydration could be considered as a risk factor for development of CVST in appropriate situations. PMID:25206031

  8. Early Embolization for Ruptured Aneurysm in Acute Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, T.; Rada, K. TE; Hirotsune, N.; Nishino, S.; Asano, T.; Manabe, T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Four cases of ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) presented with severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE). On admission, two patients were grade IV and two were grade V according to Hunt and Hess grading. All patients needed respiratory management with the assistance of a ventilator. Three of them underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within three days from onset after ensuring hemodynamic stability. Immediately after the endovascular treatment, lumbar spinal drainage was inserted in all the patients. The pulmonary edema findings disappeared rapidly after the respiratory management. The results were good recovery in two, and moderate disability in two. We concluded that early embolization of ruptured aneurysm and placement of spinal drainage is a satisfactory option for severe SAH with NPE. PMID:20566097

  9. Anticoagulation Reversal Strategies for Left Ventricular Assist Device Patients Presenting with Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joshua K; Chen, Peter C; Falvey, Jennifer; Melvin, Amber L; Lidder, Alcina K; Lowenstein, Lisa M; Miranpuri, Amrendra S; Knight, Peter A; Massey, H Todd

    2016-01-01

    The safety of alternative vitamin K antagonist (VKA) reversal strategies in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD's) who present with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are not well known. A review of LVAD patients with ICH from May 2008 to 2015 was conducted, comparing the safety and efficacy of 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate-assisted VKA reversal (4F-PCC group, n = 10) to reversal with traditional agents alone (no-PCC group, n = 10). An analysis of a no-reversal strategy in selected patients (n = 11) with ICH was additionally performed. Thirty-one cases of ICH on LVAD support were reviewed. The rate of post reversal thromboembolic events was not significantly different between 4F-PCC and no-PCC patients (0% vs. 10%, p = 1.0); however, the time to VKA reversal was shorter (474 vs. 945 minutes, p = 0.02) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) requirements lower (1.9 vs. 3.6 units, p = 0.05) in 4F-PCC patients, with no difference in mortality between groups (p = 1.0). Eleven patients (mean ICH volume: 0.4 cm) were successfully managed without active VKA reversal, with no increased hemorrhage noted on neuroimaging. These results suggest that 4F-PCC-assisted reversal in LVAD patients is safe and may improve the efficacy of VKA reversal. Our findings also indicate that carefully selected patients with small ICH volumes may be safely managed by discontinuing anticoagulation and allowing the international normalized ratio (INR) to normalize physiologically. PMID:27347708

  10. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, N V; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or intravenous hydroxocobalamin (OHCob) both abolish cyanide (CN)-induced surges in interstitial brain lactate and glucose concentrations. HBOT has been shown to induce a delayed increase in whole blood CN concentrations, whereas OHCob may act as an intravascular CN scavenger. Additionally, HBOT may prevent respiratory distress and restore blood pressure during CN intoxication, an effect not seen with OHCob administration. In this report, we evaluated the combined effects of HBOT and OHCob on interstitial lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations as well as lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 kPa in 90 min). OHCob and HBOT significantly attenuated the acute surges in interstitial cerebral lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations compared with the intoxicated rats given no treatment. Furthermore, the combined treatment resulted in consistent low lactate, glucose, and glycerol concentrations, as well as in low lactate-to-pyruvate ratios compared with CN intoxicated controls. In rats receiving OHCob and HBOT, respiration improved and cyanosis disappeared, with subsequent stabilization of mean arterial blood pressure. The present findings indicate that a combined administration of OHCob and HBOT has a beneficial and persistent effect on the cerebral metabolism during CN intoxication.

  11. Postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, Cindy W

    2012-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a very common obstetric emergency with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Understanding its etiology is fundamental to effectively managing PPH in an acute setting. Active management of the third stage of labor is also a key component in its prevention. Management strategies include conservative measures (medications, uterine tamponade, and arterial embolization) as well as surgical interventions (arterial ligations, compression sutures, and hysterectomy). Creating a standardized PPH protocol and running simulation-based drills with a multidisciplinary team may also help decrease maternal morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes, although further studies are needed. PMID:22309588

  12. Reduction of the systemic inflammatory induced by acute cerebral infarction through ultra-early thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    YE, LICHAO; CAI, RUOWEI; YANG, MEILI; QIAN, JIAQIANG; HONG, ZHILIN

    2015-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke induces systemic inflammation, exhibited as changes in body temperature, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of intravenous thrombolytic therapy on inflammatory indices in order to investigate the hypothesis that post-stroke systemic inflammatory response occurs in response to the necrosis of brain tissues. In this study, 62 patients with acute cerebral infarction and indications for intravenous thrombolysis were divided into three groups on the basis of their treatment and response: Successful thrombolysis (n=36), failed thrombolysis (n=12) and control (n=14) groups. The body temperature, white blood cell counts and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were recorded pre-treatment and on post-stroke days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score positively correlated with body temperature, white blood cell count and hs-CRP levels. On day 3 of effective intravenous thrombolysis, the body temperature and white blood cell were decreased and on days 3 and 5, the serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced compared with those in the failed thrombolysis and control groups. The results indicate that the systemic inflammatory response following acute cerebral infarction was mainly caused by ischemic injury of local brain tissue; the more serious the stroke, the stronger the inflammatory response. Ultra-early thrombolytic therapy may inhibit the necrosis of brain tissue and thereby reduce the inflammatory response. PMID:26622513

  13. A proposed definition of symptomatic vasospasm based on treatment of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage in Japan: Consensus 2009, a project of the 25th Spasm Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Shirao, Satoshi; Yoneda, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Kajiwara, Koji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of unified information on diagnosis and treatment of cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) among the hospitals in Japan. Thus, the aim of the study was to define the current practice in this area based on a survey by Japanese neurosurgeons. Methods: A survey on diagnosis and treatment of CV was sent to 414 hospitals each of which performs >100 neurosurgeries annually. Results: Responses were received from 240 hospitals (58.0%). Because accurate criteria for diagnosis of symptomatic vasospasm (SVS) were used in only 33.8% of the hospitals, we proposed a clinical definition of SVS that was approved at the 25th Spasm Symposium (Consensus 2009). This definition is simplified as follows: (1) the presence of neurological worsening; (2) no other identifiable cause of neurological worsening; and (3) confirmation of vasospasm by medical examinations. The results also showed that the Fisher CT scale is used differently for patients with ICH or IVH, with 41.3% of cases with ICH/IVH based on SAH that met Fisher criteria classified into Fisher group 1, 2 or 3, and 46.3% classified into Fisher group 4. There were no major differences in prophylactic therapies of CV and therapy for cerebral ischemia among the hospitals. Endovascular treatment for vasospasm was performed in most hospitals (78.7%); however, the criteria differed among the hospitals: (1) angiographic vasospasm and SVS appeared (37.9%), (2) only when aggressive therapy was ineffective (41.4%). Conclusion: We established a clinical definition of SVS based on the results of this survey (Consensus 2009). PMID:21748027

  14. Age-related plaque morphology and C-terminal heterogeneity of amyloid beta in Dutch-type hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Maat-Schieman, M L; Yamaguchi, H; van Duinen, S G; Natté, R; Roos, R A

    2000-04-01

    The evolvement of amyloid beta (Abeta) deposition in the frontal cerebral cortex of 24 patients of increasing age with Dutch-type hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (HCHWA-D) was studied using end-specific monoclonal antibodies to Abetax-42 (Abeta42) or Abetax-40 (Abeta40) and markers for degenerating neurites. Abeta42 immunostaining revealed parenchymal Abeta deposits with a heterogeneous morphology and distribution, i.e., clouds, fine/dense diffuse, coarse, and homogeneous plaques. Clouds and diffuse plaques were associated with glial Abeta granules. Abeta40 labeling was absent in clouds/fine diffuse plaques, inconsistent and variably intense in dense diffuse/coarse plaques and consistent in homogeneous plaques. In a subset of Abeta40-positive plaques, degenerating neurites--without tauopathy--and/or amyloid cores were observed. Electron microscopy revealed no apparent amyloid fibrils in fine diffuse plaques, small bundles of fibrils in dense diffuse/homogeneous plaques, and amyloid masses in coarse plaques. The parenchymal Abeta pathology was age-related: the ratio of fine to dense diffuse plaques decreased with age, clouds were limited to younger patients; coarse plaques to the oldest old. Homogeneous/cored plaques were present most consistently in older patients. Plaque density did not increase with age. Vascular Abeta deposits stained for both Abeta species, but exclusively Abeta42-positive, presumably recent deposits were also observed. This study suggests that HCHWA-D is a model of plaque evolution in which clouds leave fine diffuse plaques, which may become dense diffuse and ultimately coarse or homogeneous plaques.

  15. High-Dose Simvastatin Is Effective in Preventing Cerebral Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Woong; Kang, Hee In; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Moon, Byung Gwan; Kim, Joo Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to assess the effect of high-dose simvastatin on cerebral vasospasm and its clinical outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Korean patients. Methods This study was designed as a prospective observational cohort study. Its subjects were aneurysmal SAH patients who had undergone aneurysm clipping or coiling. They were assigned to 1 of 3 groups : the 20 mg, 40 mg, and 80 mg simvastatin groups. The primary end-point was the occurrence of symptomatic vasospasm. The clinical outcome was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score after 1 month and 3 months. The risk factors of the development of vasospasm were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Results Ninety nine patients with aneurysmal SAH were treated and screened. They were sequentially assigned to the 20 mg (n=22), 40 mg (n=34), and 80 mg (n=31) simvastatin groups. Symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 36.4% of the 20 mg group, 8.8% of the 40 mg group, and 3.2% of the 80 mg group (p=0.003). The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that poor Hunt-Hess grades (OR=5.4 and 95% CI=1.09-26.62) and high-dose (80 mg) simvastatin (OR=0.09 and 95% CI=0.1-0.85) were independent factors of symptomatic vasospasm. The clinical outcomes did not show a significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion This study demonstrated that 80 mg simvastatin treatment was effective in preventing cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH, but did not improve the clinical outcome in Korean patients. PMID:26587185

  16. Preventive effect of continuous cisternal irrigation with magnesium sulfate solution on angiographic cerebral vasospasms associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro; Esaki, Takanori; Nakao, Yasuaki; Tokugawa, Joji; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Although cerebral vasospasm (CV) is one of the most important predictors for the outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), no treatment has yet been established for this condition. This study investigated the efficacy of continuous direct infusion of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solution into the intrathecal cistern in patients with an aneurysmal SAH. METHODS An SAH caused by a ruptured aneurysm was identified on CT scans within 72 hours after SAH onset. All patients were treated by surgical clipping and randomized into 2 groups: a control group of patients undergoing a standard treatment and a magnesium (Mg) group of patients additionally undergoing continuous infusion of 5 mmol/L MgSO4 solution for 14 days. The Mg(2+) concentrations in serum and CSF were recorded daily. Neurological examinations were performed by intensive care clinicians. Delayed cerebral ischemia was monitored by CT or MRI. To assess the effect of the Mg treatment on CV, the CVs were graded on the basis of the relative degree of constriction visible on cerebral angiograms taken on Day 10 after the SAH, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed daily to measure blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Neurological outcomes and mortality rates were evaluated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Scale at 3 months after SAH onset. RESULTS Seventy-three patients admitted during the period of April 2008 to March 2013 were eligible and enrolled in this study. Three patients were excluded because of violation of protocol requirements. The 2 groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, or Fisher grade. In the Mg group, the Mg(2+) concentration in CSF gradually increased from Day 4 after initiation of the continuous MgSO4 intrathecal administration. No such increase was observed in the control group. No significant changes in the serum Mg(2+) levels were observed for 14 days, and no

  17. Acute anti-emetic withdrawal associated with a hemorrhagic cerebellar arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, S; Tomlinson, K; Valles, J; Hundert, M; Bagdonas, R; Eisenberg, M

    2010-08-01

    We present a 67-year-old right-handed male with a brachium pontis arteriovenous malformation on continuous anti-emetic therapy who demonstrated acute withdrawal symptoms after the abrupt discontinuation of ondansetron, a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist. Removal of anti-emetic therapy led to the development of extreme flushing and tremor, but subsequent return of ondansetron resulted in the resolution of these symptoms. This is the first clinical report demonstrating acute withdrawal from an anti-emetic agent and we further highlight the need for future studies evaluating not only arterial supply with pressure gradients and anatomical location, but also the association with periventricular venous drainage, venous drainage stenosis, and mass effect from venous stasis as this may contribute partly to the sensitivity of the serotonergic receptors seen here. PMID:20488707

  18. [Structural-metabolic characteristics of the myocardium in acute hemorrhage and hyperbaric oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Berkutskaia, T S; Bykov, E G; Leonov, A N

    1975-01-01

    Histochemical and pathomorphological changes in the myocardium in acute loss of blood and hyperbaric oxygenation were investigated in experiments on 130 white rats. It was established that acute loss of blood brought about an activation of phosphorylase, a decrease in the content of glycogen, an inhibition of the activity of cytochrome oxidase and succinic dehydrogenase in the myocardium. Foci of dystrophy were formed in the subendocaridal zone of the two ventricles and septum. Oxygenobarotherapy contributed to normalization of the level of activity of enzymes, preservation of glycogen, reduced the extent of manifestation of dystrophic changes in myocardiocytes. Hyperbaric oxygenation of healthy animals led to changes in the enzymatic activity in the myocardium. Dystrophic changes were noted in individual myocardiocytes. The data obtained testify to a direct influence of oxygen on metabolism of the myocardial cells.

  19. Risk of Hemorrhage in Combined Neuroform Stenting and Coil Embolization of Acutely Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jankowitz, B.; Thomas, A.J.; Vora, N.; Gupta, R.; Levy, E.; Yamamoto, J.; Kassam, A.; Gologorsky, Y.; Panapitiya, N.; Sandhu, E.; Crago, E.; Hricik, A.; Lee, K.; Gallek, M.; Jovin, T.; Horowitz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Stenting as adjuvant therapy for the coiling of acutely ruptured aneurysms remains controversial due to the necessity of anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications. We report our experience using the Neuroform stent in the management of 41 aneurysms in 40 patients over a period of three years. For aneurysms whose open surgical risk remains excessive with a morphology that would preclude complete embolization, the risks of stenting may be warranted. PMID:20557738

  20. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  1. Amyloid fibrils in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Icelandic type is a variant of gamma-trace basic protein (cystatin C).

    PubMed Central

    Ghiso, J; Jensson, O; Frangione, B

    1986-01-01

    A gamma-trace variant protein is the major constituent of the amyloid fibrils in patients from Iceland with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. The protein consists of 110 residues and is similar to human urinary gamma-trace basic protein (or cystatin C) beginning at its 11th amino-terminal residue. It has an amino acid substitution (glutamine for leucine) at position 58 (position 68 in gamma-trace numbering), which is near the proposed active site of related proteins--namely, cysteine protease inhibitors and kininogens. It is postulated that a point mutation has occurred, leading to the production of an unusual protein that is abnormally degraded, bound, and/or precipitated. Alternatively, gamma-trace basic protein may be genetically polymorphic, and the variant described here may represent an as-yet-undiscovered isotype or an allelic form that is linked to, but not responsible for, the deposition disease. Our data on the structure of a gamma-trace variant protein suggests that its gene expresses a polyprotein precursor in which active peptides are flanked by basic amino acid residues that permit cleavage to liberate small internal peptides. It is likely that the nucleotide sequence coding for Arg-Xaa and Lys-Xaa repeated several times in the molecule may function as alternative splicing sites for mRNA processing. Images PMID:3517880

  2. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  3. Evaluation of a computer-aided detection algorithm for timely diagnosis of small acute intracranial hemorrhage on computed tomography in a critical care environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2009-02-01

    Detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (AIH) is a primary task in the interpretation of computed tomography (CT) brain scans of patients suffering from acute neurological disturbances or after head trauma. Interpretation can be difficult especially when the lesion is inconspicuous or the reader is inexperienced. We have previously developed a computeraided detection (CAD) algorithm to detect small AIH. One hundred and thirty five small AIH CT studies from the Los Angeles County (LAC) + USC Hospital were identified and matched by age and sex with one hundred and thirty five normal studies. These cases were then processed using our AIH CAD system to evaluate the efficacy and constraints of the algorithm.

  4. Intracranial hemorrhage in acute and chronic childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura over a ten-year period: an Egyptian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen; Elbarbary, Nancy; Khaddah, Normine; Abdelwahab, Magy; El Rashidy, Farida; Hassab, Hoda; Al-Tonbary, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a rare but major cause of death in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The authors reviewed data of 1,840 patient with ITP, from 5 pediatric hematology centers in Egypt from 1997 to 2007, to study the incidence and risk factors of ICH. Ten cases of ICH were identified with a median age at presentation of 7.5 years; 4 patients had acute ITP, 2 persistent and 4 chronic. The platelet count was <10 x 10(9)/l in 7 cases, and only 1 patient had a history of head trauma. Seven children were on treatment prior to or at the time of occurrence of ICH and all were treated by pharmacotherapy. Two children died shortly afterwards due to late referral to a specialized center. Our results suggest that treatment does not prevent ICH and that it can occur at any time during the course of the disease. Delayed referral can be considered a risk factor for unfavorable outcome of ICH, highlighting the importance of teaching sessions for patients and their parents to minimize subsequent morbidity and mortality of ICH in children with ITP. PMID:19955713

  5. Clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes in adults experiencing dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2009-04-01

    In a retrospective study, acute renal failure (ARF) was found in 10 (3.3%) among 304 hospitalized adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and 6 (60%) of the 10 patients with ARF died, whereas all 294 patients without ARF (controls) survived (P < 0.001). Compared with the controls, DHF patients with ARF were found to be significantly older (P = 0.002) and male predominant (P < 0.001) and to have higher frequency of previous stroke (P = 0.005), chronic renal insufficiency (P = 0.046), dengue shock syndrome (DSS; P < 0.001), gastrointestinal bleeding (P < 0.001), and concurrent bacteremia (P = 0.009), lower hemoglobin (P = 0.003) and serum albumin levels (P = 0.003), and higher incidences of prolonged prothrombin time (P < 0.001), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.001), and alanine aminotransferase levels (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed DSS (odd ratio = 220.0; P < 0.001) was an independent risk factor for development of ARF in DHF patients. The high fatality rate in DHF patients complicated with ARF in our series underscore the importance of clinicians' alertness to this potentially fatal complication so that initiation of timely appropriate treatment is possible.

  6. Acute hydrocephalus secondary to obstruction of the foramen of monro and cerebral aqueduct caused by a choroid plexus cyst in the lateral ventricle. Case report.

    PubMed

    Nahed, Brian V; Darbar, Aneela; Doiron, Robert; Saad, Ali; Robson, Caroline D; Smith, Edward R

    2007-09-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are common and typically asymptomatic abnormal folds of the epithelial lining of the choroid plexus. Rarely, these cysts may gradually enlarge and cause outflow obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid. The authors present a case of a large choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus in a previously healthy 2-year-old boy. The patient presented with markedly declining mental status, vomiting, and bradycardia over the course of several hours. Computed tomography scans demonstrated enlarged lateral and third ventricles with sulcal effacement, but no obvious mass lesions or hemorrhage. There was no antecedent illness or trauma. A right frontal external ventricular drain was placed in the patient, resulting in decompression of only the right lateral ventricle. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a lobulated cyst arising from the choroid plexus of the left lateral ventricle and herniating through the foramen of Monro into the third ventricle, occluding both the foramen of Monro and the cerebral aqueduct. The patient underwent an endoscopic fenestration of the cyst, and histological results confirmed that it was a choroid plexus cyst. Postoperative MR imaging showed a marked reduction in the cyst size. The cyst was no longer in the third ventricle, the foramen of Monro and the aqueduct were patent, and the ventricles were decompressed. The patient was discharged home with no deficits. To the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of a choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus due to herniation into the third ventricle. This case is illustrative because it describes this entity for the first time, and more importantly highlights the need to obtain a diagnosis when a patient presents with acute hydrocephalus without a clear cause.

  7. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hemorrhage Mimicking an Aneurysm: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashish; Vyas, Sameer; Sanghvi, Ankur; Salunke, Pravin; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background A sudden onset of neurological symptoms in patients is conventionally thought to be due to vascular phenomenon, with one common differential diagnosis being subarachnoid hemorrhage. Another important differential diagnosis is ischemic stroke. An uncommon cause of such acute symptoms can be hemorrhage in a pre-existing tumor, that is, intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH). Purpose ITH is an important, though uncommon differential diagnosis in cases of sudden onset of neurological deterioration. Methods and Result A 60-year-old male presented with seizures and loss of consciousness 12 h prior to admission. The episode was sudden in onset. After detailed clinical and radiological investigations, the patient was diagnosed with glioma with bleed and was successfully operated upon. Conclusion The combination of hemorrhage and ischemic stroke pointed more towards an aneurysm rather than a tumor bleed. There were pointers both in favor of and against both the diagnosis. Therefore, a complex hemorrhagic cerebral tumor with acute presentation and discordant finding on CT or CT angiography should be characterized preoperatively. A large thrombosed aneurysm remains an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27780994

  8. Acute and chronic hypoxia: implications for cerebral function and exercise tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodall, Stuart; Twomey, Rosie; Amann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To outline how hypoxia profoundly affects neuronal functionality and thus compromise exercise-performance. Methods Investigations using electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) detecting neuronal changes at rest and those studying fatiguing effects on whole-body exercise performance in acute (AH) and chronic hypoxia (CH) were evaluated. Results At rest during very early hypoxia (<1-h), slowing of cerebral neuronal activity is evident despite no change in corticospinal excitability. As time in hypoxia progresses (3-h), increased corticospinal excitability becomes evident; however, changes in neuronal activity are unknown. Prolonged exposure (3–5 d) causes a respiratory alkalosis which modulates Na+ channels, potentially explaining reduced neuronal excitability. Locomotor exercise in AH exacerbates the development of peripheral-fatigue; as the severity of hypoxia increases, mechanisms of peripheral-fatigue become less dominant and CNS hypoxia becomes the predominant factor. The greatest central-fatigue in AH occurs when SaO2 is ≤75%, a level that coincides with increasing impairments in neuronal activity. CH does not improve the level of peripheral-fatigue observed in AH; however, it attenuates the development of central-fatigue paralleling increases in cerebral O2 availability and corticospinal excitability. Conclusions The attenuated development of central-fatigue in CH might explain, the improvements in locomotor exercise-performance commonly observed after acclimatisation to high altitude. PMID:25593787

  9. Cerebral CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute stroke detection: a systematic review of diagnostic value

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Cantiriga; Sun, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the diagnostic value of cerebral CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) examinations in the detection of acute stroke based on a systematic review of the current literature. The review was conducted based on searching of seven databases for articles published between 1993 and 2013. Diagnostic value in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy was analysed from 21 articles which were found to meet selection criteria. The mean sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for CTA were significantly higher than those for CTP with 83.2% (95% CI: 57.9-100.0%), 95.0% (95% CI: 74.4-100%), 84.1% (95% CI: 50.0-100%), 97.1 (95% CI: 94.0-100%) and 94.0% (95% CI: 83.0-99.0) versus 69.9% (95% CI: 20.0-97.0%), 87.4 (95% CI: 61.0-100.0%), 76.4% (95% CI: 48.0-95.4%), 78.2% (95% CI: 55.8-93.9%) and 89.8% (95% CI: 75.7-97.1%), respectively. This analysis shows that CTA has high diagnostic value in detecting high degree of cerebral arterial stenosis (>70%) whereas CTP provides high specificity in the detection of ischemia and infarct tissue of brain. PMID:25202664

  10. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Arthur J.; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures • coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. Case Report: A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Conclusions: Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema

  11. [Role of computerized tomography in percutaneous drainage of acute infected necrotic-hemorrhagic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Violino, P; Ghirardo, D; Fioranti, L; Borrelli, M; Scarrone, A; Pancione, L; Ambrogi, C; Ferro, C

    1996-09-01

    In the last few years, Computed Tomography (CT) has emerged as the most sensitive and reliable imaging technique to diagnose acute pancreatitis (AP). Besides assessing the extent of damage to the pancreas and to periglandular tissue. CT can recognize the major early and late complications of the disease promptly and with extreme accuracy. We investigated the diagnostic capabilities of CT in controlling AP development and tried to assess the role of interventional radiology as a therapeutic support after or instead of surgery in treating the necrotic forms of pancreatitis complicated by sepsis. From 1989 to 1995, acute pancreatitis mostly due to biliary tract disease and alcoholism was diagnosed in 228 patients. Necrotic processes were identified in 105 of them since disease onset; septic complications developed in 57 patients. Surgery was performed in 42 patients, but the result was poor in 11 of them (30%) and CT showed the persistence of some infectious pancreatic exudate which had been drained insufficiently. Since sepsis persisted in these patients, the exudate was aspirated percutaneously after positioning appropriate drainage means guided by abdominal CT. Sepsis resolved completely in 10 patients, while one required subsequent surgery. Percutaneous drainage catheters were positioned in 15 patients as the treatment of choice, under CT and US guidance. Sepsis resolved in 7 cases only (45%), while 3 of the extant patients died and 5 needed surgery. The results of our experience demonstrate the effectiveness of percutaneous drainage under CT guidance. However, this technique should be used after and as a support to surgery, the latter remaining the treatment of choice for infectious necrotic AP. Thus, in our experience, the use of percutaneous aspiration instead of surgery proved to be a less effective tool in curing this condition and its use should therefore be limited to high-risk surgical patients.

  12. Acute Neuromuscular Adaptation at the Spinal Level Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Pin-Barre, Caroline; Laurin, Jérôme; Felix, Marie-Solenne; Pertici, Vincent; Kober, Frank; Marqueste, Tanguy; Matarazzo, Valery; Muscatelli-Bossy, Françoise; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to highlight the acute motor reflex adaptation and to deepen functional deficits following a middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO-r). Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were included in this study. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO; 120 min) was performed on 16 rats studied at 1 and 7 days, respectively (MCAO-D1 and MCAO-D7, n = 8 for each group). The other animals were divided into 3 groups: SHAM-D1 (n = 6), SHAM-D7 (n = 6) and Control (n = 8). Rats performed 4 behavioral tests (the elevated body swing test, the beam balance test, the ladder-climbing test and the forelimb grip force) before the surgery and daily after MCAO-r. H-reflex on triceps brachii was measured before and after isometric exercise. Infarction size and cerebral edema were respectively assessed by histological (Cresyl violet) and MRI measurements at the same time points than H-reflex recordings. Animals with cerebral ischemia showed persistent functional deficits during the first week post-MCAO-r. H-reflex was not decreased in response to isometric exercise one day after the cerebral ischemia contrary to the other groups. The motor reflex regulation was recovered 7 days post-MCAO-r. This result reflects an acute sensorimotor adaptation at the spinal level after MCAO-r. PMID:24587147

  13. Acute sialadenitis secondary to submandibular calculi after botulinum neurotoxin injection for sialorrhea in a child with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mike; Shelton, Jean

    2011-12-01

    Children with cerebral palsy and other neurologic diseases often present with sialorrhea. Intraglandular botulinum neurotoxin is being increasingly reported to be clinically effective for the treatment of sialorrhea. This treatment is becoming more popular in recent years because of being less invasive than surgical procedures. In addition, fewer adverse effects have been documented compared with oral or topical anticholinergic medication. We report the first case in a child with cerebral palsy who developed serious acute sialadenitis with submandibular sialolithiasis after intraglandular botulinum neurotoxin injection for sialorrhea.

  14. Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis (massive necrosis) with fat necrosis induced in mice by DL-ethionine fed with a choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, B.; Estes, L. W.; Longnecker, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    Female, albino mice were fed a choline-deficient diet containing 0.5% DL-ethionine. All animals died within 5 days due to the development of an acute hemorrhagic pancreatis with fat necrosis throughout the peritoneal cavity. The apancreatitis was characterized by a massive necrosis of the exocrine parenchyma with intense hemorrhage and inflammatory reaction of the stroma. The sequence of histologic and ultrastructural alterations occurring in the acinar cells of the pancreas were studied in mice fed the diet for 1, 2, and 3 days. Major findings consited of accumulation of zymogen granules, vacuolation due to foci of cytoplasmic degradation, and alterations in the morphology of the zymogen granules. The pancreatitis appears to be due to intraparenchymal activation of zymogens, resulting from a synergistic action of choline deficiency with the basic toxicity of ethionine toward the acinar cells of the pancreas. The experimental model simulates closely the acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with fat necrosis occurring in humans and may prove useful for exploring the pathogenesis of this condition. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 PMID:1094837

  15. Analysis of factors affecting hemorrhagic diathesis and overall survival in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Seul; Koh, Myeong Seok; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Suee; Oh, Sung Yong; Han, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study investigated whether patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) truly fulfill the diagnostic criteria of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), as proposed by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) and the Korean Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (KSTH), and analyzed which component of the criteria most contributes to bleeding diathesis. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis was conducted on newly diagnosed APL patients between January 1995 and May 2012. Results: A total of 46 newly diagnosed APL patients were analyzed. Of these, 27 patients (58.7%) showed initial bleeding. The median number of points per patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of overt DIC by the ISTH and the KSTH was 5 (range, 1 to 7) and 3 (range, 1 to 4), respectively. At diagnosis of APL, 22 patients (47.8%) fulfilled the overt DIC diagnostic criteria by either the ISTH or KSTH. In multivariate analysis of the ISTH or KSTH diagnostic criteria for overt DIC, the initial fibrinogen level was the only statistically significant factor associated with initial bleeding (p = 0.035), but it was not associated with overall survival (OS). Conclusions: Initial fibrinogen level is associated with initial presentation of bleeding of APL patients, but does not affect OS. PMID:26552464

  16. Analysis of the mechanisms of rabbit’s brainstem hemorrhage complicated with irritable changes in the alvine mucous membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xue-Long; Zheng, Yang; Shen, Hai-Ming; Jing, Wen-Li; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Huang, Jian-Zhong; Tan, Qing-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes in the pressure of the lateral ventricle during acute brainstem hemorrhage and the changes of neural discharge of vagus nerve under the load of intracranial hypertension, so as to analyze their effects on the congestive degree of intestinal mucous membrane and the morphologic changes of intestinal mucous membrane. METHODS: An operation was made to open the skull to obtain an acute brainstem hemorrhage animal model. Microcirculatory microscope photography device and video recording system were used to determine the changes continuously in the caliber of jejunal mesenteric artery during brainstem hemorrhage and the changes with time in the congestion of jejunal mucosal villi. We used HE stain morphology to analyze the changes of duodenal mucosal villi. A recording electrode was used to calculate and measure the electric discharge activities of cervical vagus nerve. RESULTS: (1) We observed that the pressure of lateral cerebral ventricle increased transiently during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (2) The caliber of the jejunal mesenteric artery increased during brainstem hemorrhage. Analysis of red color coordinate values indicated transient increase in the congestion of jejunal mucous membrane during acute brainstem hemorrhage; (3) Through the analysis of the pathologic slice, we found enlarged blood vessels, stagnant blood, and transudatory red blood cells in the duodenal submucous layer; (4) Electric discharge of vagus nerve increased and sporadic hemorrhage spots occurred in duodenal mucous and submucous layer, when the lateral ventricle was under pressure. CONCLUSION: Brainstem hemorrhage could cause intracranial hypertension, which would increase the neural discharge of vagus nerve and cause the transient congestion of jejunal mucous membrane. It could cause hyperemia and diffused hemorrhage in the duodenal submucous layer 48 h after brainstem hemorrhage. PMID:15786536

  17. Serum vitamin B12 and folic Acid levels in acute cerebral atherothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Kocer, Abdulkadir; Ince, Nurhan; Canbulat, Cuneyt E; Sargin, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cerebral stroke. Vitamin B12 and folic acid are important determinants of homocysteine metabolism. We aimed to evaluate the relationship, if present, between vitamin B12 and folic acid levels and acute cerebral stroke in this study. Blood aliquots drawn within 24 hours after the stroke from hospitalized patients (n=66) with the diagnosis of acute ischemic cerebrovascular episode and also blood samples from 38 healthy controls without any vascular risk factor were analyzed. With a competitive, chemoluminescence assay, serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured in blood samples taken within 24 hours after the stroke. The differences and correlations were tested using frequency test, student-t test and multivariate analysis. Mean serum vitamin B12 levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the control subjects, 245.40 (S.D.: 72.9) and 343.2 (S.D.: 113.0) pg/ml respectively (p=0.0001). This difference was independent from other risk factors. Likewise, mean serum folic acid levels were lower in the patients than in the control subjects, 4.62 (S.D.: 1.94) and 5.97 (S.D.: 1.19) ng/ml, respectively (p=0.003). Mean serum levels of vitamin B12 and folate at the convalescence phase were 253.05 (S.D.: 68.78) pg/ml and 4.48 (S.D.: 2.08) ng/ml, respectively; the values obtained at the acute phase were not significantly different from the values obtained at the convalescence phase. We conclude that low vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations are associated with an increased risk of stroke, and the relationship for vitamin B12 is independent from the other known modifiable stroke risk factors. For understanding the effects of B12 and folate in stroke patients, more detailed follow-up studies with long period are needed.

  18. Persistent reversed end diastolic flow in the fetal middle cerebral artery: an ominous finding.

    PubMed

    Brownfoot, F C; Cluver, C A; Walker, S P

    2015-08-01

    Fetal persistent middle cerebral artery reversed end diastolic flow is a rare and ominous finding. Previous cases have been associated with intracranial hemorrhage, growth restriction, anaemia, and hepatic anomaly. Intrauterine demise or early neonatal death is a common outcome. We report the case of persistent middle cerebral artery reversed end diastolic flow in a well-grown fetus at 32 weeks' gestation resulting from acute, severe anaemia due to a large feto-maternal hemorrhage. An emergency cesarean section was performed and the neonate required advanced resuscitation and immediate blood transfusion. Postnatal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic parietal infarct and bilateral ischaemic changes in the basal ganglia. This provides further evidence that persistent middle cerebral artery reversed end diastolic flow in any fetus is an ominous finding warranting urgent diagnostic evaluation and/or delivery. PMID:27433256

  19. [The relationship between placental lesions and early hemorrhagic-ischemic cerebral injury in very low birth weight infants].

    PubMed

    Vaihinger, Mara; Mazzitelli, Nancy; Balanian, Nora; Grandi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El examen histopatológico de la placenta es trascendente para evidenciar desordenes relacionados con el embarazo que se asocian a lesiones isquémico hemorrágicas cerebrales (LIHC) en recién nacidos prematuros (RNPT). Objetivo: Estudiar la asociación entre lesiones placentarias y LIHC precoces detectadas con ecografía en RNPT ≤ 1500 g y 32 semanas. Material y Métodos: diseño caso – control. Criterios de inclusión: RNPT ≥ 24 y ≤ 32 semanas, ≥ 500 y ≤ 1500 g, nacidos en la Maternidad Sardá entre años 2006 y 2012. Criterios de exclusión: RNPT gemelares, con malformaciones o infecciones intrauterinas específicas y los fallecidos antes de las 24 horas de vida. Resultados: fueron incluidos 198 RNPT, 49 con LIHC (casos) y 149 sin LIHC (controles). No se encontraron diferencias en las lesiones histopatológicas placentarias entre los dos grupos, aunque se apreció una clara tendencia de lesiones inflamatorias en los casos (67.3%) en comparación con los controles (48 %, p = 0.018). La ruptura prematura de las membranas (p = 0.027) y la corioamnionitis clínica fueron más frecuentes en los casos. Complicaciones fuertemente asociadas a prematurez fueron estadísticamente más evidentes entre los casos. La hemorragia intraventricular fue la lesión cerebral más hallada. El 50% de los casos persistieron con LIHC a las 36-40 semanas, mientras que a mayor edad gestacional el riesgo de LIHC fue menor . Conclusiones: las lesiones histopatológicas placentarias no estuvieron asociadas independientemente a mayor riesgo de LIHC, aunque se observó un predominio de lesiones inflamatorias en los casos.

  20. [The developing profile of cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Martí-Vilalta, J L; Martí-Fábregas, J

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, which may be silently manifested as transitory ischemia attacks or cerebral infarction, is not a stable, but rather, a moving process. In cerebral infarctions the initial ischemic area may change or move in a high percentage of patients and may involve a significant volume (mean of 32%) of neuronal tissue. The negative changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce a worsening of the same may be due to the progression of the thrombus, appearance of new embolisms, cerebral edema, hemorrhage, blood reperfusion and systemias causes. These changes may determine the conversion of the shaded ischemic area into a definitive, irreversible infarction. The negative changes may also be produced some distance from the initial ischemic area, either because of microthromboembolisms or diaschisis. The positive changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce as improvement of the same, may be due to collateral circulation, lysis or fragmentation of the embolism and a decrease in cerebral edema. Clinical changes with no evident clinical manifestations may also be produced and may be diagnosed with the use of clinical scales, imaging techniques, ultrasound and hematological and biochemical markers. Acknowledgement of these cerebral ischemia changes in the acute phase may determine the salvation of a part of the brain, and thereby modify the future clinical situation of the patient.

  1. [Sporadic Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: An Overview with Clinical Cases].

    PubMed

    Schöberl, F; Eren, O E; Wollenweber, F A; Kraus, T; Kellert, L

    2016-09-01

    Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebral small vessel disease in the elderly. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by deposition of amyloid-ß (Aß) in the wall of small to medium-sized arteries, capillaries and venules of the cerebral cortex and leptomeninges. Over the last years it was recognized as an important cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive deficits in the elderly. The clinical and radiological manifestations are diverse ranging from acute onset focal neurological deficits due to intracerebral lobar hemorrhage to subacute progressive cognitive impairment due to Aß-mediated inflammation confluent subcortical edema. The wide clinico-radiological spectrum of CAA is a major challenge for the neurologist and stroke physician. This review provides a structured and detailed look at recent developments in CAA, and is illustrated with case studies. PMID:27607067

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Video Capsule Endoscopy Compared to Other Strategies to Manage Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Andrew C.; Ward, Michael J.; Gralnek, Ian M.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Study objective Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a common presentation in hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). A novel diagnostic approach is to use video capsule endoscopy to directly visualize the upper GI tract and identify bleeding. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the relative costs and benefits of video capsule endoscopy compared to other strategies in low to moderate risk ED patients with acute upper GI hemorrhage. Methods We constructed a model using standard decision analysis software to examine the cost-effectiveness of four available strategies for a base-case patient who presents to the ED with either mild or moderate risk scenarios (by Glasgow-Blatchford Score) for requiring invasive hemostatic intervention (i.e., endoscopic, surgical, etc.) The four available diagnostic strategies were (1) direct imaging with video capsule endoscopy performed in the ED, (2) risk stratification using the Glasgow-Blatchford score, (3) nasogastric tube placement and, finally, (4) an admit-all strategy. Results In the low-risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy was preferred strategy (cost $5,691, 14.69 QALYs) and more cost effective than the remaining strategies including nasogastric tube strategy (cost $8,159, 14.69 QALYs), risk stratification strategy (cost $10,695, 14.69 QALYs) and admit-all strategy (cost $22,766, 14.68 QALYs). In the moderate risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy continued to be preferred strategy (cost $9,190, 14.56 QALYs) compared to nasogastric tube (cost $9,487, 14.58 QALYs, ICER $15,891) and more cost effective than admit-all strategy (cost, $22,584, 14.54 QALYs.) Conclusion Video capsule endoscopy may be cost-effective for low and moderate risk patients presenting to the ED with acute upper GI hemorrhage. PMID:24961149

  3. A rare case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a patient of acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sankhe, Shilpa; Kamath, Namita; Sahu, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxic reactions of chemotherapy occur frequently and are often dose limiting side effects of chemotherapy. It is important to differentiate these various nonneoplastic effects from metastases, or sometimes even from each other, since the therapeutic approach differs accordingly. To arrive at a definitive and comprehensive diagnosis, the radiologist should integrate imaging findings, clinical signs, and laboratory results together. Here we present a unique case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a 13-year-old patient of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  4. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Connexin43′s Protection of the Neurovascular Unit under Acute Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuai; Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Hong-Yan; Deng, Fang; Feng, Jia-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We observed mitochondrial connexin43 (mtCx43) expression under cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, analyzed its regulation, and explored its protective mechanisms. Wistar rats were divided into groups based on injections received before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Cerebral infarction volume was detected by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolim chloride staining, and cell apoptosis was observed by transferase dUTP nick end labeling. We used transmission electron microscopy to observe mitochondrial morphology and determined superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. MtCx43, p-mtCx43, protein kinase C (PKC), and p-PKC expression were detected by Western blot. Compared with those in the IR group, cerebral infarction volumes in the carbenoxolone (CBX) and diazoxide (DZX) groups were obviously smaller, and the apoptosis indices were down-regulated. Mitochondrial morphology was damaged after I/R, especially in the IR and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) groups. Similarly, decreased SOD activity and increased MDA were observed after MCAO; CBX, DZX, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) reduced mitochondrial functional injury. Expression of mtCx43 and p-mtCx43 and the p-Cx43/Cx43 ratio were significantly lower in the IR group than in the sham group. These abnormalities were ameliorated by CBX, DZX, and PMA. MtCx43 may protect the neurovascular unit from acute cerebral IR injury via PKC activation induced by mitoKATP channel agonists. PMID:27164087

  5. Microcatheter Looping Facilitates Access to Both the Acutely Angled Parent Artery and Cerebral Aneurysms for Effective Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Hui; Ye, Jian-Ya; Su, Xian-Hui; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Er-Wei; Han, Yong-Feng; Yang, Song-Tao; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aneurysms with an acutely angled parent artery are difficult to access for coiling. This study aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of microcatheter looping for embolization of cerebral aneurysms with access difficulty. Ten patients (male:female=5:5) with cerebral aneurysms treated with the microcatheter looping technique were analyzed retrospectively. The parent artery formed an acute angle with the major artery in five aneurysms. The microcatheter was looped into a “α” loop for treatment in the anterior temporal artery aneurysm and a “U” loop in the remaining nine aneurysms. All ten aneurysms were successfully treated with the microcatheter looping technique. The microcatheter tip was successfully navigated into the aneurysm sac and remained stable throughout the embolization process. All aneurysms were occluded with total occlusion in five and near-total occlusion in five, and the parent artery remained patent in all cases. No complications occurred peri-procedurally. The Glasgow Outcome Scale was 5 in all patients before discharge. Follow-up angiography six to 12 months later revealed a good occlusion status of the aneurysms. The microcatheter looping technique is effective when the conventional embolization technique fails to treat cerebral aneurysms with difficult access especially when the parent artery forming an acute angle with the major artery exacerbates difficult access to the aneurysms. PMID:25496676

  6. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  7. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  8. International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Scoring System for disseminated intravascular coagulation ≥ 6: a new predictor of hemorrhagic early death in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, Mirjana; Suvajdzic, Nada; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Kurtovic, Nada Kraguljac; Sretenovic, Aleksandra; Elezovic, Ivo; Tomin, Dragica

    2013-03-01

    High-hemorrhagic early death (ED) rate is a major impediment in the managing of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our group of 56 newly diagnosed APL patients, ED occurred in 12 subjects, due to endocranial bleeding (8/12), differentiation syndrome (2/12), or infection (2/12). Predictors of hemorrhagic ED were as follows: white blood cells count ≥ 20 × 10(9)/L (P = 0.002337), Eastern cooperative oncology group performance status ≥ 3 (P = 0.00173), fibrinogen level <2 g/L (P = 0.004907), prothrombin time <50% (P = 0.0124), and International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Scoring System for disseminated intravascular coagulation (ISTH DIC score) ≥ 6 (P = 0.00741). Multivariate analysis indicated ISTH DIC score ≥ 6 to be the most significant predictor for hemorrhagic ED (P = 0.008). The main finding of this study is that simple coagulation-related tests, performed on hospital admission and combined in the ISTH DIC score, might help to identify patients at high risk for fatal bleeding needing more aggressive supportive measures.

  9. Mismatch of Low Perfusion and High Permeability Predicts Hemorrhagic Transformation Region in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intra-arterial Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nan; Li, Ying; Wintermark, Max; Jackson, Alan; Wu, Bing; Su, Zihua; Chen, Fei; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yongwei; Zhu, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether the permeability related parameter Ktrans, derived from computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, can predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke who receive intra-arterial thrombolysis. Data from patients meeting the criterion were examined. CTP was performed and Ktrans maps were used to assess the permeability values in HT and non-HT regions. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated, showing the sensitivity and specificity of Ktrans for predicting HT risk. Composite images were produced to illustrate the spatial correlations among perfusion, permeability changes and HT. This study examined 41 patients. Twenty-six patients had hemorrhagic infarction and 15 had parenchymal hemorrhage. The mean Ktrans value in HT regions was significantly lower than that in the non-HT regions (0.26 ± 0.21/min vs. 0.78 ± 0.64/min; P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis identified an optimal cutoff value of 0.334/min for Ktrans to predict HT risk. Composite images suggested ischemic regions with low permeability, or the mismatch area of low perfusion and high permeability, more likely have HT. HT regions after intra-arterial thrombolysis had lower permeability values on Ktrans maps. The mismatch area of lower perfusion and higher permeability are more likely to develop HT. PMID:27302077

  10. Glucocorticosteroids in nano-sterically stabilized liposomes are efficacious for elimination of the acute symptoms of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Waknine-Grinberg, Judith H; Even-Chen, Simcha; Avichzer, Jasmine; Turjeman, Keren; Bentura-Marciano, Annael; Haynes, Richard K; Weiss, Lola; Allon, Nahum; Ovadia, Haim; Golenser, Jacob; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection, and a leading cause of death in children under the age of five in malaria-endemic areas. We report high therapeutic efficacy of a novel formulation of liposome-encapsulated water-soluble glucocorticoid prodrugs, and in particular β-methasone hemisuccinate (BMS), for treatment of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), using the murine P. berghei ANKA model. BMS is a novel derivative of the potent steroid β-methasone, and was specially synthesized to enable remote loading into nano-sterically stabilized liposomes (nSSL), to form nSSL-BMS. The novel nano-drug, composed of nSSL remote loaded with BMS, dramatically improves drug efficacy and abolishes the high toxicity seen upon administration of free BMS. nSSL-BMS reduces ECM rates in a dose-dependent manner and creates a survival time-window, enabling administration of an antiplasmodial drug, such as artemisone. Administration of artemisone after treatment with the nSSL-BMS results in complete cure. Treatment with BMS leads to lower levels of cerebral inflammation, demonstrated by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and cell markers, as well as diminished hemorrhage and edema, correlating with reduced clinical score. Administration of the liposomal formulation results in accumulation of BMS in the brains of sick mice but not of healthy mice. This steroidal nano-drug effectively eliminates the adverse effects of the cerebral syndrome even when the treatment is started at late stages of disease, in which disruption of the blood-brain barrier has occurred and mice show clear signs of neurological impairment. Overall, sequential treatment with nSSL-BMS and artemisone may be an efficacious and well-tolerated therapy for prevention of CM, elimination of parasites, and prevention of long-term cognitive damage.

  11. Effects of acute administration of caffeine on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A; Lucignani, G; Kadekaro, M; Porrino, L J; Sokoloff, L

    1984-05-18

    The quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose autoradiographic method was used to study the effects of acute intravenous injections (15 min prior to study) of caffeine on brain energy metabolism. With doses of 0.1 mg/kg the effects of caffeine on cerebral glucose utilization were limited to the habenula, spinal trigeminal and paraventricular nuclei. After the 1.0 mg/kg dose significant increases were additionally seen in the caudate, ventral tegmental area and medial septum. After the injection of 10 mg/kg of caffeine, average glucose utilization of the brain as a whole was increased by 15%, and of 71 structures examined 31 structures were statistically significantly affected. Among these were all brainstem monoaminergic cell groupings, components of the extrapyramidal motor system, anterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex. In the hypothalamus glucose utilization increased only in the paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus, and median eminence. This study demonstrates that there is a correlation between the known stimulant effects of caffeine on behavior and widespread increases in glucose utilization throughout the brain.

  12. Acute Physical Exercise Affects Cognitive Functioning in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Désirée B; Gane, Claire; Dufour, Sophie-Krystale; Wyss, Dominik; Bouyer, Laurent J; McFadyen, Bradford J; Zabjek, Karl; Andrysek, Jan; Voisen, Julien I

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of acute exercise on the cognitive functioning of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Selected cognitive functions were thus measured using a pediatric version of the Stroop test before and after maximal, locomotor based aerobic exercise in 16 independently ambulatory children (8 children with CP), 6-15 years old. Intense exercise had: 1) a significant, large, positive effect on reaction time (RT) for the CP group (preexercise: 892 ± 56.5 ms vs. postexercise: 798 ± 45.6 ms, p < .002, d = 1.87) with a trend for a similar but smaller response for the typically developing (TD) group (preexercise: 855 ± 56.5 ms vs. postexercise: 822 ± 45.6 ms, p < .08, d = 0.59), and 2) a significant, medium, negative effect on the interference effect for the CP group (preexercise: 4.5 ± 2.5%RT vs. postexercise: 13 ± 2.9%RT, p < .04, d = 0.77) with no significant effect for the TD group (preexercise: 7.2 ± 2.5%RT vs. postexercise: 6.9 ± 2.9%RT, p > .4, d = 0.03). Response accuracy was high in both groups pre- and postexercise (>96%). In conclusion, intense exercise impacts cognitive functioning in children with CP, both by increasing processing speed and decreasing executive function. PMID:26502458

  13. [Recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy due to vasospasm and cerebral hypoperfusionin in acute leukemia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hiraide, Takuya; Matsubayashi, Tomoko; Ishigaki, Hidetoshi; Asahina, Miki; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with recurrent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). She was diagnosed with B-precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and was administered remission-induction chemotherapy. On day 28 of the induction therapy, she experienced seizure and prolonged unconsciousness. Blood pressure was slightly elevated. MRI revealed cortical cytotoxic edema in the right temporal and occipital lobes. In the right occipital white matter the lesion with vasogenic edema also existed. Three days later, MRI showed vasogenic edema in subcortical white matter of the right temporal right occipital and bilateral occipital lobes. The lesions had receded with time. Since the seizure occurred, the chemotherapy had been discontinued. The episodes of seizure and prolonged consciousness recurred 22 days later. MRI revealed vasogenic edema in the right occipital lobe, and MR angiography demonstrated vessel irregularity and reduced branch visualization in the middle and posterior cerebral arteries. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) showed hypoperfusion in both occipital lobes. It suggests that vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion could lead to recurrent PRES in this case. It is possible that ASL might be more sensitive than MRI in detecting the lesions of PRES. It should be noted that PRES might recur in leukemia. PMID:26717647

  14. Impact of Reperfusion after 3 Hours of Symptom Onset on Tissue Fate in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Oh Young; Liebeskind, David S.; Buck, Brian H.; Yoon, Sa Rah; Alger, Jeffry R.; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Saver, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reperfusion of penumbral tissue is a promising strategy for treatment of acute cerebral ischemia more than 3 hours from symptom onset. However, there has been only sparse direct evidence that reperfusion after 3 hours prevents infarct growth. METHODS We analyzed clinical and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data on patients who received endovascular recanalization therapy 3–12 hours after last known well time. Multimodal MRIs were acquired pretreatment, early (1–20 hours), and late (2–7 days) after treatment. Degree of recanalization was assessed on end of procedure catheter angiogram, degree of reperfusion on early posttreatment perfusion MRI, and infarct growth by analysis of diffusion lesion volumes on pretreatment and late MRIs. RESULTS Twenty-seven (12 men, 15 women) underwent endovascular recanalization procedures at 6.0 ± 2.1 hours (range, 3.0–11.5 hours) after last known well time. Immediate posttreatment perfusion lesion (Tmax ≥4 seconds) volume correlated strongly with infarct growth (r = .951, P < .001), exceeding the correlations of vessel recanalization score (r = −.198, P = .446) and pretreatment diffusion-perfusion mismatch volume (r = .518, P = .033). Without reperfusion, enlargement of DWI lesion volume was observed in all patients, and extent of enlargement depended on volume of immediate posttreatment perfusion defects. CONCLUSION Our data indicate that posttreatment reperfusion is the major determinant of threatened tissue outcome, and suggest reperfusion even after 3 hours of symptom onset can alter tissue fate over a wide range of mismatch volumes. PMID:19021836

  15. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  16. Rapid diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 variant by real-time one-step RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Nicolas; Lahlou Amine, Idriss; Tcheng, Remy; Falcon, Delphine; Rivat, Nathalie; Dussart, Philippe; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Chomel, Jean-Jacques; Norder, Helene; Eugene, Maxime; Lina, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Coxsackievirus A24 variant is, together with enterovirus 70 and adenoviruses, the major etiological agent involved in acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks worldwide. However, the standard virus isolation method followed by serotyping or VP1 region sequencing is time-consuming. A rapid method for the detection of coxsackievirus A24 variant from conjunctival swab specimens would be useful in the context of explosive and extensive outbreaks. A one-step real-time RT-PCR assay based on TaqMan technology was thus developed and assessed on 36 conjunctival swabs from outbreaks of conjunctivitis in Morocco in 2004 due to a coxsackievirus A24 variant and in Corsica in 2006 due to adenovirus type 3, and 83 virus strains including 41 coxsackievirus A24 variant collected in French Guiana and Guadeloupe in 2003, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2003, in Morocco in 2004 and 42 other virus species genetically close or known to be responsible for conjunctivitis. All the conjunctival swabs from coxsackievirus A24 variant related outbreak and the 41 coxsackievirus A24 variant strains were tested positive by the RT-PCR assay within 4h. This novel single-tube real-time RT-PCR assay is sensitive and specific, and consists in a reliable and faster alternative to the viral culture for recent and future acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis outbreaks caused by coxsackievirus A24 variant.

  17. Acute cyst rupture, hemorrhage and septic shock after a shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Bae, Sang Rak; Lho, Yong Soo; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of urinary calculi in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) ranges from 10 to 36 %. Shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for urinary calculi in ADPKD was reported to be a safe and effective treatment option. However, there is a potential risk of cyst rupture and traumatic hemorrhage because of shockwaves. A 39-year-old female with polycystic kidneys and upper ureter stone was treated with SWL and developed life-threatening complications of cyst rupture, traumatic hemorrhage and septic shock. She was initially treated with supportive care in the intensive care unit, but in the end nephrectomy was performed.

  18. Acute toxicity of a nuclear magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow indicator in cats.

    PubMed

    Branch, C A; Ewing, J R; Fagan, S C; Goldberg, D A; Welch, K M

    1990-08-01

    We studied trifluoromethane as a potential gaseous indicator in nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of cerebral blood flow. We considered the effects of trifluoromethane on cerebral blood flow in 17 cats and on the electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram in nine cats and compared these with the effects of the more toxic compound chlorodifluoromethane in five cats. Inhaled at 60%, trifluoromethane had no effect on cerebral blood flow, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, or oxyhemoglobin content. At 70%, trifluoromethane sensitized the cats' hearts to epinephrine, but to a much lesser degree than 40% chlorodifluoromethane, and produced only moderate changes in cerebral electrical activity as measured by the electroencephalogram. We found trifluoromethane to be suitable for use in animals, but its toxicity needs to be studied further before it can be used in humans for the measurement of cerebral blood flow.

  19. Major ozonated autohemotherapy promotes the recovery of upper limb motor function in patients with acute cerebral infarction★

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaona; Li, Zhensheng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Peng, Haiyan; Huang, Yongjun; Luo, Gaoquan; Peng, Kairun

    2013-01-01

    Major ozonated autohemotherapy is classically used in treating ischemic disorder of the lower limbs. In the present study, we performed major ozonated autohemotherapy treatment in patients with acute cerebral infarction, and assessed outcomes according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health Stroke Score, Modified Rankin Scale, and transcranial magnetic stimulation motor-evoked potential. Compared with the control group, the clinical total effective rate and the cortical potential rise rate of the upper limbs were significantly higher, the central motor conduction time of upper limb was significantly shorter, and the upper limb motor-evoked potential amplitude was significantly increased, in the ozone group. In the ozone group, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Score was positively correlated with the central motor conduction time and the motor-evoked potential amplitude of the upper limb. Central motor conduction time and motor-evoked potential amplitude of the upper limb may be effective indicators of motor-evoked potentials to assess upper limb motor function in cerebral infarct patients. Furthermore, major ozonated autohemotherapy may promote motor function recovery of the upper limb in patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:25206688

  20. Angiographic and Clinical Factors Related with Good Functional Outcome after Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hyuk; Han, Young Min; Jang, Kyeong Sool; Yoon, Wan Soo; Jang, Dong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate good prognostic factors for an acute occlusion of a major cerebral artery using mechanical thrombectomy. Methods Between January 2013 to December 2014, 37 consecutive patients with acute occlusion of a major cerebral artery treated by mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers were conducted. We analyzed clinical and angiographic factors retrospectively. The collateral flow and the result of recanalization were sorted by grading systems. Outcome was assessed by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90 days. We compared the various parameters between good and poor angiographic and clinical results. Results Twenty seven patients demonstrated good recanalization [Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) 2b or 3] after thrombectomy. At the 90-day follow up, 19 patients had good (mRS, 0-2), 14 had moderate (3-4) and four had poor outcomes (5-6). The mRS of older patients (≥75 years) were poor than younger patients. Early recanalization, high Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score, and low baseline NIHSS were closely related to 90-day mRS, whereas high TICI was related to both mRS and the decrease in the NIHSS. Conclusion NIHSS decreased markedly only when recanalization was successful. A good mRS was related to low initial NIHSS, good collateral, and early successful recanalization. PMID:26539260

  1. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  2. The Application of Diffusion- and Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis and Therapy of Acute Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, Huifang; Dai, Jianping

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI and PWI) was applied for stroke diagnose in 120 acute (< 48 h) ischemic stroke patients. At hyperacute (< 6 h) stage, it is difficult to find out the infarction zone in conventional T1 or T2 image, but it is easy in DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map; when at 3–6-hour stage it is also easy in PWI, cerebral blood flow (CBF) map, cerebral blood volume (CBV) map, and mean transit time (MTT) map; at acute (6–48 h) stage, DWI or PWI is more sensitive than conventional T1 or T2 image too. Combining DWI with ADC, acute and chronic infarction can be distinguished. Besides, penumbra which should be developed in meaning was used as an indication or to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. There were two cases (< 1.5 h) that broke the model of penumbra because abnormity was found in DWI but not that in PWI, finally they recovered without any sequela. PMID:23165020

  3. Cerebral Thrombotic Complications Related to l-Asparaginase Treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Retrospective Review of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Eden, D; Hipkins, R; Bradbury, C A

    2016-09-01

    l-Asparaginase is a potent antileukemia agent and an essential part of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, toxicity limits dose escalation, especially in adults. This includes a significant risk of thrombosis, which remains an important source of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Here, we provide a detailed report of 10 cases of cerebral thrombotic complications that occurred over a 5-year period at 4 large tertiary referral hospitals. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this type in the published literature. PMID:25693917

  4. A dynamic concept of middle cerebral artery occlusion and cerebral infarction in the acute state based on interpreting severe hyperemia as a sign of embolic migration.

    PubMed

    Olsen, T S; Lassen, N A

    1984-01-01

    The present study investigates the pathogenesis of focal cerebral hyperemia, its effect on brain tissue and discusses its pathophysiological and therapeutic importance in the light of interpreting severe hyperemia as a sign of arterial reopening probably due to embolic migration. Cerebral angiography, serial CT-scans and serial TC99 -scans were performed in a consecutive group of 73 patients with completed stroke all admitted to hospital within 3 days after stroke onset. When possible the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied with the intracarotid Xe 133 injection method. Twenty-nine patients had evidence of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion; rCBF was investigated in 24. Fourteen patients had either occlusion or severe internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis; rCBF was not measured in these patients. Thirty patients had no angiographical evidence of MCA occlusion, ICA occlusion or severe ICA stenosis; rCBF was investigated in 24. Focal hyperemia was observed in 21 patients but exclusively in the group with evidence of MCA occlusion. Hence, these 21 patients are typical and representative for the group of patients with evidence of MCA occlusion. Hyperemia was found in infarcted as well as in non-infarcted tissue. Apparently, it is the severity of the initial ischemic episode and not the hyperemia that determines whether or not tissue necrosis develops. Interpreting severe hyperemia as a sign of arterial reopening and embolic migration (evidenced by partial reopening affecting only some MCA branches) reopening had occurred in about 1/3 of the patients with MCA occlusion before they were examined 1 to 4 days after stroke onset. Autopsy studies performed in 8 of the patients with MCA occlusion indicate that arterial reopening also takes place in many patients later on (7 of 8). According to this interpretation, hypothetical as it is, the changing position of the embolus is associated with partial or complete reperfusion leading to hyperemia in the

  5. Cerebral Metabolism and the Role of Glucose Control in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M; Prashant, Giyarpuram N; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews key concepts of cerebral glucose metabolism, neurologic outcomes in clinical trials, the biology of the neurovascular unit and its involvement in secondary brain injury after traumatic brain insults, and current scientific and clinical data that demonstrate a better understanding of the biology of metabolic dysfunction in the brain, a concept now known as cerebral metabolic energy crisis. The use of neuromonitoring techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of the metabolic crisis is reviewed and a model that summarizes the triphasic view of cerebral metabolic disturbance supported by existing scientific data is outlined. The evidence is summarized and a template for future research provided. PMID:27637395

  6. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Marlies; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  7. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  8. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis as an Extrahepatic Manifestation of Acute Anicteric Hepatitis A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zis, Panagiotis; Kontogeorgi, Elli; Karakalos, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Despoina; Sevastianos, Vassilios A.

    2012-01-01

    Among the many infective causes of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), viral hepatitis has been regarded as a rare associated condition. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with CVT associated with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, outlining probable pathogenic mechanisms. We suggest that hepatitis A serological markers should be routinely included in the investigation of cerebral venous thrombosis of unknown etiology, in nonvaccinated patients with risk factors of a recent HAV exposure. PMID:22934203

  9. Recurrent acute obstructive hydrocephalus as clinical onset of cerebral Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Vincenzo; Imperato, Alessia; Colella, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Valentina; Mariniello, Giuseppe; Gangemi, Michelangelo

    2010-10-01

    Whipple's disease is a rare multisystemic infection caused by the intracellular bacteria Thropheryma whippelii. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not rare. The most frequent CNS manifestations are cognitive and behavioural changes, sopranuclear ophtalmoplegia, myoclonus, epilepsy, ataxia, meningitis and focal cerebral palsy. We report one case of cerebral localization of Whipple's disease with a clinical presentation of recurrent endocranic hypertension and hydrocephalus, and uncommon neurological symptoms, successfully treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy and antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole.

  10. Acute stress induces an increase in rat cerebral cortex levels of n-butyl-?-carboline-3-carboxylate, an endogenous benzodiazepine binding inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Medina, J H; Peña, C; Novas, M L; Paladini, A C; De Robertis, E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of an acute swimming stress in rats on the amount of n-butyl-?-carboline-3-carboxylate, an endogenous benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor, was investigated. In 15 min this substance increased two fold in the cerebral cortex of the stressed rat and this increase was blocked by the previous injection of diazepam; however, no changes were observed in the cerebellum with stress. These results are discussed in relation to previous findings that, after the acute stress, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding decreases in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, but not in cerebellum. A possible relationship between this benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor and the state of "anxiety" produced by stress is postulated.

  11. Heterogeneity of cerebral vasoreactivity in preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Pryds, O.; Greisen, G.; Lou, H.; Friis-Hansen, B. )

    1989-10-01

    The reaction of cerebral blood flow to acute changes in arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) and mean arterial blood pressure was determined in 57 preterm infants supported by mechanical ventilation (mean gestational age 30.1 weeks) during the first 48 hours of life. All infants had normal brain sonograms at the time of the investigation. In each infant, global cerebral blood flow was determined by xenon-133 clearance two to five times within a few hours at different levels of PaCO2. Changes in PaCO2 followed adjustments of the ventilator settings. Arterial oxygen pressure was intended to be kept constant, and mean arterial blood pressure fluctuated spontaneously between measurements. The data were analyzed by stepwise multiple regression, with changes in global cerebral blood flow, PaCO2, mean arterial blood pressure, and postnatal age or intracranial hemorrhage used as variables. In infants with persistently normal brain sonograms, the global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity was markedly lower during the first day of life (mean 11.2% to 11.8%/kPa PaCO2) compared with the second day of life (mean 32.6/kPa PaCO2), and pressure-flow autoregulation was preserved. Similarly, global cerebral blood flow-carbon dioxide reactivity and pressure-flow autoregulation were present in infants in whom mild intracranial hemorrhage developed after the study. In contrast, global cerebral blood flow reactivity to changes in PaCO2 and mean arterial blood pressure was absent in infants in whom ultrasonographic signs of severe intracranial hemorrhage subsequently developed. These infants also had about 20% lower global cerebral blood flow before hemorrhage, in comparison with infants whose sonograms were normal, a finding that suggests functional disturbances of cerebral blood flow regulation.

  12. Neuroprotective mechanism of HIF-1α overexpression in the early stage of acute cerebral infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YUHUA; HE, WEIYA; GENG, LIJIAO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the expression and neuroprotective mechanism of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) in the brain tissue of a rat model of early acute cerebral infarction. A total of 64 Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into surgery and sham groups and the model of focal cerebral infarction was established by the suture-occluded method. In the sham group, blood vessels were separated but not occluded. Rats in the surgery and sham groups were subdivided into eight groups (n=4/group). Blood samples was collected at 8 time points including 30 min and 1, 3, 6, 12, 48, 24 and 72 h, respectively, and HIF-1α content was detected using ELISA. Brain tissues of rats in all groups were harvested following blood collection. HIF-1α protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling was used to analyze the brain cell apoptosis index. ELISA results demonstrated that rats in the surgery group began to express HIF-1α within 30 min, and HIF-1α expression levels gradually increased, peaking at 12 h. HIF-1α expression levels were significantly increased in the surgery group at all time points, as compared with the sham group (P<0.05). The concentration of HIF-1α decreased rapidly in 12 h. At various time points, HIF-1α protein expression in the brain tissue of rats in the sham group was negative. HIF-1α protein expression was significantly increased in the surgery group (P<0.05), peaking at 12 h, and decreasing after this point. As compared with the sham group, the apoptosis indices of the brain tissue of rats in the surgery group exhibited a gradual increasing trend with significant decreases observed after 12 h (P<0.05). Intra-group comparison of all indices in the surgery group, indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between postoperative 12 h and other time points (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HIF-1α was highly

  13. MRI of Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, James R.; Chopp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability using MRI and its application to cerebral ischemia are reviewed. Measurement of BBB permeability using MRI has been employed to evaluate ischemic damage during acute and subacute phases of stroke and to predict hemorrhagic transformation. There is also an emerging interest on the development and use of MRI to monitor vascular structural changes and angiogenesis during stroke recovery. In this review, we describe MRI BBB permeability and susceptibility-weighted MRI measurements and its applications to evaluate ischemic damage during the acute and subacute phases of stroke and vascular remodeling during stroke recovery. PMID:23997835

  14. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  15. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  16. Relationship of Early Spontaneous Type V Blood Pressure Fluctuation after Thrombolysis in Acute Cerebral Infarction Patients and the Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Wan, Ting; Xu, Xiahong; Liu, Feifeng; Li, Changsong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Huan; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between an early spontaneous type V blood pressure fluctuation and the post-thrombolysis prognosis of patients with acute cerebral infarction. Patients were admitted consecutively. All patients were categorized into the type V blood pressure fluctuation group or non-type V blood pressure group. Their blood pressure was monitored before thrombolysis and until 6 h after thrombolysis. Baseline data and clinical outcomes were compared. Of 170 patients, 43 (25.2%) had an early type V blood pressure fluctuation. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score before thrombolysis and 24 h after thrombolysis, and the modified Rankin scale score at 90 days differed significantly between the two groups (P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an unfavorable prognosis at 3 months was associated with the NIHSS score before thrombolysis (P = 0.000) but probably not with this blood pressure fluctuation (P = 0.058). An early spontaneous type V blood pressure fluctuation is common in patients with acute cerebral infarction who received venous thrombolysis, especially if they have a higher NIHSS score before thrombolysis. The type V blood pressure fluctuation may not influence patients’ prognosis; however, this needs to be confirmed in future trials. PMID:27278121

  17. [Metabolic response in the acute stage of cerebral infarction--with special reference to oxygen consumption and resting metabolic expenditure].

    PubMed

    Touho, H; Sawada, T; Karasawa, J; Kikuchi, H; Ohgitani, S

    1986-05-01

    Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, respiratory quotients, and resting metabolic expenditure were measured in 23 patients with cerebral infarction in their acute stage. Metabolic measurement were carried out with the technique of indirect calorimetry on their admission within two days from the onsets. At the same time, urine was collected twenty-four hours to measure urinary catecholamine excretion. Mean value of resting metabolic expenditure was 115.1% and this positively correlated with urinary catecholamine, especially noradrenaline excretion. Maximum value of resting metabolic expenditure was up to 187.1% of that expected for an uninjured resting person of equivalent age, sex, and body surface area. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production also positively correlated to urinary catecholamine excretion. On the other hand, respiratory quotients did not have any significant correlation with oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, resting metabolic expenditure, or urinary catecholamine excretion. From those facts, it was implied that overactivity of sympathetic nervous system existed in their acute stage of cerebral infarction, and the overflow might directly influence oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and resting metabolic expenditure, and moreover we had to take into consideration of hyper-metabolic state to manage patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases as malnutrition might cause weight loss and immune incompetence.

  18. Optical bedside monitoring of cerebral perfusion: technological and methodological advances applied in a study on acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Gruber, Clemens; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Jelzow, Alexander; Steinbrink, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B.; MacDonald, Rainer; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2010-11-01

    We present results of a clinical study on bedside perfusion monitoring of the human brain by optical bolus tracking. We measure the kinetics of the contrast agent indocyanine green using time-domain near-IR spectroscopy (tdNIRS) in 10 patients suffering from acute unilateral ischemic stroke. In all patients, a delay of the bolus over the affected when compared to the unaffected hemisphere is found (mean: 1.5 s, range: 0.2 s to 5.2 s). A portable time-domain near-IR reflectometer is optimized and approved for clinical studies. Data analysis based on statistical moments of time-of-flight distributions of diffusely reflected photons enables high sensitivity to intracerebral changes in bolus kinetics. Since the second centralized moment, variance, is preferentially sensitive to deep absorption changes, it provides a suitable representation of the cerebral signals relevant for perfusion monitoring in stroke. We show that variance-based bolus tracking is also less susceptible to motion artifacts, which often occur in severely affected patients. We present data that clearly manifest the applicability of the tdNIRS approach to assess cerebral perfusion in acute stroke patients at the bedside. This may be of high relevance to its introduction as a monitoring tool on stroke units.

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karakama, Jun; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Maehara, Taketoshi; Ohno, Kikuo

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with an extremely rare case of intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of an anterior spinal artery aneurysm manifesting as disturbance of consciousness following sudden onset of neck pain and numbness of the extremities. Cranial computed tomography revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage, mainly in the posterior fossa. Cerebral angiography studies on admission and on the 4th day demonstrated no definite abnormality as a bleeding source. A ventricular catheter was inserted to treat the acute hydrocephalus, and conservative management was continued during the acute period. Third angiography on the 18th day demonstrated an anterior spinal artery aneurysm at the C1 level which was considered to be the bleeding site. After conservative treatment, the patient was discharged without neurological deficits. Fourth angiography on the 108 th day disclosed spontaneous disappearance of the aneurysm, which was confirmed by the fifth angiography on the 269 th day. If subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown etiology is encountered, spinal artery aneurysm should be considered as the bleeding source. Despite the controversy concerning the treatment strategy, ruptured spinal artery aneurysms can be treated conservatively because of the possibility of spontaneous regression. Follow-up angiography is required to evaluate the natural course of the lesion.

  20. Cerebral Infarction following Acute Subdural Hematoma in Infants and Young Children: Predictors and Significance of FLAIR Vessel Hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    MOMOSE, Hiroaki; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; AOKI, Rie; ATSUMI, Hideki; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    A phenomenon of cerebral infarction following acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) in infants and young children, termed cerebral infarction following ASDH (CIASDH), has been well recognized, though both its mechanisms and risk factors have been poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the predictors for CIASDH in a population of ASDH, and to evaluate the imaging studies to presume the mechanisms of CIASDH. We retrospectively examined consecutive children 6 years of age or younger, who were diagnosed with ASDH and were admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2014. In 57 consecutive children with ASDH, 12 (21.1%) developed CIASDH. The multivariate analysis revealed five predictors for CIASDH: presence of seizure, consciousness disturbance at admission, absence of skull fracture, hematoma thickness ≥ 5 mm on computed tomography (CT), and midline shift ≥ 3 mm on CT (p < 0.05). In three of six patients (50%) undergoing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) within 5 days of admission, serpentine hyperintensities in the subarachnoid space (FLAIR vessel hyperintensities) were demonstrated. MR angiography showed neither occlusion nor stenosis of the cerebral arteries. Single photon emission CT performed at admission in one patient showed a cerebral blood flow reduction in the ASDH side. All the children with CIASDH showed unfavorable outcomes at discharge. Children showing multiple predictors at admission should be carefully observed for development of CIASDH. Evaluation of the imaging studies suggested that a blood flow disturbance in the level of peripheral arteries to microcirculation was one candidate for possible mechanisms to induce the CIASDH. PMID:26041626

  1. Management of Acute Submacular Hemorrhage with Intravitreal Injection of Tenecteplase, Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pil; Park, Jun Sang; Kwon, Oh Woong; You, Yong Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the visual and anatomical outcomes for neovascular age-related macular degeneration with submacular hemorrhage after intravitreal injections of tenecteplase (TNK), anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and expansile gas. Methods This study was a retrospective clinical case series following 25 eyes of 25 patients. All patients received a triple injection using 0.05 mL TNK (50 µg), 0.05 mL anti-VEGF and 0.3 mL of perfluoropropane gas. Retreatment with anti-VEGF was performed as needed. Preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central retinal thickness were analyzed. Results The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution of best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly from 1.09 ± 0.77 at baseline to 0.52 ± 0.60 at 12 months (p < 0.001). The mean central retinal thickness also improved significantly from 545 ± 156 at baseline to 266 ± 107 at 12 months (p < 0.001). A visual improvement of 0.3 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution unit or more was achieved in 15 eyes (60%). During the 12 postoperative months, an average of 4.04 intravitreal anti-VEGF injections was applied. Conclusions A triple injection of TNK, anti-VEGF, and a gas appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of submacular hemorrhage secondary to neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27247518

  2. Effect of edaravone on favorable outcome in patients with acute cerebral large vessel occlusion: subanalysis of RESCUE-Japan Registry.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Yuki; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Egashira, Yusuke; Shirakawa, Manabu; Uchida, Kazutaka; Kageyama, Hirohito; Tomogane, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    The data of the nationwide prospective registry of acute cerebral large vessel occlusion (LVO; RESCUE-Japan Registry) were analyzed to know the effect of edaravone, a free radical scavenger, on clinical outcome at 90 days after onset. In this registry, patients with acute cerebral LVO admitted within 24 h after onset were prospectively registered. The effect of various factors including endovascular treatment (EVT), intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA), and other medication including edaravone on favorable outcome (modified Rankin scale 0-1) was analyzed. Of the 1,454 registered patients, 1,442 patients (99.2%) had the information of edaravone were analyzed. In total, edaravone group had more patients with favorable outcome compared to non-edaravone group (22.9% vs. 13.8%, p = 0.0006). Edaravone increased favorable outcome in patients treated with IV rt-PA (29.4% vs. 11.1%, p = 0.0107), but not with EVT (21.2% vs. 13.9%, p = 0.309). Logistic regression analysis revealed that higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score on admission [odds ratio (OR) 0.875, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.858-0.894] and advanced age (OR 0.963, 95%CI 0.952-0.975) were significantly related to unfavorable outcome. In contrast, IV rt-PA (OR 2.489, 95%CI 1.867-3.319), EVT (OR 1.375, 95%CI 1.013-1.865), and edaravone (OR 1.483, 95%CI 1.027-2.143) were significantly associated with favorable outcome. This analysis indicated that IV rt-PA, EVT, and edaravone were effective to obtain favorable outcome in patients with acute LVO. Combination IV rt-PA with edaravone was more effective. PMID:25739433

  3. Effect of acute exposure to hypergravity (GX vs. GZ) on dynamic cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Wood, S. J.; Picot, P. A.; Stein, F.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Rupert, A. H.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of 30 min of exposure to either +3GX (front-to-back) or +GZ (head-to-foot) centrifugation on cerebrovascular responses to 80 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 14 healthy individuals. Both before and after +3 GX or +3 GZ centrifugation, eye-level blood pressure (BP(eye)), end tidal PCO2 (PET(CO2)), mean cerebral flow velocity (CFV) in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), cerebral vascular resistance (CVR), and dynamic cerebral autoregulatory gain (GAIN) were measured with subjects in the supine position and during subsequent 80 degrees HUT for 30 min. Mean BP(eye) decreased with HUT in both the GX (n = 7) and GZ (n = 7) groups (P < 0.001), with the decrease being greater after centrifugation only in the GZ group (P < 0.05). PET(CO2) also decreased with HUT in both groups (P < 0.01), but the absolute level of decrease was unaffected by centrifugation. CFV decreased during HUT more significantly after centrifugation than before centrifugation in both groups (P < 0.02). However, these greater decreases were not associated with greater increases in CVR. In the supine position after centrifugation compared with before centrifugation, GAIN increased in both groups (P < 0.05, suggesting an autoregulatory deficit), with the change being correlated to a measure of otolith function (the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex) in the GX group (r = 0.76, P < 0.05) but not in the GZ group (r = 0.24, P = 0.60). However, GAIN was subsequently restored to precentrifugation levels during postcentrifugation HUT (i.e., as BP(eye) decreased), suggesting that both types of centrifugation resulted in a leftward shift of the cerebral autoregulation curve. We speculate that this leftward shift may have been due to vestibular activation (especially during +GX) or potentially to an adaptation to reduced cerebral perfusion pressure during +GZ.

  4. Reversible cerebral periventricular white matter changes with corpus callosum involvement in acute toluene-poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liu, Chi-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Substance poisoning, such as toluene intoxication, has seldom been reported in the relevant literature. The documented cerebral neuroimaging has mostly described reversible symmetrical white matter changes in both the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. This paper presents 2 patients with toluene poisoning, whose brain magnetic resonance imaging studies showed a similar picture that included extra involvement over the corpus callosum; however, such corpus callosum involvement has never been mentioned and is quite rare in the literature. We discussed the underlying neuropathological pathways in this article. Hopefully, these cases will provide first-line clinicians with some valuable information with regard to toluene intoxication and clinical neuroimaging presentations.

  5. EEG patterns from acute to chronic stroke phases in focal cerebral ischemic rats: correlations with functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-jie; Ke, Zheng; Li, Le; Yip, Shea-ping; Tong, Kai-yu

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring the neural activities from the ischemic penumbra provides critical information on neurological recovery after stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the temporal alterations of neural activities using electroencephalography (EEG) from the acute phase to the chronic phase, and to compare EEG with the degree of post-stroke motor function recovery in a rat model of focal ischemic stroke. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 90 min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery followed by reperfusion for seven days (n = 58). The EEG signals were recorded at the pre-stroke phase (0 h), acute phase (3, 6 h), subacute phase (12, 24, 48, 72 h) and chronic phase (96, 120, 144, 168 h) (n = 8). This study analyzed post-stroke seizures and polymorphic delta activities (PDAs) and calculated quantitative EEG parameters such as the alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR). The ADR represented the ratio between alpha power and delta power, which indicated how fast the EEG activities were. Forelimb and hindlimb motor functions were measured by De Ryck's test and the beam walking test, respectively. In the acute phase, delta power increased fourfold with the occurrence of PDAs, and the histological staining showed that the infarct was limited to the striatum and secondary sensory cortex. In the subacute phase, the alpha power reduced to 50% of the baseline, and the infarct progressed to the forelimb cortical region. ADRs reduced from 0.23 ± 0.09 to 0.04 ± 0.01 at 3 h in the acute phase and gradually recovered to 0.22 ± 0.08 at 168 h in the chronic phase. In the comparison of correlations between the EEG parameters and the limb motor function from the acute phase to the chronic phase, ADRs were found to have the highest correlation coefficients with the beam walking test (r = 0.9524, p < 0.05) and De Ryck's test (r = 0.8077, p < 0.05). This study measured EEG activities after focal cerebral ischemia and showed that functional recovery was closely

  6. Obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs, effective surgical techniques, and extensive blood banking facilities, post-partum hemorrhage remains a major cause of death in the United States. A hemorrhage bundle developed by the New York Safe Motherhood Initiative provides clear guidelines for reducing such deaths. This bundle focuses on risk assessment, preparation, diagnosis, and the provision of several management algorithms. Implementation of the protocols and approaches contained in this document, or their equivalent, on a systems basis and a consideration of several additional recommendations for individual care will reduce the likelihood of death from hemorrhage.

  7. Acute simultaneous multiple lacunar infarcts as the initial presentation of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Yun-Chung; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an adult-onset, dominantly inherited small-vessel disease of the brain caused by NOTCH3 mutations and characterized by recurrent subcortical infarctions, dementia, migraine with aura, and mood disturbance. We report a patient with unusual presentation of CADASIL with acute simultaneous multiple subcortical lacunar infarcts as the first manifestation. A 69-year-old man developed confusion, drowsiness, right hemiparesis, and slurred speech following orthopedic surgeries. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leukoencephalopathy and multiple acute subcortical lacunar infarcts. Brain magnetic resonance angiography, echocardiography and 24-hour electrocardiography were unremarkable. The symptoms improved quickly after treatment with fluid hydration and antiplatelet agent, and his consciousness and mentality totally recovered within 3 days. The NOTCH3 genetic testing showed a heterozygous missense mutation, c.1630C>T (p. Arg544Cys). The experience in this case suggests that brain imaging is important in managing postoperative confusion, and any patient with diffuse leukoencephalopathy of unknown etiology may need to be tested for NOTCH3 mutations. Surgery is an important factor of encephalopathy and acute infarction in individuals with NOTCH3 mutations. Comprehensive presurgical evaluations and proactive perioperative precautions to avoid dehydration and anemia are necessary for patients with CADASIL who are about to receive anesthesia and surgery. PMID:25959358

  8. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Subgroup Analysis of the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa; Adami, Alessandro; Becker, Jennifer L.; Cala, Lesley A.; Casado, Ana M.; Chen, Christopher; Dineen, Robert A.; Gommans, John; Koumellis, Panos; Christensen, Hanna; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Lees, Kennedy R.; Ntaios, George; Ozturk, Serefnur; Phillips, Stephen J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Szatmari, Szabolcs; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. Methods ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Results Blood pressure level (baseline 171/92 mmHg) fell in both groups but was significantly lower at 7 days in those patients assigned to continue antihypertensive drugs (difference 9.4/3.5 mmHg, P < .01). At 90 days, the primary outcome did not differ between the groups; the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with continue versus stop drugs was .92 (95% confidence interval, .45-1.89; P = .83). There was no difference between the treatment groups for any secondary outcome measure, or rates of death or serious adverse events. Conclusions Among patients with acute ICH, immediate continuation of antihypertensive drugs during the first week did not reduce death or major disability in comparison to stopping treatment temporarily. PMID:26853137

  9. β-cypermethrin-induced acute neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, DeQing; Chen, Nan; Zhu, ChunXiao; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Li; Yang, Jun; An, Li

    2015-01-01

    A Type II pyrethroid pesticide β-cypermethrin is widely used in agriculture and domestic applications for pest control. However, the effect of β-cypermethrin on the glutamate neurotransmitter has not been well-documented. In the current study, mice were treated with 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as a vehicle control. Four hours after treatment, we investigated glutamate levels and glutamate-metabolizing enzyme (phosphate-activated glutaminase, PAG; glutamine synthetase, GS) activities in the cerebral cortex of mice, using a HPLC system with ultraviolet detectors and a colorimetric assay. Glutamate uptake levels in the synaptosomes of cerebral cortex and mRNA expression levels of PAG, GS, and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the cerebral cortex were detected by a radioactive labeling method and qRT-PCR, respectively. Toxic symptoms were observed in mice treated with 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. Compared with the control, significant decreases in glutamate level and GS activity, and an obvious increase in synaptosomal glutamate uptake, were found in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. No significant changes were found among groups in PAG activity or PAG, GS, and GLT-1 mRNA expression levels. These results suggest that β-cypermethrin treatment may reduce the glutamate level in the mouse cerebral cortex, which is associated with decreased GS activity and increased synaptosomal glutamate uptake. Our findings provide a partial explanation for the neurotoxic effects of synthetic β-cypermethrin insecticides.

  10. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  11. Effect of Acute Exposure to Hypergravity (Gx vs. Gz) on Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, Jorge M.; Wood, S. J.; Picot, P. A.; Stein, F.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Rupert, A. H.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of 30 min of exposure to either +3G(sub x) or +3G(sub z) centrifugation on cerebrovascular responses to 800 head-up tilt (HUT) in 14 healthy individuals. Both before and after +3G(sub x) or +3G(sub z) centrifugation, eye-level blood pressure (BP(sub eye)), end tidal CO2 (P(sub ET)CO2), mean cerebral flow velocity (CFV) in the middle cerebral artery (trans cranial Doppler ultrasound), cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) and dynamic cerebral autoregulatory gain (GAIN) were measured with subjects in the supine position and during subsequent 800 HUT for 30 min. Mean BP(sub eye) decreased with HUT in both the G(sub x) (n= 7) and G(sub z) (n=7) groups (P less than 0.00l), with the decrease being greater after centrifugation only in the G(sub z) group (P less than 0.05). P(sub ET)CO2 also decreased with HUT in both groups (P less than 0.0l), but the absolute level of decrease was unaffected by centrifugation. CFV decreased during HUT more significantly after than before centrifugation in both groups (P less than 0.02). However, these greater decreases were not associated with greater increases in CVR. In the supine position after compared to before centrifugation, GAIN increased in both groups (P less than 0.05, suggesting an autoregulatory deficit), with the change being correlated to a measure of otolith function (the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex) in the G(sub x) group (R=0.76, P less than 0.05) but not in the G(sub z) group (R=0.24, P=0.60). However, GAIN was subsequently restored to pre-centrifugation levels during post-centrifugation HUT (i.e., as BP(sub eye) decreased), suggesting that both types of centrifugation resulted in a leftward shift of the cerebral autoregulation curve. We speculate that this leftward shift may have been due to vestibular activation (especially during +G(sub x)) or potentially to an adaptation to reduced cerebral perfusion pressure during +G(sub z).

  12. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  13. Automatic Detection and Quantification of Acute Cerebral Infarct by Fuzzy Clustering and Histographic Characterization on Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Map

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Chen, Yu-Wei; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Wu, Hsiao-Kuang; Lin, Yun-Yu; Lee, Ying-Ying; Chen, Chi-Jen; Lin, Huey-Juan; Smith, Eric Edward; Hsin, Yue-Loong

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the volumes of acute cerebral infarct in the magnetic resonance imaging harbors prognostic values. However, semiautomatic method of segmentation is time-consuming and with high interrater variability. Using diffusion weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map from patients with acute infarction in 10 days, we aimed to develop a fully automatic algorithm to measure infarct volume. It includes an unsupervised classification with fuzzy C-means clustering determination of the histographic distribution, defining self-adjusted intensity thresholds. The proposed method attained high agreement with the semiautomatic method, with similarity index 89.9 ± 6.5%, in detecting cerebral infarct lesions from 22 acute stroke patients. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed computer-assisted prompt segmentation method, which appeared promising to replace the laborious, time-consuming, and operator-dependent semiautomatic segmentation. PMID:24738080

  14. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Hardik; Wiseman, Natalie; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wentao; Welch, Robert D.; O’Neil, Brian J.; Zuk, Conor; Wang, Xiao; Mika, Valerie; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM) for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL). We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively). We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both). mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation. PMID:25659079

  15. [Cerebral artery infarction presented as an unusual complication of acute middle otitis].

    PubMed

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Gutiérrez-Paternina, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la otitis media aguda es una inflamación del oído medio frecuente en la edad pediátrica. Aproximadamente 2 % de todos los casos desarrolla complicaciones intracraneales, más específicamente meningitis; por lo general, los infartos cerebrales originados por esta última son venosos. Rara vez se ha descrito la ocurrencia de un infarto arterial cerebral como complicación directa de la otitis media aguda. Caso clínico: niña de 12 meses de edad quien fue llevada a un servicio de urgencias por síndrome febril secundario a otitis media aguda y alteración del estado de conciencia. A la exploración física se identificó que estaba somnolienta, con anisocoria, midriasis en el ojo derecho y hemiparesia izquierda. Con la tomografía axial computarizada de cerebro se apreció un infarto arterial cerebral extenso. Los padres no autorizaron la craniectomía descompresiva y la paciente falleció a las 48 horas de su ingreso hospitalario. Conclusiones: a pesar de los recursos tecnológicos con los que se dispone actualmente, el infarto cerebral relacionado con la otitis media aguda tiene una evolución tórpida. Los signos neurológicos focalizadores y el deterioro progresivo deben apuntar a la ineficacia del tratamiento antimicrobiano instaurado.

  16. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  17. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism.

  18. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circumstances while showing its potential in others. PMID:24910565

  19. [Intensive glycemia control in the first day of the acute cerebral blood flow disturbance in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, I G; Gustov, A V; Strongin, L G; Beliaeva, N G

    2012-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with cerebral stroke and diabetes mellitus type 2 were included in the study. To maintain the target values of glycemia on the level 7.8-10.2 mmol/l, patients of the main group received the continuous intravenous infusion of insulin and patients of the control group received frequent (every 3h) subcutaneous injections of insulin during the first 24 h after the acute cerebral blood flow disturbance. The results obtained have shown that continuous intravenous insulin infusion reduces the risk of hypoglycemia, accelerates positive neurologic dynamics, reduces terms of hospitalization and decreases mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

  20. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  1. Acute Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Cole, Erica C.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ9-THC (.01–50 mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100 mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ9-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ9-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval) = 0.64 (0.26 – 1.55) mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01 – 0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ9-THC given i.p. was 2–3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ9-THC between each behavior measure was 7–18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ9-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects. PMID:23769745

  2. Acute Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks gastric hemorrhages induced by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Cole, Erica C

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are among the most widely used analgesics in the world, cause gastrointestinal inflammation that is potentially life-threatening. Although inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes protect against gastropathy in fasted NSAID-treated mice, the gastroprotective effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, have yet to be investigated. Male C57BL/6J mice were fasted, administered vehicle or Δ(9)-THC (.01-50mg/kg; oral or intraperitoneal), and then treated with the NSAID diclofenac sodium (100mg/kg, p.o.) to induce gastric lesions. In separate groups of mice, the cannabimimetic behavioral effects of Δ(9)-THC given via each route of administration were compared using a battery of tests, consisting of assessment of locomotor activity, nociception in the tail withdrawal test, catalepsy in the bar test, and hypothermia. Δ(9)-THC dose-dependently attenuated diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhagic streaks through both p.o. and i.p. routes of administration (ED50 (95% confidence interval)=0.64 (0.26-1.55)mg/kg and 0.06 (0.01-0.34) mg/kg, respectively). Δ(9)-THC given i.p. was 2-3 orders of magnitude more potent in reducing diclofenac-induced gastric ulcers than in producing locomotor immobility, antinociception, hypothermia, and catalepsy, while the potency of ratio of p.o. Δ(9)-THC between each behavior measure was 7-18. These data indicate that the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC protects against diclofenac-induced gastric inflammatory tissue damage at doses insufficient to cause common cannabinoid side effects.

  3. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Wei; Wu, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Liu, Jing-Peng; Zhuang, Zong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Zhang, Xin; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Resveratrol (RSV), a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI) after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway. PMID:27529233

  4. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  5. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    PubMed

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  6. Reticulocyte count is the most important predictor of acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk transcranial Doppler in a newborn cohort of 395 children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Belisário, André Rolim; Sales, Rahyssa Rodrigues; Toledo, Nayara Evelin; Muniz, Maristela Braga de Sousa Rodrigues; Velloso-Rodrigues, Cibele; Silva, Célia Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a severe clinical manifestation of sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the prognostic relevance of transcranial Doppler (TCD), more accurate tools to assess stroke risk in children with SCA are required. Here, we describe the effect of clinical, laboratory, and molecular features on the risk of stroke and high-risk TCD in children from the newborn cohort of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Outcomes studied were acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk TCD. Clinical and hematological data were retrieved from children's records. Genetic markers, which were known for their association with stroke risk, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing. The cumulative incidence of acute cerebral ischemia by the age of 8 years was 7.4 % and that of high-risk TCD by the age of 11.5 years was 14.2 %. The final multivariate model for acute cerebral ischemia risk included high white blood cell count and reticulocyte count, acute chest syndrome rate, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) TEK rs489347 and TNF-α rs1800629. The model for high-risk TCD included high reticulocyte count and the SNPs TEK rs489347 and TGFBR3 rs284875. Children with risk factors should be considered for intensive risk monitoring and for intervention therapy. PMID:27520094

  7. Reticulocyte count is the most important predictor of acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk transcranial Doppler in a newborn cohort of 395 children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Belisário, André Rolim; Sales, Rahyssa Rodrigues; Toledo, Nayara Evelin; Muniz, Maristela Braga de Sousa Rodrigues; Velloso-Rodrigues, Cibele; Silva, Célia Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a severe clinical manifestation of sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the prognostic relevance of transcranial Doppler (TCD), more accurate tools to assess stroke risk in children with SCA are required. Here, we describe the effect of clinical, laboratory, and molecular features on the risk of stroke and high-risk TCD in children from the newborn cohort of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Outcomes studied were acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk TCD. Clinical and hematological data were retrieved from children's records. Genetic markers, which were known for their association with stroke risk, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing. The cumulative incidence of acute cerebral ischemia by the age of 8 years was 7.4 % and that of high-risk TCD by the age of 11.5 years was 14.2 %. The final multivariate model for acute cerebral ischemia risk included high white blood cell count and reticulocyte count, acute chest syndrome rate, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) TEK rs489347 and TNF-α rs1800629. The model for high-risk TCD included high reticulocyte count and the SNPs TEK rs489347 and TGFBR3 rs284875. Children with risk factors should be considered for intensive risk monitoring and for intervention therapy.

  8. Validation of a clinical classification for subtypes of acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C S; Taylor, B V; Hankey, G J; Stewart-Wynne, E G; Jamrozik, K D

    1994-01-01

    The validity of a clinical classification system was assessed for subtypes of cerebral infarction for use in clinical trials of putative stroke therapies and clinical decision making in a population based stroke register (n = 536) compiled in Perth, Western Australia in 1989-90. The Perth Community Stroke Project (PCSS) used definitions and methodology similar to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP) where the classification system was developed. In the PCSS, 421 cases of cerebral infarction and primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PICH), confirmed by brain imaging or necropsy, were classified into the subtypes total anterior circulation syndrome (TACS), partial anterior circulation syndrome (PACS), lacunar syndrome (LACS), and posterior circulation syndrome (POCS). In this relatively unselected population, relying exclusively on LACS for a diagnosis of PICH had a very low sensitivity (6%) and positive predictive value (3%). Comparison of the frequencies and outcomes (at one year after the onset of symptoms) for each subgroup of first ever cerebral infarction in the PCSS (n = 248) with the OCSP (n = 543) registers showed uniformity only for LACI. For example, there were 27% of cases of TACI in the PCSS compared with 17% in the OCSP (difference = 10%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 4% to 16%) and 15% of cases in the PCSS compared with 24% in the OCSP were POCI (difference = 9%; 95% CI 3% to 15%). Case fatalities and long-term handicap across the subgroups were not significantly different between studies, but the frequencies of recurrent stroke were significantly greater for POCI in the OCSP compared with the PCSS. Although this classification system defines subtypes of stroke with different outcomes, simple clinical measures-level of consciousness, paresis, disability, and incontinence at onset-are more powerful predictors of death or dependency at one year. It is concluded that simple clinical measures that reflect the severity of the neurological deficit

  9. [A case of acute limbic encephalitis with cerebral salt wasting syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Motonobu; Nishitani, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman presented with psychiatric symptoms. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis and increased protein. The patient was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis on the basis of the clinical course. However, remarkable hyponatremia was noted throughout the clinical course, leading to a diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). The hyponatremia was alleviated by supplementation with sodium and water. The findings seen in this case indicate that differentiation between syndrome of inappropriate of antidiuretic hormone and CSWS is important in cases of hyponatremia accompanied by central nervous system disease.

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... and sweaty. These symptoms are followed by a shock -like state. Bleeding appears as tiny spots of ...

  11. Comparison of microcoils and polyvinyl alcohol particles in selective microcatheter angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer-Ul-Haq; Idris, Muhammad; Salam, Basit; Akhtar, Waseem; Jamil, Yasir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with microcoils in angiembolisation of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who underwent transcatheter angioembolization from January, 1995 to December, 2013 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Patients were divided into two groups on basis of use of either microcoils or PVA particles and compared in terms of technical success, clinical success, re-bleeding and ischemic complication rates. Chi (χ2) square and Fisher’s exact tests were applied and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty seven patients underwent angioembolization. Microcoil and PVA particles embolization was performed in 63% (36/57) and 35% (20/57) cases respectively. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100%). Clinical success rate was higher in microcoils group (92%) than PVA particles group (75%) with statistically significant P value (p=0.048). Ischemic complication was seen in one case (3%) in the microcoil group, while no such complications were seen in the PVA particles group. Conclusion: In angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage microcoils are better than Polyvinyl alcohol particles with higher clinical success and lower re-bleed rates. PMID:26430397

  12. Cerebral Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bethany; Kalanuria, Atul; Kumar, Monisha; Burke, Kathryn; Balu, Ramani; Amendolia, Olivia; McNulty, Kyle; Marion, BethAnn; Beckmann, Brittany; Ciocco, Lauren; Miller, Kimberly; Schuele, Donnamarie; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Frangos, Suzanne; Wright, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    A variety of neuromonitoring techniques are available to aid in the care of neurocritically ill patients. However, traditional monitors lack the ability to measure brain biochemistry and may provide inadequate warning of potentially reversible deleterious conditions. Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a safe, novel method of monitoring regional brain biochemistry. Analysis of CMD analytes as part of a multimodal approach may help inform clinical decision making, guide medical treatments, and aid in prognostication of patient outcome. Its use is most frequently documented in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Incorporating CMD into clinical practice is a multidisciplinary effort.

  13. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Isosteviol Sodium Injection on Acute Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui; Sun, Xiao ou; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Qing; Tan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Previous report has indicated that isosteviol has neuroprotective effects. However, isosteviol was administered preventively before ischemia and the inclusion criteria were limited. In the present study, a more soluble and injectable form of isosteviol sodium (STVNA) was administered intravenously hours after transient or permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO or pMCAO) to investigate its neuroprotective effects in rats. The rats were assessed for neurobehavioral deficits 24 hours after ischemia and sacrificed for infarct volume quantification and histology evaluation. STVNA 10 mg·kg−1 can significantly reduce the infarct volumes compared with vehicle in animals subjected to tMCAO and is twice as potent as previously reported. Additionally, the therapeutic window study showed that STVNA could reduce the infarct volume compared with the vehicle group when administered 4 hours after reperfusion. A similar effect was also observed in animals treated 4 hours after pMCAO. Assessment of neurobehavioral deficits after 24 hours showed that STVNA treatment significantly reduced neurobehavioral impairments. The number of restored NeuN-labeled neurons was increased and the number of TUNEL positive cells was reduced in animals that received STVNA treatment compared with vehicle group. All of these findings suggest that STVNA might provide therapeutic benefits against cerebral ischemia-induced injury. PMID:27047634

  15. Quantitative T(1rho) and magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging of acute cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Heidi I; Kettunen, Mikko I; Gröhn, Olli H J; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2002-05-01

    It has been previously shown that T1 in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) is a very sensitive and early marker of cerebral ischemia and that, interestingly, it can provide prognostic information about the degree of subsequent neuronal damage. In the present study the authors have quantified T(1rho) together with the rate and other variables of magnetization transfer (MT) associated with spin interactions between the bulk and semisolid macromolecular pools by means of Z spectroscopy, to examine the possible overlap of mechanisms affecting these magnetic resonance imaging contrasts. Substantial prolongation of cerebral T(1rho) was observed minutes after induction of ischemia, this change progressing in a time-dependent manner. Difference Z spectra (contralateral nonischemic minus ischemic brain tissue) showed a significant positive reminder in the time points from 0.5 to 3 hours after induction of ischemia, the polarity of this change reversing by 24 hours. Detailed analysis of the MT variables showed that the initial Z spectral changes were due to concerted increase in the maximal MT (+3%) and amount of MT (+4%). Interestingly, the MT rates derived either from the entire frequency range of Z spectra or the time constant for the first-order forward exchange (k(sat)) were unchanged at this time, these variables reducing only one day after induction of ischemia. The authors conclude that T(1rho) changes in the acute phase of ischemia coincide with both elevated maximal MT and amount of MT. These changes occur independent of the overall MT rate and in the absence of net water gain to the tissue, whereas in the consolidating infarction the decrease in the rate and amount of MT, as well as the extensive prolongation of T(1rho), are associated with water accumulation. PMID:11973427

  16. Assessment of the fetal PO2 changes by cerebral and umbilical Doppler on lamb fetuses during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Arbeille, P; Maulik, D; Fignon, A; Stale, H; Berson, M; Bodard, S; Locatelli, A

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to validate one or a combination of fetal Doppler parameters in order to assess acute fetal hypoxia in an ovine model. Acute hypoxia was induced by reducing umbilical, or maternal aortic flow (approx. 70%). A CW Doppler probe was fixed on the fetal cervical skin, facing the internal carotid artery and the fetal abdominal skin adjacent to the umbilical arteries. (The angle between Doppler beam and flow vector remained constant.) A "Doptek 3000" spectrum analyser was used to measure the maximal and mean Doppler frequencies. Heart rate (HR), umbilical blood flow (UBF), carotid blood flow (CBF), umbilical RI (URI), cerebral RI (CRI) and cerebroplacental ratio (CPR = CRI/URI) were calculated in real time. A catheter was inserted into the fetal femoral artery, for blood gas (PO2, PCO2 pH) and blood pressure (BP) measurements. After 1 min of aorta compression (70% aortic flow reduction), the URI increased by 10% (P < 0.05), and the UBF decreased by 10% (P < 0.05), but the CRI decreased by 20% (P < 0.02), and the CBF did not change significantly. Fetal PO2 and CPR fell down after 1 min (59% and 38%, respectively; P < 0.001), although strong fetal heart rate decelerations were observed. The blood pressure, PCO2 and pH did not change significantly during this test. Throughout the 12 min of cord compression (70% umbilical flow reduction) the URI increased (70% to 80% P < 0.001), and the UBF decreased (approx. 60%; P < 0.001), but the CRI decreased (approx. 25%; P < 0.01), and the CBF remained constant (+/- 5%; ns). Fetal PO2 and CPR all decreased during the compression (30% to 44% and 40% to 60%, respectively; P < 0.001). HR, pH and PCO2 did not change significantly. During cord compression the blood pressure did not change significantly. In both cases, the CPR decreased significantly (P < 0.001) with the PO2 in the same direction and with a comparable amplitude (-30% to -50%). Nevertheless, the drop in CPR was greater during cord

  17. The Kynurenine Pathway in the Acute and Chronic Phases of Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cuartero, María Isabel; de la Parra, Juan; García-Culebras, Alicia; Ballesteros, Iván; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Moro, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenines are a wide range of catabolites which derive from tryptophan through the “Kynurenine Pathway” (KP). In addition to its peripheral role, increasing evidence shows a role of the KP in the central nervous system (CNS), mediating both physiological and pathological functions. Indeed, an imbalance in this route has been associated with several neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. Altered KP catabolism has also been described during both acute and chronic phases of stroke; however the contribution of the KP to the pathophysiology of acute ischemic damage and of post-stroke disorders during the chronic phase including depression and vascular dementia, and the exact mechanisms implicated in the regulation of the KP after stroke are not well established yet. A better understanding of the regulation and activity of the KP after stroke could provide new pharmacological tools in both acute and chronic phases of stroke. In this review, we will make an overview of CNS modulation by the KP. We will detail the KP contribution in the ischemic damage, how the unbalance of the KP might trigger an alteration of the cognitive function after stroke as well as potential targets for the development of new drugs. PMID:25248805

  18. [Molecular Identification and Phylogenetic Analyses of Coxsackievirus A24v Causing an Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis in Jiangxi, China, in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongmei; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Qiai; Zhang, Shuxia; Gong, Tian; Zhu, Tian; Wang, Donavan; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenbo

    2015-05-01

    To identify the cause of an outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) in Jiangxi (China) in 2010, 20 eye conjunctival swabs were first collected from AHC patients. Then, viruses were isola- ted and tested for human enterovirus 70, coxsackievirus A24 variant (CV-A24v) and adenovirus using the polymerase chain reaction. All CV-A24v isolates underwent sequencing of 3C and VP1 coding regions. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for Jiangxi CV-A24v and worldwide CV-A24v based on,3C and VP1 regions, respectively. Ten out of 20 specimens were positive for CV-A24v, implying that the outbreak was caused by CV-A24v. The phylogenetic tree based on the 3C region showed that Jiangxi CV- A24v belonged to cluster 5 in genotype IV (GIV-C5) with strains isolated throughout the world after 2010, and were divided further into A and B lineages. Phylogenetic analyses of the VP1 region showed that all of the worldwide CV-A24v strains isolated after 2000 could be divided into five groups (1-5). Jiangxi CV-A24v was classified into group 5 and also divided further into A and B lineages upon analyses of the 3C region. These data suggested that CV-A24v causing AHC outbreaks in China in 2010 belonged to GIV-C3 and GIV-C5. At least two transmission lineages were circulated in Jiangxi in 2010. The classification of CV-A24v isolated after 2010 worldwide using the phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 region was almost consistent with that based on the 3C region and also had significant chronological clustering.

  19. In vivo cerebral incorporation of radiolabeled fatty acids after acute unilateral orbital enucleation in adult hooded Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, S.; Freed, L.M.; Bell, J.M.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    We examined effects of acute unilateral enucleation on incorporation from blood of intravenously injected unsaturated [1-{sup 14}C]arachidonic acid ([{sup 14}C]AA) and [1-{sup 14}C]docosahexaenoic acid ([{sup 14}C]DHA), and of saturated [9,10-{sup 3}H]palmitic acid ([{sup 3}H]PA), into visual and nonvisual brain areas of awake adult Long-Evans hooded rats. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR{sub glc}) values also were assessed with 2-deoxy-D-[1-{sup 14}C]glucose ([{sup 14}C]DG). One day after unilateral enucleation, an awake rat was placed in a brightly lit visual stimulation box with black and white striped walls, and a radiolabeled fatty acid was infused for 5 min or [{sup 14}C]DG was injected as a bolus. [{sup 14}C]DG also was injected in a group of rats kept in the dark for 4 h. Fifteen minutes after starting an infusion of a radiolabeled fatty acid, or 45 min after injecting [{sup 14}C]DG, the rat was killed and the brain was prepared for quantitative autoradiography. Incorporation coefficients k* of fatty acids, or rCMR{sub glc} values, were calculated in homologous brain regions contralateral and ipsilateral to enucleation. As compared with ipsilateral regions, rCMR{sub glc} was reduced significantly (by as much as -39%) in contralateral visual areas, including the superior colliculus, lateral geniculate body, and layers I, IV, and V of the primary (striate) and secondary (association, extrastriate) visual cortices. These results indicate that enucleation acutely reduces neuronal activity in contralateral visual areas of the awake rat and that the reductions are coupled to reduced incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids into sn-2 regions of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Reduced fatty acid incorporation likely reflects reduced activity of phospholipases A{sub 2} and/or phospholipase C. 65 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Contrast staining on CT after DSA in ischemic stroke patients progresses to infarction and rarely hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Amans, Matthew R; Cooke, Daniel L; Vella, Maya; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; Hetts, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    Contrast staining of brain parenchyma identified on non-contrast CT performed after DSA in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is an incompletely understood imaging finding. We hypothesize contrast staining to be an indicator of brain injury and suspect the fate of involved parenchyma to be cerebral infarction. Seventeen years of AIS data were retrospectively analyzed for contrast staining. Charts were reviewed and outcomes of the stained parenchyma were identified on subsequent CT and MRI. Thirty-six of 67 patients meeting inclusion criteria (53.7%) had contrast staining on CT obtained within 72 hours after DSA. Brain parenchyma with contrast staining in patients with AIS most often evolved into cerebral infarction (81%). Hemorrhagic transformation was less likely in cases with staining compared with hemorrhagic transformation in the cohort that did not have contrast staining of the parenchyma on post DSA CT (6% versus 25%, respectively, OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.017 - 0.98, p = 0.02). Brain parenchyma with contrast staining on CT after DSA in AIS patients was likely to infarct and unlikely to hemorrhage. PMID:24556308

  1. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Porrino, L J; Domer, F R; Crane, A M; Sokoloff, L

    1988-05-01

    The 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  2. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  3. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Lazor, R; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined by the presence of red blood cells originating from the lung capillaries or venules within the alveoli. The diagnosis is established on clinical features, radiological pattern, and especially bronchoalveolar lavage. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may have many immune or non-immune causes. Immune causes of DAH include vasculitides, connective tissue diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome). Treatment is both supportive and causal, often based on high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy (especially intravenous cyclophosphamide). Plasma exchanges are performed in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and are considered in systemic vasculitis. Non-immune causes of DAH mainly include heart diseases, coagulation disorders, infections, drug toxicities and idiopathic DAH. Treatment of non-immune DAH is that of its cause. Whatever the cause, DAH is an emergency requiring prompt assessment and early treatment.

  4. Phase analysis of platelet aggregation in acute disturbances of cerebral circulation.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T R; Pavlishchuk, S A; Grigoriev, G I

    1975-01-01

    In 120 patients with atherosclerosis, complicated in 43 patients by a haemorrhagic, in 47 patients by an ischaemic, and in 30 patients by a transient cerebral insult, phase analysis of platelet aggregation was performed by the turbidimetric method according to Born with graphic recording according to O'Brien. An increase in the platelet activity was found in ischaemic insult, manifesting itself by the occurrence of spontaneous aggregationin 60% of the cases, an acceleration of ADP-induced aggregation, and the second aggregation phase in all patients examined. A direct correlation was revealed between the secondary aggregation and the intensity of spontaneous and of ADP-induced aggregation, and the possibility of a transformation of the spontaneous into the secondary aggregation of platelets was demonstrated. Haemorrhagic insults were characterized by the absence of spontaneous and secondary aggregation and by the suppression of ADP-induced aggregation. In a transient insult, the mean values of the aggregatogram items did differ from normal. In vitro, the role of increased permeability of platelet membranes in the mechanism triggering off spontaneous aggregation and the second phase of ADP-induced aggregation was documented.

  5. Hippo/MST1 signaling mediates microglial activation following acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Siqi; Yin, Jie; Zhou, Lujun; Yan, Feng; He, Qing; Huang, Li; Peng, Shengyi; Jia, Junying; Cheng, Jinbo; Chen, Hong; Tao, Wufan; Ji, Xunming; Xu, Yun; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury is a major public health concern that causes high rates of disability and mortality in adults. Microglial activation plays a crucial role in ischemic stroke-induced alteration of the immune microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying the triggering of microglial activation by ischemic stroke remains to be elucidated. Previously, we demonstrated that the protein kinase Hippo/MST1 plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced cell death in mammalian primary neurons and that the protein kinase c-Abl phosphorylates MST1 at Y433, which increases MST1 kinase activity. Microglial activation has been implicated as a secondary detrimental cellular response that contributes to neuronal cell death in ischemic stroke. Here, we are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that MST1 mediates stroke-induced microglial activation by directly phosphorylating IκBα at residues S32 and S36. We further demonstrate that Src kinase functions upstream of MST1-IκB signaling during microglial activation. Specific deletion of MST1 in microglia mitigates stroke-induced brain injury. Therefore, we propose that Src-MST1-IκB signaling plays a critical role in stroke-induced microglial activation. Together with our previous work demonstrating that MST1 is important for oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death, our results indicate that MST1 could represent a potent therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

  6. The Effects of Acute Intense Physical Exercise on Postural Stability in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Matthew J; Wyss, Dominik; Dufour, Sophie-Krystale; Gane, Claire; Zabjek, Karl; Bouyer, Laurent J; Maltais, Désirée B; Voisin, Julien I; Andrysek, Jan

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects of intense physical exercise on postural stability of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Center of pressure (CoP) was measured in 9 typically developing (TD) children and 8 with CP before and after a maximal aerobic shuttle-run test (SRT) using a single force plate. Anteroposterior and mediolateral sway velocities, sway area, and sway regularity were calculated from the CoP data and compared between pre- and postexercise levels and between groups. Children with CP demonstrated significantly higher pre-SRT CoP velocities than TD children in the sagittal (18.6 ± 7.6 vs. 6.75 1.78 m/s) and frontal planes (15.4 ± 5.3 vs. 8.04 ± 1.51 m/s). Post-SRT, CoP velocities significantly increased for children with CP in the sagittal plane (27.0 ± 1.2 m/s), with near-significant increases in the frontal plane (25.0 ± 1.5m/s). Similarly, children with CP evidenced larger sway areas than the TD children both pre- and postexercise. The diminished postural stability in children with CP after short but intense physical exercise may have important implications including increased risk of falls and injury. PMID:27623610

  7. [Hemorrhagic enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Brobmann, G F; van Lessen, H; Springorum, H W; Thomas, C

    1976-10-21

    Intestinal infarction in the absence of organic vascular occlusion received increasing attention in recent years. The clinical picture is discussed based on results in 9 cases, an attempt to suggest a possible pathophysiological mechanism is made. Prophylactic digitalisation especially in the elderly patient in the absence of severe heart failure and in cases with already low mesenteric perfusion may lead to a further vasoconstriction and to hemorrhagic enteropathy. Therapeutic possibilities are discussed. PMID:1086816

  8. Targets of vascular protection in acute ischemic stroke differ in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Cobbs, Aisha I; Prakash, Roshini; Li, Weiguo; Pillai, Bindu; Hafez, Sherif; Coucha, Maha; Johnson, Maribeth H; Ogbi, Safia N; Fagan, Susan C; Ergul, Adviye

    2013-03-15

    Hemorrhagic transformation is an important complication of acute ischemic stroke, particularly in diabetic patients receiving thrombolytic treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, the only approved drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of acute manipulation of potential targets for vascular protection [i.e., NF-κB, peroxynitrite, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)] on vascular injury and functional outcome in a diabetic model of cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in control and type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. Treatment groups received a single dose of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron (III), the nonspecific NF-κB inhibitor curcumin, or the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor minocycline at reperfusion. Poststroke infarct volume, edema, hemorrhage, neurological deficits, and MMP-9 activity were evaluated. All acute treatments reduced MMP-9 and hemorrhagic transformation in diabetic groups. In addition, acute curcumin and minocycline therapy reduced edema in these animals. Improved neurological function was observed in varying degrees with treatment, as indicated by beam-walk performance, modified Bederson scores, and grip strength; however, infarct size was similar to untreated diabetic animals. In control animals, all treatments reduced MMP-9 activity, yet bleeding was not improved. Neuroprotection was only conferred by curcumin and minocycline. Uncovering the underlying mechanisms contributing to the success of acute therapy in diabetes will advance tailored stroke therapies. PMID:23335797

  9. Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging in acute stroke: assessment of cerebral perfusion deficits related to arterial recanalization.

    PubMed

    Bolognese, Manuel; Artemis, Dimitrios; Alonso, Angelika; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephan; Kern, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    We investigated whether real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) is able to detect perfusion changes related to arterial recanalization in the acute phase of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Twenty-four patients with acute territorial MCA stroke were examined with rt-UPI and transcranial color-coded duplex ultrasound (TCCD). Ultrasound studies were consecutively performed within 24 h and 72-96 h after stroke onset. Real-time UPI parameters of bolus kinetics (time to peak, rt-TTP) and of refill kinetics (plateau A and slope β of the exponential replenishment curve) were calculated from regions of interest of ischemic versus normal brain tissue; these parameters were compared between early and follow-up examinations in patients who recanalized. At the early examination, there was a delay of rt-TTP in patients with MCA occlusion (rt-TTP [s]: 13.09 ± 3.21 vs. 10.16 ± 2.6; p = 0.01) and a lower value of the refill parameter β (β [1/s]: 0.62 ± 0.34 vs. 1.09 ± 0.58; p = 0.01) in ischemic compared with normal brain tissue, whereas there were no differences of the parameters A and Axβ. At follow-up, the delay of rt-TTP was reversible once recanalization of an underlying MCA obstruction was demonstrated: rt-TTP [s], 13.09 ± 3.21 at 24 h versus 10.95 ± 1.5 at 72-96 h (p = 0.03). Correspondingly, β showed a higher slope than at the first examination: β [1/s]: 0.55 ± 0.29 at 24 h versus 0.71 ± 0.27 at 72-96 h (p = 0.04). We conclude that real-time UPI can detect hemodynamic impairment in acute MCA occlusion and subsequent improvement following arterial recanalization. This offers the chance for bedside monitoring of the hemodynamic compromise (e.g. during therapeutic interventions such as systemic thrombolysis).

  10. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  11. Cerebral microdialysis reflects the neuroprotective effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption in acute liver failure better and earlier than intracranial pressure: a controlled study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral edema is a well-recognized and potentially fatal complication of acute liver failure (ALF). The effectiveness of treatments that address intracranial hypertension is generally assessed by measuring intracranial pressure (ICP). The aim of this study was to determine the role of cerebral microdialysis in monitoring the efficacy of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA) treatment for ALF. We hypothesized that in ALF cerebral microdialysis reflects the benefits of FPSA treatment on cerebral edema before ICP. Methods A surgical resection model of ALF was used in 21 pigs. We measured plasma ammonia concentration, brain concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glutamine, and ICP. Animals were randomized into three groups: in one group eight animals received 6 hours of FPSA treatment 2 hours after induction of ALF; in another group 10 animals received supportive treatment for ALF only; and in the final group three underwent sham surgery. Results The ICP was significantly higher in the ALF group than in the FPSA group 9 hours after surgery. The lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group 5 hours after surgery, before any significant difference in ICP was detected. Indeed, significant changes in the L/P ratio could be observed within 1 hour of treatment. Glutamine levels were significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group between 6 hours and 10 hours after surgery. Conclusions Brain lactate/pyruvate ratio and concentration of glutamine measured by cerebral microdialysis reflected the beneficial effects of FPSA treatment on cerebral metabolism more precisely and rapidly than ICP in pigs with fulminant ALF. The role of glutamine as a marker of the efficacy of FPSA treatment for ALF appears promising, but needs further evaluation. PMID:23758689

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury by a Closed Head Injury Device Induces Cerebral Blood Flow Changes and Microhemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Bandaru, Sharath; Zakaria, Nisrine; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Zhang, Liying; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic brain injury is a poly-pathology characterized by changes in the cerebral blood flow, inflammation, diffuse axonal, cellular, and vascular injuries. However, studies related to understanding the temporal changes in the cerebral blood flow following traumatic brain injury extending to sub-acute periods are limited. In addition, knowledge related to microhemorrhages, such as their detection, localization, and temporal progression, is important in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods: Cerebral blood flow changes and microhemorrhages in male Sprague Dawley rats at 4 h, 24 h, 3 days, and 7 days were assessed following a closed head injury induced by the Marmarou impact acceleration device (2 m height, 450 g brass weight). Cerebral blood flow was measured by arterial spin labeling. Microhemorrhages were assessed by susceptibility-weighted imaging and Prussian blue histology. Results: Traumatic brain injury rats showed reduced regional and global cerebral blood flow at 4 h and 7 days post-injury. Injured rats showed hemorrhagic lesions in the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, and brainstem in susceptibility-weighted imaging. Injured rats also showed Prussian blue reaction products in both the white and gray matter regions up to 7 days after the injury. These lesions were observed in various areas of the cortex, corpus callosum, hippocampus, thalamus, and midbrain. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow and hemorrhagic lesions can persist for sub-acute periods after the initial traumatic insult in an animal model. In addition, microhemorrhages otherwise not seen by susceptibility-weighted imaging are present in diverse regions of the brain. The combination of altered cerebral blood flow and microhemorrhages can potentially be a source of secondary injury changes following traumatic brain injury and may need to be taken into consideration in the long-term care of these cases. PMID:26605126

  13. Clinical Characteristics and Lesions Responsible for Swallowing Hesitation After Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsukasa; Hayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Hajime; Ota, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Some stroke patients with a unilateral lesion demonstrate acute dysphagia characterized by a markedly prolonged swallowing time, making us think they are reluctant to swallow. In order to clarify the clinical characteristics and causative lesions of delayed swallowing, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 right-handed patients without a history of swallowing dysfunction who underwent videofluorography on suspicion of dysphagia after a first ischemic stroke. The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required to swallow jelly for patients classified as having delayed swallowing was over 10 s. The time required for swallowing jelly was significantly longer than that without the hesitation (median value, 24.1 vs. 8.9 s, P < 0.001). The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required for patients with delayed swallowing to swallow thickened water was largely over 5 s and significantly longer than that of patients without swallowing hesitation (median value, 10.2 vs. 3.3 s, P < 0.001). Swallowing hesitation caused by acute unilateral infarction could be separated into two different patterns. Because four of the five patients with a rippling tongue movement in the swallowing hesitation pattern had a lesion in the left primary motor cortex, which induces some kinds of apraxia, swallowing hesitation with a rippling tongue movement seems to be a representative characteristic of apraxia. The patients with swallowing hesitation with a temporary stasis of the tongue in this study tended to have broad lesions in the frontal lobe, especially in the middle frontal gyrus, which is thought to be involved in higher cognition.

  14. Reversal of acute experimental cerebral vasospasm by calcium antagonism with verapamil.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R; Feindel, W; Yamamoto, L; Milton, J G; Frojmovic, M M

    1984-02-01

    Acute vasospasm of the transclivally exposed basilar artery of anesthetised cats was produced by the subarachnoid injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treated with enough adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet aggregation and secretion. Vasorelaxation was produced by the topical application of the calcium antagonist verapamil. Changes in the internal diameter of the basilar artery were determined by measuring the blood column diameter from photomicrographs taken sequentially, at 5 minute intervals, through the operating microscope. Changes in blood vessel diameter are expressed as a plus or minus percentage of the pretreatment diameter. Arterial blood pressure and blood gas values were kept in the physiological range for the cat. The subarachnoid injection of PRP-ADP produced severe constriction of the basilar artery (mean constriction at 5 minutes after injection: -40.7% +/- 2.8 SEM). Platelet-free plasma, ADP alone and Elliott's A solution had no spasmogenic effect when injected into the subarachnoid space. The topical application of the calcium channel blocker verapamil (0.1 mg per kg) 30 minutes after the injection of PRP-ADP, with the basilar artery still in spasm (mean constriction: -23% +/- 3.5 SEM), produced prompt and dramatic vasodilation (mean dilation at 5 minutes after application: +52.7% +/- 18.1 SEM). This spasmolytic effect persisted in a decremental fashion for the 60 minute period of observation, by which time the previously constricted vessel had returned to its normal size. These observations indicate that the platelet fraction of whole blood may be involved in the genesis of acute vasospasm following subarachnoid hemmorrhage and that this phenomenon can be readily reversed by calcium antagonism. PMID:6704793

  15. Clinical Characteristics and Lesions Responsible for Swallowing Hesitation After Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsukasa; Hayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Hajime; Ota, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Some stroke patients with a unilateral lesion demonstrate acute dysphagia characterized by a markedly prolonged swallowing time, making us think they are reluctant to swallow. In order to clarify the clinical characteristics and causative lesions of delayed swallowing, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 right-handed patients without a history of swallowing dysfunction who underwent videofluorography on suspicion of dysphagia after a first ischemic stroke. The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required to swallow jelly for patients classified as having delayed swallowing was over 10 s. The time required for swallowing jelly was significantly longer than that without the hesitation (median value, 24.1 vs. 8.9 s, P < 0.001). The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required for patients with delayed swallowing to swallow thickened water was largely over 5 s and significantly longer than that of patients without swallowing hesitation (median value, 10.2 vs. 3.3 s, P < 0.001). Swallowing hesitation caused by acute unilateral infarction could be separated into two different patterns. Because four of the five patients with a rippling tongue movement in the swallowing hesitation pattern had a lesion in the left primary motor cortex, which induces some kinds of apraxia, swallowing hesitation with a rippling tongue movement seems to be a representative characteristic of apraxia. The patients with swallowing hesitation with a temporary stasis of the tongue in this study tended to have broad lesions in the frontal lobe, especially in the middle frontal gyrus, which is thought to be involved in higher cognition. PMID:27277890

  16. In vivo imaging of hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in acute focal cerebral ischemic rats with laser speckle imaging and functional photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease. The changes in cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism associated with stroke play an important role in pathophysiology study. But the changes were difficult to describe with a single imaging modality. Here the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and oxygen saturation (SO2) were yielded with laser speckle imaging (LSI) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) during and after 3-h acute focal ischemic rats. These hemodynamic measures were further synthesized to deduce the changes in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The results indicate that all the hemodynamics except CBV had rapid declines within 40-min occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO). CBV in arteries and veins first increased to the maximum value of 112.42±36.69% and 130.58±31.01% by 15 min MCAO; then all the hemodynamics had a persistent reduction with small fluctuations during the ischemic. When ischemia lasted for 3 h, CBF in arteries, veins decreased to 17±14.65%, 24.52±20.66%, respectively, CBV dropped to 62±18.56% and 59±18.48%. And the absolute SO2 decreased by 40.52±22.42% and 54.24±11.77%. After 180-min MCAO, the changes in hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism were also quantified. The study suggested that combining LSI and PAM provides an attractive approach for stroke detection in small animal studies.

  17. Head position change is not associated with acute changes in bilateral cerebral oxygenation in stable preterm infants during the first three days of life

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Steve Ming-Che; Rao, Rakesh; Mathur, Amit M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several recent intraventricular hemorrhage prevention bundles include midline head positioning to prevent potential disturbances in cerebral hemodynamics. We aimed to study the impact of head position change on regional cerebral saturations (SctO2) in preterm infants (< 30 weeks GA) during the first three days of life. Study Design Bilateral SctO2 was measured by near infrared spectroscopy. The infant's head was turned sequentially to each side from midline (baseline) in thirty-minute intervals while keeping the body supine. Bilateral SctO2 before and after each position change were compared using paired t-test. Results In relatively stable preterm infants (gestational age 26.5±1.7 weeks, birth weight 930±220g; n=20), bilateral SctO2 remained within normal range (71.1% - 75.3%) when the head was turned from midline position to either side. Conclusion Stable preterm infants tolerated brief changes in head position from midline without significant alternation in bilateral SctO2; the impact on critically ill infants needs further evaluation. PMID:25282608

  18. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry--a novel method to quantify blood volume in experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Foerch, Christian; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2013-02-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10% of all strokes and has a significantly higher mortality than cerebral ischemia. For decades, ICH has been neglected by experimental stroke researchers. Recently, however, clinical trials on acute blood pressure lowering or hyperacute supplementation of coagulation factors in ICH have spurred an interest to also design and improve translational animal models of spontaneous and anticoagulant-associated ICH. Hematoma volume is a substantial outcome parameter of most experimental ICH studies. We present graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) as a suitable method to precisely quantify hematoma volumes in rodent models of ICH.

  19. Effects of acute administration of ethanol on cerebral glucose utilization in adult alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats.

    PubMed

    Strother, Wendy N; McBride, William J; Lumeng, Lawrence; Li, Ting-Kai

    2005-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rates, as determined by the [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique, were examined after acute ethanol administration within selected brain regions of alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats. Adult male P and NP rats were injected with saline, 0.25 g/kg, or 1.0 g/kg ethanol, intraperitoneally (ip), 10 min before an intravenous bolus of [(14)C]2-DG (125 microCi/kg). Timed arterial blood samples were collected over 45 min and assayed for plasma glucose, ethanol, and [(14)C]2-DG levels. Image densities were determined using quantitative autoradiography and LCGU values calculated. Data were collected from several key limbic, basal ganglionic, cortical, and subcortical structures. Low-dose ethanol (0.25 g/kg) significantly decreased LCGU rates in several brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, and the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus of P rats. Low-dose ethanol had no significant effects on LCGU rates in the NP rats. Moderate-dose ethanol (1.0 g/kg) also significantly lowered LCGU rates in many brain regions of P rats, including key limbic structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, ventral tegmental area, basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, lateral septum, and ventral pallidum. Moderate-dose ethanol also significantly lowered LCGU rates in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the habenula of NP rats. All other regions were unaffected in the NP rats. These findings support the suggestion that certain central nervous system regions of P rats may be more sensitive than those of NP rats to the effects of low to intermediate doses of ethanol.

  20. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  1. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Presenting With Visual Field Defects.

    PubMed

    Raven, Meisha L; Ringeisen, Alexander L; McAllister, Angela R; Knoch, Daniel W

    2016-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of depression and anxiety, treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), experienced acute, recurrent, and severe bifrontal headaches. Over time, she developed a left homonymous hemianopia and mental status changes. MRA revealed segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in multiple vascular distributions. She was treated with a calcium-channel blocker and magnesium, and there was resolution of her symptoms and cerebrovascular changes. Her clinical course and neuroimaging findings were consistent with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Although rare, this disorder frequently manifests with visual complaints. Although the prognosis is generally favorable, patients with this syndrome require prompt diagnosis and care directed to avoid complications including stroke, seizure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26807800

  2. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  3. Predictors of outcome in childhood intracerebral hemorrhage: a prospective consecutive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Beslow, Lauren A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Storm, Phillip B; Heuer, Gregory G; Zimmerman, Robert A; Feiler, Alana M; Kasner, Scott E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose To describe features of children with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and to determine predictors of short-term outcome in a single-center prospective cohort study. Methods Single-center prospective consecutive cohort study of spontaneous ICH in children age 1-18 years from January 2006 to June 2008. Exclusion criteria were inciting trauma; intracranial tumor; isolated epidural, subdural, intraventricular, or subarachnoid hemorrhage; hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke; and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Hospitalization records were abstracted. Follow-up assessments included outcome scores using the Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) and King's Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury (KOSCHI). ICH volumes and total brain volumes (TBV) were measured by manual tracing. Results Twenty-two patients, median age of 10.3 years (range 4.2-16.6 years), had presenting symptoms of headache in 77%, focal deficits 50%, altered mental status 50%, and seizures 41%. Vascular malformations caused hemorrhage in 91%. Surgical treatment (hematoma evacuation, lesion embolization or excision) was performed during acute hospitalization in 50%. One patient died acutely. At median follow-up of 3.5 months (range 0.3-7.5 months), 71% of survivors had neurological deficits; 55% had clinically significant disability. Outcome based on PSOM and KOSCHI scores was worse in patients with ICH volume >2% of TBV (p=0.023) and altered mental status at presentation (p = 0.005). Conclusions Spontaneous childhood ICH was due mostly to vascular malformations. Acute surgical intervention was commonly performed. Although death was rare, 71% of survivors had persisting neurological deficits. Larger ICH volume and altered mental status predicted clinically significant disability. PMID:20019325

  4. Inaugural cerebral sinovenous thrombosis revealing homocystinuria in a 2-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Saboul, Cécile; Darteyre, Stéphane; Ged, Cécile; Fichtner, Christine; Gay, Claire; Stephan, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis is unusual during childhood and requires early and accurate management because of its detrimental consequences. We report on the case of a 2-year-old boy with mild psychomotor delay, who presented with nonfebrile acute ataxia. A brain computed tomographic (CT) scan showed complete thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus, confirmed by magnetic resonance angiography and associated with a right frontal hemorrhagic infarction. Systematic screening for thrombophilia revealed homocystinuria linked to cystathionine β-synthase deficiency with underlying compound heterozygosity. The evolution was favorable after anticoagulant therapy, specific diet, and vitamin supplementation. This case is of interest because of the unusual clinical presentation as a pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Furthermore, homocystinuria is rarely revealed by cerebral sinovenous thrombosis at the onset of the disease and should systematically be ruled out in pediatric stroke. PMID:24598125

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to subcapsular renal hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, N C; Sirvanci, M; Tüfek, I; Onat, L; Duran, C

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare intraabdominal bleeding. In this report we present a case of a nontraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma. A 54-year-old patient who was under warfarin therapy, developed subcapsular right renal hematoma. Subcapsular and retroperitoneal hemorrhage were low signal on T1- and T2-weighted images consistent with acute stage of blood. The source of subcapsular hematoma was shown to be the rupture of hemorrhagic renal cyst on MRI. Extension of hemorrhage into the retroperitoneal space anterior to right psoas muscle was also successfully shown on MRI. Patient underwent nephrectomy and retroperitoneal blood was evacuated.

  6. Noninvasive ventilatory correction as an adjunct to an experimental systemic reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Balucani, Clotilde; Palazzo, Paola; Zhao, Limin; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies. PMID:21052540

  7. Multimodality Monitoring, Inflammation, and Neuroregeneration in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Ariel B.; Esteves Veiga, José C.; Teixeira, Manoel J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The mortality rate of poor-grade SAH ranges from 34% to 52%. In an attempt to improve SAH outcomes, clinical research on multimodality monitoring has been performed, as has basic science research on inflammation and neuroregeneration (which can occur due to injury-induced neurogenesis). Nevertheless, the current literature does not focus on the integrated study of these fields. Multimodality monitoring corresponds to physiological data obtained during clinical management by both noninvasive and invasive methods. Regarding inflammation and neuroregeneration, evidence suggests that, in all types of stroke, a proinflammatory phase and an anti-inflammatory phase occur consecutively; these phases affect neurogenesis, which is also influenced by other pathophysiological features of stroke, such as ischemia, seizures, and spreading depression. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether injury-induced neurogenesis is a prognostic factor in poor-grade SAH that can be monitored and modulated. METHODS: We propose a protocol for multimodality monitoring-guided hypothermia in poor-grade SAH in which cellular and molecular markers of inflammation and neuroregeneration can be monitored in parallel with clinical and multimodal data. EXPECTED OUTCOMES: This study may reveal correlations between markers of inflammation and neurogenesis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, based on clinical and multimodality monitoring parameters. DISCUSSION: This protocol has the potential to lead to new therapies for acute, diffuse, and severe brain diseases. ABBREVIATIONS: BBB, blood-brain barrier CPP, cerebral perfusion pressure EEG, electroencephalography ICP, intracranial pressure IL, interleukin MCA, middle cerebral artery SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage SD, spreading depression SGZ, subgranular zone SVZ, subventricular zone TCD, transcranial Doppler PMID:25050583

  8. Mechanisms of electroacupuncture effects on acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: possible association with upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-biao; Yang, Lai-fu; He, Qing-song; Li, Tong; Ma, Yi-yong; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Yi-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at the head acupoints Baihui (GV20) and Shuigou (GV26) improves recovery of neurological function following ischemic cerebrovascular events, but its mechanism remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the action of electroacupuncture at these acupoints is associated with elevated serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). To test this, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Electroacupuncture was performed at Baihui and Shuigou with a “disperse-dense” wave at an alternating frequency of 2 and 150 Hz, and at a constant intensity of 3 mA. Each electroacupuncture session lasted 30 minutes and was performed every 12 hours for 3 days. Neurological severity scores were lower in injured rats after acupuncture than in those not subjected to treatment. Furthermore, serum level of TGF-β1 was greater after electroacupuncture than after no treatment. Our results indicate that electroacupuncture at Baihui and Shuigou increases the serum level of TGF-β1 in rats with acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and exerts neuroprotective effects. PMID:27630692

  9. Mechanisms of electroacupuncture effects on acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: possible association with upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Biao; Yang, Lai-Fu; He, Qing-Song; Li, Tong; Ma, Yi-Yong; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Yi-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Electroacupuncture at the head acupoints Baihui (GV20) and Shuigou (GV26) improves recovery of neurological function following ischemic cerebrovascular events, but its mechanism remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the action of electroacupuncture at these acupoints is associated with elevated serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). To test this, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Electroacupuncture was performed at Baihui and Shuigou with a "disperse-dense" wave at an alternating frequency of 2 and 150 Hz, and at a constant intensity of 3 mA. Each electroacupuncture session lasted 30 minutes and was performed every 12 hours for 3 days. Neurological severity scores were lower in injured rats after acupuncture than in those not subjected to treatment. Furthermore, serum level of TGF-β1 was greater after electroacupuncture than after no treatment. Our results indicate that electroacupuncture at Baihui and Shuigou increases the serum level of TGF-β1 in rats with acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and exerts neuroprotective effects. PMID:27630692

  10. Mechanisms of electroacupuncture effects on acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: possible association with upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-biao; Yang, Lai-fu; He, Qing-song; Li, Tong; Ma, Yi-yong; Zhang, Ping; Cao, Yi-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at the head acupoints Baihui (GV20) and Shuigou (GV26) improves recovery of neurological function following ischemic cerebrovascular events, but its mechanism remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the action of electroacupuncture at these acupoints is associated with elevated serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). To test this, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Electroacupuncture was performed at Baihui and Shuigou with a “disperse-dense” wave at an alternating frequency of 2 and 150 Hz, and at a constant intensity of 3 mA. Each electroacupuncture session lasted 30 minutes and was performed every 12 hours for 3 days. Neurological severity scores were lower in injured rats after acupuncture than in those not subjected to treatment. Furthermore, serum level of TGF-β1 was greater after electroacupuncture than after no treatment. Our results indicate that electroacupuncture at Baihui and Shuigou increases the serum level of TGF-β1 in rats with acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, and exerts neuroprotective effects.

  11. Blocking B7-1/CD28 Pathway Diminished Long-Range Brain Damage by Regulating the Immune and Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Shen, Xi; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Ji, Mengmeng; Luo, Chengliang; Zhang, Mingyang; Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiping; Tao, Luyang

    2016-07-01

    Acute brain injuries can activate bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. The immune system, particularly T lymphocytes and cytokines, has been implicated in the progression of brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Co-stimulatory molecules B7-1 (CD80)/B7-2 (CD86) binding cognate receptor provides a secondary signaling to T cell activation. The aim of our study was to explore the effects of anti-B7-1 antibody on the development and prognosis of cerebral hemorrhage and to investigate the possible underlying mechanism. Mice were inner canthus veniplex administered with anti-B7-1 antibody at 10 min and 24 h after ICH and sacrificed on the third day after ICH. Immune function was assessed via splenocyte proliferation assay and organism index, respectively. IFN-γ and IL-4 were detected by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay. The cerebral edema was evaluated via brain water content. The levels of autophagy and apoptosis related proteins were measured by western blotting analysis. In addition, functional outcome was studied with pole-climbing test and morris water maze. The mice were weighed on 0, 1, 3, 14 and 21 days after ICH. The treatment with anti-B7-1 antibody significantly lowered immune function, and reduced the latency of water maze on 18 and 20 days, the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 as well as body weight on day 3 after cerebral hemorrhage. Our study suggests that in the cerebral hemorrhage mice brain anti-B7-1 antibody may reduce long-range brain damage by reversing immune imbalance. PMID:26980009

  12. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  13. AltitudeOmics: cerebral autoregulation during ascent, acclimatization, and re-exposure to high altitude and its relation with acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Andrew W; Fan, Jui-Lin; Evero, Oghenero; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Julian, Colleen G; Lovering, Andrew T; Panerai, Ronney B; Roach, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) acts to maintain brain blood flow despite fluctuations in perfusion pressure. Acute hypoxia is thought to impair CA, but it is unclear if CA is affected by acclimatization or related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). We assessed changes in CA using transfer function analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in radial artery blood pressure (indwelling catheter) and resulting changes in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler) in 21 active individuals at sea level upon arrival at 5,260 m (ALT1), after 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16), and upon re-exposure to 5,260 m after 7 days at 1,525 m (POST7). The Lake Louise Questionnaire was used to evaluate AMS symptom severity. CA was impaired upon arrival at ALT1 (P < 0.001) and did not change with acclimatization at ALT16 or upon re-exposure at POST7. CA was not associated with AMS symptoms (all R < 0.50, P > 0.05). These findings suggest that alterations in CA are an intrinsic consequence of hypoxia and are not directly related to the occurrence or severity of AMS.

  14. [Advance in research on the genetic etiology of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jifeng; Huang, Qing; Liu, Yunhai

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is a form of brain parenchymal hemorrhage caused by a variety of non-traumatic reasons, resulting in cerebral artery, veins or capillaries rupture. The etiology of SICH is variable, with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage being the most common, accounting for 60% ~ 81% of all cases. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, drug use related hemorrhage, Moyamoya disease are also important causes of SICH. Previous studies showed that genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of SICH. Here the genetic mechanisms of SICH and classification of its etiology are reviewed. PMID:27577228

  15. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  16. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome as a cause of thunderclap headache: a retrospective case series study.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Breen, David P; Phillips, Timothy J; Misbahuddin, Anjum; Chawda, Sanjiv; de Silva, Rajith

    2015-06-01

    Thunderclap headache is a common emergency department presentation. Although subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should be the first diagnosis to exclude, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an important alternative cause, which may be commoner than appreciated. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is characterized by multifocal narrowing of cerebral arteries, typically manifested by acute, severe headache with or without neurologic deficits. To compare and discuss the clinical and radiologic characteristics of patients with RCVS. We report 4 cases of RCVS, presenting at a single unit in 1 year. All presented with thunderclap headache, whereas half of them had additional neurologic symptoms such as right homonymous hemianopia, right-sided weakness, and slurred speech. Brain computed tomography was normal in 2 of our patients, but subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed xanthochromia consistent with SAH. The remaining 2 patients demonstrated intracerebral hemorrhage on computed tomography. All of our patients underwent digital subtraction angiography that showed segmental narrowing and dilatation of one or more cerebral arteries without any signs of aneurysm. Repeat digital subtraction angiography after 3 months was entirely normal prompting the diagnosis of RCVS. Thunderclap headache requires urgent workup to identify the underlying cause. Although SAH is the most important diagnosis to exclude in the first instance, emergency physicians should be aware of other causes and how they present, such as RCVS. Early recognition of this condition is important in order to remove precipitants, avoid unnecessary investigations, and inform patients about their prognosis. PMID:25583268

  17. The complement system is involved in acute inflammation but not in the hemorrhage produced by a Bothrops atrox snake venom low molecular mass proteinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Flávia G; Petretski, Jorge H; Kanashiro, Milton M; Lemos, Luciana; da Silva, Wilmar Dias; Kipnis, Thereza L

    2004-03-01

    Low molecular weight hemorrhagins were purified from crude Bothrops atrox snake venom by gel filtration followed by ionic strength chromatography. The protein fractions obtained, designated HI-1 to HI-8, contained proteins with molecular masses lower than 30 kDa. HI-5, the most representative among of these fractions, exhibited, in vitro, proteolytic and C inactivating properties, as analyzed by proteolysis of a protein substrate, and C system consumptive activities as assayed by reduction of the hemolytic C activity in normal human serum and by cleavage of partially purified component C3. HI-5 hemorrhagin injected i.m. into C-sufficient BALB/c mice induced a local inflammation characterized by edema, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and hemorrhage. In contrast, when injected into BALB/c mice previously C-depleted, the number of PMN per tissue section, but not hemorrhage, was significantly reduced (129.668 +/- 31.341 cells per microscopic field) as compared with the control C-sufficient mice (812.168 +/- 111.194 cells per microscopic field). The observations were confirmed by using C5-deficient mice instead of C-depleted mice. The average number of PMN per tissue section in C5-defficient A/J mice was 72.666 +/- 19.416 cells per microscopic field. These data indicate that the C system is involved in PMN accumulation, but not in the hemorrhage, at the local induced lesions by low molecular mass B. atrox hemorrhagins. HI-5 apparently is not contaminated with other direct or indirect inflammation mediators, PMN accumulation and hemorrhage, however, an independent phenomenon, could be mediated by the same hemorrhagin proteinase domain. PMID:15104120

  18. [A case presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed midbrain and upper pontine hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kenji; Furutani, Rikiya; Shiota, Jun-ichi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2003-07-01

    We describe a patient presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed mesencephalic hemorrhage. A 36-year-old man with no past illness visited our hospital complaining of sudden onset of diplopia, dysesthesia of the left face and upper extremity, and acuphenes of the left ear. Neurological examination revealed left trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance of the left side almost above T11 level. Pain and temperature sensation were disturbed, but vibration, joint position, graphesthesia, kinesthesia, and discrimination sensation were spared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head, performed 7 days after onset, revealed acute to subacute phase hemorrhage at the right inferior colliculus. No abnormalities were identified on cerebral angiography. Symptoms gradually improved with conservative therapy. After about ten weeks, diplopia disappeared and area of sensory disturbance was reduced (disturbance of pain sensation reduced to about T4 level, temperature sensation to about T9). Segmental sensory disturbance usually accompanies spinal cord lesion. However, several cases of similar symptoms following cerebrovascular disease of the brainstem have been reported. Conversely, some reports have indicated that trochlear nerve palsy due to midbrain hemorrhage accompanies sensory disturbance contralateral to the lesion. The nature of sensory disturbance is thus variable. The present case suggests that segmental sensory disturbance might accompany trochlear nerve palsy caused by hemorrhage of the inferior colliculus, as intramedullary fibers of the trochlear nerve and spinothalamic tract are located nearby and somatotopy of the spinothalamic tract is preserved even at the level of the midbrain.

  19. PREDICTORS OF HIGHLY PREVALENT BRAIN ISCHEMIA IN INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Ravi S.; Burgess, Richard E.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Gibbons, M. Christopher; Shara, Nawar M.; Fernandez, Stephen; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; German, Laura; Sobotka, Ian; Edwards, Dorothy; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and temporal profile of concurrent ischemic lesions in patients with acute primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Patients were recruited within a prospective, longitudinal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based study of primary ICH. Clinical, demographic, and MRI data were collected on all subjects at baseline and 1 month. Results Of the 138 patients enrolled, mean age was 59 years, 54% were male, 73% black, and 84% had a history of hypertension. At baseline, ischemic lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were found in 35% of patients. At 1 month, lesions were present in 27%, and of these lesions, 83% were new and not present at baseline. ICH volume (p=0.025), intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.019), presence of microbleeds (p=0.024), and large, early reductions in mean arterial pressure (p=0.003) were independent predictors of baseline DWI lesions. A multivariate logistical model predicting the presence of 1 month DWI lesions included history of any prior stroke (p=0.012), presence of 1 or more microbleeds (p=0.04), black race (p=0.641), and presence of a DWI lesion at baseline (p=0.007) Interpretation This study demonstrates that more than 1/3 of patients with primary ICH have active cerebral ischemia at baseline remote from the index hematoma, and 1/4 of patients experience ongoing, acute ischemic events at 1 month. Multivariate analyses implicate blood pressure reductions in the setting of an active vasculopathy as a potential underlying mechanism. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of these lesions on outcome and optimal management strategies to arrest vascular damage. PMID:22367992

  20. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  1. Influence of Acute Jugular Vein Compression on the Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, Pial Artery Pulsation and Width of Subarachnoid Space in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Winklewski, Pawel J.; Guminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acute bilateral jugular vein compression on: (1) pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ); (2) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV); (3) peripheral blood pressure; and (4) possible relations between mentioned parameters. Methods Experiments were performed on a group of 32 healthy 19–30 years old male subjects. cc-TQ and the subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) were measured using near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS), CBFV in the left anterior cerebral artery using transcranial Doppler, blood pressure was measured using Finapres, while end-tidal CO2 was measured using medical gas analyser. Bilateral jugular vein compression was achieved with the use of a sphygmomanometer held on the neck of the participant and pumped at the pressure of 40 mmHg, and was performed in the bend-over (BOPT) and swayed to the back (initial) position. Results In the first group (n = 10) during BOPT, sas-TQ and pulse pressure (PP) decreased (−17.6% and −17.9%, respectively) and CBFV increased (+35.0%), while cc-TQ did not change (+1.91%). In the second group, in the initial position (n = 22) cc-TQ and CBFV increased (106.6% and 20.1%, respectively), while sas-TQ and PP decreases were not statistically significant (−15.5% and −9.0%, respectively). End-tidal CO2 remained stable during BOPT and venous compression in both groups. Significant interdependence between changes in cc-TQ and PP after bilateral jugular vein compression in the initial position was found (r = −0.74). Conclusions Acute bilateral jugular venous insufficiency leads to hyperkinetic cerebral circulation characterised by augmented pial artery pulsation and CBFV and direct transmission of PP into the brain microcirculation. The Windkessel effect with impaired jugular outflow and more likely increased intracranial pressure is described. This study clarifies the potential mechanism linking jugular outflow insufficiency with arterial small

  2. Endovascular Therapies for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Techniques and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted for acute management of hemorrhagic complications in obstetric and gynecologic patients. The aim of this article is to review the common indications for vascular embolization in obstetric and gynecologic emergencies, specifically in the setting of primary postpartum hemorrhage, and to discuss the technique and outcomes of endovascular treatment. PMID:24436559

  3. Global aphasia due to left thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ozeren, Ali; Koc, Filiz; Demirkiran, Meltem; Sönmezler, Abdurrahman; Kibar, Mustafa

    2006-12-01

    Global aphasia is an acquired language disorder characterized by severe impairments in all modalities of language. The specific sites of injury commonly include Wernike's and Broca's areas and result from large strokes--particularly those involving the internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries. Rarely, deep subcortical lesions may cause global aphasia. We present three cases with global aphasia due to a more rare cause: left thalamic hemorrhage. Their common feature was the large size of the hemorrhage and its extension to the third ventricule. HMPAO-SPECT in one of the cases revealed ipsilateral subcortical, frontotemporal cortical and right frontal cortical hypoperfusion. Left thalamic hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of global aphasia. PMID:17114855

  4. Primary Medullary Hemorrhage Associated with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Jee-Young

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous primary medullary hemorrhage is a rare event. A 64-year-old man was admitted for sudden-onset vertigo and vomiting. His clinical features were similar to those of lateral medullary syndrome. The patient had no anticoagulant therapy, vascular malformation, or a caudal extension of a pontine hemorrhage. The patient had multiple hypertensive changes, including retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography, multiple cerebral microbleeds, and small-vessel changes on MRI. T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI performed 3 months prior to admission and contrast-enhanced MRI showed no evidence of vascular malformation. We concluded that the patient had uncontrolled hypertension that may have lead to primary medullary hemorrhage. PMID:20396466

  5. Methicillin Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bracis, R.; Sanders, C. V.; Gilbert, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a recognized complication of methicillin therapy. Hemorrhagic cystitis due to methicillin has not been emphasized. Evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis developed in six patients receiving methicillin therapy and was confirmed by cystoscopy in three of them. PMID:907335

  6. Progesterone Improves Neurobehavioral Outcome in Models of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Wang, Haichen; Jeong, Seongtae; Hsieh, Justin T; Majeed, Mohammed; Dawson, Hana; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S; James, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    In models of acute brain injury, progesterone improves recovery through several mechanisms including modulation of neuroinflammation. Secondary injury from neuroinflammation is a potential therapeutic target after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). For potential translation of progesterone as a clinical acute ICH therapeutic, the present study sought to define efficacy of exogenous progesterone administration in ICH-relevant experimental paradigms. Young and aged C57BL/6 male, female, and ovariectomized (OVX) mice underwent left intrastriatal collagenase (0.05-0.075 U) or autologous whole blood (35 μl) injection. Progesterone at varying doses (4-16 mg/kg) was administered at 2, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h after injury. Rotarod and Morris water maze latencies were measured on days 1-7 and days 28-31 after injury, respectively. Hematoma volume, brain water content (cerebral edema), complementary immunohistochemistry, multiplex cytokine arrays, and inflammatory proteins were assessed at prespecified time points after injury. Progesterone (4 mg/kg) administration improved rotarod and water maze latencies (p < 0.01), and decreased cerebral edema (p < 0.05), microglial proliferation, and neuronal loss (p < 0.01) in young and aged male, young OVX, and aged female mice. Brain concentration of proinflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor-associated proteins were also decreased after progesterone (4 mg/kg) treatment (p < 0.01). Progesterone-treated young female mice showed no detectable effects. Exogenous progesterone improved short- and long-term neurobehavioral recovery and modulated neuroinflammation in male and OVX mice after ICH. Future studies should validate these findings, and address timing and length of administration before translation to clinical trial.

  7. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  8. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  9. Superficial siderosis is a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linn, Jennifer; Wollenweber, Frank A; Lummel, Nina; Bochmann, Katja; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Bruckmann, Hartmut; Dichgans, Martin; Opherk, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Supratentorial superficial siderosis (SS) is a frequent imaging marker of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). It is most probably caused by focal subarachnoid hemorrhages (fSAHs). Based on single-case observations, it has been proposed that such fSAHs might be a predisposing factor for future intracranial hemorrhage. Here we tested the hypothesis if a SS as a residue of fSAHs must be regarded as a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage. Fifty-one consecutive patients with SS and no apparent cause other than possible or probable CAA were identified through a database search and followed-up for a median interval of 35.3 months (range 6-120 months). Main outcome measures were rate and location of new intracranial hemorrhages. Twenty-four patients (47.1 %) had experienced any new intracranial hemorrhage, 18 patients (35.3 %) had an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and in 13 of them (25.5 %), the hemorrhage was located at the site of pre-existing siderosis. Six patients (11.7 %) had developed a new subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), four of them at the site of siderosis. Patients with SS are at substantial risk for subsequent intracranial hemorrhage. SS can be considered a warning sign of future ICH or SAH, which frequently occur adjacent to pre-existing SS. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  10. Phycocyanobilin promotes PC12 cell survival and modulates immune and inflammatory genes and oxidative stress markers in acute cerebral hypoperfusion in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Riva, Federica; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    Since the inflammatory response and oxidative stress are involved in the stroke cascade, we evaluated here the effects of Phycocyanobilin (PCB, the C-Phycocyanin linked tetrapyrrole) on PC12 cell survival, the gene expression and the oxidative status of hypoperfused rat brain. After the permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAo), the animals were treated with saline or PCB, taking samples 24 h post-surgery. Global gene expression was analyzed with GeneChip Rat Gene ST 1.1 from Affymetrix; the expression of particular genes was assessed by the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix and Bioplex methods; and redox markers (MDA, PP, CAT, SOD) were evaluated spectrophotometrically. The PCB treatment prevented the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell injury assessed by the MTT assay, and modulated 190 genes (93 up- and 97 down-regulated) associated to several immunological and inflammatory processes in BCCAo rats. Furthermore, PCB positively modulated 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment and counteracted the oxidative imbalance in the treated BCCAo animals. Our results support the view of an effective influence of PCB on major inflammatory mediators in acute cerebral hypoperfusion. These results suggest that PCB has a potential to be a treatment for ischemic stroke for which further studies are needed. - Highlights: • Phycocyanobilin (PCB) prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell viability loss. • Anterior cortex and striatum are highly vulnerable to cerebral hypoperfusion (CH). • PCB modulates 190 genes associated to inflammation in acute CH. • PCB regulates 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment. • PCB restores redox and immune balances showing promise as potential stroke therapy.

  11. Maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Dildy, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhage remains as one of the top 3 obstetrics related causes of maternal mortality, with most deaths occurring within 24-48 hours of delivery. Although hemorrhage related maternal mortality has declined globally, it continues to be a vexing problem. More specifically, the developing world continue to shoulder a disproportionate share of hemorrhage related deaths (99%) compared with industrialized nations (1%). Given the often preventable nature of death from hemorrhage, the cornerstone of effective mortality reduction involves risk factor identification, quick diagnosis, and timely management. In this monograph we will review the epidemiology, etiology, and preventative measures related to maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

  12. Sensitivity of 3D Gradient Recalled Echo Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Technique Compared to Computed Tomography Angiography for Detection of Middle Cerebral Artery Thrombus in Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Vijay, Kanupriya; Thamburaj, Krishnamoorthy; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul

    2014-10-23

    We aimed at comparing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with computed tomography angiography (CTA) in the detection of middle cerebral artery (MCA) thrombus in acute stroke. Seventy-nine patients with acute MCA stroke was selected using our search engine software; only the ones showing restricted diffusion in the MCA territory on diffusion-weighted images were included. We finally selected 35 patients who had done both MRI (including SWI) and CTA. Twenty random subjects with completely normal MRI (including SWI) exam were selected as control. Two neuroradiologists (blinded to the presence or absence of stroke) reviewed the SW images and then compared the findings with CT angiogram (in patients with stroke). The number of MCA segments showing thrombus in each patient was tabulated to estimate the thrombus burden. Thrombus was detected on SWI in one or more MCA segments in 30 out of 35 patients, on the first review. Of the 30, SWI showed thrombus in more than one MCA segments in 7 patients. CTA depicted branch occlusion in 31 cases. Thrombus was seen on both SWI and CTA in 28 patients. Thrombus was noted in two patients on SWI only, with no corresponding abnormality seen on CTA. Two patients with acute MCA showed no vascular occlusion or thrombus on either CTA or SWI. Only two case of false-positive thrombus was reported in normal control subjects. Susceptibility-weighted images had sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 90% respectively, with positive predictive value 94%. Sensitivity was 86% for SWI, compared with 89% for CTA, and this difference was statistically insignificant (P>0.05). Of all the positive cases on CTA (31) corresponding thrombus was seen on SWI in 90% of subjects (28 of 31). Susceptibility-weighted imaging has high sensitivity for detection of thrombus in acute MCA stroke. Moreover, SWI is a powerful technique for estimation of thrombus burden, which can be challenging on CTA.

  13. Validity of the Child Facial Coding System for the Assessment of Acute Pain in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Kellie L; LeFort, Sandra; O'Brien, Michelle; Coyte, Peter C; Guerriere, Denise N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the concurrent and discriminant validity of the Child Facial Coding System for children with cerebral palsy. Eighty-five children (mean = 8.35 years, SD = 4.72 years) were videotaped during a passive joint stretch with their physiotherapist and during 3 time segments: baseline, passive joint stretch, and recovery. Children's pain responses were rated from videotape using the Numerical Rating Scale and Child Facial Coding System. Results indicated that Child Facial Coding System scores during the passive joint stretch significantly correlated with Numerical Rating Scale scores (r = .72, P < .01). Child Facial Coding System scores were also significantly higher during the passive joint stretch than the baseline and recovery segments (P < .001). Facial activity was not significantly correlated with the developmental measures. These findings suggest that the Child Facial Coding System is a valid method of identifying pain in children with cerebral palsy.

  14. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  15. Intestinal Epithelial TLR-4 Activation Is Required for the Development of Acute Lung Injury after Trauma/Hemorrhagic Shock via the Release of HMGB1 from the Gut.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Chhinder P; Jia, Hongpeng; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Good, Misty; Egan, Charlotte; Ozolek, John; Zhu, Xiaorong; Billiar, Timothy R; Hackam, David J

    2015-05-15

    The mechanisms that lead to the development of remote lung injury after trauma remain unknown, although a central role for the gut in the induction of lung injury has been postulated. We hypothesized that the development of remote lung injury after trauma/hemorrhagic shock requires activation of TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, and we sought to determine the mechanisms involved. We show that trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused lung injury in wild-type mice, but not in mice that lack TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium, confirming the importance of intestinal TLR4 activation in the process. Activation of intestinal TLR4 after trauma led to increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, enterocyte apoptosis, and the release of circulating HMGB1, whereas inhibition of ER stress attenuated apoptosis, reduced circulating HMGB1, and decreased lung injury severity. Neutralization of circulating HMGB1 led to reduced severity of lung injury after trauma, and mice that lack HMGB1 in the intestinal epithelium were protected from the development of lung injury, confirming the importance of the intestine as the source of HMGB1, whose release of HMGB1 induced a rapid protein kinase C ζ-mediated internalization of surface tight junctions in the pulmonary epithelium. Strikingly, the use of a novel small-molecule TLR4 inhibitor reduced intestinal ER stress, decreased circulating HMGB1, and preserved lung architecture after trauma. Thus, intestinal epithelial TLR4 activation leads to HMGB1 release from the gut and the development of lung injury, whereas strategies that block upstream TLR4 signaling may offer pulmonary protective strategies after trauma.

  16. Intracranial hemorrhage during aeromedical transport and correlation with high altitude adaptations in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kouliev, Timur; Richardson, Airron; Glushak, Cai

    2012-01-01

    Aeromedical transport is challenging not only because of limitations of equipment, unfamiliar surroundings, and challenging environmental conditions, but also due to difficulty in developing methodologies for research and data collection. To our knowledge, neurological changes at the oxygen tensions of a pressurized cabin have not been systematically studied. Here we report a case of intracranial hemorrhage during aeromedical transport and review the body's cardiovascular and respiratory adaptation to decreased ambient oxygen tension. Previous experience with high altitude cerebral edema serves as guidance for mitigating the effects of vasogenic edema in patients at risk of neurological events who travel by air. Review of this case and relevant altitude-related physiological changes may be grounds for more conservative recommendations on aeromedical transport after an acute neurological event. PMID:27147866

  17. Acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in a patient taking dabigatran with radiographic evidence of recanalization.

    PubMed

    Sangha, Navdeep; El Khoury, Ramy; Misra, Vivek; Lopez, George

    2012-11-01

    Dabigatran etexelate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. A 51-year-old man with a history of atrial fibrillation who was taking dabigatran presented with an acute ischemic stroke. The patient had a normal international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and an elevated thrombin time of 26.4 seconds. Recanalization of the middle cerebral artery with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was apparent on digital subtraction angiography, and there was no evidence of intracerebral hemorrhage on the repeat computed tomographic scan. This is the first report of a patient who was taking dabigatran etexilate and who had an ischemic stroke caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion, with an elevated thrombin time and radiographic recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator without evidence of hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:22683118

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  19. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  20. Cerebral Venous Congestion as Indication for Thrombolytic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fong Y. Kostanian, Varoujan; Rivera, Monica; Lee, Kwo-Whie; Chen, Clayton C.; Nguyen, Thong H.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To carry out a retrospective analysis of patients with acute dural sinus thrombosis, and the role of cerebral venous congestion in patient management. Methods. Twenty-five patients were identified with the clinical and imaging diagnosis of acute dural sinus thrombosis. The imaging diagnosis was by magnetic resonance (MR) and/or computed tomography (CT) venography. There was a female predominance with a female to male ratio of 1.5 to 1 (16 women, 9 men). The age range was from 19 to 64 years old with an average age of 37 years. The first 10 patients, who ranged in age from 21 to 64 years old (average 37 years), received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods ranging from 5 days to 2 months. The remaining 15 patients ranged in age from 19 to 57 years old (average 38 years). They either underwent subsequent thrombectomy after a trial of anticoagulation therapy, or went straight to thrombectomy. These latter 15 patients had initial evidence of cerebral venous congestion, either clinically by severe or worsening symptoms despite anticoagulation therapy, or on initial or subsequent CT or MR imaging. In our experience, the cerebral venous congestion imaging findings included intracranial hemorrhage, a hematoma, or edema. The thrombolytic treatment technique consisted of the advancement of a 6 Fr guiding catheter to the jugular bulb or sigmoid sinus from a transfemoral approach. A microcatheter was then advanced to the proximal portion of the thrombus and then either tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase was injected to prevent clot propagation. A balloon catheter was used to perform thrombectomy since the thrombolytic agents can be injected via the inner lumen with an inflated balloon. The inflated balloon helped to keep the venous flow from washing out the thrombolytic agent, thus facilitating the agent's effect. Results. The first 10 patients received only anticoagulation therapy with heparin and warfarin for periods

  1. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescents: 3 case reports.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yeon Jin; Lee, Hyun Young; Jung, In Ah; Cho, Won-Kyoung; Cho, Bin; Suh, Byung-Kyu

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS) is a rare disease characterized by a extracellular volume depletion and hyponatremia induced by marked natriuresis. It is mainly reported in patients who experience a central nervous system insult, such as cerebral hemorrhage or encephalitis. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a main cause of severe hyponatremia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas CSWS is rarely reported. We report 3 patients with childhood acute leukemia who developed CSWS with central nervous system complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of CSW was made on the basis of severe hyponatremia accompanied by increased urine output with clinical signs of dehydration. All patients showed elevated natriuretic peptide and normal antidiuretic hormone. Aggressive water and sodium replacement treatment was instituted in all 3 patients and 2 of them were effectively recovered, the other one was required to add fludrocortisone administration.

  2. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adolescents: 3 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yeon Jin; Lee, Hyun Young; Jung, In Ah; Cho, Won-Kyoung; Cho, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS) is a rare disease characterized by a extracellular volume depletion and hyponatremia induced by marked natriuresis. It is mainly reported in patients who experience a central nervous system insult, such as cerebral hemorrhage or encephalitis. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a main cause of severe hyponatremia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas CSWS is rarely reported. We report 3 patients with childhood acute leukemia who developed CSWS with central nervous system complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The diagnosis of CSW was made on the basis of severe hyponatremia accompanied by increased urine output with clinical signs of dehydration. All patients showed elevated natriuretic peptide and normal antidiuretic hormone. Aggressive water and sodium replacement treatment was instituted in all 3 patients and 2 of them were effectively recovered, the other one was required to add fludrocortisone administration. PMID:26817009

  3. [Hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst: case report and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Aranda, Jorge; Wingartz-Plata, Hugo F; Maldonado-Arce, Boris; Vega-Espinosa, J Juvenal; Maldonado-Alcaraz, Efraín

    2004-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare entities, and hemorrhagic pseudocysts are even less frequent. Generally, they are unsuspected during first patient evaluation and can suggest acute abdomen. We present the case of a hemorrhagic pseudocyst with sudden onset of abdominal pain and features compatible with acute appendicitis.

  4. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  5. Profiling biochemical and hemodynamic markers using chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained rats undergoing severe, acute controlled hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock as an integrated in-vivo model system to assess new blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Daull, P; Blouin, A; Cayer, J; Beaudoin, M; Belleville, K; Sirois, P; Nantel, F; Chang, T M S; Battistini, B

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess several biochemical and physiological endpoint parameters alongside controlled hemorrhagic and recovery phases of chronically instrumented, conscious and unrestrained healthy rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12-14 weeks; 430+/-20 g; n=22-18) were instrumented with a saline-perfused femoral arterial catheter and placed individually in a metabolic cage for up to 20 days, allowing instant assessments of the hemodynamic profile and blood and urine sampling for hematological profile and biochemical measurements to assess hepatic, renal and metabolic functions. In addition, body weight, food and water intake, and diuresis were monitored daily. After a 7-day stabilization period, the rats underwent severe and acute hemorrhagic shock (HS) (removal of 50% of total circulating blood volume), kept in hypovolemic shock for an ischemic period of 50 min and then resuscitated over 10 min. Gr. 1 was re-infused with autologous shed blood (AB; n=10) whereas Gr. 2 was infused 1:1 with a solution of sterile saline-albumin (SA; 7% w/v) (n=8-12). Ischemic rats recovered much more rapidly following AB re-infusion than those receiving SA. Normal hemodynamic and biochemical profiles were re-established after 24 h. Depressed blood pressure lasted 4-5 days in SA rats. The hematological profile in the SA resuscitated rats was even more drastically affected. Circulating plasma concentrations of hemoglobin (-40%), hematocrit (-50%), RBC (-40%) and platelets (-41%) counts were still severely decreased 24 h after the acute ischemic event whereas WBC counts increased 2.2-fold by day 4. It took 5-9 days for these profiles to normalize after ischemia-reperfusion with SA. Diuresis increased in both groups (by 45+/-7% on day 1) but presented distinct electrolytic profiles. Hepatic and renal functions were normal in AB rats whereas altered in SA rats. The present set of experiments enabled us to validate a model of HS in conscious rats and the use of an

  6. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  7. In vivo cerebral blood flow autoregulation studies using rheoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, M.; Pearce, F.; Garcia, A.; Van Albert, S.; Settle, T.; Szebeni, J.; Baranyi, L.; Hartings, J.; Armonda, R.

    2010-04-01

    Acute management of patients with traumatic brain/blast injury is a challenge. To minimize secondary injury and improve outcome, it is critical to detect neurological deterioration early, when it is potentially reversible. One potential monitoring method is cerebral electrical impedance (rheoencephalography-REG) because of its non-invasiveness and good time resolution. Reported here are the results of cerebral blood flow (CBF) manipulations comparing electroencephalogram (EEG) with REG (both intra-cerebral) and measuring with surface and skull REG electrodes. Our hypothesis was that REG would reflect spreading depression and CBF autoregulation. Animal experiments were performed using one rat (four trials with intracerebral electrodes), monkeys (n=8, with surface electrodes) and pigs (n = 24 pigs with skull electrodes; 57 trials, 19 types of liposomes). Challenges included intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation, liposome infusion, and hemorrhage. Data were stored on a PC and evaluated off line. CBF autoregulation was evaluated both by visual inspection and by a Matlab script. These studies confirmed that REG reflects CBF autoregulation and that REG is useful for detecting spreading depression (SD), vasospasm and the lower limit of CBF autoregulation. These findings have clinical relevance for use in noninvasive neuro-monitoring in the neurosurgery intensive care and during transportation of patients with brain injury.

  8. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M D

    1993-05-01

    Adrenal cysts are uncommon. They may be fatal if they hemorrhage and are not rapidly diagnosed. Most adrenal cysts are small and asymptomatic. When they are symptomatic, it is usually because the cyst has enlarged, causing flank discomfort, gastrointestinal complaints, and hemorrhage. Occasionally, a palpable mass may be found. It is thought that hemorrhage occurs secondary to trauma or some toxic or infectious process. The author describes a case in which a previously healthy man had a sudden hemorrhage within a benign adrenal cyst with infarction of the kidney. A discussion of adrenal cysts follows.

  9. Mechanical Recanalization following i.v. Thrombolysis: A Retrospective Analysis regarding Secondary Hemorrhagic Infarctions and Parenchymal Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Höltje, J; Bonk, F; Anstadt, A; Terborg, C; Pohlmann, C; Urban, P P; Brüning, R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In acute stroke by occlusion of the proximal medial cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery, intravenous thrombolysis is an established treatment. Another option is mechanical recanalization. It remains unclear if the combination of both methods poses an additional bleeding risk. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to determine the proportion of hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hematomas. Methods. Inclusion criteria were an occlusion of the carotid T or proximal MCA treated with full dose thrombolysis and mechanical recanalization. 31 patients were selected. Devices used were Trevo, Penumbra Aspiration system, Penumbra 3D Retriever, and Revive. The initial control by computed tomography was carried out with a mean delay to intervention of 10.9 hours (SD: 8.5 hours). Results. A slight hemorrhagic infarction (HI1) was observed in 2/31 patients, and a more severe HI2 occurred in two cases. A smaller parenchymal hematoma (PH1) was not seen and a space-occupying PH2 was seen in 2/31 cases. There was no significant difference in the probability of intracranial bleeding after successful (thrombolysis in cerebral infarctions 2b and 3) or unsuccessful recanalization. Conclusion. The proportion of intracranial bleeding using mechanical recanalization following intravenous thrombolysis appears comparable with reports using thrombolysis alone. PMID:26640710

  10. Perinephric Hematoma and Hemorrhagic Shock as a Rare Presentation for an Acutely Obstructive Ureteral Stone with Forniceal Rupture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zynger, Debra L.; Box, Geoffrey N.; Shah, Ketul K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Spontaneous perinephric hematoma (SPH) secondary to a forniceal rupture as the first presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone in a patient without history of urolithiasis has not been described previously. Case presentation: We report a 70-year-old Caucasian male patient who presented to our emergency room with fever, altered mental status, and left flank pain. He had a temperature of 103.3°F, tachycardia, but stable blood pressure. He had left flank tenderness. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed an intracapsular hematoma (13.3 × 10.0 × 6.4 cm) with an active bleeding and a 1.1 cm left proximal ureteral stone. The patient became quickly hemodynamically unstable and was taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy and left nephrectomy. An active bleeding was encountered secondary to a (2.4 × 2.0 cm) lateral capsular defect in the kidney. Conclusion: Hemorrhagic/septic shock as a presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone may require an emergent nephrectomy in a hemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:27579423

  11. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  12. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg(-1) min(-1)), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (P time < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited.

  13. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  14. Prognostic accuracy of cerebral blood flow measurement by perfusion computed tomography, at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Reichhart, Marc; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Chalaron, Marc; Schnyder, Pierre; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Meuli, Reto

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic accuracy of perfusion computed tomography (CT), performed at the time of emergency room admission, in acute stroke patients. Accuracy was determined by comparison of perfusion CT with delayed magnetic resonance (MR) and by monitoring the evolution of each patient's clinical condition. Twenty-two acute stroke patients underwent perfusion CT covering four contiguous 10mm slices on admission, as well as delayed MR, performed after a median interval of 3 days after emergency room admission. Eight were treated with thrombolytic agents. Infarct size on the admission perfusion CT was compared with that on the delayed diffusion-weighted (DWI)-MR, chosen as the gold standard. Delayed magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion-weighted MR were used to detect recanalization. A potential recuperation ratio, defined as PRR = penumbra size/(penumbra size + infarct size) on the admission perfusion CT, was compared with the evolution in each patient's clinical condition, defined by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). In the 8 cases with arterial recanalization, the size of the cerebral infarct on the delayed DWI-MR was larger than or equal to that of the infarct on the admission perfusion CT, but smaller than or equal to that of the ischemic lesion on the admission perfusion CT; and the observed improvement in the NIHSS correlated with the PRR (correlation coefficient = 0.833). In the 14 cases with persistent arterial occlusion, infarct size on the delayed DWI-MR correlated with ischemic lesion size on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.958). In all 22 patients, the admission NIHSS correlated with the size of the ischemic area on the admission perfusion CT (r = 0.627). Based on these findings, we conclude that perfusion CT allows the accurate prediction of the final infarct size and the evaluation of clinical prognosis for acute stroke patients at the time of emergency evaluation. It may also provide

  15. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  16. Multi-site evaluation of a computer aided detection (CAD) algorithm for small acute intra-cranial hemorrhage and development of a stand-alone CAD system ready for deployment in a clinical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi R.; Fernandez, James; Lee, Joon K.; Chan, Tao; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2010-03-01

    Timely detection of Acute Intra-cranial Hemorrhage (AIH) in an emergency environment is essential for the triage of patients suffering from Traumatic Brain Injury. Moreover, the small size of lesions and lack of experience on the reader's part could lead to difficulties in the detection of AIH. A CT based CAD algorithm for the detection of AIH has been developed in order to improve upon the current standard of identification and treatment of AIH. A retrospective analysis of the algorithm has already been carried out with 135 AIH CT studies with 135 matched normal head CT studies from the Los Angeles County General Hospital/ University of Southern California Hospital System (LAC/USC). In the next step, AIH studies have been collected from Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and are currently being processed using the AIH CAD system as part of implementing a multi-site assessment and evaluation of the performance of the algorithm. The sensitivity and specificity numbers from the Walter Reed study will be compared with the numbers from the LAC/USC study to determine if there are differences in the presentation and detection due to the difference in the nature of trauma between the two sites. Simultaneously, a stand-alone system with a user friendly GUI has been developed to facilitate implementation in a clinical setting.

  17. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  18. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  19. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  20. SOD1 overexpression prevents acute hyperglycemia-induced cerebral myogenic dysfunction: relevance to contralateral hemisphere and stroke outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Li, Weiguo; Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Admission hyperglycemia (HG) amplifies vascular injury and neurological deficits in acute ischemic stroke, but the mechanisms remain controversial. We recently reported that ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury impairs the myogenic response in both hemispheres via increased nitration. However, whether HG amplifies contralateral myogenic dysfunction and whether loss of tone in the contralateral hemisphere contributes to stroke outcomes remain to be determined. Our hypothesis was that contralateral myogenic dysfunction worsens stroke outcomes after acute hyperglycemic stroke in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. Male wild-type or SOD1 transgenic rats were injected with saline or 40% glucose solution 10 min before surgery and then subjected to 30 min of ischemia/45 min or 24 h of reperfusion. In another set of animals (n = 5), SOD1 was overexpressed only in the contralateral hemisphere by stereotaxic adenovirus injection 2–3 wk before I/R. Myogenic tone and neurovascular outcomes were determined. HG exacerbated myogenic dysfunction in contralateral side only, which was associated with infarct size expansion, increased edema, and more pronounced neurological deficit. Global and selective SOD1 overexpression restored myogenic reactivity in ipsilateral and contralateral sides, respectively, and enhanced neurovascular outcomes. In conclusion, our results show that SOD1 overexpression nullified the detrimental effects of HG on myogenic tone and stroke outcomes and that the contralateral hemisphere may be a novel target for the management of acute hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:25552308

  1. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system. PMID:27196070

  2. Comprehensive Overview of Contemporary Management Strategies for Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Amitoz; Nimjee, Shahid M; Agrawal, Abhishek; Zhang, Jonathan; Diaz, Orlando; Zomorodi, Ali R; Smith, Tony; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric; Klucznik, Richard P; Ferrell, Andrew; Golshani, Kiarash; Stieg, Philip E; Britz, Gavin W

    2015-10-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains an important health issue in the United States. Despite recent improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral aneurysms, the mortality rate following aneurysm rupture. In those patients who survive, up to 50% are left severely disabled. The goal of preventing the hemorrhage or re-hemorrhage can only be achieved by successfully excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. This article is a comprehensive review by contemporary vascular neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiolgists on the modern management of cerebral aneurysms.

  3. Neuropsychology of acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sinanović, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychology includes both the psychiatric manifestations of neurological illness (primary brain-based disorders) and neurobiology of "idiopathic" psychiatric disorders. Neurological primary brain disorders provoke broad spectrum of brain pathophysiology that cause deficit sin human behaviour, and the magnitude of neurobehavioral-related problems is a world wide health concern. Speech disorders of aphasic type, unilateral neglect, anosognosia (deficit disorders), delirium and mood disorders (productive disorders) in urgent neurology, first of all in acute phase of stroke are more frequent disorders then it verified in routine exam, not only in the developed and large neurological departments. Aphasia is common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with prevalence of one third of all stroke patients in acute phase although exist reports on greater frequency. Unilateral neglect is a disorder that mostly effects the patient after the lesion of the right hemisphere, mostly caused by a cerebrovascular insult (infarct or haemorrhage affecting a large area - up to two thirds of the right hemisphere), and in general the left-side neglect is the most widespread neuropsychological deficit after the lesion of the right cerebral hemisphere. Reports on the incidence of visual neglect vary and they range from 13 to 85%. Anosognosia is on the second place as neuropsychological syndrome of stroke in right hemisphere, characterized by the denial of the motor, visual or cognitive deficit. This syndrome, defined as denial of hemiparesis or hemianopsia, is a common disorder verified in 17-28% of all patents with acute brain stoke. There are different reports on frequency of delirium in acute stroke, from 24 to 48%, and it is more frequent in hemorrhagic then ischemic stoke. Post stroke depression (PSD) is one of the more frequent consequences on the stroke, and the prevalence of PSD has ranged from 5 to 63% of patients in

  4. Planned Two-Fraction Proton Beam Stereotactic Radiosurgery for High-Risk Inoperable Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Chapman, Paul H.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Rowell, Alison; Daartz, Juliane; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patients with high-risk cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), based on eloquent brain location or large size, who underwent planned two-fraction proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 59 patients with high-risk cerebral AVMs received two-fraction PSRS. Median nidus volume was 23 cc (range, 1.4-58.1 cc), 70% of cases had nidus volume {>=}14 cc, and 34% were in critical locations (brainstem, basal ganglia). Median AVM score based on age, AVM size, and location was 3.19 (range, 0.9-6.9). Many patients had prior surgery or embolization (40%) or prior PSRS (12%). The most common prescription was 16 Gy radiobiologic equivalent (RBE) in two fractions, prescribed to the 90% isodose. Results: At a median follow-up of 56.1 months, 9 patients (15%) had total and 20 patients (34%) had partial obliteration. Patients with total obliteration received higher total dose than those with partial or no obliteration (mean dose, 17.6 vs. 15.5 Gy (RBE), p = 0.01). Median time to total obliteration was 62 months (range, 23-109 months), and 5-year actuarial rate of partial or total obliteration was 33%. Five-year actuarial rate of hemorrhage was 22% (95% confidence interval, 12.5%-36.8%) and 14% (n = 8) suffered fatal hemorrhage. Lesions with higher AVM scores were more likely to hemorrhage (p = 0.024) and less responsive to radiation (p = 0.026). The most common complication was Grade 1 headache acutely (14%) and long term (12%). One patient developed a Grade 2 generalized seizure disorder, and two had mild neurologic deficits. Conclusions: High-risk AVMs can be safely treated with two-fraction PSRS, although total obliteration rate is low and patients remain at risk for future hemorrhage. Future studies should include higher doses or a multistaged PSRS approach for lesions more resistant to obliteration with radiation.

  5. Prolonged Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion via Right Axillary Artery (≥60 min) Does Not Affect Early Outcomes in a Repair of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Yoshiaki; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to investigate whether the duration of antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) via right axillary artery with an 8-mm prosthetic graft affects early outcomes in a repair of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: Over the 24 months from April 2010, a repair of AAD under ACP via the right axillary artery and mild hypothermic circulatory arrest (rectum temperature, 28–30°C) was performed in 34 patients. Mean age was 64.5 ± 13.7 years of age. Preoperative shock status was in three due to cardiac tamponade. Organ malperfusion occurred in 11 patients preoperatively. Mean follow-up period was 9.6 ± 8.4 months and follow-up rate was 100%. Results: Hospital mortality rate was 8.8%. No newly required hemodialysis and new onset of temporary or permanent neurologic deficits were present in survivors. There were no statistically significant differences of mortality rate, new onset of permanent or temporary neurologic deficits and distal organ dysfunction between ACP duration <60 min and ≥60 min. The 12-month survival was 84.4% ± 6.4%. And, freedom from aorta-related events at 12 and 18 months were 100% ± 0.0% and 88.9% ± 10.5%, respectively. Conclusions: The duration of ACP via right axillary artery does not affect early outcomes following a repair of AAD. PMID:26062579

  6. Phycocyanobilin promotes PC12 cell survival and modulates immune and inflammatory genes and oxidative stress markers in acute cerebral hypoperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Pavón-Fuentes, Nancy; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Fernández-Massó, Julio R; Delgado-Roche, Liván; Mendoza-Marí, Yssel; Santana, Seydi Pedroso; Cruz-Ramírez, Alieski; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Nazábal-Gálvez, Marcelo; Cintado-Benítez, Alberto; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Polentarutti, Nadia; Riva, Federica; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo; Pentón-Rol, Giselle

    2013-10-01

    Since the inflammatory response and oxidative stress are involved in the stroke cascade, we evaluated here the effects of Phycocyanobilin (PCB, the C-Phycocyanin linked tetrapyrrole) on PC12 cell survival, the gene expression and the oxidative status of hypoperfused rat brain. After the permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAo), the animals were treated with saline or PCB, taking samples 24h post-surgery. Global gene expression was analyzed with GeneChip Rat Gene ST 1.1 from Affymetrix; the expression of particular genes was assessed by the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix and Bioplex methods; and redox markers (MDA, PP, CAT, SOD) were evaluated spectrophotometrically. The PCB treatment prevented the H2O2 and glutamate induced PC12 cell injury assessed by the MTT assay, and modulated 190 genes (93 up- and 97 down-regulated) associated to several immunological and inflammatory processes in BCCAo rats. Furthermore, PCB positively modulated 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment and counteracted the oxidative imbalance in the treated BCCAo animals. Our results support the view of an effective influence of PCB on major inflammatory mediators in acute cerebral hypoperfusion. These results suggest that PCB has a potential to be a treatment for ischemic stroke for which further studies are needed. PMID:23732081

  7. Core-shell hybrid liposomal vesicles loaded with panax notoginsenoside: preparation, characterization and protective effects on global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and acute myocardial ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Han, Xizhen; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun; Zhao, Haiping; Yang, Ming; Ni, Bin; Liao, Zhenggen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Novel panax notoginsenoside-loaded core-shell hybrid liposomal vesicles (PNS-HLV) were developed to resolve the restricted bioavailability of PNS and to enhance its protective effects in vivo on oral administration. Methods: Physicochemical characterizations of PNS-HLV included assessment of morphology, particle size and zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency (EE%), stability and in vitro release study. In addition, to evaluate its oral treatment potential, we compared the effect of PNS-HLV on global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and acute myocardial ischemia injury with those of PNS solution, conventional PNS-loaded nanoparticles, and liposomes. Results: In comparison with PNS solution, conventional PNS-loaded nanoparticles and liposomes, PNS-HLV was stable for at least 12 months at 4°C. Satisfactory improvements in the EE% of notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rb1, and ginsenoside Rg1 were shown with the differences in EE% shortened and the greater controlled drug release profiles were exhibited from PNS-HLV. The improvements in the physicochemical properties of HLV contributed to the results that PNS-HLV was able to significantly inhibit the edema of brain and reduce the infarct volume, while it could markedly inhibit H2O2, modified Dixon agar, and serum lactate dehydrogenase, and increase superoxide dismutase (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of the present study imply that HLV has promising prospects for improving free drug bioactivity on oral administration. PMID:22915851

  8. Intravenous Administration of Cilostazol Nanoparticles Ameliorates Acute Ischemic Stroke in a Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury Model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that cilostazol (CLZ) suppressed disruption of the microvasculature in ischemic areas. In this study, we have designed novel injection formulations containing CLZ nanoparticles using 0.5% methylcellulose, 0.2% docusate sodium salt, and mill methods (CLZnano dispersion; particle size 81 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated their toxicity and usefulness in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury model (MCAO/reperfusion mice). The pharmacokinetics of injections of CLZnano dispersions is similar to that of CLZ solutions prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and no changes in the rate of hemolysis of rabbit red blood cells, a model of cell injury, were observed with CLZnano dispersions. In addition, the intravenous injection of 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions does not affect the blood pressure and blood flow, and the 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions ameliorate neurological deficits and ischemic stroke in MCAO/reperfusion mice. It is possible that the CLZnano dispersions will provide effective therapy for ischemic stroke patients, and that injection preparations of lipophilic drugs containing drug nanoparticles expand their therapeutic usage. PMID:26690139

  9. Intravenous Administration of Cilostazol Nanoparticles Ameliorates Acute Ischemic Stroke in a Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Noriaki; Yoshioka, Chiaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that cilostazol (CLZ) suppressed disruption of the microvasculature in ischemic areas. In this study, we have designed novel injection formulations containing CLZ nanoparticles using 0.5% methylcellulose, 0.2% docusate sodium salt, and mill methods (CLZnano dispersion; particle size 81 ± 59 nm, mean ± S.D.), and investigated their toxicity and usefulness in a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury model (MCAO/reperfusion mice). The pharmacokinetics of injections of CLZnano dispersions is similar to that of CLZ solutions prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, and no changes in the rate of hemolysis of rabbit red blood cells, a model of cell injury, were observed with CLZnano dispersions. In addition, the intravenous injection of 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions does not affect the blood pressure and blood flow, and the 0.6 mg/kg CLZnano dispersions ameliorate neurological deficits and ischemic stroke in MCAO/reperfusion mice. It is possible that the CLZnano dispersions will provide effective therapy for ischemic stroke patients, and that injection preparations of lipophilic drugs containing drug nanoparticles expand their therapeutic usage. PMID:26690139

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the African-American population: a cooperative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, G. C.; Welch, B.; Cole, A. N.; Mendoza, R.; Morgan, J.; Epps, J.; Bernard, E.; St Louis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage is complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia and contributing factors such as hypertension. To observe the impact of hypertension and delayed cerebral ischemia on the outcome of a predominantly African-American cohort following subarachnoid hemorrhage, both retrospective (n = 42) and prospective (n = 21) studies were conducted. In the total pool (n = 63), the mean age was 49.7 years (range: 17 to 80) with a preponderance of female patients (70%). Aneurysm formation was significant in the region of the posterior communicating artery. Of the patients reviewed, 73.8% had preexisting hypertension and 45.9% developed delayed cerebral ischemia. Approximately 89% of the patients who suffered from delayed cerebral ischemia had hypertension. Results failed to display any significant beneficial association between the use of the calcium channel blocker nimodipine and delayed cerebral ischemia. Use of the antifibrinolytic drug aminocaproic acid demonstrated a worse patient outcome. It is not recommended that aminocaproic acid be used in this population. Subsequently, due to the proportional occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in hypertensive patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage, it is suggested that prophylactic surgical management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms be considered in hypertensive patients. Further study is needed to discern the association between hypertension, delayed cerebral ischemia, and stroke in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:9046763

  12. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH.

  13. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from a Thoracic Radicular Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Methamphetamine and Synthetic Cannabinoid Abuse: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Krisht, Khaled M.; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid “Spice.” He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2–3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH. PMID:24436861

  14. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates.

  15. [Apixaban-Related Convexal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Hara, Takeshi; Ohba, Hideo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The risk of anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage(ICH)is relatively low in patients treated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants(NOAC). The anticoagulant-associated ICH comprises mainly intraparenchimal hemorrhage. Subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)are rare complications after treatment with NOAC, trauma being the most common cause for these two types of ICH. We report a case of non-traumatic convexal SAH(cSAH)associated with Apixavan. A 68-year-old man with repeated history of cerebral embolism with cardiogenic cause presented with weakness of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarctions, and treatment with apixaban(5 mg twice per day)was administered. Three days later, SAH in the right superior frontal sulcus was discovered incidentally on computed tomography(CT). NOAC-associated SAH is a rare manifestation. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy(CAA)is the most common cause of cSAH in the elderly, and cSAH is supposed to be a warning sign of cerebral hemorrhage in CAA. Patients with CAA started on NOAC require careful monitoring.

  16. Acute Brain MRI Findings in 120 Malawian Children with Cerebral Malaria: New Insights into an Ancient Disease

    PubMed Central

    Potchen, Michael J.; Kampondeni, Sam D.; Seydel, Karl B.; Birbeck, Gretchen L.; Hammond, Colleen A.; Bradley, William G.; DeMarco, J. Kevin; Glover, Simon J.; Ugorji, Joseph O.; Latourette, Matt; Siebert, James; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose There have been few neuroimaging studies of pediatric cerebral malaria (CM), a common, often fatal tropical condition. We undertook a prospective study of pediatric CM to better characterize the MRI features of this syndrome, comparing findings in children meeting a stringent definition of CM to those in a control group who were infected with malaria but who were likely to have a non-malarial cause of coma. Materials and Methods Consecutive children admitted with traditionally defined CM (parasitemia, coma and no other coma etiology evident) were eligible for this study. The presence or absence of malaria retinopathy was determined. MRI findings in patients with retinopathy-positive (ret+) CM (cases) were compared to those with retinopathy-negative (ret−) CM (controls). Two radiologists blinded to retinopathy status jointly developed a scoring procedure for image interpretation and provided independent reviews. MRI findings were compared between patients with and without retinopathy, to assess the specificity of changes for patients with very strictly defined CM. Results Of 152 children with clinically defined CM, 120 were ret+, and 32 were ret −. Abnormalities were much more common in the ret + cases, and included severe edema, abnormal T2 signal, and DWI abnormalities in the cortical, deep gray and white matter structures. Focal abnormalities rarely respected vascular distributions. Most of the scans in the more clinically heterogeneous ret− group were normal, and none of the abnormalities noted were more prevalent in controls. Conclusions Distinctive MRI findings present in patients meeting a stringent definition of CM may offer insights into disease pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:22517285

  17. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  18. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  19. Sympathetic storming in a patient with intracranial basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Marino, Michael; Desai, Anjuli; Nissley, Frederick

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic deficits and medical complications are common sequelae after intracranial hemorrhage. Among the medical complications, sympathetic storming is relatively rare. We describe a case of a patient with an acute right basal ganglia hemorrhage. During the patient's hospital course, he developed tachypnea, diaphoresis, hypertension, hyperthermia, and tachycardia for three consecutive days. A complete laboratory work-up and imaging studies were unremarkable for infectious etiology, new intracranial hemorrhage, and deep vein thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with sympathetic storming, a relatively uncommon cause of these symptoms. The storming was secondary to a kinked Foley catheter, and subsequent placement of a new catheter resulted in the resolution of his symptoms. PMID:21297401

  20. Plastic Change along the Intact Crossed Pathway in Acute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia Revealed by Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; He, Yongzhi; Lu, Hongyang; Li, Yao; Su, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    The intact crossed pathway via which the contralesional hemisphere responds to the ipsilesional somatosensory input has shown to be affected by unilateral stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of the intact crossed pathway in response to different intensities of stimulation in a rodent photothrombotic stroke model. Using optical intrinsic signal imaging, an overall increase of the contralesional cortical response was observed in the acute phase (≤48 hours) after stroke. In particular, the contralesional hyperactivation is more prominent under weak stimulations, while a strong stimulation would even elicit a depressed response. The results suggest a distinct stimulation-response pattern along the intact crossed pathway after stroke. We speculate that the contralesional hyperactivation under weak stimulations was due to the reorganization for compensatory response to the weak ipsilateral somatosensory input. PMID:27144032

  1. Clinical features of recurrent stroke after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Yoshioka, Shotaroh; Sasaki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2012-06-14

    There have been many reports about the prognosis and risk factors of stroke recurrence following brain infarction (BI). However, little is known about the stroke recurrence after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH). Therefore, we explored the recurrent stroke patients after initial PICH retrospectively, to reveal the critical factors of stroke recurrence. Acute BI (n=4013) and acute PICH patients (n=1067) admitted to the hospital between April 2000 and March 2009 were consecutively screened. PICH patients with a history of ICH and BI patients with a history of ICH were then classified into the ICH-ICH group (n=64, age 70.8±9.5 years) and ICH-BI group (n=52, age 72.8±9.7years), respectively. ICH lesions were categorized into ganglionic and lober types according to the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Subtypes of BI were classified into cardioembolism, large-artery atherosclerosis, small-artery occlusion and others. There was no difference in incidence of risk factors between ICH-ICH and ICH-BI groups. Distribution of initial PICH lesions was significantly abundant in the lobar type in the ICH-ICH group (P<0.01) and in ganglionic type in the ICH-BI group (P<0.02). Age of onset was significantly older in recurrent lobar ICH compared with recurrent ganglionic ICH (P<0.01: 73.6±10.0 and 59.1±9.0 years, respectively). In conclusion, ganglionic ICH patients may have a chance of recurrent stroke in both brain infarction and ganglionic ICH, suggesting the participation of atherosclerosis in intracranial arteries. Lobar ICH patients were older and prone to recurrent lobar ICH, suggesting the participation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy as a risk of stroke recurrence. PMID:23139848

  2. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  3. Time Course and Predictors of Neurological Deterioration after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Aaron S.; Gilmore, Emily; Choi, H. Alex; Mayer, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neurological deterioration (ND) is a devastating complication following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) but little is known about time course and predictors. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of placebo patients in ICH trials. We performed CT scans within 3 hours of symptoms and at 24- and 72-hours; and clinical evaluations at baseline, 1-hour, and days 1, 2, 3, and 15. Timing of ND was predefined: hyperacute (within 1 hour), acute (1-24 hours), subacute (1-3 days), and delayed (3-15 days). Results We enrolled 376 patients and 176 (47%) had ND within 15 days. In multivariate analyses of ND by category, hyperacute ND was associated with hematoma expansion (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and baseline ICH volume (OR 1.04 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.06) ; acute ND with hematoma expansion (OR 7.59, 95% CI 3.91-14.74), baseline ICH volume (OR 1.02 per mL, 95% CI 1.01-1.04), admission GCS (OR 0.77 per point, 95% CI 0.65-0.91) and interventricular hemorrhage (IVH) (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.05-4.35); subacute ND with 72-hour edema (OR 1.03 per mL, 95% CI 1.02-1.05) and fever (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.01-6.14); and delayed ND with age (OR 1.11 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.18), troponin (OR 4.30 per point, 95% CI 1.71-10.77) and infections (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.11-12.23). Patients with ND had worse 90-day modified Rankin scores (5 vs. 3, p<0.001). Conclusions Neurological deterioration occurs frequently and predicts poor outcomes. Our results implicate hematoma expansion and IVH in early ND, and cerebral edema, fever, and medical complications in later ND. PMID:25657190

  4. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  5. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes,