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Sample records for acute cervical sci

  1. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy.

  2. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. PMID:27616315

  3. Transplantation of Glial Progenitors That Overexpress Glutamate Transporter GLT1 Preserves Diaphragm Function Following Cervical SCI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Hala, Tamara J; Sannie, Daniel; Regan, Kathleen A; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Poulsen, David J; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) cases affect cervical regions, resulting in chronic respiratory compromise. The majority of these injuries affect midcervical levels, the location of phrenic motor neurons (PMNs) that innervate the diaphragm. A valuable opportunity exists following SCI for preventing PMN loss that occurs during secondary degeneration. One of the primary causes of secondary injury is excitotoxicity due to dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis. Astrocytes express glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), which is responsible for the majority of CNS glutamate clearance. Given our observations of GLT1 dysfunction post-SCI, we evaluated intraspinal transplantation of Glial-Restricted Precursors (GRPs)—a class of lineage-restricted astrocyte progenitors—into ventral horn following cervical hemicontusion as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 function, preventing excitotoxicity and protecting PMNs in the acutely injured spinal cord. We find that unmodified transplants express low levels of GLT1 in the injured spinal cord. To enhance their therapeutic properties, we engineered GRPs with AAV8 to overexpress GLT1 only in astrocytes using the GFA2 promoter, resulting in significantly increased GLT1 protein expression and functional glutamate uptake following astrocyte differentiation in vitro and after transplantation into C4 hemicontusion. Compared to medium-only control and unmodified GRPs, GLT1-overexpressing transplants reduced lesion size, diaphragm denervation and diaphragm dysfunction. Our findings demonstrate transplantation-based replacement of astrocyte GLT1 is a promising approach for SCI. PMID:25492561

  4. Acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morse, S D

    1982-08-01

    Two cases of the acute central cervical spinal cord syndrome are presented. A 63-year-old diabetic hypertensive man manifested the syndrome as a result of atraumatic ischemia of the cord. A 32-year-old health man developed it after sustaining a hyperextension injury in a baseball game. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this entity are reviewed. Knowledge of this entity is of major importance in the analysis and management of head and neck trauma, as well as in the recognition and management of atraumatic neurologic dysfunction due to ischemia, hemorrhage, or thrombosis.

  5. Relationship Between Depressive State and Treatment Characteristics of Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasufumi; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya; Wada, Futoshi; Sugita, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed whether treatment of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) patients contributes to depression. Methods Using an administrative database, we assessed patients for whom the diagnosis was unspecified injuries of cervical spinal cord (International Classification of Diseases and Injuries-10th (ICD-10) code; S14.1). We categorized patients with codes for depressive episode (ICD-10 code; F32) or recurrent depressive disorder (F33), or those prescribed antidepressants (tricyclic, tetracyclic, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Serotonin Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, Trazodone, Sulpiride, or Mirtazapine) as having a depressive state. We compared the rate of each acute treatment between the depressive state group and the non-depressive state group using chi-square tests, and a multiple logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the acute treatment and depressive state. Results There were 151 patients who were judged to be in a depressive state, and the other 2115 patients were categorized into the non-depressive state group. Intervention of intravenous anesthesia, tracheostomy, artificial respiration, and gastrostomy had a significant positive correlation with depressive state. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that tracheostomy (odds ratio [OR] 2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–4.38) and artificial respiration (OR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.32–3.93) were significantly associated with depressive state, and men had a 36% reduction in the risk of depressive state compared with women (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44–0.94), whereas age, wound-treatment, all of the orthopedic procedures, intravenous anesthesia, and gastrostomy were not associated with depressive state. Conclusions These findings suggest that tracheostomy, artificial respiration and female gender in the acute phase after cervical SCI might be associated with the development of depression. PMID:26567604

  6. Programmed management of acute cervical cord trauma.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Bryk, J P; Yashon, D; Albin, M S; Demian, Y K

    Results in ten patients admitted with the diagnosis of complete traumatic quadriplegia and with fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on aggressive emergency surgical treatment of these lesions such as tracheostomy, laminectomy and cord cooling, incorporated into a detailed protocol of overall management.

  7. Assessing Forelimb Function after Unilateral Cervical SCI using Novel Tasks: Limb Step-alternation, Postural Instability and Pasta Handling

    PubMed Central

    Schallert, Timothy; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) can cause devastating neurological deficits, including impairment or loss of upper limb and hand function. A majority of the spinal cord injuries in humans occur at the cervical levels. Therefore, developing cervical injury models and developing relevant and sensitive behavioral tests is of great importance. Here we describe the use of a newly developed forelimb step-alternation test after cervical spinal cord injury in rats. In addition, we describe two behavioral tests that have not been used after spinal cord injury: a postural instability test (PIT), and a pasta-handling test. All three behavioral tests are highly sensitive to injury and are easy to use. Therefore, we feel that these behavioral tests can be instrumental in investigating therapeutic strategies after cSCI. PMID:24084700

  8. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  9. Combined SCI and TBI: Recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L.; Creasey, Graham H.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16–74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI + TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6 weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI + ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI + contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI + contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the

  10. Acute theophylline exposure modulates breathing activity through a cervical contusion.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Kevin C; Alilain, Warren J

    2015-09-01

    Cervical spinal contusion injuries are the most common form of spinal cord injury (>50%) observed in humans. These injuries can result in the impaired ability to breathe. In this study we examine the role of theophylline in the rescue of breathing behavior after a cervical spinal contusion. Previous research in the C2 hemisection model has shown that acute administration of theophylline can rescue phrenic nerve activity and diaphragmatic EMG on the side ipsilateral to injury. However, this effect is dependent on intact and uninjured pathways. In this study we utilized a cervical contusion injury model that more closely mimics the human condition. This injury model can determine the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, in this case theophylline, on the isolated contused pathways of the spinal cord. Three weeks after a 150 kD C3/4 unilateral contusion subjects received a 15 mg/kg dose of theophylline prior to a contralateral C2 hemisection. Subjects that received theophylline were able to effectively utilize damaged pathways to breathe for up to 2 min, while subjects treated with saline were unable to support ventilation. Through these experiments, we demonstrate that theophylline can make injured pathways that mediate breathing more effective and therefore, suggest a potential therapeutic role in the critical time points immediately after injury.

  11. Cervical spinal cord injury exacerbates ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smuder, Ashley J; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Kwon, Oh Sung; Morton, Aaron B; Sollanek, Kurt J; Powers, Scott K; Fuller, David D

    2016-01-15

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) can dramatically impair diaphragm muscle function and often necessitates mechanical ventilation (MV) to maintain adequate pulmonary gas exchange. MV is a life-saving intervention. However, prolonged MV results in atrophy and impaired function of the diaphragm. Since cervical SCI can also trigger diaphragm atrophy, it may create preconditions that exacerbate ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD). Currently, no drug therapy or clinical standard of care exists to prevent or minimize diaphragm dysfunction following SCI. Therefore, we first tested the hypothesis that initiating MV acutely after cervical SCI will exacerbate VIDD and enhance proteolytic activation in the diaphragm to a greater extent than either condition alone. Rats underwent controlled MV for 12 h following acute (∼24 h) cervical spinal hemisection injury at C2 (SCI). Diaphragm tissue was then harvested for comprehensive functional and molecular analyses. Second, we determined if antioxidant therapy could mitigate MV-induced diaphragm dysfunction after cervical SCI. In these experiments, SCI rats received antioxidant (Trolox, a vitamin E analog) or saline treatment prior to initiating MV. Our results demonstrate that compared with either condition alone, the combination of SCI and MV resulted in increased diaphragm atrophy, contractile dysfunction, and expression of atrophy-related genes, including MuRF1. Importantly, administration of the antioxidant Trolox attenuated proteolytic activation, fiber atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in the diaphragms of SCI + MV animals. These findings provide evidence that cervical SCI greatly exacerbates VIDD, but antioxidant therapy with Trolox can preserve diaphragm contractile function following acute SCI. PMID:26472866

  12. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  13. Cervical spinal cord injury: tailoring clinical trial endpoints to reflect meaningful functional improvements

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; McKerracher, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in partial to full paralysis of the upper and lower extremities. Traditional primary endpoints for acute SCI clinical trials are too broad to assess functional recovery in cervical subjects, raising the possibility of false positive outcomes in trials for cervical SCI. Endpoints focused on the recovery of hand and arm control (e.g., upper extremity motor score, motor level change) show the most potential for use as primary outcomes in upcoming trials of cervical SCI. As the field moves forward, the most reliable way to ensure meaningful clinical testing in cervical subjects may be the development of a composite primary endpoint that measures both neurological recovery and functional improvement. PMID:25317162

  14. Recurrent precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as a cervical malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Sofia; Szporn, Arnold Howard; Strauchen, James A; Chen, Hua; Kalir, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    A 59 year old woman with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission presented with right flank pain. An abdominal ultrasound showed mild to moderate right hydronephrosis due to obstruction, and computed tomography scan showed a bulky mass near the cervix, concerning for cervical or uterine malignancy. A Papanicolaou smear was suspicious for malignancy, and immunocytochemical stains were positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and cluster of differentiation (CD)-10, focally positive for CD34 and CD79a, and negative for CD3, CD20, and paired box protein-5 (PAX-5). Cervical biopsies showed an infiltrating population of cells with immunophenotype similar to the cells on cervical cytology. The cytologic and histologic workup was compatible with infiltration of the uterine cervix by recurrent precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A bone marrow biopsy showed normocellular marrow without evidence of tumor or infiltrative disease. Complete blood count and peripheral blood smear showed no evidence of leukemic involvement. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed on cervical Pap smear has been very rarely reported. The majority of cases of hematologic malignancy involving the uterine cervix present with vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, only three cases of recurrent precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the uterine cervix have been reported, two of which occurred in pediatric patients. One pediatric patient presented with vomiting and abdominal pain, and was found to have hydronephrosis on imaging. This is perhaps the first case of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed on cervical cytology in an adult patient with hydronephrosis and without vaginal bleeding.

  15. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm×30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23257942

  16. Treatment of acute cervical internal carotid artery dissection using the Solitaire FR revascularization device.

    PubMed

    To, Chiu Yuen; Badr, Yaser; Richards, Boyd

    2013-11-01

    During treatment of a right internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm, an acute iatrogenic flow limiting dissection was caused in the cervical internal carotid. The true lumen was catheterized using a Mirage 0.008 microwire over an Excelsior SL-10 microcatheter, which was exchanged for a Marksman microcatheter. A 6 mm × 30 mm Solitaire FR revascularization device was then deployed across the dissection as a salvage technique. PMID:23299103

  17. Cervical lung herniation complicating a case of acute asphyxial asthma in a child.

    PubMed

    Martchek, Melissa A; Padilla, Benjamin E; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Friedlaender, Eron Y

    2015-04-01

    The abrupt onset of respiratory failure secondary to asthma, known as acute asphyxial asthma (AAA) in adults, is uncommonly reported in children. Here, we report a case of a child with the acute onset of respiratory failure consistent with AAA complicated by the finding of a neck mass during resuscitation. This 11-year-old boy with a history of asthma initially presented in respiratory failure with altered mental status after the complaint of difficulty in breathing minutes before collapsing at home. Initially, his respiratory failure was thought to be secondary to status asthmaticus, and treatment was initiated accordingly. However, a neck mass noted during the resuscitation was cause for concern, and other etiologies for his respiratory failure were considered, including an airway obstructing neck mass. After pediatric surgery and anesthesia consultation for intubation and possible tracheostomy placement, general anesthesia was induced in the operating room with an inhaled anesthetic, with prompt resolution of the bronchspasm and decompression of the neck mass. Review of the imaging and clinical course ultimately yielded a diagnosis of cervical lung herniation as the etiology of his neck mass. We report this case of AAA and cervical lung herniation and a review of the literature of these 2 uncommon phenomena in children. PMID:25831031

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse; Ballegaard, Martin; Krassioukov, Andrei; Hansen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Kruse, Anders; Welling, Karen-Lise; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular complications including cardiac arrest and arrhythmias remain a clinical challenge in the management of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Still, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the characteristics of arrhythmias in patients with acute traumatic SCI. The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. Methods As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. Results Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) <50 b.p.m.) was present in 17–35% of the patients with cervical (C1–C8) SCI (n = 24) within the first 14 days. In the following 14 days, the occurrence was 22–32%. Bradycardia in the thoracic (Th1–Th12) SCI group (n = 6) was present in 17–33% during the observation period. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. The mean minimum HR was significantly lower in the cervical group compared with the thoracic group both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). Conclusion Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus node arrests and limited bradycardia, no arrhythmias were seen in patients with thoracic SCI. Standard 12-lead ECGs will often miss the high prevalence these arrhythmias have. PMID:24559419

  19. Prognosis for Patients With Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Combined With Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yeon; Kim, Tae Uk; Lee, Seong Jae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To delineate cervical radiculopathy that is found in combination with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and to determine whether attendant cervical radiculopathy affects the prognosis and functional outcome for SCI patients. Methods A total of 66 patients diagnosed with traumatic cervical SCI were selected for neurological assessment (using the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury [ISNCSCI]) and functional evaluation (based on the Korean version Modified Barthel Index [K-MBI] and Functional Independence Measure [FIM]) at admission and upon discharge. All of the subjects received a preliminary electrophysiological assessment, according to which they were divided into two groups as follows: those with cervical radiculopathy (the SCI/Rad group) and those without (the SCI group). Results A total of 32 patients with cervical SCI (48.5%) had cervical radiculopathy. The initial ISNCSCI scores for sensory and motor, K-MBI, and total FIM did not significantly differ between the SCI group and the SCI/Rad group. However, at discharge, the ISNCSCI scores for motor, K-MBI, and FIM of the SCI/Rad group showed less improvement (5.44±8.08, 15.19±19.39 and 10.84±11.49, respectively) than those of the SCI group (10.76±9.86, 24.79±19.65 and 17.76±15.84, respectively) (p<0.05). In the SCI/Rad group, the number of involved levels of cervical radiculopathy was negatively correlated with the initial and follow-up motors score by ISNCSCI. Conclusion Cervical radiculopathy is not rare in patients with traumatic cervical SCI, and it can impede neurological and functional improvement. Therefore, detection of combined cervical radiculopathy by electrophysiological assessment is essential for accurate prognosis of cervical SCI patients in the rehabilitation unit. PMID:25229022

  20. Postural responses without versus with acute external cervical spine fixation: a comparative study in healthy subjects and patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Bohne, Silvia; Heine, Sabrina; Volk, G Fabian; Stadler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Using a diagnostic prospective cohort single center study design, the influence of a cervical collar on standing balance during dynamic postural perturbations in healthy adults and patients with acute unilateral vestibular dysfunction was measured in 31 healthy subjects and 27 patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss. The main outcome measures were completed standard protocols on the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and Motor Control Test (MCT) of the NeuroCom Equitest(®) computerized posturography platform measured without and with acute cervical fixation, respectively. Paired t test showed no significant difference during the six conditions of neither the SOT scores nor analyzing the SOT strategies or during the MCT between the non-fixed and fixed neck in healthy subjects and in the patients (all p > 0.05). Older healthy subjects showed decreased SOT scores but equal MCT results. The age effect was more dominant in the patients when wearing the collar. Gender had no influence whether in healthy individuals nor in patients. In almost all conditions of the SOT but only in some MCT subtests patients had significantly lower scores than healthy subjects without collar and with collar (all p < 0.05). In conclusion, the SOT but only some subtest of the MCT could clearly distinguish between healthy adults and patient with acute unilateral vestibular loss. Equilibrium scores did not change significantly when the cervical spine was fixed with a collar. Acute fixation of the neck with a collar seems not to affect standing balance, even not when vestibular, visual and/or somatosensory input are also reduced. PMID:22237759

  1. Daily acute intermittent hypoxia elicits functional recovery of diaphragm and inspiratory intercostal muscle activity after acute cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Opazo, A.; Vinit, S; Dougherty, B.J.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    A major cause of mortality after spinal cord injury is respiratory failure. In normal rats, acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces respiratory motor plasticity, expressed as diaphragm (Dia) and second external intercostal (T2 EIC) long-term facilitation (LTF). Dia (not T2 EIC) LTF is enhanced by systemic adenosine 2A (A2a) receptor inhibition in normal rats. We investigated the respective contributions of Dia and T2 EIC to daily AIH-induced functional recovery of breathing capacity with/without A2a receptor antagonist (KW6002, i.p.) following C2 hemisection (C2HS). Rats received daily AIH (dAIH: 10, 5-min episodes, 10.5% O2; 5-min normoxic intervals; 7 successive days beginning 7 days post-C2HS) or daily normoxia (dNx) with/without KW6002, followed by weekly (reminder) presentations for 8 weeks. Ventilation and EMGs from bilateral diaphragm and T2 EIC muscles were measured with room air breathing (21% O2) and maximum chemoreceptor stimulation (MCS: 7% CO2, 10.5% O2). dAIH increased tidal volume (Vt) in C2HS rats breathing room air (dAIH + vehicle: 0.47 ± 0.02, dNx + vehicle: 0.40 ± 0.01ml/100 g; p<0.05) and MCS (dAIH + vehicle: 0.83 ± 0.01, dNx + vehicle: 0.73 ± 0.01ml/100g; p<0.001); KW6002 had no significant effect. dAIH enhanced contralateral (uninjured) diaphragm EMG activity, an effect attenuated by KW6002, during room air breathing and MCS (p<0.05). Although dAIH enhanced contralateral T2 EIC EMG activity during room air breathing, KW6002 had no effect. dAIH had no statistically significant effects on diaphragm or T2 EIC EMG activity ipsilateral to injury. Thus, two weeks post-C2HS: 1) dAIH enhances breathing capacity by effects on contralateral diaphragm and T2 EIC activity; and 2) dAIH-induced recovery is A2a dependent in diaphragm, but not T2 EIC. Daily AIH may be a useful in promoting functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury, but A2a receptor antagonists (eg. caffeine) may undermine its effectiveness shortly after

  2. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Acute Management of the Cervical Spine–Injured Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E; Boden, Barry P; Courson, Ronald W; Decoster, Laura C; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Norkus, Susan A; Rehberg, Robb S; Waninger, Kevin N

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, team physicians, emergency responders, and other health care professionals with recommendations on how to best manage a catastrophic cervical spine injury in the athlete. Background: The relative incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injury in sports is low compared with other injuries. However, cervical spine injuries necessitate delicate and precise management, often involving the combined efforts of a variety of health care providers. The outcome of a catastrophic cervical spine injury depends on the efficiency of this management process and the timeliness of transfer to a controlled environment for diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations: Recommendations are based on current evidence pertaining to prevention strategies to reduce the incidence of cervical spine injuries in sport; emergency planning and preparation to increase management efficiency; maintaining or creating neutral alignment in the cervical spine; accessing and maintaining the airway; stabilizing and transferring the athlete with a suspected cervical spine injury; managing the athlete participating in an equipment-laden sport, such as football, hockey, or lacrosse; and considerations in the emergency department. PMID:19478836

  3. Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Dose on Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer: Principal Component Analysis on High Dimensional Data

    SciTech Connect

    Yun Liang; Messer, Karen; Rose, Brent S.; Lewis, John H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of increasing pelvic bone marrow (BM) radiation dose on acute hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, using a novel modeling approach to preserve the local spatial dose information. Methods and Materials: The study included 37 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent weekly cisplatin and pelvic radiation therapy. The white blood cell count nadir during treatment was used as the indicator for acute hematologic toxicity. Pelvic BM radiation dose distributions were standardized across patients by registering the pelvic BM volumes to a common template, followed by dose remapping using deformable image registration, resulting in a dose array. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the dose array, and the significant eigenvectors were identified by linear regression on the PCs. The coefficients for PC regression and significant eigenvectors were represented in three dimensions to identify critical BM subregions where dose accumulation is associated with hematologic toxicity. Results: We identified five PCs associated with acute hematologic toxicity. PC analysis regression modeling explained a high proportion of the variation in acute hematologicity (adjusted R{sup 2}, 0.49). Three-dimensional rendering of a linear combination of the significant eigenvectors revealed patterns consistent with anatomical distributions of hematopoietically active BM. Conclusions: We have developed a novel approach that preserves spatial dose information to model effects of radiation dose on toxicity, which may be useful in optimizing radiation techniques to avoid critical subregions of normal tissues. Further validation of this approach in a large cohort is ongoing.

  4. Differential effects of mental concentration and acute psychosocial stress on cervical muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Bahar; Haight, Ashley; Maluf, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    Physical and psychosocial stressors in the workplace have been independently associated with the development of neck pain, yet interactions among these risk factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of mentally challenging computer work performed with and without exposure to a psychosocial stressor on cervical muscle activity and posture. Changes in cervical posture and electromyography of upper trapezius, cervical extensor, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were compared between a resting seated posture at baseline, a low stress condition with mental concentration, and a high stress condition with mental concentration and psychosocial stress in sixty healthy office workers. Forward head posture significantly increased with mental concentration compared to baseline, but did not change with further introduction of the stressor. Muscle activity significantly increased from the low stress to high stress condition for both the dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius, with no corresponding change in activity of the cervical extensors or flexors between stress conditions. These findings suggest that upper trapezius muscles are selectively activated by psychosocial stress independent of changes in concentration or posture, which may have implications for the prevention of stress-related trapezius myalgia in the workplace.

  5. Effects of Functional Electric Stimulation Cycle Ergometry Training on Lower Limb Musculature in Acute Sci Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Demchak, Timothy J.; Linderman, Jon K.; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Jackson, Rebecca; Suun, Jihong; Devor, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different intervals for a between sets rest period during a common isokinetic knee extension strength-testing protocol of twenty older Brazilian men (66.30 ± 3.92 yrs). The volunteers underwent unilateral knee extension (Biodex System 3) testing to determine their individual isokinetic peak torque at 60, 90, and 120° ·s-1. The contraction speeds and the rest periods between sets (30, 60 and 90 s) were randomly performed in three different days with a minimum rest period of 48 hours. Significant differences between and within sets were analyzed using a One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. Although, at angular velocity of 60°·s-1 produced a higher peak torque, there were no significant differences in peak torque among any of the rest periods. Likewise, there were no significant differences between mean peak torque among all resting periods (30, 60 and 90s) at angular velocities of 90 and 120°·s-1. The results showed that during a common isokinetic strength testing protocol a between set rest period of at least 30 s is sufficient for recovery before the next test set in older men. Key Points Muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSAf ) decreased 38% following spinal cord injury (SCI). Early intervention with functional electric stimulation cycle ergometry (FES-CE) prevented further loss of CSAf in SCI patients and increased power output. Muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myonuclear density were unaffected by SCI or FES-CE PMID:24453530

  6. Effects of functional electric stimulation cycle ergometry training on lower limb musculature in acute sci individuals.

    PubMed

    Demchak, Timothy J; Linderman, Jon K; Mysiw, W Jerry; Jackson, Rebecca; Suun, Jihong; Devor, Steven T

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different intervals for a between sets rest period during a common isokinetic knee extension strength-testing protocol of twenty older Brazilian men (66.30 ± 3.92 yrs). The volunteers underwent unilateral knee extension (Biodex System 3) testing to determine their individual isokinetic peak torque at 60, 90, and 120° ·s-1. The contraction speeds and the rest periods between sets (30, 60 and 90 s) were randomly performed in three different days with a minimum rest period of 48 hours. Significant differences between and within sets were analyzed using a One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. Although, at angular velocity of 60°·s-1 produced a higher peak torque, there were no significant differences in peak torque among any of the rest periods. Likewise, there were no significant differences between mean peak torque among all resting periods (30, 60 and 90s) at angular velocities of 90 and 120°·s-1. The results showed that during a common isokinetic strength testing protocol a between set rest period of at least 30 s is sufficient for recovery before the next test set in older men. Key PointsMuscle fiber cross sectional area (CSAf ) decreased 38% following spinal cord injury (SCI).Early intervention with functional electric stimulation cycle ergometry (FES-CE) prevented further loss of CSAf in SCI patients and increased power output.Muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myonuclear density were unaffected by SCI or FES-CE. PMID:24453530

  7. Factors associated with early mortality after cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jiang; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Xiongsheng; Jia, Lianshun; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Xuhui; Yan, Wangjun; Zhang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background A relatively high early mortality rate (<30 days post-injury) for cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) has been observed. Objective To investigate this early mortality rate observed after cervical SCI and analyze the associated influential factors. Methods Medical records for 1163 patients with cervical SCI were reviewed, and the number of patients with early mortality was documented. Through logistic regression analysis, the effects of age, gender, occupation, cause of injury, severity of injury, highest involved spinal cord segment, nutritional condition during hospitalization, surgical treatment, tracheotomy, etc., on early mortality were assessed. Implementation of early treatment (i.e. surgery, tracheotomy, and nutritional support) and its effect on patient prognosis were also analyzed. Results Early mortality occurred in 109 of 1163 patients (9.4%). Four factors affected the early mortality rate, including level and severity of SCI, whether or not surgery was performed, the time interval between SCI and surgery, malnutrition, and tracheotomy. Patients with an American Spinal Injury Association grade of A, a high cervical SCI (C1–C3), and/or no surgical intervention were statistically more likely to have early mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Severe cervical SCI, upper-level cervical cord injury, malnutrition, and inappropriate tracheotomy are risk factors for early mortality in patients with cervical SCI. Surgery can reduce early mortality. Early tracheotomy should be performed in patients with complete upper-level cervical SCI, but patients with incomplete cervical SCI or complete low-level cervical SCI should initially be treated surgically to maintain smooth airway flow. PMID:22330110

  8. Quantitative detection of the human cervical cancer oncogene for monitoring the minimal residual disease in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Nan; Ren, Jin-Hai; Zhang, Jing-Nan; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR) has been shown to be over-expressed in some solid tumors, and its function is involved in negative regulation of p53 tumor suppressor gene. However, the roles of HCCR in leukemia remain unclear. The present study is to investigate whether the expression levels of HCCR mRNA are associated with clinical prognosis in patients with acute leukemia (AL) and to explore the potential use as a biomarker for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) in AL. The mRNA levels of HCCR1 and HCCR2 were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow samples from 80 adult de novo AL patients and 20 normal healthy donors. The expressions of HCCR1 and HCCR2 were significantly higher in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than those in healthy donors (P < 0.01), but there was no significant difference between AML and ALL (P > 0.05). Besides white blood cell count, we did not find any significant correlation between HCCR expression and clinical characteristics, such as age, sex, CD34 antigen expression, and response to chemotherapy. HCCR was monitored in 12 cases during remission and/or relapse. Significant reductions of both HCCR1 and HCCR2 mRNA levels were observed in patients who had achieved complete remission after chemotherapy but not in patients with non-responsive. However, an increased HCCR expression was detected in these patients who relapsed. Our findings suggest that HCCR gene is over-expressed in AL patients and may be as a useful biomarker for monitoring MRD in AL. PMID:25034723

  9. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Brent S.; Aydogan, Bulent; Liang, Yun; Yeginer, Mete; Hasselle, Michael D.; Dandekar, Virag; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased pelvic bone marrow (BM) irradiation is associated with increased hematologic toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy and to develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for HT. Methods and Materials: We tested associations between hematologic nadirs during chemoradiotherapy and the volume of BM receiving {>=}10 and 20 Gy (V{sub 10} and V{sub 20}) using a previously developed linear regression model. The validation cohort consisted of 44 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent cisplatin and pelvic radiotherapy. Subsequently, these data were pooled with data from 37 identically treated patients from a previous study, forming a cohort of 81 patients for normal tissue complication probability analysis. Generalized linear modeling was used to test associations between hematologic nadirs and dosimetric parameters, adjusting for body mass index. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to derive optimal dosimetric planning constraints. Results: In the validation cohort, significant negative correlations were observed between white blood cell count nadir and V{sub 10} (regression coefficient ({beta}) = -0.060, p = 0.009) and V{sub 20} ({beta} = -0.044, p = 0.010). In the combined cohort, the (adjusted) {beta} estimates for log (white blood cell) vs. V{sub 10} and V{sub 20} were as follows: -0.022 (p = 0.025) and -0.021 (p = 0.002), respectively. Patients with V{sub 10} {>=} 95% were more likely to experience Grade {>=}3 leukopenia (68.8% vs. 24.6%, p < 0.001) than were patients with V{sub 20} > 76% (57.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.001). Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that HT increases with increasing pelvic BM volume irradiated. Efforts to maintain V{sub 10} < 95% and V{sub 20} < 76% may reduce HT.

  10. Biphasic bisperoxovanadium administration and Schwann cell transplantation for repair after cervical contusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Wang, Xiaofei; Bullis, Carli; Liu, Nai-Kui; Lu, Qingbo; Fry, Colin; Deng, Lingxiao; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) hold promise for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair; however, there are limitations for use as a lone treatment. We showed acute inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) by bisperoxovanadium (bpV) was neuroprotective and enhanced function following cervical hemicontusion SCI. We hypothesized that combining acute bpV therapy and delayed SC engraftment would further improve neuroprotection and recovery after cervical SCI. Adult female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly sorted into 5 groups: sham, vehicle, bpV, SC transplantation, and bpV + SC transplantation. SCs were isolated from adult green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing SD rats (GFP-SCs). 200 g/kg bpV(pic) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) twice daily for 7 days post-SCI in bpV-treated groups. GFP-SCs (1 × 106 in 5 μl medium) were transplanted into the lesion epicenter at the 8th day post-SCI. Forelimb function was tested for 10 weeks and histology was assessed. bpV alone significantly reduced lesion (by 40%, p<0.05) and cavitation (by 65%, p<0.05) and improved functional recovery (p <0.05) compared to injury alone. The combination promoted similar neuroprotection (p<0.01 vs. injury); however, GFP-SCs alone did not. Both SC-transplanted groups exhibited remarkable long-term SC survival, SMI-31+ axon ingrowth and RECA-1+ vasculature presence in the SC graft; however, bpV + SCs promoted an 89% greater axon-to-lesion ratio than SCs only. We concluded that bpV likely contributed largely to the neuroprotective and functional benefits while SCs facilitated considerable host-tissue interaction and modification. The combination of the two shows promise as an attractive strategy to enhance recovery after SCI. PMID:25510318

  11. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  12. Acute complications of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Ellen Merete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of acute complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). Along with motor and sensory deficits, instabilities of the cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and broncho-pulmonary system are common after a SCI. Disturbances of the urinary and gastrointestinal systems are typical as well as sexual dysfunction. Frequent complications of cervical and high thoracic SCI are neurogenic shock, bradyarrhythmias, hypotension, ectopic beats, abnormal temperature control and disturbance of sweating, vasodilatation and autonomic dysreflexia. Autonomic dysreflexia is an abrupt, uncontrolled sympathetic response, elicited by stimuli below the level of injury. The symptoms may be mild like skin rash or slight headache, but can cause severe hypertension, cerebral haemorrhage and death. All personnel caring for the patient should be able to recognize the symptoms and be able to intervene promptly. Disturbance of respiratory function are frequent in tetraplegia and a primary cause of both short and long-term morbidity and mortality is pulmonary complications. Due to physical inactivity and altered haemostasis, patients with SCI have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and pressure ulcers. Spasticity and pain are frequent complications which need to be addressed. The psychological stress associated with SCI may lead to anxiety and depression. Knowledge of possible complications during the acute phase is important because they may be life threatening and/ or may lead to prolonged rehabilitation. PMID:25621207

  13. Acute cervical spinal cord injury secondary to air bag deployment without proper use of lap or shoulder harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hart, R A; Mayberry, J C; Herzberg, A M

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with cervical central spinal cord syndrome caused by a hyperextension injury after a motor vehicle collision in which the air bag deployed in the absence of shoulder or lap belt harnesses. The potential for cervical spine and spinal cord hyperextension injuries in passengers positioned in front of air bags without proper use of shoulder or lap belt harnesses is discussed. Cervical central spinal cord quadriplegia occurred with cervical spondylosis and kyphosis that was managed by early three-level cervical corpectomy in a 58-year-old patient. Early improvement in the patient's neurological status occurred but was incomplete at the time of this report. Cervical hyperextension injuries are possible in passengers positioned in the front seat of cars with air bags when shoulder or lap belt harnesses are not used properly. Previous biomechanical studies have documented the potential for these types of injuries.

  14. Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain in axial structures, like the back and neck, are difficult to treat, and have incidence as high as 15%. Surprisingly, most preclinical work on pain mechanisms focuses on cutaneous structures in the limbs and animal models of axial pain are not widely available. Accordingly, we developed a mouse model of acute cervical muscle inflammation and assessed the functional properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons. Results Male C57/Bl6 mice (P24-P40) were deeply anaesthetised (urethane 2.2 g/kg i.p) and the rectus capitis major muscle (RCM) injected with 40 μl of 2% carrageenan. Sham animals received vehicle injection and controls remained anaesthetised for 2 hrs. Mice in each group were sacrificed at 2 hrs for analysis. c-Fos staining was used to determine the location of activated neurons. c-Fos labelling in carrageenan-injected mice was concentrated within ipsilateral (87% and 63% of labelled neurons in C1 and C2 segments, respectively) and contralateral laminae I - II with some expression in lateral lamina V. c-Fos expression remained below detectable levels in control and sham animals. In additional experiments, whole cell recordings were obtained from visualised SDH neurons in transverse slices in the ipsilateral C1 and C2 spinal segments. Resting membrane potential and input resistance were not altered. Mean spontaneous EPSC amplitude was reduced by ~20% in neurons from carrageenan-injected mice versus control and sham animals (20.63 ± 1.05 vs. 24.64 ± 0.91 and 25.87 ± 1.32 pA, respectively). The amplitude (238 ± 33 vs. 494 ± 96 and 593 ± 167 pA) and inactivation time constant (12.9 ± 1.5 vs. 22.1 ± 3.6 and 15.3 ± 1.4 ms) of the rapid A type potassium current (IAr), the dominant subthreshold current in SDH neurons, were reduced in carrageenan-injected mice. Conclusions Excitatory synaptic drive onto, and important intrinsic properties (i.e., IAr) within SDH neurons are

  15. Hemorrhagic intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the cervical spinal cord presenting with acute-onset quadriparesis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gluf, Wayne M.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Hemangioblastomas of the spinal cord are uncommon vascular tumors. Patients commonly present with subtle neurologic findings that are thought to represent growth of the lesion over time. Hemorrhage of an intramedullary hemangioblastoma presenting as acute neurologic deficit is an extremely rare occurrence. Although the cervical spine is the most common location for hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord, there have been no previously published cases in the literature of intramedullary hemorrhage from such a lesion. Findings A 22-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed spinal cord hemangioblastoma presented with sudden-onset dense quadriparesis due to intramedullary hemorrhage in the cervical spinal cord. The patient did not have any clinical findings of von-Hippel Lindau disease. Laminoplasty from C5 to T2 and posterior midline myelotomy for resection of the intramedullary tumor with hematoma evacuation were completed without complication. Conclusion Intramedullary hemangioblastoma of the spinal cord is uncommon, and hemorrhage from a cervical spinal cord lesion has not previously been reported. Symptoms from these usually indolent lesions are commonly associated with tumor growth, edema, or associated syrinx, whereas devastating acute neurologic deficit from hemorrhage is exceedingly rare. Microsurgical resection should be done in cases of symptomatic lesions and considered in isolated symptomatic lesions without the known diagnosis of von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25029412

  16. [Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial syndrome: A rare form of Guillain-Barré syndrome with severe acute bulbar palsy].

    PubMed

    Lametery, E; Dubois-Teklali, F; Millet, A; Manel, V

    2016-02-01

    The pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare in children. It is characterized by oropharyngeal, neck, and upper limb muscle involvement, without ataxia and disturbed consciousness. Although associated with anti-GT1a antibodies, there is no single clinical or serological marker of PCB syndrome. We report on two cases in a 14-year-old and a 15-year-old females. The first symptom was acute dysphonia followed by severe bulbar palsy with deglutition disorders, associated with involvement of other cranial nerves and arm and leg weakness. One of the girls had normal deep tendon reflexes. Both had normal cerebral imaging and normal cerebrospinal fluid. No sign of neuropathy was found on nerve conduction studies. The diagnosis of PCB syndrome was established based on the presence of antiganglioside antibodies. Both adolescents had IgG anti-GT1a antibodies. Anti-GQ1b and anti-GT1b antibodies were associated in the first case, anti-GM1 and anti-GD1a in the second case. Clinical improvement was fast after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Recovery was complete. Only a few cases of children and adolescents with PCB syndrome have been reported. The main differential diagnoses were excluded with brain MRI. The neurophysiological findings in PCB syndrome are axonal neuropathy rather than demyelinating neuropathy, which might be normal in the early stages of the disease. Positivity of anti-GT1a IgG antibodies is very helpful for the diagnosis of PCB syndrome. In atypical cases of bulbar palsy with other cranial nerve involvement and normal brain MRI, diagnosis of PCB syndrome should be considered. Recognizing the atypical cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome enables anticipatory monitoring for disease complications and identifies therapeutic options. The short- and long-term outcome of the PCB syndrome after intravenous immunoglobulin treatment seems favorable.

  17. Delayed Intervention with Intermittent Hypoxia and Task Training Improves Forelimb Function in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Injury.

    PubMed

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Hassan, Atiq; Mitchell, Gordon S; Muir, Gillian D

    2015-09-15

    The reduction of motor, sensory and autonomic function below the level of an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) has devastating consequences. One approach to restore function is to induce neural plasticity as a means of augmenting spontaneous functional recovery. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH-brief exposures to reduced O2 levels alternating with normal O2 levels) elicits plasticity in respiratory and nonrespiratory somatic spinal systems, including improvements in ladder walking performance in rats with incomplete SCI. Here, we determined whether delayed treatment with AIH, with or without concomitant motor training, could improve motor recovery in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI. In a randomized, blinded, sham-controlled study, rats were exposed to AIH for 7 days beginning at 4 weeks post-SCI, after much spontaneous recovery on a horizontal ladder-crossing task had already occurred. For up to 2 months post-treatment, AIH-treated rats made fewer footslips on the ladder task compared with sham-treated rats. Importantly, concomitant ladder-specific motor training was needed to elicit AIH-induced improvements, such that AIH-treated SCI rats receiving no motor training or nontask-specific treadmill training during the treatment week did not show improvements over sham-treated rats with SCI. AIH treatment combined with task-specific training did not improve recovery on two different reach-to-grasp tasks, however, nor on tasks involving unskilled forepaw use. In brief, our results indicate that task-specific training is needed for AIH to improve ladder performance in a rat model of incomplete cervical SCI. PMID:25664481

  18. Cervical Laminoplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments for Spinal Pain Surgical Options Anterior Cervical Fusion Artificial Disc Replacement Bone Graft Alternatives Bone Morphogenetic ... Discectomy Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy Spinal Fusion ... Medicine Cervical Laminoplasty What is ...

  19. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Song, William Y.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Rose, Brent S.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I-III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving {>=}45 Gy (V{sub 45}) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V{sub 45} was 143 mL (99). The mean V{sub 45} values for patients with and without Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V{sub 45} >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity with and without V{sub 45} >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and {gamma} were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60-399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04-0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V{sub 45} was associated with an increased odds of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04-4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V{sub 45} is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V{sub 45} could reduce the risk of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  20. Mortality and Readmissions After Cervical Fractures From Falls In Older Adults: A Comparison To Hip Fractures Using National Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zara; Mitchell, Susan L.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Ayanian, John Z.; Bernacki, Rachelle E.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Jha, Ashish K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical fractures from falls are a potentially lethal injury in older patients. Little is known about their epidemiology and outcomes. Objectives To examine the prevalence of cervical spine fractures after falls among older Americans and show changes in recent years. Further, to compare 12-month outcomes in patients with cervical and hip fracture after falls. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective study of Medicare data from 2007–2011 including patients ≥65 with cervical fracture and hip fracture after falls treated at acute care hospitals. Measurements Rates of cervical fracture, 12-month mortality and readmission rates after injury. Results Rates of cervical fracture increased from 4.6/10,000 in 2007 to 5.3/10,000 in 2011, whereas rates of hip fracture decreased from 77.3/10,000 in 2007 to 63.5/10,000 in 2011. Patients with cervical fracture without and with spinal cord injury (SCI) were more likely than patients with hip fracture, respectively, to receive treatment at large hospitals (54.1%, 59.4% vs. 28.1%, p< 0.001), teaching hospitals (40.0%, 49.3% vs. 13.4%, p< 0.001), and regional trauma centers (38.5%, 46.3% vs. 13.0%, p< 0.001). Patients with cervical fracture, particularly those with SCI, had higher risk-adjusted mortality rates at one year than those with hip fracture (24.5%, 41.7% vs. 22.7%, p<0.001). By one year, more than half of patients with cervical and hip fracture died or were readmitted to the hospital (59.5%, 73.4% vs. 59.3%, p<0.001). Conclusion Cervical spine fractures occur in one of every 2,000 Medicare beneficiaries annually and appear to be increasing over time. Patients with cervical fractures had higher mortality than those with hip fractures. Given the increasing prevalence and the poor outcomes of this population, hospitals need to develop processes to improve care for these vulnerable patients. PMID:26456855

  1. PTEN inhibitor bisperoxovanadium protects oligodendrocytes and myelin and prevents neuronal atrophy in adult rats following cervical hemicontusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) damages axons and motor neurons responsible for ipsilateral forelimb function and causes demyelination and oligodendrocyte death. Inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue, PTEN, promotes neural cell survival, neuroprotection and regeneration in vivo and in vitro. PTEN inhibition can also promote oligodendrocyte-mediated myelination of axons in vitro likely through Akt activation. We recently demonstrated that acute treatment with phosphatase PTEN inhibitor, bisperoxovanadium (bpV)-pic reduced tissue damage, neuron death, and promoted functional recovery after cervical hemi-contusion SCI. Evidence suggests bpV can promote myelin stability; however, bpV effects on myelination and oligodendrocytes in contusive SCI models are unclear. We hypothesized that bpV could increase myelin around the injury site through sparing or remyelination, and that bpV treatment may promote increased numbers of oligodendrocytes. Using histological and immunofluorescence labeling, we found that bpV treatment promoted significant spared white matter (30%; p < 0.01) and Luxol Fast Blue (LFB)+ myelin area rostral (Veh: 0.56 ± 0.01 vs. bpV: 0.64 ± 0.02; p < 0.05) and at the epicenter (Veh: 0.4175 ± 0.03 vs. bpV: 0.5400 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). VLF oligodendrocytes were also significantly greater with bpV therapy (109 ± 5.3 vs. Veh: 77 ± 2.7/mm2; p < 0.01). In addition, bpV increased mean motor neuron soma area versus vehicle-treatment (1.0 ± 0.02 vs. Veh: 0.77 ± 0.02) relative to Sham neuron size. This study provides key insight into additional cell and tissue effects that could contribute to bpV-mediated functional recovery observed after contusive cervical SCI. PMID:24582904

  2. Synergetic use of neural precursor cells and self-assembling peptides in experimental cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zweckberger, Klaus; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jian; Forgione, Nicole; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) cause serious neurological impairment and psychological, economic, and social consequences for patients and their families. Clinically, more than 50% of SCI affect the cervical spine. As a consequence of the primary injury, a cascade of secondary mechanisms including inflammation, apoptosis, and demyelination occur finally leading to tissue scarring and development of intramedullary cavities. Both represent physical and chemical barriers to cell transplantation, integration, and regeneration. Therefore, shaping the inhibitory environment and bridging cavities to create a supportive milieu for cell transplantation and regeneration is a promising therapeutic target. Here, a contusion/compression model of cervical SCI using an aneurysm clip is described. This model is more clinically relevant than other experimental models, since complete transection or ruptures of the cord are rare. Also in comparison to the weight drop model, which in particular damage the dorsum columns, circumferential compression of the spinal cord appears advantageous. Clip closing force and duration can be adjusted to achieve different injury severity. A ring spring facilitates precise calibration and constancy of clip force. Under physiological conditions, synthetic self-assembling peptides (SAP) self-assemble into nanofibers and thus, are appealing for application in SCI. They can be injected directly into the lesion minimizing damage to the cord. SAPs are biocompatible structures erecting scaffolds to bridge intramedullary cavities and thus, equip the damaged cord for regenerative treatments. K2(QL)6K2 (QL6) is a novel SAP introduced by Dong et al. In comparison to other peptides, QL6 self-assembles into β-sheets at neutral pH. 14 days after SCI, after the acute stage, SAPs are injected into the center of the lesion and neural precursor cells (NPC) are injected into adjacent dorsal columns. In order to support cell survival, transplantation is combined with

  3. Synergetic use of neural precursor cells and self-assembling peptides in experimental cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zweckberger, Klaus; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jian; Forgione, Nicole; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-02-23

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) cause serious neurological impairment and psychological, economic, and social consequences for patients and their families. Clinically, more than 50% of SCI affect the cervical spine. As a consequence of the primary injury, a cascade of secondary mechanisms including inflammation, apoptosis, and demyelination occur finally leading to tissue scarring and development of intramedullary cavities. Both represent physical and chemical barriers to cell transplantation, integration, and regeneration. Therefore, shaping the inhibitory environment and bridging cavities to create a supportive milieu for cell transplantation and regeneration is a promising therapeutic target. Here, a contusion/compression model of cervical SCI using an aneurysm clip is described. This model is more clinically relevant than other experimental models, since complete transection or ruptures of the cord are rare. Also in comparison to the weight drop model, which in particular damage the dorsum columns, circumferential compression of the spinal cord appears advantageous. Clip closing force and duration can be adjusted to achieve different injury severity. A ring spring facilitates precise calibration and constancy of clip force. Under physiological conditions, synthetic self-assembling peptides (SAP) self-assemble into nanofibers and thus, are appealing for application in SCI. They can be injected directly into the lesion minimizing damage to the cord. SAPs are biocompatible structures erecting scaffolds to bridge intramedullary cavities and thus, equip the damaged cord for regenerative treatments. K2(QL)6K2 (QL6) is a novel SAP introduced by Dong et al. In comparison to other peptides, QL6 self-assembles into β-sheets at neutral pH. 14 days after SCI, after the acute stage, SAPs are injected into the center of the lesion and neural precursor cells (NPC) are injected into adjacent dorsal columns. In order to support cell survival, transplantation is combined with

  4. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  5. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  6. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  7. Chronic At- and Below-Level Pain after Moderate Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Rodel E.; Houlé, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chronic neuropathic pain is a significant consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that is associated with evoked pain, including allodynia and/or hyperalgesia. Allodynia is defined as a painful response to normally innocuous stimuli, and hyperalgesia occurs when there is an amplified pain response to normally noxious stimuli. We describe a model of a unilateral cervical level (C5) contusion injury where sensory recovery was assessed weekly for 6 weeks in 32 adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia are detectable in the fore- and hindpaws as early as 7 days post-injury (dpi) and persist for at least 42 days. Paw withdrawal latency in response to a noxious thermal stimulus significantly intra-animal pre-operative values. Change in paw withdrawal latency plateaued at 21 dpi. Interestingly, bilateral forepaw allodynia develops in fewer than 40% of rats as measured by von Frey monofilament testing. Similar results occur in the hindpaws, where bilateral allodynia occurs in 46% of rats with SCI. The contralesional forepaw and both hindpaws of rats showed a slight increase in paw withdrawal threshold to tactile stimuli acutely after SCI, corresponding to ipsilesional forelimb motor deficits that resolve over time. That there is no difference among allodynic and non-allodynic groups in overall spared tissue or specifically of the dorsal column or ventrolateral white matter where ascending sensory tracts reside suggests that SCI-induced pain does not depend solely on the size or extent of the lesion, but that other mechanisms are in play. These observations provide a valid model system for future testing of therapeutic interventions to prevent the onset or to reduce the debilitating effects of chronic neuropathic pain after SCI. PMID:23216008

  8. Comparative effects of glibenclamide and riluzole in a rat model of severe cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Simard, J Marc; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanov, Alexander; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Both glibenclamide and riluzole reduce necrosis and improve outcome in rat models of spinal cord injury (SCI). In SCI, gene suppression experiments show that newly upregulated sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1)-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels in microvascular endothelial cells are responsible for "persistent sodium currents" that cause capillary fragmentation and "progressive hemorrhagic necrosis". Glibenclamide is a potent blocker of Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels (IC(50), 6-48 nM). Riluzole is a pleotropic drug that blocks "persistent sodium currents" in neurons, but in SCI, its molecular mechanism of action is uncertain. We hypothesized that riluzole might block the putative pore-forming subunits of Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels, Trpm4. In patch clamp experiments, riluzole blocked Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channels in endothelial cells and heterologously expressed Trpm4 (IC(50), 31 μM). Using a rat model of cervical SCI associated with high mortality, we compared the effects of glibenclamide and riluzole administered beginning at 3h and continuing for 7 days after impact. During the acute phase, both drugs reduced capillary fragmentation and progressive hemorrhagic necrosis, and both prevented death. At 6 weeks, modified (unilateral) Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan locomotor scores were similar, but measures of complex function (grip strength, rearing, accelerating rotarod) and tissue sparing were significantly better with glibenclamide than with riluzole. We conclude that both drugs act similarly, glibenclamide on the regulatory subunit, and riluzole on the putative pore-forming subunit of the Sur1-regulated NC(Ca-ATP) channel. Differences in specificity, dose-limiting potency, or in spectrum of action may account for the apparent superiority of glibenclamide over riluzole in this model of severe SCI. PMID:22177998

  9. Cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  10. Cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cerclage is an obstetric procedure performed for prevention of prematurity. Cerclage was first introduced by Drs Shirodkar and McDonald in the mid-1950s for women with repeated second trimester losses and cervical changes in current pregnancy. Currently, cerclage placement is based on 3 common indications in singleton gestations, including history-indicated (prior multiple early preterm births or second trimester losses), ultrasound-indicated (cervical length <25 mm before 24-wk gestational age in women with prior spontaneous preterm birth) and physical examination-indicated (cervical dilation on manual or physical examination before 24 wk).

  11. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  12. Neurological deterioration during intubation in cervical spine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Sahu, Barada Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesiologists are often involved in the management of patients with cervical spine disorders. Airway management is often implicated in the deterioration of spinal cord function. Most evidence on neurological deterioration resulting from intubation is from case reports which suggest only association, but not causation. Most anaesthesiologists and surgeons probably believe that the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) during intubation is largely due to mechanical compression produced by movement of the cervical spine. But it is questionable that the small and brief deformations produced during intubation can produce SCI. Difficult intubation, more frequently encountered in patients with cervical spine disorders, is likely to produce greater movement of spine. Several alternative intubation techniques are shown to improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement but their role in limiting SCI is not studied. The current opinion is that most neurological injuries during anaesthesia are the result of prolonged deformation, impaired perfusion of the cord, or both. To prevent further neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and positioning for surgery are essential. The features that diagnose laryngoscopy induced SCI are myelopathy present on recovery, short period of unconsciousness, autonomic disturbances following laryngoscopy, cranio-cervical junction disease or gross instability below C3. It is difficult to accept or refute the claim that neurological deterioration was induced by intubation. Hence, a record of adequate care at laryngoscopy and also perioperative period are important in the event of later medico-legal proceedings. PMID:25624530

  13. A case of acute pancreatitis secondary to spinal cord injury. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lijun; Sun, Yun; Lu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Pinjie; Yin, Lu; Li, Hui; Hua, Tianfeng; Zheng, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent and potentially life-threatening disease with high morbidity and mortality. The overall mortality of AP is approximately 5%. Alcohol consumption and gallstones are the main etiology of AP. Hypertriglyceridemia, idiosyncratic reactions to drugs, anatomic alterations and ascaris lumbricoides can also give rise to AP. Although spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause AP, however, the case of induced by cervical spine surgery has not been reported. A 61-year-old man with quadriplegic and respiratory distress received cervical spine surgery for spinal cervical spondylosis and multi-stage longitudinal ligament. He was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after tracheotomy for progressive dyspnea, one day after the cervical spine surgery. The patient was diagnosed with AP, in the absence of any identifiable causes of pancreatitis. He was treated with intravenous fluids, no oral feeding, enteral and parenteral nutrition, antibiotic and mechanical ventilation. The patient's condition gradually improved after the treatment. This case describes a case of postoperative cervical spondylosis that led to AP. In this report, we highlight the importance of early diagnosis and subsequent appropriate treatment. We conclude that the outcome can be favorable, if the treatment is appropriate. PMID:26707037

  14. [Cervical cerclage].

    PubMed

    Akladios, C Y; Sananes, N; Gaudineau, A; Boudier, E; Langer, B

    2015-10-01

    Cervical cerclage aims to strengthen not only the mechanical properties of the cervix, but also its immunological and anti-infectious functions. The demonstration of a strong interrelation between cervical insufficiency as well as decreased cervical length at endo-vaginal ultrasonography and infection has changed the indications cerclage. Actually we can distinguish three indications for cerclage: prophylactic, for obstetrical history; therapeutic, for shortened cervical length at ultrasonography in patients at risk and; emergency cerclage in case of threatening cervix at physical examination. The McDonald's technique is the most recommended. In case of failure, it is proposed to realize cerclage at a higher level on the cervix either by vaginal or abdominal route. PMID:26144289

  15. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  16. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... pain using stretches. The therapist will teach you exercises that make your neck muscles stronger. The therapist ...

  17. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding - polyps ... The exact cause of cervical polyps is not known. They may occur with: An abnormal response to increased levels of the female hormone estrogen Chronic inflammation Clogged ...

  18. Early Decompression (< 8 h) after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Improves Functional Outcome as Assessed by Spinal Cord Independence Measure after One Year.

    PubMed

    Grassner, Lukas; Wutte, Christof; Klein, Barbara; Mach, Orpheus; Riesner, Silvie; Panzer, Stephanie; Vogel, Matthias; Bühren, Volker; Strowitzki, Martin; Vastmans, Jan; Maier, Doris

    2016-09-15

    There is an ongoing controversy about the optimal timing for surgical decompression after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). For this reason, we performed a retrospective study of patients who were operated on after traumatic cervical SCI at the Trauma Center Murnau, Germany, and who met inclusion as well as exclusion criteria (n = 70 patients). Follow-up data were collected prospectively according to the European Multicenter Study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) protocol over a period of 1 year. Early decompression was defined as within the first 8 h after the insult (n = 35 patients). Primary outcome was the difference in the SCIM (Spinal Cord Independence Measure) 1 year after the trauma. After the follow-up period, patients who were decompressed earlier had a significantly higher SCIM difference (45.8 vs. 27.1, p < 0.005). A regression analysis showed that timing of decompression, age, as well as basal AIS (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale) and basal SCIM scores were independent predictors for a better functional outcome (SCIM). Further, patients from the early decompression group had better AIS grades (p < 0.006) and a higher AIS conversion rate (p < 0.029). Additionally, this cohort also had a better total motor performance as well as upper extremity motor function after 1 year (p < 0.025 and p < 0.002). The motor and neurological levels of patients who were operated on within 8 h were significantly more caudal (p < 0.003 and p < 0.014) after 1 year. The present study suggests that early decompression after traumatic cervical SCI might have a positive impact on the functional and neurological outcome of affected individuals.

  19. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the NCI website . Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy General Information About Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy Treatment of cervical ...

  20. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression. PMID:26185991

  1. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression.

  2. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained. PMID:22353492

  3. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: 1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and 2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI, (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:19651247

  4. Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Jong-Sup

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer, contributing to neoplastic progression through the action of viral oncoproteins, mainly E6 and E7. Cervical screening programs using Pap smear testing have dramatically improved cervical cancer incidence and reduced deaths, but cervical cancer still remains a global health burden. The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (collectively referred to as high-grade cervical disease) represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine and cytopathology. PMID:19690652

  5. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  6. Modulation of hand aperture during reaching in persons with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Victoria; Hayes, Heather B; Buetefisch, Cathrin; Wolf, Steven L; Trumbower, Randy D

    2014-01-01

    The intact neuromotor system prepares for object grasp by first opening the hand to an aperture that is scaled according to object size and then closing the hand around the object. After cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), hand function is significantly impaired, but the degree to which object-specific hand aperture scaling is affected remains unknown. Here we hypothesized that persons with incomplete cervical SCI have a reduced maximum hand opening capacity but exhibit novel neuromuscular coordination strategies that permit object-specific hand aperture scaling during reaching. To test this hypothesis, we measured hand kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) from seven muscles of the hand and wrist during attempts at maximum hand opening as well as reaching for four balls of different diameters. Our results showed that persons with SCI exhibited significantly reduced maximum hand aperture compared to able-bodied (AB) controls. However, persons with SCI preserved the ability to scale peak hand aperture with ball size during reaching. Persons with SCI also used distinct muscle coordination patterns that included increased co-activity of flexors and extensors at the wrist and hand compared to AB controls. These results suggest that motor planning for aperture modulation is preserved even though execution is limited by constraints on hand opening capacity and altered muscle co-activity. Thus, persons with incomplete cervical SCI may benefit from rehabilitation aimed at increasing hand opening capacity and reducing flexor-extensor co-activity at the wrist and hand. PMID:25511164

  7. Cervical spine trauma in children and adults: perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Vanderhave, Kelly L; Chiravuri, Srinivas; Caird, Michelle S; Farley, Frances A; Graziano, Gregory P; Hensinger, Robert N; Patel, Rakesh D

    2011-06-01

    A wide spectrum of cervical spine injuries, including stable and unstable injuries with and without neurologic compromise, account for a large percentage of emergency department visits. Effective treatment of the polytrauma patient with cervical spine injury requires knowledge of cervical spine anatomy and the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, as well as techniques for cervical spine stabilization, intraoperative positioning, and airway management. The orthopaedic surgeon must oversee patient care and coordinate treatment with emergency department physicians and anesthesia services in both the acute and subacute settings. Children are particularly susceptible to substantial destabilizing cervical injuries and must be treated with a high degree of caution. The surgeon must understand the unique anatomic and biomechanical properties associated with the pediatric cervical spine as well as injury patterns and stabilization techniques specific to this patient population.

  8. Cervical spondylitis due to Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Stéphanie; Bémer, Pascale; Corvec, Stéphane; Faure, Alexis; Redon, Hervé; Drugeon, Henri B

    2006-05-01

    The diverse clinical spectrum of meningococcal infections includes frequent clinical forms, such as meningitis or septicemia, and uncommon manifestations, such as septic arthritis. Neisseria meningitidis is not generally considered to be a causative agent of osteoarticular infections. We report the first case of acute primary cervical spondylitis in a 48-year-old man.

  9. Cervical spondylitis due to Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Stéphanie; Bémer, Pascale; Corvec, Stéphane; Faure, Alexis; Redon, Hervé; Drugeon, Henri B

    2006-05-01

    The diverse clinical spectrum of meningococcal infections includes frequent clinical forms, such as meningitis or septicemia, and uncommon manifestations, such as septic arthritis. Neisseria meningitidis is not generally considered to be a causative agent of osteoarticular infections. We report the first case of acute primary cervical spondylitis in a 48-year-old man. PMID:16618455

  10. Degeneration of Phrenic Motor Neurons Induces Long-Term Diaphragm Deficits following Mid-Cervical Spinal Contusion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise, Charles; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Hala, Tamara J.; Regan, Kathleen A.; Frank, David M.; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Leroy, Karelle; Pochet, Roland; Wright, Megan C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A primary cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is respiratory compromise, regardless of the level of trauma. In particular, SCI at mid-cervical regions targets degeneration of both descending bulbospinal respiratory axons and cell bodies of phrenic motor neurons, resulting in deficits in the function of the diaphragm, the primary muscle of inspiration. Contusion-type trauma to the cervical spinal cord is one of the most common forms of human SCI; however, few studies have evaluated mid-cervical contusion in animal models or characterized consequent histopathological and functional effects of degeneration of phrenic motor neuron–diaphragm circuitry. We have generated a mouse model of cervical contusion SCI that unilaterally targets both C4 and C5 levels, the location of the phrenic motor neuron pool, and have examined histological and functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks post-injury. We report that phrenic motor neuron loss in cervical spinal cord, phrenic nerve axonal degeneration, and denervation at diaphragm neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) resulted in compromised ipsilateral diaphragm function, as demonstrated by persistent reduction in diaphragm compound muscle action potential amplitudes following phrenic nerve stimulation and abnormalities in spontaneous diaphragm electromyography (EMG) recordings. This injury paradigm is reproducible, does not require ventilatory assistance, and provides proof-of-principle that generation of unilateral cervical contusion is a feasible strategy for modeling diaphragmatic/respiratory deficits in mice. This study and its accompanying analyses pave the way for using transgenic mouse technology to explore the function of specific genes in the pathophysiology of phrenic motor neuron degeneration and respiratory dysfunction following cervical SCI. PMID:23176637

  11. Correlation Between Radiation Dose to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Brent S.; Liang Yun; Lau, Steven K.; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hoh, Carl K.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiation dose to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-defined active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) subregions is correlated with hematologic toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The conditions of 26 women with cervical cancer who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET before treatment with concurrent cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy were analyzed. BM{sub ACT} was defined as the subregion of total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}) with a standardized uptake value (SUV) equal to or above the mean for that individual. Inactive bone marrow (BM{sub INACT}) was defined as BM{sub TOT} - BM{sub ACT}. Generalized linear modeling was used to test the correlation between BM{sub ACT} and BM{sub INACT} dose-volume metrics and hematologic nadirs, particularly white blood cell count (WBC) and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Results: Increased BM{sub ACT} mean dose was significantly associated with decreased log(WBC) nadir ({beta} = -0.04; 95% CI, -0.07to -0.01; p = 0.009), decreased log(ANC) nadir ({beta} = -0.05; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.02; p = 0.006), decreased hemoglobin nadir ({beta} = -0.16; 95% CI, -0.27 to -0.05; p = 0.010), and decreased platelet nadir ({beta} = -6.16; 95% CI, -9.37 to -2.96; p < 0.001). By contrast, there was no association between BM{sub INACT} mean dose and log(WBC) nadir ({beta} = -0.01; 95% CI, -0.06 to 0.05; p = 0.84), log(ANC) nadir ({beta} = -0.03; 95% CI, -0.10 to 0.04; p = 0.40), hemoglobin nadir ({beta} = -0.09; 95% CI, -0.31 to 0.14; p = 0.452), or platelet nadir ({beta} = -3.47; 95% CI, -10.44 to 3.50; p = 0.339). Conclusions: Irradiation of BM subregions with higher {sup 18}F-FDG-PET activity was associated with hematologic toxicity, supporting the hypothesis that reducing dose to BM{sub ACT} subregions could mitigate hematologic toxicity. Future investigation should seek to confirm these findings and to identify

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Doulames, Vanessa M; Plant, Giles W

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient's own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI-even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  14. Cervical spondylosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical spondylosis is a disorder that results from abnormal growth of the bones of the neck and ... Progressive neck pain is a key indication of cervical spondylosis. It may be the only symptom in ...

  15. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  16. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  17. FDG and FMISO PET Hypoxia Evaluation in Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  18. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  19. Hemidystonia secondary to cervical demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Yücesan, C; Tuncel, D; Akbostanci, M C; Yücemen, N; Mutluer, N

    2000-09-01

    Hemidystonia is usually associated with a structural lesion in the contralateral basal ganglia. We report a patient with definite multiple sclerosis, according to Poser's criteria, presenting with an acute-onset sustained left hemidystonia. Cranial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed several hyperintense lesions in the centri semiovali and in the periventricular area without basal ganglia involvement. Moreover cervical spinal cord T2-weighted MRI showed two hyperintense lesions in the left posterolateral spine at C2 and C3, and one lesion in the right posterolateral spine at C4 levels. The hemidystonia improved completely after daily treatment with 1000 mg of methylprednisolone, and cervical MRI was performed after the improvement which showed that the lesions had become smaller and less intense. Finally we consider that the hemidystonia may be caused by the cervical spinal cord lesions of multiple sclerosis. PMID:11054144

  20. Synergistic effects of self-assembling peptide and neural stem/progenitor cells to promote tissue repair and forelimb functional recovery in cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Motoyuki; Wilcox, Jared T; Nishimura, Yusuke; Zweckberger, Klaus; Suzuki, Hidenori; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Karadimas, Spyridon K; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-03-01

    While neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) show promise for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), their efficacy in cervical SCI remains to be established. Moreover, their application to SCI is limited by the challenges posed by the lesion including the glial scar and the post-traumatic cavitation. Given this background, we sought to examine the synergistic effect of self-assembling peptide (SAP) molecules, designed to optimize the post-traumatic CNS microenvironment, and NSCs in a clinically-relevant model of contusive/compressive cervical SCI. We injected K2(QL)6K2 (QL6) SAPs into the lesion epicenter 14 days after bilateral clip compression-induced cervical SCI in rats, combined with simultaneous transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) intraspinally adjacent to the lesion epicenter. The QL6 SAPs reduced the volume of cystic cavitation in the spinal cord lesion. Simultaneously engrafted NPCs preserved motor neurons and attenuated perilesional inflammation. The combination of QL6 and NPCs promoted forelimb neurobehavioral recovery and was associated with significant improvement in forelimb print area and stride length. In summary, we report for the first time histologic and functional benefits in a clinically-relevant model of cervical SCI through the synergistic effects of combined SAP and NPCs.

  1. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer This page lists cancer ... in cervical cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Cervical Cancer Cervarix (Recombinant HPV ...

  2. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  3. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  4. Cervical insufficiency and cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard; Gagnon, Robert; Delisle, Marie-France; Gagnon, Robert; Bujold, Emmanuel; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Crane, Joan; Davies, Gregory; Gouin, Katy; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank; Senikas, Vyta

    2013-12-01

    Objectif : La présente directive clinique a pour but de fournir un cadre de référence que les cliniciens pourront utiliser pour identifier les femmes qui sont exposées aux plus grands risques de connaître une insuffisance cervicale, ainsi que pour déterminer les circonstances en présence desquelles la mise en place d’un cerclage pourrait s’avérer souhaitable. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2012 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « uterine cervical incompetence ») et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « cervical insufficiency », « cerclage », « Shirodkar », « cerclage », « MacDonald », « cerclage », « abdominal », « cervical length », « mid-trimester pregnancy loss »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en janvier 2011. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Recommandations 1. Les femmes qui sont enceintes ou qui planifient connaître une grossesse devraient faire l’objet d’une évaluation visant les facteurs de

  5. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    PubMed

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  6. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  7. Respiratory outcomes after mid-cervical transplantation of embryonic medullary cells in rats with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, B J; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Lee, K Z; Ross, H H; Reier, P J; Fuller, D D

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory motor output after cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) is profoundly influenced by spinal serotonin. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of embryonic midline brainstem (MB) cells rich in serotonergic raphé neurons would improve respiratory outcomes after cSCI. One week after hemisection of the 2nd cervical segment (C2Hx) a suspension of either embryonic (E14) MB cells, fetal spinal cord cells (FSC), or media only (sham) was delivered to the dorsal C3 spinal cord of adult male rats. Six weeks later, ventilation was evaluated using plethysmography; phrenic nerve activity was evaluated in a subset of rats. Seven of 12 rats receiving MB-derived grafts had clear histological evidence of serotonin-positive neurons in the C3-4 dorsal white matter. The transplantations had no impact on baseline breathing patterns, but during a brief respiratory challenge (7% inspired CO2) rats with successful MB grafts had increased ventilation compared to rats with failed MB grafts, FSC or sham grafts. Recordings from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to C2Hx also indicated increased output during respiratory challenge in rats with successful MB grafts. We conclude that intraspinal allografting of E14 MB cells can have a positive impact on respiratory motor recovery following high cSCI. PMID:26808660

  8. Respiratory outcomes after mid-cervical transplantation of embryonic medullary cells in rats with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, B J; Gonzalez-Rothi, E J; Lee, K Z; Ross, H H; Reier, P J; Fuller, D D

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory motor output after cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) is profoundly influenced by spinal serotonin. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of embryonic midline brainstem (MB) cells rich in serotonergic raphé neurons would improve respiratory outcomes after cSCI. One week after hemisection of the 2nd cervical segment (C2Hx) a suspension of either embryonic (E14) MB cells, fetal spinal cord cells (FSC), or media only (sham) was delivered to the dorsal C3 spinal cord of adult male rats. Six weeks later, ventilation was evaluated using plethysmography; phrenic nerve activity was evaluated in a subset of rats. Seven of 12 rats receiving MB-derived grafts had clear histological evidence of serotonin-positive neurons in the C3-4 dorsal white matter. The transplantations had no impact on baseline breathing patterns, but during a brief respiratory challenge (7% inspired CO2) rats with successful MB grafts had increased ventilation compared to rats with failed MB grafts, FSC or sham grafts. Recordings from the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to C2Hx also indicated increased output during respiratory challenge in rats with successful MB grafts. We conclude that intraspinal allografting of E14 MB cells can have a positive impact on respiratory motor recovery following high cSCI.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doulames, Vanessa M.; Plant, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical-level injuries account for the majority of presented spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to date. Despite the increase in survival rates due to emergency medicine improvements, overall quality of life remains poor, with patients facing variable deficits in respiratory and motor function. Therapies aiming to ameliorate symptoms and restore function, even partially, are urgently needed. Current therapeutic avenues in SCI seek to increase regenerative capacities through trophic and immunomodulatory factors, provide scaffolding to bridge the lesion site and promote regeneration of native axons, and to replace SCI-lost neurons and glia via intraspinal transplantation. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a clinically viable means to accomplish this; they have no major ethical barriers, sources can be patient-matched and collected using non-invasive methods. In addition, the patient’s own cells can be used to establish a starter population capable of producing multiple cell types. To date, there is only a limited pool of research examining iPSC-derived transplants in SCI—even less research that is specific to cervical injury. The purpose of the review herein is to explore both preclinical and clinical recent advances in iPSC therapies with a detailed focus on cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:27070598

  10. Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear without cervical os dilatation.

    PubMed

    Djokovic, Dusan; Costa, Cristina; Martins, Ana; Abushad, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear, provoked by prostaglandin-induced uterine contractions, was described in a G2P0 woman with a history of cervical dilatation and uterine curettage. This rare complication with potentially serious maternal-fetal consequences can be predicted by an aberrant cervical response to prostaglandins in parturients with previous cervical interventions. PMID:25678963

  11. Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear without cervical os dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Djokovic, Dusan; Costa, Cristina; Martins, Ana; Abushad, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear, provoked by prostaglandin-induced uterine contractions, was described in a G2P0 woman with a history of cervical dilatation and uterine curettage. This rare complication with potentially serious maternal–fetal consequences can be predicted by an aberrant cervical response to prostaglandins in parturients with previous cervical interventions. PMID:25678963

  12. Cervical Discitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Scheuerman, Oded; Landau, Daniel; Schwarz, Michael; Hoffer, Vered; Marcus, Nufar; Hoffnung, Liat Ashkenazi; Levy, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Cervical discitis, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of torticollis, neck pain and neurodevelopmental regression in motor skills in children and infants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic method of choice. Treatment should be conservative with antibiotics only. The aim of this study was to describe the 10-year experience of a tertiary pediatric medical center with cervical discitis. PMID:25886786

  13. Alterations in multidimensional motor unit number index of hand muscles after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply a novel multidimensional motor unit number index (MD-MUNIX) technique to examine hand muscles in patients with incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The MD-MUNIX was estimated from the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and different levels of surface interference pattern electromyogram (EMG) at multiple directions of voluntary isometric muscle contraction. The MD-MUNIX was applied in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), thenar and hypothenar muscles of SCI (n = 12) and healthy control (n = 12) subjects. The results showed that the SCI subjects had significantly smaller CMAP and MD-MUNIX in all the three examined muscles, compared to those derived from the healthy control subjects. The multidimensional motor unit size index (MD-MUSIX) demonstrated significantly larger values for the FDI and hypothenar muscles in SCI subjects than those from healthy control subjects, whereas the MD-MUSIX enlargement was marginally significant for the thenar muscles. The findings from the MD-MUNIX analyses provide an evidence of motor unit loss in hand muscles of cervical SCI patients, contributing to hand function deterioration. PMID:26005410

  14. Behavioral and histological characterization of unilateral cervical spinal cord contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Tovar, C Amy; Hamers, Frank P T; Deibert, Rochelle J; Beattie, Michael S; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C

    2006-01-01

    Most experimental studies of spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats damage the thoracic cord, with the consequent functional loss being due to interruption of long tracts connecting the caudal spinal cord to the rostral nervous system. Less work has been done evaluating injury to the cervical cord, even though it is the most common level of human SCI. In addition to the long tracts, the cervical spinal cord contains the sensory and motor neurons responsible for upper extremity function. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model of cervical spinal cord contusion injury using a modified NYU/MASCIS weight drop device. Mild (6.25 mm) and moderate (12.5 mm) C5 unilateral injuries were produced. Behavioral recovery was examined using a grooming test, a paw preference test, a walkway test (The Catwalk), and a horizontal ladder test. Histological outcome measures included sparing at the lesion epicenter, sparing throughout the extent of the lesion, quantification of myelin loss rostral and caudal to the lesion, and motor neuron counts. Compared to controls, animals receiving SCI exhibited injury severity-specific deficits in forelimb, locomotor, and hindlimb function persisting for 6-weeks post-SCI. Histological analysis revealed ipsilateral containment of the injury, and differentiation between groups on all measures except motor neuron counts. This model has many advantages: (1) minimal animal care requirements post-SCI, (2) within subject controls, (3) functional loss involves primarily the ipsilateral forelimb, and (4) it is a behavioral and histological model for both gray and white matter damage caused by contusive SCI. PMID:16430371

  15. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bailleux, Caroline; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Chand-Fouche, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts) presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid) and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results Median age was 56.4 years (27-79). Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%), T3a = 1 pt (3%), T3b = 6 pts (18.2%), and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%). Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27). Median CTVCT (16 pts) and HR-CTVMRI (17 pts) were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3), 31.9 cc (17.1-58), respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5), 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4), respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI) for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9), 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4), and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1), respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51). Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pts, G3 infection = 2 pts), and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts), respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion); no bleeding was

  16. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  17. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury.

  19. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury. PMID:26611563

  20. [Cervical cerclage in 2008].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Senat, M-V; Gervaise, A; Deffieux, X; Faivre, E; Frydman, R; Fernandez, H

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cerclage is a common surgical technique that has been used for more than 50 years to prevent preterm deliveries and in the management of a threatened second trimester loss. However, it remains one of the most controversial interventions in obstetrics and this is probably due to difficulties in diagnosing cervical insufficiency, which is based on a history of recurrent second trimester loss or early preterm delivery following painless cervical dilatation in the absence of contractions or bleeding. This article reviews in 2008 the current literature regarding the efficacy of elective cerclage, ultrasound-indicated cerclage, emergency cerclage, and cervico-isthmic cerclage for singletons and multiple pregnancies.

  1. [Cervical cerclage in 2008].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Senat, M-V; Gervaise, A; Deffieux, X; Faivre, E; Frydman, R; Fernandez, H

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cerclage is a common surgical technique that has been used for more than 50 years to prevent preterm deliveries and in the management of a threatened second trimester loss. However, it remains one of the most controversial interventions in obstetrics and this is probably due to difficulties in diagnosing cervical insufficiency, which is based on a history of recurrent second trimester loss or early preterm delivery following painless cervical dilatation in the absence of contractions or bleeding. This article reviews in 2008 the current literature regarding the efficacy of elective cerclage, ultrasound-indicated cerclage, emergency cerclage, and cervico-isthmic cerclage for singletons and multiple pregnancies. PMID:18922730

  2. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  3. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ... uterus, vagina, and vulva. Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  5. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  6. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Pseudoactinomyces in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Deen, Suha; Ashford, Keith; Harwood, Andrew; Gray, Trevor

    2011-05-01

    Actinomyces israelii are gram-positive filamentous bacteria forming yellow sulfur granules. They are the most well known complication of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD). Healthcare staff dealing with reporting cervical smears should be aware of pseudoactinomyces entity in a cervical smears and biopsies as it may raise a false alarm to the clinician and may lead to unnecessary removal of IUCD and/or medical treatment.

  8. Postlaminectomy cervical deformity.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel; Haid, Regis W; Rodts, Gerald E; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2003-09-15

    Postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis is an important consideration when performing surgery. Identifying factors predisposing to postoperative deformity is essential. The goal is to prevent postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis while exposing the patient to minimal additional morbidity. When postlaminectomy kyphosis does occur, surgical correction is often required and performed via an anterior, posterior, or combined approach. The authors discuss the indications for surgical approaches as well as clinical results. PMID:15347223

  9. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  10. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. The Influence of Time from Injury to Surgery on Motor Recovery and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Observational Canadian Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C.; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R.; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R. John; Johnson, Michael G.; Linassi, A.G.; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24 h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72 h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24 h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24 h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24 h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS. PMID:25333195

  12. Finite element modelling of the cervical spinal cord injury -- clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Czyż, Marcin; Ścigała, Krzysztof; Będziński, Romuald; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of Finite Element Method (FEM) modelling of the clinical cases of traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study population consisted of 28 patients suffering from traumatic cervical spine injury with (study group) and without (control) neurological deficits. A numerical simulation of the trauma event was performed, based on validated 3D FEM model. All the results obtained underwent statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences between both groups were found in severity of bony and neural structure damage as well as in stress and strain ratios. The highest values of tensile stress and deformation were noted in the sagittal (Y) axis. The maximum stress and strain were found in anterior spinothalamic, lateral spinothalamic and dorsal columns. It was also found that stress and strain in each segment and axis of the spinal cord model were positively correlated with the severity of the cervical spine injury (R-Spearman 0.39 to 0.64) and neurological symptoms of SCI (R-Spearman: 0.43 to 0.82). It is possible to create a clinical numerical model of the SCI with the use of FEM. The correlations between the mechanical force and neurological deficits show tendencies which require further studies based on an improved model and a greater number of patients.

  13. Topiramate Treatment Is Neuroprotective and Reduces Oligodendrocyte Loss after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gensel, John C.; Tovar, C. Amy; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Micheal S.

    2012-01-01

    Excess glutamate release and associated neurotoxicity contributes to cell death after spinal cord injury (SCI). Indeed, delayed administration of glutamate receptor antagonists after SCI in rodents improves tissue sparing and functional recovery. Despite their therapeutic potential, most glutamate receptor antagonists have detrimental side effects and have largely failed clinical trials. Topiramate is an AMPA-specific, glutamate receptor antagonists that is FDA-approved to treat CNS disorders. In the current study we tested whether topiramate treatment is neuroprotective after cervical contusion injury in rats. We report that topiramate, delivered 15-minutes after SCI, increases tissue sparing and preserves oligodendrocytes and neurons when compared to vehicle treatment. In addition, topiramate is more effective than the AMPA-receptor antagonist, NBQX. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report documenting a neuroprotective effect of topiramate treatment after spinal cord injury. PMID:22428066

  14. Determinants of risk of invasive cervical cancer in young women.

    PubMed Central

    Parazzini, F.; Chatenoud, L.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.; Bolis, G.

    1998-01-01

    We analysed determinants of risk of cervical cancer in women aged less than 45 years using data from a case-control study conducted in Italy. Cases were 261 women aged < 45 years with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer. Controls were 257 women aged < 45 years, with acute, non-neoplastic conditions, judged to be unrelated to any of the known or suspected risk factors for cervical cancer. In comparison with women reporting one or no sexual partner, the multivariate odds ratio (OR) of cervical cancer was 2.4 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.3-4.6), for women reporting two or more sexual partners, and, in comparison with women reporting their first intercourse at 17 years of age or before, the multivariate OR was 0.5 (95% CI 0.3-0.9) in women aged > or =23 years at first intercourse. The risk of cervical cancer was higher in parous women and increased with number of births (OR = 8.1 for three or more births). Among parous women the risk tended to increase with later age at last birth; in comparison with parous women reporting their last birth before age 25, the OR was 1.9 in those reporting their last birth at > or =35 years. No clear association emerged between oral contraceptive use, smoking, education, social class and risk of cervical cancer. PMID:9514067

  15. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  16. A Novel Myoelectric Pattern Recognition Strategy for Hand Function Restoration after Incomplete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhou, Ping

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a novel myoelectric pattern recognition strategy towards restoration of hand function after incomplete cervical spinal cord Injury (SCI). High density surface electromyogram (EMG) signals comprised of 57 channels were recorded from the forearm of 9 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI while they tried to perform 6 different hand grasp patterns. A series of pattern recognition algorithms with different EMG feature sets and classifiers were implemented to identify the intended tasks of each SCI subject. High average overall accuracies (>97%) were achieved in classification of 7 different classes (6 intended hand grasp patterns plus a hand rest pattern), indicating that substantial motor control information can be extracted from partially paralyzed muscles of SCI subjects. Such information can potentially enable volitional control of assistive devices, thereby facilitating restoration of hand function. Furthermore, it was possible to maintain high levels of classification accuracy with a very limited number of electrodes selected from the high density surface EMG recordings. This demonstrates clinical feasibility and robustness in the concept of using myoelectric pattern recognition techniques toward improved function restoration for individuals with spinal injury. PMID:23033334

  17. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  18. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  19. Ovarian and cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.

    1992-01-01

    Death rates from cervical cancer have already fallen this century and for patients with invasive cervical cancer five year survival rates are greater than for most solid tumours. Better screening for premalignant changes may further reduce the incidence of invasive cancer; indeed, it has been claimed that the reduction in mortality could be as high as 90%, though estimates of screening efficacy have varied greatly. For those with advanced invasive carcinoma neoadjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the risk of relapse and improve survival. Images FIG 2 p1504-a PMID:1611377

  20. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  1. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  2. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Systemic Bisperoxovanadium Activates Akt/mTOR, Reduces Autophagy, and Enhances Recovery following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Walker, Melissa J.; Liu, Nai-Kui; Risberg, Emelie C.; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jinhui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Secondary damage following primary spinal cord injury extends pathology beyond the site of initial trauma, and effective management is imperative for maximizing anatomical and functional recovery. Bisperoxovanadium compounds have proven neuroprotective effects in several central nervous system injury/disease models, however, no mechanism has been linked to such neuroprotection from bisperoxovanadium treatment following spinal trauma. The goal of this study was to assess acute bisperoxovanadium treatment effects on neuroprotection and functional recovery following cervical unilateral contusive spinal cord injury, and investigate a potential mechanism of the compound's action. Two experimental groups of rats were established to 1) assess twice-daily 7 day treatment of the compound, potassium bisperoxo (picolinato) vanadium, on long-term recovery of skilled forelimb activity using a novel food manipulation test, and neuroprotection 6 weeks following injury and 2) elucidate an acute mechanistic link for the action of the drug post-injury. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting were performed to assess cellular signaling 1 day following SCI, and histochemistry and forelimb functional analysis were utilized to assess neuroprotection and recovery 6 weeks after injury. Bisperoxovanadium promoted significant neuroprotection through reduced motorneuron death, increased tissue sparing, and minimized cavity formation in rats. Enhanced forelimb functional ability during a treat-eating assessment was also observed. Additionally, bisperoxovanadium significantly enhanced downstream Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and reduced autophagic activity, suggesting inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten as a potential mechanism of bisperoxovanadium action following traumatic spinal cord injury. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of a clinically applicable pharmacological therapy for rapid initiation of neuroprotection post

  5. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  6. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  7. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  8. Cervical disc herniation as a trigger for temporary cervical cord ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Güliz; Schneider, Ulf C.; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Disc herniations are only reported in few case reports as a rare cause of acute spinal ischemia. A surgical treatment has not been described so far in these reports with analysis of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI/MRI) before and after surgery. The aim of our study is to report a case of cervical spinal cord ischemia caused by cervical disc herniation and discuss the literature concerning diagnostic and treatment options. Methods A 72-year-old female patient developed an acute progressive tetraparesis with emphasis on the upper extremities. MRI showed a disc herniation at the cervical segment 5/6 (C5/6) with consecutive spinal canal stenosis and additional signs of spinal cord ischemia in T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI reaching from C3 to C5 level. With the MRI being highly suggestive for anterior spinal cord ischemia, we hypothesized that this might be caused by compression of the anterior spinal artery through the significant disc herniation. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior discectomy and fusion at C5/6 level. Results Following surgery, the patient’s symptoms showed immediate regression with complete recovery after two months in correspondence with the normalization in the control MRI scan of cervical cord. Conclusions Assumedly our patient suffered from a partial anterior spinal artery syndrome, possibly caused by a disc herniation-related compression that was reversible following surgery. This was accompanied by a complete resolution of spinal cord signal abnormalities in T2WI and DWI.

  9. Functional recovery after cervical spinal cord injury: Role of neurotrophin and glutamatergic signaling in phrenic motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Gill, Luther C; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-06-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts descending neural drive to phrenic motoneurons causing diaphragm muscle (DIAm) paralysis. Recent studies using a well-established model of SCI, unilateral spinal hemisection of the C2 segment of the cervical spinal cord (SH), provide novel information regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of functional recovery after SCI. Over time post-SH, gradual recovery of rhythmic ipsilateral DIAm activity occurs. Recovery of ipsilateral DIAm electromyogram (EMG) activity following SH is enhanced by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool. Delivery of exogenous BDNF either via intrathecal infusion or via mesenchymal stem cells engineered to release BDNF similarly enhance recovery. Conversely, recovery after SH is blunted by quenching endogenous BDNF with the fusion-protein TrkB-Fc in the region of the phrenic motoneuron pool or by selective inhibition of TrkB kinase activity using a chemical-genetic approach in TrkB(F616A) mice. Furthermore, the importance of BDNF signaling via TrkB receptors at phrenic motoneurons is highlighted by the blunting of recovery by siRNA-mediated downregulation of TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons and by the enhancement of recovery evident following virally-induced increases in TrkB expression specifically in phrenic motoneurons. BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates synaptic plasticity in various neuronal systems, including glutamatergic pathways. Glutamatergic neurotransmission constitutes the main inspiratory-related, excitatory drive to motoneurons, and following SH, spontaneous neuroplasticity is associated with increased expression of ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Evidence for the role of BDNF/TrkB and glutamatergic signaling in recovery of DIAm activity following cervical SCI is reviewed.

  10. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. [Endovascular treatment for cervical carotid artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yasuhiko; Sugiu, Kenji; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Tokunaga, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Date, Isao

    2013-06-01

    We report here a case of cervical carotid artery aneurysm. This 37-year-old male suffered from acute neck swelling when he was taking lunch after physical work. Ultrasonography demonstrated a cervical pseudoaneurysm and a jet flow, which was blowing into the dome from the carotid artery. Angiogram revealed an aneurysm with a diameter of 3 cm at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. Coil embolization using double-catheter technique was performed and complete occlusion of the aneurysm was obtained without any complications. The patient returned to his normal life. Cervical carotid artery aneurysms are rare and they induce pain by swelling in the neck, hoarseness, swallowing disturbance, hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to embolism. In case of a cervical carotid artery aneurysm, safe and effective treatments are required and endovascular treatment should be considered. Although stent-assisted coil embolization or covered-stent placement were reported as an effective treatment for cervical aneurysms, coil embolization without using a stent was performed in this particular patient who is a young, blue-collar worker because the avoidance of long-term anti-platelet therapy was desirable. Preoperative evaluation is important to select adequate treatment. PMID:23732763

  13. Multimodal decoding and congruent sensory information enhance reaching performance in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Elaine A; Sachs, Nicholas A; Körding, Konrad P; Perreault, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) paralyzes muscles of the hand and arm, making it difficult to perform activities of daily living. Restoring the ability to reach can dramatically improve quality of life for people with cervical SCI. Any reaching system requires a user interface to decode parameters of an intended reach, such as trajectory and target. A challenge in developing such decoders is that often few physiological signals related to the intended reach remain under voluntary control, especially in patients with high cervical injuries. Furthermore, the decoding problem changes when the user is controlling the motion of their limb, as opposed to an external device. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of combining disparate signal sources to control reach in people with a range of impairments, and to consider the effect of two feedback approaches. Subjects with cervical SCI performed robot-assisted reaching, controlling trajectories with either shoulder electromyograms (EMGs) or EMGs combined with gaze. We then evaluated how reaching performance was influenced by task-related sensory feedback, testing the EMG-only decoder in two conditions. The first involved moving the arm with the robot, providing congruent sensory feedback through their remaining sense of proprioception. In the second, the subjects moved the robot without the arm attached, as in applications that control external devices. We found that the multimodal-decoding algorithm worked well for all subjects, enabling them to perform straight, accurate reaches. The inclusion of gaze information, used to estimate target location, was especially important for the most impaired subjects. In the absence of gaze information, congruent sensory feedback improved performance. These results highlight the importance of proprioceptive feedback, and suggest that multi-modal decoders are likely to be most beneficial for highly impaired subjects and in tasks where such feedback is unavailable

  14. Clinical aspects of cervical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lotgering, Frederik K

    2007-06-01

    Fetal loss is a painful experience. A history of second or early third trimester fetal loss, after painless dilatation of the cervix, prolapse or rupture of the membranes, and expulsion of a live fetus despite minimal uterine activity, is characteristic for cervical insufficiency. In such cases the risk of recurrence is high, and a policy of prophylactic cerclage may be safer than one of serial cervical length measurements followed by cerclage, tocolysis and bed rest in case of cervical shortening or dilatation. In low risk cases, however, prophylactic cerclage is not useful. There is a need for more basic knowledge of cervical ripening, objective assessment of cervical visco-elastic properties, and randomized controlled trials of technical aspects of cervical cerclage (e.g. suturing technique).

  15. Derivation of Multivariate Syndromic Outcome Metrics for Consistent Testing across Multiple Models of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Gensel, John C.; Nielson, Jessica L.; Lin, Amity; Ly, Johnathan; Segal, Mark R.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurological disorders involve complex biological and functional changes. Well-characterized preclinical models provide a powerful tool for understanding mechanisms of disease; however managing information produced by experimental models represents a significant challenge for translating findings across research projects and presents a substantial hurdle for translation of novel therapies to humans. In the present work we demonstrate a novel ‘syndromic’ information-processing approach for capitalizing on heterogeneous data from diverse preclinical models of SCI to discover translational outcomes for therapeutic testing. We first built a large, detailed repository of preclinical outcome data from 10 years of basic research on cervical SCI in rats, and then applied multivariate pattern detection techniques to extract features that are conserved across different injury models. We then applied this translational knowledge to derive a data-driven multivariate metric that provides a common ‘ruler’ for comparisons of outcomes across different types of injury (NYU/MASCIS weight drop injuries, Infinite Horizons (IH) injuries, and hemisection injuries). The findings revealed that each individual endpoint provides a different view of the SCI syndrome, and that considering any single outcome measure in isolation provides a misleading, incomplete view of the SCI syndrome. This limitation was overcome by taking a novel multivariate integrative approach for leveraging complex data from preclinical models of neurological disease to identify therapies that target multiple outcomes. We suggest that applying this syndromic approach provides a roadmap for translating therapies for SCI and other complex neurological diseases. PMID:23544088

  16. Derivation of multivariate syndromic outcome metrics for consistent testing across multiple models of cervical spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Adam R; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Gensel, John C; Nielson, Jessica L; Lin, Amity; Ly, Johnathan; Segal, Mark R; Ratan, Rajiv R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurological disorders involve complex biological and functional changes. Well-characterized preclinical models provide a powerful tool for understanding mechanisms of disease; however managing information produced by experimental models represents a significant challenge for translating findings across research projects and presents a substantial hurdle for translation of novel therapies to humans. In the present work we demonstrate a novel 'syndromic' information-processing approach for capitalizing on heterogeneous data from diverse preclinical models of SCI to discover translational outcomes for therapeutic testing. We first built a large, detailed repository of preclinical outcome data from 10 years of basic research on cervical SCI in rats, and then applied multivariate pattern detection techniques to extract features that are conserved across different injury models. We then applied this translational knowledge to derive a data-driven multivariate metric that provides a common 'ruler' for comparisons of outcomes across different types of injury (NYU/MASCIS weight drop injuries, Infinite Horizons (IH) injuries, and hemisection injuries). The findings revealed that each individual endpoint provides a different view of the SCI syndrome, and that considering any single outcome measure in isolation provides a misleading, incomplete view of the SCI syndrome. This limitation was overcome by taking a novel multivariate integrative approach for leveraging complex data from preclinical models of neurological disease to identify therapies that target multiple outcomes. We suggest that applying this syndromic approach provides a roadmap for translating therapies for SCI and other complex neurological diseases. PMID:23544088

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  18. Operations for cervical incompetence.

    PubMed

    Branch, D W

    1986-06-01

    At present, cervical cerclage is indicated in those patients with a classic history of cervical incompetence. For the majority of these patients, a postconceptional cerclage procedure is better suited because it is done after the fetus has been evaluated ultrasonographically for obvious abnormalities and after the risk for spontaneous abortion is past. The greatest experience is with the Shirodkar and the McDonald procedures; allowing for operator differences, neither appears to have an important advantage. The transabdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage may be a useful postconceptional procedure in the selected patient whose cervix is either markedly foreshortened, deeply lacerated, or infected. Preconceptional cerclages are best reserved for those rare patients in whom a markedly foreshortened incompetent cervix is associated with early second-trimester pregnancy losses (preconceptional isthmic cerclage) or in whom the cervix has a single, identifiable scar or deep laceration extending through the internal os (Lash procedure). PMID:3522005

  19. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  20. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  1. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  2. [Preventing cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Noël, J-C

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer has hopefully been dropping down in our industrialized countries since the introduction of both primary and secondary prevention. Nevertheless, it is still lethal in one out of two affected women though the introduction of cytological screening has dramatically reduced the mortality. Progressive diffusion of anti-HPV vaccination, the broadening of the viral types concerned, its association with existing screening measures and finally the introduction of viral detection as a screening tool must optimize the results already obtained.

  3. Asymptomatic cervical bruits.

    PubMed Central

    Côté, R.; Battista, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis, significance and management of asymptomatic cervical bruits have been the focus of considerable controversy. The literature does not support an aggressive approach but, rather, careful follow-up of patients with this disorder. This paper reviews the available data and discusses the management options of family practitioners who may detect this disorder during a routine physical examination, during an examination prompted by an unrelated problem or preoperatively when elective surgery is being considered. PMID:6367922

  4. Cervical spondylosis. An update.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, B M; Weinstein, P R

    1996-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is caused by degenerative disc disease and usually produces intermittent neck pain in middle-aged and elderly patients. This pain usually responds to activity modification, neck immobilization, isometric exercises, and medication. Neurologic symptoms occur infrequently, usually in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. For these patients, magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred initial diagnostic study. Because involvement of neurologic structures on imaging studies may be asymptomatic, consultation with a neurologist is advised to rule out other neurologic diseases. In most cases of spondylotic radiculopathy, the results of conservative treatment are so favorable that surgical intervention is not considered unless pain persists or unless there is progressive neurologic deficit. If indicated, a surgical procedure may be done through the anterior or posterior cervical spine; results are gratifying, with long-term improvement in 70% to 80% of patients. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most serious and disabling condition of this disease. Because many patients have nonprogressive minor impairment, neck immobilization is a reasonable treatment in patients presenting with minor neurologic findings or in whom an operation is contraindicated. This simple remedy will result in improvement in 30% to 50% of patients. Surgical intervention is indicated for patients presenting with severe or progressive neurologic deficits. Anterior cervical approaches are generally preferred, although there are still indications for laminectomy. Surgical results are modest, with good initial results expected in about 70% of patients. Functional outcome noticeably declines with long-term follow-up, which raises the question of whether, and how much, surgical treatment affects the natural course of the disease. Prospective randomized studies are needed to answer these questions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8855684

  5. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  6. [Ultrastructure of cervical mucus].

    PubMed

    Chretien, F C

    1973-09-01

    This discussion covers the chemical structure of cervical mucus, accepted thoeries of its ultrastructure, and the author's data from the scanning electron microscope. A theory of the ultrastructure of cervical mucus must explain how it can be viscous and hostile to sperm for most of the cycle, but elastic and arranged parallel to their upward migration at ovulation. Cervical mucus is a hydrogel with 2%-12% solid phase composed of glucoproteins, probably meshed noncovalently into protein chains, with oligosaccharide side chains ending in sialic acid. A popular thoery generated by nuclear magnetic resonnance studies suggests that there may be sheaves of fibers arranged into micelles, with transverse fibers forming a netwrok that enlarges at ovulation. The light microscope is useless for studying mucus structure, but transmission electron microscopes have tentatively verified this hypothesis. The author's work with the scanning electron microscope showed a tangled web of filaments approximately 500-750 Angstroms, 1000-1500 or 300-6000 Angstroms thick. Usually the margin of the specimen appeared thin, like a spider web, but the center appeared thick with open channels, like the skeleton of a sponge, with a secondary network at the level of the oblique and transverse fibers.

  7. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. A Contusive Model of Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Using the Infinite Horizon Impactor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae H.T.; Streijger, Femke; Tigchelaar, Seth; Maloon, Michael; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram; Kwon, Brian K.

    2012-01-01

    While the majority of human spinal cord injuries occur in the cervical spinal cord, the vast majority of laboratory research employs animal models of spinal cord injury (SCI) in which the thoracic spinal cord is injured. Additionally, because most human cord injuries occur as the result of blunt, non-penetrating trauma (e.g. motor vehicle accident, sporting injury) where the spinal cord is violently struck by displaced bone or soft tissues, the majority of SCI researchers are of the opinion that the most clinically relevant injury models are those in which the spinal cord is rapidly contused.1 Therefore, an important step in the preclinical evaluation of novel treatments on their way to human translation is an assessment of their efficacy in a model of contusion SCI within the cervical spinal cord. Here, we describe the technical aspects and resultant anatomical and behavioral outcomes of an unilateral contusive model of cervical SCI that employs the Infinite Horizon spinal cord injury impactor. Sprague Dawley rats underwent a left-sided unilateral laminectomy at C5. To optimize the reproducibility of the biomechanical, functional, and histological outcomes of the injury model, we contused the spinal cords using an impact force of 150 kdyn, an impact trajectory of 22.5° (animals rotated at 22.5°), and an impact location off of midline of 1.4 mm. Functional recovery was assessed using the cylinder rearing test, horizontal ladder test, grooming test and modified Montoya's staircase test for up to 6 weeks, after which the spinal cords were evaluated histologically for white and grey matter sparing. The injury model presented here imparts consistent and reproducible biomechanical forces to the spinal cord, an important feature of any experimental SCI model. This results in discrete histological damage to the lateral half of the spinal cord which is largely contained to the ipsilateral side of injury. The injury is well tolerated by the animals, but does result in

  9. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chunhao; Sun, Xiaoying; Zhang, Weijing; Li, Han; Xu, Liqun; Li, Jun; Xu, Benke; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6) in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC). NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p = 0.006), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006), vital status (p < 0.001), tumor recurrence (p = 0.001), chemotherapy (p = 0.039), and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001). Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:27775588

  10. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P = 0.001) and PI ,max (P = 0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P = 0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P = 0.081, partial eta-squared = 0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P = 0.077, partial eta-squared = 0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population.

  11. Pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with cervical dystonia and severe cervical dyskinesias with cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J; Loher, T; Pohle, T; Weber, S; Taub, E; Barlocher, C; Burgunder, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical treatment of complex cervical dystonia and of cervical dyskinesias associated with cervical myelopathy is challenging. In this prospective study, the long term effect of chronic pallidal stimulation in cervical dystonia and on combining the technique with spinal surgery in patients with severe cervical dyskinesias and secondary cervical myelopathy is described. Methods: Eight patients with a history of chronic dystonia who did not achieve adequate benefit from medical treatment or botulinum toxin injection participated in the study. Five patients had complex cervical dystonia with tonic postures and phasic movements. Three patients had rapidly progressive cervical myelopathy secondary to severe cervical dyskinesias and dystonia in the context of a generalised movement disorder. Quadripolar electrodes were implanted in the posteroventral lateral globus pallidus internus with stereotactic CT and microelectrode guidance. In the three patients with secondary cervical myelopathy, spinal surgery was performed within a few weeks and included multilevel laminectomies and a four level cervical corporectomy with spinal stabilisation. Results: Improvement of the movement disorder was noted early after pallidal surgery, but the full benefit could be appreciated only with a delay of several months during chronic stimulation. Three months after surgery, patients with cervical dystonia had improved by 38% in the severity score, by 54% in the disability score, and by 38% in the pain score of a modified version of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale. At a mean follow up of 20 months, the severity score had improved by 63%, the disability score by 69%, and the pain score by 50% compared with preoperatively. There was also sustained amelioration of cervical dyskinesias in the three patients who underwent spinal surgery. Lead fractures occurred in two patients. The mean amplitude needed for chronic deep brain stimulation was 3.8 V at a mean

  12. Assessing forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury: novel forelimb tasks predict lesion severity and recovery.

    PubMed

    Khaing, Zin Z; Geissler, Sydney A; Jiang, Shan; Milman, Brian D; Aguilar, Sandra V; Schmidt, Christine E; Schallert, Timothy

    2012-02-10

    Cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) can cause devastating neurological deficits, including impairment or loss of upper limb and hand function. Recently there has been increasing interest in cervical spinal cord injury models because the majority of spinal cord injuries are at cervical levels. Here we examined spontaneous functional recovery of adult rats with either laminectomy or lateral hemisection of the cervical spinal cord at C3-C4. Behavioral tests were carried out, including the forelimb locomotor scale (FLS), a postural instability test (PIT), a pasta-handling test that has been used to assess forepaw digit function and latency to eat, forelimb use during vertical-lateral wall exploration in a cylindrical enclosure, and vibrissae-elicited forelimb placing tests. In addition, a forelimb step-alternation test was developed to assess functional recovery at 12 weeks post-injury. All tests detected cSCI-induced deficits relative to laminectomy. Interestingly, the severity of deficits in the forelimb step-alternation test was associated with more extensive spinal damage, greater impairment, and less recovery in the FLS and other tests. For the pasta-handling test we found that rats with a milder cervical injury (alternators) were more likely to use both forepaws together compared to rats with a more severe injury (non-alternators). In addition, using the PIT, we detected enhanced function of the good limb, suggesting that neural plasticity on the unaffected side of the spinal cord may have occurred to compensate for deficits in the impaired forelimb. These outcome measures should be useful for investigating neural events associated with cSCI, and for developing novel treatment strategies.

  13. Awake behaving electrophysiological correlates of forelimb hyperreflexia, weakness and disrupted muscular synchronization following cervical spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick Daniel; Meyers, Eric Christopher; Sloan, Andrew Michael; Maliakkal, Reshma; Ruiz, Andrea; Kilgard, Michael Paul; Robert, LeMoine Rennaker

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury usually occurs at the level of the cervical spine and results in profound impairment of forelimb function. In this study, we recorded awake behaving intramuscular electromyography (EMG) from the biceps and triceps muscles of the impaired forelimb during volitional and reflexive forelimb movements before and after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) in rats. C5/C6 hemicontusion reduced volitional forelimb strength by more than 50% despite weekly rehabilitation for one month post-injury. Triceps EMG during volitional strength assessment was reduced by more than 60% following injury, indicating reduced descending drive. Biceps EMG during reflexive withdrawal from a thermal stimulus was increased by 500% following injury, indicating flexor withdrawal hyperreflexia. The reduction in volitional forelimb strength was significantly correlated with volitional and reflexive biceps EMG activity. Our results support the hypothesis that biceps hyperreflexia and descending volitional drive both significantly contribute to forelimb strength deficits after cSCI and provide new insight into dynamic muscular dysfunction after cSCI. The use of multiple automated quantitative measures of forelimb dysfunction in the rodent cSCI model will likely aid the search for effective regenerative, pharmacological, and neuroprosthetic treatments for spinal cord injury. PMID:27033345

  14. Awake behaving electrophysiological correlates of forelimb hyperreflexia, weakness and disrupted muscular synchronization following cervical spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Patrick Daniel; Meyers, Eric Christopher; Sloan, Andrew Michael; Maliakkal, Reshma; Ruiz, Andrea; Kilgard, Michael Paul; Robert, LeMoine Rennaker

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord injury usually occurs at the level of the cervical spine and results in profound impairment of forelimb function. In this study, we recorded awake behaving intramuscular electromyography (EMG) from the biceps and triceps muscles of the impaired forelimb during volitional and reflexive forelimb movements before and after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) in rats. C5/C6 hemicontusion reduced volitional forelimb strength by more than 50% despite weekly rehabilitation for one month post-injury. Triceps EMG during volitional strength assessment was reduced by more than 60% following injury, indicating reduced descending drive. Biceps EMG during reflexive withdrawal from a thermal stimulus was increased by 500% following injury, indicating flexor withdrawal hyperreflexia. The reduction in volitional forelimb strength was significantly correlated with volitional and reflexive biceps EMG activity. Our results support the hypothesis that biceps hyperreflexia and descending volitional drive both significantly contribute to forelimb strength deficits after cSCI and provide new insight into dynamic muscular dysfunction after cSCI. The use of multiple automated quantitative measures of forelimb dysfunction in the rodent cSCI model will likely aid the search for effective regenerative, pharmacological, and neuroprosthetic treatments for spinal cord injury.

  15. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h. PMID:24071567

  16. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) modulates neurological function when intravenously infused in acute and, chronically injured spinal cord of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Khaledi, Ghanim; Mousa, Alyaa; Karam, Shaima M; Abul, Habib; Asfar, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes severe and long lasting motor and sensory deficits, chronic pain, and autonomic dysreflexia. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has shown to produce neuroprotective effect in a broad range of neurodegenerative disease animal models. This study designed to test the efficacy of intravenous infusion of EGCG for 36 h, in acutely injured rats' spinal cord: within first 4 h post-injury and, in chronically SC injured rats: after one year of injury. Functional outcomes measured using standard BBB scale, The Louisville Swim Scale (LSS) and, pain behavior assessment tests. 72 Female adult rats subjected to moderate thoracic SCI using MASCIS Impactor, blindly randomized as the following: (I) Acute SCI + EGCG (II) Acute SCI + saline. (III) Chronic SCI + EGCG. (IV) Chronic SCI + saline and, sham SCI animals. EGCG i.v. treatment of acute and, chronic SCI animals resulted in significantly better recovery of motor and sensory functions, BBB and LSS (P < 0.005) and (P < 0.05) respectively. Tactile allodynia, mechanical nociception (P < 0.05) significantly improved. Paw withdrawal and, tail flick latencies increase significantly (P < 0.05). Moreover, in the EGCG treated acute SCI animals the percentage of lesion size area significantly reduced (P < 0.0001) and, the number of neurons in the spinal cord increased (P < 0.001). Percent areas of GAP-43 and GFAP immunohistochemistry showed significant (P < 0.05) increase. We conclude that the therapeutic window of opportunity for EGCG to depict neurological recovery in SCI animals, is viable up to one year post SCI when intravenously infused for 36 h.

  17. Tetraplegia or paraplegia with brachial diparesis? What is the most appropriate designation for the motor deficit in patients with lower cervical spinal cord injury?

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nicandro; Figueiredo, Iara Eberhard; Resnick, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    The authors seek to clarify the nomenclature used to describe cervical spinal cord injuries, particularly the use of the terms "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia" when applied to patients with lower cervical cord injuries. A review of the origin of the terms and nomenclature used currently to describe the neurological status of patients with SCI in the literature was performed. The terms "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia" have been used very often to describe patients with complete lower cervical SCI despite the fact that the clinical scenario is all the same for most of these patients. Most of these patients have total loss of the motor voluntary movements of their lower trunk and inferior limbs, and partial impairment of movement of their superior limbs, preserving many motor functions of the proximal muscles of their arms (superior limbs). A potentially better descriptive term may be "paraplegia with brachial diparesis". In using the most appropriate terminology, the patients with lower cervical SCI currently referred as presenting with "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia", might be better described as having "paraplegia with brachial diparesis".

  18. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  19. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years. PMID:27606653

  20. Cervical incompetence: diagnosis and outcome.

    PubMed

    Barford, D A; Rosen, M G

    1984-08-01

    The results of 147 cervical cerclage procedures were reviewed in a retrospective study. Patient history and past reproductive performance were assessed to determine which factors were predictive of successful pregnancy outcome after cervical cerclage. A past history of spontaneous second trimester abortion or premature labor was associated with a better outcome than was a history classically associated with cervical incompetence. Morbidity immediately following the procedure was low, however significant morbidity related to cervical scarring occurred at the time of delivery. There was poor correlation between the clinical history, examination and adjunctive tests of cervical incompetence, and the pregnancy outcome following cerclage. These observations indicate the need for a prospective, randomized study of the efficacy of this procedure.

  1. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  2. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  3. Electrodiagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Kevin; Spanier, David

    2013-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common diagnosis with a peak onset in the fifth decade. The most commonly affected nerve root is C7, C6, and C8. The etiology is often compressive, but may arise from noncompressive sources. Patients commonly complain of pain, weakness, numbness, and/or tingling. Examination may reveal sensory or motor disturbance in a dermatomal/myotomal distribution. Neural compression and tension signs may be positive. Diagnostic tests include imaging and electrodiagnostic study. Electrodiagnostic study serves as an extension of the neurologic examination. Electrodiagnostic findings can be useful for patients with atypical symptoms, potential pain-mediated weakness, and nonfocal imaging findings.

  4. Biomechanical response of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Kemper, Andrew R; Porta, David J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical response of human cervical spine segments in dynamic axial compression. This was accomplished by performing dynamic axial compression tests on human cervical spine segments, C4-T1 and C6-T1, dissected from fresh frozen human male cadavers. The proximal and distal vertebral bodies were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot and subjected to dynamic compressive loading rates using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System at a rate of 50 mm/s. The average force and moment at time of structural failure were found to be 3022 +/- 45 N and 46.1 +/-8.1 Nm, respectively, for C4-T1 segments and 6117 +/- 6639 N and 69.5 +/-6.8 Nm, respectively for C6-T1segments. The most severe injury as a result of this testing was compression fractures of the vertebral body. In addition, injuries to the intervertebral discs were only observed in specimens that sustained severe vertebral body fractures. This is consistent with the findings of previous researchers who have reported that intervertebral disc failures do not occur due to single acute loading events without associated severe boney fractures. PMID:19141905

  5. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  6. Upper limb kinematics after cervical spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Sébastien; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Reilly, Karen T; Rossetti, Yves; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-30

    Although a number of upper limb kinematic studies have been conducted, no review actually addresses the key-features of open-chain upper limb movements after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this literature review is to provide a clear understanding of motor control and kinematic changes during open-chain upper limb reaching, reach-to-grasp, overhead movements, and fast elbow flexion movements after tetraplegia. Using data from MEDLINE between 1966 and December 2014, we examined temporal and spatial kinematic measures and when available electromyographic recordings. We included fifteen control case and three series case studies with a total of 164 SCI participants and 131 healthy control participants. SCI participants efficiently performed a broad range of tasks with their upper limb and movements were planned and executed with strong kinematic invariants like movement endpoint accuracy and minimal cost. Our review revealed that elbow extension without triceps brachii relies on increased scapulothoracic and glenohumeral movements providing a dynamic coupling between shoulder and elbow. Furthermore, contrary to normal grasping patterns where grasping is prepared during the transport phase, reaching and grasping are performed successively after SCI. The prolonged transport phase ensures correct hand placement while the grasping relies on wrist extension eliciting either whole hand or lateral grip. One of the main kinematic characteristics observed after tetraplegia is motor slowing attested by increased movement time. This could be caused by (i) decreased strength, (ii) triceps brachii paralysis which disrupts normal agonist-antagonist co-contractions, (iii) accuracy preservation at movement endpoint, and/or (iv) grasping relying on tenodesis. Another feature is a reduction of maximal superior reaching during overhead movements which could be caused by i) strength deficit in agonist muscles like pectoralis major, ii) strength deficit in proximal synergic

  7. Upper limb kinematics after cervical spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Sébastien; Roby-Brami, Agnès; Reilly, Karen T; Rossetti, Yves; Collet, Christian; Rode, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Although a number of upper limb kinematic studies have been conducted, no review actually addresses the key-features of open-chain upper limb movements after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this literature review is to provide a clear understanding of motor control and kinematic changes during open-chain upper limb reaching, reach-to-grasp, overhead movements, and fast elbow flexion movements after tetraplegia. Using data from MEDLINE between 1966 and December 2014, we examined temporal and spatial kinematic measures and when available electromyographic recordings. We included fifteen control case and three series case studies with a total of 164 SCI participants and 131 healthy control participants. SCI participants efficiently performed a broad range of tasks with their upper limb and movements were planned and executed with strong kinematic invariants like movement endpoint accuracy and minimal cost. Our review revealed that elbow extension without triceps brachii relies on increased scapulothoracic and glenohumeral movements providing a dynamic coupling between shoulder and elbow. Furthermore, contrary to normal grasping patterns where grasping is prepared during the transport phase, reaching and grasping are performed successively after SCI. The prolonged transport phase ensures correct hand placement while the grasping relies on wrist extension eliciting either whole hand or lateral grip. One of the main kinematic characteristics observed after tetraplegia is motor slowing attested by increased movement time. This could be caused by (i) decreased strength, (ii) triceps brachii paralysis which disrupts normal agonist-antagonist co-contractions, (iii) accuracy preservation at movement endpoint, and/or (iv) grasping relying on tenodesis. Another feature is a reduction of maximal superior reaching during overhead movements which could be caused by i) strength deficit in agonist muscles like pectoralis major, ii) strength deficit in proximal synergic

  8. [Medical management of cervical arterial dissections].

    PubMed

    Vuillier, F; Tatu, L; Moulin, T

    2002-12-01

    Medical management of cervical arterial dissections is not standardized and has not been the subject of randomized trials. Management is mainly based on the presumed pathophysiology of secondary cerebral infarcts associated with dissections and the individual experience of each treating team. First, a review of the literature regarding medical management of acute and chronic dissections is presented. Then, results from a national study sponsored by the Société Française Neuro-Vasculaire and the Société Française de Neuro-Radiologie evaluating the medical management of this pathology in French neuro-vascular centers will be presented. These data will be useful to generate practical management recommendations and establish guidelines for further studies.

  9. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung.

  10. A Direct Comparison of Three Clinically Relevant Treatments in a Rat Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hosier, Hillary; Peterson, David; Tsymbalyuk, Orest; Keledjian, Kaspar; Smith, Bradley R.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent preclinical studies have identified three treatments that are especially promising for reducing acute lesion expansion following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI): riluzole, systemic hypothermia, and glibenclamide. Each has demonstrated efficacy in multiple studies with independent replication, but there is no way to compare them in terms of efficacy or safety, since different models were used, different laboratories were involved, and different outcomes were evaluated. Here, using a model of lower cervical hemicord contusion, we compared safety and efficacy for the three treatments, administered beginning 4 h after trauma. Treatment-associated mortality was 30% (3/10), 30% (3/10), 12.5% (1/8), and 0% (0/7) in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively. For survivors, all three treatments showed overall favorable efficacy, compared with controls. On open-field locomotor scores (modified Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores), hypothermia- and glibenclamide-treated animals were largely indistinguishable throughout the study, whereas riluzole-treated rats underperformed for the first two weeks; during the last four weeks, scores for the three treatments were similar, and significantly different from controls. On beam balance, hypothermia and glibenclamide treatments showed significant advantages over riluzole. After trauma, rats in the glibenclamide group rapidly regained a normal pattern of weight gain that differed markedly and significantly from that in all other groups. Lesion volumes at six weeks were: 4.8±0.7, 3.5±0.4, 3.1±0.3 and 2.5±0.3 mm3 in the control, riluzole, hypothermia, and glibenclamide groups, respectively; measurements of spared spinal cord tissue confirmed these results. Overall, in terms of safety and efficacy, systemic hypothermia and glibenclamide were superior to riluzole. PMID:26192071

  11. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chiao-Fan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Kuo-You; Chiu, Wei-Che; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, no prior population-based study has been published wherein the primary aim was to evaluate whether an association between psychotropic drug prescription and cervical cancer exists. Herein we have conducted the first study that primarily aimed to determine the association between antidepressants use and risk of invasive cervical cancer in the general population. This is a population-based study utilizing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 26,262 cases with invasive cervical cancer and 129,490 controls. We adopted the conditional logistic regression model as the statistical method and adjusted for potential confounding factors. The prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (adjusted OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), mirtazapine and bupropion, adjusting for cumulative dose, was not associated with an increased, or decreased, risk for invasive cervical cancer. An association between trazodone prescription and invasive cervical cancer was observed (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.03–1.43). An association between the major classes of antidepressants and invasive cervical cancer was not observed herein. Our preliminary finding regarding a possible association between trazodone and cervical cancer requires replication. PMID:26496343

  12. Lateral cervical sinus: specific sonographic findings in two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Yoshitake; Sato, Yumiko; Tanami, Yutaka; Amano, Hizuru; Fujiogi, Michimasa; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    A lateral cervical sinus, also known as a second pharyngeal or branchial cleft fistula/sinus, occurs when the second pharyngeal arch fails to grow caudally over the third and fourth arches, leaving remnants of the second branchial clefts in contact with the surface of the neck via a narrow canal. This type of sinus is detected on the lateral aspect of the neck directly anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We report two pediatric cases with lateral cervical sinus, and pathognomonic sonographic findings to confirm the diagnosis. The first case involved a 3-month-old boy with a sinus on the lateral neck and occasional drainage from a cervical sinus opening. Sonography revealed that the sinus tract extended between the external and internal carotid arteries. In case two, a 1-month-old girl presented with a sinus on the lateral neck and signs of acute infection at the site of a pinpoint opening. Sonography revealed an oval-shaped cystic lesion and sinus tract extending between the external and internal carotid arteries. Sonography does not require radiation or sedation for children. The best choice for the first examination for lateral cervical sinus is sonography, rather than CT, MRI, or contrast fistulograms. PMID:26576989

  13. Epicritic sensation in cervical spinal cord injury: diagnostic gains beyond testing light touch.

    PubMed

    Velstra, Inge-Marie; Bolliger, Marc; Baumberger, Michael; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Curt, Armin

    2013-08-01

    Abstract Applied as a bedside test of gross dorsal column function, the testing of light touch (LT) sensation is of high clinical value in the diagnosis of human spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the assessment of overall dorsal column deficit by testing only LT may be limited, because the dorsal column pathway conveys several large diameter afferent modalities (e.g., sensation of touch, two-point discrimination, and proprioception). Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the epicritic sensation assessed by LT, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM), and electrical perception threshold (EPT) across cervical dermatomes (C3-C8) in individuals with cervical SCI. A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed at 6 months after cervical SCI, applying combined measures of LT, SWM, and EPT, bilaterally over predefined key sensory points (C3-C8). A total of 300 left- and right-sided dermatomes were tested for each outcome measure in 25 participants. The percentage agreement between classifications according to LT and SWM/EPT testing for all dermatomes between C3 and C8 ranged from 95.5% to 36.2%. The degree of agreement showed considerably variable κ coefficients (-0.1≥kw≤0.7) for each dermatome between C3 and C8. The additional measurements of epicritic sensation by SWM and EPT increased sensitivity by detecting and quantifying differences in sensory thresholds above, at, and below the LT level of injury. This is relevant for early clinical trials (phase 1/2), in which disclosing any biological activity of an intervention may be revealed by subtle sensory changes that might gain a clinical relevance.

  14. Acute and Chronic Deficits in the Urinary Bladder after Spinal Contusion Injury in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Juan J.; Haywood-Watson, Ricky J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) permanently alters bladder function in humans. Hematuria and cystitis occur in both human SCI as well as in rodent models of SCI. Others have reported early SCI-dependent disruption to bladder uroepithelial integrity that results in increased permeability to urine and urine-borne substances. This can result in cystitis, or inflammation of the bladder, an ongoing pathological condition present throughout the chronic phase of SCI in humans. The goals of our study were twofold: (1) to begin to examine the inflammatory and molecular changes that occur within the bladder uroepithelium using a clinically-relevant spinal contusion model of injury, and (2) to assess whether these alterations continue into the chronic phase of SCI. Rats received either moderate SCI or sham surgery. Urine was collected from SCI and sham subjects over 7 days or at 7 months to assess levels of excreted proteins. Inflammation in the bladder wall was assessed via biochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Bladder tight junction proteins, mediators of uroepithelial integrity, were also measured in both the acute and chronic phases of SCI. Urine protein and hemoglobin levels rapidly increase following SCI. An SCI-dependent elevation in numbers of neutrophils within the bladder wall peaked at 48 h. Bladder tight junction proteins demonstrate a rapid but transient decrease as early as 2 h post-SCI. Surprisingly, elevated levels of urine proteins and significant deficits in bladder tight junction proteins could be detected in chronic SCI, suggesting that early pathological changes to the bladder may continue throughout the chronic phase of injury. PMID:19891526

  15. Motor-related cortical activity after cervical spinal cord injury: multifaceted EEG analysis of isometric elbow flexion contractions.

    PubMed

    Cremoux, Sylvain; Tallet, Jessica; Berton, Eric; Dal Maso, Fabien; Amarantini, David

    2013-10-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) studies have well established that motor cortex (M1) activity ~20 Hz decreases during muscular contraction and increases as soon as contraction stops, which are known as event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS), respectively. ERD is supposed to reflect M1 activation, sending information to recruited muscles, while the process underlying ERS is interpreted either as active cortical inhibition or as processing of sensory inputs. Investigation of the process behind ERD/ERS in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) would be particularly relevant since their M1 remains effective despite decreased sensorimotor abilities. In this study, we recorded net joint torque and EEG in 6 participants with cervical SCI and 8 healthy participants who performed isometric elbow flexion at 3 force levels. Multifaceted EEG analysis was introduced to assess ERD/ERS according to their amplitude, frequency range and duration. The results revealed that net joint torque increased with the required force level for all participants and time to contraction inhibition was longer in the SCI group. At the cortical level, ERD/ERS frequency ranges increased with the required force level in all participants, indicating that the modulation of cortical activity with force level is preserved after SCI. However, ERS amplitude decreased only in SCI participants, which may be linked to delayed contraction inhibition. All in all, cortical modulation of frequency range and amplitude could reflect two different kinds of neural communication. PMID:23939224

  16. The relationship between cervical flexor endurance, cervical extensor endurance, VAS, and disability in subjects with neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several tests have been suggested to assess the isometric endurance of the cervical flexor (NFME) and extensors (NEE) muscles. This study proposes to determine whether neck flexors endurance is related to extensor endurance, and whether cervical muscle endurance is related to disability, pain amount and pain stage in subjects with neck pain. Methods Thirty subjects (18 women, 12 men, mean ± SD age: 43 ± 12 years) complaining of neck pain filled out the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Neck Pain and Disability Scale-Italian version (NPDS-I). They also completed the timed endurance tests for the cervical muscles. Results The mean endurance was 246.7 ± 150 seconds for the NEE test, and 44.9 ± 25.3 seconds for the NMFE test. A significant correlation was found between the results of these two tests (r = 0.52, p = 0.003). A positive relationship was also found between VAS and NPDS-I (r = 0.549, p = 0.002). The endurance rates were similar for acute/subacute and chronic subjects, whereas males demonstrated significantly higher values compared to females in NFME test. Conclusions These findings suggest that neck flexors and extensors endurance are correlated and that the cervical endurance is not significantly altered by the duration of symptoms in subjects with neck pain. PMID:24581272

  17. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  18. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    By almost any measure, the SciDAC community has come a long way since DOE launched the SciDAC program back in 2001. At the time, we were grappling with how to efficiently run applications on terascale systems (the November 2001 TOP500 list was led by DOE's ASCI White IBM system at Lawrence Livermore achieving 7.2 teraflop/s). And the results stemming from the first round of SciDAC projects were summed up in two-page reports. The scientific results were presented at annual meetings, which were by invitation only and typically were attended by about 75 researchers. Fast forward to 2009 and we now have SciDAC Review, a quarterly magazine showcasing the scientific computing contributions of SciDAC projects and related programs, all focused on presenting a comprehensive look at Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing. That is also the motivation behind the annual SciDAC conference that in 2009 was held from June 14-18 in San Diego. The annual conference, which can also be described as a celebration of all things SciDAC, grew out those meetings organized in the early days of the program. In 2005, the meeting was held in San Francisco and attendance was opened up to all members of the SciDAC community. The schedule was also expanded to include a keynote address, plenary speakers and other features found in a conference format. This year marks the fifth such SciDAC conference, which now comprises four days of computational science presentations, multiple poster sessions and, since last year, an evening event showcasing simulations and modeling runs resulting from SciDAC projects. The fifth annual SciDAC conference was remarkable on several levels. The primary purpose, of course, is to showcase the research accomplishments resulting from SciDAC programs in particular and computational science in general. It is these accomplishments, represented in 38 papers and 52 posters, that comprise this set of conference proceedings. These proceedings can stand alone as

  19. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  20. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Oni-Orisan, Akinwunmi; Kaushal, Mayank; Li, Wenjun; Leschke, Jack; Ward, B Douglas; Vedantam, Aditya; Kalinosky, Benjamin; Budde, Matthew D; Schmit, Brian D; Li, Shi-Jiang; Muqeet, Vaishnavi; Kurpad, Shekar N

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity). However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury) and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI) based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system. PMID:26954693

  1. Alterations in Cortical Sensorimotor Connectivity following Complete Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Prospective Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Leschke, Jack; Ward, B. Douglas; Vedantam, Aditya; Kalinosky, Benjamin; Budde, Matthew D.; Schmit, Brian D.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Muqeet, Vaishnavi; Kurpad, Shekar N.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated alterations during task-induced brain activation in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. The interruption to structural integrity of the spinal cord and the resultant disrupted flow of bidirectional communication between the brain and the spinal cord might contribute to the observed dynamic reorganization (neural plasticity). However, the effect of SCI on brain resting-state connectivity patterns remains unclear. We undertook a prospective resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) study to explore changes to cortical activation patterns following SCI. With institutional review board approval, rs-fMRI data was obtained in eleven patients with complete cervical SCI (>2 years post injury) and nine age-matched controls. The data was processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimages software. Region of interest (ROI) based analysis was performed to study changes in the sensorimotor network using pre- and post-central gyri as seed regions. Two-sampled t-test was carried out to check for significant differences between the two groups. SCI patients showed decreased functional connectivity in motor and sensory cortical regions when compared to controls. The decrease was noted in ipsilateral, contralateral, and interhemispheric regions for left and right precentral ROIs. Additionally, the left postcentral ROI demonstrated increased connectivity with the thalamus bilaterally in SCI patients. Our results suggest that cortical activation patterns in the sensorimotor network undergo dynamic reorganization following SCI. The presence of these changes in chronic spinal cord injury patients is suggestive of the inherent neural plasticity within the central nervous system. PMID:26954693

  2. Resection of cervical ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Giuseppe; Morales-Valero, Saul F; Krauss, William E; Campero, Mario; Marsh, W Richard

    2014-09-01

    Intramedullary ependymomas are surgically curable tumors. However, their surgical resection poses several challenges. In this intraoperative video we illustrate the main steps for the surgical resection of a cervical intramedullary ependymoma. These critical steps include: adequate exposure of the entire length of the tumor; use of the intraoperative ultrasound; identification of the posterior median sulcus and separation of the posterior columns; Identification of the plane between the spinal cord and the tumor; mobilization and debulking of the tumor and disconnection of the vascular supply (usually from small anterior spinal artery branches). Following these basic steps a complete resection can be safely achieved in many cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/QMYXC_F4O4U. PMID:25175575

  3. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the vertebrae results in narrowing of the space for the spinal cord and its branches, known ... and cervical stenosis refers to narrowing of the space for the spinal cord or nerve branches in ...

  4. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... help understanding your Pap test result . What about cost? Testing for cervical cancer is covered under the ... may be able to get tested at no cost to you. If you have private insurance, check ...

  5. [Diagnosis and therapy of cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Matijević, Ratko; Grgić, Ozren; Klobucar, Ante

    2003-01-01

    Cervical insufficiency is one of the risk factors for late spontaneous miscarriage and preterm labor. As cervical insufficiency can reoccur in the every subsequent pregnancy, there is a need for precise diagnostic modality and therapeutic procedure in order to reduce perinatal mortality and morbidity. Traditionally, the diagnosis of cervical insufficiency was made based on the patient's history. In this cases the intervention in the form of the cervical cerclage, was not found to be useful, i.e. perinatal mortality and morbidity remained unchanged. It is a similar situation in cervical insufficiency suspected based on hysterosalpingography and clinical examination. Recently, ultrasound, or more precisely transvaginal cervical assessment--cervicometry, was introduced in order to assess the morphological changes indicative for cervical insufficiency. In this literature review, we analyzed ultrasound based markers of cervical insufficiency, with their specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, as well as usefulness of cervical cerclage in such cases.

  6. How Are Cervical Cancers and Pre-Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is cervical cancer staged? How is cervical cancer diagnosed? The first step in finding cervical cancer ... systems. Tests for women with symptoms of cervical cancer or abnormal Pap results Medical history and physical ...

  7. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Preface: SciDAC 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Horst

    2009-07-01

    By almost any measure, the SciDAC community has come a long way since DOE launched the SciDAC program back in 2001. At the time, we were grappling with how to efficiently run applications on terascale systems (the November 2001 TOP500 list was led by DOE's ASCI White IBM system at Lawrence Livermore achieving 7.2 teraflop/s). And the results stemming from the first round of SciDAC projects were summed up in two-page reports. The scientific results were presented at annual meetings, which were by invitation only and typically were attended by about 75 researchers. Fast forward to 2009 and we now have SciDAC Review, a quarterly magazine showcasing the scientific computing contributions of SciDAC projects and related programs, all focused on presenting a comprehensive look at Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing. That is also the motivation behind the annual SciDAC conference that in 2009 was held from June 14-18 in San Diego. The annual conference, which can also be described as a celebration of all things SciDAC, grew out those meetings organized in the early days of the program. In 2005, the meeting was held in San Francisco and attendance was opened up to all members of the SciDAC community. The schedule was also expanded to include a keynote address, plenary speakers and other features found in a conference format. This year marks the fifth such SciDAC conference, which now comprises four days of computational science presentations, multiple poster sessions and, since last year, an evening event showcasing simulations and modeling runs resulting from SciDAC projects. The fifth annual SciDAC conference was remarkable on several levels. The primary purpose, of course, is to showcase the research accomplishments resulting from SciDAC programs in particular and computational science in general. It is these accomplishments, represented in 38 papers and 52 posters, that comprise this set of conference proceedings. These proceedings can stand alone as

  9. Restoration of Upper Limb Function in an Individual with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy using Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Milos R.; Zivanovic, Vera; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic spinal cord pathology is responsible for 25–52% of all spinal cord lesions. Studies have revealed that spinal stenosis accounts for 16–21% of spinal cord injury (SCI) admissions. Impaired grips as well as slow unskilled hand and finger movements are the most common complaints in patients with spinal cord disorders, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. In the past, our team carried out couple of successful clinical trials, including two randomized control trials, showing that functional electrical stimulation therapy (FEST) can restore voluntary reaching and/or grasping function, in people with stroke and traumatic SCI. Motivated by this success, we decided to examine changes in the upper limb function following FEST in a patient who suffered loss of hand function due to myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. The participant was a 61-year-old male who had C3–C7 posterior laminectomy and instrumented fusion for cervical myelopathy. The participant presented with progressive right hand weakness that resulted in his inability to voluntarily open and close the hand and to manipulate objects unilaterally with his right hand. The participant was enrolled in the study ~22 months following initial surgical intervention. Participant was assessed using Toronto Rehabilitation Institute’s Hand Function Test (TRI-HFT), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). The pre–post differences in scores on all measures clearly demonstrated improvement in voluntary hand function following 15 1-h FEST sessions. The changes observed were meaningful and have resulted in substantial improvement in performance of activities of daily living. These results provide preliminary evidence that FEST has a potential to improve upper limb function in patients with non-traumatic SCI, such as myelopathy secondary to cervical spondylosis. PMID:27375547

  10. Cervical cord injury after massage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Han; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2011-10-01

    We present the case of a 47-yr-old gentleman with cervical cord injury after he received massage in the neck area. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a herniation of the nucleus pulposus and compressive myelopathy. The patient required surgical intervention and rehabilitation. Despite 6 mos of rehabilitation, residual hand dysfunction and minor ambulation problems persisted. Although massage has many benefits, this case reminds us that there is potential danger in performing neck massage. PMID:21862908

  11. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elicin, Olgun; Callaway, Sharon; Prior, John O.; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Herrera, Fernanda G.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  12. Use of hinged rods for controlled osteoclastic correction of a fixed cervical kyphotic deformity in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Khoueir, Paul; Hoh, Daniel J; Wang, Michael Y

    2008-06-01

    Cervical kyphosis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be severely disabling. Surgical treatment of this disorder is technically demanding, however, with a considerable risk of neurological and vascular injuries. The extension osteotomy is a well-described posterior treatment for this condition, but this approach presents the risk of acute subluxation and spinal column translation during the reduction. In this paper, the authors report the novel use of a hinged posterior cervical rod for controlled correction of cervical kyphosis. After sustaining a traumatic spinal fracture, a 57-year-old man with AS developed a delayed cervical flexion deformity. The patient was neurologically intact, but suffered from disabling impairment in horizontal gaze and activities of daily living, and from neck pain. The patient subsequently underwent surgical correction via a posterior cervical extension osteotomy at C7-T1 with manual extension of the neck for osteoclastic reduction of the cervical kyphosis. Controlled correction was performed by using a hinged rod affixed to posterior cervical and thoracic screws, allowing for free sagittal correction while restricting translational forces. Once the desired angle of correction was achieved, the hinge connector was locked, transforming the rod into a rigid device for permanent internal fixation. The use of hinged rods in cervical kyphosis correction provides a controlled method for reduction at the osteotomy site, decreasing the risk of neurological injury. PMID:18518681

  13. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  14. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cervical Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Peng, Baogan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vertigo is characterized by vertigo from the cervical spine. However, whether cervical vertigo is an independent entity still remains controversial. In this narrative review, we outline the basic science and clinical evidence for cervical vertigo according to the current literature. So far, there are 4 different hypotheses explaining the vertigo of a cervical origin, including proprioceptive cervical vertigo, Barré-Lieou syndrome, rotational vertebral artery vertigo, and migraine-associated cervicogenic vertigo. Proprioceptive cervical vertigo and rotational vertebral artery vertigo have survived with time. Barré-Lieou syndrome once was discredited, but it has been resurrected recently by increased scientific evidence. Diagnosis depends mostly on patients' subjective feelings, lacking positive signs, specific laboratory examinations and clinical trials, and often relies on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Neurological, vestibular, and psychosomatic disorders must first be excluded before the dizziness and unsteadiness in cervical pain syndromes can be attributed to a cervical origin. Treatment for cervical vertigo is challenging. Manual therapy is recommended for treatment of proprioceptive cervical vertigo. Anterior cervical surgery and percutaneous laser disc decompression are effective for the cervical spondylosis patients accompanied with Barré-Liéou syndrome. As to rotational vertebral artery vertigo, a rare entity, when the exact area of the arterial compression is identified through appropriate tests such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) decompressive surgery should be the chosen treatment.

  15. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  16. Cervical insufficiency: re-evaluating the prophylactic cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Abenhaim, Haim A; Tulandi, Togas

    2009-06-01

    Historically, placement of a cervical cerclage was based almost entirely on the obstetrical history. Over the past two decades however, we have recognised that history alone may not be the only indication for cerclage but rather, complementing the obstetrical history with ultrasonographic and biochemical findings may better identify those women who may benefit most from the placement of a cervical cerclage. Review of the literature appears to suggest that the best approach towards the management of a cervical insufficiency is to first categorise women as being either high risk of low risk-based on obstetrical history. Although women with an obstetrical history of at least three 2nd trimester losses are likely to benefit from a prophylactic cerclage than those without this history may better be managed with progesterone and serial cervical length measurements. This approach can in turn be used to identify those women with early cervical shortening that may require an emergency cerclage. Although randomised controlled trials are still lacking, recent studies suggests that this approach may be more effective especially when combined with markers of intra-amniotic inflammation. As for the prophylactic cerclage itself, with the abdominal cerclage being less invasive given the possibility of a laparoscopic placement, it may prove to be a more effective alternative to the conventionally placed McDonald cerclage. This however, remains to be evaluated more carefully.

  17. [Therapy of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kothe, R; Wiesner, L; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    The rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine can be divided into three phases. In the early stage of the disease there is an isolated atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), followed by vertical instability and subaxial instability. If patients show clear symptoms of cervical myelopathy, which can occur during any stage of the disease, the progression cannot be stopped by conservative treatment, which is of great importance at the beginning of the cervical manifestation. Patient education, physiotherapy and immobilization with a stiff collar can significantly reduce pain. Early and effective DMARD therapy can have a positive effect on the natural history of the disease. In case of progressive instability, cervical myelopathy or severe pain operative treatment is indicated. If there is an isolated AAS, fusion can be restricted to the C1/C2 segment. The Magerl transarticular screw fixation is the preferred technique for stabilization. If there is evidence for vertical instability or severe destruction of the C0/C1 joints, occipital cervical fusion has to be performed. Durin the preoperative planning it is necessary to look for signs of subaxial instability. If this is the case, fusion should include the entire cervical spine. Transoral decompression may be necessary when there is persistent anterior compression of the myelon, typically seen in fixed AAS. Non-ambulatory myelopathic patients are more likely to develop severe surgical complications. Therefore, it is important to avoid the development of severe cervical instability by early surgical intervention. The right timing for surgery is still a matter of controversy. Future prospective randomized trials should address this topic to improve the treatment concept for the rheumatoid patient.

  18. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    It takes a village to perform a petascale computation—domain scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computer system vendors, program managers, and support staff—and the village was assembled during 24-28 June 2007 in Boston's Westin Copley Place for the third annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) 2007 Conference. Over 300 registered participants networked around 76 posters, focused on achievements and challenges in 36 plenary talks, and brainstormed in two panels. In addition, with an eye to spreading the vision for simulation at the petascale and to growing the workforce, 115 participants—mostly doctoral students and post-docs complementary to the conferees—were gathered on 29 June 2007 in classrooms of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a full day of tutorials on the use of SciDAC software. Eleven SciDAC-sponsored research groups presented their software at an introductory level, in both lecture and hands-on formats that included live runs on a local BlueGene/L. Computation has always been about garnering insight into the behavior of systems too complex to explore satisfactorily by theoretical means alone. Today, however, computation is about much more: scientists and decision makers expect quantitatively reliable predictions from simulations ranging in scale from that of the Earth's climate, down to quarks, and out to colliding black holes. Predictive simulation lies at the heart of policy choices in energy and environment affecting billions of lives and expenditures of trillions of dollars. It is also at the heart of scientific debates on the nature of matter and the origin of the universe. The petascale is barely adequate for such demands and we are barely established at the levels of resolution and throughput that this new scale of computation affords. However, no scientific agenda worldwide is pushing the petascale frontier on all its fronts as vigorously as SciDAC. The breadth of this conference

  19. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoo, Jeehyun; Kim, Il-Sun; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyejin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Hwang, Kyujin; Kim, Miri; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-01-01

    In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs) transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C), 1 (A → B), and 2 (B → D), whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B). Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), Registration Number: KCT0000879. PMID:26568892

  20. Clinical Trial of Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Patients with Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoo, Jeehyun; Kim, Il-Sun; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyejin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Hwang, Kyujin; Kim, Miri; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-01-01

    In a phase I/IIa open-label and nonrandomized controlled clinical trial, we sought to assess the safety and neurological effects of human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSPCs) transplanted into the injured cord after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Of 19 treated subjects, 17 were sensorimotor complete and 2 were motor complete and sensory incomplete. hNSPCs derived from the fetal telencephalon were grown as neurospheres and transplanted into the cord. In the control group, who did not receive cell implantation but were otherwise closely matched with the transplantation group, 15 patients with traumatic cervical SCI were included. At 1 year after cell transplantation, there was no evidence of cord damage, syrinx or tumor formation, neurological deterioration, and exacerbating neuropathic pain or spasticity. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improved in 5 of 19 transplanted patients, 2 (A → C), 1 (A → B), and 2 (B → D), whereas only one patient in the control group showed improvement (A → B). Improvements included increased motor scores, recovery of motor levels, and responses to electrophysiological studies in the transplantation group. Therefore, the transplantation of hNSPCs into cervical SCI is safe and well-tolerated and is of modest neurological benefit up to 1 year after transplants. This trial is registered with Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS), Registration Number: KCT0000879.

  1. Sudden onset odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Akiko; Maemoto, Tatsuo; Honda, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the upper cervical spine rarely occur but carry a high rate of mortality and neurological disabilities in children. Although odontoid fractures are commonly caused by high-impact injuries, cerebral palsy children with cervical instability have a risk of developing spinal fractures even from mild trauma. We herein present the first case of an odontoid fracture in a 4-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. He exhibited prominent cervical instability due to hypotonic cerebral palsy from infancy. He suddenly developed acute respiratory failure, which subsequently required mechanical ventilation. Neuroimaging clearly revealed a type-III odontoid fracture accompanied by anterior displacement with compression of the cervical spinal cord. Bone mineral density was prominently decreased probably due to his long-term bedridden status and poor nutritional condition. We subsequently performed posterior internal fixation surgically using an onlay bone graft, resulting in a dramatic improvement in his respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy. Since cervical instability and decreased bone mineral density are frequently associated with cerebral palsy, odontoid fractures should be cautiously examined in cases of sudden onset respiratory failure and aggravated weakness, especially in hypotonic cerebral palsy patients.

  2. Multiple subluxations and comminuted fracture of the cervical spine in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Chen, K-S; Lin, Y-L; Chan, J P-W

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old, 13.5 kg, female Corriedale sheep was referred to the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, with a history of traumatic injury of the cervical spine followed by non-ambulatoric tetraparesis that occurred 2 weeks before being admitted to the hospital. At admission, malalignment of the cervical spine with the cranial part of the neck deviating to the right was noted. Neurological examinations identified the absence of postural reactions in both forelimbs, mildly decreased spinal reflexes, and normal reaction to pain perception tests. Radiography revealed malalignment of the cervical vertebrae with subluxations at C1-C2 and C2-C3, and a comminuted fracture of the caudal aspect of C2. The sheep was euthanized due to a presumed poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathological findings confirmed injuries of the cervical spine from C1 to C3, which were consistent with the clinical finding of tetraparesis in this case. This paper presents a rare case of multiple subluxations of the cervical spine caused by blunt force trauma in a young sheep. These results highlight the importance of an astute clinical diagnosis for such an acute cervical spine trauma and the need for prompt surgical correction for similar cases in the future. PMID:25626484

  3. Multiple subluxations and comminuted fracture of the cervical spine in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Chen, K-S; Lin, Y-L; Chan, J P-W

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old, 13.5 kg, female Corriedale sheep was referred to the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, with a history of traumatic injury of the cervical spine followed by non-ambulatoric tetraparesis that occurred 2 weeks before being admitted to the hospital. At admission, malalignment of the cervical spine with the cranial part of the neck deviating to the right was noted. Neurological examinations identified the absence of postural reactions in both forelimbs, mildly decreased spinal reflexes, and normal reaction to pain perception tests. Radiography revealed malalignment of the cervical vertebrae with subluxations at C1-C2 and C2-C3, and a comminuted fracture of the caudal aspect of C2. The sheep was euthanized due to a presumed poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathological findings confirmed injuries of the cervical spine from C1 to C3, which were consistent with the clinical finding of tetraparesis in this case. This paper presents a rare case of multiple subluxations of the cervical spine caused by blunt force trauma in a young sheep. These results highlight the importance of an astute clinical diagnosis for such an acute cervical spine trauma and the need for prompt surgical correction for similar cases in the future.

  4. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention of Cervical Cancer ASCCP has endorsed American Society of Clinical Oncology's Guidelines for Secondary Prevention of ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  5. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  6. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized.

  7. [Cervical incompetence after previous cervical dilatation and curettage (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Riss, P

    1979-07-15

    Out of a total of 3502 deliveries over a period of two years 254 patients (7.25%) had a surgical closure of the cervix according to Shirodkar because of cervical incompetence. All 3502 records were reviewed with regard to previous obstetrical and gynecological history. In the group with Shirodkar operation the percentage of women with a history of spontaneous or induced abortions was almost twice as high as in the comparison group. The reason for the development of cervical incompetence could be a trauma to the endocervix due to mechanical dilatation since diagnostic or therapeutic dilatation and curettage was found five times more often in women with Shirodkar operation than in patients without cervical incompetence. The results show that dilatation and curettage for any indication should be performed as carefully as possible, especially in younger women of childbearing age. Chemical dilatation of the endocervix--for example with prostaglandins--seems to be preferable to mechanical dilatation.

  8. Cervical interfacet spacers and maintenance of cervical lordosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Straus, David C; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The cervical interfacet spacer (CIS) is a relatively new technology that can increase foraminal height and area by facet distraction. These offer the potential to provide indirect neuroforaminal decompression while simultaneously enhancing fusion potential due to the relatively large osteoconductive surface area and compressive forces exerted on the grafts. These potential benefits, along with the relative ease of implantation during posterior cervical fusion procedures, make the CIS an attractive adjuvant in the management of cervical pathology. One concern with the use of interfacet spacers is the theoretical risk of inducing iatrogenic kyphosis. This work tests the hypothesis that interfacet spacers are associated with loss of cervical lordosis. METHODS Records from patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion at Rush University Medical Center between March 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. The FacetLift CISs were used in all patients. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data were reviewed and the Ishihara indices and cervical lordotic angles were measured and recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. RESULTS A total of 64 patients were identified in whom 154 cervical levels were implanted with machined allograft interfacet spacers. Of these, 15 patients underwent anterior-posterior fusions, 4 underwent anterior-posterior-anterior fusions, and the remaining 45 patients underwent posterior-only fusions. In the 45 patients with posterior-only fusions, a total of 110 levels were treated with spacers. There were 14 patients (31%) with a single level treated, 16 patients (36%) with two levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with three levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with four levels treated, 1 patient (2%) with five levels treated, and 4 patients (9%) with six levels treated. Complete radiographic data were available in 38 of 45 patients (84%). On average, radiographic follow-up was obtained at 256.9 days (range 48-524 days

  9. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  10. Cervical incompetence: preliminary evaluation with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Chang, Y C; Cann, C E; Parer, J T

    1990-03-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate cervical incompetence in nonpregnant women was investigated in a prospective study of 41 volunteers referred in random order. These included 20 patients with normal cervices, 11 with cervical incompetence of traumatic or congenital origin, and 10 with clinically small cervices due to in utero diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure. On MR images of the normal patients, cervical length was 33.0 mm +/- 1.0 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and the width of the internal cervical os was 3.3 mm +/- 0.1. In patients with cervical incompetence, the cervical length did not significantly differ from those in the normal group. However, the internal cervical os was significantly wider (4.5 mm +/- 0.3, P less than .001), and localized irregularity of the endocervical canal was demonstrated in two patients. The MR appearance of the cervical stroma varied from normal, uniformly low signal intensity (n = 4) to uniformly (n = 3) or partially (n = 4) medium-to-high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In the patients with in utero DES exposure, the mean length of the cervical canal (22.9 mm +/- 1.7) was significantly shorter than that of the normal group. The width of the internal cervical os and the MR signal intensity of the cervical stroma were normal. In summary, MR findings of a cervical length shorter than 3.1 mm (95% confidence limit), an internal cervical os wider than 4.2 mm (95% confidence limit), or abnormal signal intensity in the cervical stroma are highly suggestive of incompetent cervix and should assist in planning further therapeutic decisions. PMID:2305065

  11. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Sander, Bente Braad; Bonde, Jesper; Rebolj, Matejka

    2014-08-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT) demonstrated that HPV testing provides better protection against cervical cancer than cytology, but it requires extra repeated testing. HPV vaccination RCTs, furthermore, have proved that HPV vaccination protects against vaccine-type high-grade CIN in women vaccinated prior to sexual activity, but less so in women vaccinated later. The challenge now is therefore to find an algorithm for screening of a heterogeneous population including non-vaccinated women; women vaccinated prior to start of sexual activity; and women vaccinated later.

  12. Preface: SciDAC 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, William M., Dr.

    2006-01-01

    The second annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held from June 25-29, 2006 at the new Hyatt Regency Hotel in Denver, Colorado. This conference showcased outstanding SciDAC-sponsored computational science results achieved during the past year across many scientific domains, with an emphasis on science at scale. Exciting computational science that has been accomplished outside of the SciDAC program both nationally and internationally was also featured to help foster communication between SciDAC computational scientists and those funded by other agencies. This was illustrated by many compelling examples of how domain scientists collaborated productively with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to effectively take advantage of terascale computers (capable of performing trillions of calculations per second) not only to accelerate progress in scientific discovery in a variety of fields but also to show great promise for being able to utilize the exciting petascale capabilities in the near future. The SciDAC program was originally conceived as an interdisciplinary computational science program based on the guiding principle that strong collaborative alliances between domain scientists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists are vital to accelerated progress and associated discovery on the world's most challenging scientific problems. Associated verification and validation are essential in this successful program, which was funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE OS) five years ago. As is made clear in many of the papers in these proceedings, SciDAC has fundamentally changed the way that computational science is now carried out in response to the exciting challenge of making the best use of the rapid progress in the emergence of more and more powerful computational platforms. In this regard, Dr. Raymond Orbach, Energy Undersecretary for Science at the DOE and Director of the OS has stated

  13. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  14. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  15. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  18. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  1. The role of the cervical spine in post-concussion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Cameron M; Vernon, Howard; Leddy, John J; Baldwin, Bradley A

    2015-07-01

    While much is known regarding the pathophysiology surrounding concussion injuries in the acute phase, there is little evidence to support many of the theorized etiologies to post-concussion syndrome (PCS); the chronic phase of concussion occurring in ∼ 10-15% of concussed patients. This paper reviews the existing literature surrounding the numerous proposed theories of PCS and introduces another potential, and very treatable, cause of this chronic condition; cervical spine dysfunction due to concomitant whiplash-type injury. We also discuss a short case-series of five patients with diagnosed PCS having very favorable outcomes following various treatment and rehabilitative techniques aimed at restoring cervical spine function. PMID:26138797

  2. The role of the cervical spine in post-concussion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Cameron M; Vernon, Howard; Leddy, John J; Baldwin, Bradley A

    2015-07-01

    While much is known regarding the pathophysiology surrounding concussion injuries in the acute phase, there is little evidence to support many of the theorized etiologies to post-concussion syndrome (PCS); the chronic phase of concussion occurring in ∼ 10-15% of concussed patients. This paper reviews the existing literature surrounding the numerous proposed theories of PCS and introduces another potential, and very treatable, cause of this chronic condition; cervical spine dysfunction due to concomitant whiplash-type injury. We also discuss a short case-series of five patients with diagnosed PCS having very favorable outcomes following various treatment and rehabilitative techniques aimed at restoring cervical spine function.

  3. Successful management of acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).

    PubMed

    Dadone, Liza I; Haussler, Kevin K; Brown, Greg; Marsden, Melanie; Gaynor, James; Johnston, Matthew S; Garelle, Della

    2013-03-01

    A 2-yr-old male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) presented with severe midcervical segmental torticollis upon arrival as an incoming shipment. Despite initial medical management, the giraffe developed marked neck sensitivity, focal muscle spasms, and decreased cervical range of motion. Using operant conditioning to assist patient positioning and tolerance to cervical manipulation, a series of manually applied chiropractic treatments were applied to the affected cervical vertebrae in an effort to restore normal cervical mobility. Laser therapy and cervical range of motion exercises were also used to reduce cervical muscle hypertonicity. The combined application of these nontraditional therapies produced marked clinical improvement. This case highlights the potential benefits of combining traditional medical management with chiropractic treatment and physical therapy techniques for management of severe acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe.

  4. Successful management of acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata).

    PubMed

    Dadone, Liza I; Haussler, Kevin K; Brown, Greg; Marsden, Melanie; Gaynor, James; Johnston, Matthew S; Garelle, Della

    2013-03-01

    A 2-yr-old male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) presented with severe midcervical segmental torticollis upon arrival as an incoming shipment. Despite initial medical management, the giraffe developed marked neck sensitivity, focal muscle spasms, and decreased cervical range of motion. Using operant conditioning to assist patient positioning and tolerance to cervical manipulation, a series of manually applied chiropractic treatments were applied to the affected cervical vertebrae in an effort to restore normal cervical mobility. Laser therapy and cervical range of motion exercises were also used to reduce cervical muscle hypertonicity. The combined application of these nontraditional therapies produced marked clinical improvement. This case highlights the potential benefits of combining traditional medical management with chiropractic treatment and physical therapy techniques for management of severe acute-onset torticollis in a giraffe. PMID:23505724

  5. Invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    La Russa, M; Jeyarajah, A R

    2016-05-01

    Detection of invasive cervical cancer during pregnancy is rare, with reported incidence rates ranging from 0.05% to 0.1%. However, cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies diagnosed during pregnancy. The management of invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy is extremely challenging and requires a multidisciplinary team approach to optimise the treatment for the patient by simultaneously providing the best chance of survival for the foetus. The approach is based mainly on the following factors: gestational age at the time of the diagnosis, stage, histological subtype, desire regarding fertility and quality of life. The gold standard treatment for this condition in pregnancy is not yet established. This is due to the absence of prospective studies and clinical trials. Therefore, its management presents a dilemma that requires individualisation of care. The various factors that need to be considered for obtaining a good outcome for both mother and child are described in this study. PMID:26586539

  6. Cervical cancer: a preventable death.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer kills 260,000 women annually, and nearly 85% of these deaths occur in developing nations, where it is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Disparities of health and poverty play a large role in this high mortality rate. Whereas routine Papanicolaou and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths in Western nations, without proper infrastructure, facilities, and medical training, the rates of cervical cancer in developing nations will remain high. Studies on HPV DNA testing and the low-technology method of "screen and treat" are promising. In addition, reducing the cost and increasing the availability of HPV vaccines in developing nations brings hope and promise to the next generation of women. PMID:20111660

  7. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  8. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    The fourth annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held June 13-18, 2008, in Seattle, Washington. The SciDAC conference series is the premier communitywide venue for presentation of results from the DOE Office of Science's interdisciplinary computational science program. Started in 2001 and renewed in 2006, the DOE SciDAC program is the country's - and arguably the world's - most significant interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of advanced scientific computing methods and their application to fundamental and applied areas of science. SciDAC supports computational science across many disciplines, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, fusion sciences, and nuclear physics. Moreover, the program actively encourages the creation of long-term partnerships among scientists focused on challenging problems and computer scientists and applied mathematicians developing the technology and tools needed to address those problems. The SciDAC program has played an increasingly important role in scientific research by allowing scientists to create more accurate models of complex processes, simulate problems once thought to be impossible, and analyze the growing amount of data generated by experiments. To help further the research community's ability to tap into the capabilities of current and future supercomputers, Under Secretary for Science, Raymond Orbach, launched the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program in 2003. The INCITE program was conceived specifically to seek out computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. The program encourages proposals from universities, other research institutions, and industry. During the first two years of the INCITE program, 10 percent of the resources at NERSC were allocated to INCITE awardees. However, demand for supercomputing resources

  9. Intraspinal Cell Transplantation for Targeting Cervical Ventral Horn in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lepore, Angelo C.

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory compromise due to phrenic motor neuron loss is a debilitating consequence of a large proportion of human traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) cases 1 and is the ultimate cause of death in patients with the motor neuron disorder, amyotrophic laterals sclerosis (ALS) 2. ALS is a devastating neurological disorder that is characterized by relatively rapid degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Patients ultimately succumb to the disease on average 2-5 years following diagnosis because of respiratory paralysis due to loss of phrenic motor neuron innnervation of the diaphragm 3. The vast majority of cases are sporadic, while 10% are of the familial form. Approximately twenty percent of familial cases are linked to various point mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene on chromosome 21 4. Transgenic mice 4,5 and rats 6 carrying mutant human SOD1 genes (G93A, G37R, G86R, G85R) have been generated, and, despite the existence of other animal models of motor neuron loss, are currently the most highly used models of the disease. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a heterogeneous set of conditions resulting from physical trauma to the spinal cord, with functional outcome varying according to the type, location and severity of the injury 7. Nevertheless, approximately half of human SCI cases affect cervical regions, resulting in debilitating respiratory dysfunction due to phrenic motor neuron loss and injury to descending bulbospinal respiratory axons 1. A number of animal models of SCI have been developed, with the most commonly used and clinically-relevant being the contusion 8. Transplantation of various classes of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of traumatic CNS injuries and neurodegeneration, including ALS and SCI, because of the ability to replace lost or dysfunctional CNS cell types, provide neuroprotection, and deliver gene factors of interest 9. Animal models of both ALS and SCI can model many

  10. Spontaneous cervical and mediastinal emphysema.

    PubMed

    Parker, G S; Mosborg, D A; Foley, R W; Stiernberg, C M

    1990-09-01

    Subcutaneous cervical emphysema often appears as a result of surgery or trauma. However, when it occurs spontaneously, the patient may present with clinically impressive and dramatic features. The etiology is related to the rupture of terminal alveoli and dissection of air along the pulmonary vasculature. Exercise may contribute to the process by increases in intrathoracic pressure. Six cases of spontaneous cervical emphysema, all related to SCUBA diving training at a Naval facility, were recently seen at our institution. Proper management entails having a high index of suspicion for diagnosis, and then being able to identify potentially life-threatening complications.

  11. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  12. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  13. Cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Krabak, Brian J; Kanarek, Samantha L

    2011-08-01

    Cervical pain is a common complaint in both the well-conditioned athlete and the weekend warrior. Some injuries are mild in nature, responding to conservative treatment, including rest, medication, physical therapy, and time. However, more serious injuries, especially those involving the cervical spine, can have devastating consequences. Having a comprehensive understanding of the evaluation and management of cervical pain and cervical spine emergencies is crucial for physicians providing coverage for organized athletic events or for those who serve as team physicians. This article reviews the common causes of cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

  14. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  15. Cervical Whiplash: Considerations in the Rehabilitation of Cervical Myofascial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ameis, Arthur

    1986-01-01

    Cervical whiplash, usually the result of impact injuries at high speed, is a typically 20th-century problem. This article describes the biomechanical stresses that result in whiplash and outlines the treatment programs that can be expected to help the patient through the four stages of recovery to achieve functional rehabilitation. PMID:21267293

  16. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  17. Evaluation of optimal electrode configurations for epidural spinal cord stimulation in cervical spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Shah, Prithvi K.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidural spinal cord stimulation is a promising technique for modulating the level of excitability and reactivation of dormant spinal neuronal circuits after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined the ability of chronically implanted epidural stimulation electrodes within the cervical spinal cord to (1) directly elicit spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEPs) in forelimb muscles and (2) determine whether these sMEPs can serve as a biomarker of forelimb motor function after SCI. New method We implanted EMG electrodes in forelimb muscles and epidural stimulation electrodes at C6 and C8 in adult rats. After recovering from a dorsal funiculi crush (C4), rats were tested with different stimulation configurations and current intensities to elicit sMEPs and determined forelimb grip strength. Results: sMEPs were evoked in all muscles tested and their characteristics were dependent on electrode configurations and current intensities. C6(−) stimulation elicited more robust sMEPs than stimulation at C8(−). Stimulating C6 and C8 simultaneously produced better muscle recruitment and higher grip strengths than stimulation at one site. Comparison with existing method(s) Classical method to select the most optimal stimulation configuration is to empirically test each combination individually for every subject and relate to functional improvements. This approach is impractical, requiring extensively long experimental time to determine the more effective stimulation parameters. Our proposed method is fast and physiologically sound. Conclusions Results suggest that sMEPs from forelimb muscles can be useful biomarkers for identifying optimal parameters for epidural stimulation of the cervical spinal cord after SCI. PMID:25791014

  18. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yan, Deng-lu; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors' clinic and treated by PCN. The patients' gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 +/- 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3-4, 30 cases at C4-5, 40 cases at C5-6, and 35 cases at C6-7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) > or =11 degrees or horizontal displacement (HD) > or =3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  19. [Cervical pessary and prevention of preterm birth].

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, L; Descamps, P; Legendre, G

    2014-01-01

    Cervical pessary is a promising tool to prevent preterm birth in high risk pregnant women with shortened midtrimester ultrasonographic cervical length. It is well tolerated by women. PECEP and ProTWIN trials have opened new fields of clinical research. Their results suggest that cervical pessary may prevent preterm birth in women with (i) singleton and cervical length ≤25 mm at 18-22weeks, and with (ii) twins and cervical length ≤37mm at 16-22weeks. These results must be confirmed by other randomized controlled trial before a generalization of cervical pessary in these situations. The role of cervical pessary in the existing strategies to prevent birth (progesterone, cerclage or combinations thereof) has to be determined.

  20. Acquired cervical spinal arachnoid diverticulum in a cat.

    PubMed

    Adams, R J; Garosi, L; Matiasek, K; Lowrie, M

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, female entire, domestic, shorthair cat presented with acute onset non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with a C3-C4 acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion and the cat was treated conservatively. The cat was able to walk after 10 days and was normal 2 months after presentation. The cat was referred five and a half years later for investigation of an insidious onset 3-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine was repeated, demonstrating a spinal arachnoid diverticulum at C3 causing marked focal compression of the spinal cord. This was treated surgically with hemilaminectomy and durectomy. The cat improved uneventfully and was discharged 12 days later.

  1. Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis Treated with Tooth Extractions following Mediastinal and Cervical Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Minoru; Suzuki, Okihide; Nasu, Daisuke; Koizumi, Kazue; Muta, Yu; Imaizumi, Hideko; Ishiguro, Toru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rare condition in which oropharyngeal infection spreads to the mediastinum via the cervical fascia. Delayed diagnosis and surgery result in a high mortality rate among patients with DNM. We present a case of DNM resulting from odontogenic infection treated successfully with tooth extraction following mediastinal and cervical drainage. A 43-year-old, previously healthy Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of acute mediastinitis. Computed tomography revealed gas collection around the mid-thoracic esophagus and bilateral pleural effusion. We performed mediastinal drainage via right thoracotomy. Cervicotomy was performed on postoperative day 14 to drain a residual cervical abscess. The patient required the extraction of ten teeth over three procedures to address primary odontogenic infection before his fever resolved on postoperative day 40. Prompt diagnosis, aggressive drainage and removal of the source of infection can improve survival among patients with this life-threatening disease. PMID:26600767

  2. Post-traumatic upper cervical subluxation visualized by MRI: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Demetrious, James

    2007-01-01

    Background This paper describes MRI findings of upper cervical subluxation due to alar ligament disruption following a vehicular collision. Incidental findings included the presence of a myodural bridge and a spinal cord syrinx. Chiropractic management of the patient is discussed. Case presentation A 21-year old female presented with complaints of acute, debilitating upper neck pain with unremitting sub-occipital headache and dizziness following a vehicular collision. Initial emergency department and neurologic investigations included x-ray and CT evaluation of the head and neck. Due to persistent pain, the patient sought chiropractic care. MRI of the upper cervical spine revealed previously unrecognized clinical entities. Conclusion This case highlights the identification of upper cervical ligamentous injury that produced vertebral subluxation following a traumatic incident. MRI evaluation provided visualization of previously undetected injury. The patient experienced improvement through chiropractic care. PMID:18093309

  3. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  5. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  7. Learning by Creating and Exchanging Objects: The SCY Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Ton; Van Joolingen, Wouter R.; Giemza, Adam; Girault, Isabelle; Hoppe, Ulrich; Kindermann, Jorg; Kluge, Anders; Lazonder, Ard W.; Vold, Vibeke; Weinberger, Armin; Weinbrenner, Stefan; Wichmann, Astrid; Anjewierden, Anjo; Bodin, Marjolaine; Bollen, Lars; D'Ham, Cedric; Dolonen, Jan; Engler, Jan; Geraedts, Caspar; Grosskreutz, Henrik; Hovardas, Tasos; Julien, Rachel; Lechner, Judith; Ludvigsen, Sten; Matteman, Yuri; Meistadt, Oyvind; Naess, Bjorge; Ney, Muriel; Pedaste, Margus; Perritano, Anthony; Rinket, Marieke; Von Schlanbusch, Henrik; Sarapuu, Tago; Schulz, Florian; Sikken, Jakob; Slotta, Jim; Toussaint, Jeremy; Verkade, Alex; Wajeman, Claire; Wasson, Barbara; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Van Der Zanden, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Science Created by You (SCY) is a project on learning in science and technology domains. SCY uses a pedagogical approach that centres around products, called "emerging learning objects" (ELOs) that are created by students. Students work individually and collaboratively in SCY-Lab (the general SCY learning environment) on "missions" that are guided…

  8. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injury Revealed by Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Wu, Guangyao; Zhou, Xin; Li, Jielan; Wen, Zhi; Lin, Fuchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity. Results Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores. Conclusion Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as

  9. Thromboembolism in the Sub-Acute Phase of Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Belci, Maurizio; Van Middendorp, Joost J; Al Halabi, Ahmed; Meagher, Tom M

    2016-01-01

    To review the evidence of thromboembolism incidence and prophylaxis in the sub-acute phase of spinal cord injury (SCI) 3–6 months post injury. All observational and experimental studies with any length of follow-up and no limitations on language or publication status published up to March 2015 were included. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes studied were incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the sub-acute phase of SCI. The secondary outcome was type of thromboprophylaxis. Our search identified 4305 references and seven articles that met the inclusion criteria. Five papers reported PE events and three papers reported DVT events in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Studies were heterogeneous in populations, design and outcome reporting, therefore a meta-analysis was not performed. The included studies report a PE incidence of 0.5%–6.0% and DVT incidence of 2.0%–8.0% in the sub-acute phase of SCI. Thromboprophylaxis was poorly reported. Spinal patients continue to have a significant risk of PE and DVT after the acute period of their injury. Clinicians are advised to have a low threshold for suspecting venous thromboembolism in the sub-acute phase of SCI and to continue prophylactic anticoagulation therapy for a longer period of time. PMID:27790330

  10. Anterior decompression, fusion and plating in cervical spine injury: Early experience in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogungbo, Biodun

    2011-01-01

    Background: We present a review of the results of the current surgical management of acute cervical spine injuries in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. This is the first detailed retrospective study on the surgical management of patients with cervical spine injuries from Nigeria. Methods: The medical reports of patients with traumatic cervical spine and spinal cord injuries undergoing surgery from 1 August 2009 till 30 August 2010 were reviewed. Management and early results of outcome were ascertained and detailed consecutively in a prospective Microsoft Office Access® database (Microsoft Group of Companies). Frankel grading was used for pre- and immediate post-operative evaluation (within 48 hours). The Barthel index (BI) was used to classify patients as dependent or independent at follow-up. Results: Twenty consecutive patients presented with acute cervical spine and spinal cord injuries since August 2009. Twenty anterior cervical spine decompression and fixation with an iliac graft and an anterior cervical plate (ACDF) were performed in 18 patients. All operations were performed with general anaesthesia using standard techniques but without a microscope or a high speed drill. Of the 18 patients who were operated, 4 patients died within a short period following surgical intervention. Seven patients have made a full recovery and seven remain fully dependent. Only two of the dependent quadriplegic patients have become reintegrated back into the society. Conclusion: The management of spinal cord injuries in Abuja is evolving. The operations were performed adequately with much limited complement of equipment. Poor intensive care therapy is a major challenge and improvements in this area of care will likely lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:22140641

  11. Respiratory function following bilateral mid-cervical contusion injury in the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Michael A.; Lee, Kun-Ze; Salazar, Krystal; O’Steen, Barbara E.; Bloom, David C.; Fuller, David D.; Reier, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The consequences of spinal cord injury (SCI) are often viewed as the result of white matter damage. However, injuries occurring at any spinal level, especially in cervical and lumbar enlargement regions, also entail segmental neuronal loss. Yet, the contributions of gray matter injury and plasticity to functional outcomes are poorly understood. The present study addressed this issue by investigating changes in respiratory function following bilateral C3/C4 contusion injuries at the level of the phoenix motoneuron (PhMN) pool which in the adult rat extends from C3–C5/6 and provides innervation to the diaphragm. Despite extensive white and gray matter pathology associated with two magnitudes of injury severity, ventilation was relatively unaffected during both quiet breathing and respiratory challenge (hypercapnia). On the other hand, bilateral diaphragm EMG recordings revealed that the ability to increase diaphragm activity during respiratory challenge was substantially, and chronically, impaired. This deficit has not been seen following predominantly white matter lesions at higher cervical levels. Thus, the impact of gray matter damage relative to PhMNs and/or interneurons becomes evident during conditions associated with increased respiratory drive. Unaltered ventilatory behavior, despite significant deficits in diaphragm function, suggests compensatory neuroplasticity involving recruitment of other spinal respiratory networks which may entail remodeling of connections. Transynaptic tracing, using pseudorabies virus (PRV), revealed changes in PhMN-related interneuronal labeling rostral to the site of injury, thus offering insight into the potential anatomical reorganization and spinal plasticity following cervical contusion. PMID:21963673

  12. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  13. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging. PMID:27273940

  14. Optimizing Speech Production in the Ventilator-Assisted Individual Following Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBean, Naomi; Ward, Elizabeth; Murdoch, Bruce; Cahill, Louise; Solley, Maura; Geraghty, Timothy; Hukins, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation is commonly used during the acute management of cervical spinal cord injury, and is required on an ongoing basis in the majority of patients with injuries at or above C3. However, to date there have been limited systematic investigations of the options available to improve speech while ventilator-assisted…

  15. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  16. Multiple Cerebral Infarctions due to Unilateral Traumatic Vertebral Artery Dissection after Cervical Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Youl; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of multiple symptomatic cerebral infarctions from a traumatic vertebral artery dissection (VAD) after cervical fractures. A 73-year-old man was admitted with stuporous mentality and left hemiparesis after a motor-vehicle accident. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan at admission showed a traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage on the left parietal lobe. A cervical CT scan showed left lateral mass fractures on C2, C5, and C6, involving the transverse foramen. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of signal void on the left vertebral artery. Neck CT angiography showed left VAD starting at the C5 level. Brain MRI revealed acute, multiple cerebral infarctions involving the pons, midbrain, thalamus, corpus callosum, and parietal and frontal lobes on diffusion weighted images. The patient was treated conservatively at the intensive care unit in the acute stage to prevent extent of stroke. Aspirin was started for antiplatelet therapy in the chronic stage. The possibility of symptomatic cerebral infarctions due to traumatic VAD following cervical fracture should be considered. PMID:27182500

  17. Pathogenic characterization of a cervical lymph node derived from a patient with Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Katano, Harutaka; Sato, Seiichi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kinumaki, Akiko; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Sato, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of multisystem vasculitis in childhood. Although cervical lymphadenitis is one of the major symptoms in KD, lymph node biopsy is rarely performed, because KD is usually diagnosed by clinical symptoms. A cervical lymph node biopsy was taken from a girl aged 1 year and 8 months who had suspected lymphoma, but she was diagnosed with KD after the biopsy. The cervical lymph node specimen was analyzed with multivirus real-time PCR that can detect >160 viruses, and unbiased direct sequencing with a next-generation DNA sequencer to detect potential pathogens in the lymph node. Histologically, focal necrosis with inflammatory cell infiltration, including neutrophils and macrophages, was observed in the marginal zone of the cervical lymph node, which was compatible with the acute phase of KD. Multivirus real-time PCR detected a low copy number of torque teno virus in the sample. Comprehensive direct sequencing of the cervical lymph node biopsy sample sequenced more than 8 million and 3 million reads from DNA and RNA samples, respectively. Bacterial genomes were detected in 0.03% and 1.79% of all reads in DNA and RNA samples, respectively. Although many reads corresponded to genomes of bacterial environmental microorganisms, Streptococcus spp. genome was detected in both DNA (77 reads) and RNA (2,925 reads) samples. Further studies are required to reveal any association of microbial or viral infection with the pathogenesis of KD. PMID:23071864

  18. Variation in emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Vandemheen, K; Laupacis, A; Brison, R; Eisenhauer, M A; Greenberg, G H; MacPhail, I; McKnight, R D; Reardon, M; Verbeek, R; Worthington, J; Lesiuk, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To, assess the emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable adult trauma patients in terms of utilization, yield for injury and variation in practices among hospitals and physicians. DESIGN: Retrospective survey of health records. SETTING: Emergency departments of 6 teaching and 2 community hospitals in Ontario and British Columbia. PATIENTS: Consecutive alert, stable adult trauma patients seen with potential cervical spine injury between July 1, 1994, and June 30, 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total number of eligible patients, referral for cervical spine radiography (overall, by hospital and by physician), presence of cervical spine injury, patient characteristics and hospitals associated with use of radiography. RESULTS: Of 6855 eligible patients, cervical spine radiography was ordered for 3979 (58.0%). Only 60 (0.9%) patients were found to have an acute cervical spine injury (fracture, dislocation or ligamentous instability); 98.5% of the radiographic films were negative for any significant abnormality. The demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were similar across the 8 hospitals, and no cervical spine injuries were missed. Significant variation was found among the 8 hospitals in the rate of ordering radiography (p < 0.0001), from a low of 37.0% to a high of 72.5%. After possible differences in case severity and patient characteristics at each hospital were controlled for, logistic regression analysis revealed that 6 of the hospitals were significantly associated with the use of radiography. At 7 hospitals, there was significant variation in the rate of ordering radiography among the attending emergency physicians (p < 0.05), from a low of 15.6% to a high of 91.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite considerable variation among institutions and individual physicians in the ordering of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients with similar characteristics, no cervical spine injuries were missed. The

  19. Epidemiology of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A; Fraumeni, J F

    1986-01-01

    The epidemiology of cervical cancer presents a number of unique challenges, mainly with respect to disentangling correlated factors and to elucidating biological mechanisms. The available evidence suggests a complex multifactorial etiology, although the relative contributions of risk factors and their interactions remain obscure. Infectious agents are strongly suspected, but as yet not conclusively identified. It is also unclear whether there are subgroups of women or periods of life that are most susceptible to the action of infectious agents, and the contribution of the "male factor" needs to be defined. Several epidemiologic leads can be pursued through biochemical and molecular techniques. Most promising is the recent evidence linking certain HPV types to cervical abnormalities, including cancer, and newly developed probes can be incorporated into epidemiologic studies to evaluate an array of risk factors. Endocrine and metabolic assays may be helpful in clarifying the role of exogenous and possibly endogenous hormones. The effects of cigarette smoking may be further evaluated by studying constituents of tobacco smoke and their metabolites in cervical mucus. Finally, the relationship of diet to cervical cancer should be assessed by examining the levels of micronutrients, trace minerals, and other nutritional indices in body tissues and fluids, as well as through interview data. An understanding of cervical cancer etiology will require a better identification of risk factors for precursor lesions as well as factors that enhance their progression to invasive cancer. Through studies that focus on disease stage and time-related events, it should be possible to clarify the multi-stage processes involved in cervical carcinogenesis, and those factors that may inhibit as well as promote transition rates. The protective effects of screening programs deserve further attention, and research into dietary factors may lead in time to nutritional intervention. Investigation

  20. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  1. Cervical spondylosis and hypertension: a clinical study of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  2. What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for cervical cancer What`s new in cervical cancer research and treatment? New ways to prevent and treat ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  3. Preface: SciDAC 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    On 26-30 June 2005 at the Grand Hyatt on Union Square in San Francisco several hundred computational scientists from around the world came together for what can certainly be described as a celebration of computational science. Scientists from the SciDAC Program and scientists from other agencies and nations were joined by applied mathematicians and computer scientists to highlight the many successes in the past year where computation has led to scientific discovery in a variety of fields: lattice quantum chromodynamics, accelerator modeling, chemistry, biology, materials science, Earth and climate science, astrophysics, and combustion and fusion energy science. Also highlighted were the advances in numerical methods and computer science, and the multidisciplinary collaboration cutting across science, mathematics, and computer science that enabled these discoveries. The SciDAC Program was conceived and funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Science. It is the Office of Science's premier computational science program founded on what is arguably the perfect formula: the priority and focus is science and scientific discovery, with the understanding that the full arsenal of `enabling technologies' in applied mathematics and computer science must be brought to bear if we are to have any hope of attacking and ultimately solving today's computational Grand Challenge problems. The SciDAC Program has been in existence for four years, and many of the computational scientists funded by this program will tell you that the program has given them the hope of addressing their scientific problems in full realism for the very first time. Many of these scientists will also tell you that SciDAC has also fundamentally changed the way they do computational science. We begin this volume with one of DOE's great traditions, and core missions: energy research. As we will see, computation has been seminal to the critical advances that have been made in this arena. Of course, to

  4. Acute torticollis secondary to rupture of the sternocleidomastoid.

    PubMed

    Schuyler-Hacker, H; Green, R; Wingate, L; Sklar, J

    1989-11-01

    Trauma to the neck musculature and cervical spine is frequently caused by hyperextension injuries which may result in muscular spasm or rupture. Partial rupture of the sternocleidomastoid muscle with subsequent formation of a fibrotic band is an unusual cause of acute torticollis. The case of a 21-year-old man who developed an acute torticollis and cervical pain after a motor vehicle accident is presented. Computed tomography scan demonstrated 75% rupture of the left sternocleidomastoid muscle with fibrotic band replacing the absent muscle tissue. Neck range of motion was markedly decreased. The patient underwent a trial of muscle relaxants and intensive physical therapy with no significant improvement. Surgical release of the residual fibrotic band was performed, and the left deviation of the neck was reduced from 25 degrees preoperatively to 5 degrees postoperatively. With surgical release and intensive postoperative physical therapy, the patient regained full motion and strength of the cervical spine musculature.

  5. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  6. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  7. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  8. [Inequalities in cervical screening practices].

    PubMed

    Döbrőssy, Lajos; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András

    2015-06-14

    Theoretically, the cytology-based cervical screening is capable of early detection of precancerous epithelial lesions of cervix uteri and its cancer, and of early referral to treatment. In this way, screening can inmprove the quality of life of the patients and reduce mortality from the target disease. Unfortunately, this often remains unexploited, because there might be inequalities on both "supply" and "demand" side of screening. In addition to the geopolitical situation of a country, inequalities might result from differences in the health care systems, and heavy access to the screening services. On the other hand, the socioeconomic status, the health-conciousness of the target population, and their knowledge and information of the benefits and potential harms of screening examination might have a bearing on the acceptance or refusal of the offered screening. Efforts need to be made to increase the uptake of cervical screening programmes.

  9. Cervical teratoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, N E; Pearson, J

    2001-03-01

    A young adult boxer dog was examined for a painless swelling in the left cranial cervical area that was refractory to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound examination revealed a hypoechoic mass abutting the rostrolateral aspect of the left mandibular salivary gland. The cystic mass was excised and was found to extend through the capsule of the salivary gland and appeared to be confluent with the glandular tissue at this point. Histopathological examination of the excised tissue demonstrated tissue from all 3 germinal layers. There was no indication of malignancy and the mass was diagnosed as a benign cervical teratoma. Hypotheses regarding the origin of teratomas in general are discussed and the origin of the teratoma in this case is suggested.

  10. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qizhi, Sun; Peijia, Li; Lei, Sun; Junsheng, Chen; Jianmin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45–75 years). Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI), swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months). The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup (P < 0.01). The NDI score was significantly decreased from preoperative 13.06 to postoperative 3.35 (P < 0.01). The operation also provided a significant increase in the cervical lordosis (P < 0.01) from preoperative 10.17° to postoperative 17.06°. The fusion rate was 94.1% at 6 months postoperatively, and 100% at 12 months after surgery. The mean SWAL-QOL score decreased from preoperative 68.06 to immediate postoperatively 65.65 and then increased to 67.65 at final followup

  11. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  12. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  13. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

  14. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  15. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. PMID:25752817

  16. Clinical technique for invasive cervical root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Martos, Josué; Piovesan, Edno Moacir; César Neto, João Batista

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an external invasive cervical resorption. A 17-year-old female patient had a confirmed diagnosis of invasive cervical resorption class 4 by cone beam computerized tomography. Although, there was no communication with the root canal, the invasive resorption process was extending into the cervical and middle third of the root. The treatment of the cervical resorption of the lateral incisor interrupted the resorptive process and restored the damaged root surface and the dental functions without any esthetic sequelae. Both the radiographic examination and computed tomography are imperative to reveal the extent of the defect in the differential diagnosis. PMID:22144822

  17. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  18. Amphetamine-Enhanced Motor Training after Cervical Contusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Krisa, Laura; Frederick, Kelly L.; Canver, John C.; Stackhouse, Scott K.; Shumsky, Jed S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Individually, motor training, pharmacological interventions, and housing animals in an enriched environment (EE) following spinal cord injury (SCI) result in limited functional improvement but, when combined, may enhance motor function. Here, we tested amphetamine (AMPH)-enhanced skilled motor training following a unilateral C3–C4 contusion injury on the qualitative components of reaching and on skilled forelimb function, as assessed using single-pellet and staircase reaching tasks. Kinematic analysis evaluated the quality of the reach, and unskilled locomotor function was also tested. Animals receiving AMPH and skilled forelimb training performed better than operated control animals on qualitative reaching, but not on skilled reaching. Those that received the combination treatment and were housed in EE cages showed significantly less improvement in qualitative reaching and grasping. Kinematic analysis revealed a decrease in digit abduction during skilled reaching among all groups, with no differences among groups. Kinematics provided no evidence that improved function was related to improved quality of reach. There was no evidence of neuroprotection in the cervical spinal cord. The absence of evidence for kinematic improvement or neuroprotection suggested that AMPH-enhanced motor training is due primarily to supraspinal effects, an enhancement of attention during skilled motor training, or plasticity in supraspinal circuitry involved with motor control. PMID:21651384

  19. Delayed Post-Injury Administration of Riluzole Is Neuroprotective in a Preclinical Rodent Model of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongchao; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Teng, Yang; Chow, Diana S.-L.; Buttigieg, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Riluzole, a sodium/glutamate antagonist has shown promise as a neuroprotective agent. It is licensed for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and is in clinical trial development for spinal cord injury (SCI). This study investigated the therapeutic time-window and pharmacokinetics of riluzole in a rodent model of cervical SCI. Rats were treated with riluzole (8 mg/kg) at 1 hour (P1) and 3 hours (P3) after injury or with vehicle. Afterward, P1 and P3 groups received riluzole (6 (mg/kg) every 12 hours for 7 days. Both P1 and P3 animals had significant improvements in locomotor recovery as measured by open field locomotion (BBB score, BBB subscore). Von Frey stimuli did not reveal an increase in at level or below level mechanical allodynia. Sensory-evoked potential recordings and quantification of axonal cytoskeleton demonstrated a riluzole-mediated improvement in axonal integrity and function. Histopathological and retrograde tracing studies demonstrated that delayed administration leads to tissue preservation and reduces apoptosis and inflammation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was undertaken to examine the pharmacokinetics of riluzole. Riluzole penetrates the spinal cord in 15 min, and SCI slowed elimination of riluzole from the spinal cord, resulting in a longer half-life and higher drug concentration in spinal cord and plasma. Initiation of riluzole treatment 1 and 3 hours post-SCI led to functional, histological, and molecular benefits. While extrapolation of post-injury time windows from rat to man is challenging, evidence from SCI-related biomarker studies would suggest that the post-injury time window is likely to be at least 12 hours in man. PMID:23517137

  20. Comparison of the Using Ability Between a Smartphone and a Conventional Mobile Phone in People With Cervical Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongkyu; Kim, Ji Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ability of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the use mobile cellular devices, especially the smartphone. Methods Seventeen people with motor complete cervical SCI participated in the study. The assist-devices deemed most fitting were introduced to the patients: a mouth stick, multifunctional splint, activities of daily living (ADL) splint, universal cuff or none of the above. To determine the effective devices, a Multi-Directional Click Test (MDCT), Phone Number Test (PNT), and individual satisfaction inquiry were used. The most appropriate assist device was selected by MDCT. Subsequently PNT and individual satisfaction inquiry were performed with the conventional model and compared. Results Those with C4 cord injury chose mouth stick. Those with C5 cord injury chose multifunctional splint (3 people) and ADL splint (2 people). Those with C6 cord injury chose universal cuff (3 people) or bare hands only. Those with C7 cord injury chose universal cuff (3 people). With a smartphone, all participants were able to complete the PNT. With a conventional model, only twelve participants (71%) were able to complete the same test. While it took 26.8±6.8 seconds with a conventional model to complete PNT, the same test took 18.8±10.9 seconds to complete with a smartphone (p<0.05). Overall, participants expressed higher satisfaction when using a smartphone. Conclusion The results offer a practical insight into the appropriate assist devices for SCI patients who wish to use mobile cellular devices, particularly smartphones. When the SCI patients are given the use of a smartphone with the appropriate assist devices, the SCI patients are expected to access mobile cellular device faster and with more satisfaction. PMID:24855612

  1. Forced Exercise as a Rehabilitation Strategy after Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R.; Izzi, Jessica; Shumsky, Jed S.; Zhukareva, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of locomotor training after spinal cord injury (SCI) has primarily focused on hind limb recovery, with evidence of functional and molecular changes in response to exercise. Since trauma at a cervical (C) level is common in human SCI, we used a unilateral C4 contusion injury model in rats to determine whether forced exercise (Ex) would affect spinal cord biochemistry, anatomy, and recovery of fore and hind limb function. SCI was created with the Infinite Horizon spinal cord impactor device at C4 with a force of 200 Kdyne and a mean displacement of 1600–1800 μm in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats that had been acclimated to a motorized exercise wheel apparatus. Five days post-operatively, the treated group began Ex on the wheel for 20 min per day, 5 days per week for 8 weeks. Wheel speed was increased daily according to the abilities of each animal up to 14 m/min. Control rats were handled daily but were not exposed to Ex. In one set of animals experiencing 5 days of Ex, there was a moderate increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and heat shock protein–27 (HSP-27) levels in the lesion epicenter and surrounding tissue. Long-term (8 weeks) survival groups were exposed to weekly behavioral tests to assess qualitative aspects of fore limb and hind limb locomotion (fore limb scale, FLS and BBB [Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale]), as well as sensorimotor (grid) and motor (grip) skills. Biweekly assessment of performance during wheel walking examined gross and fine motor skills. The FLS indicated a significant benefit of Ex during weeks 2–4. The BBB test showed no change with Ex at the end of the 8-week period, however hind limb grid performance was improved during weeks 2–4. Lesion size was not affected by Ex, but the presence of phagocytic and reactive glial cells was reduced with Ex as an intervention. These results suggest that Ex alone can influence the evolution of the injury and transiently

  2. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  3. [SciELO: method for electronic publishing].

    PubMed

    Laerte Packer, A; Rocha Biojone, M; Antonio, I; Mayumi Takemaka, R; Pedroso García, A; Costa da Silva, A; Toshiyuki Murasaki, R; Mylek, C; Carvalho Reisl, O; Rocha F Delbucio, H C

    2001-01-01

    It describes the SciELO Methodology Scientific Electronic Library Online for electronic publishing of scientific periodicals, examining issues such as the transition from traditional printed publication to electronic publishing, the scientific communication process, the principles which founded the methodology development, its application in the building of the SciELO site, its modules and components, the tools use for its construction etc. The article also discusses the potentialities and trends for the area in Brazil and Latin America, pointing out questions and proposals which should be investigated and solved by the methodology. It concludes that the SciELO Methodology is an efficient, flexible and wide solution for the scientific electronic publishing.

  4. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  5. Incidence of deep vein thrombosis after spinal cord injury in Korean patients at acute rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Do, Jong Geol; Kim, Du Hwan; Sung, Duk Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) remain significant causes of morbidity, mortality in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Since incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean population has not been much studied, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 185 SCI patients admitted for acute rehabilitation unit to investigate the incidence of DVT. Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed to screen for the occurrence of DVT at the time of initial presentation to acute rehabilitation unit. Primary study outcome was the incidence of DVT. Possible risk factors for DVT including the epidemiologic characteristics, completeness of motor paralysis, cause of injury, spasticity, surgery, and active cancer were analyzed. The incidence of DVT after SCI was 27.6%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, absence of spasticity was a significant independent risk factor (P<0.05) for occurrence of DVT. Symptomatic pulmonary embolism was evident in 7 patients without an episode of sudden death. Therefore, it is concluded that the incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean patients is comparable with that in Western populations. This result suggests that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered in Korean patients with SCI.

  6. Relationship of Specific Bacteria in the Cervical and Vaginal Microbiotas with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Morgan, Martin T.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; McClelland, R. Scott; Fredricks, David N.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervicitis is an inflammatory condition of the cervix associated with upper genital tract infection and reproductive complications. Although cervicitis can be caused by several known pathogens, the etiology frequently remains obscure. Here we investigate vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis as potential causes of cervicitis. Methods Associations between vaginal bacteria and cervicitis were assessed in a retrospective case control study of women attending a Seattle STD clinic. Individual bacterial species were detected using two molecular methods: quantitative PCR (qPCR) and broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing. The primary finding from this initial study was evaluated using qPCR in a second cohort of Kenyan women. Results The presence of Mageeibacillus indolicus, formerly BVAB3, in the cervix was associated with cervicitis, while the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii was inversely associated. Quantities of these bacteria did not differ between cervicitis cases and controls, though in a model inclusive of presence and abundance, M. indolicus remained significantly associated with cervicitis after adjustment for other cervicitis-causing pathogens. M. indolicus was not associated with cervicitis in our study of Kenyan women, possibly due to differences in the clinical definition of cervicitis. Conclusions Colonization of the endocervix with M. indolicus may contribute to the clinical manifestations of cervicitis, but further study is needed to determine whether this finding is repeatable and applicable to diverse groups of women. Colonization of the cervix with L. jensenii could be a marker of health, perhaps reducing inflammation or inhibiting pathogenic infection. PMID:26267872

  7. 18F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    von Leden, Ramona E.; Selwyn, Reed G.; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M.; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel bio-marker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24 hours and 15 days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6 hours post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24 hours and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target. PMID:27084688

  8. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting to ... a “complete” and “incomplete” spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ...

  9. Accelerating Scientific Analysis with SciDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, L.; Faham, C. H.; Yao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    SciDB is an open-source analytical database for scalable complex analytics on very large array or multi-structured data from a variety of sources, programmable from Python and R. It runs on HPC, commodity hardware grids, or in a cloud and can manage and analyze terabytes of array-structured data and do complex analytics in-database. We present an overall description of the SciDB framework and describe its implementation at NERSC at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A case study using SciDB to analyze data from the LUX dark matter detector is described and future plans for a large SciDB array at NERSC are described.

  10. Bilateral cervical ribs in a Dobermann Pinscher.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Gernone, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old intact female Doberman Pinscher was presented with the complaint of non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Clinical and neurological examination revealed a caudal cervical spinal cord disfunction (C6-T2 spinal cord segments). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings of the cervical spine were consistent with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). During the diagnostic work-up for the cervical spine, bilateral bone anomalies involving the seventh cervical vertebra and the first ribs were found on radiographs and CT examination. The rib anomalies found in this dog appear similar to cervical ribs widely described in human medicine. In people, cervical ribs are associated with a high rate of stillbirth, early childhood cancer, and can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome, characterized by neurovascular compression at level of superior aperture of the chest. In dogs, only some sporadic anatomopathological descriptions of cervical ribs exist. In this report the radiographic and CT findings of these particular vertebral and rib anomalies along with their relationships with adjacent vasculature and musculature are shown intravitam in a dog. Specific radiographic and CT findings described in this report may help in reaching a presumptive diagnosis of this anomaly. Finally, their clinical and evolutionary significance are discussed.

  11. Surgical Management of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wesley; Dorsi, Michael J.; Witham, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common degenerative condition that is a significant cause of morbidity. This review discusses the pathophysiology and natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and focuses on the current literature evaluating the clinical management of these patients. PMID:20191085

  12. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  13. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  14. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized. PMID:27479833

  15. Preface: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Rick

    2008-07-01

    The fourth annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Conference was held June 13-18, 2008, in Seattle, Washington. The SciDAC conference series is the premier communitywide venue for presentation of results from the DOE Office of Science's interdisciplinary computational science program. Started in 2001 and renewed in 2006, the DOE SciDAC program is the country's - and arguably the world's - most significant interdisciplinary research program supporting the development of advanced scientific computing methods and their application to fundamental and applied areas of science. SciDAC supports computational science across many disciplines, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, fusion sciences, and nuclear physics. Moreover, the program actively encourages the creation of long-term partnerships among scientists focused on challenging problems and computer scientists and applied mathematicians developing the technology and tools needed to address those problems. The SciDAC program has played an increasingly important role in scientific research by allowing scientists to create more accurate models of complex processes, simulate problems once thought to be impossible, and analyze the growing amount of data generated by experiments. To help further the research community's ability to tap into the capabilities of current and future supercomputers, Under Secretary for Science, Raymond Orbach, launched the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program in 2003. The INCITE program was conceived specifically to seek out computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. The program encourages proposals from universities, other research institutions, and industry. During the first two years of the INCITE program, 10 percent of the resources at NERSC were allocated to INCITE awardees. However, demand for supercomputing resources

  16. SciVal Experts: a collaborative tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily; Feddern-Bekcan, Tanya; Moore, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SciVal Experts is a resource for finding experts and fostering collaboration. The tool creates researcher profiles with automatically updated publication and grant information and faculty-inputted curriculum vitae, more fully capturing a researcher's body of work. SciVal Experts indexes campus-based "experts" by research topic, allowing faculty to find potential research partners and mentors, furthering translational research opportunities and dissemination of knowledge.

  17. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  18. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  19. Cervical Vertebral Body Chordoma in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Hampel, R; Taylor-Brown, F; Priestnall, S L

    2016-05-01

    A 9-year-old, neutered female Maine Coon cat with a 6-week history of progressive ataxia was diagnosed with a cervical vertebral body mass using magnetic resonance imaging. The mass displaced and compressed the cervical spinal cord. The cat was humanely destroyed and necropsy examination confirmed a mass within the second cervical vertebral body. Microscopically, the mass was composed of large, clear, vacuolated ('physaliferous') cells. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin and the final diagnosis was a cervical, vertebral body chordoma. This is only the third report of a chordoma in this species and the first in this location. Chordoma should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for tumours arising from the cervical vertebrae in the cat.

  20. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  1. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance. PMID:26136407

  2. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance. PMID:26136407

  3. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael; Cho, Samuel Kang-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  4. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Dugoni, D.E.; Mancarella, C.; Landi, A.; Tarantino, R.; Ruggeri, A.G.; Delfini, R.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cervical kyphosis is a progressive cervical sagittal plane deformity that may cause a reduction in the ability to look horizontally, breathing and swallowing difficulties, sense of thoracic oppression and social isolation. Moreover, cervical kyphosis can cause myelopathy due to a direct compression by osteo-articular structures on the spinal cord or to a transitory ischaemic injury. The treatment of choice is surgery. The goals of surgery are: nervous structures decompression, cervical and global sagittal balance correction and vertebral stabilization and fusion. PRESENTATION OF CASE In October 2008 a 35 years old woman underwent surgical removal of a cervical-bulbar ependymoma with C1–C5 laminectomy and a C2–C5 laminoplasty. Five months after surgery, the patient developed a kyphotic posture, with intense neck and scapular girdle pain. The patients had a flexible cervical kyphosis. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior surgical approach. We performed a corpectomy C4–C5 in order to achieve the anterior decompression; we placed a titanium expansion mesh. DISCUSSION Cervical kyphosis can be flexible or fixed. Some authors have reported the use of anterior surgery only for flexible cervical kyphosis as discectomy and corpectomy. This approach is useful for anterior column load sharing however it is not required for deformity correction. CONCLUSION The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability. PMID:25462050

  5. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  6. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os by cervical insertion of...

  7. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  8. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  9. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  10. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  11. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  12. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  13. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  14. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  15. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  16. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  17. The Effect of the PEEK Cage on the Cervical Lordosis in Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gulsen, Salih

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of cervical lordosis is a significant factor in the development of degeneration of the spine with aging. This degenerative changings of the cervical spine would cause pressure effect on the cervical root and/or medulla spinalis. AIM: Our goal is to understand the effect of the PEEK cage on cervical lordosis in the early postoperative period. Also, to interpret the effects of one- level, two- level, three-level and four- level disc pathologies on cervical lordosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated our archive, and we selected thirty-four patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix (ACDFP). RESULTS: We determined that ACDFP provides improvement in the cervical lordosis angle in both groups. Also, we found statistically significant difference between group 1 and 2 regarding causes of radiculomyelopathy statistically. CONCLUSION: We achieved better cervical lordotic angles at the postoperative period by implanting one-level, two-level, three-level or four-level PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix. Also, the causes of cervical root and or medulla spinalis impingement were different in group1 and 2. While extruded cervical disc impingement was the first pathology in group 1, osteophyte formation was the first pathology in group 2. PMID:27275224

  18. Anatomic Variations of Cervical and High Thoracic Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural blocks are widely used for the management of acute and chronic pain. The technique of loss of resistance is frequently adopted to determine the epidural space. A discontinuity of the ligamentum flavum may increase the risk of failure to identify the epidural space. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomic variations of the cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum in embalmed cadavers. Methods Vertebral column specimens of 15 human cadavers were obtained. After vertebral arches were detached from pedicles, the dural sac and epidural connective tissue were removed. The ligamentum flavum from C3 to T6 was directly examined anteriorly. Results The incidence of midline gaps in the ligamentum flavum was 87%-100% between C3 and T2. The incidence decreased below this level and was the lowest at T4-T5 (8%). Among the levels with a gap, the location of a gap in the caudal third of the ligamentum flavum was more frequent than in the middle or cephalic portion of the ligamentum flavum. Conclusions The cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum frequently has midline intervals with various features, especially in the caudal portion of the intervertebral space. Therefore, the ligamentum flavum is not always reliable as a perceptible barrier to identify the epidural space at these vertebral levels. Additionally, it may be more useful to insert the needle into the cephalic portion of the intervertebral space than in the caudal portion. PMID:25317280

  19. Spontaneous resorption of a large cervical herniated nucleus pulposus.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Hsu, Andrew R; Frank, Rachel M; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B

    2014-07-01

    The majority of patients with symptomatic herniated discs can be successfully and conservatively managed and can achieve clinical improvement without surgical intervention. Resorption of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is 1 conservative mechanism for clinical improvement. We present the case of a 76-year-old healthy man with acute cervical radicular right arm pain and positive Spurling test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large disc extrusion behind the C6 vertebral body, causing severe central canal stenosis and right-greater-than-left foraminal stenosis. The patient did not want surgical intervention, and his symptoms resolved with conservative treatment. A follow-up MRI 7 months after his initial presentation showed almost complete resorption of the herniated disc. The patient returned to his normal activities and has not had recurrence of symptoms for 2 years. This report provides an interesting example of complete resorption of a large, extruded cervical herniated disc in a symptomatic patient and a review of the literature on resorption of herniated discs. The review suggests that larger herniations with an epidural location (penetration of the posterior longitudinal ligament) have a greater chance of resorption.

  20. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  1. Resource Letter Scy-3: Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butch, N. P.; de Andrade, M. C.; Maple, M. B.

    2008-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on superconductivity. Since the last Resource Letter on superconductivity, Scy-2, was published in 1970, there have been dramatic advances in our basic understanding of superconductivity, discovery of new superconducting materials, and improved technological exploitation of superconductors. We review basic phenomenology, followed by concise descriptions of several main classes of superconductors recognized today. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: Conventional superconductors, paramagnetic impurities in superconductors, magnetically ordered superconductors, heavy fermion superconductors, high Tc superconductors, organic superconductors, applications of superconductivity, and laboratory demonstrations of superconductivity. Owing to the large volume of available literature on superconductivity, the journal articles and books we discuss constitute good starting points for further exploration of particular topics.

  2. Swim Training Initiated Acutely after Spinal Cord Injury Is Ineffective and Induces Extravasation In and Around the Epicenter

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Brown, Edward H.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Whelan, Ashley; Burke, Darlene A.; Benton, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Activity-based rehabilitation is a promising strategy for improving functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). While results from both clinical and animal studies have shown that a variety of approaches can be effective, debate still exists regarding the optimal post-injury period to apply rehabilitation. We recently demonstrated that rats with moderately severe thoracic contusive SCI can be re-trained to swim when training is initiated 2 weeks after injury and that swim training had no effect on the recovery of overground locomotion. We concluded that swim training is a task-specific model of post-SCI activity-based rehabilitation. In the present study, we ask if re-training initiated acutely is more or less effective than when initiated at 2 weeks post-injury. Using the Louisville Swim Scale, an 18-point swimming assessment, supplemented by kinematic assessment of hindlimb movement during swimming, we report that acute re-training is less effective than training initiated at 2 weeks. Using the bioluminescent protein luciferase as a blood-borne macromolecular marker, we also show a significant increase in extravasation in and around the site of SCI following only 8 min of swimming at 3 days post-injury. Taken together, these results suggest that acute re-training in a rat model of SCI may compromise rehabilitation efforts via mechanisms that may involve one or more secondary injury cascades, including acute spinal microvascular dysfunction. PMID:19331515

  3. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. Aim To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Method Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Conclusions Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them. PMID:25626943

  4. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  5. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  6. Effect of Alpha-1-Adrenergic Agonist, Midodrine for the Management of Long-Standing Neurogenic Shock in Patient with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taikwan

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a 71-year-old male patient who had suffered from long-lasting neurogenic shock for 13 weeks after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by a bicycle accident. The neurogenic shock was resolved dramatically 2 weeks after the administration of alpha-1-adrenergic agonist, midodrine hydrochloride. In usual cases, neurogenic shock tends to improve between 2 and 6 weeks after SCI; however, in a few cases, the shock lasts for several months. In our case, spinal shock lasted for 13 weeks and exhibited very sensitive decline of blood pressure for even a slight decrease of dopamine despite recovered bulbospongiosus reflex. Three days after midodrine hydrochloride was added, hypotension improved dramatically. We discuss our rare case with pertinent literatures. PMID:27169082

  7. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. PMID:27614953

  8. Conservative Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rema, P; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    There is a rising incidence of early cervical cancer in young patients as a result of screening and early detection. Treatment of cervical cancer by surgery or radiotherapy results in permanent infertility which affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Now with improved survival rates among early cervical cancer patients, conservative surgery aiming at fertility preservation in those desiring future pregnancy is an accepted treatment. Conservative surgery is possible in early cervical cancer including micro invasive cancer and stage IB cancers less than 2 cm. Stage IA1 cervical cancer is treated effectively by cervical conisation. In stage IA2 cancers and stage IB1 cancers less than 2 cm the fertility preservation surgery is radical trachelectomy. Radical trachelectomy removes the cervix with medial parametrium and upper 2 cm vaginal cuff retaining the uterus and adnexa to allow future pregnancy. Radical trachelectomy is a safe procedure in selected patients with cancer cervix with acceptable oncologic risks and promising obstetric outcome. It should be avoided in tumours larger than 2 cm and aggressive histologic types. This article focuses on the current options of conservative surgery in early cervical cancer. PMID:27651696

  9. Fatal Cervical Spine Injury From Diving Accident.

    PubMed

    Voland, Christelle; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injuries result after diving into shallow water, often after incautious jumps head first into water of unknown depth during recreational or sport activities. Mortality is generally due to upper cervical trauma. The authors present a case of a diving-related death in a young woman who underwent medicolegal investigations. The measured water depth at the supposed dive site was 1.40 m. Postmortem radiology and autopsy revealed fractures of the body and the posterior arch of the fifth cervical vertebra, a fracture of the right transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra and hemorrhages involving the cervical paraspinal muscles. Neuropathology showed a posterior epidural hematoma involving the whole cervical region and a symmetric laceration of the spinal cord located at the fourth and fifth cervical vertebra level, surrounded by multiple petechial hemorrhages. Toxicology revealed the presence of ethanol in both blood and urine samples. The death was attributed to cervical spine fracture (C5-C6), spinal cord contusion, and subsequent drowning. This case highlights the usefulness of postmortem radiology, examination of the deep structures of the neck, toxicology, neuropathology, and a detailed research of signs of drowning to formulate appropriate hypotheses pertaining to the cause and mechanism of death.

  10. Aging: a new opportunity to publish in SCI nursing.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S

    2005-01-01

    Publishing in SCI Nursing is a rewarding experience in terms of professional growth and contributing to the body of knowledge of SCI nurses. "Guidelines for Contributors" are on the back, inside cover of each issue of SCI Nursing and on the AASCIN Web site. Collaborate with nursing colleagues, or interdisciplinary team members, to begin your manuscript today.

  11. SciDAC-2 software infrastructure for lattice QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Balint Joo

    2007-06-01

    We present work carried out by the USQCD Collaboration on Software Infrastructure funded under SciDAC 2. We present successes of the software from the original SciDAC 1 project as well as ongoing and future work. We outline the various scientific collaborations SciDAC-2 has created.

  12. Nogo receptor deletion and multimodal exercise improve distinct aspects of recovery in cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Harel, Noam Y; Song, Kang-Ho; Tang, Xin; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2010-11-01

    We tested the ability of two plasticity-promoting approaches to enhance recovery in a mouse model of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Genetically, we reduced myelin-mediated inhibition of neural plasticity through Nogo66-receptor (NgR) gene deletion. Behaviorally, we utilized a novel multimodal exercise training paradigm. Adult mice of wild-type or NgR-null genotype were subjected to partial lateral hemisection (LHx) at C3-C4 with the intent of producing anatomically and functionally mild deficits. Exercise training or control treatment proceeded for 14 weeks. Behavioral outcomes were assessed prior to tract tracing and histological analysis. Genotype and training exerted differing effects on performance; training improved performance on a test related to the training regimen (task-specific benefit), whereas genotype also improved performance on more generalized behaviors (task-non-specific benefit). There were no significant histological differences across genotype or training assignment with regard to lesion size or axonal tract staining. Thus either NgR gene deletion or exercise training benefits mice with mild cervical spinal injury. In this lesion model, the effects of NgR deletion and training were not synergistic for the tasks assessed. Further work is required to optimize the interaction between pharmacological and physical interventions for SCI.

  13. A Unilateral Cervical Spinal Cord Contusion Injury Model in Non-Human Primates (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Salegio, Ernesto A.; Sparrey, Carolyn J.; Camisa, William; Fischer, Jason; Leasure, Jeremi; Buckley, Jennifer; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S.; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Moseanko, Rod; Strand, Sarah; Hawbecker, Stephanie; Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Haefeli, Jenny; Ma, Xiaokui; Nielson, Jessica L.; Edgerton, V.R.; Ferguson, Adam R.; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of a non-human primate (NHP) model of spinal cord injury (SCI) based on mechanical and computational modeling is described. We scaled up from a rodent model to a larger primate model using a highly controllable, friction-free, electronically-driven actuator to generate unilateral C6-C7 spinal cord injuries. Graded contusion lesions with varying degrees of functional recovery, depending upon pre-set impact parameters, were produced in nine NHPs. Protocols and pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to optimize the predictability of outcomes by matching impact protocols to the size of each animal's spinal canal, cord, and cerebrospinal fluid space. Post-operative MRI confirmed lesion placement and provided information on lesion volume and spread for comparison with histological measures. We evaluated the relationships between impact parameters, lesion measures, and behavioral outcomes, and confirmed that these relationships were consistent with our previous studies in the rat. In addition to providing multiple univariate outcome measures, we also developed an integrated outcome metric describing the multivariate cervical SCI syndrome. Impacts at the higher ranges of peak force produced highly lateralized and enduring deficits in multiple measures of forelimb and hand function, while lower energy impacts produced early weakness followed by substantial recovery but enduring deficits in fine digital control (e.g., pincer grasp). This model provides a clinically relevant system in which to evaluate the safety and, potentially, the efficacy of candidate translational therapies. PMID:26788611

  14. Persistent At-Level Thermal Hyperalgesia and Tactile Allodynia Accompany Chronic Neuronal and Astrocyte Activation in Superficial Dorsal Horn following Mouse Cervical Contusion Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jaime L.; Hala, Tamara J.; Putatunda, Rajarshi; Sannie, Daniel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sensory abnormalities, including neuropathic pain, often result from traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI can induce cellular changes in the CNS, termed central sensitization, that alter excitability of spinal cord neurons, including those in the dorsal horn involved in pain transmission. Persistently elevated levels of neuronal activity, glial activation, and glutamatergic transmission are thought to contribute to the hyperexcitability of these dorsal horn neurons, which can lead to maladaptive circuitry, aberrant pain processing and, ultimately, chronic neuropathic pain. Here we present a mouse model of SCI-induced neuropathic pain that exhibits a persistent pain phenotype accompanied by chronic neuronal hyperexcitability and glial activation in the spinal cord dorsal horn. We generated a unilateral cervical contusion injury at the C5 or C6 level of the adult mouse spinal cord. Following injury, an increase in the number of neurons expressing ΔFosB (a marker of chronic neuronal activation), persistent astrocyte activation and proliferation (as measured by GFAP and Ki67 expression), and a decrease in the expression of the astrocyte glutamate transporter GLT1 are observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn of cervical spinal cord. These changes have previously been associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and may contribute to altered pain transmission and chronic neuropathic pain. In our model, they are accompanied by robust at-level hyperaglesia in the ipsilateral forepaw and allodynia in both forepaws that are evident within two weeks following injury and persist for at least six weeks. Furthermore, the pain phenotype occurs in the absence of alterations in forelimb grip strength, suggesting that it represents sensory and not motor abnormalities. Given the importance of transgenic mouse technology, this clinically-relevant model provides a resource that can be used to study the molecular mechanisms contributing to neuropathic pain

  15. [Induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Morkhov, K Yu; Nechushkina, V M; Kuznetsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The main methods of treatment for cervical cancer are surgery, radiotherapy or their combination. During past two decades chemotherapy are increasingly being used not only in patients with disseminated forms of this disease but also in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or as induction therapy. Possibilities of adjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer are being studied. According to A.D.Kaprin and V.V. Starinskiy in 2013 in Russia, 32% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer underwent only radiation therapy, 32%--combined or complex treatment, 27.3%--only surgery, and just 8.7%--chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26087600

  16. Esophageal, pharyngeal and hemorrhagic complications occurring in anterior cervical surgery: Three illustrative cases

    PubMed Central

    Paradells, Víctor Rodrigo; Pérez, Juan Bosco Calatayud; Vicente, Francisco Javier Díar; Florez, Luciano Bances; de la Viuda, Marta Claramonte; Villagrasa, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of esophageal and pharyngeal perforations occurring in anterior cervical surgeries ranges from 0.25% to 1% and 0.2% to 1.2%, respectively. Symptoms usually appear postoperatively and are attributed to: Local infection, fistula, sepsis, or mediastinitis. Acute postoperative hematoma, although very rare (<1%), is the first complication to rule out due to its life-threatening complications (e.g. acute respiratory failure). Case Description: Over a 36-year period, the author(s) described three severe esophageal/pharyngeal complications attributed to anterior cervical surgery. As these complications were appropriately recognized/treated, patients had favorable outcomes. Conclusions: Anterior cervical spine surgery is a safe approach and is associated with few major esophageal/pharyngeal complications, which most commonly include transient dysphagia and dysphonia. If symptoms persist, patients should be assessed for esophageal/pharyngeal defects utilizing appropriate imaging studies. Notably, even if the major complications listed above are adequately treated, optimal results are in no way guaranteed. PMID:24843808

  17. Cervical sprains, disc herniations, minor fractures, and other cervical injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Zmurko, Matthew G; Tannoury, Tony Y; Tannoury, Chadi A; Anderson, D Greg

    2003-07-01

    In today's health-conscious society, more people are participating in athletic endeavors. As participation increases, so does the incidence of cervical injuries. Fortunately, most of the cervical injuries seen in sports are minor and can be treated successfully with minimal morbidity. It is important, however, to accurately assess the patient sustaining a cervical injury to rule out the presence of a more severe cervical injury. When practitioners understand the pathophysiology and treatment of common injuries, including sprains, strains, contusions, disc herniations, and simple fractures, most athletes can be returned to full function.

  18. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  19. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  20. Effects of Rolipram on Adult Rat Oligodendrocytes and Functional Recovery after Contusive Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Eric; Whitaker, Christopher M.; Burke, Darlene A.; Hetman, Michal; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic human spinal cord injury causes devastating and long-term hardships. These are due to the irreparable primary mechanical injury and secondary injury cascade. In particular, oligodendrocyte cell death, white matter axon damage, spared axon demyelination, and the ensuing dysfunction in action potential conduction lead to the initial deficits and impair functional recovery. For these reasons, and that oligodendrocyte and axon survival may be related, various neuroprotective strategies after SCI are being investigated. We previously demonstrated that oligodendrocytes in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus express 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphodiesterase 4 subtypes and that their death was attenuated up to 3 days after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, was administered. Here, we report that 1) there are more oligodendrocyte somata in the adult rat epicenter ventrolateral funiculus, 2) descending and ascending axonal conductivity in the ventrolateral funiculus improves, and that 3) there are fewer hindlimb footfall errors during grid-walking at 5 weeks after contusive cervical spinal cord injury when rolipram is delivered for 2 weeks. This is the first demonstration of improved descending and ascending long-tract axonal conductivity across a spinal cord injury with this pharmacological approach. Since descending long-tract axonal conductivity did not return to normal, further evaluations of the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic window of rolipram as well as optimal combinations are necessary before consideration for neuroprotection in humans with spinal cord injury. PMID:19635528

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. pO{sub 2} Fluctuation Pattern and Cycling Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma and Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Galappathi, Kanthi; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Blood perfusion in tumors is spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in local fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}) and tissue regions showing cycling hypoxia. In this study, we investigated whether the pO{sub 2} fluctuation pattern and the extent of cycling hypoxia differ between tumor types showing high (e.g., cervical carcinoma xenograft) and low (e.g., melanoma xenograft) fractions of connective tissue-associated blood vessels. Methods and Materials: Two cervical carcinoma lines (CK-160 and TS-415) and two melanoma lines (A-07 and R-18) transplanted into BALB/c nu/nu mice were included in the study. Tissue pO{sub 2} was measured simultaneously in two positions in each tumor by using a two-channel OxyLite fiber-optic oxygen-sensing device. The extent of acute and chronic hypoxia was assessed by combining a radiobiological and a pimonidazole-based immunohistochemical assay of tumor hypoxia. Results: The proportion of tumor regions showing pO{sub 2} fluctuations, the pO{sub 2} fluctuation frequency in these regions, and the relative amplitude of the pO{sub 2} fluctuations were significantly higher in the melanoma xenografts than in the cervical carcinoma xenografts. Cervical carcinoma and melanoma xenografts did not differ significantly in the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells or the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells. However, the ratio between fraction of acutely hypoxic cells and fraction of chronically hypoxic cells was significantly higher in melanoma than in cervical carcinoma xenografts. Conclusions: Temporal heterogeneity in blood flow and tissue pO{sub 2} in tumors may depend on tumor histology. Connective tissue surrounding microvessels may stabilize blood flow and pO{sub 2} and, thus, protect tumor tissue from cycling hypoxia.

  3. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Avoid irritants such as douches and deodorant tampons. Make sure that any foreign objects you insert into your vagina (such as tampons) are properly placed. Be sure to follow instructions ...

  4. [Cervical cancer: particularities in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Grellier, Noémie; Quéro, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. It represents one of the most challenging public health problems in developing countries. HIV-infected women have a higher risk of cervical cancer which is an AIDS defining cancer. Cervical cancer treatment in HIV-infected and non-infected women is the same. HIV naive women must be prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy at the moment of HIV cancer diagnosis. A close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is mandatory to optimize HIV treatment. Among HIV-infected women, PAP-smear screening for early detection and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions is recommended. HPV vaccination is also recommended with the same efficacy and safety profile as the general population.

  5. Cervical Human Papillomavirus Screening among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Grainge, Matthew J.; Seth, Rashmi; Guo, Li; Neal, Keith R.; Coupland, Carol; Vryenhoef, Paul; Johnson, Jane; Jenkins, David

    2005-01-01

    Rates of acquisition and clearance of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) during a 3-year period in women 51 years of age were compared with rates in younger women to provide data on cervical screening for women >50 years of age. Paired, cytologically negative, archived cervical smears taken 3 years apart from 710 women in Nottingham, United Kingdom, were retrieved and tested for HPV infection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with GP5+/6+ primers. Seventy-one (21.3%) of 333 women 51 years of age who were HPV negative at baseline were positive 3 years later. This percentage was higher than the corresponding acquisition rates among women 21 (15.2%), 31 (14.1%), and 41 (13.3%) years of age, although these differences were not significant. This retrospective study shows that HPV-negative women >50 years of age can acquire HPV and, therefore, require cervical screening. PMID:16318718

  6. Traumatic cervical spine fractures in the adult.

    PubMed

    Copley, Phillip; Tilliridou, Vicky; Jamjoom, Aimun

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews fractures of the cervical spine, highlighting the pertinent goals of initial management, the indications for different imaging modalities and the different fracture patterns. Basic principles of management of these different fracture patterns are outlined. PMID:27640656

  7. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  8. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  9. Midline cervical cleft. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ikuzawa, M; Matsumoto, K; Amino, K; Sakuda, M

    1992-10-01

    A case of incomplete midline cervical cleft of the upper neck is reported. It showed histological resemblance to a mature teratoma with three different germ-cell components, including cartilage, striated muscles, small salivary glands, and nerves.

  10. Unmet clinical needs in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jianyu; Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa; Shroyer, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer rates worldwide are expected to increase disproportionally in coming decades relative to the projected increase in population, especially in the developing world. The general unavailability of the Pap test and the cost of the HPV test in the developing world have precluded the deployment of effective cervical cancer screening programs in many developing countries. Recent improvements in testing technology arise from a need to overcome the significant limitations of the Pap test and HPV test, but results require first-world technology and validation. Developing countries, where cervical cancer remains one of the most important causes of cancer death, have the greatest need for an affordable, easy-to-use, and highly reliable cancer screening method that can return a diagnosis through efficient laboratory analysis or, more easily, at a woman's point of care. While research, testing, and vaccine improvements in recent years continue to lower the incidence of cervical cancer in some developed countries such as the U.S., HPV testing research needs to do more than test for the presence of virus. The tests must determine the presence and progression of cervical disease. Tests should be more sensitive and specific than Pap tests and Pap-related tests, and should be accurate in more than 90 percent of cases. Tests also need to be low-cost, objective, and easy to perform so screening programs can be widely implemented in developing countries where the need for a better cervical cancer screening test is highest. Such tests may be available through the recent advances in specific biomarkers of cervical cancer and multiplex detection technologies. Development of the next generation of cervical cancer tests that are more specific, sensitive, and informative than the traditional Pap or HPV test will make a significant impact on the reduction of cervical cancer worldwide.

  11. Cervical intra-/extramedullary solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Prakash, S; Kulkarni, G; Bradey, N; Marks, S M; Scoones, D

    2005-06-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of symptoms of right-sided weakness, tingling and hypersentivity to clothes on both sides of the body. MRI revealed a large intraspinal intradural tumour at the level of C3-C4 in the cervical cord. The final histology was a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the cervical spinal cord. The radiological diagnosis, surgical management and histology are reviewed.

  12. Forelimb Locomotor Assessment Scale (FLAS): Novel Assessment of Forelimb Dysfunction After Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kim D.; Sharp, Kelli G.; Hofstadter, Maura; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Murray, Marion; Steward, Oswald

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a novel Forelimb Locomotor Assessment Scale (FLAS) that assesses forelimb use during locomotion in rats injured at the cervical level. A quantitative scale was developed that measures movements of shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints, forepaw position and digit placement, forelimb-hindlimb coordination, compensatory behaviors adopted while walking, and balance. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received graded cervical contusions ranging from 200–230 (“mild”, n=11) and 250–290 kilodynes (“moderate”, n=13) between C5–8. Rats were videotaped post-injury as they walked along an alley to determine deficits and recovery of forelimb function. Recovery of shoulder and elbow joint movement occurred rapidly (within 1–7 days post-injury), whereas recovery of wrist joint movement was slower and more variable. Most rats in all groups displayed persistent deficits in forepaw and digit movement, but developed compensatory behaviors to allow functional forward locomotion within 1–2 weeks post-injury. Recovery of forelimb function as measured by the FLAS reached a plateau by 3 weeks post-injury in all groups. Rats with mild contusions displayed greater locomotor recovery than rats with moderate contusions, but exhibited persistent deficits compared to sham controls. Reliability was tested by having seven raters (3 internal, 4 external) from different laboratories, independently and blindly score videos of all rats. The multivariate correlation between all raters, all animals, and all time-points ranged from r2=0.88–0.96 (p<0.0001), indicating a high inter-rater reliability. Thus, the FLAS is a simple, inexpensive, sensitive, and reliable measure of forelimb function during locomotion following cervical SCI. PMID:19733168

  13. Rodent Models and Behavioral Outcomes of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Sydney A.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Schallert, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Rodent spinal cord injury (SCI) models have been developed to examine functional and physiological deficits after spinal cord injury with the hope that these models will elucidate information about human SCI. Models are needed to examine possible treatments and to understand histopathology after SCI; however, they should be considered carefully and chosen based on the goals of the study being performed. Contusion, compression, transection, and other models exist and have the potential to reveal important information about SCI that may be related to human SCI and the outcomes of treatment and timing of intervention. PMID:25309824

  14. Cortex-sparing infarction in triple cervical artery dissection following chiropractic neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Melikyan, Gayane; Kamran, Saadat; Akhtar, Naveed; Deleu, Dirk; Miyares, Francisco Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multivessel cervical dissection with cortical sparing is exceptional in clinical practice. Case presentation: A 55-year-old man presented with acute-onset neck pain with associated sudden onset right-sided hemiparesis and dysphasia after chiropractic manipulation for chronic neck pain. Results and Discussion: Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral internal carotid artery dissection and left extracranial vertebral artery dissection with bilateral anterior cerebral artery territory infarctions and large cortical-sparing left middle cerebral artery infarction. This suggests the presence of functionally patent and interconnecting leptomeningeal anastomoses between cerebral arteries, which may provide sufficient blood flow to salvage penumbral regions when a supplying artery is occluded. Conclusion: Chiropractic cervical manipulation can result in catastrophic vascular lesions preventable if these practices are limited to highly specialized personnel under very specific situations. PMID:26835412

  15. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A CERVICAL SPINAL FRACTURE IN A BENNETT'S WALLABY (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS).

    PubMed

    Kragness, Brandy J; Graham, Jennifer E; Bedenice, Daniela; Restifo, Melissa M; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2016-03-01

    Macropods are susceptible to trauma, and fractures of the cervical vertebrae due to collisions are relatively common. A 4-yr-old, intact male Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) was presented acutely nonambulatory and tetraparetic but with motor function present in all limbs. Cervical radiographs revealed a C4 vertebral fracture. Surgical stabilization was obtained through a ventral midline approach whereby the vertebral bodies were distracted and then secured with screws and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Postoperative radiographs revealed restoration of the spinal canal and appropriate implant placement. The patient was discharged 4 days postoperatively and gradually recovered full neurologic function per the owner over the ensuing 10 wk. Subsequent radiographs obtained 10.5 mo postoperatively revealed a healed fracture with stable implants. The ventral spinal distraction and stabilization technique using screws and PMMA, as are used in the domestic dog, was successful in this wallaby despite its smaller vertebral size and comparable lack of soft-tissue support. PMID:27010308

  16. Cervical cancer: A comprehensive approach towards extermination.

    PubMed

    Bava, Smitha V; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Sreekanth, Chanickal N; Anto, Ruby John

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted pathogen, globally. Oncogenic types of HPV are the causative agents of many neoplastic diseases, including cervical cancer, which ranks as the most common cancer affecting females in developing countries. HPV infection of the cervical epithelium and the subsequent integration of viral DNA into the host genome are the major risk factors for cervical cancer. The scientific discovery of HPV as the causal agent of cervical cancer has led to the development of HPV-based diagnostic tools. Prophylactic vaccines, based on the oncogenic HPV type virus-like particles have been introduced in several developed countries as a preliminary preventive approach. Nevertheless, it remains a continuous threat to women in developing countries, where the prophylactic vaccines are unaffordable and organized screening programmes are lacking. This warrants implementation of prevention strategies that will reduce cervical cancer-related mortality. In this review, we have discussed molecular pathogenesis of HPV infection and the risk factors associated with it. The diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies of HPV-related cervical cancer have also been discussed.

  17. The Future of Vaccines for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, making prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines an important focus for cervical cancer prevention. The increasing accessibility of these vaccines worldwide has the potential to greatly decrease the incidence and burden of disease in the future. However, current prophylactic vaccines offer no therapeutic benefit for persons already infected with human papillomavirus types targeted by vaccines or persons with precancerous lesions or cervical cancer. The protection offered by current vaccines is primarily against human papillomavirus types used to derive the vaccine, although partial cross-protection for related virus types has been observed. Herein, we describe findings from preclinical and clinical studies that employ vaccine strategies that have the potential to shape the future of vaccines against cervical cancer. Modalities include prophylactic strategies to target more oncogenic virus types by using the minor capsid antigen L2 and/or by increasing the number of types used to derive virus-like particle vaccines. Therapeutic strategies include the development of vaccines against human papillomavirus early proteins (targets for cellular immunity) for the resolution of precancerous lesions and cervical cancer. Future applications of existing VLP-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:18482559

  18. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: a sporadic case

    PubMed Central

    Bostan, Sezen; Yaşar, Şirin; Serdar, Zehra Aşiran; Gizlenti, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis is a very rare form of primary localized hypertrichosis. It consists of a tuft of terminal hair on the anterior neck just above the laryngeal prominence. The etiology is still unknown. In this article, we reported a 15-year-old female patient who presented to our clinic with a complaint of hypertrichosis on the anterior aspect of the neck for the last five years. Her past medical history revealed no pathology except for vesicoureteral reflux. On the basis of clinical presentation, our patient was diagnosed with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and she was considered to be a sporadic case due to lack of other similar cases in familial history. To date, 33 patients with anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis can be associated with other abnormalities, but it frequently presents as an isolated defect (70%). The association of vesicoureteral reflux and anterior cervical hypertrichosis which was observed in our patient might be coincidental. So far, no case of anterior cervical hypertrichosis associated with vesicoureteral reflux has been reported in the literature. PMID:27103865

  19. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70–80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy. PMID:27610199

  20. Cervical radiculopathy: epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woods, Barrett I; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a relatively common neurological disorder resulting from nerve root dysfunction, which is often due to mechanical compression; however, inflammatory cytokines released from damaged intervertebral disks can also result in symptoms. Cervical radiculopathy can often be diagnosed with a thorough history and physical examination, but an magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelogram should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Because of the ubiquity of degenerative changes found on these imaging modalities, the patient's symptoms must correlate with pathology for a successful diagnosis. In the absence of myelopathy or significant muscle weakness all patients should be treated conservatively for at least 6 weeks. Conservative treatments consist of immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, cervical traction, and epidural steroid injections. Cervical radiculopathy typically is self-limiting with 75%-90% of patients achieving symptomatic improvement with nonoperative care. For patients who are persistently symptomatic despite conservative treatment, or those who have a significant functional deficit surgical treatment is appropriate. Surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical disk arthroplasty, and posterior foraminotomy. Patient selection is critical to optimize outcome. PMID:25985461

  1. Cervical cancer: disease prevention and informational support.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lindsay Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are significant health care concerns for women worldwide. Globally, in 2006, cervical cancer remains the second most common cancer in women. Infection with high-risk strains of HPV is found to be present in approximately 99% of cervical cancer cases. The Supportive Care Framework developed by Fitch (2008) will serve as a guide to the paper. The need for informational support and disease prevention initiatives will be explored. Knowledge and awareness of HPV and its link to cervical cancer amongst the general population are low. Once women are made aware of the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer, they want more information on disease prevention, transmission, detection, treatment information, symptoms and risk for developing cancer. Evidence-based nursing interventions that focus on meeting the informational needs of women and increasing awareness of HPV and cervical cancer will be proposed. Information on HPV-prophylactic vaccines and Papanicolaou (PAP) screening as primary and secondary disease prevention strategies will be discussed.

  2. Intrapartum Cervical Laceration and Subsequent Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Luchin F.; Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Varner, Michael W.; Manuck, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe pregnancy outcomes, including cervical insufficiency and preterm birth, in the subsequent pregnancy following an intrapartum cervical laceration. Study Design Retrospective cohort of women with their first two consecutive singleton pregnancies carried to ≥ 200/7 weeks' gestation within a tertiary health care system from 2002 to 2012. Cervical laceration cases were identified by ICD9 codes and included if suture repair was required. Results In this study, 55 women were confirmed to have a cervical laceration in the first delivery; 43 lacerations after vaginal delivery (VD) and 12 after cesarean delivery (CD). The median gestational age of the first delivery was 400/7 weeks and the median birth weight 3,545 g; these did not differ between VD and CD. In the second pregnancy, 2 of 55 women (4.6%) had a prophylactic cerclage placed; 1 carried to term and the other delivered at 356/7 weeks. In total, four women (9.3%) delivered the second pregnancy < 37 weeks: three had a prior term VD and one had a prior 34 weeks VD. There was only one case of recurrent cervical laceration, occurring in the setting of vaginal deliveries. Conclusion Obstetric cervical lacerations are uncommon. Complications in the following pregnancy were low, despite lack of additional prophylactic cerclage use. PMID:27621953

  3. Cervical cerclage: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nathan S; Chervenak, Frank A

    2008-01-01

    Cervical insufficiency is a difficult and confusing diagnosis. Its diagnostic criteria, etiology, and treatment are all debated. Cervical cerclage has been a common practice in obstetrics since it was first described by Shirodker and then McDonald in the 1950s. Cerclages have been placed because of a patient's obstetrical history, physical examination, ultrasound, or a combination of the above. However, the data supporting cerclage placement is limited. There has never been a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of cerclage versus no cerclage in patients with a classic history of cervical insufficiency (multiple painless second trimester losses occurring at progressively earlier gestational ages). This article attempts to review the relevant studies regarding cerclage placement for the treatment of cervical insufficiency. Based on the current literature, there is evidence supporting cervical cerclage in the following limited circumstances: a history of 3 or more spontaneous preterm births or second trimester losses; a high-risk patient with a singleton pregnancy who has a short cervix in the second trimester. Because the majority of patients with risk factors for preterm birth and second trimester loss (poor obstetric history, short cervix) will still deliver at term or near-term, studies on the effectiveness of cervical cerclage would need many patients to be powered appropriately.

  4. Cervical cancer: screening and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Thara, Somanathan; Esmy, Pulikottil Okkuru; Basu, Partha

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown to have a wide range of sensitivity in most routine settings including in developing countries. Although liquid-based cytology improves sample adequacy, claims on improved sensitivity remain controversial. Human papillomavirus testing is more sensitive than cytology, but whether this gain represents protection against future cervical cancer is not clear. Recently, in a randomized trial, the use of visual inspection with 4% acetic acid was shown to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Cryotherapy and large loop excision of the transformation zone are effective and safe treatment methods for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The clinical stage of cancer is the single most important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal treatment between surgery and radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. At the public health level, health care infrastructure, affordability and capacity for initiating and sustaining vaccination and screening programmes are critical factors in cervical cancer control. On the other hand, an informed practitioner can utilize the multiple opportunities in routine primary care interactions for prevention, screening, early detection and prompt referral for treatment. PMID:18685274

  5. Intrapartum Cervical Laceration and Subsequent Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Luchin F.; Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Varner, Michael W.; Manuck, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to describe pregnancy outcomes, including cervical insufficiency and preterm birth, in the subsequent pregnancy following an intrapartum cervical laceration. Study Design  Retrospective cohort of women with their first two consecutive singleton pregnancies carried to ≥ 200/7 weeks' gestation within a tertiary health care system from 2002 to 2012. Cervical laceration cases were identified by ICD9 codes and included if suture repair was required. Results  In this study, 55 women were confirmed to have a cervical laceration in the first delivery; 43 lacerations after vaginal delivery (VD) and 12 after cesarean delivery (CD). The median gestational age of the first delivery was 400/7 weeks and the median birth weight 3,545 g; these did not differ between VD and CD. In the second pregnancy, 2 of 55 women (4.6%) had a prophylactic cerclage placed; 1 carried to term and the other delivered at 356/7 weeks. In total, four women (9.3%) delivered the second pregnancy < 37 weeks: three had a prior term VD and one had a prior 34 weeks VD. There was only one case of recurrent cervical laceration, occurring in the setting of vaginal deliveries. Conclusion  Obstetric cervical lacerations are uncommon. Complications in the following pregnancy were low, despite lack of additional prophylactic cerclage use. PMID:27621953

  6. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70-80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy. PMID:27610199

  7. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Salazar-León, Jonathan; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%-95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development. PMID:23144564

  8. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  9. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70–80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy.

  10. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with nedaplatin in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Toru; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Koizumi, Masae; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Nabeta, Motoo; Koizumi, Koji; Matsubara, Yuko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Matsubara, Keiichi; Katayama, Tomihiro; Nawa, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of nadaplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. Patients with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were treated with nadaplatin-based CCRT, using high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) or radiotherapy (RT) alone, in patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma. CCRT with nedaplatin (80 mg/m(2)) was administered on Days 1 and 29. The records of 17 women treated either with nadaplatin-based CCRT using HSR-ICBT (n=8) or RT alone (n=9), for stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. The activity and toxicity were compared in the two treatment groups. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were the main endpoints. The 5-year overall survival rates in the CCRT and RT groups were 68.6 and 77.8%, respectively. The median OS of the CCRT and RT groups was 38.5 and 27.3 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in either PFS (P=0.618) or OS (P= 0.231). The most common grade 3-4 or higher toxicities in the CCRT groups were leuko-/neutropenia (37.5%). The frequency of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was higher in the CCRT compared to the RT group. However, no statistically significant difference was observed. Nedaplatin-based CCRT was safely performed. Although the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage IIA to IVA cervical carcinoma was not significantly improved, fewer distant relapses were observed in this treatment. Consequently, nedaplatin-based CCRT may be considered as a potential alternative to cisplatin-based CCRT in this patient population.

  12. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of cervical microstructure.

    PubMed

    Feltovich, Helen; Nam, Kibo; Hall, Timothy J

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to determine whether quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can provide insight into, and characterization of, uterine cervical microstructure. Throughout pregnancy, cervical collagen reorganizes (from aligned and anisotropic to disorganized and isotropic) as the cervix changes in preparation for delivery. Premature changes in collagen are associated with premature birth in mammals. Because QUS is able to detect structural anisotropy/isotropy, we hypothesized that it may provide a means of noninvasively assessing cervical microstructure. Thorough study of cervical microstructure has been limited by lack of technology to detect small changes in collagen organization, which has in turn limited our ability to detect abnormal and/or premature changes in collagen that may lead to preterm birth. In order to determine whether QUS may be useful for detection of cervical microstructure, radiofrequency (rf) echo data were acquired from the cervices of human hysterectomy specimens (n = 10). The angle between the acoustic beam and tissue was used to assess anisotropic acoustic propagation by control of transmit/receive angles from -20 degrees to +20 degrees. The power spectrum of the echo signals from within a region of interest was computed in order to investigate the microstructure of the tissue. An identical analysis was performed on a homogeneous phantom with spherical scatterers for system calibration. Power spectra of backscattered rf from the cervix were 6 dB higher for normal (0 degree) than steered (+/- 20 degrees) beams. The spectral power for steered beams decreased monotonically (0.4 dB at +5 degrees to 3.6 dB at +20 degrees). The excess difference (compared to similar analysis for the phantom) in normally-incident (0 degree) versus steered beams is consistent with scattering from an aligned component of the cervical microstructure. Therefore, QUS appears to reliably identify an aligned component of cervical microstructure

  14. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nubia; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  15. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  16. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  17. Cervical ligamentous instability in a canine in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, R; Moran, D J; Fechner, R E; Ruch, W W; Drucker, S; Hooper, W E; McCoig, J A

    1987-12-01

    A canine in vivo model of midcervical ligamentous instability was developed by dividing the anterior longitudinal ligament, anulus fibrosus, and all posterior ligamentous structures including the ligamentum flavum. The natural history of healing in the model, the effect on its healing by an adjacent one-level arthrodesis, and the effect of a one-level arthrodesis on normal adjacent ligamentous structures were studied radiographically, mechanically, and histologically. The authors determined that healing takes place primarily by anterior scar formation in their instability model but not to a degree sufficient to recreate normal mechanical stability. After three months, healing in the model was not affected by an adjacent arthrodesis; however, acutely, instability apparently was increased as three animals became quadriplegic between the second and fourth postoperative days. Arthrodesis did not affect adjacent normal ligamentous structures, during this period. Incomplete healing in the authors' model supports those who advocate arthrodesis as the treatment of choice for destabilizing cervical ligamentous injury. The authors previously reported the case of a patient who sustained bilateral facet dislocations adjacent to an arthrodesed segment and questioned whether this resulted from a stress-concentrating effect. This study indicates that this could well have been the case acutely. Thus, inadvertent exclusion of an unstable segment from an arthrodesis has potentially catastrophic results. Finally, the authors also have previously questioned whether arthrodesis of a midcervical segment could lead to instability of adjacent normal segments. This project does not support such a concern, at least for the three postoperative months of study. PMID:3441821

  18. EMG Biofeedback and Exercise for Treatment of Cervical and Shoulder Pain in Individuals with a Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in the cervical and shoulder region is a common secondary problem after spinal cord injury (SCI), reported by 30% to 70% of individuals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback training, in addition to a standard exercise program, on reducing shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. Methods: Fifteen individuals with SCI, C6 or lower, who were manual wheelchair users with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions. The Exercise group (n = 7) received instruction on a standard home-based exercise program. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (n = 8) received identical exercise instruction plus EMG biofeedback training to improve muscle balance and muscle relaxation during wheelchair propulsion. Shoulder pain was assessed by the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI) at baseline, at posttest 10 weeks after the start of intervention, and at follow-up 16 weeks after posttest. Results: The number of participants per group allowed only within-group comparisons; however, the findings indicated a beneficial effect from EMG biofeedback training. Shoulder pain, as measured by WUSPI, decreased 64% from baseline to posttest for the EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group (P = .02). Shoulder pain for the Exercise group decreased a nonsignificant 27%. At follow-up, both groups showed continued improvement, yet the benefit of EMG biofeedback training was still discernible. The EMG Biofeedback plus Exercise group had an 82% reduction in shoulder pain from baseline to follow-up (P = .004), while the Exercise group showed a 63% reduction (P = .03) over the same time period. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that EMG biofeedback has value when added to an exercise intervention to reduce shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users with SCI. These findings indicate that EMG biofeedback may be valuable in remediating

  19. Everted cervical vein for carotid patch angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Yu, A; Dardik, H; Wolodiger, F; Raccuia, J; Kapadia, I; Sussman, B; Kahn, M; Pecoraro, J P; Ibrahim, I M

    1990-11-01

    Because of the theoretic benefits of autologous vein we undertook an investigation to evaluate cervical veins (facial, external jugular) as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. A device that stimulated both circumferential fixation by sutures and radial tension exerted on in vivo patches was constructed to measure burst strength of tissue. Mean bursting pressure for groin saphenous vein (n = 10) was 94.5 +/- 15.1 pounds per square inch (psi), 75.5 +/- 8.9 psi for ankle saphenous vein (n = 10), 83.3 +/- 14.5 psi for everted (double layer) cervical vein (n = 5) and 10 +/- 3.3 psi for single layer cervical vein (n = 5). No significant differences between saphenous vein at any level and everted (double layer) cervical vein, but all were significantly different from single layer cervical vein (p less than 0.05). From June 1987 through November 1989, 19 patients underwent 21 carotid endarterectomies complemented with adjunctive everted cervical vein patch angioplasty. Indications for surgery were asymptomatic stenosis (53%), transient ischemic attack (29%), and cerebrovascular accident with recovery (18%). All patients were studied after surgery with duplex scanning. Asymptomatic recurrent stenosis was observed in one patient. Transient hypoglossal nerve dysfunction occurred in one other patient. One postoperative death occurred as a result of massive aspiration. These results indicate that everted cervical vein is comparable to the saphenous vein in resistance to bursting and can yield similar results as patch material after carotid endarterectomy. Accordingly, saphenous vein can be spared and lower extremity incisions avoided.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  1. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care. PMID:27482201

  2. Knockdown of Legumain Suppresses Cervical Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women living in less developed countries. The pathological and molecular mechanisms of cervical cancer are not comprehensively known. Though legumain has been found to be highly expressed in various types of solid tumors, its expression and biological function in cervical cancer remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate legumain expression and functions in cervical cancer. We found that legumain was highly expressed in cervical cancer cells. When knocked down, legumain expression in HeLa and SiHa cells significantly reduced its migration and invasion abilities compared with control cells. Furthermore, legumain silencing suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteases (MMP2 and MMP3) in cervical cancer cells. This study indicates that legumain might play an important role in cervical cancer cell migration and invasion. Legumain might be a potential therapeutic target for cervical cancer therapy.

  3. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Cancer.gov

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  4. Understanding Cervical Changes: A Health Guide for Women

    Cancer.gov

    Explains HPV Infection; cervical cancer screening tests including Pap test, HPV test, and Pap/HPV cotesting; new cervical cancer screening guidelines; possible Pap test results and Pap/HPV cotest results; follow-up testing; treatment; and HPV vaccination.

  5. Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine? Less testing could reduce risk of false positives ... cervical cancer screening depends on the type of vaccine she had, the researchers said. Women vaccinated with ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  7. Breast, Cervical Cancer More Deadly in Developing Nations: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Health News on: Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  8. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  9. Family Fun at SCI-FEST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Verilette

    1996-01-01

    Describes the SCI-FEST (Science Collaborative Initiative-Festival to Enhance Science and Technology) where community members worked together to put on a successful science festival for the whole family. Discusses the planning and implementation of the festival which included nearly 100 hands-on science activities, skits, puppet shows, and…

  10. Optimal Extent of Prophylactic Irradiation of Paraaortic Lymph Nodes in Patients with Uterine Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyun; Yoon, Hong In; Lee, Jeongshim; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine optimal extent of prophylactic irradiation of paraaortic lymph nodes (PALN) in patients with uterine cervical cancer who had metastatic pelvic LNs. Methods and Materials We retrospectively evaluated 103 patients with cervical cancer and pelvic lymph node metastasis who were treated with prophylactic semi-extended field radiotherapy (SEFRT) between 1990 and 2012. The semi-extended field included PALN below the second lumbar spine with prescribed doses of 45 to 50 Gy. Survival outcomes were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and acute and late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results The median follow-up after SEFRT was 61 (range 5–296) months. Overall, 28 patients (27.2%) experienced treatment failures, which were classified as local in 8 patients (7.8%), regional in 8 patients (7.8%), and distant in 13 patients (12.6%). Of the regional failures, only two involved PALN failure around the renal artery or the renal hilum area at the upper margin of the semi-extended field. At 5 years, the overall survival was 82%. Grade 3 or higher acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities occurred in one and two patients, respectively. As a late toxicity, one patient developed grade 3 small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Prophylactic SEFRT provided favorable outcomes with little acute or late gastrointestinal toxicity. For prophylaxis of PALN recurrences, upper part of PALN might not need to be included in patients with uterine cervical cancer and metastatic pelvic LNs. PMID:26659867

  11. [Cervical neuroblastoma in an infant].

    PubMed

    Arvai, Krisztina; Tóth, Judit; Németh, Tamás; Kiss, Csongor; Molnár, Péter; Oláh, Eva

    2004-01-01

    The case of a one-month-old patient admitted to the Department of Pediatrics (Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen University) because of respiratory distress caused by a cervical mass compressing the upper respiratory pathways is presented. The mass could only be partially removed, the histological diagnosis proved to be neuroblastoma (SBCT: "small blue cell tumor"). Despite the fact that the DNA index of tumor cells (ploidy measurements) and the age of the patient suggested a favourable prognosis, the tumor continued to grow and metastases appeared. Because of symptoms of compression exerted on the respiratory system by the tumor, chemotherapy had to be applied. Since a standard OPEC/OJEC chemotherapeutic protocol proved to be not entirely effective and a residual tumor was still present, retinoic acid and interferon treatment was introduced. Presently, 4 years after the diagnosis, the patient is in complete remission and can be considered to be cured. The case presented here demonstrates that despite the favorable prognosis of the majority of infant neuroblastomas, in some cases the anatomic location of the tumor, leading to disturbance of vital functions, may serve as indication of chemotherapy. Our experience also proved the efficacy of retinoic acid and interferon treatment in relapsed neuroblastoma. PMID:15105902

  12. Curcumin Nanoformulation for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mohd S.; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Gara, Rishi K.; Maher, Diane M.; Kumari, Sonam; Sikander, Mohammed; Khan, Sheema; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. Current standards of care for cervical cancer includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Conventional chemotherapy fails to elicit therapeutic responses and causes severe systemic toxicity. Thus, developing a natural product based, safe treatment modality would be a highly viable option. Curcumin (CUR) is a well-known natural compound, which exhibits excellent anti-cancer potential by regulating many proliferative, oncogenic, and chemo-resistance associated genes/proteins. However, due to rapid degradation and poor bioavailability, its translational and clinical use has been limited. To improve these clinically relevant parameters, we report a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) based curcumin nanoparticle formulation (Nano-CUR). This study demonstrates that in comparison to free CUR, Nano-CUR effectively inhibits cell growth, induces apoptosis, and arrests the cell cycle in cervical cancer cell lines. Nano-CUR treatment modulated entities such as miRNAs, transcription factors, and proteins associated with carcinogenesis. Moreover, Nano-CUR effectively reduced the tumor burden in a pre-clinical orthotopic mouse model of cervical cancer by decreasing oncogenic miRNA-21, suppressing nuclear β-catenin, and abrogating expression of E6/E7 HPV oncoproteins including smoking compound benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced E6/E7 and IL-6 expression. These superior pre-clinical data suggest that Nano-CUR may be an effective therapeutic modality for cervical cancer. PMID:26837852

  13. Cervical Ripening in The Netherlands: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Claartje M. A.; Jozwiak, Marta; de Leeuw, Jan Willem; Mol, Ben Willem; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We aim to investigate methods and use of cervical ripening in women without and with a prior cesarean delivery in The Netherlands. Methods. In 2010, we conducted a postal survey in all Dutch hospitals with a labor ward. One gynecologist per hospital was addressed and was asked to respond on behalf of the staff. The questionnaire contained 31 questions concerning cervical ripening and induction of labor. We compared this survey to a similar Dutch survey conducted in 2006. Results. Response rate was 78% (70/92 hospitals). In women without a prior cesarean and in need of cervical ripening, all hospitals (100%) applied prostaglandins (either E1 or E2). In women with a prior cesarean, 21.4% of the hospitals performed an elective cesarean section if delivery was indicated (26.0% in 2006). In case of cervical ripening, 72.7% used mechanical methods (49.1% in 2006), 20.0% used prostaglandins (40.4% in 2006), 3.6% used a combination of prostaglandins and mechanical methods, and 3.6% used membrane-sweeping or oxytocin. Conclusions. In 2010, in The Netherlands, prostaglandins and Foley catheters were the preferred methods for cervical ripening in women without and with a prior cesarean, respectively. Use of mechanical methods in women with a prior cesarean has increased rapidly between 2006 and 2010, corresponding with decreasing use of prostaglandins and elective repeat cesarean sections. PMID:23997770

  14. Cervical cytology service in Nigeria: providers' perspective.

    PubMed

    Adesina, O A; Babarinsa, I A; Fawole, O A; Oladokun, A; Adeniji, A R; Adewole, I F

    2003-07-01

    It has been noted that efforts to organise an effective screening programme in developing countries will have to find adequate financial resources, develop the infrastructure, train the necessary manpower and elaborate surveillance mechanisms. In our study, we set out to determine (a) just how frequent is cervical cancer, to warrant the investment of funds in screening programmes; (b) what proportion of surveyed health facilities offer a cervical cytology screening programme; and (c) what basic facilities are currently available where such programmes exist? A pretested, self-completed questionnaire was sent to heads of department of obstetrics and gynaecology in public tertiary and secondary care hospitals in Nigeria as well as major mission hospitals. The response rate was 63%, monthly consultations included a mean of 114 (+/-11.7) new gynaecological patients and an average of 5 (4.7+/-0.8) cervical cancer cases. One-half of the institutions had a hospital-based cervical screening programme with an average of 27 patients being screened monthly. Finance was the main difficulty encountered in maintaining a screening service. Only four had a certified gynaecological oncologist. In conclusion, there is dismal utilisation of available services and a dearth of trained specialists should any cervical cancer screening programme be considered. PMID:12881085

  15. [Epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer progression].

    PubMed

    Ríos-Romero, Magdalena; Soto-Valladares, Ana Guadalupe; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of the screening test, such as Papanicolaou, and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer remains as a public health problem in México and it is the second leading cause of death for malignant neoplasias among women. High-risk HPV infection is the main risk factor for the development of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer; however, HPV infection is not the only factor; there are various genetic and epigenetic alterations required for the development of neoplasias; some of them have been described and even in some cases they have been suggested as biomarkers for prognosis. However, in contrast with other cancer types, such as breast cancer, in cervical cancer the use of biomarkers has not been established for clinical applications. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible; in this sense, their characterization is important, since they have not only a potential use as biomarkers, but they also could represent new therapeutic targets for treatment of cervical cancer. This review describes some of the more common epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer and its potential use in routine clinical practice.

  16. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  17. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome: a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sumant; Jha, Sneh Kumar; Pandey, Suchit; Shukla, Rakesh

    2015-10-16

    We report a case of bilateral useless hand syndrome, a rare presenting manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A 38-year-old man, a strict vegetarian and a teacher by occupation, presented with acute onset clumsiness of both hands while performing fine movements. Detailed history-taking, examination of the patient and relevant investigations (complete blood count, serum vitamin B12 and MRI of the cervical spinal cord) were carried out. Laboratory analysis was suggestive of vitamin B12 deficiency and MRI demonstrated a lesion involving the posterior columns of the cervical cord. The patient was diagnosed as a case of non-compressive cervical myelopathy predominantly involving the posterior column due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Acute bilateral useless hand syndrome can be a rare presenting feature of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  18. [Meaning of opening form of internal cervical opening in prognosis of cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hirnle, L; Zmijewski, J; Kłósek, A

    2000-04-01

    The introduction of the ultrasonographical examinations into the obstetrical diagnostics has created further possibilities in the process of recognition of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency. The qualification of the opening forms of the internal cervical os, described as Y, V and U forms, is possible with the utilization of transperineal and, especially, transvaginal sonography. The aim of this study was the valuation of the ultrasonographical examinations' usefulness in the diagnostics of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency and the estimation of the opening form of the internal cervical os as a prognostic factor in the pregnancy course. 265 cases of pregnant women hospitalized in Department of Fertility and Obstetrics Medical University of Wrocław have been analyzed. On the ground of the executed examinations it has been ascertained that the ultrasonographical examination, considering the valuation of the opening form of the internal cervical os, is essential in the diagnostics of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency. Furthermore, it has been proved that in the aspect of the obtainment of the full-term pregnancy, the worst-prognosing form of the internal cervical os is the U form and the statement of a U or V formed opening confirms the necessity of the circular suture of the cervix. PMID:10860259

  19. [Meaning of opening form of internal cervical opening in prognosis of cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hirnle, L; Zmijewski, J; Kłósek, A

    2000-04-01

    The introduction of the ultrasonographical examinations into the obstetrical diagnostics has created further possibilities in the process of recognition of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency. The qualification of the opening forms of the internal cervical os, described as Y, V and U forms, is possible with the utilization of transperineal and, especially, transvaginal sonography. The aim of this study was the valuation of the ultrasonographical examinations' usefulness in the diagnostics of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency and the estimation of the opening form of the internal cervical os as a prognostic factor in the pregnancy course. 265 cases of pregnant women hospitalized in Department of Fertility and Obstetrics Medical University of Wrocław have been analyzed. On the ground of the executed examinations it has been ascertained that the ultrasonographical examination, considering the valuation of the opening form of the internal cervical os, is essential in the diagnostics of the isthmico-cervical insufficiency. Furthermore, it has been proved that in the aspect of the obtainment of the full-term pregnancy, the worst-prognosing form of the internal cervical os is the U form and the statement of a U or V formed opening confirms the necessity of the circular suture of the cervix.

  20. 21 CFR 884.4270 - Vibratory cervical dilators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vibratory cervical dilators. 884.4270 Section 884.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....4270 Vibratory cervical dilators. (a) Identification. A vibratory cervical dilator is a device...

  1. A cervical ectopic masquerading as a molar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masir, N; Tamby, M R; Jamil, M A

    2000-03-01

    We report a case of cervical pregnancy complicated by life threatening hemorrhage. An initial diagnosis of molar pregnancy was made preoperatively. During uterine evacuation she developed profuse hemorrhage which required an emergency hysterectomy for uncontrolled bleeding. Histopathological examination confirmed a cervical pregnancy. The clinical and pathological criteria for the diagnosis and the etiology of cervical pregnancy are discussed. PMID:11072500

  2. An Historical Look at a Contemporary Question: The Cervical Cap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmet, Judy A.; Reagan, Patricia A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of the use of cervical caps as a birth control method is recounted in the areas of (1) revival of the cervical cap; (2) repopularization of the cervical cap; (3) empirical research; (4) nonbehavioral factors; (5) behavioral problems; and (6) health problems. (CB)

  3. Controversies involving hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Liliane; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez

    2009-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by a diffuse inflammatory reaction of lung parenchyma induced by a direct insult to the alveolar epithelium (pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome) or an indirect lesion through the vascular endothelium (extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome). The main therapeutic strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome is the ventilatory support. However, mechanical ventilation can worsen lung injury. In this context, a protective ventilatory strategy with low tidal volume has been proposed. The use of low tidal volume reduced the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, but result in hypercapnic acidosis. The current article presents a review of literature on the effects of permissive hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome. To that end, we carried out a systematic review of scientific literature based on established criteria for documental analysis including clinical and experimental articles, using as data bases MedLine, LILACS, SciELO, PubMed, Cochrane. Hypercapnic acidosis has been considered by some authors as a modulator of the inflammatory process of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, clinical and experimental studies on the effects of hypercapnic acidosis have shown controversial results. Therefore it is important to better elucidate the role of hypercapnic acidosis in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. [Implementation status of cervical screening in Europe].

    PubMed

    Döbrőssy, Lajos; Cornides, Agnes; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András

    2014-12-14

    Following the recommendation of the Council of the European Union, almost all governments made a policy statement on the introduction of cytology-based cervical screening for the health care system. However, the status of implementation is uneven. In the majority of the developed countries an organised model of screening recommended by the relevant international professional organisations are in use, while occasional screening is applied in some other countries. Screening strategies (i.e. age range, screening intervals), coverage of the target population, and compliance rates vary significantly. The screening activities are in a planning phase is some less developed Central-Eastern and South European countries. In Hungary, the transition from the traditional "gynaecological cancer screening" into the recommended organised cervical screening is in progress; the active involvement of the district health visitors in the cervical screening would provide further improvement. PMID:25481500

  5. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  6. Cervical cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2015-05-20

    Cervical cancer is a major gynecological cancer which involves uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasiveness of the female uterine cervix. With the availability of new technologies researchers have increased their efforts to develop novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, and evaluation and monitoring of therapeutic treatments. This approach will help in the development of early diagnosis and in increasing treatment efficacy with decreased recurrence. The present review explains the currently available biomarkers for cervical cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Apart from the currently available biomarkers the review also explains strategies for the development of biomarkers based on cellular and molecular approaches such as DNA, protein and other metabolic markers with suitable clinical examples. The investigations of specific proteins, enzymes and metabolites will establish more useful biomarkers for accurate detection and management of gynecological cancers especially cervical cancer.

  7. [Screening for cervical and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Wilm, J; Schüler-Toprak, S; Ortmann, O

    2016-09-01

    Screening programs for cervical cancer and breast cancer lead to a clear reduction of mortality. Starting in 2018 screening for cervical cancer will be structured as an organized program as already exists for breast cancer. In future screening for cervical cancer will be primarily performed by human papillomavirus (HPV) testing at intervals of 5 years while cytological examination (Pap smear) will also be available as an additional or alternative procedure. For breast cancer screening in Germany an annual clinical examination with palpation and mammography screening at 2‑year intervals is provided for women aged between 50 and 69 years. In Germany only approximately 50 % of invited women have used the opportunity to participate in screening in recent years. Weighing the benefits against the harms of cancer screening programs is always important in the process of evaluation of different strategies. PMID:27577734

  8. Cigarette smoking and invasive cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, L.A.; Schairer, C.; Haenszel, W.; Stolley, P.; Lehman, H.F.; Levine, R.; Savitz, D.A.

    1986-06-20

    A case-control study of 480 patients with invasive cervical cancer and 797 population controls, conducted in five geographic areas in the United States, included an evaluation of the relationship of several cigarette smoking variables to cervical cancer risk. Although smoking was correlated with both age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners, a significant smoking-related risk persisted for squamous cell carcinoma after adjustment for these factors (relative risk, 1.5). Twofold excess risks were seen for those smoking 40 or more cigarettes per day and those smoking for 40 or more years. Increased risks, however, were observed only among recent and continuous smokers. In contrast to squamous cell cancer, no relationship was observed between smoking and risk of adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. These results suggest a causal relationship between cigarette smoking and invasive squamous cell cervical cancer, perhaps through a late-stage or promotional event, although the mechanisms of action require further elucidation.

  9. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  10. [Wnt signalling pathway and cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Álvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; García-Castro, Beatriz; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a pathology that arises in the cervical epithelium, whose major cause of risk is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Due to the fact that HPV infection per se is not enough to generate a carcinogenic process, it has been proposed that alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. The Wnt family consists of 13 receptors and 19 ligands, and it is highly conserved phylogenetically due to its contribution in different biological processes, such as embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Additionally, this signaling pathway modulates various cellular functions, for instance: cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell polarity. This paper describes the Wnt signaling pathways and alterations that have been found in members of this family in different cancer types and, especially, in CC.

  11. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  12. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation.

  13. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  14. Factors Predictive of Protracted Course of Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated with Definitive Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dominello, Michael; Morris, Robert; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a benefit to completing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical cancer within 56 days. However, many patients experience delays due to missed radiation treatments that prolong the overall course of therapy. In order to improve patient care, we performed a quality improvement project to determine factors predictive of protracted treatment and develop strategies to enable timely treatment completion. Methods  Seventy-one patients treated for cervical cancer with CRT were identified. Medical records were reviewed to gather demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Prolonged treatment was defined as >56 days per the American Brachytherapy Society guidelines. The following variables were evaluated using paired t-tests and univariate logistic regression: demographics, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation technique, use of a boost, time to stent placement, time to first brachytherapy (BT), and genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Results The median treatment length for all patients was 59 days. Factors associated with prolonged treatment were time to cervical stent placement (p=0.001), delay ≥2 days between final external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and initial BT (p=0.0195), any grade GU toxicity (p=0.0007), or GI toxicity (p=0.0002), and the presence of a boost (p=0.0006). Age, stage, and IMRT versus conventional technique were not associated with protracted treatment. Conclusion  In this series of patients, acute toxicity, increased time to cervical stent placement, and time to first BT treatment were associated with prolonged treatment time. The patients who completed treatment in ≤56 days had a lower average time to cervical stent placement, 27 versus 31 days. Our results suggest that cervical stent placement during week four of treatment can enhance patient care and improve outcomes.  PMID:27182472

  15. Cervical spine immobilization in the elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J.; Wilson, David; Ball, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Background Immobilization of the cervical spine is a cornerstone of spinal injury management. In the context of suspected cervical spine injury, patients are immobilized in a ‘neutral position’ based on the head and trunk resting on a flat surface. It is hypothesized that the increased thoracic kyphosis and loss of cervical lordosis seen in elderly patients may require alternative cervical immobilization, compared with the ‘neutral position’. Methods To investigate this, an audit of pan-scan CT performed on consecutive major trauma patients aged over 65 years was carried out over a 6-month period. Utilizing the pan-CT’s localizing scout film, a novel measurement, the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle was independently measured by a senior spine surgeon (RJM) and a neurosurgeon (PJR) with the gantry used as a horizontal zero- degree reference. The benefit of the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle in the trauma setting is it can be assessed from the bedside whilst the patient is immobilized against a flat surface. Results During the 6-month study period, 58 patients were identified (30 male, 28 female), with an average age of 77.6 years (minimum 65, maximum 97). Results showed that ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angles varied widely, between +15.8 degrees in flexion to −30.5 degrees in extension (mean −12.4 degrees in extension, standard deviation 9.31 degrees. The interobserver correlation was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.995–0.998). Conclusions These findings suggest that, due to degenerative changes commonly seen in elderly patients, the routine use of the ‘neutral position’ adopted for cervical spine immobilization may not be appropriate in this population. We suggest that consideration be taken in cervical spine immobilization, with patients assessed on an individual basis including the fracture morphology, to minimize the risk of fracture displacement and worsened neurological deficit.

  16. Cervical lymphadenitis: tuberculosis or tularaemia?

    PubMed

    Karabay, O; Kilic, S; Gurcan, S; Pelitli, T; Karadenizli, A; Bozkurt, H; Bostanci, S

    2013-02-01

    Both tuberculosis cervical lymphadenitis (TCL) and oropharyngeal tularaemia (OT) have similar signs, symptoms and pathological findings. We aimed to investigate the frequency of tularaemia antibodies in patients diagnosed with TCL. Using data from the Tuberculosis Control Dispensaries between the years of 2008 and 2011 in Turkey, all patients diagnosed with TCL were informed about and included in the study. Control group subjects were selected from healthy blood donors who lived in the same region. After informed consent was obtained, the sera obtained from volunteer TCL patients and the control group were tested with a microagglutination technique for Francisella tularensis. Antibodies to Brucella were also investigated with a tube agglutination test for cross-reactivity in sera that were seropositive for tularaemia. Sera were obtained from a total of 1170 individuals in the TCL group and 596 in the control group from 67 of 81 provinces in Turkey. Francisella tularensis-positive antibodies were found in 79 (6.75%) cases in the TCL group and two (0.33%) cases in the control group with a titre of ≥1:80 (p < 0.01). When the presence of antibody of any titre was considered, the ratio became 8.2% (96/1170) in the TCL group and 0.67% (4/596) in the control group (p < 0.001). For the first time, with this study, tularaemia serology was found to be positive in a significant portion (6.75%) of diagnosed cases of TCL. In tularaemia endemic regions, it was concluded that tularaemia serology should be investigated in patients suspected of having TCL. PMID:23211027

  17. Cervical lymphadenitis: tuberculosis or tularaemia?

    PubMed

    Karabay, O; Kilic, S; Gurcan, S; Pelitli, T; Karadenizli, A; Bozkurt, H; Bostanci, S

    2013-02-01

    Both tuberculosis cervical lymphadenitis (TCL) and oropharyngeal tularaemia (OT) have similar signs, symptoms and pathological findings. We aimed to investigate the frequency of tularaemia antibodies in patients diagnosed with TCL. Using data from the Tuberculosis Control Dispensaries between the years of 2008 and 2011 in Turkey, all patients diagnosed with TCL were informed about and included in the study. Control group subjects were selected from healthy blood donors who lived in the same region. After informed consent was obtained, the sera obtained from volunteer TCL patients and the control group were tested with a microagglutination technique for Francisella tularensis. Antibodies to Brucella were also investigated with a tube agglutination test for cross-reactivity in sera that were seropositive for tularaemia. Sera were obtained from a total of 1170 individuals in the TCL group and 596 in the control group from 67 of 81 provinces in Turkey. Francisella tularensis-positive antibodies were found in 79 (6.75%) cases in the TCL group and two (0.33%) cases in the control group with a titre of ≥1:80 (p < 0.01). When the presence of antibody of any titre was considered, the ratio became 8.2% (96/1170) in the TCL group and 0.67% (4/596) in the control group (p < 0.001). For the first time, with this study, tularaemia serology was found to be positive in a significant portion (6.75%) of diagnosed cases of TCL. In tularaemia endemic regions, it was concluded that tularaemia serology should be investigated in patients suspected of having TCL.

  18. Cervical nucleolysis: indications, technique, results. 190 patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, D; Drape, J L; Jambon, F; de Souza-Lima, A; Tongio, J; Maitrot, D; Orenstein, D; Giannetti, A; Boyer, P; Srour, R

    1993-03-01

    For many years now percutaneous techniques have proved effective in the curative treatment of lumbar disc herniation, mostly in young subjects. This technique, however, is seldom indicated, let alone performed, in the cervical spine for a variety of reasons: a) the neck contains several closely arranged structures such as the vasculo-nervous bundles, the airway-digestive tract and the cervical spine around the spinal cord; b) the disc is approached by the anterior route, in contrast with the lumbo-sacral spine where the approach is posterolateral; c) the manufacturers insist on restrictions in the use of chymopapain in view of the potential risk of spinal cord damage, either by possible breaks in the meninges of by accidental diffusion of the enzyme into perimedullary epidural structures which support a particularly developed venous plexus; d) legal protection may be denied to operators who perform cervical chemonucleolysis, since the product has not yet been officially authorized, in France and perhaps elsewhere*, for treatment of cervical disc herniation. Several years of experience in the practice of cervical nucleolysis have convinced the authors that this method is remarkably effective and can be used in the treatment of cervicobrachial neuralgia (CBN) occurring in young subjects. Radiculalgia is essentially due to a disc fragment being positioned within the vertebral canal or a foramen, thereby compressing the nerve roots. During several years microsurgery of the disc has been effective in the treatment of refractory radiculalgia, and to compete with this procedure familiar to neurosurgeons cervical nucleolysis must convincingly demonstrate that its therapeutic value is at least as good as that of surgery. Finally, the vast majority of cervical disc herniations is made up of free disc fragments located within the meshes of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (transligamentous fragment). Cervical nucleolysis was introduced in France by Bonafe and

  19. Cervical insufficiency: a new issue for guidelines on prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease?

    PubMed

    Natale, Fabio; Brunelli, Roberto; Bizzarri, Bianca; Castronovo, Antonella; De Curtis, Mario

    2013-02-01

    The updated Guidelines on Prevention of Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease, issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, actually represent the mainstay in the prevention of neonatal early-onset group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis. According to these guidelines, patients with possible preterm delivery are screened for GBS colonization and offered intrapartum prophylaxis only if they enter preterm labor or experience preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Nonetheless, the fulfillment of these recommendations seems to be suboptimal in clinical practice, as it is heavily influenced by the knowledge of the colonization status. We report here 2 cases of blood culture-proven, early-onset neonatal GBS sepsis involving preterm infants delivered by mothers who had midtrimester cervical insufficiency and bulging membranes. Midtrimester acute cervical insufficiency strongly predicts preterm delivery. These women are liable to miss intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis because they typically have shorter labor, and the test results for GBS status are unlikely to be available before delivery. We believe that women with midtrimester cervical insufficiency and bulging membranes should be screened for GBS infection soon after hospital admittance if the gestational age is close to the threshold of fetal viability. A timely diagnosis of GBS colonization may not only increase the number of patients receiving targeted intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis but would also allow consideration of the administration of antepartum antibiotic prophylaxis. Indeed, as further outlined in this report, GBS intraamniotic infection may dramatically occur before the onset of preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

  20. Giant cervical myoma associated with urinary incontinence and hydroureteronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, V; Cetinkaya, N; Kilickaya, A; Kilinc, A; Köse, D

    2015-01-01

    Cervical leiomyomas compromise fewer than 5% of all uterine leiomyomas. Cervical myomas exacerbates surgical difficulties, such as poor operative field, difficult suture repairs, and blood loss. When performing myomectomy for cervical myomas, care must be taken to avoid injuries to neighboring structures in the pelvic cavity.These structures include the bladder in front of the cervix, the rectum behind the cervix, and the uterine arteries and ureters on both sides. Myomectomy for cervical myoma is empirically difficult and frequently problematic. The authors report a case of giant cervical myoma presenting with urinary incontinence.

  1. "Visual sensory trick" in patient with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan-Nyoung; Eun, Mi-Yeon; Kwon, Do-Young; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Kun-Woo

    2012-06-01

    Sensory tricks are clinical maneuvers that may partially relieve dystonic contractions. Any clinical maneuver that modulates afferent sensory and efferent motor pathways could be used as a sensory trick in patients with cervical dystonia. Although various sensory tricks have been described to reduce cervical dystonia, little is known about the exact mechanisms by which they operate. We report a case of cervical dystonia that was alleviated through the use of a visual-sensory trick. Our findings suggest that visual stimulation might be an effective sensory trick in cervical dystonia by compensating for a defective sensory system, or because visual pathways might be also affected by sensory interactions in cervical dystonia.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  3. Acupuncture's Effects in Treating the Sequelae of Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries: A Review of Allopathic and Traditional Chinese Medicine Literature.

    PubMed

    Dorsher, Peter T; McIntosh, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Each year, there are an estimated 12 000 individuals who sustain a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SCI and its sequelae has over the past 50 years led to the development of medical treatments (especially urologic) that have enhanced short- and long-term survival from these injuries. The prevalence of individuals with SCI in this country is ~250 000 individuals; and beyond the incalculable personal consequences of these devastating neurologic injuries, substantial direct and indirect societal costs result from the sequelae of SCI including paralysis, sensory loss, chronic pain, decubiti and bladder and/or bowel incontinence. The purpose of this treatise is to review the allopathic and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) literature available through MEDLINE, PubMed and eCAM search engines that discuss the potential uses of acupuncture to treat acute and chronic spinal cord injuries and their sequelae, and present the neurophysiologic mechanisms for acupuncture's beneficial effects. There is evidence that use of electroacupuncture in acute SCI may significantly improve long-term neurologic recovery from these injuries both in terms of motor, sensory and bowel/bladder function with essentially no risk. Acupuncture may even improve neurourologic function in individuals with chronic SCI, and help with management with chronic pain associated with these injuries.

  4. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  5. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Welcome to Seattle and the 2008 SciDAC Conference. This conference, the fourth in the series, is a continuation of the PI meetings we first began under SciDAC-1. I would like to start by thanking the organizing committee, and Rick Stevens in particular, for organizing this year's meeting. This morning I would like to look briefly at SciDAC, to give you a brief history of SciDAC and also look ahead to see where we plan to go over the next few years. I think the best description of SciDAC, at least the simulation part, comes from a quote from Dr Ray Orbach, DOE's Under Secretary for Science and Director of the Office of Science. In an interview that appeared in the SciDAC Review magazine, Dr Orbach said, `SciDAC is unique in the world. There isn't any other program like it anywhere else, and it has the remarkable ability to do science by bringing together physical scientists, mathematicians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists who recognize that computation is not something you do at the end, but rather it needs to be built into the solution of the very problem that one is addressing'. Of course, that is extended not just to physical scientists, but also to biological scientists. This is a theme of computational science, this partnership among disciplines, which goes all the way back to the early 1980s and Ken Wilson. It's a unique thread within the Department of Energy. SciDAC-1, launched around the turn of the millennium, created a new generation of scientific simulation codes. It advocated building out mathematical and computing system software in support of science and a new collaboratory software environment for data. The original concept for SciDAC-1 had topical centers for the execution of the various science codes, but several corrections and adjustments were needed. The ASCR scientific computing infrastructure was also upgraded, providing the hardware facilities for the program. The computing facility that we had at that time was the big 3

  6. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    PubMed

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  7. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Audirac-Chalifour, Astride; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings.

  8. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  9. A review of functional outcome measures for cervical spine disorders: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, André

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the reliability, validity and usefulness of three outcome measures: cervical ranges of motion, sagittal neck muscle strength and presence or absence of the flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) in the neck. The literature search included the Index Medicus and computerized database of MEDLINE for relevant material. Articles were selected if they contained primary data on neck range of motion, sagittal muscle strength and FRP. The results of 59 articles and 2 textbooks were analyzed. Normative values of cervical ROM have been reported in healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 74 years. The extent of degrees of motion lost per year did not differ between male or female subjects, but females started with higher degrees of active range of motion, which they maintained throughout life. Instrumented methods of recording muscle strength have included strain gauge dynamometers and modified sphygmomanometers. Parameters such as gender, age and stature were also observed to have important effects on muscle strength. The ratio of extension to flexion maximum isometric peak force has been estimated to range between 1.40-1.70 in normal subjects. Therefore, the extensor muscles of the neck are approximately 40% stronger then the neck flexor muscles. Evidence suggested that neck pain sufferers have weaker neck flexors than normal subjects. The FRP refers to the absence of myoelectrical activity in extensor muscles upon full forward flexion and has been documented in the cervical spine of asymptomatic subjects. In conclusion, inclinometric methods used for measurements of cervical range of motion were found to be safe, effective and reliable. The Cervical Range of Motion Device appeared to be well suited for clinical practice. The ratio of cervical extension-flexion maximum isometric voluntary contraction has been determined in asymptomatic subjects. The presence of the FRP in the neck has also been observed in normals. Future study is

  10. [Tuberculosis and tularemia as part of the differential diagnosis in cervical lymphadenitis].

    PubMed

    Karagöz, Ergenekon; Ulçay, Asım; Hatipoğlu, Mustafa; Turhan, Vedat

    2014-10-01

    We have read with interest the recently published article entitled "Investigation of the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph node aspirates of the suspected tularemia lymphadenitis cases" by Albayrak et al. published in Mikrobiyol Bul 2014; 48(1): 129-34. They concluded that tuberculous lymphadenitis (TCL) should be kept in mind in suspected tularemia cases and those patients should also be investigated simultaneously for the presence of TCL. With reference to data provided by the Ministry of Health in Turkey, the number of reported cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in comparison to previous years is currently on decline whereas a gradual increase in extra-pulmonary (specifically cervical TCL) cases has been observed. Besides, as one of the most common causes of cervical lymphadenitis, we are witnessing a marked increase in granulomatous infections which have been part of the evaluated cases of oropharyngeal tularemia in Turkey. In fact, differentiation of the two types of lymphadenitis can be confusing on the basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Thus, investigating the presence of M.tuberculosis in cervical lymph node aspirates of tularemia suspected cases is a vital contribution, specifically in a geographical region that is considered endemic for both diseases. We would therefore like to note the importance of this study and thank the authors for their comprehensive contribution. Contrary to what is noted in the study, cervical lymphadenitis due to acute tonsillopharyngitis unresponsive to penicillin and its derivatives, has been regarded as cervical TCL due to their histopathological appearance and have been treated unnecessarily with long-term antituberculous drugs. There are some publications from Turkey indicating the detection of Francisella tularensis antibodies and nucleic acids in the patients who were histologically diagnosed as TCL. In situations where the exact etiology of cervical lymphadenitis is not determined, treatment

  11. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  12. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended. PMID:27032913

  13. MRI features of cervical articular process degenerative joint disease in Great Dane dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy or Wobbler syndrome commonly affects the cervical vertebral column of Great Dane dogs. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints are a frequent finding in these patients; however, the correlation between these changes and other features of cervical spondylomyelopathy are uncertain. We described and graded the degenerative changes evident in the cervical articular process joints from 13 Great Danes dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy using MR imaging, and evaluated the relationship between individual features of cervical articular process joint degeneration and the presence of spinal cord compression, vertebral foraminal stenosis, intramedullary spinal cord changes, and intervertebral disc degenerative changes. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints were common, with only 13 of 94 (14%) having no degenerative changes. The most severe changes were evident between C4-C5 and C7-T1 intervertebral spaces. Reduction or loss of the hyperintense synovial fluid signal on T2-weighted MR images was the most frequent feature associated with articular process joint degenerative changes. Degenerative changes of the articular process joints affecting the synovial fluid or articular surface, or causing lateral hypertrophic tissue, were positively correlated with lateral spinal cord compression and vertebral foraminal stenosis. Dorsal hypertrophic tissue was positively correlated with dorsal spinal cord compression. Disc-associated spinal cord compression was recognized less frequently.

  14. Recovery of sensorimotor function and activities of daily living after cervical spinal cord injury: the influence of age.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Markus; Dietz, Volker

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study was designed to examine the influence of age on the outcome of motor function and activities of daily living (ADLs) in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study is based on the data registry of the European Multicenter Study of Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) study group. Initial upper-extremity motor score (UEMS) and its change over 5 months, as well as the initial Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score, did not differ between younger adults (20-39 years) and elderly (60-79 years) patients. However, the change in SCIM score over 5 months was significantly greater in the younger patient group. Initial UEMS, SCIM, and ulnar compound motor action potentials (CMAP), reflecting peripheral nerve damage (motoneurons and roots), were significantly greater in incomplete, compared to complete, SCI, regardless of age group. The initial assessment of UEMS in combination with CMAP recordings allows an early prediction of ADLs outcomes in both younger adults and elderly subjects. The impaired translation of gain in motor score into increased ADL independence in elderly patients requires specifically tailored rehabilitation programs.

  15. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    compared chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone; and one trial compared chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone. It was not possible to perform subgroup analyses by stage or tumour size. Compared with adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of death (two trials, 297 women; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36 to 0.87) and disease progression (two trials, 297 women; HR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.74), with no heterogeneity between trials (I2 = 0% for both meta-analyses). Acute grade 4 toxicity occurred significantly more frequently in the chemotherapy plus radiotherapy group than in the radiotherapy group (risk ratio (RR) 5.66, 95% CI 2.14 to 14.98). We considered this evidence to be of a moderate quality due to small numbers and limited follow-up in the included studies. In addition, it was not possible to separate data for bulky early stage disease. In the one small trial that compared adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy alone there was no significant difference in disease recurrence between the groups (HR = 1.34; 95% CI 0.24 to 7.66) and OS was not reported. We considered this evidence to be of a low quality. No trials compared adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy with no adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for early cervical cancer with risk factors for recurrence. Authors’ conclusions The addition of platinum-based chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy (chemoradiation) may improve survival in women with early stage cervical cancer (IA2-IIA) and risk factors for recurrence. Adjuvant chemoradiation is associated with an increased risk of severe acute toxicity, although it is not clear whether this toxicity is significant in the long-term due to a lack of long-term data. This evidence is limited by the small numbers and poor methodological quality of included studies. We await the results of three ongoing trials

  16. Cervical injuries suffered in automobile crashes.

    PubMed

    Huelke, D F; O'Day, J; Mendelsohn, R A

    1981-03-01

    The National Crash Severity Study data in which occupants sustained severe, critical-to-life, or fatal cervical injuries were reviewed. Of passenger cars damaged severely enough to be towed from the scene, it is estimated that one in 300 occupants sustained a neck injury of a severe nature. The neck-injury rate rose to one in 14 occupants for those ejected from their cars, although many of these injuries resulted from contacts within the car before or during the process of ejection. Severe neck injuries were rather rare in cars struck in the rear, but were more common in frontal and side impacts. Occupants between 16 and 25 years of age had such injuries more than twice as often as those in any other age group. Most of the neck injuries of a more severe nature involved the cervical spine or spinal cord. Injuries of the anterior aspect of the neck were relatively infrequent, and usually resulted from direct blunt impacts. National projections of the number of fatalities related to cervical injuries indicates that 5940 deaths, or approximately 20% of all in-car deaths, include fatal cervical spine injuries, and that about 500 cases of quadriplegia per year result from automobile accidents. PMID:7463132

  17. Congenital cystic choristoma mimicking cervical lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Park, Kwi-Won; Yun, Woong-Jae; Patten, Phillip P; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2008-09-01

    Choristoma is a tissue or mass with a normal histology at an abnormal location, and cystic choristoma has rarely been reported in the head and neck region. Cervical cystic masses in neonates are usually diagnosed as cystic lymphangioma. The authors present a case of a congenital laterocervical cystic mass that appeared to be lymphangioma, but which turned out to be a cystic choristoma.

  18. Fractal Analysis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizii, Markus; Moinfar, Farid; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) represent precursor lesions of cervical cancer. These neoplastic lesions are traditionally subdivided into three categories CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3, using microscopical criteria. The relation between grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and its fractal dimension was investigated to establish a basis for an objective diagnosis using the method proposed. Methods Classical evaluation of the tissue samples was performed by an experienced gynecologic pathologist. Tissue samples were scanned and saved as digital images using Aperio scanner and software. After image segmentation the box counting method as well as multifractal methods were applied to determine the relation between fractal dimension and grades of CIN. A total of 46 images were used to compare the pathologist's neoplasia grades with the predicted groups obtained by fractal methods. Results Significant or highly significant differences between all grades of CIN could be found. The confusion matrix, comparing between pathologist's grading and predicted group by fractal methods showed a match of 87.1%. Multifractal spectra were able to differentiate between normal epithelium and low grade as well as high grade neoplasia. Conclusion Fractal dimension can be considered to be an objective parameter to grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:25302712

  19. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  20. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... collect menstrual flow or to aid artificial insemination. This generic type of device is not...

  1. [A Case of Infantile Cervical Ectopic Thymus].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Tsuyoshi; Hakamada, Katsura; Oshima, Goro; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Iwanaga, Ken; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Yumiko; Kita, Junya; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    We report herein on a case of ectopic cervical thymus in a 5-year-old boy and the literature is reviewed. Swelling of the right neck was seen in the patient in his newborn period and it was diagnosed as cystic disease of the neck in a previous hospital at 4 months of age. Ultrasonography (US) and MRI revealed a cervical tumor consisting of a solid component in our hospital, and histopathologic examination showed no evidence of malignancy. The lesion revealed almost no change in size but showed a mosaic pattern on US, whereon the parents agreed to the removal of the tumor. Intraoperatively, the tumor could be easily dissected from the surrounding tissue and resected. The pathological diagnosis was normal thymic tissue. The postoperative course was uneventful and no complication or immunological disorders were seen. A cervical ectopic thymus is a congenital lesion that results from abnormal thymic migration during embryogenesis. Most patients are asymptomatic and the condition is found incidentally. Preoperative diagnosis of cervical ectopic thymus in children is rarely made, so surgical treatment is the definitive means of pathological diagnosis. This disease should be listed in the differential diagnosis for neck masses in children, and should be suspected when the mosaic pattern is detected in the lesion on US.

  2. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Elerding, S C; Fernandez, R N; Grotta, J C; Lindberg, R D; Causay, L C; McMurtrey, M J

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p = 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult. PMID:7294930

  3. Information provision in cervical screening in Australia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jane H; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie

    2014-09-01

    The National Cervical Screening Program and associated state and territory organisations are responsible for promoting cervical screening. Communication via multiple media channels encourages women to be screened. However, some communications are not clear about the risk of cervical cancer and the protective capacity and reliability of the Pap test. The potential harms of screening are rarely presented. Women usually receive Pap tests from general practitioners, who often screen opportunistically during appointments. Screening targets and incentive payments encourage high screening rates. Consent is an important ethical principle in the delivery of all health care. Provision of material information is one of the elements of valid consent. The combination of arguably ambiguous communications, screening participation targets and opportunistic testing under time pressure seems likely to undermine opportunities for women to be informed. Of particular concern are women who are less likely to benefit, those who are more likely to experience harm, and some groups of disadvantaged women. Improved communications could include providing patients with information on the absolute risk of cervical cancer, and the morbidity and mortality benefits and harms of screening. Screening programs internationally have begun providing such information. Areas for further research include the appropriate roles of the programs, screeners and individuals in providing and seeking information. Such work would identify the optimum method for informing women in the screening process.

  4. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  5. The molecular genetics of cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A

    1999-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma there are three major components, two of them related to the role of human papillomaviruses (HPV). First, the effect of viral E6 and E7 proteins. Second, the integration of viral DNA in chromosomal regions associated with well known tumour phenotypes. Some of these viral integrations occur recurrently at specific chromosomal locations, such as 8q24 and 12q15, both harbouring HPV18 and HPV16. And third, there are other recurrent genetic alterations not linked to HPV. Recurrent losses of heterozygosity (LOH) have been detected in chromosome regions 3p14–22, 4p16, 5p15, 6p21–22, 11q23, 17p13.3 without effect on p53, 18q12–22 and 19q13, all of them suggesting the alteration of putative tumour suppressor genes not yet identified. Recurrent amplification has been mapped to 3q+ arm, with the common region in 3q24–28 in 90% of invasive carcinomas. The mutator phenotype, microsatellite instability, plays a minor role and is detected in only 7% of cervical carcinomas. The development of cervical carcinoma requires the sequential occurrence and selection of several genetic alterations. The identification of the specific genes involved, and their correlation with specific tumour properties and stages could improve the understanding and perhaps the management of cervical carcinoma. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471054

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  7. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  8. Survivin promoter polymorphism and cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, A A; Murvai, M; Szarka, K; Kónya, J; Gergely, L; Hernádi, Z; Veress, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Survivin, a novel member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family, plays an important role in cell cycle regulation. A common polymorphism at the survivin gene promoter (G/C at position 31) was shown to be correlated with survivin gene expression in cancer cell lines. Aim To investigate whether this polymorphism could be involved in the development of human papillomavirus (HPV)‐associated cervical carcinoma. Methods Survivin promoter polymorphism was detected in patients with cervical cancer, in patients with equivocal cytological atypia and in a control population using polymerase chain reaction (PCR‐restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR‐single strand conformation polymorphism analysis. HPV was typed in patients with cervical cancer and cytological atypia using PCR‐RFLP. Results No statistically significant differences were found in the genotype distributions of the survivin promoter variants among our study groups. Conclusions The survivin promoter polymorphism at position 31 may not represent an increased risk for the development of cervical cancer, at least in the population studied here. PMID:16714396

  9. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  10. Extensive cervical lymphadenitis mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Felipe de Souza; da Silva, Marco Felipe Castro; Kozu, Kátia Tomie; Camargo, Luís Fernando Aranha; Rossi, Flávia Feijó Panico; Silva, Clovis Artur; Campos, Lúcia Maria de Arruda

    2015-01-01

    Cervical adenitis >1.5cm in diameter is the less frequently observed criteria in patients with Kawasaki disease and it is usually found in association with other symptoms during the acute phase. Moreover, the finding of fever and lymphadenitis with intense local signs of inflammation and phlegmon is rarely seen as the initial manifestation of Kawasaki disease. We report the case of a 7-year-old boy who had cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease. The patient had fever, cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis, and severe headache. Cefadroxil was prescribed based on the clinical diagnosis of bacterial adenitis. Because he remained febrile and phlogistic signs worsened, after 1 day of hospitalization, antibiotics were administrated intravenously (ceftriaxone and oxacillin). The computed tomography of the neck showed primary infectious/inflammatory process. On the fourth day, the patient had dry and scaly lips, and treatment with oxacillin was replaced by clindamycin because the patient was still febrile. On the ninth day, he presented non-exudative bilateral conjunctival injection. On the tenth day of febrile disease, a rash appeared on his trunk, hands and feet. Patient’s symptoms resolved after intravenous administration of immunoglobulin (2g/kg/dose), and he was discharged 2 days later. On the 14th day, the patient had lamellar desquamation of fingers. Kawasaki disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in children with febrile cervical lymphadenitis unresponsive to empiric antibiotics even if they have adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon. PMID:26132362

  11. Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Visits of Veterans With Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders: Rates, Trends, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bridget M; Evans, Charlesnika T; Kurichi, Jibby E; Weaver, Frances M; Patel, Nayna; Burns, Stephen P

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Respiratory complications are a major cause of illness and death in persons with spinal cord injuries and dysfunction (SCI&Ds). The objectives of this study were to examine rates of outpatient visits over 5 years for acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs), including pneumonia and influenza (P&I), lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs), and upper respiratory tract infections (URIs), in veterans with SCI&Ds and to determine whether individual characteristics were associated with the number of annual visits for each type of ARI. Methods: This was a longitudinal (fiscal years 1998–2002) study of ARI visits at the Veterans Health Administration (VA) in 18,693 veterans with SCI&Ds. To examine the associations between time, patient characteristics, and annual number of ARI visits, we used random effect negative binomial models. Results: Veterans with SCI&Ds had a total of 11,113 ARI visits over the 5-year period. There was a slightly decreasing trend for LRI visits over time (P < 0.01) but no significant change for other ARIs over time. There were 30 to 35 pneumonia visits and 21 to 30 acute bronchitis visits per 1,000 SCI&D veterans per year. Older veterans were more likely than younger to have P&I visits and less likely to have URI visits (P < 0.01). Veterans with paraplegia had fewer P&I visits than subjects with tetraplegia (IRR = 0.58; CI = 0.51–0.67). Conclusions: Visit rates for ARIs are stable for veterans with SCI&Ds. Identifying risk factors associated with ARI visits is an important first step to improve prevention and treatment of ARIs and to improve the health of veterans with SCI&Ds. PMID:17853657

  12. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V̇o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8-12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16-19%, P < 0.05). V̇o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function.

  13. HPV immunohistochemical testing and cervical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    MUREŞAN, DANIEL; ROTAR, IOANA CRISTINA; APOSTOL, SILVANA; COROIU, GEORGIANA; STAMATIAN, FLORIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infection represents a necessary condition for cervical carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of HPV testing using an immunohistochemical staining kit with implications upon both diagnosis and treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods Seventy-nine patients and eighty-six controls were enrolled in the study. Each patient had completed a physical examination, gynecological examination with cervical sampling using a liquid-based cytology system and also colposcopy. The cervical samples were analyzed according to Bethesda terminology and HPV-HR immunohistochemical staining was performed. In all the patients with high-grade lesion a surgical excision procedure was performed followed by pathological examination of the specimen. The collected data were analyzed using statistical software. Results The colposcopic examination has detected acetowhite modifications of the cervical epithelium in 47% of patients with ASC-US (Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance) in 71% of patients with LSIL (Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and in 100% of patients with HSIL ( High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LSIL in 27% of biopsy specimens in patients with ASC-US and in 79.99% of patients with LSIL respectively. In all patients with HSIL the diagnosis was CIN II or higher. The percentage of HPV-HR (Human Papilloma Virus – High Risk) positivity porportionaly increased with the severity of cytological diagnosis: 30% in ASC-US, 42.86% in LSIL and 75% in HSIL patients. The sensitivity of detection of HPV-HR was 50% with CI 95% [17.45;82.55] for ASC-US, 77.77% with CI 95% [51.91;92.62] for LSIL and 81.81% with CI 95% [58.99;94.00] for HSIL. Conclusion HPV testing can be an important screening tool for cervical dysplasia. The HPV testing targeting high risk types is indicated for ASC-US and LSIL triage. The present work

  14. Cervical Scoliosis: Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Addisu; Bakhsh, Wajeeh R.; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Cervical scoliosis is a rare condition that can arise from various etiologies. Few reports on the surgical management of cervical scoliosis exist. Our objective was to evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes following surgical management of cervical scoliosis. Methods We evaluated our cervical spine surgical database for patients with cervical scoliosis (Cobb angle > 10 degrees) from 2005 to 2010. Demographic data including age, gender, diagnoses, and primary versus revision surgery was collected. Surgical data including procedure (anterior versus posterior), estimated blood loss (EBL), length of surgery, length of hospitalization, and complications was recorded. Preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle measurements and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores were recorded. Results Cervical scoliosis was identified in 18 patients. We excluded 5, leaving 5 men and 8 women with an average age of 50.7 (median 52, range 25 to 65). The average follow-up was 40 months (median 36.5, range 5 to 87). An anterior-only approach was used in 6 cases (average 4 levels fused), 5 cases were posterior-only approach (average 8.7 levels fused), and 2 cases were combined anterior-posterior approach. The EBL was an average of 286 mL (median 150, range 50 to 900), the average surgical time was 266 minutes (median 239, range 136 to 508), and the average hospital stay was 2.7 days (median 2, range 1 to 7). Complications occurred in 7 patients, and 2 developed adjacent segment pathology. The average coronal Cobb angle preoperatively was 35.1 degrees (median 31, range 13 to 63) and corrected was 15.7 degrees (median 10.5, range 2 to 59) postoperatively (p < 0.005). The average NDI preoperatively was 24.9 (median 26, range 6 to 37) and was reduced to 17.8 (median 18, range 7 to 30) postoperatively (p < 0.02). Conclusion Surgical management of cervical scoliosis can result in deformity correction and improvement in patient

  15. Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Pakhee

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol’s iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

  16. Acute Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yoon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of acute vertigo may represent both a common benign disorder or a life threatening but rare one. Familiarity with the common peripheral vestibular disorders will allow the clinician to rapidly “rule-in” a benign disorder and recognize when further testing is required. Key features of vertigo required to make an accurate diagnosis are duration, chronicity, associated symptoms, and triggers. Bedside tests that are critical to the diagnosis of acute vertigo include the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and canalith repositioning manuever, occlusive ophthalmoscopy, and the head impulse test. The goal of this review is to provide the clinician with the clinical and pathophysiologic background of the most common disorders that present with vertigo to develop a logical differential diagnosis and management plan. PMID:23983835

  17. Changes in cervical sagittal alignment after single-level posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Heon; Shin, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Kim, Jung Hee

    2015-02-01

    Study Design Case series. Objective Posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy (PECD) can preserve the disk in patients with a foraminal disk herniation. However, progressive angulation at the operated segment is a concern, especially for patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees. The change in cervical lordosis after posterior PECD was analyzed. Methods Medical records were reviewed of 32 consecutive patients (22 men, 10 women; mean age, 49 ± 12 years) who had single-level foraminal soft disk herniation. The operation levels were as follows: C4-5 in 1 patient, C5-6 in 12, C6-7 in 18, and C7-T1 in 1. All patients were discharged the day after the operation, and neck motion was encouraged. All patients were followed for 30 ± 7 months (range, 24 to 46 months), and 21/32 patients (66%) had radiographs taken at 25 ± 11 months (range, 12 to 45 months). Radiologic parameters were assessed, including cervical curvature (C2-7), segmental Cobb's angle (SA), and anterior and posterior disk height (AH and PH, respectively) at the operative level. Results At the last follow-up, 29/32 patients (91%) had no or minimal pain, and 3/32 patients had occasional pain. SA, AH, and PH were not significantly changed. Cervical lordosis < 10 degrees was present in 10/21 patients preoperatively and in 3/21 patients at the last follow-up. For patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from -2.5 ± 8.0 to -11.3 ± 9.3 degrees (p = 0.01). For patients with cervical lordosis ≥ 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from -17.5 ± 5.8 to -19.9 ± 5.7 degrees (p = 0.24). Conclusions Cervical curvature does not worsen after posterior PECD. PMID:25648214

  18. Changes in Cervical Sagittal Alignment after Single-Level Posterior Percutaneous Endoscopic Cervical Diskectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi Heon; Shin, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Kim, Jung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Objective Posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy (PECD) can preserve the disk in patients with a foraminal disk herniation. However, progressive angulation at the operated segment is a concern, especially for patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees. The change in cervical lordosis after posterior PECD was analyzed. Methods Medical records were reviewed of 32 consecutive patients (22 men, 10 women; mean age, 49 ± 12 years) who had single-level foraminal soft disk herniation. The operation levels were as follows: C4–5 in 1 patient, C5–6 in 12, C6–7 in 18, and C7–T1 in 1. All patients were discharged the day after the operation, and neck motion was encouraged. All patients were followed for 30 ± 7 months (range, 24 to 46 months), and 21/32 patients (66%) had radiographs taken at 25 ± 11 months (range, 12 to 45 months). Radiologic parameters were assessed, including cervical curvature (C2–7), segmental Cobb's angle (SA), and anterior and posterior disk height (AH and PH, respectively) at the operative level. Results At the last follow-up, 29/32 patients (91%) had no or minimal pain, and 3/32 patients had occasional pain. SA, AH, and PH were not significantly changed. Cervical lordosis < 10 degrees was present in 10/21 patients preoperatively and in 3/21 patients at the last follow-up. For patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from −2.5 ± 8.0 to −11.3 ± 9.3 degrees (p = 0.01). For patients with cervical lordosis ≥ 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from −17.5 ± 5.8 to −19.9 ± 5.7 degrees (p = 0.24). Conclusions Cervical curvature does not worsen after posterior PECD. PMID:25648214

  19. [Acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, Konstantin; Schoepfer, Alain

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea, defined as three or more loose or watery stools per day, represents a frequent problem in outpatients as well as inpatients. As most of the patients with acute diarrhea show a self-limiting disease course, the main challenge for the physician is to discriminate patients for whom symptomatic therapy is sufficient from those with severe disease course and threatening complications. This review aims to provide a practical guidance for such decisions.

  20. Development and initial evaluation of the SCI-FI/AT

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Alan M.; Slavin, Mary D.; Ni, Pengsheng; Kisala, Pamela A.; Tulsky, David S.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Charlifue, Susie; Tate, Denise G.; Fyffe, Denise; Morse, Leslie; Marino, Ralph; Smith, Ian; Williams, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the domain structure and calibration of the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Index for samples using Assistive Technology (SCI-FI/AT) and report the initial psychometric properties of each domain. Design Cross sectional survey followed by computerized adaptive test (CAT) simulations. Setting Inpatient and community settings. Participants A sample of 460 adults with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) stratified by level of injury, completeness of injury, and time since injury. Interventions None Main outcome measure SCI-FI/AT Results Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Item response theory (IRT) analyses identified 4 unidimensional SCI-FI/AT domains: Basic Mobility (41 items) Self-care (71 items), Fine Motor Function (35 items), and Ambulation (29 items). High correlations of full item banks with 10-item simulated CATs indicated high accuracy of each CAT in estimating a person's function, and there was high measurement reliability for the simulated CAT scales compared with the full item bank. SCI-FI/AT item difficulties in the domains of Self-care, Fine Motor Function, and Ambulation were less difficult than the same items in the original SCI-FI item banks. Conclusion With the development of the SCI-FI/AT, clinicians and investigators have available multidimensional assessment scales that evaluate function for users of AT to complement the scales available in the original SCI-FI. PMID:26010975

  1. Sci-Math: Applications in Proportional Problem Solving. Module One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Madeline P.

    Sci-Math is an interdisciplinary curriculum intended to help students develop the math skills needed for science, especially dimensional analysis, ratio, and the concept of proportion. Sci-Math is divided into two modules with each module having a student and teacher's guide. This module is a pre-algebra module dealing with the arithmetic and…

  2. Risk of invasive cervical cancer after atypical glandular cells in cervical screening: nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andrae, Bengt; Sundström, Karin; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim; Sparén, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the risks of invasive cervical cancer after detection of atypical glandular cells (AGC) during cervical screening. Design Nationwide population based cohort study. Setting Cancer and population registries in Sweden. Participants 3 054 328 women living in Sweden at any time between 1 January 1980 and 1 July 2011 who had any record of cervical cytological testing at ages 23-59. Of these, 2 899 968 women had normal cytology results at the first screening record. The first recorded abnormal result was atypical glandular cells (AGC) in 14 625, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) in 65 633, and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) in 244 168. Main outcome measures Cumulative incidence of invasive cervical cancer over 15.5 years; proportion of invasive cervical cancer within six months of abnormality (prevalence); crude incidence rates for invasive cervical cancer over 0.5-15.5 years of follow-up; incidence rate ratios compared with women with normal cytology, estimated with Poisson regression adjusted for age and stratified by histopathology of cancer; distribution of clinical assessment within six months after the abnormality. Results The prevalence of cervical cancer was 1.4% for women with AGC, which was lower than for women with HSIL (2.5%) but higher than for women with LSIL (0.2%); adenocarcinoma accounted for 73.2% of the prevalent cases associated with AGC. The incidence rate of invasive cervical cancer after AGC was significantly higher than for women with normal results on cytology for up to 15.5 years and higher than HSIL and LSIL for up to 6.5 years. The incidence rate of adenocarcinoma was 61 times higher than for women with normal results on cytology in the first screening round after AGC, and remained nine times higher for up to 15.5 years. Incidence and prevalence of invasive cervical cancer was highest when AGC was found at ages 30-39. Only 54% of women with AGC underwent histology assessment

  3. Experiences using SciPy for computer vision research

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian R; Rosten, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    SciPy is an effective tool suite for prototyping new algorithms. We share some of our experiences using it for the first time to support our research in object detection. SciPy makes it easy to integrate C code, which is essential when algorithms operating on large data sets cannot be vectorized. The universality of Python, the language in which SciPy was written, gives the researcher access to a broader set of non-numerical libraries to support GUI development, interface with databases, manipulate graph structures. render 3D graphics, unpack binary files, etc. Python's extensive support for operator overloading makes SciPy's syntax as succinct as its competitors, MATLAB, Octave, and R. More profoundly, we found it easy to rework research code written with SciPy into a production application, deployable on numerous platforms.

  4. Delayed cerebral infarct following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Graffeo, Christopher S.; Puffer, Ross C.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.; Krauss, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) is an exceedingly rare complication. There are only three previous cases focusing on this problem in the literature; here, we present the fourth case. Case Description: A patient, cared for at an outside institution, developed a delayed ischemic stroke 3 days following an ACDF. This complication was attributed to carotid manipulation precipitating vascular injury in the setting of multiple comorbid vascular and coagulopathic risk factors, including previously undiagnosed carotid atherosclerosis, a prior history of pulmonary embolus requiring Warfarin anticoagulation (held perioperatively), acute dehydration, and atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: This case demonstrates the importance of focused history and examination in appropriate patients prior to ACDF, with special consideration given to the significance of age, comorbidities including coagulopathy and arrhythmia, and potential underlying vascular disease as markers for increased risk of perioperative thrombotic stroke associated with carotid manipulation. Patients at higher risk warrant comprehensive preoperative assessment, including medical evaluation, carotid imaging, and consideration for alternative surgical approaches. PMID:27713852

  5. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  6. The association of uterine cervical microbiota with an increased risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, H Y; Kim, B-S; Seo, S-S; Kong, J-S; Lee, J-K; Park, S-Y; Hong, K-M; Kim, H-K; Kim, M K

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested potential roles of the microbiome in cervicovaginal diseases. However, there has been no report on the cervical microbiome in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). We aimed to identify the cervical microbiota of Korean women and assess the association between the cervical microbiota and CIN, and to determine the combined effect of the microbiota and human papillomavirus (HPV) on the risk of CIN. The cervical microbiota of 70 women with CIN and 50 control women was analysed using pyrosequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene. The associations between specific microbial patterns or abundance of specific microbiota and CIN risk were assessed using multivariate logistic regression, and the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and the synergy index (S) were calculated. The phyla Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Tenericutes, Fusobacteria and TM7 were predominant in the microbiota and four distinct community types were observed in all women. A high score of the pattern characterized by predominance of Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Lactobacillus iners with a minority of Lactobacillus crispatus had a higher CIN risk (OR 5.80, 95% CI 1.73-19.4) and abundance of A. vaginae had a higher CIN risk (OR 6.63, 95% CI 1.61-27.2). The synergistic effect of a high score of this microbial pattern and oncogenic HPV was observed (OR 34.1, 95% CI 4.95-284.5; RERI/S, 15.9/1.93). A predominance of A. vaginae, G. vaginalis and L. iners with a concomitant paucity of L. crispatus in the cervical microbiota was associated with CIN risk, suggesting that bacterial dysbiosis and its combination with oncogenic HPV may be a risk factor for cervical neoplasia.

  7. [Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for early cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Muroya, T; Suehiro, Y; Umayahara, K; Akiya, T; Iwabuchi, H; Sakunaga, H; Sakamoto, M; Sugishita, T; Tenjin, Y

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and dysplasia of the uterine cervix has been increasing among young women in recent years. Most of these patients want to preserve their fertility. Also, to accommodate high-risk patients with complications, elderly patients, and those who refuse surgery, we perform PDT as a method to preserve fertility. The technique required for PDT is relatively simple, and can be performed without anesthesia, since it causes no pain or bleeding. PDT, with the use of Excimer Dye Laser (EDL), a type of low pulse laser, has a considerably higher degree of tissue penetration, even compared to PDT using Argon Dye Laser (ADL). Also, PDT using EDL can manage glandular involvement of CIN, and its special feature of selective destruction of malignant cells with almost no effect on normal tissues is noteworthy. Beginning in 1995, PDT using YAG-OPO Laser with a variable laser wavelength has been performed. PDT is performed 48 hours after intravenous injection of 1.5 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg photosensitizer Porfimer sodium (PHE) when the difference in density of PHE becomes greatest between malignant cells and normal tissue. The most advanced features of our method compared to conventional radiation which uses cut fiber are: First, by using colposcope with an optical path for the laser, it is possible to show a 10 mm circular spot at the focus of observation. With this method, cervical lesions can be observed and checked while receiving stable and precise photoradiation by using colposcope through direct observation. Second, for cervical canal treatment, by using a cervical probe to administer photoradiation in the forward direction in the cervical canal and to the side walls, 70% of the laser light is scattered to the side walls, so that all of the cervical canal can be radiated. Also, the cervical canal probe used to administer photoradiation, by inserting 2 cm to 3 cm depending on the conditions of the cervical canal and withdrawing the probe 1 mm, can

  8. 75 FR 24747 - SCI, LLC/Zener-Rectifier Operations Division A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of SCI, LLC/ON...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... of SCI, LLC/ON Semiconductor, Phoenix, Arizona. The notice was published in the Federal Register on December 11, 2009 (74 FR 65795). At the request of the petitioner, the Department reviewed the... of SCI, LLC/ON Semiconductor Including On-Site Leased Workers From Superior Technical...

  9. A lectin-based diagnostic system using circulating antibodies to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yingji; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed serological strategies using immunoglobulin fractions obtained by protein A chromatography to screen for cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN I). The reactivities of the immunoglobulins purified from sera of women with normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer were compared in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and enzyme-linked lectin assays (ELLAs). To capture the immunoglobulins, ELISAs and ELLAs were performed in protein A immobilized microplates. The reactivity of immunoglobulin in ELISA was in the increasing order normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer, while that in ELLAs for detecting fucosylation was in the decreasing order normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer. It was confirmed that women with CIN I were distinguishable from women with normal cytology or women with cervical cancer in the ELISA or the ELLA for detecting fucosylation with considerable sensitivity and specificity. Women with cervical cancer were also distinguishable from women with normal cytology with high sensitivity (ELISA: 97%, ELLA: 87%) and specificity (ELISA: 69%, ELLA: 72%). Moreover, the logistic regression model of the ELISA and the ELLA discriminated cervical cancer from normal cytology with 93% sensitivity and 93% specificity. These results indicate that the ELISAs and the ELLAs have great potential as strategies for primary screening of cervical cancer and CIN. It is expected that the ELISA and the ELLA can provide new insights to understand systemic changes of serum immunoglobulins during cervical cancer progression.

  10. The effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2013-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of cervical nerve root pathology that may lead to chronic pain and disability. Although manual therapy interventions including cervical traction and neural mobilization have been advocated to decrease pain and disability caused by cervical radiculopathy, their analgesic effect has been questioned due to the low quality of research evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in a patient experiencing cervical radiculopathy. A 52-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of neurological cervico-brachial pain and whose presentation was consistent with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical traction and a slider neural mobilization of the medial nerve were applied simultaneously to reduce the patient's pain and disability measured at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Improvements in all outcome measures were noted over a period of four weeks. Scores in all outcome measures revealed that the patient's pain had almost disappeared and that she was able to perform her household chores and job tasks without difficulties and limitations. In conclusion, the findings of this study support that the application of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization can produce significant improvements in terms of pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy.

  11. A rare cause of acute urinary retention in women: meatal condyloma accuminata, a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Onder; Suat Bolat, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Sahinkaya, Necmettin

    2016-01-01

    Acute urinary retention in women is a rarely seen phenomenon due to pharmacological, neuromuscular, anatomical, functional and infectious causes. Human papillomaviruses causing condyloma acuminata is one of the rarely reported viral infectious cause of acute urinary retention in case reports. A 45-year-old woman with acute urinary retention was found to have a round solid lesion on external urethral meatus. Histopathological examination revealed as condyloma acuminata. Urethral condyloma can be treated by local excision as an effective method for early improvement of voiding function. Even if the genital condyloma can be locally excised, patients should be referred to the gynecologists for cervical cancer screening.

  12. A rare cause of acute urinary retention in women: meatal condyloma accuminata, a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Onder; Suat Bolat, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Sahinkaya, Necmettin

    2016-01-01

    Acute urinary retention in women is a rarely seen phenomenon due to pharmacological, neuromuscular, anatomical, functional and infectious causes. Human papillomaviruses causing condyloma acuminata is one of the rarely reported viral infectious cause of acute urinary retention in case reports. A 45-year-old woman with acute urinary retention was found to have a round solid lesion on external urethral meatus. Histopathological examination revealed as condyloma acuminata. Urethral condyloma can be treated by local excision as an effective method for early improvement of voiding function. Even if the genital condyloma can be locally excised, patients should be referred to the gynecologists for cervical cancer screening. PMID:27642426

  13. A rare cause of acute urinary retention in women: meatal condyloma accuminata, a case report.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Onder; Suat Bolat, Mustafa; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Sahinkaya, Necmettin

    2016-01-01

    Acute urinary retention in women is a rarely seen phenomenon due to pharmacological, neuromuscular, anatomical, functional and infectious causes. Human papillomaviruses causing condyloma acuminata is one of the rarely reported viral infectious cause of acute urinary retention in case reports. A 45-year-old woman with acute urinary retention was found to have a round solid lesion on external urethral meatus. Histopathological examination revealed as condyloma acuminata. Urethral condyloma can be treated by local excision as an effective method for early improvement of voiding function. Even if the genital condyloma can be locally excised, patients should be referred to the gynecologists for cervical cancer screening. PMID:27642426

  14. Aetiology, pathogenesis, and pathology of cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Arends, M J; Buckley, C H; Wells, M

    1998-01-01

    Early epidemiological studies of cervical neoplasia suggested a causal relation with sexual activity and human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have emerged as prime suspects as venerally transmitted carcinogens. HPVs fall into two broad camps: low risk types, associated with cervical condylomas and CIN 1; and high risk types (mostly 16 and 18), found in 50-80% of CIN 2 and CIN 3 lesions, and 90% of cancers. This association with cancer is very strong, with odds ratios of > 15 (often much higher) in case-control studies that are methodologically sound. An infrequently detected third group of intermediate risk type HPVs is associated with all grades of CIN and occasionally with cancers. HPVs have also been detected in a wide range of asymptomatic controls, indicating that other events are required for development of neoplasia such as viral persistence and/or altered expression of viral genes, often following integration of the viral genome. This leaves the two major viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, directly coupled to viral enhancers and promoters, allowing their continued expression after integration. High risk HPV E7 proteins bind and inactivate the Rb protein, whereas E6 proteins bind p53 and direct its rapid degradation. A range of putative cofactors has been implicated in progression: HLA type, immunosuppression, sex steroid hormones, and smoking; most of these cofactors appear to influence progression to CIN 3. The natural history includes progression to CIN 3 in 10% of CIN 1 and 20% of CIN 2 cases, whereas at least 12% of CIN 3 cases progress to invasive carcinoma. Cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) often coexists with squamous CIN, and the premalignant potential of high grade CGIN is not in doubt, but the natural history of low grade CGIN remains uncertain. A high proportion of CGIN lesions and adenocarcinomas are HPV positive, and HPV18 has been implicated more in glandular than in squamous lesions. A strong clinical case for the application of HPV

  15. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  16. Traumatic cervical cord transection without facet dislocations--a proposal of combined hyperflexion-hyperextension mechanism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yoo-Hyun; Cho, Tai-Hyoung; Suh, Jung-Keun

    2010-08-01

    A patient is presented with a cervical spinal cord transection which occurred after a motor vehicle accident in which the air bag deployed and the seat belt was not in use. The patient had complete quadriplegia below the C5 level and his imaging study showed cervical cord transection at the level of the C5/6 disc space with C5, C6 vertebral bodies and laminar fractures. He underwent a C5 laminectomy and a C4-7 posterior fusion with lateral mass screw fixation. Previous reports have described central cord syndromes occurring in hyperextension injuries, but in adults, acute spinal cord transections have only developed after fracture-dislocations of the spine. A case involving a post-traumatic spinal cord transection without any evidence of radiologic facet dislocations is reported. Also, we propose a combined hyperflexion-hyperextension mechanism to explain this type of injury.

  17. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity. PMID:26311984

  18. [Accident analytics for structural traumas of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, E; Elbel, M; Schultheiss, M; Kettler, A; Kinzl, L; Kramer, M

    2004-12-01

    The differentiation between degenerative syndromes of the cervical spine and post-traumatic symptoms requires accident analysis. Experiments with human subjects yield data only in the low-energy range, and there are still no accident analyses of structural traumas of the cervical spine. From 1 January 2000 to 30 April 2002, 15 patients with structural injuries to the cervical spine due to car accidents were treated in the Department of Trauma Surgery of the University of Ulm. In 11 of these cases, the DEKRA Ulm completed an appraisal of the accident process.With lateral impacts, structural injuries to the cervical spine can occur even at speeds of only ca 10 km/h. Injuries to the alar ligaments are produced by frontal collisions with substantial differences in speed. Data from accident analysis of structural injuries to the cervical spine must be taken into consideration in causality examinations of distortions of the cervical spine.

  19. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  20. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  1. Cervical cerclage in the treatment of cervical incompetence in Zambian women.

    PubMed

    Waloch, M

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years from January 1989 to October 1994, 207 patients with cervical incompetence were managed with Mac Donald's cervical cerclage at Nkana/Wusikili Mine Hospitals, Kitwe, Zambia. The incidence rate of cervical incompetence in our population was 1.47%. Our results confirmed a success rate of 90.8% as compared to 52.5% in previous pregnancies. This represents 159 (76.8%) full term pregnancies, 29 (14%) premature deliveries and 19 (9.2%) abortions. Post operation total survival rate was 87.4% with fetal salvage ratio of 1.68. We confirmed that optimum time to insert cerclage was 18 weeks and below. The possibility of having a mature baby in the group of low number previous abortions was significantly higher as compared to the group with a higher number of habitual abortions. Better pregnancy outcome was seen in low parity group (less than 2 previous deliveries) as compared to higher parity group. Our study confirms that cervical cerclage is a successful way in the treatment of cervical incompetence.

  2. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women.

  3. Human papillomavirus, current vaccines, and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Anne M; Stringer, Marilyn; Averbuch, Tali; Witkoski, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infection, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The new human papillomavirus vaccine advances cervical cancer prevention; however, provider-recommended screening with Papanicolaou tests and lifestyle modifications are still needed. Widespread implementation of the vaccine and delivering cervical cancer screening to underserved populations remain a challenge. Nurses are ideally suited to address these needs by providing education to patients and families. PMID:19208050

  4. Clinical Influence of Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis on Neurological Outcome after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Major Fracture or Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Seiji; Morishita, Yuichiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Ideta, Ryosuke; Mori, Eiji; Yugue, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To clarify the influence of cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) on neurological functional recovery after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without major fracture or dislocation. Overview of Literature The biomechanical etiology of traumatic CSCI remains under discussion and its relationship with CSCS is one of the most controversial issues in the clinical management of traumatic CSCI. Methods To obtain a relatively uniform background, patients non-surgically treated for an acute C3–4 level CSCI without major fracture or dislocation were selected. We analyzed 58 subjects with traumatic CSCI using T2-weighted mid-sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. The sagittal diameter of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) column, degree of canal stenosis, and neurologic outcomes in motor function, including improvement rate, were assessed. Results There were no significant relationships between sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their American Spinal Injury Association motor scores at both admission and discharge. Moreover, no significant relationships were observed between the sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their neurological recovery during the following period. Conclusions No relationships between pre-existing CSCS and neurological outcomes were evident after traumatic CSCI. These results suggest that decompression surgery might not be recommended for traumatic CSCI without major fracture or dislocation despite pre-existing CSCS. PMID:27340535

  5. [Cervical disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-10-28

    A cervical disc herniation (CDH) is a frequently encountered pathology in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of a nerve root (a radiculopathy, with or without sensory-motor deficit) or of the spinal cord (myelopathy). The majority of CDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment. When a radiculopathy is found and a clinico-radiological correlation is present, a moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, or if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during 6 to 8 months, surgery is then recommended. A symptomatic cervical myelopathy is, by itself, an indication for a surgical treatment. PMID:26672182

  6. [Cervical cancer is a clinical challenge].

    PubMed

    Bjurberg, Maria; Beskow, Catharina; Kannisto, Päivi; Lindahl, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common female cancer world wide. In Sweden, some 450 cases are diagnosed annually. One out of three affected Swedish women is under the age of 40. Survival for all stages is 73 % in Sweden. Human papilloma virus (HPV) can be detected in the majority of all cervical cancers. Treatment consists of surgery for early stages, and a combination of chemoradiation and brachytherapy for locally advanced disease. For metastatic disease, the treatment is palliative. Late side effects after treatment may have serious impact on the quality of life. There is a strong need for more efficient treatment of metastatic disease. Current lines of research include surgical strategies, optimised radiotherapy, neoadjuvant therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy including therapeutic vaccines. PMID:26646957

  7. Cervical cerclage. A review of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R P; Chatwani, A; Sullivan, P

    1984-02-01

    The records of seventy-four patients who had had cervical cerclage procedures were surveyed. Without suture placement, these patients would have had a fetal salvage rate of 23%. The Shirodkar method was performed in 67 cases and the McDonald in 7. Spontaneous abortions occurred in ten women (13.5%). Four pregnancies terminated between the 20th and 26th week of gestation; two of these losses were due to chorioamnionitis and two to immature labor. No congenital anomalies were noted. In the remaining 60 patients, 6 pregnancies terminated between the 28th and the 36th week of gestation, and 54 pregnancies were carried beyond the 36th week; all of these infants survived. The salvage rate after the cerclage procedure was 81.8%. The average length of labor in the patients who delivered vaginally was 9 hours, 18 minutes. The incidence of cervical lacerations was 3%. Eight cesarean sections were performed (13.3%) for various reasons.

  8. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Capote Negrin, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The basic aspects of the descriptive epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America are presented. A decrease in the incidence and mortality rates has been observed in the period from 2000 to 2012 in all countries across the region, this has not occurred at the same proportions, and in many countries, observed figures of incidence and mortality are among the highest levels in the world. In Latin America, calculating a mean measure of the numbers from the GLOBOCAN data from 2000 to 2012, we can observe a difference of up to fivefold of the incidence (Puerto Rico 9,73 Vs Bolivia 50,73) and almost seven times for mortality (Puerto Rico 3,3 Vs Nicaragua 21,67). A report of the epidemiology, risk factors, and evaluation of screening procedures regarding the possible impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine I in the prevention of cervical cancer is presented. PMID:26557875

  9. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release.

  10. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release. PMID:26835213

  11. Opening Comments: SciDAC 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Welcome to Seattle and the 2008 SciDAC Conference. This conference, the fourth in the series, is a continuation of the PI meetings we first began under SciDAC-1. I would like to start by thanking the organizing committee, and Rick Stevens in particular, for organizing this year's meeting. This morning I would like to look briefly at SciDAC, to give you a brief history of SciDAC and also look ahead to see where we plan to go over the next few years. I think the best description of SciDAC, at least the simulation part, comes from a quote from Dr Ray Orbach, DOE's Under Secretary for Science and Director of the Office of Science. In an interview that appeared in the SciDAC Review magazine, Dr Orbach said, `SciDAC is unique in the world. There isn't any other program like it anywhere else, and it has the remarkable ability to do science by bringing together physical scientists, mathematicians, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists who recognize that computation is not something you do at the end, but rather it needs to be built into the solution of the very problem that one is addressing'. Of course, that is extended not just to physical scientists, but also to biological scientists. This is a theme of computational science, this partnership among disciplines, which goes all the way back to the early 1980s and Ken Wilson. It's a unique thread within the Department of Energy. SciDAC-1, launched around the turn of the millennium, created a new generation of scientific simulation codes. It advocated building out mathematical and computing system software in support of science and a new collaboratory software environment for data. The original concept for SciDAC-1 had topical centers for the execution of the various science codes, but several corrections and adjustments were needed. The ASCR scientific computing infrastructure was also upgraded, providing the hardware facilities for the program. The computing facility that we had at that time was the big 3

  12. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 μg/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 μg/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was

  13. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and β-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 μg/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 μg/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was

  14. Margins for cervical and vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Namita; Rauh, Lisa A; Lachiewicz, Mark P; Horowitz, Ira R

    2016-03-01

    Surgery is the primary treatment for vulvar cancer as well as early-stage carcinoma of the cervix. This article reviews the significance of margin status after surgery on overall survival, need for further surgical intervention, and role for possible adjuvant therapy. It summarizes the abundant literature on margin status in vulvar cancer and highlights the need for further investigation on the prognostic significance of margins in cervical cancer. In addition, it reviews other important operative considerations.

  15. The role of trachelectomy in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halaska, MJ; Robova, H; Pluta, M; Rob, L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. Because it often affects women of childbearing age (19–45 years), fertility-sparing surgery is an important issue. The article reviews current viable fertility-sparing options with a special focus on trachelectomy, including vaginal radical trachelectomy, abdominal radical trachelectomy and simple trachelectomy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is also discussed. Finally, the decision to proceed with fertility-sparing treatment should be a patient-driven process. PMID:25729419

  16. Cervical Cystic Hygroma in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Derin, Serhan; Şahan, Murat; Dere, Yelda; Çullu, Neşat; Şahan, Leyla

    2014-01-01

    Cystic hygromas/lymphangiomas are extremely rare malformations in adults. They are usually seen in infants and children under 2 years of age. En bloc resection is difficult due to the adhesive characteristics of the tumors. Inadequate surgical intervention often leads to recurrent disease. We report herein the case of a cystic hygroma/lymphangioma that presented as an uncommon mass on the cervical region in an adult, together with its histopathological, radiologic, and operative features. PMID:25548704

  17. Cervical cystic hygroma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Şahan, Murat; Dere, Yelda; Çullu, Neşat; Şahan, Leyla

    2014-01-01

    Cystic hygromas/lymphangiomas are extremely rare malformations in adults. They are usually seen in infants and children under 2 years of age. En bloc resection is difficult due to the adhesive characteristics of the tumors. Inadequate surgical intervention often leads to recurrent disease. We report herein the case of a cystic hygroma/lymphangioma that presented as an uncommon mass on the cervical region in an adult, together with its histopathological, radiologic, and operative features. PMID:25548704

  18. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  19. Antibody diffusion in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, W M; Radomsky, M L; Whaley, K J; Cone, R A

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal immune system actively transports large quantities of antibodies into all mucus secretions, and these secreted antibodies help prevent infectious entry of many pathogens. Mucus is generally thought to protect epithelial cells by forming a diffusional barrier through which only small molecules can pass. However, electron microscopy indicates that the pore size in mucus is approximately 100 nm, which suggests that antibodies as well as other large molecules might also diffuse through mucus. We measured the diffusion coefficients for antibodies and other proteins within human midcycle cervical mucus using two techniques: fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The two techniques are complementary, since the rates of diffusion are observed over millimeter distances with fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and micron distances with fluorescence photobleaching recovery. Both methods yielded essentially the same diffusion coefficients. In contrast to previous reports indicating mucus significantly impedes diffusion of small molecules, antibody diffusion in mucus was relatively unimpeded. In our observations IgG, IgG fragments, IgA, and IgM diffused almost as rapidly in cervical mucus as in water (1.0 > Dmucus/Dwater > 0.7). Simple models for diffusion through water-filled pores suggest that the hydrodynamic pore size for cervical mucus is approximately 100 nm, smaller than the approximately 1000 nm pore size of a collagen gel (at 1 mg/ml) and larger than the approximately 10 nm pore size of gelatin (at 100 mg/ml). This estimated pore size is consistent both with electron micrographs and geometric models of interfiber spacing. Based on these results, we predict that particles as large as viruses can diffuse rapidly through human midcycle cervical mucus, provided the particle forms no adhesive interactions with mucus glycoproteins. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8161703

  20. Cervical kinematics during drinking in developing chickens.

    PubMed

    Heidweiller, J; Van der Leeuw, A H; Zweers, G A

    1992-05-01

    Development of head neck motion patterns is studied in drinking chickens to examine (1) general motion principles, (2) ontogenetic changes in these patterns, and (3) whether pattern changes are due to scaling effects during growth. Behavioral patterns are analyzed by high speed filming, radiography, and calculation of rotation patterns for each joint during all movement patterns. Flexibility and variability are great, but representative kinematic patterns are selected for immersion, upstroke, and tip-up phases. Five principles were found that control cervical motion. Two principles maximize rotation efficiency: the geometric and lever arm principles. Two trajectory compensating principles occur; one controls compensation for overflexion, and the other corrects curved into straight trajectories of head motion. One principle occurs that minimizes rotation force if large forces tend to develop in one joint. This principle results in a characteristic cervical motion pattern ("bike chain" pattern). There are three developmental periods: (1) hatchlings (2) chickens 1 to 4 weeks old (1-4W), and (3) older than 4 weeks. Each period is characterized by different kinematic patterns. In 1-4W chicks, the rotation force is minimized. In older stages, the cervical joints rotate according to geometric and lever arm principles. The totally different motion pattern in hatchlings results from a different behavioral reaction to water and the influence of large centrifugal forces. Transitions in cervical motion patterns are connected to effects of scaling, primarily changes in head and body weights. Changes in motion patterns are not related to changes in anatomical characters such as flexion extremes and relative length of each vertebra since these are similar in all stages.