Science.gov

Sample records for acute childhood leukemia

  1. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  4. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  6. Benzene and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Campbell, Janis E; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pate, Anne; Stoner, Julie A; Peck, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Although childhood cancer is a leading cause of childhood mortality in the US, evidence regarding the etiology is lacking. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between benzene, a known carcinogen, and childhood acute leukemia. We conducted a case-control study including cases diagnosed with acute leukemia between 1997 and 2012 (n = 307) from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and controls matched on week of birth from birth certificates (n = 1013). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between benzene, measured with the 2005 National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) at census tract of the birth residence, and childhood acute leukemia. We observed no differences in benzene exposure overall between cases and controls. However, when stratified by year of birth, cases born from 2005 to 2010 had a three-fold increased unadjusted odds of elevated exposure compared to controls born in this same time period (4th Quartile OR: 3.53, 95% CI: 1.35, 9.27). Furthermore, the estimates for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were stronger than those with acute lymphoid leukemia, though not statistically significant. While we did not observe an association between benzene and childhood leukemia overall, our results suggest that acute leukemia is associated with increased benzene exposure among more recent births, and children with AML may have increased benzene exposure at birth. Using the NATA estimates allowed us to assess a specific pollutant at the census tract level, providing an advantage over monitor or point source data. Our study, however, cannot rule out the possibility that benzene may be a marker of other traffic-related exposures and temporal misclassification may explain the lack of an association among earlier births. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  8. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  10. Novel therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Raoul; Vairy, Stéphanie; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2017-08-01

    During recent decades, the prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically, nowadays, reaching a cure rate of almost 90%. These results are due to a better management and combination of old therapies, refined risk-group stratification and emergence of minimal residual disease (MRD) combined with treatment's intensification for high-risk subgroups. However, the subgroup of patients with refractory/relapsed ALL still presents a dismal prognosis indicating necessity for innovative therapeutic approaches. Areas covered: We performed an exhaustive review of current first-line therapies for childhood ALL in the worldwide main consortia, summarized the major advances for front-line and relapse treatment and highlighted recent and promising innovative therapies with an overview of the most promising ongoing clinical trials. Expert opinion: Two major avenues marked the beginning of 21(st) century. First, is the introduction of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor coupled to chemotherapy for treatment of Philadelphia positive ALL opening new treatment possibilities for the recently identified subgroup of Ph-like ALL. Second, is the breakthrough of immunotherapy, notably CAR T-cell and specific antibody-based therapy, with remarkable success observed in initial studies. This review gives an insight on current knowledge in these innovative therapeutic directions, summarizes currently ongoing clinical trials and addresses challenges these approaches are faced with.

  11. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  12. Measurements of treatment response in childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Measuring response to chemotherapy is a backbone of the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. This task has historically relied on the ability to identify leukemic cells among normal bone marrow cells by their morphology. However, more accurate ways to identify leukemic cells have been developed, which allow their detection even when they are present in small numbers that would be impossible to be recognized by microscopic inspection. The levels of such minimal residual disease (MRD) are now widely used as parameters for risk assignment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increasingly so in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, different MRD monitoring methods may produce discrepant results. Moreover, results of morphologic examination may be in stark contradiction to MRD measurements, thus creating confusion and complicating treatment decisions. This review focusses on the relation between results of different approaches to measure response to treatment and define relapse in childhood acute leukemia. PMID:23320002

  13. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  14. Backtracking RAS mutations in High Hyperdiploid Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P < 0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype. PMID:20688547

  15. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  16. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Saldivar, María Luisa; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Espinosa-Hernández, Laura; Flores-Chapa, José de Diego; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alvarado-Ibarra, Martha; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Duarte-Rodríguez, David Aldebarán; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Del Campo-Martínez, María de Los Ángeles; Cárdenas-Cardos, Rocío; Alamilla-Galicia, Paola Hillary; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortega-Alvarez, Manuel Carlos; Mejia-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2011-08-17

    Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high risk. There was a positive

  18. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  19. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  1. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  2. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  3. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Integrating Genomics into Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy of childhood, is a genetically complex entity that remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. Major advances in genomic and epigenomic profiling during the past decade have appreciably enhanced knowledge of the biology of de novo and relapsed ALL and have facilitated more precise risk stratification of patients. These achievements have also provided critical insights regarding potentially targetable lesions for development of new therapeutic approaches in the era of precision medicine. This review delineates the current genetic landscape of childhood ALL with emphasis upon patient outcomes with contemporary treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic implications of newly identified genomic alterations in specific subsets of ALL. PMID:26194091

  4. Fetal growth and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R; Metayer, Catherine; Schüz, Joachim; Petridou, Eleni; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Roman, Eve; Dockerty, John D; Spector, Logan G; Koifman, Sérgio; Orsi, Laurent; Rudant, Jérémie; Dessypris, Nick; Simpson, Jill; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Baka, Margarita; Faro, Alessandra; Armstrong, Bruce K; Clavel, Jacqueline; Buffler, Patricia A

    2013-12-15

    Positive associations have been reported between the measures of accelerated fetal growth and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated this association by pooling individual-level data from 12 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Two measures of fetal growth-weight-for-gestational-age and proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW)-were analysed. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and combined in fixed effects meta-analyses. Pooled analyses of all data were also undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analyses were undertaken when possible. Data on weight for gestational age were available for 7,348 cases and 12,489 controls from all 12 studies and POBW data were available for 1,680 cases and 3,139 controls from three studies. The summary ORs from the meta-analyses were 1.24 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.36) for children who were large for gestational age relative to appropriate for gestational age, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.24) for a one-standard deviation increase in POBW. The pooled analyses produced similar results. The summary and pooled ORs for small-for-gestational-age children were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.95), respectively. Results were consistent across subgroups defined by sex, ethnicity and immunophenotype, and when the analysis was restricted to children who did not have high birth weight. The evidence that accelerated fetal growth is associated with a modest increased risk of childhood ALL is strong and consistent with known biological mechanisms involving insulin-like growth factors. © 2013 UICC.

  5. Fetal Growth and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC)

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R.; Metayer, Catherine; Schüz, Joachim; Petridou, Eleni; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Roman, Eve; Dockerty, John D.; Spector, Logan G.; Koifman, Sérgio; Orsi, Laurent; Rudant, Jérémie; Dessypris, Nick; Simpson, Jill; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Baka, Margarita; Faro, Alessandra; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Positive associations have been reported between measures of accelerated fetal growth and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated this association by pooling individual-level data from 12 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Two measures of fetal growth – weight-for-gestational-age and proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW) – were analysed. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and combined in fixed effects meta-analyses. Pooled analyses of all data were also undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analyses were undertaken when possible. Data on weight for gestational age were available for 7,348 cases and 12,489 controls from all 12 studies and POBW data were available for 1,680 cases and 3,139 controls from three studies. The summary ORs from the meta-analyses were 1.24 (95% CI 1.13, 1.36) for children who were large for gestational age relative to appropriate for gestational age, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.24) for a one standard deviation increase in POBW. The pooled analyses produced similar results. The summary and pooled ORs for small-for-gestational-age children were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.77, 0.95) respectively. Results were consistent across subgroups defined by sex, ethnicity and immunophenotype, and when the analysis was restricted to children who did not have high birth weight. The evidence that accelerated fetal growth is associated with a modest increased risk of childhood ALL is strong and consistent with known biological mechanisms involving insulin like growth factors. PMID:23754574

  6. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  7. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  8. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  9. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Amy L; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Agnes F; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L; Leal, Valeria P; Espinoza, Juan P M; Kamel, Azza M; Ebid, Gamal T A; Radwan, Eman R; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2011-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  12. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  13. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  14. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  15. Therapies on the Horizon for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, William L.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review The prognosis for children with the most common childhood malignancy, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically. However the burden of therapy can be substantial with long term side effects and certain subgroups continue to have a poor outcome. Recent Advances The recent discovery of new genetic alterations in high risk subsets provide targets for precision medicine-based interventions using existing FDA approved agents. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches are being deployed in relapsed ALL, one of the leading causes of cancer cell death in children. Moreover genomic analysis has charted the evolution of tumor subclones and relapse specific alterations now provide a mechanistic explanation for drug resistance setting the stage for targeted therapy. There is greater recognition that host factors, genetic polymorphisms, influence cancer risk, response to therapy and toxicity. In the future it is anticipated that they will be integrated into clinical decision making to maximize cure and minimize side effects. Recent efforts to limit prophylactic central nervous system irradiation have been successful thereby sparing many children late neurocognitive impairments. Summary Integration of advances in precision medicine approaches and novel agents will continue to increase the cure rate and decrease the burden of therapy for childhood ALL. PMID:26576011

  16. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  19. Germline genomic variations associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Lisa R.; Yang, Wenjian; French, Deborah; Hunger, Stephen; Carroll, William L.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Willman, Cheryl; Neale, Geoffrey; Downing, James; Raimondi, Susana; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    We identified germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its subtypes. Using the Affymetrix 500K Mapping array and publicly available genotypes, we identified 18 SNPs whose allele frequency differed (P<1×10−5) between a pediatric ALL population (n=317) and non-ALL controls (n=17,958). Six of these SNPs differed (P≤0.05) in allele frequency among four ALL subtypes. Two SNPs in ARID5B not only differed between ALL and non-ALL groups (rs10821936, P=1.4×10−15, odds ratio[OR]=1.91; rs10994982, P=5.7×10−9, OR=1.62) but also distinguished B-hyperdiploid ALL from other subtypes (rs10821936, P=1.62 ×10−5, OR=2.17; rs10994982, P=0.003, OR 1.72). These ARID5B SNPs also distinguished B-hyperdiploid ALL from other subtypes in an independent validation cohort (n=124 children with ALL) (P=0.003 and P=0.0008, OR 2.45 and 2.86, respectively) and were associated with methotrexate accumulation and gene expression pattern in leukemic lymphoblasts. We conclude that germline genomic variations affect susceptibility to and characteristics of specific ALL subtypes. PMID:19684603

  20. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Baruchel, Andre; Devidas, Meenakshi; Escherich, Gabriele; Gibson, Brenda; Heydrich, Christiane; Horibe, Keizo; Ishida, Yasushi; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Michel, Gérard; Pieters, Rob; Piette, Caroline; Pui, Ching-Hon; Raimondi, Susana; Silverman, Lewis; Stanulla, Martin; Stark, Batia; Winick, Naomi; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. Patients and Methods We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980 and 2007. Results Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival estimates for AML were 11.2% ± 2.9% for 125 patients diagnosed before 2000 and 34.1% ± 6.3% for 61 patients diagnosed after 2000 (P < .001); 5-year survival estimates for MDS were 17.1% ± 6.4% (n = 36) and 48.2% ± 10.6% (n = 33; P = .005). Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation failed to improve outcome of secondary myeloid malignancies after adjusting for waiting time to transplantation. Five-year survival rates were above 90% for patients with meningioma, Hodgkin lymphoma, thyroid carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and parotid gland tumor, and 68.5% ± 6.4% for those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Eighty-nine percent of patients with brain tumors had received cranial irradiation. Solid tumors were associated with cyclophosphamide exposure, and myeloid malignancy was associated with topoisomerase II inhibitors and starting doses of methotrexate of at least 25 mg/m2 per week and mercaptopurine of at least 75 mg/m2 per day. Myeloid malignancies with monosomy 7/5q− were associated with high hyperdiploid ALL karyotypes, whereas 11q23/MLL-rearranged AML or MDS was associated with ALL harboring translocations of t(9;22), t(4;11), t(1;19), and t(12;21) (P = .03). Conclusion SMNs, except for brain tumors, AML, and MDS, have outcomes similar to their primary counterparts. PMID:23690411

  1. The concurrent occurrence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood acute leukemia in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Gisele Moledo; Azevedo-Silva, Fernanda; dos Santos Thuler, Luiz Claudio; Pina, Eugênia Terra Granado; Souza, Celeste S.F.; Calabrese, Katia; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the co-existence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood leukemia in patients naïve to treatment; this has serious clinical and epidemiological implications. Methods The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies prior to any treatment was investigated in children with clinical features of acute leukemia. Serological tests were performed in 470 samples drawn from under 14-year-old children from different regions of Brazil with clinical suspicion of acute leukemia. Acute leukemia subtypes were characterized by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Morphological analyses of bone marrow aspirates were systematically performed to visualize blast cells and/or the formation of L. chagasi amastigotes. Data analysis used a standard univariate procedure and the Pearson's chi-square test. Results The plasma of 437 children (93%) displayed antibodies against L. chagasi by indirect immunofluorescence assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. Of the 437 patients diagnosed from 2002 to 2006, 254 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 92 had acute myeloid leukemia, and 91 did not have acute leukemia. The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies according to the indirect immunofluorescence assay test (22.5%) was similar in children with or without acute leukemia (p-value = 0.76). The co-existence of visceral leishmanasis and acute leukemia was confirmed in 24 children. The overall survival of these children was poor with a high death rate during the first year of leukemia treatment. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of childhood leukemia, visceral leishmanasis should be considered as a potential concurrent disease in regions where L. chagasi is endemic. PMID:25305169

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Novel agents for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Annesley, Colleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Together, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) make up approximately one-third of all pediatric cancer diagnoses. Despite remarkable improvement in the treatment outcomes of these diseases over the past several decades, the prognosis for certain high-risk groups of leukemia and for relapsed disease remains poor. However, recent insights into different types of ‘driver’ lesions of leukemogenesis, such as the aberrant activation of signaling pathways and various epigenetic modifications, have led to the discovery of novel agents that specifically target the mechanism of transformation. In parallel, emerging approaches in cancer immunotherapy have led to newer therapies that can exploit and harness cytotoxic immunity directed against malignant cells. This review details the rationale and implementation of recent and specifically targeted therapies in acute pediatric leukemia. Topics covered include the inhibition of critical cell signaling pathways [BCR-ABL, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Janus-associated kinase (JAK)], proteasome inhibition, inhibition of epigenetic regulators of gene expression [DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and disruptor of telomeric signaling-1 (DOT1L) inhibitors], monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugated toxins, bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR) T cells. PMID:25830014

  5. Compliance with a protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Benigna Maria; Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Silva, Marcilene Rezende; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2011-01-01

    Background Remission rates achieved after the initial treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia may be similar in both developed and developing countries, but relapse rates are much higher in the latter. Thus, other reasons are needed, in addition to biological characteristics of the leukemic cells themselves, to explain the unfavorable evolution of patients living in unfavorable socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Objective The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate compliance to an acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocol. Methods Main abstracted data were: total duration and reasons for interruption of chemotherapy, prescribed doses of 6-mercaptopurine, and median white blood cell and neutrophil counts during the maintenance phase. Interruptions of chemotherapy were considered inappropriate if they did not follow predetermined criteria established in the protocol. Results Fourteen of 73 patients (19.2%) unduly interrupted chemotherapy by determination of their physicians. The median white blood cell count was higher when compared with the protocol recommendations; the median 6-MP dose was lower than the standard recommended dose. The estimated probability of event-free survival was higher for patients with lower median leukocyte counts and close to those predetermined by the protocol. Event-free survival was also higher for children with a higher percentage of days without chemotherapy due to bone marrow or liver toxicity excluding undue interruptions. In multivariate analysis, both factors remained statistically significant. These results suggest that the intensity of maintenance chemotherapy may not have been enough in some children, to achieve adequate myelosuppression, hence the observation of higher leukocyte counts and none or rare episodes of therapy interruption. Conclusions Compliance to the therapeutic protocol by both doctors and patients should always be considered in the evaluation of therapeutic failure in acute lymphoblastic

  6. The Role of HDACs Inhibitors in Childhood and Adolescence Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Masetti, Riccardo; Serravalle, Salvatore; Biagi, Carlotta; Pession, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs) are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia. PMID:21318168

  7. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  9. Maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute leukemia: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Su, Hong; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Xu; Peng, Meiling; Song, Jian; Fan, Dongdong

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the association between maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy and childhood acute leukemia (AL). The PubMed database was used to search studies up to May 5, 2013, and the lists of references of retrieved articles were also screened to identify additional relevant studies. Studies were included if they reported the odds ratio and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of childhood AL, including childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), with respect to maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy. Compared with non/lowest drinkers, the combined odds ratio regarding the relationship of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy and childhood AL was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.04-1.43) for ever drinkers, 1.16 (95% CI, 1.00-1.34) for low to moderate-level drinkers, and 1.72 (95% CI, 1.37-2.16) for high-level drinkers. When analysis was conducted by subtypes of childhood AL, maternal coffee consumption (high-level drinkers vs non/lowest drinkers) was statistically significantly associated with childhood ALL (1.65; 95% CI, 1.28-2.12) and childhood AML (1.58; 95% CI, 1.20-2.08). We observed the linear dose-response relationship of coffee consumption and childhood AL (P for nonlinearity = .68), including childhood ALL and childhood AML; with increased coffee consumption, the risk of childhood AL increased. The findings of the metaanalysis suggest that maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy may increase the risk of childhood AL. Because of limited studies, further prospective studies are urgently needed to explore the adverse effect of coffee consumption on childhood AL. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Home paint exposures and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Petridou, Eleni; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Spector, Logan G; Clavel, Jacqueline; Dockerty, John D; Zhang, Luoping; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Amigou, Alicia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Kang, Alice Y; Stiakaki, Eftychia; Schüz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that home paint exposure increases the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods We obtained individual level data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. All studies had home paint exposure data (sometimes including lacquers and varnishes) for the pregnancy period with additional data for the 1–3 month period before conception in five, the year before conception in two, and the period after birth in four studies respectively. Cytogenetic subtype data were available for some studies. Data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled analyses of individual data were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Results Based on 3,002 cases and 3,836 controls, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for home paint exposure in the 1–3 months before conception and risk of ALL was 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28, 1.85), while based on 1160 cases and 1641 controls for exposure in the year before conception it was 1.00 (95% CI 0.86, 1.17). For exposure during pregnancy, using 4,382 cases and 5,747 controls, the pooled OR was 1.14 (95% CI 1.04, 1.25) and for exposure after birth, the OR was 1.22 (95% CI 1.07, 1.39), based on data from 1,962 cases and 2,973 controls. The risk was greater for certain cytogenetic subtypes and if someone other than the parents did the painting. Conclusions Home paint exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and/or after birth appeared to increase the risk of childhood ALL. It may be prudent to limit exposure during these periods. PMID:26134047

  12. Home paint exposures and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Petridou, Eleni Th; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Spector, Logan G; Clavel, Jacqueline; Dockerty, John D; Zhang, Luoping; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Amigou, Alicia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Kang, Alice Y; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that home paint exposure increases the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We obtained individual level data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. All studies had home paint exposure data (sometimes including lacquers and varnishes) for the pregnancy period with additional data for the 1-3-month period before conception in five, the year before conception in two, and the period after birth in four studies, respectively. Cytogenetic subtype data were available for some studies. Data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled analyses of individual data were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Based on 3,002 cases and 3,836 controls, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for home paint exposure in the 1-3 months before conception and risk of ALL was 1.54 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28, 1.85], while based on 1,160 cases and 1,641 controls for exposure in the year before conception, it was 1.00 (95% CI 0.86, 1.17). For exposure during pregnancy, using 4,382 cases and 5,747 controls, the pooled OR was 1.14 (95% CI 1.04, 1.25), and for exposure after birth, the OR was 1.22 (95% CI 1.07, 1.39), based on data from 1,962 cases and 2,973 controls. The risk was greater for certain cytogenetic subtypes and if someone other than the parents did the painting. Home paint exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy, and/or after birth appeared to increase the risk of childhood ALL. It may be prudent to limit exposure during these periods.

  13. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-05

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Childhood acute leukemia in West Bengal, India with an emphasis on uncommon clinical features.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saumitra; Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Jayati; Paul, Prabir Chandra; Konar, Abantika; Das, Shikha

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias are the commonest childhood malignancy in West Bengal. This study was undertaken on 75 children at NRS Medical College, West Bengal to determine the distribution of signs and symptoms of leukemia and to identify unusual clinical features. After obtaining clinical history, physical examination, hematological and radiological investigations were performed. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, 72%) was the commonest followed by acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, 18.7%). Common symptoms and signs were fever (85.3%), pallor (64%), hepatomegaly (72%), splenomegaly (60%) and lymphadenopathy (50.7%). The uncommon signs and symptoms were abdominal pain (9.3%), joint pain (9.3%), hematemesis and malena (8%), diarrhea (5.3%), proptosis (2 cases), dysphagia, mediastinal mass and parotid swelling (1 case each). Uncommon clinical presentations lead to delay in diagnosis in some cases. Awareness of uncommon signs and symptoms of childhood leukemia together with laboratory tests may help in earlier diagnosis and proper management of the patients.

  17. Lymphocyte aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness in acute leukemia of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer, J.L.; Dunn, R.; Esterhay, M.D.; Yamashita, T.S.; Gross, S.

    1981-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility were examined in mitogen-stimulated cultured lymphocytes from children with acute leukemia in remission, with nonleukemic malignancies, and with no family or personal history of malignant disease. Neither morphological differences nor differences in mitogen responsivelness were observed among the three sources of cells studied. Levels of constitutive and dibenzanthracene-induced AHH activity were found to be similar among the three groups by analysis of variance. However, when results were analyzed in terms of inducibility ratios, it was found that cells from leukemic children were significantly less inducible (p < 0.005) than cells from unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancies. The reason for this difference became apparent when statistical criteria were employed for the phenotypic separation of individuals who were highly aromatic hydrocarbon responsive and minimally responsive. A significantly larger proportion (p < 0.001) of leukemic children than unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancy were found to be minimally aromatic hydrocarbon responsive. Moreover, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing while on therapy, longer durations of the first remission were correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the highly inducible AHH phenotype.

  18. Novel targeted drug therapies for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Smith, Franklin O; Carroll, William L; Reaman, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    The cure rates for childhood acute leukemia have dramatically improved to approximately 70% overal, with treatments that include intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in some cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, many children still die of their disease or of treatment-related toxicities. Even in patients that are cured, there can be significant and, not uncommonly debilitating, acute and late complications of treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of leukemia and the increasing availability of high-throughput genomic techniques have facilitated the development of molecularly targeted therapies that have the potential to be more effective and less toxic than the standard approaches. In this article, we review the progress to date with agents that are showing promise in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, inhibitors of kinases and other signaling molecules (e.g., BCR–ABL, FLT3, farnesyltransferase, mTOR and γ-secretase), agents that target epigenetic regulation of gene expression (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and proteasome inhibitors. For the specific agents in each of these classes, we summarize the published preclinical data and the clinical trials that have been completed, are in progress or are being planned for children with acute leukemia. Finally, we discuss potential challenges to the success of molecularly targeted therapy, including proper target identification, adequate targeting of leukemia stem cells, developing synergistic and tolerable combinations of agents and designing adequately powered clinical trials to test efficacy in molecularly defined subsets of patients. PMID:20126514

  19. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  20. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-29

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Endocrine sequelae and metabolic syndrome in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Blijdorp, Karin; van Waas, Marjolein; van der Lely, Aart-Jan; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Neggers, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the effect of chemotherapy on endocrinopathies and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Endocrine function and metabolic syndrome were evaluated in 12 AML survivors, treated with chemotherapy, and in 9 survivors of myeloid leukemias treated with stem cell transplantation (SCT), after a median follow-up time of 20 years (range 9-31). In survivors treated with chemotherapy, no endocrinopathies or metabolic syndrome were present, although AMH and Inhibin B levels tended to be lower than in controls. In SCT survivors, pituitary deficiencies and metabolic syndrome were more frequent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hong Hoe

    2011-03-01

    In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the Philadelphia chromosome translocation is uncommon, with a frequency of less than 5%. However, it is classified as a high or very high risk, and only 20-30% of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) children with ALL are cured with chemotherapy alone. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a closely matched donor cures 60% of patients in first complete remission. Recent data suggest that chemotherapy plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may be the initial treatment of choice for Ph+ ALL in children. However, longer observation is required to determine whether long-term outcome with intensive imatinib and chemotherapy is indeed equivalent to that with allogeneic related or alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Reports on the use of second-generation TKIs in children with Ph+ ALL are limited. A few case reports have indicated the feasibility and clinical benefit of using dasatinib as salvage therapy enabling HSCT. However, more extensive data from clinical trials are needed to determine whether the administration of second-generation TKIs in children is comparable to that in adults. Because Ph+ ALL is rare in children, the question of whether HSCT could be a dispensable part of their therapy may not be answered for some time. An international multicenter study is needed to answer the question of whether imatinib plus chemotherapy could replace sibling allogeneic HSCT in children with Ph+ ALL.

  3. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  4. Birth Weight and Acute Childhood Leukemia: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-22

    22 MAR 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Birth Weight and Acute Childhood Leukemia: A Meta - analysis of Observational...and to quantify the strength of the relationships. We conducted a meta - analysis of nine case-control studies (published between 1991 and 2004...Based on a meta - analysis of only three case-control studies (published between 1997 and 2004) involving over 700 children with AML and over 1,900

  5. World Health Organization Grade II Oligodendroglioma Occurring after Successful Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-In; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Yul; Chung, Yong-Gu

    2016-01-01

    When treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), secondary neoplasms are a significant long term problem. Radiation is generally accepted to be a major cause of the development of secondary neoplasms. Following treatment for ALL, a variety of secondary tumors, including brain tumors, hematologic malignancies, sarcomas, thyroid cancers, and skin cancers have been reported. However, oligodendroglioma as a secondary neoplasm is extremely rare. Herein we present a case of secondary oligodendroglioma occurring 13 years after the end of ALL treatment. PMID:27867928

  6. Implication of IRF4 aberrant gene expression in the acute leukemias of childhood.

    PubMed

    Adamaki, Maria; Lambrou, George I; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Tzanoudaki, Marianna; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The most frequent targets of genetic alterations in human leukemias are transcription factor genes with essential functions in normal blood cell development. The Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) gene encodes a transcription factor important for key developmental stages of hematopoiesis, with known oncogenic implications in multiple myeloma, adult leukemias and lymphomas. Very few studies have reported an association of IRF4 with childhood malignancy, whereas high transcript levels have been observed in the more mature immunophenotype of ALL. Our aim was to investigate the expression levels of IRF4 in the diagnostic samples of pediatric leukemias and compare them to those of healthy controls, in order to determine aberrant gene expression and whether it extends to leukemic subtypes other than the relatively mature ALL subpopulation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR methodology was used to investigate IRF4 expression in 58 children with acute leukemias, 4 leukemic cell lines and 20 healthy children. We show that aberrant IRF4 gene expression is implicated in a variety of leukemic subtypes; higher transcript levels appear in the more immature B-common ALL subtype and in T-cell than in B-cell leukemias, with the highest expression levels appearing in the AML group. Interestingly, we show that childhood leukemia, irrespective of subtype or cell maturation stage, is characterised by a minimum of approximately twice the amount of IRF4 gene expression encountered in healthy children. A statistically significant correlation also appeared to exist between high IRF4 expression and relapse. Our results show that ectopic expression of IRF4 follows the reverse expression pattern of what is encountered in normal B-cell development and that there might be a dose-dependency of childhood leukemia for aberrantly expressed IRF4, a characteristic that could be explored therapeutically. It is also suggested that high IRF4 expression might be used as an additional prognostic marker of

  7. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. [Genetic prognostic factors in childhood acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, D; Von Neuhoff, C; Sander, A; Creutzig, U

    2012-10-01

    The survival rate of children and adolescents suffering acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been significantly improved within the last decades. This has been achieved by a continuously intensified therapy and progress in supportive care to prevent and treat complications. In Germany, the AML-BFM trials 98 (n=413) and 2004 (n=499) enrolled 912 children and adolescents as protocol patients (1998-2010). The 5-year-overall survival was 71±2%. In the previous studies prognosis and subsequent treatment stratification based on morphology, cytochemistry and white blood cell count. Today, the identification of new genetic aberrations in AML enables a genetically determined estimation of prognosis, although treatment response must be considered for treatment stratification. The group with a favorable prognosis summarized AML with t(8;21), inv(16), t(15;17), t(1;11), and AML with normal karyotype and NPM1-mutation (n=253; EFS 74±3%, OS 88±2%). A poor prognosis (HR-group) must be expected in AML with t(4;11), t(5;11), t(6;11), t(6;9), t(7;12), t(9;22), Monosomy 7, combined FLT3/WT1-mutation, and AML with der(12p)-aberration (n=101; EFS 30±5%; OS 56±5%). The intermediate group summarizes all other subgroups especially AML with normal karyotyp, AML with FLT3-ITD or t(9;11) (n=558; EFS 43±2%; OS 64±2%). The validation of the internationally identified, genetically determined prognostic factors within the AML-BFM (Germany) study population will support treatment recommendations.

  9. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia During Therapy For Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Darbandi, Rashid; Pei, Deqing; Ramsey, Laura B.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Sandlund, John T.; Cheng, Cheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Jeha, Sima; Metzger, Monika L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asparaginase and steroids can cause hypertriglyceridemia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There are no guidelines for screening or management of patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (>1000 mg/dL) during ALL therapy. Patients and Methods Fasting lipid profiles were obtained prospectively at 4 time-points for 257 children consecutively enrolled on a frontline ALL study. Risk factors were evaluated by the exact chi-square test. Details of adverse events and management of hypertriglyceridemia were extracted retrospectively. Results Eighteen of 257 (7%) patients developed severe hypertriglyceridemia. Older age and treatment with higher doses of asparaginase and steroids on the standard/high-risk arm were significant risk factors. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with pancreatitis after adjustment for age and treatment arm or with osteonecrosis after adjustment for age. However, patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia had a 2.5 to 3 times higher risk of thrombosis compared to patients without, albeit the difference was not statistical significant. Of the 30 episodes of severe hypertriglyceridemia in 18 patients, 7 were managed conservatively while the others with pharmacotherapy. Seventeen of 18 patients continued to receive asparaginase and steroids. Triglyceride levels normalized after completion of ALL therapy in all 12 patients with available measurements. Conclusion Asparaginase- and steroid-induced transient hypertriglyceridemia can be adequately managed with dietary modifications and close monitoring without altering chemotherapy. Patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia were not at increased risk of adverse events, with a possible exception of thrombosis. The benefit of pharmacotherapy in decreasing symptoms and potential complications requires further investigation. PMID:25087182

  10. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Results Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Conclusions Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process. PMID:23433104

  12. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Lee, Maria Lúcia de Martino; Andreoni, Solange; Geloneze, Bruno; Lederman, Henrique; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2013-02-21

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process.

  13. In utero cytomegalovirus infection and development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Stephen Starko; Wallace, Amelia D; Wendt, George A; Li, Linlin; Liu, Fenyong; Riley, Lee W; Kogan, Scott; Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Dahl, Gary V; Ma, Xiaomei; Delwart, Eric; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2017-03-23

    It is widely suspected, yet controversial, that infection plays an etiologic role in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer and a disease with a confirmed prenatal origin in most cases. We investigated infections at diagnosis and then assessed the timing of infection at birth in children with ALL and age, gender, and ethnicity matched controls to identify potential causal initiating infections. Comprehensive untargeted virome and bacterial analyses of pretreatment bone marrow specimens (n = 127 ALL in comparison with 38 acute myeloid leukemia cases in a comparison group) revealed prevalent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection at diagnosis in childhood ALL, demonstrating active viral transcription in leukemia blasts as well as intact virions in serum. Screening of newborn blood samples revealed a significantly higher prevalence of in utero CMV infection in ALL cases (n = 268) than healthy controls (n = 270) (odds ratio [OR], 3.71, confidence interval [CI], 1.56-7.92, P = .0016). Risk was more pronounced in Hispanics (OR=5.90, CI=1.89-25.96) than in non-Hispanic whites (OR=2.10 CI= 0.69-7.13). This is the first study to suggest that congenital CMV infection is a risk factor for childhood ALL and is more prominent in Hispanic children. Further investigation of CMV as an etiologic agent for ALL is warranted.

  14. [Effects of birth order, maternal abortion and mode of delivery on childhood acute leukemia risk: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Zou, Guobin; Sha, Xia

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the associations between birth order, maternal abortion and mode of delivery and childhood acute leukemia risk. Multiple electronic databases were searched to identify relevant studies up to March 2013 using the search terms "childhood leukemia", "acute lymphoblastic leukemia", "acute myeloid leukemia","birth order", "abortion", "miscarriage", "cesarean", "birth characteristics" and "prenatal risk factor". Data from cohort and case-control studies were analyzed using the Stata software. Twenty-three studies were included in this meta-analysis according to the selection criteria. No significant associations were identified for birth order and mode of delivery (birth order = 2: OR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.89-1.05; birth order = 3: OR = 1.00, 95%CI: 0.91-1.11; birth order ≥ 4: OR = 1.02, 95%CI: 0.87-1.20; mode of delivery: OR = 1.05, 95%CI: 0.96-1.15). However, there was a significant association between maternal abortion and childhood acute leukemia risk (spontaneous abortion: OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.05-1.41; induced abortion: OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.07-1.43). Furthermore, the stratified analysis by disease subtypes showed that spontaneous and induced abortions were significantly associated with the risks of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (OR = 1.71, 95%CI: 1.09-2.70) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (OR = 1.23, 95%CI: 1.05-1.42), respectively. This meta-analysis revealed that maternal abortion might contribute to the childhood acute leukemia risk.

  15. Traffic-related air pollution and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Campbell, Janis E; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pate, Anne; Stoner, Julie A; Peck, Jennifer D

    2016-07-01

    While many studies have evaluated the association between acute childhood leukemia and environmental factors, knowledge is limited. Ambient air pollution has been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen, but studies have not established whether traffic-related air pollution is associated with leukemia. The goal of our study was to determine if children with acute leukemia had higher odds of exposure to traffic-related air pollution at birth compared to controls. We conducted a case-control study using the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry to identify cases of acute leukemia in children diagnosed before 20 years of age between 1997 and 2012 (n=307). Controls were selected from birth certificates and matched to cases on week of birth (n=1013). Using a novel satellite-based land-use regression model of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and estimating road density based on the 2010 US Census, we evaluated the association between traffic-related air pollution and childhood leukemia using conditional logistic regression. The odds of exposure to the fourth quartile of NO2 (11.19-19.89ppb) were similar in cases compared to controls after adjustment for maternal education (OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.75, 1.55). These estimates were stronger among children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) than acute lymphoid leukemia, with a positive association observed among urban children with AML (4th quartile odds ratio: 5.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 25.26). While we observed no significant association with road density, male cases had an elevated odds of exposure to roads at 500m from the birth residence compared to controls (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.93, 2.10), which was slightly attenuated at 750m. Although we observed no association overall between NO2 or road density, this was the first study to observe an elevated odds of exposure to NO2 among children with AML compared to controls suggesting further exploration of traffic-related air pollution and AML is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Association between MTR A2756G polymorphism and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; Wang, Yadan; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Abstract To date, many studies on the association between methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have provided either controversial or inconclusive results. To clarify the effect of MTR A2756G on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a meta-analysis of all relevant studies was performed. The fixed effects model showed that the 2756A allele was associated with a decreased risk of childhood ALL compared with the G allele (ORA vs. G = 0.872; 95% CI 0.782-0.974; p = 0.015, I(2) = 46.9%). Additionally, when comparing subjects with ALL and controls with AA vs. AG or AA vs. AG + GG (dominant model), significant differences were found in the fixed effects model (ORAA vs. AG = 0.869; 95% CI 0.760-0.994; p = 0.040, I(2) = 26.4%; ORAA vs. AG+ GG = 0.858; 95% CI 0.754-0.976; p = 0.020, I(2) = 39.6%). In a subgroup analysis in a population with the same background, individuals with the AA genotype had a reduced risk of developing ALL compared to individuals with the AG genotype. In conclusion, our study provides evidence suggesting that MTR A2756G is associated with a reduced risk of developing childhood ALL.

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Variation in CDKN2A at 9p21.3 influences childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Amy L; Hosking, Fay J; Prasad, Rashmi B; Kumar, Rajiv; Koehler, Rolf; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Bartram, Claus R; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Gast, Andreas; Dobbins, Sara E; Ma, Yussanne; Sheridan, Eamonn; Taylor, Malcolm; Kinsey, Sally E; Lightfoot, Tracey; Roman, Eve; Irving, Julie A E; Allan, James M; Moorman, Anthony V; Harrison, Christine J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Richards, Sue; Zimmermann, Martin; Szalai, Csaba; Semsei, Agnes F; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel; Healy, Jasmine; Gonzalez Neira, Anna; Kawamata, Norihiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip; Hemminki, Kari; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2010-06-01

    Using data from a genome-wide association study of 907 individuals with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cases) and 2,398 controls and with validation in samples totaling 2,386 cases and 2,419 controls, we have shown that common variation at 9p21.3 (rs3731217, intron 1 of CDKN2A) influences acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk (odds ratio = 0.71, P = 3.01 x 10(-11)), irrespective of cell lineage.

  19. Variation in CDKN2A at 9p21.3 influences childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L; Hosking, Fay J; Prasad, Rashmi B; Kumar, Rajiv; Koehler, Rolf; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Bartram, Claus R; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Gast, Andreas; Dobbins, Sara E; Ma, Yussanne; Sheridan, Eamonn; Taylor, Malcolm; Kinsey, Sally E; Lightfoot, Tracey; Roman, Eve; Irving, Julie A E; Allan, James M; Moorman, Anthony V; Harrison, Christine J; Tomlinson, Ian P; Richards, Sue; Zimmermann, Martin; Szalai, Csaba; Semsei, Ágnes F; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel; Healy, Jasmine; Neira, Anna Gonzalez; Kawamata, Norihiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip; Hemminki, Kari; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a genome-wide association study of 907 individuals with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cases) and 2,398 controls and with validation in samples totaling 2,386 cases and 2,419 controls, we have shown that common variation at 9p21.3 (rs3731217, intron 1 of CDKN2A) influences acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk (odds ratio = 0.71, P = 3.01 × 10−11), irrespective of cell lineage. PMID:20453839

  20. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  1. Residential proximity to agricultural pesticide applications and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rull, Rudolph P; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-10-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5m) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child's lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, chlorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia.

  2. Maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nousome, Darryl; Lupo, Philip J.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Discovering genetic predictors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) necessitates the evaluation of novel factors including maternal genetic effects, which are a proxy for the intrauterine environment, and robust epidemiologic study designs. Therefore, we evaluated five maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood ALL among 120 case-parent triads. Two of the five haplotypes were significantly associated with risk: GSTM3/GSTM4 (P=0.01) and GSTP1 (P=0.02). The EPHX1 haplotype was marginally associated with risk (P=0.05), whereas haplotypes in CYP1B1 and GSTA4 were not. Our results suggest genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolism is important in childhood ALL etiology. PMID:23433810

  3. [Descriptive epidemiology of children with acute myeloid leukemia residing in Mexico City: a report from the Mexican Inter-Institutional Group for Identifying Childhood Leukemia Causes].

    PubMed

    Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Martín-Trejo, Jorge Alfonso; Duarte-Rodríguez, David Aldebarán; Medina-Sansón, Aurora; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Núñez-Villegas, Nora Nancy; Pérez-Saldívar, María Luisa; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Flores-Chapa, José de Diego; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; Flores-Villegas, Luz Victoria; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Espinosa-Elizondo, Rosa Martha; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; González-Bonilla, César; Békker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Jiménez-Morales, Silvia; Martínez-Morales, Gabriela Bibiana; Vargas, Haydeé Rosas; Rangel-López, Angélica

    2016-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias represent the second most common childhood leukemia subtype. In Mexico, there are few studies on descriptive epidemiology for this disease. To report acute myeloid leukemia incidence for children less than 15 years of age in the Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico for a period of five years (2010-2014) and to analyze whether there are differences in the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia by regions. A descriptive study was conducted in nine public hospitals in Mexico City. The crude annual average incidence rate and adjusted average annual incidence rate were calculated. A total of 190 patients with diagnosis of de novo acute myeloid leukemia were analyzed. Male sex (57.2%) and acute myeloid leukemia-M3 subtype (25.3%) were more frequent. The adjusted average annual incidence rates for Mexico City and for the Metropolitan Area of the Valley of Mexico were 8.18 and 7.74 per million children under 15 years old, respectively. It seems that childhood acute myeloid leukemia incidence is increasing in Mexico City, which makes the identification of associated risk factors imperative.

  4. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Childhood ALL is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many immature lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). Here’s what you need to know about the risk factors, signs, tests to diagnose, and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent ALL in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Childhood Leukemia and Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Singer, Amanda W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer, affecting 3,800 children per year in the United States. Its annual incidence has increased over the last decades, especially among Latinos. Although most children diagnosed with leukemia are now cured, many suffer long-term complications, and primary prevention efforts are urgently needed. The early onset of leukemia – usually before age five – and the presence at birth of “pre-leukemic” genetic signatures indicate that pre- and postnatal events are critical to the development of the disease. In contrast to most pediatric cancers, there is a growing body of literature – in the United States and internationally – that has implicated several environmental, infectious, and dietary risk factors in the etiology of childhood leukemia, mainly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common subtype. For example, exposures to pesticides, tobacco smoke, solvents, and traffic emissions have consistently demonstrated positive associations with the risk of developing childhood leukemia. In contrast, intake of vitamins and folate supplementation during the pre-conception period or pregnancy, breastfeeding, and exposure to routine childhood infections have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood leukemia. Some children may be especially vulnerable to these risk factors, as demonstrated by a disproportionate burden of childhood leukemia in the Latino population of California. The evidence supporting the associations between childhood leukemia and its risk factors – including pooled analyses from around the world and systematic reviews – is strong; however, the dissemination of this knowledge to clinicians has been limited. To protect children’s health, it is prudent to initiate programs designed to alter exposure to well-established leukemia risk factors rather than to suspend judgement until no uncertainty remains. Primary prevention programs for childhood leukemia would also result in the significant co

  7. ETS-related gene is a novel prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Zhao; Jia, Ming; Luo, Ze-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Si-Si; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Guo, Xiao-Ping; Tang, Yong-Min

    2017-01-01

    The ETS-related gene (ERG) has been demonstrated to be associated with overall survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia and acute T cell-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in adult patients. However, there are no data available regarding the impact of ERG expression on childhood ALL. In the present study, ERG expression levels were analyzed in bone marrow samples from 119 ALL pediatric patients. ALL patients demonstrated higher ERG expression compared with the controls (P<0.0001). In addition, low ERG expression identified a group of patients with higher white blood cell counts (P=0.011), higher percentages of T-ALL immunophenotype (P=0.027), and higher relapse rates (P=0.009). Survival analyses demonstrated that low ERG expression was associated with inferior relapse-free survival (RFS) in childhood ALL (P=0.036) and was an independent prognostic factor in multivariable analyses for RFS. In conclusion, low ERG expression is associated with poor outcomes and may be used to serve as a molecular prognostic marker to identify patients with a high risk of relapse in childhood ALL.

  8. Implications of infectious diseases and the adrenal hypothesis for the etiology of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Silva, F; Camargo, B de; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S

    2010-03-01

    Acute leukemia is the most frequent cancer in children. Recently, a new hypothesis was proposed for the pathogenesis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The so-called 'adrenal hypothesis' emphasized the role of endogenous cortisol in the etiology of B-cell precursor ALL. The incidence peak of ALL in children between 3 to 5 years of age has been well documented and is consistent with this view. The adrenal hypothesis proposes that the risk of childhood B-cell precursor ALL is reduced when early childhood infections induce qualitative and quantitative changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. It suggests that the increased plasma cortisol levels would be sufficient to eliminate all clonal leukemic cells originating during fetal life. Because Brazil is a continental and tropical country, the exposure to infections is diversified with endemic viral and regionally non-viral infections, with some characteristics that support the recent adrenal hypothesis. Here we discuss this new hypothesis in terms of data from epidemiological studies and the possible implications of the diversity of infections occurring in Brazilian children.

  9. Presenting features and imaging in childhood acute myeloid leukemia with central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Susanna; Palomäki, Maarit; Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Hasle, Henrik; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Heyman, Mats; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2017-02-24

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can manifest as leukemic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid, a solid CNS tumor, or as neurological symptoms. We evaluated the presenting symptoms and neuroimaging findings in 33 of 34 children with AML and CNS involvement at diagnosis in the period 2000-2012 in Sweden, Finland, and Denmark. Imaging was performed in 22 patients, of whom 16 had CNS-related symptoms. Seven patients, including all but two with facial palsy, had mastoid cell opacification, considered an incidental finding. The frequent involvement of the mastoid bone with facial palsy warrants evaluation in larger series. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as ''cold'' lesions on bone scan: a report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Caudle, R.J.; Crawford, A.H.; Gelfand, M.J.; Gruppo, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''Cold'' lesions on bone scan have been reported in a variety of disease processes, including infection, avascular necrosis, and cysts. We present two cases of children who presented with large ''cold'' areas on technetium bone scans and were treated initially for septic processes. Acute childhood leukemia frequently presents with bone or joint pain, fever, and elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Although the diagnosis may be difficult if the characteristic clinical signs and laboratory findings are absent, the presence of anemia should alert the physician to the possibility of malignancy. Bone scanning provides a sensitive method of localizing pathology, but diagnosis requires biopsy or marrow aspiration.

  11. Ophthalmic evaluation of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R.G. Jr.; Chauvenet, A.R.; Smith, T.J.; Schwartz, A.C.

    1986-08-15

    Thirty-four long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations to detect retinopathy or other ocular sequelae. Sixteen of the 34 patients received whole brain radiation (greater than or equal to 2400 rad). All 18 patients in the non-radiated group had normal eye examinations, while 4 of 16 in the radiated group had ocular abnormalities. None of the ocular abnormalities could be definitely attributed to radiation and all patients had normal visual acuity. No radiation retinopathy was found in either group.

  12. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  13. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  15. Brain sarcoma of meningeal origin after cranial irradiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberin, P.; Maor, E.; Zaizov, R.; Cohen, I.J.; Hirsch, M.; Yosefovich, T.; Ronen, J.; Goldstein, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors report their experience with an unusual case of intracerebral sarcoma of meningeal cell origin in an 8 1/2-year-old girl. This tumor occurred 6 1/2 years after cranial irradiation at relatively low dosage (2200 rads) had been delivered to the head in the course of a multimodality treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor recurred approximately 10 months after the first surgical intervention. Macroscopic total excision of the recurrent growth followed by whole-brain irradiation (4500 rads) failed to eradicate it completely and local recurrence prompted reoperation 18 months later. This complication of treatment in long-term childhood leukemia survivors is briefly discussed, as well as the pathology of meningeal sarcomas.

  16. Pathogenesis of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mechanisms underlying its relapse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congcong; Chang, Lixian; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2017-05-23

    ETV6/RUNX1 (E/R) is the most common fusion gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Multiple lines of evidence imply a "two-hit" model for the molecular pathogenesis of E/R-positive ALL, whereby E/R rearrangement is followed by a series of secondary mutations that trigger overt leukemia. The cellular framework in which E/R arises and the maintenance of a pre-leukemic condition by E/R are fundamental to the mechanism that underlies leukemogenesis. Accordingly, a variety of studies have focused on the relationship between the clones giving rise to the primary and recurrent E/R-positive ALL. We review here the most recent insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying E/R-positive ALL, as well as the molecular abnormalities prevailing at relapse.

  17. Reduced bone mineral density in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arikoski, P; Komulainen, J; Voutilainen, R; Riikonen, P; Parviainen, M; Tapanainen, P; Knip, M; Kröger, H

    1998-01-01

    Osteoporosis and pathologic fractures are occasionally found in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study was performed to determine the degree of possible osteopenia in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Lumbar spine (L2-L4) and femoral neck bone mineral densities (BMDs) (g/cm2) were measured in 29 survivors (aged 12 to 30 years, median 17) of childhood ALL 2 to 20 (median 8) years after discontinuation of chemotherapy. These results were compared with those from 273 healthy controls and expressed as a percentage of the age- and sex-matched control values (mean +/- standard deviation). Lumbar and femoral BMDs were significantly reduced in survivors of childhood ALL. Particularly, male gender (lumbar: 91.7 +/- 10.4%, p = 0.008; femoral: 91.9 +/- 11.3%, p = 0.005) and a history of cranial irradiation (lumbar: 93.0 +/- 8.9%, p = 0.005; femoral: 94.4 +/- 13.3%, p = 0.03) were associated with low lumbar and femoral BMDs. The detected deficit in bone density in survivors of childhood ALL may predispose these patients to osteoporotic fractures later in adulthood. A follow-up of BMD in survivors of childhood ALL should facilitate the identification of patients who would require specific therapeutic interventions to prevent further decrease of their skeletal mass and preserve their BMD.

  18. Symptoms of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: red flags to recognize leukemia in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Bernbeck, B; Wüller, D; Janssen, G; Wessalowski, R; Göbel, U; Schneider, D T

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify clinical "red flags" that may assist the general pediatrician in detecting patients with an acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Medical history and clinical findings of 189 children and adolescents, diagnosed with ALL between 1/1995 and 7/2004, were analyzed retrospectively. Only 50% of patients presented with symptoms known in children with leukemia (fever, fatigue, paleness, hemorrhage); 5% were diagnosed accidentally in the absence of any clinical symptoms. The majority of patients had a medical history up to few weeks; in 11% of patients up to several months without impairing curability. 95% of the patients presented at diagnosis with enlargement of lymphnodes, liver and/or spleen. The characteristic laboratory constellation included mono-, respectively bi- or trilinear pathology of the blood count and with blasts in the blood smear. The clinical diagnosis of ALL relies on physical examination and the blood count including microscopic examination. Therefore, the alertness of the treating paediatrician with regard to clinical findings and a pathologic blood count is more important than elaborate laboratory investigations. In uncertain cases, a close follow-up examination may help to unmask ALL, which will most likely be stratified in the low-risk-group. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  19. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. Brain volume and cognitive function in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Michelle N; Krull, Kevin R

    2013-10-01

    The survival rate for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is greater than 80%. However, many of these survivors develop long-term chronic health conditions, with a relatively common late effect being neurocognitive dysfunction. Although neurocognitive impairments have decreased in frequency and severity as treatment has evolved, there is a subset of survivors in the current treatment era that are especially vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of ALL and its treatment. Additionally, little is known about long-term brain development as survivors mature into adulthood. A recent study by Zeller et al. compared neurocognitive function and brain volume in 130 adult survivors of childhood ALL to 130 healthy adults matched on age and sex. They identified the caudate as particularly sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy. We discuss the implications and limitations of this study, including how their findings support the concept of individual vulnerability to ALL and its treatment.

  3. Paternal Smoking and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association between paternal smoking and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. We identified 18 published epidemiologic studies that reported data on both paternal smoking and childhood ALL risk. We performed a meta-analysis and analyzed dose-response relationships on ALL risk for smoking during preconception, during pregnancy, after birth, and ever smoking. Results. The summary odds ratio (OR) of childhood ALL associated with paternal smoking was 1.11 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.05–1.18, I2 = 18%) during any time period, 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.46, I2 = 53%) preconception; 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07–1.43, I2 = 54%) during pregnancy, and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.96–1.60, I2 = 64%) after birth, with a dose-response relationship between childhood ALL and paternal smoking preconception or after birth. Conclusion. The evidence supports a positive association between childhood ALL and paternal ever smoking and at each exposure time period examined. Future epidemiologic studies should assess paternal smoking during well-defined exposure windows and should include biomarkers to assess smoking exposure and toxicological mechanisms. PMID:21765828

  4. Altered brain function in new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy: A resting-state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhanqi; Zou, Dongfang; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yue; Liao, Jianxiang; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guosheng; Zeng, Hongwu; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive impairments had been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, what caused the impairments needed to be demonstrated, chemotherapy-related or the disease itself. The primary aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if there were changes in brain function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy. In this study, we advanced a measure named regional homogeneity to evaluate the resting-state brain activities, intelligence quotient test was performed at same time. Using regional homogeneity, we first investigated the resting state brain function in patients with new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy, healthy children as control. The decreased ReHo values were mainly founded in the default mode network and left frontal lobe, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, precentral gyrus, bilateral cerebellum in the newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients compared with the healthy control. While in contrast, increased ReHo values were mainly shown in the right frontal lobe (language area), superior frontal gyrus-R, middle frontal gyrus-R and inferior parietal lobule-R for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients group. There were no significant differences for intelligence quotient measurements between the acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient group and the healthy control in performance intelligence quotient, verbal intelligence quotient, total intelligence quotient. The altered brain functions are associated with cognitive change and language, it is suggested that there may be cognition impairment before the chemotherapy. Regional homogeneity by functional magnetic resonance image is a sensitive way for early detection on brain damage in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and use of electrical appliances during pregnancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Hatch, E E; Linet, M S; Kleinerman, R A; Tarone, R E; Severson, R K; Hartsock, C T; Haines, C; Kaune, W T; Friedman, D; Robison, L L; Wacholder, S

    1998-05-01

    As part of a comprehensive study of residential magnetic field exposure in nine midwestern and mid-Atlantic states, we evaluated the use of appliances by 640 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 0-14 years of age, diagnosed between 1989 and 1993, and 640 matched control children. Mothers were interviewed regarding use of electrical appliances during their pregnancy with the subject and the child's postnatal use. The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was elevated in children whose mothers reported use of an electric blanket or mattress pad during pregnancy [odds ratio (OR) = 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-2.29] but was reduced for use of sewing machines during pregnancy (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.59-0.98). The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was increased with children's use of electric blankets or mattress pads (OR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.52-4.98) and three other electrical appliances (hair dryers, video machines in arcades, and video games connected to a television), but the patterns of risk for duration in years of use and frequency of use were inconsistent for most appliances used by children. Risks rose with increasing number of hours per day children spent watching television, but risks were similar regardless of the usual distance from the television. The inconsistency in the dose-response patterns for many appliances, reporting and selection bias, and the lack of an effect for measured 60 Hertz magnetic fields or wire codes in our companion study must be considered before ascribing these associations to exposures from magnetic fields.

  6. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Late thyroid complications in survivors of childhood acute leukemia. An L.E.A. study

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Claire; Auquier, Pascal; Bertrand, Yves; Chastagner, Philippe; Kanold, Justyna; Poirée, Maryline; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Ducassou, Stephane; Plantaz, Dominique; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Sirvent, Anne; Villes, Virginie; Barlogis, Vincent; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Berbis, Julie; Michel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid complications are known side effects of irradiation. However, the risk of such complications in childhood acute leukemia survivors who received either central nervous system irradiation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is less described. We prospectively evaluated the incidence and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction and tumors in survivors of childhood acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia. A total of 588 patients were evaluated for thyroid function, and 502 individuals were assessed for thyroid tumors (median follow-up duration: 12.6 and 12.5 years, respectively). The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 17.3% (95% CI: 14.1–21.1) and 24.6% (95% CI: 20.4–29.6) at 10 and 20 years from leukemia diagnosis, respectively. Patients who received total body irradiation (with or without prior central nervous system irradiation) were at higher risk of hypothyroidism (adjusted HR: 2.87; P=0.04 and 2.79, P=0.01, respectively) as compared with transplanted patients who never received any irradiation. Patients transplanted without total body irradiation who received central nervous system irradiation were also at higher risk (adjusted HR: 3.39; P=0.02). Patients irradiated or transplanted at older than 10 years of age had a lower risk (adjusted HR: 0.61; P=0.02). Thyroid malignancy was found in 26 patients (5.2%). Among them, two patients had never received any type of irradiation: alkylating agents could also promote thyroid cancer. The cumulative incidence of thyroid malignancy was 9.6% (95% CI: 6.0–15.0) at 20 years. Women were at higher risk than men (adjusted HR: 4.74; P=0.002). In conclusion, thyroid complications are frequent among patients who undergo transplantation after total body irradiation and those who received prior central nervous system irradiation. Close monitoring is thus warranted for these patients. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01756599. PMID:26969082

  8. Dietary intake and childhood leukemia: The Diet and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (DALLT) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ladas, Elena J; Orjuela, Manuela; Stevenson, Kristen; Cole, Peter D; Lin, Meiko; Athale, Uma H; Clavell, Luis A; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Michon, Bruno; Schorin, Marshall A; Welch, Jennifer Greene; Asselin, Barbara L; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Kelly, Kara M

    2016-10-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at elevated risk for nutrition-related morbidity both during and after therapy. We present the demographic characteristics and nutrient intake at study entry of a prospective cohort in which evaluating dietary intake in children diagnosed with ALL was investigated. Dietary intake data were collected for participants enrolled on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocol. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was compared with the dietary reference intake by ALL risk group (standard and high risk). Dietary intake data were collected from 81% of participants (n = 640). We found that 27% of participants were overweight/obese. Intake of total calories and other nutrients exceeded the dietary reference intake in up to 79% of children. This was evident in both risk groups and was pronounced among younger children. For micronutrients, dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D (females only), and zinc differed significantly between patients with standard-risk and those with high-risk ALL. This study was successful in collecting dietary intake data at the time of cancer diagnosis in a multicenter setting in a pediatric population at high-risk for nutrition-related morbidity. We identified "at-risk" dietary intakes, which vary by sex and ALL risk group; such patients may benefit from future dietary interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in minimal residual disease within childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Yin, Kailin; Dong, Yujun; Wang, Pingzhang; Xue, Yun; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Yuedan

    2017-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. In this study, a novel gene therapy target for childhood T-ALL to overcome chemoresistance was discovered: TFDP3 increased in the minimal residual disease (MRD) positive childhood T-ALL patients. Then, we established a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy to examine the functional relevance of TFDP3 to chemoresistance in MRD derived from Jurkat/E6-1. Jurkat xenografts in NOD/SCID mice were exposed to a four drug combination (VXLD) of vincristine (VCR), dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase (L-asp) and daunorubicin (DNR). During the 4-week VXLD treatment, the level of TFDP3 increased 4-fold. High expression of TFDP3 was identified in the re-emerging lines (Jurkat/MRD) with increased chemoresistance, which is correlated with partially promoter demethylation of TFDP3. Downregulation of TFDP3 by RNA interference reversed chemoresistance in Jurkat/MRD accompanied by reinstated E2F1 activity that coincided with increased levels of p53, p73, and associated proapoptotic target genes. Importantly, TFDP3 silencing in vivo induced apparent benefit to overcome chemoresistance in combination with VXLD treatment. Collectively, TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in MRD within childhood T-ALL, indicating that TFDP3 is a potential gene therapy target for residual cancer. PMID:27902457

  10. Parental exposure to carcinogens and risk for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Colombia, 2000-2005.

    PubMed

    Castro-Jiménez, Miguel Ángel; Orozco-Vargas, Luis Carlos

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and, in particular, the role of parental occupational exposure to carcinogenic and probably carcinogenic hydrocarbons before the child's conception. For this case-control study, cases were children younger than 15 years who were newly diagnosed with ALL between January 2000 and March 2005 at 1 of 6 Colombian hospitals. An interview with both parents of 170 children (85 cases and 85 individually matched neighborhood controls) gathered information about each child's exposures and parental demographic and occupational characteristics, medical history, health risk behaviors, and pregnancy and birth history. A job-exposure matrix was used to classify parental exposure to hydrocarbons on the basis of the main industrial activity of each workplace where parents worked before (both parents) or during the index pregnancy (mother only). Conditional odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by period of exposure (preconception, pregnancy, and childhood). The risk of childhood ALL was linked to 1) parental occupational exposure to hydrocarbons before conception, 2) parental smoking before conception, 3) maternal low socioeconomic status during pregnancy, and 4) higher maternal age (≥35 y) at the child's birth. These findings suggest an association between childhood ALL and parental occupational exposure to carcinogenic and probably carcinogenic hydrocarbons before conception. Outcomes depended on the parent exposed. Future research should investigate the additive or multiplicative role of other environmental sources of hydrocarbons.

  11. Refractory double-hit lymphoma/leukemia in childhood mimicking B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia at initial presentation.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Suguru; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Yokoi, Takehito; Nino, Nanako; Tahara, Teppei; Tamura, Akihiro; Saito, Atsuro; Kozaki, Aiko; Kishimoto, Kenji; Ishida, Toshiaki; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki

    A 10-year-old girl was referred to our hospital with left preauricular adenopathy and gingival swelling. She was diagnosed with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) based on being positive for expressions of CD10, CD19, TdT and HLA-DR. She showed no CD20 expression at the time of diagnosis. Based on the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL, induction chemotherapy for BCP-ALL was initiated. However, the blasts did not disappear from her peripheral blood. Bone marrow examination on day 33 identified 81.3% residual blasts with positive expressions of CD19, 20 and HLA-DR and negative CD10 and TdT expressions; these cells were morphologically and phenotypically different from those at the initial diagnosis. Based on cytogenetic studies, the final diagnosis was double-hit lymphoma/leukemia (DHL) with IgH-BCL2 and Igλ-MYC. Although dose intensive chemotherapy, including rituximab, led to complete remission, bone marrow and central nervous system relapse occurred. At relapse, blasts expressed CD10, CD19 and HLA-DR, but not CD20, findings the same as those at the onset. The patient died of the disease 44 days after cord blood transplantation with non-remission status. DHL in childhood is extremely rare and its prognosis is poor. The establishment of an effective treatment for DHL is highly anticipated.

  12. Household pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood acute leukemia in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gao, Yu; Shi, Rong; Chen, Didi; Wang, Xiaojin; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Tamie; Khalequzzaman, Md; Zhou, Yijun; Zheng, Ying; Bao, Pingping; Tian, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Childhood acute leukemia (AL) is the most common malignant tumor in children, but its etiology remains largely unknown. We investigated the relationship between household exposure to pesticides and childhood AL. Between 2009 and 2010 in Shanghai, a total of 248 newly diagnosed cases of AL and 111 gender-, age-, and hospital-matched controls were included. Five nonspecific dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) [including dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), dimethyl thiophosphate (DMTP), diethyl thiophosphate (DETP), and diethyl dithiophosphate (DEDTP)] in the urine were analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that the median DMP, DEP, DMTP, DETP, and DEDEP levels adjusted for creatinine (Cr) in cases (13.2, 10.0, 31.3, 8.5, and 6.1 μg g(-1), respectively) were all significantly elevated compared with those in controls (3.6, 3.6, 13.3, 2.7, and 1.7 μg g(-1), respectively) (P < 0.05). The household use of mosquito repellent was significantly associated with an increased risk of childhood AL (odds ratio (OR) = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.1). Moreover, higher exposures were significantly associated with an elevated risk of childhood AL for DMs, DEs, and DAPs. Our findings support the notion that the household use of pesticides may play a role in the etiology of childhood AL and provide some evidence to warrant further investigation of the link between household pesticide exposures and childhood AL in Shanghai.

  13. Osteolytic bone lesions, severe hypercalcemia without circulating blasts: unusual presentation of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bechir, Achour; Haifa, Regaieg; Atef, Ben Abdelkader; Emna, Bouslema; Asma, Achour; Nesrine, Ben Sayed; Yosra, Ben Youssef; Abdrrahim, Khelif

    2017-01-01

    Hypercalcemia and severe osteolytic lesions are rare complications of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood. We report a case of a 3 years old boy who presented with prolonged fever, nausea, vomiting and increasing lower limbs pain. Skeletal X-rays and CT scan showed severe osteolytic lesions of the skull and extremities. Her physical examination showed multiple cervical lymph nodes. In laboratory tests, he had severe hypercalcemia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) was not elevated. Despite the absence of circulating blasts, bone marrow biopsy revealed B-precursor (ALL). Hypercalcemia was initially treated with intravenous isotonic sodium chloride solution and diuretics but the serum calcium level normalized only after the beginning of corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The child responded initially to chemotherapy and eventually relapsed and died of septic shock. Acute leukemia must be considered in differential diagnosis in patients with hypercalcemia. A detailed examination even when there no circulating blasts in their peripheral blood smear, and if in doubt bone marrow aspiration should must be taken into consideration.

  14. Osteolytic bone lesions, severe hypercalcemia without circulating blasts: unusual presentation of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bechir, Achour; Haifa, Regaieg; Atef, Ben Abdelkader; Emna, Bouslema; Asma, Achour; Nesrine, Ben Sayed; Yosra, Ben Youssef; Abdrrahim, Khelif

    2017-01-01

    Hypercalcemia and severe osteolytic lesions are rare complications of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in childhood. We report a case of a 3 years old boy who presented with prolonged fever, nausea, vomiting and increasing lower limbs pain. Skeletal X-rays and CT scan showed severe osteolytic lesions of the skull and extremities. Her physical examination showed multiple cervical lymph nodes. In laboratory tests, he had severe hypercalcemia. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) was not elevated. Despite the absence of circulating blasts, bone marrow biopsy revealed B-precursor (ALL). Hypercalcemia was initially treated with intravenous isotonic sodium chloride solution and diuretics but the serum calcium level normalized only after the beginning of corticosteroids and chemotherapy. The child responded initially to chemotherapy and eventually relapsed and died of septic shock. Acute leukemia must be considered in differential diagnosis in patients with hypercalcemia. A detailed examination even when there no circulating blasts in their peripheral blood smear, and if in doubt bone marrow aspiration should must be taken into consideration. PMID:28690758

  15. Clinical features and early treatment response of central nervous system involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Frandsen, Thomas L; Harila-Saari, Arja; Heyman, Mats; Jonsson, Olafur G; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Lausen, Birgitte; Vaitkevičienė, Goda; Asberg, Ann; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2014-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a therapeutic challenge. To explore leukemia characteristics of patients with CNS involvement at ALL diagnosis, we analyzed clinical features and early treatment response of 744 patients on Nordic-Baltic trials. CNS status was classified as CNS1 (no CSF blasts), CNS2 (<5 leukocytes/µl CSF with blasts), CNS3 (≥5 leukocytes/µl with blasts or signs of CNS involvement), TLP+ (traumatic lumbar puncture with blasts), and TLP- (TLP with no blasts). Patients with CNS involvement had higher leukocyte count compared with patients with CNS1 (P < 0.002). Patients with CNS3 more often had T-ALL (P < 0.001) and t(9;22)(q34;q11)[BCR-ABL1] (P < 0.004) compared with patients with CNS1. Among patients with CNS involvement headache (17%) and vomiting (14%) were most common symptoms. Symptoms or clinical findings were present among 27 of 54 patients with CNS3 versus only 7 of 39 patients with CNS2 and 15 of 75 patients with TLP+ (P < 0.001). The majority of patients with CNS involvement received additional induction therapy. The post induction bone marrow residual disease level did not differ between patients with CNS involvement and patients with CNS1 (P > 0.15). The 12-year event-free survival for patients with leukemic mass on neuroimaging did not differ from patients with negative or no scan (0.50 vs. 0.60; P = 0.7) or between patients with symptoms or signs suggestive of CNS leukemia and patients without such characteristics (0.50 vs. 0.61; P = 0.2). CNS involvement at diagnosis is associated with adverse prognostic features but does not indicate a less chemosensitive leukemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) A A A What's in this article? About ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  17. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  18. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  19. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL.

  20. Polymorphisms in glucocorticoid receptor gene and the outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Labuda, Malgorzata; Gahier, Annabel; Gagné, Vincent; Moghrabi, Albert; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja

    2010-04-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients (n=310) were analyzed for four SNPs in the NR3C1 gene. Polymorphisms -627A/G, intron 2 +646C/G and 9bT/C were all associated with reduced event-free survival. Haplotypes composed of AGT alleles at these loci and tagged by the intron 2 +646G variant also associated with lower event-free survival (p=0.03). The progressive impact of this haplotype on outcome was seen with two copies associated with reduced overall survival (p=0.05). Quantitative mRNA analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed that carriers of the AGT haplotype had a higher ratio of GR gamma/alpha isoforms (p=0.04), which possibly explains its association with reduced event-free survival and overall survival. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MTHFR polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: influence on methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Umerez, Maitane; Gutierrez-Camino, Ángela; Muñoz-Maldonado, Carmen; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an important component in the therapy used to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme for MTX pharmacokinetics. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, affecting MTHFR activity, have been widely studied as potential markers of MTX toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. In this review, we show that the majority of published reports do not find association or present opposite effect. Therefore, MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms do not seem to be good markers of MTX-related toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. The efforts should be focused on other genes, such as transporter genes or microRNA-related genes. PMID:28392709

  2. Dust-metal Loadings and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001–2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in less than 15% of homes. Relationships between dust-metal loadings (μg metal per m2 carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child’s age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust-metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.94 (0.83, 1.05), cadmium: 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), chromium: 0.99 (0.87, 1.12), copper: 0.96 (0.90, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.92 (0.80, 1.07), tin: 0.93 (0.82, 1.05), and zinc: 0.91 (0.81, 1.02)]. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL. PMID:25736162

  3. Dust metal loadings and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Todd P; Ward, Mary H; Colt, Joanne S; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B; Katharine Hammond, S; Rappaport, Stephen M; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001-2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in <15% of homes. Relationships between dust metal loadings (μg metal per m(2) carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child's age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.96 (0.86, 1.07), cadmium: 0.92 (0.81, 1.05), chromium: 1.01 (0.90, 1.14), copper: 0.97 (0.91, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.95 (0.82, 1.09), tin: 0.96 (0.86, 1.08), and zinc: 0.94 (0.84, 1.05)). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL.

  4. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K; Klesges, Lisa M; Baker, K Scott; Gurney, James G

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Cancer Prevention recommendations, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and the 2005 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide. Mean daily energy intake was consistent with estimated requirements; however, mean body mass index was 27.1 kg/m2 (overweight). Dietary index scores averaged fewer than half the possible number of points on all 3 scales, indicating poor adherence to recommended guidelines. No study participant reported complete adherence to any set of guidelines. Although half the participants met minimal daily goals for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables (WCRF/AICR recommendations) and childhood ALL is not concordant with dietary recommendations that may help reduce their risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, or other treatment-related late effects.

  5. Using adaptive model predictive control to customize maintenance therapy chemotherapeutic dosing for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Noble, Sarah L; Sherer, Eric; Hannemann, Robert E; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Vik, Terry; Rundell, Ann E

    2010-06-07

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common childhood cancer in which nearly one-quarter of patients experience a disease relapse. However, it has been shown that individualizing therapy for childhood ALL patients by adjusting doses based on the blood concentration of active drug metabolite could significantly improve treatment outcome. An adaptive model predictive control (MPC) strategy is presented in which maintenance therapy for childhood ALL is personalized using routine patient measurements of red blood cell mean corpuscular volume as a surrogate for the active drug metabolite concentration. A clinically relevant mathematical model is developed and used to describe the patient response to the chemotherapeutic drug 6-mercaptopurine, with some model parameters being patient-specific. During the course of treatment, the patient-specific parameters are adaptively identified using recurrent complete blood count measurements, which sufficiently constrain the patient parameter uncertainty to support customized adjustments of the drug dose. While this work represents only a first step toward a quantitative tool for clinical use, the simulated treatment results indicate that the proposed mathematical model and adaptive MPC approach could serve as valuable resources to the oncologist toward creating a personalized treatment strategy that is both safe and effective. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation patterns in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazutoshi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    The 5-year survival rate of patients with childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) now exceeds 90%, though there are still patients who fail to achieve remission or relapse early. To improve the outcomes of these cases, new diagnostic markers for stratification of those with unfavorable outcomes and novel targets for treatment have been investigated based on data from the OMICs analysis. We performed gene expression analysis of leukemic cells from 91 near-diploid BCP-ALL cases without specific fusion genes enrolled in Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group (TCCSG)-L0416 & L0616 clinical trials employing the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Among them, DNA methylation status was analyzed in 24 cases by using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Herein, initially, the current situations of gene expression analysis and DNA methylation analysis of childhood BCP-ALL are reviewed. Then, our analyses of gene expressions and DNA methylation related to the prognosis of childhood ALL without fusion genes are presented.

  7. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  8. Relapse-specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julia A; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E; Yang, Jun J; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Evans, William E; Morrison, Debra J; Mason, Christopher E; Carroll, William L

    2013-03-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis, despite intensive retreatment, owing to intrinsic drug resistance. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here, we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten individuals with pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired, novel nonsynonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, with 2 individuals harboring relapse-specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, encoding a 5'-nucleotidase. Full-exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 further relapse specimens, identifying additional mutations in 5 cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins showed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analog therapies. Clinically, all individuals who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, within 36 months of initial diagnosis (P = 0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug-resistant clones in ALL.

  9. Relapse specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julia A.; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E.; Yang, Jun J.; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P.; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L.; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Evans, William E.; Morrison, Debra J.; Mason, Christopher E.; Carroll, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis despite intensive retreatment, due to intrinsic drug resistance1-2. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten pediatric B lymphoblastic leukemia patients using RNA-sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired novel non-synonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, of which two patients harbored relapse specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, a 5′-nucleotidase. Full exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 additional relapse specimens, identifying five additional cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins revealed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analogue therapies. Clinically, all patients who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, or within 36 months of initial diagnosis (p=0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug resistant clones in ALL. PMID:23377183

  10. Neuropsychological sequelae of central nervous system prophylaxis in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Said, J.A.; Waters, B.G.; Cousens, P.; Stevens, M.M.

    1989-04-01

    We assessed neuropsychologically 106 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had all received cranial irradiation for the prevention of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia 1-13 years previously. Children were assessed for adverse late effects of their therapy, using age-appropriate Wechsler measures of overall intellectual ability and supplementary tests. Forty-five siblings near in age to the patients were tested as controls. The patients who had had the most intensive central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis were found to have a WISC-R Full Scale IQ 17 points lower than the sibling control group. Performance IQ was more affected than verbal IQ. The patients were more easily distracted and less able to concentrate. The severity of the aftereffects was related to younger age at the time of CNS prophylaxis and to a higher dose of cranial irradiation but not to time since CNS prophylaxis. CNS prophylaxis using a combination of cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate has lowered the incidence of CNS relapse in childhood ALL but is associated with considerable long-term morbidity in survivors.

  11. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaink, Alexis; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  12. Residential Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in California

    PubMed Central

    Colt, Joanne S.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Nishioka, Marcia; Dahl, Gary V.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Metayer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: House dust is a major source of exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are found at high levels in U.S. homes. Methods: We studied 167 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases 0–7 years of age and 214 birth certificate controls matched on date of birth, sex, and race/ethnicity from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. In 2001–2007, we sampled carpets in the room where the child spent the most time while awake; we used a high-volume small-surface sampler or we took dust from the home vacuum. We measured concentrations of 14 PBDE congeners including penta (28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154), octa (183, 196, 197, 203), and decaBDEs (206–209). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, income, year of dust collection, and sampling method. Results: BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209 were found at the highest concentrations (medians, 1,173, 1,579, and 938 ng/g, respectively). Comparing the highest to lowest quartile, we found no association with ALL for summed pentaBDEs (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.3), octaBDEs (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.7, 2.3), or decaBDEs (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8). Comparing homes in the highest concentration (nanograms per gram) tertile to those with no detections, we observed significantly increased ALL risk for BDE-196 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.8), BDE-203 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), BDE-206 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9), and BDE-207 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.8). Conclusion: We found no association with ALL for common PBDEs, but we observed positive associations for specific octa and nonaBDEs. Additional studies with repeated sampling and biological measures would be informative. Citation: Ward MH, Colt JS, Deziel NC, Whitehead TP, Reynolds P, Gunier RB, Nishioka M, Dahl GV, Rappaport SM, Buffler PA, Metayer C. 2014. Residential levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in California. Environ Health Perspect 122:1110–1116

  13. Association of Muscle Strength and Bone Mineral Density in Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Emily D.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Ferry, Robert J.; Robison, Leslie L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a population at increased risk for both decreased BMD and muscle strength from cancer and its treatment. Design Cohort data from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) study. Setting Department of Cancer Control at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Participants Subjects were adults enrolled in St Jude Lifetime Cohort study and treated for childhood ALL between 1962 and 1999. As part of a comprehensive evaluation, participants had dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans and muscle strength testing. The participants consisted of 261 women and 232 men who were 20.4 to 49.8 years old (median, 35.7y), and 12.7 to 46.5 years from diagnosis of childhood ALL (median, 27.2y). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures BMD was determined by DEXA scan. Muscle strength of upper and lower extremities was assessed with physical performance testing. Results After adjusting for covariates, we found significant (P < 0.005) associations between BMD and muscle strength in lower extremities (R2 range, 0.33–0.40) and strong, significant associations in upper extremities (left-side R2 = 0.558; right-side R2 = 0.560). Conclusions Muscle strength was associated with BMD in the extremities of long-term survivors of childhood ALL, a finding suggesting that muscle strengthening interventions may improve bone health in them. PMID:21621662

  14. Analysis of Normal Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Contents in Childhood Acute Leukemia Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Vadillo, Eduardo; Dozal, David; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Laffont-Ortiz, Merle Denisse; Prieto-Chávez, Jessica L; Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Quintela-Nuñez Del Prado, Henry; Mayani, Héctor; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; López-Martínez, Briceida; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute leukemias (AL) are characterized by the excessive production of malignant precursor cells at the expense of effective blood cell development. The dominance of leukemic cells over normal progenitors may result in either direct suppression of functional hematopoiesis or remodeling of microenvironmental niches, contributing to BM failure and AL-associated mortality. We undertook this study to investigate the contents and functional activity of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) and their relationship to immune cell production and risk status in AL pediatric patients. Multiparametric flow cytometry of BM aspirates was performed to classify AL on the basis of lineage and differentiation stages and to analyze HSPC and immune cell frequencies. Controlled co-culture systems were conducted to evaluate functional lineage potentials of primitive cells. Statistical correlations and inter-group significant differences were established. Among 113 AL BM aspirates, 26.5% corresponded to ProB, 19.5% to PreB and 32% contain ProB and PreB differentiation stages, whereas nearly 9% of the cases were T- and 13% myeloid-lineage leukemias. We identified ProB-ALL as the subtype endowed with the highest relative contents of HSPC, whereas T-ALL and PreB-ALL showed a critically reduced size of both HSC and MLP compartments. Notably, lower cell frequencies of HSPC in ProB-ALL correlated to high-risk prognosis at disease debut. HSPC abundance at initial diagnosis may aid to predict the clinical course of ALL and to identify high-risk patients. A clearer understanding of their population dynamics and functional properties in the leukemia setting will potentially pave the way for targeted therapies. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Infection and childhood leukemia: review of evidence

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Raquel da Rocha Paiva; Wünsch, Victor

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze studies that evaluated the role of infections as well as indirect measures of exposure to infection in the risk of childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia. METHODS A search in Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO scientific publication databases initially using the descriptors "childhood leukemia" and "infection" and later searching for the words "childhood leukemia" and "maternal infection or disease" or "breastfeeding" or "daycare attendance" or "vaccination" resulted in 62 publications that met the following inclusion criteria: subject aged ≤ 15 years; specific analysis of cases diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or total leukemia; exposure assessment of mothers' or infants' to infections (or proxy of infection), and risk of leukemia. RESULTS Overall, 23 studies that assessed infections in children support the hypothesis that occurrence of infection during early childhood reduces the risk of leukemia, but there are disagreements within and between studies. The evaluation of exposure to infection by indirect measures showed evidence of reduced risk of leukemia associated mainly with daycare attendance. More than 50.0% of the 16 studies that assessed maternal exposure to infection observed increased risk of leukemia associated with episodes of influenza, pneumonia, chickenpox, herpes zoster, lower genital tract infection, skin disease, sexually transmitted diseases, Epstein-Barr virus, and Helicobacter pylori. CONCLUSIONS Although no specific infectious agent has been identified, scientific evidence suggests that exposure to infections has some effect on childhood leukemia etiology. PMID:24626555

  16. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemias by Cytogenetic Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Zhang, Luoping; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bartley, Karen; Schiffman, Joshua; Ma, Xiaomei; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia H.; Ducore, Jonathan; Smith, Martyn T.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains carcinogens known to damage somatic and germ cells. We investigated the effect tobacco smoke on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML), especially subtypes of pre-natal origin like ALL with translocation t(12;21) or high-hyperdiploidy (51–67 chromosomes). Methods We collected information on exposures to tobacco smoking before conception, during pregnancy, and after birth in 767 ALL cases, 135 AML cases, and 1,139 controls (1996–2008). Among cases, chromosome translocations, deletions, or aneuploidy were identified by conventional karyotype and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Results Multivariable regression analyses for ALL and AML overall showed no definite evidence of associations with self-reported (yes/no) parental prenatal active smoking and child's passive smoking. However, children with history of paternal prenatal smoking combined with postnatal passive smoking had a 1.5-fold increased risk of ALL (95% CI: 1.01–2.23), compared to those without smoking history (ORs for pre- or postnatal smoking only were close to one). This joint effect was seen for B-cell precursor ALL with t(12;21) (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.04–4.16), but not high hyperdiploid B-cell ALL. Similarly, child's passive smoking was associated with an elevated risk of AML with chromosome structural changes (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.01–7.58), but not aneuploidy. Conclusions our data suggest that exposure to tobacco smoking before were associated with increased risks of childhood ALL and AML; and risks varied by timing of exposure (before and/or after birth) and cytogenetic subtype, based on imprecise estimates. Impact Parents should limit exposures to tobacco smoke before and after the child's birth. PMID:23853208

  17. Polymorphisms of the vincristine pathway and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Langlois-Pelletier, Chloé; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Ciolino, Claire; Lorenzo, Samanta De; Kevin, Kojok M; Cijov, Diana; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Background Vincristine (VCR) is a standard component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR cytotoxicity is primarily due to its ability to disrupt the formation of microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Patients & methods A total of 17 polymorphisms in regulatory and coding regions of genes controlling VCR targets (TUBB1, MAP4, ACTG1 and CAPG) or potentially influencing VCR levels (ABCB1 and CYP3A5) were investigated for an association with peripheral neuropathy and outcome in childhood ALL patients. Results High-grade neurotoxicity was more frequent in carriers of the A allele of synonymous (Ala310) G to A (rs1135989) variation in the ACTG1 gene. Substitution (rs4728709) in the promoter of the ABCB1 gene had a protective effect against lower grade neurotoxicity and C to A variation (rs3770102) located 17 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site had a protective effect against high-grade neurotoxicity. Patients with the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had lower event-free survival; the association with event-free survival was not supported by the analysis in the replication patient set. Conclusion The polymorphisms in the ACTG1, CAPG and ABCB1 genes may modulate VCR-related neurotoxicity, whereas the risk of relapse seems not to be affected by the genes of the VCR pathway. PMID:25084203

  18. Altered neutrophil immunophenotypes in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Elen; Bacelar, Thiago S.; Ciudad, Juana; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília M.; Garcia, Daniela R.N.; Sedek, Lukasz; Maia, Simone F.; Aranha, Daniel B.; Machado, Indyara C.; Ikeda, Arissa; Baglioli, Bianca F.; Lopez-Duarte, Nathalia; Teixeira, Lisandra A. C.; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Silva, Maria Luiza M.; Land, Marcelo G.P.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of evidences suggest a genetic predisposition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that might favor the occurrence of the driver genetic alterations. Such genetic background might also translate into phenotypic alterations of residual hematopoietic cells. Whether such phenotypic alterations are present in bone marrow (BM) cells from childhood B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL remains to be investigated. Here we analyzed the immunophenotypic profile of BM and peripheral blood (PB) maturing/matured neutrophils from 118 children with BCP-ALL and their relationship with the features of the disease. Our results showed altered neutrophil phenotypes in most (77%) BCP-ALL cases. The most frequently altered marker was CD10 (53%), followed by CD33 (34%), CD13 (15%), CD15/CD65 (10%) and CD123 (7%). Of note, patients with altered neutrophil phenotypes had younger age (p = 0.03) and lower percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (p = 0.004) together with greater BM lymphocyte (p = 0.04), and mature B-cell (p = 0.03) counts. No significant association was found between an altered neutrophil phenotype and other disease features. These findings point out the potential existence of an altered residual hematopoiesis in most childhood BCP-ALL cases. PMID:27028865

  19. Parental Perceptions of Obesity and Obesity Risk Associated With Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gary L; McClellan, Wendy; Raman, Sripriya; Sherman, Ashley; Guest, Erin; August, Keith

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related comorbidities in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is well established and ranges anywhere from 29% to 69% depending on the study. We sought to explore the awareness of parents of survivors of childhood ALL regarding the increased risk of obesity and their perceptions regarding the overall health of their child. One hundred twenty-one parents of 99 survivors of pediatric ALL completed surveys regarding perceptions of obesity risk in survivors. Eighty percent of parents of overweight and obese survivors correctly identified their child as "a little overweight" or "overweight." Few parents recalled discussing weight gain (21%) or obesity risk (36%) with their practitioner. Parents that did recall having these discussions and/or reported a decreased level of posttherapy activity in their child were more likely to be concerned about their child's weight status. Improved awareness and education regarding the risk of obesity and associated comorbid conditions may provide an avenue for future prevention of obesity in survivors of pediatric ALL. Discussion and education regarding a healthy lifestyle, including proper diet and exercise, should be incorporated early in routine patient visits.

  20. Approach to prediagnostic clinical semiology, noticed by mothers, of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Castro-Jiménez, Miguel Ángel; Rueda-Arenas, Ernesto; Cabrera-Rodríguez, Daladier

    2015-08-01

    Recognizing early symptoms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may help to make an early diagnosis. The objective of this study is to identify clinical manifestations preceding the diagnosis of childhood ALL from the maternal perspective and to establish the time elapsed from the first manifestation to the diagnosis. Six hospitals located in Bogotá and Bucaramanga (Colombia) participated. Cases consisted of children under 15 years old with incidental diagnosis of ALL between January 2000 and March 2005. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, pre diagnostic clinical manifestations, first symptom, and time to diagnosis were collected during interviews with mothers. Medians, ranges and proportions were estimated. P values below 0.05 were considered significant. One hundred and twenty-eight cases were analyzed. Pallor (83.6%), loss of appetite (72.6%), weight loss (62.5%), andbleeding into the skin (39.1%) were the most common symptoms preceding diagnosis. The delay between the occurrence of the first symptom and the diagnosis of ALL depends on what the first manifestation is, and it maybe shorter when there is evidence of hemorrhage (median= 14 days). The presence of palpable lymph nodes in the armpits was more significant in girls than in boys (p= 0.04). Childhood ALL symptomatology in the prediagnostic stage is not specific to this disease; however, the clinical sign and time since its occurrence may serve as a guide in the early stage of this disease.

  1. Polymorphisms of the vincristine pathway and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Langlois-Pelletier, Chloé; Gagné, Vincent; Rousseau, Julie; Ciolino, Claire; De Lorenzo, Samanta; Kevin, Kojok M; Cijov, Diana; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Krajinovic, Maja

    2014-06-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is a standard component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). VCR cytotoxicity is primarily due to its ability to disrupt the formation of microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Seventeen polymorphisms in regulatory and coding regions of genes controlling VCR targets (TUBB1, MAP4, ACTG1 and CAPG) or potentially influencing VCR levels (ABCB1 and CYP3A5) were investigated for an association with peripheral neuropathy and outcome in childhood ALL patients. High-grade neurotoxicity was more frequent in carriers of the A allele of synonymous (Ala310) G to A (rs1135989) variation in the ACTG1 gene. Substitution (rs4728709) in the promoter of the ABCB1 gene had a protective effect against lower grade neurotoxicity and C to A variation (rs3770102) located 17 nucleotides upstream from the transcription start site had a protective effect against high-grade neurotoxicity. Patients with the ABCB1 3435TT genotype had lower event-free survival; the association with event-free survival was not supported by the analysis in the replication patient set. The polymorphisms in the ACTG1, CAPG and ABCB1 genes may modulate VCR-related neurotoxicity, whereas the risk of relapse seems not to be affected by the genes of the VCR pathway.

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Obesity in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Kevin C; Mertens, Ann C; Sklar, Charles A; Yasui, Yutaka; Fears, Thomas; Stovall, Marilyn; Vik, Terry A; Inskip, Peter D; Robison, Leslie L

    2003-04-01

    To determine whether adult survivors (>or= 18 years of age) of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for obesity and to assess patient and treatment variables that influence risk. A retrospective cohort of participants of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study was used to compare 1,765 adult survivors of childhood ALL to 2,565 adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Body-mass index (BMI; kilograms per square meter), calculated from self-reported heights and weights, was used to determine the prevalence of being overweight (BMI, 25-29.9) or obese (BMI >or= 30.0). Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for being overweight or obese among ALL survivors relative to the sibling control group. The age- and race-adjusted OR for being obese in survivors treated with cranial radiation doses >or= 20 Gy in comparison with siblings was 2.59 for females (95% CI, 1.88 to 3.55; P <.001) and 1.86 for males (95% CI, 1.33 to 2.57; P <.001). The OR for obesity was greatest among females diagnosed at 0 to 4 years of age and treated with radiation doses >or= 20 Gy (OR, 3.81; 95% CI, 2.34 to 5.99; P <.001). Obesity was not associated with treatment consisting of chemotherapy only or with cranial radiation doses of 10 to 19 Gy. Cranial radiotherapy >or= 20 Gy is associated with an increased prevalence of obesity, especially in females treated at a young age. It is imperative that healthcare professionals recognize this risk and develop strategies to enhance weight control and encourage longitudinal follow-up.

  4. Prelabor cesarean delivery and early-onset acute childhood leukemia risk.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Dessypris, Nick; Chrousos, George; Karalexi, Maria A; Karavasilis, Theodoros G; Baka, Margarita; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Kourti, Maria; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Sidi, Vasiliki; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Moschovi, Maria; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Petridou, Eleni Th

    2016-03-01

    The long-term impact of cesarean delivery (CD) on the health of the offspring is being explored methodically. We sought to investigate the effect of birth by (a) prelabor and (b) during-labor CD on the risk of early-onset (≤3 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), specifically of its prevailing precursor B (B-ALL) subtype. A total of 1099 incident cases of ALL (957 B-ALL), 131 of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and their 1 : 1 age-matched and sex-matched controls, derived from the Nationwide Registry for Childhood Hematological Malignancies (1996-2013), were analyzed using multivariate regression models. A null association was found between prelabor and/or during labor CD and either ALL (B-ALL) or AML in the 0-14 age range. By contrast, birth by CD increased significantly the risk of early-onset ALL [odds ratioCD (ORCD)=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.24] mainly on account of prelabor CD (ORprelaborCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43). The respective figures were even higher for the early-onset precursor B-ALL (ORCD=1.66, 95% CI: 1.15-2.40 and ORprelaborCD=1.79, 95% CI: 1.21-2.66), whereas no association emerged for early-onset AML. Prelabor CD, which deprives exposure of the fetus/infant to the presumably beneficial effect of stress hormones released in both vaginal labor and during labor CD, was associated exclusively with an increased risk of early-onset ALL, particularly the precursor B-ALL subtype. If confirmed, these adverse long-term outcomes of CD may point to re-evaluation of prelabor CD practices and prompt scientific discussion on the best ways to simulate the effects of vaginal delivery, such as a precesarean induction of labor.

  5. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  6. Impaired mitochondrial function is abrogated by dexrazoxane in doxorubicin-treated childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors.

    PubMed

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Anderson, Lynn M; Miller, Tracie L; Gerschenson, Mariana; Stevenson, Kristen E; Neuberg, Donna S; Franco, Vivian I; LiButti, Daniel E; Silverman, Lewis B; Vrooman, Lynda M; Sallan, Stephen E

    2016-03-15

    Impaired cardiac function in doxorubicin-treated childhood cancer survivors is partly mediated by the disruption of mitochondrial energy production. Doxorubicin intercalates into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and disrupts genes encoding for polypeptides that make adenosine triphosphate. This cross-sectional study examined mtDNA copy numbers per cell and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 64 childhood survivors of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had been treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute childhood ALL protocols and had received doxorubicin alone (42%) or doxorubicin with the cardioprotectant dexrazoxane (58%). The number of mtDNA copies per cell and the OXPHOS enzyme activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (complex I [CI]) and cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV [CIV]) were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction immunoassays and thin-layer chromatography, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.8 years after treatment, the median number of mtDNA copies per cell for patients treated with doxorubicin alone (1106.3) was significantly higher than the median number for those who had also received dexrazoxane (310.5; P = .001). No significant differences were detected between the groups for CI or CIV activity. Doxorubicin-treated survivors had an increased number of PBMC mtDNA copies per cell, and concomitant use of dexrazoxane was associated with a lower number of mtDNA copies per cell. Because of a possible compensatory increase in mtDNA copies per cell to maintain mitochondrial function in the setting of mitochondrial dysfunction, overall OXPHOS activity was not different between the groups. The long-term sustainability of this compensatory response in these survivors at risk for cardiac dysfunction over their lifespan is concerning. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Exposure to professional pest control treatments and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Armstrong, Bruce K; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Fritschi, Lin; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney J; Smibert, Elizabeth; Milne, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that exposure to pesticides increases the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether professional pest treatments in or around the home before birth or during childhood increased the risk of childhood ALL. Data from 388 cases and 870 frequency-matched controls were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for study matching variables and potential confounders, to calculate odds ratios (ORs). A meta-analysis of our findings with the published findings of previous studies was also conducted. The ORs for any professional pest control treatments were 1.19 (95% CI 0.83, 1.69) in the year before pregnancy, 1.30 (95% CI 0.86, 1.97) during pregnancy and 1.24 (95% CI 0.93, 1.65) for those done after the child's birth. The ORs for exposure after birth were highest when it occurred between the ages of two and three years. ORs were elevated for termite treatments before birth. ORs were higher for pre-B than T cell ALL and for t(12;21) (ETV6-Runx-1) than other cytogenetic sub-types. The pooled OR from a meta-analysis of our study with three previous studies of professional pest control treatments during pregnancy was 1.37 (95% CI 1.00, 1.88). Our results, and those of our meta-analysis, provide some evidence of a modestly increased risk of ALL for professional pest control treatments done during the index pregnancy and possibly in the child's early years. The analysis of pooled data from international collaborations may provide more certainty regarding these potentially important associations. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  8. Exposure to diagnostic radiological procedures and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Armstrong, Bruce K; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Fritschi, Lin; Attia, John; Lockwood, Liane; Milne, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Diagnostic irradiation of the mother during pregnancy increases the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). There is inconsistent evidence on associations between ALL and other parental or childhood diagnostic irradiation. The aim of this analysis is to investigate whether diagnostic X-rays of the mother before birth, of the father before conception, or of the child increased the risk of childhood ALL. Data from 389 cases and 876 frequency-matched controls were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for study matching factors and potential confounders. A meta-analysis of our findings in relation to paternal X-rays before conception with the published findings of previous studies was also conducted. There was no evidence of an increased risk with maternal abdominal X-rays before the birth of the index child or with the child having any X-rays more than 6 months before the censoring date. The odds ratio (OR) for any paternal abdominal X-ray before conception was 1.17 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-1.55], and 1.47 (95% CI, 0.98-2.21) for more than one X-ray. The OR for any paternal intravenous pyelogram before conception was 3.56 (95% CI, 1.59-7.98). The pooled OR for this study with previous studies of any paternal abdominal X-rays before conception was 1.17 (95% CI, 0.92-1.48). There was some evidence of an increased risk of ALL in the offspring if the father had more than one abdominal X-ray before conception or had ever had an intravenous pyelogram. We plan to repeat this analysis by using pooled data to improve precision. ©2010 AACR.

  9. Impaired mitochondrial function is abrogated by dexrazoxane in doxorubicin-treated childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Anderson, Lynn M.; Miller, Tracie L.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Stevenson, Kristen E.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Franco, Vivian I.; LiButti, Daniel E.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Vrooman, Lynda M.; Sallan, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Impaired cardiac function in doxorubicin-treated childhood cancer survivors is partly mediated by disruption of mitochondrial energy production. Doxorubicin intercalates into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disrupting genes encoding for polypeptides that make ATP. METHODS This cross-sectional study examined mtDNA copy numbers/cell and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 64 childhood survivors of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Childhood ALL protocols who had received doxorubicin alone (42%) or with dexrazoxane (58%), a cardioprotectant. Mitochondrial DNA copies per cell and OXPHOS enzyme activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase (Complex I, CI) and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV, CIV) were measured by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) immunoassay and thin layer chromatography, respectively. RESULTS At a median follow-up of 7.8 years after treatment, the median number of mtDNA copies per cell for patients treated with doxorubicin alone was significantly higher than for those who also received dexrazoxane (medians, 1106.3 and 310.5; P=0.001). No significant differences were detected between groups for CI or CIV activities. CONCLUSIONS Doxorubicin-treated survivors had increased PBMC mtDNA copies/cell and concomitant use of dexrazoxane was associated with lower mtDNA copies/cell. Due to a possible compensatory increase in mtDNA copies/cell to maintain mitochondrial function in the setting of mitochondrial dysfunction, overall OXPHOS activity was not different between groups. The long-term sustainability of this compensatory response in these survivors at risk for cardiac dysfunction over their lifespan is concerning. PMID:26762648

  10. Identification of germline susceptibility loci in ETV6-RUNX1-rearranged childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ellinghaus, E; Stanulla, M; Richter, G; Ellinghaus, D; te Kronnie, G; Cario, G; Cazzaniga, G; Horstmann, M; Panzer Grümayer, R; Cavé, H; Trka, J; Cinek, O; Teigler-Schlegel, A; ElSharawy, A; Häsler, R; Nebel, A; Meissner, B; Bartram, T; Lescai, F; Franceschi, C; Giordan, M; Nürnberg, P; Heinzow, B; Zimmermann, M; Schreiber, S; Schrappe, M; Franke, A

    2012-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease of the white blood cells. The etiology of ALL is believed to be multifactorial and likely to involve an interplay of environmental and genetic variables. We performed a genome-wide association study of 355 750 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 474 controls and 419 childhood ALL cases characterized by a t(12;21)(p13;q22) — the most common chromosomal translocation observed in childhood ALL — which leads to an ETV6–RUNX1 gene fusion. The eight most strongly associated SNPs were followed-up in 951 ETV6-RUNX1-positive cases and 3061 controls from Germany/Austria and Italy, respectively. We identified a novel, genome-wide significant risk locus at 3q28 (TP63, rs17505102, PCMH=8.94 × 10−9, OR=0.65). The separate analysis of the combined German/Austrian sample only, revealed additional genome-wide significant associations at 11q11 (OR8U8, rs1945213, P=9.14 × 10−11, OR=0.69) and 8p21.3 (near INTS10, rs920590, P=6.12 × 10−9, OR=1.36). These associations and another association at 11p11.2 (PTPRJ, rs3942852, P=4.95 × 10−7, OR=0.72) remained significant in the German/Austrian replication panel after correction for multiple testing. Our findings demonstrate that germline genetic variation can specifically contribute to the risk of ETV6–RUNX1-positive childhood ALL. The identification of TP63 and PTPRJ as susceptibility genes emphasize the role of the TP53 gene family and the importance of proteins regulating cellular processes in connection with tumorigenesis. PMID:22076464

  11. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  12. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients. To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation. In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences

  13. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Kalina, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients.To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p< 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation.In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences in

  14. Evolution of modern treatment of childhood acute leukemia and cancer: adventures and battles in the 1970s and 1980s.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi

    2015-02-01

    This article summarizes the adventures and explorations in the 1970s and 1980s in the treatment of children with leukemia and cancer that paved the way for the current success in childhood cancers. Indeed, these were adventures and bold steps into unchartered waters. Because childhood leukemia the most common of the childhood cancers, success in childhood leukemia was pivotal in the push toward cure of all childhood cancers. The success in childhood leukemia illustrates how treatment programs were designed using clinical- and biology-based risk factors seen in the patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... et al. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ...

  16. Dermatoglyphics in childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berka, Ludmila; McClure, P. D.; Sonley, Marilyn J.; Thompson, Margaret W.

    1971-01-01

    The dermatoglyphics of 54 leukemic children do not differ significantly from those of 25 mothers and 592 unrelated controls with respect to frequency of digital pattern types, position of axial triradius, or type of palmar flexion creases. These findings do not support the hypothesis that children with leukemia have an increased frequency of unusual dermal patterns, but suggest that the dermatoglyphics of leukemic children are not distinctive and therefore have no practical value in the diagnosis of childhood leukemia. Whatever factors are responsible for the development of leukemia in children, these factors do not appear regularly to affect the differentiation of the dermal ridges. PMID:5112119

  17. In vitro cellular drug resistance and prognosis in newly diagnosed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaspers, G J; Veerman, A J; Pieters, R; Van Zantwijk, C H; Smets, L A; Van Wering, E R; Van Der Does-Van Den Berg, A

    1997-10-01

    As an important determinant of the response to chemotherapy, measurements of cellular drug resistance may provide prognostically significant information, which could be useful for optimal risk-group stratification. The objective of this report is to determine the relation between in vitro resistance to 12 drugs, measured with the colorimetric methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium (MTT) assay, and long-term clinical response to chemotherapy in 152 children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. At risk-group stratified analyses, in vitro resistance to prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine were each significantly (P < .01) related to the probability of disease-free survival (pDFS) after combination chemotherapy. The combination of data for prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine provided a drug-resistance profile with prognostic independent significance superior to that of any single drug or any other factor. The 3-years pDFS was 100% for the group with the most sensitive profile, 20% of all patients, 84% (SE 6%) for the group with an intermediately sensitive profile, 40% of all patients, and 43% (SE 8%) for the remaining group with the most resistant profile (P < .001). In conclusion, the extent of in vitro cellular resistance to prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine, measured using the MTT assay, was significantly related to the clinical response to combination chemotherapy. Treatment failure in newly diagnosed childhood ALL can be predicted based on cellular drug resistance data.

  18. Trajectories of Obesity and Overweight Rates Among Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Megan R; Hockenberry, Marilyn J; McCarthy, Kathy S; Silva, Susan G

    2015-07-01

    To describe the trajectories of obesity/overweight rates by age group among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from diagnosis through several years post-therapy. Longitudinal, descriptive. Hematology/oncology clinic in the southwestern United States. 62 child and adolescent ALL survivors receiving treatment and follow-up care from 1999-2013. Retrospective chart review of height, weight, and body mass index. Annual obesity/overweight rates and developmental age groups. Different trajectories of obesity/overweight rates existed among age groups. Forty-seven percent of adolescents met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for obesity/overweight status at some point following diagnosis, compared to 68% of school-age and 73% of preschool children. Preschool children demonstrated the most rapid rate increase following diagnosis, with a particularly susceptible period in the years immediately following therapy. Obesity/overweight persistence was most characteristic of school-age children. Important variations in rate and pattern of weight status trajectories exist by age group, demonstrating that children diagnosed with ALL during the preschool and school-age developmental years have the greatest vulnerability of developing obesity/overweight status. Obesity/overweight prevention efforts are greatly needed in children with ALL, and efforts should occur before ALL treatment completion in preschool and school-age children.

  19. Detection of clonality by polymerase chain reaction in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D A; Nowak, J S

    1994-09-01

    DNA-based PCR with various sets of primers for TCR gamma/delta, and Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes were used to study clonality in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Amplification of the IgH CDR-III was observed in 75 of 120 analyzed cases (62.5%). From all analyzed groups, the IgH gene rearrangement was most often observed in pre-B ALL (85.7%) and was rather rare in null-ALL (34.5%). TCR delta gene rearrangement was the most common, and was observed in 77 patients (64.2%). The typical pattern of rearrangements was defined as an incomplete V delta 2 to D delta 3, V delta 2 to D delta 2, or D delta 3 to D delta 2 recombination product. Rearrangements of TCR gamma gene we observed in 61 cases (50.8%). TCR gamma gene rearrangements were detected predominantly in null-ALL and early B-ALL (55.2% and 60%, respectively) and were rather rare in other groups. Of all eight V segments of V gamma I group, the most frequent gene usage concerns regions V gamma 2, V gamma 4, and psi V gamma 7. We have confirmed that IgH gene amplification, together with TCR gamma and delta gene amplification, provides a rapid, sensitive approach to assessing clonality in ALL almost in 100% of cases.

  20. FAS Promoter Polymorphism: Outcome of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia. A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Parinda A; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Elliott, James S; Zamzow, Tiffany A; Combs, Michelle; Stover, Emily; Ross, Julie A; Perentesis, John P; Meschinchi, Soheil; Lange, Beverly J; Davies, Stella M

    2009-01-01

    Purpose FAS is a cell surface receptor involved in apoptotic signal transmission. Deregulation of this pathway results in down regulation of apoptosis and subsequent persistence of a malignant clone. A single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in guanine-to-adenine (G→A) transition in the FAS promoter region (position –1377) is thought to reduce stimulatory protein 1 (SP1) transcription factor binding and decrease FAS expression. Previous work has shown increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adult patients with a variant allele at this site. The same authors have shown that the presence of an adenine residue rather than a guanine residue at –1377 bp significantly attenuates transcription factor SP1 binding and may contribute to a reduction in FAS expression and ultimately to the enrichment of apoptosis-resistant clones in AML. We hypothesized that FAS genotype by altering susceptibility to apoptosis might impact outcome of childhood AML therapy. Experimental Design 440 children treated for de novo AML on a uniform protocol were genotyped for FAS 1377. Results There were no significant differences in overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), treatment-related mortality (TRM), or relapse rate between patients with FAS 1377GG genotype vs. 1377GA/1377AA genotypes. Conclusion FAS1377 genotype does not alter outcome of de novo AML in children. PMID:19047119

  1. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  2. The Progression of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities After Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vitanza, Nicholas A; Hogan, Laura E; Zhang, Guangxiang; Parker, Robert I

    2015-07-01

    Although reduced bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is well documented, the degree of demineralization and relation to age are not well described. This is a retrospective chart analysis of 58 patients consecutively treated for ALL without relapse, cranial irradiation, or transplantation. Bone mineral densities were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and patients were divided by sex and age (≤5, 6 to 10, and >10 y) at diagnosis. Serial scans for 6 years after therapy were analyzed as Z-scores. Over 6 years after therapy, 93.1% of patients exhibited a decreased Z-score in at least 1 anatomic site. The difference in Z-score among the age cohorts was significant at both the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Patients older than 10 years at diagnosis had the lowest Z-scores: -2.78 and -2.87 for boys and -2.39 and -2.91 for girls at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, respectively. Children after ALL therapy exhibit a significant bone mineral deficit shortly after completion of therapy that persists for at least 6 years. The degree of bone demineralization can be followed up by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan and is most severe in patients older than 10 years at the initiation of therapy.

  3. Tobacco smoke and risk of childhood acute non-lymphocytic leukemia: findings from the SETIL study.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998-2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥ 11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01-3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97-3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates.

  4. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  5. High frequencies of leukemia stem cells in poor-outcome childhood precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Morisot, S; Wayne, A S; Bohana-Kashtan, O; Kaplan, I M; Gocke, C D; Hildreth, R; Stetler-Stevenson, M; Walker, R L; Davis, S; Meltzer, P S; Wheelan, S J; Brown, P; Jones, R J; Shultz, L D; Civin, C I

    2010-11-01

    In order to develop a xenograft model to determine the efficacy of new therapies against primary human precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) stem cells (LSCs), we used the highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD).Cg-Prkdc(scid)IL2rg(tmlWjl)/SzJ (NOD-severe combined immune deficient (scid) IL2rg(-/-)) mouse strain. Intravenous transplantation of 2 of 2 ALL cell lines and 9 of 14 primary ALL cases generated leukemia-like proliferations in recipient mice by 1-7 months after transplant. Leukemias were retransplantable, and the immunophenotypes, gene rearrangements and expression profiles were identical or similar to those of the original primary samples. NOD-scid mice transplanted with the same primary samples developed similar leukemias with only a slightly longer latency than did NOD-scid-IL2Rg(-/-) mice. In this highly sensitive NOD-scid-IL2Rg(-/-)-based assay, 1-100 unsorted primary human ALL cells from five of five tested patients, four of whom eventually experienced leukemia relapse, generated leukemias in recipient mice. This very high frequency of LSCs suggests that a hierarchical LSC model is not valuable for poor-outcome ALL.

  6. High frequencies of leukemia stem cells in poor-outcome childhood precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Morisot, S; Wayne, A S; Bohana-Kashtan, O; Kaplan, I M; Gocke, C D; Hildreth, R; Stetler-Stevenson, M; Walker, R L; Davis, S; Meltzer, P S; Wheelan, S J; Brown, P; Jones, R J; Shultz, L D; Civin, C I

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a xenograft model to determine the efficacy of new therapies against primary human precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) stem cells (LSCs), we used the highly immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD).Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtmlWjl/SzJ (NOD-severe combined immune deficient (scid) IL2rg−/−) mouse strain. Intravenous transplantation of 2 of 2 ALL cell lines and 9 of 14 primary ALL cases generated leukemia-like proliferations in recipient mice by 1–7 months after transplant. Leukemias were retransplantable, and the immunophenotypes, gene rearrangements and expression profiles were identical or similar to those of the original primary samples. NOD-scid mice transplanted with the same primary samples developed similar leukemias with only a slightly longer latency than did NOD-scid-IL2Rg−/− mice. In this highly sensitive NOD-scid-IL2Rg−/−-based assay, 1–100 unsorted primary human ALL cells from five of five tested patients, four of whom eventually experienced leukemia relapse, generated leukemias in recipient mice. This very high frequency of LSCs suggests that a hierarchical LSC model is not valuable for poor-outcome ALL. PMID:20739953

  7. Folate pathway gene polymorphisms, maternal folic acid use, and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R; Scott, Rodney J; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Attia, John; Jamieson, Sarra E; Miller, Margaret; Bower, Carol; Bailey, Helen D; Dawson, Somer; McCowage, Geoffrey B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; van Bockxmeer, Frank M; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation before or during pregnancy protects against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated associations between ALL risk and folate pathway gene polymorphisms, and their modification by maternal folic acid supplements, in a population-based case-control study (2003-2007). All Australian pediatric oncology centers provided cases; controls were recruited by national random digit dialing. Data from 392 cases and 535 controls were included. Seven folate pathway gene polymorphisms (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTRR 66A>G, MTR 2756 A>G, MTR 5049 C>A, CBS 844 Ins68, and CBS 2199 T>C) were genotyped in children and their parents. Information on prepregnancy maternal folic acid supplement use was collected. ORs were estimated with unconditional logistic regression adjusted for frequency-matched variables and potential confounders. Case-parent trios were also analyzed. There was some evidence of a reduced risk of ALL among children who had, or whose father had, the MTRR 66GG genotype: ORs 0.60 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.91] and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.40-1.03), respectively. The ORs for paternal MTHFR 677CT and TT genotypes were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.02-1.93) and 1.81 (95% CI, 1.06-3.07). ORs varied little by maternal folic acid supplementation. Some folate pathway gene polymorphisms in the child or a parent may influence ALL risk. While biologically plausible, underlying mechanisms for these associations need further elucidation. Folate pathway polymorphisms may be related to risk of childhood ALL, but larger studies are needed for conclusive results. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. TEL/AML-1 fusion gene. its frequency and prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamil, A; Theil, K S; Kahwash, S; Ruymann, F B; Klopfenstein, K J

    2000-10-15

    TEL gene rearrangement due to the 12;21 chromosome translocation is believed to be the most common molecular genetic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of TEL/AML-1 fusion gene resulting from a cryptic t(12;21)(p13;q22). Bone marrow samples from 86 patients diagnosed over the past 5 years at Columbus Children's Hospital were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for TEL/AML-1 fusion gene, using LSI((R)) DNA probes. The positive cases were analyzed for clinical outcome. Patients in this study received treatment according to Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols. Fifteen of the 86 cases (17%) were positive for the fusion gene. All were B-cell lineage and except for one, all were CD10 positive. TEL/AML-1 was not found in any T-cell ALL. The mean overall survival (OS) following diagnosis for the TEL/AML-1-positive group was significantly longer than for the TEL/AML-1-negative group by log-rank = 7.84, P = 0.005. Similarly, the event-free survival (EFS) after remission for the positive group (median 94.5 months) was longer than the negative group (median 57 months) by log-rank = 7.19, P = 0.007. This study confirms that the TEL/AML-1 fusion gene may be the most common genetic event in childhood ALL, occurring in 17% of the patients. It appears restricted to the B-cell lineage. In this study, the presence of a TEL/AML-1 fusion gene was statistically significant in predicting both OS and EFS, indicating a favorable clinical outcome for these patients. Screening for TEL/AML-1 should become routine at diagnosis and a useful biological variable for risk stratification in future clinical trials.

  9. Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Snell, Peter G; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A; Liu, Jennifer E; Chou, Joanne F; Smith, Stephanie M; Dunn, Andrea L; Church, Timothy S; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2013-08-01

    Adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased cardiovascular risk. Studies of factors including treatment exposures that may modify risk of low cardiorespiratory fitness in this population have been limited. To assess cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was measured in 115 ALL survivors (median age, 23.5 years; range 18-37). We compared VO2 max measurements for ALL survivors to those estimated from submaximal testing in a frequency-matched (age, gender, race/ethnicity) 2003-2004 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) cohort. Multivariable linear regression models were constructed to evaluate the association between therapeutic exposures and outcomes of interest. Compared to NHANES participants, ALL survivors had a substantially lower VO2 max (mean 30.7 vs. 39.9 ml/kg/min; adjusted P < 0.0001). For any given percent total body fat, ALL survivors had an 8.9 ml/kg/min lower VO2 max than NHANES participants. For key treatment exposure groups (cranial radiotherapy [CRT], anthracycline chemotherapy, or neither), ALL survivors had substantially lower VO2 max compared with NHANES participants (all comparisons, P < 0.001). Almost two-thirds (66.7%) of ALL survivors were classified as low cardiorespiratory fitness compared with 26.3% of NHANES participants (adjusted P < 0.0001). In multivariable models including only ALL survivors, treatment exposures were modestly associated with VO2 max. Among females, CRT was associated with low VO2 max (P = 0.02), but anthracycline exposure was not (P = 0.58). In contrast, among males, anthracycline exposure ≥ 100 mg/m(2) was associated with low VO2 max (P = 0.03), but CRT was not (P = 0.54). Adult survivors of childhood ALL have substantially lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness compared with a similarly aged non-cancer population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in residential dust and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Deziel, N C; Rull, R P; Colt, J S; Reynolds, P; Whitehead, T P; Gunier, R B; Month, S R; Taggart, D R; Buffler, P; Ward, M H; Metayer, C

    2014-08-01

    Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known or probable human carcinogens. We evaluated the relationship between PAH exposure and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using concentrations in residential dust as an exposure indicator. We conducted a population-based case-control study (251 ALL cases, 306 birth-certificate controls) in Northern and Central California from 2001 to 2007. We collected residential dust using a high volume small surface sampler (HVS3) (n=185 cases, 212 controls) or by sampling from participants' household vacuum cleaners (n=66 cases, 94 controls). We evaluated log-transformed concentrations of 9 individual PAHs, the summed PAHs, and the summed PAHs weighted by their carcinogenic potency (the toxic equivalence). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression adjusting for demographic characteristics and duration between diagnosis/reference date and dust collection. Among participants with HVS3 dust, risk of ALL was not associated with increasing concentration of any PAHs based on OR perln(ng/g). Among participants with vacuum dust, we observed positive associations between ALL risk and increasing concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (OR perln[ng/g]=1.42, 95% CI=0.95, 2.12), dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (OR=1.98, 95% CI=1.11, 3.55), benzo[k]fluoranthene (OR=1.71, 95% CI=0.91, 3.22), indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.04, 3.16), and the toxic equivalence (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.18, 4.69). The increased ALL risk among participants with vacuum dust suggests that PAH exposure may increase the risk of childhood ALL; however, reasons for the different results based on HVS3 dust samples deserve further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic Mediators of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Bhojwani, Deepa; Conklin, Heather M.; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive problems, with significant interindividual variability in outcome. This study examined genetic polymorphisms associated with variability in neurocognitive outcome. Patients and Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated at the end of therapy in 243 survivors treated on an institutional protocol featuring risk-adapted chemotherapy without prophylactic cranial irradiation. Polymorphisms in genes related to pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of antileukemic agents, drug metabolism, oxidative stress, and attention problems in noncancer populations were examined as predictors of outcome, using multiple general linear models and controlling for age at diagnosis, sex, race, and treatment intensity. Results Compared with national norms, the cohort demonstrated significantly higher rates of problems on direct assessment of sustained attention (P = .01) and on parent ratings of attention problems (P = .02). Children with the A2756G polymorphism in methionine synthase (MS) were more likely to demonstrate deficits in attentiveness (P = .03) and response speed (P = .02), whereas those with various polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase demonstrated increased performance variability (P = .01) and reduced attentiveness (P = .003). Polymorphisms in monoamine oxidase (T1460CA) were associated with increased attention variability (P = .03). Parent-reported attention problems were more common in children with the Cys112Arg polymorphism in apoliopoprotein E4 (P = .01). Conclusion These results are consistent with our previous report of association between attention problems and MS in an independent cohort of long-term survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy only. The results also raise the possibility of an impact from genetic predispositions related to oxidative stress and CNS integrity. PMID:23650422

  12. The PETALE study: Late adverse effects and biomarkers in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Sophie; Drouin, Simon; Laverdière, Caroline; Alos, Nathalie; Andelfinger, Gregor U; Bertout, Laurence; Curnier, Daniel; Friedrich, Matthias G; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Lefebvre, Geneviève; Levy, Emile; Lippé, Sarah; Marcil, Valérie; Raboisson, Marie-Josée; Rauch, Frank; Robaey, Philippe; Samoilenko, Mariia; Séguin, Chantal; Sultan, Serge; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Childhood cancer survivorship issues represent an established public health challenge. Most late adverse effects (LAEs) have been demonstrated to be time and treatment dependent. The PETALE study is a multidisciplinary research project aiming to comprehensively characterize LAEs and identify associated predictive biomarkers in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL) survivors. cALL survivors treated at Sainte-Justine University Health Center with Dana-Farber Cancer Institution-ALL protocols 87-01 through 2005-01 were eligible. During Phase I of the study, the participants underwent comprehensive clinical, biologic, and psychosocial investigation targeting metabolic syndrome, cardiotoxicity, bone morbidity, neurocognitive problems, and quality of life issues. Whole-exome sequencing was performed for all participants. Subjects identified with an extreme phenotype during Phase I were recalled for additional testing (Phase II). Phase I included 246 survivors (recall rate 71.9%). Of those, 85 participants completed Phase II (recall rate 88.5%). Survivors agreeing to participate in Phase I (n = 251) were similar to those who refused (n = 31) in terms of relapse risk profile, radiotherapy exposure, and age at the time of study. Participants, however, tended to be slightly older at diagnosis (6.1 vs. 4.7 years old, P = 0.08), with a higher proportion of female agreeing to participate compared with males (93.2 vs. 86.5%, P = 0.07). The PETALE study will contribute to comprehensively characterize clinical, psychosocial, biologic, and genomic features of cALL survivors using an integrated approach. Expected outcomes include LAE early detection biomarkers, long-term follow-up guidelines, and recommendations for physicians and health professionals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Residential Dust and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deziel, NC; Rull, RP; Colt, JS; Reynolds, P; Whitehead, TP; Gunier, RB; Month, SR; Taggart, DR; Buffler, P; Ward, MH; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known or probable human carcinogens. We evaluated the relationship between PAH exposure and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using concentrations in residential dust as an exposure indicator. We conducted a population-based case-control study (251 ALL cases, 306 birth-certificate controls) in Northern and Central California from 2001–2007. We collected residential dust using a high volume small surface sampler (HVS3) (n=185 cases, 212 controls) or by sampling from participants’ household vacuum cleaners (n=66 cases, 94 controls). We evaluated log-transformed concentrations of 9 individual PAHs, the summed PAHs, and the summed PAHs weighted by their carcinogenic potency (the toxic equivalence). We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression adjusting for demographic characteristics and duration between diagnosis/reference date and dust collection. Among participants with HVS3 dust, risk of ALL was not associated with increasing concentration of any PAHs (based on OR per ln(ng/g). Among participants with vacuum dust, we observed positive associations between ALL risk and increasing concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (OR per ln[ng/g]=1.42, 95% CI=0.95, 2.12), dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (OR=1.98, 95% CI=1.11, 3.55), benzo[k]fluoranthene (OR=1.71, 95% CI= 0.91, 3.22), indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.04, 3.16), and the toxic equivalence (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.18, 4.69). The increased ALL risk among participants with vacuum dust suggests that PAH exposure may increase the risk of childhood ALL; however, reasons for the different results based on HVS3 dust samples deserve further study. PMID:24948546

  14. Polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pakakasama, S; Mukda, E; Sasanakul, W; Kadegasem, P; Udomsubpayakul, U; Thithapandha, A; Hongeng, S

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of phase I and II enzymes is well documented in the metabolism of a wide range of drugs and xenobiotics. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these enzymes are also known to alter their protein expression and function. Moreover, genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure have been proposed to be an etiology of cancer. We hypothesized that polymorphisms of these enzymes might affect the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CYP 1A1, CYP 3A4*1B, CYP 3A5*3, CYP 3A5*6, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP in 107 children with ALL and 320 healthy controls. Allele and genotype frequencies of each of the SNPs were compared between two groups. It was found that the allele frequencies of CYP 1A1*1, *2A, *2B, and *4 were not different between cases and controls. CYP 3A4*1B allele frequency was only 0.8% and 0.9% in ALL and controls, respectively. CYP 3A5*1/*1, *1/*3, and *3/*3 genotype frequencies showed no statistically significant difference between patients and controls. CYP 3A5*6 was not detected in our population. The GSTM1 null genotype was significantly increased in children with ALL (OR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0, 2.7). In contrast, the GSTT1 null genotype did not show this effect. Our data thus demonstrate that the GSTM1 null genotype might increase the risk of childhood ALL in a Thai population.

  15. Comparison of Donor Sources in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Leukemia: A Nationwide Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kato, Shunichi; Ogawa, Atsushi; Inagaki, Jiro; Goto, Hiroaki; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Yoshida, Nao; Kato, Keisuke; Cho, Yuko; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Masami; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyamura, Koichi

    2016-12-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remains the best therapeutic option for childhood high-risk acute leukemia. However, which donor source is optimal for children lacking an identical sibling remains unclear. To evaluate the clinical impact of donor source on allo-HSCT in childhood acute leukemia, we analyzed data from 577 children who underwent allo-HSCT after a myeloablative regimen during first or second complete remission from 2005 to 2012, using registry data of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and we compared outcomes of 7/8 to 8/8 HLA allelic-matched unrelated bone marrow transplantation (UR-BMT, n = 218) and 4/6 to 6/6 HLA allelic-matched unrelated cord blood transplantation (UR-CBT, n = 200) to those of HLA-identical related bone marrow transplantation (ID-BMT, n = 159). The median follow-up of survivors was 40.0 months. Three-year overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) rates for ID-BMT, UR-BMT, and UR-CBT were 74.8% and 69.0%, 75.0% and 69.6%, and 71.8% and 63.8%, respectively. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that OS and LFS for the 3 groups are comparable, although UR-CBT carries a greater risk of nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio, 2.20; P = .03, compared to ID-BMT) in the myeloablative setting for childhood high-risk acute leukemia. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Methotrexate-Induced Neurotoxicity and Leukoencephalopathy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Sabin, Noah D.; Pei, Deqing; Yang, Jun J.; Khan, Raja B.; Panetta, John C.; Krull, Kevin R.; Inaba, Hiroto; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Metzger, Monika L.; Howard, Scott C.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Jeha, Sima; Sandlund, John T.; Evans, William E.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Methotrexate (MTX) can cause significant clinical neurotoxicity and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. We sought to identify clinical, pharmacokinetic, and genetic risk factors for these MTX-related toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy and provide data on safety of intrathecal and high-dose MTX rechallenge in patients with neurotoxicity. Patients and Methods Prospective brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed at four time points for 369 children with ALL treated in a contemporary study that included five courses of high-dose MTX and 13 to 25 doses of triple intrathecal therapy. Logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate clinical and pharmacokinetic factors, and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to identify germline polymorphisms for their association with neurotoxicities. Results Fourteen patients (3.8%) developed MTX-related clinical neurotoxicity. Of 13 patients rechallenged with intrathecal and/or high-dose MTX, 12 did not experience recurrence of neurotoxicity. Leukoencephalopathy was found in 73 (20.6%) of 355 asymptomatic patients and in all symptomatic patients and persisted in 74% of asymptomatic and 58% of symptomatic patients at the end of therapy. A high 42-hour plasma MTX to leucovorin ratio (measure of MTX exposure) was associated with increased risk of leukoencephalopathy in multivariable analysis (P = .038). GWAS revealed polymorphisms in genes enriched for neurodevelopmental pathways with plausible mechanistic roles in neurotoxicity. Conclusion MTX-related clinical neurotoxicity is transient, and most patients can receive subsequent MTX without recurrence of acute or subacute symptoms. All symptomatic patients and one in five asymptomatic patients develop leukoencephalopathy that can persist until the end of therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to neurogenesis may contribute to susceptibility to MTX-related neurotoxicity. PMID:24550419

  17. Methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity and leukoencephalopathy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Sabin, Noah D; Pei, Deqing; Yang, Jun J; Khan, Raja B; Panetta, John C; Krull, Kevin R; Inaba, Hiroto; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Metzger, Monika L; Howard, Scott C; Ribeiro, Raul C; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E; Jeha, Sima; Sandlund, John T; Evans, William E; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V

    2014-03-20

    Methotrexate (MTX) can cause significant clinical neurotoxicity and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. We sought to identify clinical, pharmacokinetic, and genetic risk factors for these MTX-related toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy and provide data on safety of intrathecal and high-dose MTX rechallenge in patients with neurotoxicity. Prospective brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed at four time points for 369 children with ALL treated in a contemporary study that included five courses of high-dose MTX and 13 to 25 doses of triple intrathecal therapy. Logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate clinical and pharmacokinetic factors, and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to identify germline polymorphisms for their association with neurotoxicities. Fourteen patients (3.8%) developed MTX-related clinical neurotoxicity. Of 13 patients rechallenged with intrathecal and/or high-dose MTX, 12 did not experience recurrence of neurotoxicity. Leukoencephalopathy was found in 73 (20.6%) of 355 asymptomatic patients and in all symptomatic patients and persisted in 74% of asymptomatic and 58% of symptomatic patients at the end of therapy. A high 42-hour plasma MTX to leucovorin ratio (measure of MTX exposure) was associated with increased risk of leukoencephalopathy in multivariable analysis (P = .038). GWAS revealed polymorphisms in genes enriched for neurodevelopmental pathways with plausible mechanistic roles in neurotoxicity. MTX-related clinical neurotoxicity is transient, and most patients can receive subsequent MTX without recurrence of acute or subacute symptoms. All symptomatic patients and one in five asymptomatic patients develop leukoencephalopathy that can persist until the end of therapy. Polymorphisms in genes related to neurogenesis may contribute to susceptibility to MTX-related neurotoxicity.

  18. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  19. Pharmacogenetics in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheok, Meyling H.; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo

    2009-01-01

    Progress in the treatment of acute leukemia in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

  20. DNA methylation as a potential mediator of environmental risks in the development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Jessica A; Relton, Caroline L; Rankin, Judith; Strathdee, Gordon; McKay, Jill A

    2016-01-01

    5-year survival rate for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has risen to approximately 90%, yet the causal disease pathway is still poorly understood. Evidence suggests multiple ‘hits’ are required for disease progression; an initial genetic abnormality followed by additional secondary ‘hits’. It is plausible that environmental influences may trigger these secondary hits, and with the peak incidence of diagnosis between 2 and 5 years of age, early life exposures are likely to be key. DNA methylation can be modified by many environmental exposures and is dramatically altered in cancers, including childhood ALL. Here we explore the potential that DNA methylation may be involved in the causal pathway toward disease by acting as a mediator between established environmental factors and childhood ALL development. PMID:27035209

  1. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  3. Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Childhood Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukemia: Findings from the SETIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Methods Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998–2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Results Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01–3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97–3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. Conclusions This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates. PMID:25401754

  4. A task-based assessment of parental occupational exposure to pesticides and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gunier, Robert B; Kang, Alice; Hammond, S Katharine; Reinier, Kyndaron; Lea, C Suzanne; Chang, Jeffrey S; Does, Monique; Scelo, Ghislaine; Kirsch, Janice; Crouse, Vonda; Cooper, Robert; Quinlan, Patricia; Metayer, Catherine

    2017-07-01

    Associations between parental occupational pesticide exposure and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) vary across studies, likely due to different exposure assessment methodologies. We assessed parental occupational pesticide exposure from the year before pregnancy to the child's third year of life for 669 children diagnosed with ALL and 1021 controls. We conducted expert rating using task-based job modules (JM) to estimate exposure to pesticides among farmer workers, gardeners, agricultural packers, and pesticide applicators. We compared this method to (1) partial JM using job titles and a brief description, but without completing the task-based questionnaire, and (2) job exposure matrix (JEM) linking job titles to the International Standard Classifications of Occupation Codes. We used unconditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for ALL cancer risk and pesticide exposure adjusting for child's sex, age, race/ethnicity and household income. Compared to complete JMs, partial JMs and JEM led to 3.1% and 9.4% of parents with pesticide exposure misclassified, respectively. Misclassification was similar in cases and controls. Using complete JMs, we observed an increased risk of ALL for paternal occupational exposure to any pesticides (OR=1.7; 95% CI=1.2, 2.5), with higher risks reported for pesticides to treat nut crops (OR=4.5; 95% CI=0.9, 23.0), and for children diagnosed before five years of age (OR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.3, 4.1). Exposure misclassification from JEM attenuated these associations by about 57%. Maternal occupational pesticide exposure before and after birth was not associated with ALL. The risk of ALL was elevated in young children with paternal occupational pesticide exposure during the perinatal period, using more detailed occupational information for exposure classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy balance and fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Karlage, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Lu, Lu; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on body composition, energy balance, and fitness among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially those treated without cranial radiation therapy (CRT). This analysis compares these metrics among 365 ALL survivors with a mean age of 28.6 ± 5.9 years (149 treated with and 216 without CRT) and 365 age-, sex-, and race-matched peers. We also report risk factors for outcomes among survivors treated without CRT. Male survivors not exposed to CRT had abnormal body composition when compared with peers (% body fat, 26.2 ± 8.2 vs 22.7 ± 7.1). Survivors without CRT had similar energy balance but had significantly impaired quadriceps strength (−21.9 ± 6.0 Newton-meters [Nm]/kg, 60°/s) and endurance (−11.4 ± 4.6 Nm/kg, 300°/s), exercise capacity (−2.0 ± 2.1 ml/kg per minute), low-back and hamstring flexibility (−4.7 ± 1.6 cm), and dorsiflexion range of motion (−3.1 ± 0.9°) and higher modified total neuropathy scores (+1.6 ± 1.1) than peers. Cumulative asparaginase dose ≥120 000 IU/m2 was associated with impaired flexibility, vincristine dose ≥39 mg/m2 with peripheral neuropathy, glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalent) dose ≥8000 mg/m2 with hand weakness, and intrathecal methotrexate dose ≥225 mg with dorsiflexion weakness. Physical inactivity was associated with hand weakness and decreased exercise capacity. Smoking was associated with peripheral neuropathy. Elimination of CRT from ALL therapy has improved, but not eliminated, body-composition outcomes. Survivors remain at risk for impaired fitness. PMID:25814529

  6. COBL is a novel hotspot for IKZF1 deletions in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Bruno Almeida; Meyer, Claus; Barbosa, Thayana Conceição; zur Stadt, Udo; Horstmann, Martin; Venn, Nicola C.; Heatley, Susan; White, Deborah L.; Sutton, Rosemary; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Marschalek, Rolf; Emerenciano, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    IKZF1 deletion (ΔIKZF1) is an important predictor of relapse in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Because of its clinical importance, we previously mapped breakpoints of intragenic deletions and developed a multiplex PCR assay to detect recurrent intragenic ΔIKZF1. Since the multiplex PCR was not able to detect complete deletions (IKZF1 Δ1-8), which account for ~30% of all ΔIKZF1, we aimed at investigating the genomic scenery of IKZF1 Δ1-8. Six samples of cases with IKZF1 Δ1-8 were analyzed by microarray assay, which identified monosomy 7, isochromosome 7q, and large interstitial deletions presenting breakpoints within COBL gene. Then, we established a multiplex ligation-probe amplification (MLPA) assay and screened copy number alterations within chromosome 7 in 43 diagnostic samples with IKZF1 Δ1-8. Our results revealed that monosomy and large interstitial deletions within chromosome 7 are the main causes of IKZF1 Δ1-8. Detailed analysis using long distance inverse PCR showed that six patients (16%) had large interstitial deletions starting within intronic regions of COBL at diagnosis, which is ~611 Kb downstream of IKZF1, suggesting that COBL is a hotspot for ΔIKZF1. We also investigated a series of 25 intragenic deletions (Δ2–8, Δ3–8 or Δ4–8) and 24 relapsed samples, and found one IKZF1-COBL tail-to-tail fusion, thus supporting that COBL is a novel hotspot for ΔIKZF1. Finally, using RIC score methodology, we show that breakpoint sequences of IKZF1 Δ1-8 are not analog to RAG-recognition sites, suggesting a different mechanism of error promotion than that suggested for intragenic ΔIKZF1. PMID:27419633

  7. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  8. Evaluation of functional RAGE gene polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia-A case-control study from Iran.

    PubMed

    Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Mohammad; Hasani, Seyed-Shahab-Adin; Naderi, Majid; Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin; Taheri, Mohsen

    2017-03-04

    We examined the possible relationship between three RAGE polymorphisms, -429C/T, -374 T/A, and 63-bp deletion, and susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in an Iranian population. This study included 75 ALL patients and 115 healthy subjects. Genotyping was performed using HEXA-ARMS-polymerase chain reaction. We found no significant association among RAGE gene polymorphisms and the risk for ALL at genotype, allelic and haplotype levels (P > 0.05). The hemoglobin levels were higher in patients with RAGE -374 TT than in the TA carriers (P = 0.019). Our results demonstrated that the RAGE gene variations were not associated with risk of pediatrics ALL.

  9. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  10. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  11. A Multicenter Experience from Lebanon in Childhood and Adolescent Acute Myeloid Leukemia: High rate of Early Death in Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Roula A.; Horkos, Jessy G.; Bustros, Youssef D.; Farhat, Hussein Z.; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease with marked heterogeneity. Despite major improvement in outcome, it remains a life-threatening malignancy. Demographic and clinical data on pediatric AML is lacking among the Lebanese population. Purpose We aimed to identify clinical, molecular and outcome data in children with AML in Lebanon. Methods A retrospective chart review of children with AML diagnosed in three Lebanese hospitals during the past 8 years was conducted. Results From May 2002 through March 2010, we identified 24 children with AML in Saint George Hospital University Medical Center, University Medical Center Rizk Hospital, and Abou-Jaoude Hospital. Males and females were equally represented; median age at diagnosis was 9 years (range 1–24) and median WBC at diagnosis was 31 × 109/L (range: 2.1–376 × 109/L). Twenty five percent of patients (6 out of 24) had acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Karyotype was normal in 33% of patients; t(8;21), inv (16), t(8;9), t(7;11), t(9;11), complex chromosomal abnormality, monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 were the most common cytogenetic abnormalities encountered. Patients were treated on different European and North American protocols. Twelve patients (50%) achieved morphologic CR after cycle 1, 6 of them (50%) had bone marrow relapse within 11 months from diagnosis. Nine patients underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant, and 3 of them are alive at 5 years post-transplant. Early death rate was 16.6% of patients, mainly those with APL and a presenting WBC > 10 × 109/L. Fifty per cent of APL patients had an early death due to DIC despite starting ATRA therapy. Overall, median survival for AML patients who died from disease progression was 25.8 months (range: 1–60 months). Overall disease-free survival was 30.4%. Patients < 10 years of age had a 50% survival rate compared to 0% in patients > 10 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the needs in Lebanon for better supportive care of children with APL

  12. A rare metabolic complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood: lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Müge; Unal, Sule; Gülşen, Hayriye; Başaran, Ozge; Cetin, Mualla; Gümrük, Fatma; Beşbaş, Nesrin; Gürgey, Aytemiz

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with nausea, fatigue, weight loss, and bone pain for two months. Complete blood count and serum renal and liver function tests were all normal. Blood gas analysis revealed severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap. Lactate level was 61.2 mmol/L. Abdominal ultrasonography yielded bilateral nephromegaly and hepatomegaly with increased echogenicity. Peripheral blood smear revealed 2% blasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed 'Common ALL Antigen'-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia by flow cytometric analysis. Metabolic acidosis dissolved as soon as chemotherapy was begun. Lactic acidosis at the presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia--especially with low tumor burden--is a very rare and almost always fatal complication. Our patient is still alive and in remission, which is a point of interest in this child.

  13. Myeloid Antigen Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Relevance for Clinical Outcome in Indonesian ALL-2006 Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Supriyadi, Eddy; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Sutaryo; Purwanto, Ignatius; vd Ven, Peter M.; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients expressing myeloid antigens on their ALL cells varies between 5 and 36% in several different studies. The clinical relevance of myeloid antigen expression in childhood ALL is controversial. In Indonesian patients, no data were present. Therefore, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, we analyzed 239 ALL patients who were immunophenotyped including myeloid markers (CD13, CD33, CD117, and/or cMPO). Myeloid antigen expression was found in 25% of patients. Expression of myeloid antigen in B-lineage leukemia was 27%, and in T-lineage leukemia, it was 18% (P = 0.15). No association was found between myeloid antigen expression and clinical or biological features. In the whole cohort of patients we did not find a significant association between myeloid antigen expression and survival, although leukemia-free survival at 3 years was higher in the myeloid-negative patients (73% ± 6%) compared to myeloid-positive patients (67% ± 8%). Interestingly, in T-ALL patients, expression of myeloid antigens was an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 3.26, 95% CI: 1.06–9.98, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier analysis for event-free survival was also significant (log rank P = 0.03) in this subgroup. In conclusion, in the Indonesian ALL population, in particular, myeloid antigen-expressing T-ALL patients had a higher chance of having induction failure. PMID:23227046

  14. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    For acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the 5-year survival rate rose from 60% to about 90% for children younger than 15 years and from 28% to about 75% for adolescents aged 15–19 years between 1975 and 2010. Get information about risk factors, signs, diagnosis, genomics, survival, risk-based treatment assignment, and induction and postinduction therapy for children and adolescents with newly diagnosed and recurrent ALL.

  15. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Low depressive symptom and mental distress scores in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harila, Marika J; Niinivirta, Tomi I T; Winqvist, Satu; Harila-Saari, Arja H

    2011-04-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are thought to be at risk of psychological difficulties. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms and mental well-being in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at a mean age of 20 years after the cessation of therapy. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21) and mental distress with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) among 73 ALL survivors and 146 healthy controls. The ALL survivors obtained significantly lower BDI scores (P=0.046) compared with the controls, indicating less depressive symptoms among the ALL survivors. BDI scores indicated a significantly less frequent moderate or severe depression in the ALL survivors compared with the controls (P=0.039). BDI scores indicated no depression in 80.8% of the ALL survivors and 73.3% of the control group. The female ALL survivors obtained lower BDI scores than did the female controls (P=0.005). No difference was found in GHQ-12 scores between the survivors and the controls. Survivors of ALL reported fewer depressive symptoms and equal mental well-being compared with healthy controls. Our findings support the idea that childhood leukemia survivors' subjective experience of well-being is possibly affected by repressive adaptive style.

  19. The Eleventh International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Workshop Report: Ponte di Legno, Italy, 6-7 May 2009.

    PubMed

    Biondi, A; Baruchel, A; Hunger, S; Masera, G; Schmiegelow, K; Schrappe, M; Pui, C H

    2009-12-01

    An international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)working group was formed during the 27th annual meeting of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology in 1995. Since then, 10 workshops have been held to address many issues that help advance treatment outcome of childhood ALL but require international collaboration (Table 1). The group was fondly named after 'Ponte di Legno,' a place in Lombardy, Italy, because the first major workshop was held there. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the first major meeting, the group returned to Ponte di Legno on 6 and 7 May 2009 for its 11th meeting (Figure 1). During the meeting, Professor Giuseppe Masera was honored for his vision and contributions to further develop the International-BFM study group and to co-found the Ponte di Legno working group. The meeting began with greetings by Professor Andrea Biondi. This report summarizes the data presented and the discussion in the meeting.

  20. Decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose after high-dose methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, K.; Takada, G.; Uemura, K.; Shishido, F.; Kanno, I. )

    1990-09-01

    We measured changes in the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography for the assessment of neurotoxicity in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) therapy. We studied 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (mean age: 9.6 years) treated with HD-MTX (200 mg/kg or 2,000 mg/M2) therapy. CMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy was most reduced (40%) in the patient who had central nervous system leukemia and was treated with the largest total doses of both intrathecal MTX (IT-MTX) and HD-MTX. CMRGlu in the whole brain after HD-MTX therapy was reduced by an average of 21% (P less than 0.05). The reductions of CMRGlu in 8 patients were correlated with total doses of both IT-MTX (r = 0.717; P less than 0.05) and systemic HD-MTX (r = 0.784; P less than 0.05). CMRGlu of the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal and occipital cortex, was reduced more noticeably than that of the basal ganglia and white matter. We suggest that the measurement of changes in rCMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy is useful for detecting accumulated MTX neurotoxicity.

  1. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gajic-Veljanoski, O.; Pham, B.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Krahn, M.; Higgins, Caroline; Bielecki, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing by higher performance techniques such as flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to detect the proportion of remaining leukemic cells in bone marrow or peripheral blood during and after the first phases of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The results of MRD testing are used to reclassify these patients and guide changes in treatment according to their future risk of relapse. We conducted a systematic review of the economic literature, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget-impact analysis to ascertain the cost-effectiveness and economic impact of MRD testing by flow cytometry for management of childhood precursor B-cell ALL in Ontario. Methods A systematic literature search (1998–2014) identified studies that examined the incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing by either flow cytometry or PCR. We developed a lifetime state-transition (Markov) microsimulation model to quantify the cost-effectiveness of MRD testing followed by risk-directed therapy to no MRD testing and to estimate its marginal effect on health outcomes and on costs. Model input parameters were based on the literature, expert opinion, and data from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Using predictions from our Markov model, we estimated the 1-year cost burden of MRD testing versus no testing and forecasted its economic impact over 3 and 5 years. Results In a base-case cost-effectiveness analysis, compared with no testing, MRD testing by flow cytometry at the end of induction and consolidation was associated with an increased discounted survival of 0.0958 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and increased discounted costs of $4,180, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,613/QALY gained. After accounting for parameter uncertainty, incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing was associated with an ICER of $50,249/QALY gained. In

  2. Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

  3. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive

  5. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. HOXA9 and MEIS1 gene overexpression in the diagnosis of childhood acute leukemias: Significant correlation with relapse and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Adamaki, Maria; Lambrou, George I; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Vlahopoulos, Spiros; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Moschovi, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Homeobox genes HOXA9 and MEIS1 are evolutionarily conserved transcription factors with essential roles in both hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They act as dominant cooperating oncoproteins that cause acute leukemias bearing MLL translocations and to a lesser extent T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) characterized by other gene fusions. Overexpression is associated with an adverse prognosis in adults. In childhood, the genes have only been investigated in leukemias bearing MLL translocations. The aim of this study was to determine whether overexpression extends to leukemic subtypes other than the MLL-positive subtype in childhood. We use quantitative real-time PCR methodology to investigate gene expression in 100 children with acute leukemias and compare them to those of healthy controls. We show that abnormally high HOXA9 and MEIS1 gene expression is associated with a variety of leukemic subtypes, including various maturation stages of B-cell ALL and cytogenetic types other than the MLL-positive population, thus suggesting that the genes are implicated in the development of a broad range of leukemic subtypes in childhood. In addition, we show that HOXA9 and MEIS1 overexpression are inversely correlated with relapse and overall survival, so the genes could become useful predictive markers of the clinical course of pediatric acute leukemias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Absolute lymphocyte count is associated with minimal residual disease level in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Qiang; Feng, Jian-Hua; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Shi, Shu-Wen; Xu, Wei-Qun

    2013-06-01

    The prognostic value of absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has been a recent matter of debate in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the current study, ALCs at the time of diagnosis (ALC-0), after 7 days of initial therapy (ALC-8) and at interim of the induction therapy (ALC-22) were examined in Chinese children with B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL and correlated with the level of minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 22 of induction therapy. Medical and laboratory records of 140 patients diagnosed with childhood BCP ALL were retrieved and analyzed. ALC-22 is significantly correlated with MRD level at day 22 of therapy and can be a good prognostic factor for childhood BCP-ALL. Furthermore, lymphocyte count at initial diagnosis is correlated with MRD level at day 22 in childhood BCP-ALL with the immnunophenotype of CD19(pos)/CD10(pos)/CD34(pos)/CD45(neg) and role as a new prognostic factor was determined.

  9. Clinical impact of circulating microRNAs as blood-based marker in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Swellam, Menha; El-Khazragy, Nashwa

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression participates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study aimed to investigate the expression of miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a among childhood ALL and study their correlation with other hematological parameters and different phenotypes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were obtained from 85 childhood ALL and 25 healthy children for the detection of miRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR. Significant higher median levels were reported for ALL compared to control children. The diagnostic efficacy for miRNA-146a was superior as both sensitivity and specificity were absolute. A significant correlation was observed between higher expression of miRNA-100 and lower platelet and lymphocyte counts; high expression of miRNA-146a showed significant correlation with low total leukocyte count (TLC) and lymphocyte counts. Significant relation was reported between studied miRNAs and different phenotyping. miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a have significant role in childhood ALL leukemogenesis, and they may be useful as biological diagnostic molecular markers.

  10. Familial history of cancer and childhood acute leukemia: a French population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ripert, Mahaut; Menegaux, Florence; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lamagnére, Jean-Pierre; Margueritte, Geneviève; Boutard, Patrick; Robert, Alain; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Munzer, Martine; Millot, Frédéric; de Lumley, Lionel; Berthou, Christian; Rialland, Xavier; Pautard, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective A case-control study was conducted to investigate the role of a familial history of cancer in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (AL). Methods The history of cancer in the relatives of 472 cases was compared to that of 567 population-based controls. Recruitment was frequency matched on age, gender and region. The familial history of cancer in each child’s relatives was reported by the mother in response to a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Results A familial history of solid tumor in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of ALL (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), while a familial history of hematopoietic malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of AML (OR=4.3 [1.4–13]). The ORs for the histories of cancer increased with the number of relatives with cancer (OR=1.5 [1.1–2.0] for one relative and OR=2.3 [1.3–3.8] for two relatives or more; ptrend<0.0001). Significant associations between childhood AL and familial history of genital cancers and brain tumor were also observed (OR=2.7 [1.2–5.8], OR=10.7 [1.3–86], respectively). Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that a familial history of cancer may play a role in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. It also evidences some specific associations that require further investigation. PMID:17923819

  11. Gonadal function after 12-Gy testicular irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, L.A.; Craft, A.W.; Kernahan, J.; Evans, R.G.; Aynsley-Green, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in 15 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had received testicular irradiation. The dose to the testes was 12 Gy in 12, 15 Gy in 1, and 24 Gy in 2 cases. All of those who had received 12 or 15 Gy had normal Leydig cell function, although high levels of gonadotropins suggest subclinical Leydig cell damage. The 2 who had 24 Gy had Leydig cell failure. All who were old enough to produce a semen specimen were azoospermic.

  12. Microarray-based classification of a consecutive series of 121 childhood acute leukemias: prediction of leukemic and genetic subtype as well as of minimal residual disease status.

    PubMed

    Andersson, A; Ritz, C; Lindgren, D; Edén, P; Lassen, C; Heldrup, J; Olofsson, T; Råde, J; Fontes, M; Porwit-Macdonald, A; Behrendtz, M; Höglund, M; Johansson, B; Fioretos, T

    2007-06-01

    Gene expression analyses were performed on 121 consecutive childhood leukemias (87 B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs), 11 T-cell ALLs and 23 acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs)), investigated during an 8-year period at a single center. The supervised learning algorithm k-nearest neighbor was utilized to build gene expression predictors that could classify the ALLs/AMLs according to clinically important subtypes with high accuracy. Validation experiments in an independent data set verified the high prediction accuracies of our classifiers. B-lineage ALLs with uncharacteristic cytogenetic aberrations or with a normal karyotype displayed heterogeneous gene expression profiles, resulting in low prediction accuracies. Minimal residual disease status (MRD) in T-cell ALLs with a high (>0.1%) MRD at day 29 could be classified with 100% accuracy already at the time of diagnosis. In pediatric leukemias with uncharacteristic cytogenetic aberrations or with a normal karyotype, unsupervised analysis identified two novel subgroups: one consisting mainly of cases remaining in complete remission (CR) and one containing a few patients in CR and all but one of the patients who relapsed. This study of a consecutive series of childhood leukemias confirms and extends further previous reports demonstrating that global gene expression profiling provides a valuable tool for genetic and clinical classification of childhood leukemias.

  13. Induction of autophagy-dependent necroptosis is required for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to overcome glucocorticoid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonapace, Laura; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Ziegler, Urs; Niggli, Felix K.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In vivo resistance to first-line chemotherapy, including to glucocorticoids, is a strong predictor of poor outcome in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Modulation of cell death regulators represents an attractive strategy for subverting such drug resistance. Here we report complete resensitization of multidrug-resistant childhood ALL cells to glucocorticoids and other cytotoxic agents with subcytotoxic concentrations of obatoclax, a putative antagonist of BCL-2 family members. The reversal of glucocorticoid resistance occurred through rapid activation of autophagy-dependent necroptosis, which bypassed the block in mitochondrial apoptosis. This effect was associated with dissociation of the autophagy inducer beclin-1 from the antiapoptotic BCL-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and with a marked decrease in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Consistent with a protective role for mTOR in glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL, combination of rapamycin with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone triggered autophagy-dependent cell death, with characteristic features of necroptosis. Execution of cell death, but not induction of autophagy, was strictly dependent on expression of receptor-interacting protein (RIP-1) kinase and cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) (CYLD), two key regulators of necroptosis. Accordingly, both inhibition of RIP-1 and interference with CYLD restored glucocorticoid resistance completely. Together with evidence for a chemosensitizing activity of obatoclax in vivo, our data provide a compelling rationale for clinical translation of this pharmacological approach into treatments for patients with refractory ALL. PMID:20200450

  14. RIP1 is required for IAP inhibitor-mediated sensitization of childhood acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Löder, S; Fakler, M; Schoeneberger, H; Cristofanon, S; Leibacher, J; Vanlangenakker, N; Bertrand, M J M; Vandenabeele, P; Jeremias, I; Debatin, K-M; Fulda, S

    2012-05-01

    Evasion of apoptosis may contribute to poor treatment response in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), calling for novel treatment strategies. Here, we report that inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) at subtoxic concentrations cooperate with various anticancer drugs (that is, AraC, Gemcitabine, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Etoposide, Vincristine and Taxol) to induce apoptosis in ALL cells in a synergistic manner as calculated by combination index and to reduce long-term clonogenic survival. Importantly, we identify RIP1 as a critical regulator of this synergism of IAP inhibitors and AraC that mediates the formation of a RIP1/FADD/caspase-8 complex via an autocrine/paracrine loop of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Knockdown of RIP1 abolishes formation of this complex and subsequent activation of caspase-8 and -3, mitochondrial perturbations and apoptosis. Similarly, inhibition of RIP1 kinase activity by Necrostatin-1 or blockage of TNFα by Enbrel inhibits IAP inhibitor- and AraC-triggered interaction of RIP1, FADD and caspase-8 and apoptosis. In contrast to malignant cells, IAP inhibitors and AraC at equimolar concentrations are non-toxic to normal peripheral blood lymphocytes or mesenchymal stromal cells. Thus, our findings provide first evidence that IAP inhibitors present a promising strategy to prime childhood ALL cells for chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in a RIP1-dependent manner. These data have important implications for developing apoptosis-targeted therapies in childhood leukemia.

  15. Effects of Maternal Diet During Pregnancy on the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Behnaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Sadeghi, Homa; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children that can be affected by maternal diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal dietary risk factors of ALL. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Springer Link, Wiley Online, Science Direct, Mosby, ISI Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest, and Scopus from database inception until February 2, 2016. Two reviewers scanned titles, abstracts, and keywords of articles after excluding duplicates. We included case-control studies evaluating the relationship between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood ALL. The search resulted in 2,940 papers, of which 11 full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion in the review and were analyzed. The finding of these studies suggest that maternal diet composed largely of vegetables, fruits, and protein sources before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of ALL in offspring. Maternal alcohol intake had no effect. Nevertheless, inherent limitations of case-control studies like measurement error, random error, recall bias, and selection bias preclude conclusive evidence. Persuading pregnant women to follow a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and protein may reduce the risk of childhood ALL. Avoiding alcohol intake seems prudent.

  16. Meningosis prophylaxis with intrathecal /sup 198/Au-colloid and methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, O.; Stoll, W.; Plenert, W.

    1982-01-15

    Since 1972, telecobalt irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) has been successfully replaced in Jena by intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) plus ITMTX for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were given 1.24-4.89 mCi (45.8-181 MBq) of colloidal 198Au IT after successful initiation of remission. During cytostatic therapy, the following relapses occurred: meningosis leucaemica, five patients (6.8%); bone-marrow relapse and the meningosis leucaemica, one patient; and bone-marrow relapse, 20 patients (27.4%). In 18 children, combination chemotherapy was terminated after two and a half or three years of treatment. After that time, one meningeal relapse and six bone-marrow relapses occurred. Within the first 24 hours after application of radioactive gold, headaches, vomiting, and fever occurred in less than 10% of the children. An apathy syndrome, leukecephalopathy, or severe infections, were not observed in a single case. Radioactive gold spreads in the subarachnoid space and is phagocytized by the arachnoidea. The tumoricide effect extends selectively over the space of distribution of the latent meningosis leucaemia. The cerebral parenchyma remains unaffected by radiation. Thus, radioactive gold may be preferable to telecobalt irradiation in preventing central nervous system leukemia.

  17. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Reisi, Nahid; Azhir, Afshin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Raeissi, Pouran; Amini, Abasgholi; Moafi, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007), 55 children (33 male and 22 female) diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) crite-ria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years) and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55) of survivors (10 male, 1 female) met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004). Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was positively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p ≤ 0.001), systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively), insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001) and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors. PMID:21772869

  20. Impact of promoter polymorphisms in key regulators of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway on the outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Rocio; St-Cyr, Janick; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Healy, Jasmine; Richer, Chantal; Gagné, Vincent; Laverdière, Caroline; Silverman, Lewis B; Sallan, Stephen E; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of multiagent treatment protocols has led to a remarkable increase in survival rates for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, yet for a subpopulation of patients, resistance to chemotherapeutics remains an obstacle to successful treatment. Here we investigate the role of the mitochondrial (or intrinsic) apoptosis pathway in modulating the onset and outcomes of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cell death is a highly regulated process that plays an essential role in regulating cell homeostasis, particularly in tissues with high intrinsic proliferating capacity such as the hematopoietic system. Following the underlying paradigm that cis-acting genetic variation can influence disease risk and outcomes by modulating gene expression, we performed a systematic analysis of the proximal promoter regions of 21 genes involved in apoptosis. Using gene reporter assays, we show that promoter variations in 11 intrinsic apoptosis genes, including ADPRT, APAF1, BCL2, BAD, BID, MCL1, BIRC4, BCL2L1, ENDOG, YWHAB, and YWHAQ, influence promoter activity in an allele-specific manner. We also show that correlated promoter variation and increased expression of MCL1 is associated with reduced overall survival among high-risk patients receiving higher doses of corticosteroid, suggesting that increased expression of this anti-apoptosis gene could lead to reduced cell death and influence treatment response in a disease- and dose-responsive manner.

  1. Impact of promoter polymorphisms in key regulators of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway on the outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Rocio; St-Cyr, Janick; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Healy, Jasmine; Richer, Chantal; Gagné, Vincent; Laverdière, Caroline; Silverman, Lewis B.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Kritikou, Ekaterini A.; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of multiagent treatment protocols has led to a remarkable increase in survival rates for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, yet for a subpopulation of patients, resistance to chemotherapeutics remains an obstacle to successful treatment. Here we investigate the role of the mitochondrial (or intrinsic) apoptosis pathway in modulating the onset and outcomes of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cell death is a highly regulated process that plays an essential role in regulating cell homeostasis, particularly in tissues with high intrinsic proliferating capacity such as the hematopoietic system. Following the underlying paradigm that cis-acting genetic variation can influence disease risk and outcomes by modulating gene expression, we performed a systematic analysis of the proximal promoter regions of 21 genes involved in apoptosis. Using gene reporter assays, we show that promoter variations in 11 intrinsic apoptosis genes, including ADPRT, APAF1, BCL2, BAD, BID, MCL1, BIRC4, BCL2L1, ENDOG, YWHAB, and YWHAQ, influence promoter activity in an allele-specific manner. We also show that correlated promoter variation and increased expression of MCL1 is associated with reduced overall survival among high-risk patients receiving higher doses of corticosteroid, suggesting that increased expression of this anti-apoptosis gene could lead to reduced cell death and influence treatment response in a disease- and dose-responsive manner. PMID:24038028

  2. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Blastic Phase; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase of Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Disease

  3. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. HLA-DP genetic variation, proxies for early life immune modulation and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk

    PubMed Central

    Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Metayer, Catherine; Ma, Xiaomei; Selvin, Steve; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wiencke, John K.; Taylor, Malcolm; Brennan, Paul; Dahl, Gary V.; Moonsamy, Priscilla; Erlich, Henry A.; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are candidate genetic susceptibility loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We examined the effect of HLA-DP genetic variation on risk and evaluated its potential interaction with 4 proxies for early immune modulation, including measures of infectious exposures in infancy (presence of older siblings, daycare attendance, ear infections) and breastfeeding. A total of 585 ALL cases and 848 controls were genotyped at the HLA-DPA1 and DPB1 loci. Because of potential heterogeneity in effect by race/ethnicity, we included only non-Hispanic white (47%) and Hispanic (53%) children and considered these 2 groups separately in the analysis. Logistic regression analyses showed an increased risk of ALL associated with HLA-DPB1*01:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.43, 95% CI, 1.01-2.04) with no heterogeneity by Hispanic ethnicity (P = .969). Analyses of DPB1 supertypes showed a marked childhood ALL association with DP1, particularly for high-hyperdiploid ALL (OR = 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20-2.78). Evidence of interaction was found between DP1 and older sibling (P = .036), and between DP1 and breastfeeding (P = .094), with both showing statistically significant DP1 associations within the lower exposure categories only. These findings support an immune mechanism in the etiology of childhood ALL involving the HLA-DPB1 gene in the context of an insufficiently modulated immune system. PMID:22923493

  5. ATF5 polymorphisms influence ATF function and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Julie; Gagné, Vincent; Labuda, Malgorzata; Beaubois, Cyrielle; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Moghrabi, Albert; Sallan, Stephen E.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Asparaginase is a standard and critical component in the therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) and the basic region leucine zipper activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) and arginosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1) have been shown to mediate the antileukemic effect of asparaginase and to display variable expression between leukemia cells that are resistant and sensitive to treatment. Fourteen polymorphisms in the regulatory and coding regions of these genes were investigated for an association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia outcome. Lower event-free survival (EFS) was associated with ATF5 T1562C, tandem-repeat ASNS polymorphism, derived haplotype, and ASS1 G1343T and G34T substitutions (P ≤ .03). Associations were limited to patients who received Escherichia coli asparaginase. Variations that sustained correction for multiple testing (ATF5 T1562C, P = .005; ASNS tandem-repeat and related haplotype, P ≤ .01) were subsequently analyzed in the replication cohort. The E coli–dependent association of the ATF5 T1562 allele with reduced EFS was confirmed (P = .01). A gene-reporter assay showed that the haplotype tagged by T1562 had higher promoter activity (P ≤ .01). The remaining regulatory polymorphisms also appeared to affect ATF5 function; 2 additional high-activity haplotypes were identified (P ≤ .02) and were further corroborated by quantitative mRNA analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The ATF5-regulated increase in ASNS expression in response to more efficacious E coli–induced asparagine depletion may explain our observed results. PMID:21972289

  6. ATF5 polymorphisms influence ATF function and response to treatment in children with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Julie; Gagné, Vincent; Labuda, Malgorzata; Beaubois, Cyrielle; Sinnett, Daniel; Laverdière, Caroline; Moghrabi, Albert; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Krajinovic, Maja

    2011-11-24

    Asparaginase is a standard and critical component in the therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) and the basic region leucine zipper activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) and arginosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1) have been shown to mediate the antileukemic effect of asparaginase and to display variable expression between leukemia cells that are resistant and sensitive to treatment. Fourteen polymorphisms in the regulatory and coding regions of these genes were investigated for an association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia outcome. Lower event-free survival (EFS) was associated with ATF5 T1562C, tandem-repeat ASNS polymorphism, derived haplotype, and ASS1 G1343T and G34T substitutions (P ≤ .03). Associations were limited to patients who received Escherichia coli asparaginase. Variations that sustained correction for multiple testing (ATF5 T1562C, P = .005; ASNS tandem-repeat and related haplotype, P ≤ .01) were subsequently analyzed in the replication cohort. The E coli-dependent association of the ATF5 T1562 allele with reduced EFS was confirmed (P = .01). A gene-reporter assay showed that the haplotype tagged by T1562 had higher promoter activity (P ≤ .01). The remaining regulatory polymorphisms also appeared to affect ATF5 function; 2 additional high-activity haplotypes were identified (P ≤ .02) and were further corroborated by quantitative mRNA analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines. The ATF5-regulated increase in ASNS expression in response to more efficacious E coli-induced asparagine depletion may explain our observed results.

  7. Germline Genetic Variation in ETV6 and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Systematic Genetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Takaya; Metzger, Monika L.; Wu, Gang; Nishii, Rina; Qian, Maoxiang; Devidas, Meenakshi; Yang, Wenjian; Cheng, Cheng; Cao; Emily, Quinn; Raimondi, Susana; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Raetz, Elizabeth; Larsen, Eric; Martin, Paul L.; Bowman, W. Paul; Winick, Naomi; Komada, Yoshihiro; Wang, Shuoguo; Edmonson, Michael; Xu, Heng; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Pui; Mullighan, Charles; Evans, William E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Hunger, Stephen P.; Relling, Mary V.; Nichols, Kim E.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hereditary predisposition is rarely suspected for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent studies identified germline ETV6 variations associated with marked familial clustering of hematologic malignancies, pointing to this gene as a potentially important genetic determinant for ALL susceptibility. The aims of the current study are to comprehensively identify ALL predisposition variants in ETV6 and to determine the extent to which they contribute to the overall risk of childhood ALL. Methods Whole-exome sequencing of an index family with multiple cases of ALL was performed to identify causal variants for ALL predisposition. Targeted sequencing of ETV6 was done in 4,405 children from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital frontline ALL trials. Patients were included in this study on the basis of their enrollment in these clinical trials and the availability of germline DNA. ETV6 variant genotypes were compared with non-ALL controls to define ALL-related germline risk variants. ETV6 variant function was characterized bioinformatically and correlated with clinical and demographic features in 2,021 children with ALL. Findings We identified a novel nonsense ETV6 variant (p.R359X) with a high penetrance of familial ALL. Subsequent targeted sequencing of ETV6 in 4,405 childhood ALL cases discovered 31 exonic variants (4 nonsense, 21 missense, 1 splice site, and 5 frame shift variants) that are potentially related to ALL risk in 35 cases (0.79%). Fifteen (48%) of the 31 ALL-related ETV6 variants clustered in the ETS domain and predicted to be highly deleterious. Children with ALL-related ETV6 variants were significantly older at leukemia diagnosis than others (10.2 years [IQR 5.3-13.8] vs 4.7 years [IQR 3.0-8.7], P=0.017). The hyperdiploid leukemia karyotype was strikingly overrepresented in ALL cases harboring germline ETV6 risk variants compared to the wildtype group (9 of 14 cases [64.3%] vs 538 of 2

  8. Chemotherapy Pharmacodynamics and Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Liu, Wei; Fellah, Slim; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Kimberg, Cara; Ogg, Robert; Srivastava, Deokumar; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations among methotrexate pharmacodynamics, neuroimaging, and neurocognitive outcomes in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on a contemporary chemotherapy-only protocol. Patients and Methods This longitudinal study linked pharmacokinetic assays collected during therapy to neurocognitive and brain imaging outcomes during long-term follow-up. A total of 218 (72.2%) of 302 eligible long-term survivors were recruited for outcome studies when they were more than 5 years post-diagnosis and older than 8 years of age. At long-term follow-up, survivors were an average of 13.8 years old and 7.7 years from diagnosis, and 51% were male. Neurocognitive testing, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during an executive function task, and structural MRI with diffusion tensor imaging were conducted. Generalized linear models were developed to identify predictors, and models were adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, and parent education. Results Intelligence was within normal limits (mean, 98; standard deviation, 14) compared with population expectations (mean, 100; standard deviation, 15), though measures of executive function, processing speed, and memory were less than population means (all P < .02 after correction for false discovery rates). Higher plasma concentration of methotrexate was associated with a poorer executive function score (P < .02). Higher plasma methotrexate was also associated with higher functional MRI activity, with thicker cortices in dorsolateral prefrontal brain regions, and with white matter microstructure in the frontostriatal tact. Neurocognitive impairment was associated with these imaging findings as well. Associations did not change after adjustment for age or dose of leucovorin rescue. Conclusion Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on contemporary chemotherapy-only protocols demonstrate executive dysfunction. A higher plasma concentration of methotrexate was

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (NFKB) in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Cristian Fabian Layton; Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Romero, Maria Del Socorro Camarillo; Sánchez, Yanko V Fabila; Romero, Isidoro Tejocote

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood. In children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β) has been associated with changes in the transcriptional activity and expression of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB) in the mononuclear cells of bone marrow. The aim of the study was to determine the possible role of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β) and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB) as prognostic variables in pediatric patients with ALL. This was a descriptive, transversal, and observational study. Bone marrow and blood samples were obtained from 30 children with newly-diagnosed ALL, who were seen at the Hematology-Oncology Service, Hospital para el Niño (HPN), Toluca, Mexico, from 2014‒2015. Anthropometric variables, clinical lab results, immunophenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities were registered. GSK-3β was evaluated through immunohistochemistry, and NFKB messenger RNA (mRNA) with real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The cases of ALL were classified into two groups of risk: high and habitual. Thirty patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 7.1 years (range 2‒13 years). Twenty-one were male and 9 female. Employing the morphological classification, 26 patients had type L1 ALL and the remaining 4 patients had type L2 ALL. Abnormal genes were found in 7 (23.33%) patients, ETV-RUNX1 in 3, followed by TCF3-PBX1 (two), STL1-TAL1 (one), and BCR-ABL1 (one). NFKB relative expression levels, in comparison to the GSK-3β immunohistochemistry results of the bone marrow samples, showed significant differences between positive and negative cases (p = 0.001) and between weak-positive and negative cases (p = 0.002). These results suggest that GSK-3β may be a prognostic biomarker in childhood ALL.

  10. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  11. Genomic and transcriptional landscape of P2RY8-CRLF2-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vesely, C; Frech, C; Eckert, C; Cario, G; Mecklenbräuker, A; zur Stadt, U; Nebral, K; Kraler, F; Fischer, S; Attarbaschi, A; Schuster, M; Bock, C; Cavé, H; von Stackelberg, A; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2017-01-01

    Children with P2RY8-CRLF2-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia have an increased relapse risk. Their mutational and transcriptional landscape, as well as the respective patterns at relapse remain largely elusive. We, therefore, performed an integrated analysis of whole-exome and RNA sequencing in 41 major clone fusion-positive cases including 19 matched diagnosis/relapse pairs. We detected a variety of frequently subclonal and highly instable JAK/STAT but also RTK/Ras pathway-activating mutations in 76% of cases at diagnosis and virtually all relapses. Unlike P2RY8-CRLF2 that was lost in 32% of relapses, all other genomic alterations affecting lymphoid development (58%) and cell cycle (39%) remained stable. Only IKZF1 alterations predominated in relapsing cases (P=0.001) and increased from initially 36 to 58% in matched cases. IKZF1’s critical role is further corroborated by its specific transcriptional signature comprising stem cell features with signs of impaired lymphoid differentiation, enhanced focal adhesion, activated hypoxia pathway, deregulated cell cycle and increased drug resistance. Our findings support the notion that P2RY8-CRLF2 is dispensable for relapse development and instead highlight the prominent rank of IKZF1 for relapse development by mediating self-renewal and homing to the bone marrow niche. Consequently, reverting aberrant IKAROS signaling or its disparate programs emerges as an attractive potential treatment option in these leukemias. PMID:27899802

  12. Ethnicity and survival in childhood acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Smith, Franklin O.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Ross, Julie A.; Perentesis, John; Woods, William G.; Lange, Beverly J.; Davies, Stella M.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated differences in outcome by ethnicity among children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We analyzed 791 children in the CCG 2891 trial and confirmed positive findings in 850 children in the CCG 2961 trial. Hispanic and black children treated with chemotherapy in CCG 2891 had significantly inferior overall survival (OS) from study entry compared with white children (37%± 9% vs 48%± 4% [P = .016] and 34% ± 10% vs 48% ± 4%, [P = .007], respectively). Significantly fewer black children had related donors. Analyses of CCG 2961 confirmed that black children had significantly decreased OS rates compared with white children (45% ± 12% vs 60% ± 4%; P = .007) The difference in OS rates between Hispanic and white children approached statistical significance (51% ± 8% vs 60% ± 4%; P = .065) Only 7.5% of black children on CCG 2961 had an available family donor. In conclusion, Hispanic and black children with AML have worse survival than white children. Access to chemotherapy, differences in supportive care or leukemia phenotype, and reduced compliance are unlikely explanations for this difference because therapy was given intravenously according to CCG protocols. Fewer black children than expected had an available family marrow donor. (Blood. 2006;108:74-80) PMID:16537811

  13. Expression of RUNX1 isoforms and its target gene BLK in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Montero-Ruíz, Oreth; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel; Betancourt, Miguel; Juárez-Velázquez, Rocío; González-Márquez, Humberto; Pérez-Vera, Patricia

    2012-09-01

    Bone marrow samples from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were analyzed for the expression of RUNX1a/b/c isoforms. Obtained patterns were associated with genetic abnormalities and the expression of the RUNX1 regulated gene BLK. RUNX1c was present in all patients, but the expected over-expression of RUNX1a was not observed. Over-expression of total RUNT domain isoforms was detected in patients with extra RUNX1 copies, and unexpectedly, in those with t(4;11). Only expression of the total RUNT domain-containing isoforms and BLK presented positive correlation. Results suggest a more complex role of RUNX1 in leukemogenesis than the proposed antagonism between the isoforms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  15. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  16. Assessment of Corticosteroid-induced Osteonecrosis in Children Undergoing Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the Japanese Childhood Cancer and Leukemia Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Yasuto; Watanabe, Arata; Taga, Takashi; Kikuta, Atsushi; Matsushita, Takeji; Kogawa, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Chihiro; Horikoshi, Yasuo; Iwai, Tsuyako; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Tsurusawa, Masahito; Asami, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON) is a challenging complication encountered during modern chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We retrospectively assessed the incidence of ON and its risk factors in a total of 1095 patients enrolled in 3 consecutive Japanese Children’s Cancer and Leukemia Study Group ALL studies (ALL941 [1994 to 2000], n=464; ALL2000 [2000 to 2004], n=305; and ALL2004 [2004 to 2010], n=326). ON was diagnosed in 16 patients, of whom 15 were symptomatic. The cumulative incidence of ON was 0.76% in ALL941, 0.35% in ALL2000, and 3.6% in ALL2004. The incidence of ON in ALL941/2000, in which only prednisolone was administered as a steroid, was significantly lower than that in ALL2004, in which dexamethasone was used as a partial substitute for prednisolone (P<0.01). In ALL2004, sex and age were significantly correlated with the incidence of ON (1.3% in boys vs. 6.7% in girls, P=0.0132; 0.42% for age <10 y vs. 15.6% for age ≥10 y, P<0.0001), suggesting that girls aged 10 years and above are at a greater risk of ON onset. These results indicate that the risk of ON should be considered when administering dexamethasone as part of ALL protocol treatment in girls aged 10 years and above. PMID:24136019

  17. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Ph-Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Implementation of a simplified flow cytometric assays for minimal residual disease monitoring in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vinhas, Ester; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Pedrosa, Francisco

    2016-06-25

    Monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to assess treatment response is crucial for risk assignment. Flow cytometry can be used to monitor MRD in ALL but the implementation of this approach requires extensive expertise. If resources are limited, the costs of full flow cytometric MRD testing might be prohibitive. We evaluated the applicability of a previously reported simplified MRD assay, designed to distinguish leukemic from normal lymphoblastic during remission induction therapy. Fifty-nine samples from children with ALL, enrolled in the RE-LLA study at a pediatric oncology center in Recife (Brazil), were evaluated for MRD on day 19 and on day 26 of remission induction therapy. We compared results obtained by a trainee in Recife and an expert. The method was implemented successfully and the concordance between results obtained by the trainee and the expert was practically absolute at the end of the study. It is possible to implement reliable measurements of MRD during remission induction therapy in childhood ALL despite limited resources. The simplicity of the MRD method used in this study does not require extensive prior training in leukemia immunophenotyping. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-27

    Adult B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Down Syndrome; Stage I B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Nutritional intake of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: evidence for bone health interventional opportunities.

    PubMed

    Tylavsky, Frances A; Smith, Karen; Surprise, Harriet; Garland, Sarah; Yan, Xiaowei; McCammon, Elizabeth; Hudson, Melissa M; Pui, Ching-Hon; Kaste, Sue C

    2010-12-15

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are vulnerable to exaggeration of the aging process including decreased bone mineral density (BMD). As little is known about their dietary or nutrient intake that may affect their long-term bone health, we examined nutrient intake in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Survivors (n = 164) of childhood ALL who had completed treatment for at least 5 years and were in continuous remission, completed a 110-item food questionnaire that reflected dietary intake over the previous year. The analyzed cohort comprised 34 females and 38 males younger than 19 years and 45 females and 47 males at least 19 years. Reported nutrient intake and food selection were compared with age-specific Recommended Dietary Allowance and USDA Pyramid Food Guide. Body mass index was compared to the general US population, adjusted for age, gender, Tanner stage and race. Less than 30% of participants met recommended dietary intakes for vitamin D, calcium, potassium, or magnesium regardless of age. Mean daily caloric intake was 2,204 kcal (51% from carbohydrates) for younger and 2,160 kcal (49% from carbohydrates) for older participants. Energy intake from sweets was 70% higher than recommended. Participants < 19 years were less likely to have a healthy weight (odds ratio 0.48, 95% CI 0.30-0.79); > 19 years more likely to be overweight (odds ratio 1.95, 95% CI 1.11-3.32, P < 0.002). Survivors of childhood ALL need careful dietary intervention to optimize long-term health.

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  3. Family Characteristics as Risk Factors for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Marcel; Brazzola, Pierluigi; Niggli, Felix; Kuehni, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, few risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been confirmed and the scientific literature is full of controversial “evidence.” We examined if family characteristics, particularly maternal and paternal age and number of older siblings, were risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methodology/Principal Findings In this population-based nationwide matched case-control study, patients 0–14 years of age with ALL diagnosed 1991–2006 and registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry were linked with their census records of 1990 and 2000. Eight controls per case were selected from the census. The association between family characteristics and ALL was analyzed by conditional logistic regressions. We found that increasing maternal age was associated with incidence of ALL in the offspring (OR per 5-year increase in maternal age 1.18, 95% CI 1.05–1.31; p = 0.004), remaining stable (trend OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.99–1.31; p = 0.060) after adjustment for other risk factors. The association with paternal age was weaker (OR per 5-year increase 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.28, p = 0.032) and disappeared after adjustments. Number of older siblings was not associated with risk of ALL in the overall group of children aged 0–14 years at diagnosis. However, we found a negative trend between number of older siblings and ALL diagnosed at age 0–4 years (OR per sibling 0.85, 95% CI 0.68–1.06; p = 0.141) and a positive trend for ALL diagnosed at age 5–9 (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.05–1.72; p = 0.019), with some evidence for an effect modification (p-value for interaction  = 0.040). Conclusions As in other studies, increasing maternal, but not paternal age was associated with risk of ALL. We found only a weak association with the number of older siblings, suggesting a delay in disease manifestation rather than a decrease in incidence. PMID:20957179

  4. Family characteristics as risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Feller, Martin; Adam, Martin; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brazzola, Pierluigi; Niggli, Felix; Kuehni, Claudia

    2010-10-04

    To date, few risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been confirmed and the scientific literature is full of controversial "evidence." We examined if family characteristics, particularly maternal and paternal age and number of older siblings, were risk factors for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this population-based nationwide matched case-control study, patients 0-14 years of age with ALL diagnosed 1991-2006 and registered in the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry were linked with their census records of 1990 and 2000. Eight controls per case were selected from the census. The association between family characteristics and ALL was analyzed by conditional logistic regressions. We found that increasing maternal age was associated with incidence of ALL in the offspring (OR per 5-year increase in maternal age 1.18, 95% CI 1.05-1.31; p = 0.004), remaining stable (trend OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.99-1.31; p = 0.060) after adjustment for other risk factors. The association with paternal age was weaker (OR per 5-year increase 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28, p = 0.032) and disappeared after adjustments. Number of older siblings was not associated with risk of ALL in the overall group of children aged 0-14 years at diagnosis. However, we found a negative trend between number of older siblings and ALL diagnosed at age 0-4 years (OR per sibling 0.85, 95% CI 0.68-1.06; p = 0.141) and a positive trend for ALL diagnosed at age 5-9 (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.05-1.72; p = 0.019), with some evidence for an effect modification (p-value for interaction  = 0.040). As in other studies, increasing maternal, but not paternal age was associated with risk of ALL. We found only a weak association with the number of older siblings, suggesting a delay in disease manifestation rather than a decrease in incidence.

  5. Breastfeeding and nutrition to 2 years of age and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Greenop, Kathryn R; Bailey, Helen D; Miller, Margaret; Scott, Rodney J; Attia, John; Ashton, Lesley J; Downie, Peter; Armstrong, Bruce K; Milne, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and childhood brain tumors (CBT) are 2 of the most common forms of childhood cancer, but little is known of their etiology. In 2 nationwide case-control studies we investigated whether breastfeeding, age of food introduction, or early diet are associated with the risk of these cancers. Cases aged 0-14 years were identified from Australian pediatric oncology units between 2003 and 2007 (ALL) and 2005 and 2010 (CBT) and population-based controls through nationwide random-digit dialing. Mothers completed questionnaires giving details of infant feeding up to the age of 2 yr. Data from 322 ALL cases, 679 ALL controls, 299 CBT cases, and 733 CBT controls were analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of ALL [odds ratio (OR) = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32, 0.84), regardless of duration. Introduction of artificial formula within 14 days of birth was positively associated with ALL (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.37), as was exclusive formula feeding to 6 mo (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.05). No associations were seen between breastfeeding or formula use and risk of CBT. Our results suggest that breastfeeding and delayed introduction of artificial formula may reduce the risk of ALL but not CBT.

  6. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Long-term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on Contemporary Treatment Protocols: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Krull, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    The intensified administration of chemotherapeutic drugs has gradually replaced cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While CRT is often implicated in neurocognitive impairment in ALL survivors, there is a paucity of literature that evaluates the persistence of neurocognitive deficits in long-term survivors of pediatric ALL who were treated with contemporary chemotherapy-only protocols. Results from this systematic review concurred to the probable cognitive-sparing effect of chemotherapy-based protocols over CRT in long-term survivors. However, coupled with multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors, survivors who received chemotherapy treatment still suffered from apparent cognitive impairment, particularly in the attention and executive function domains. Notably, there is evidence to suggest that the late neurotoxic effect of methotrexate on survivors’ neurocognitive performance may be dose-related. This review also recommends future pharmacokinetic, neuroimaging and genetic studies to illuminate the multifactorial nature of this subject matter and discusses the potential value of neurochemical, physiological, inflammatory and genetic markers for the prediction of susceptibility to neurocognitive impairment in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. PMID:25857254

  7. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Candidate gene association studies and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Houlston, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of candidate gene association studies to the understanding of genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies (January 1996–July 2009). Studies had to meet the following criteria: be case-control design, be studied by two or more studies, not be focused on HLA antigen genetic markers and be published in English. We identified 47 studies of polymorphic variation in 16 genes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. To clarify the impact of individual polymorphisms on risk, pooled analyses were performed. Of the 25 polymorphic variants studied, significant associations (P<0.05) were seen in pooled analyses for eight variants: GSTM1 (OR =1.16; 95%CI: 1.04–1.30), MTRR A66G (OR=0.73, 95%CI:0.59–0.91), SHMT1 C1420T (OR=0.79, 95%CI: 0.65–0.98), RFC1 G80A (OR=1.37, 95%CI: 1.11–1.69), CYP1A1*2A (OR=1.36, 95%CI:1.11–1.66), CYP2E1*5B (OR=1.99, 95%CI:1.32–3.00) NQO1 C609T (OR=1.24, 95%CI:1.02–1.50) and XRCC1 G28152A (OR=1.78, 95%CI:1.32–2.42). These findings should, however, be interpreted with caution as the estimated false-positive report probabilities (FPRP) for each association were not noteworthy (i.e. FPRP>0.2). While candidate gene analyses are complementary to genome-wide association studies, future analyses should be based on sample sizes commensurate with the detection of small effects and attention needs to be paid to study design. PMID:20511665

  9. Biomarker identification and pathway analysis by serum metabolomics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunnuo; Zhang, Haitao; Sun, Xiaohan; Sun, Changhao; Ren, Lihong

    2014-09-25

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common hematological malignant neoplasm that typically affects children. Although intense chemotherapeutic regimens have been useful to combat the disease, approximately 20% of patients will relapse despite treatment. Diagnosing ALL requires bone marrow puncture procedure, which many parents do not consent to for it is invasive. Additionally, metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. Metabolic alterations associated with ALL were investigated by performing serum metabolomics based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) was also performed. Thirty metabolites (17 detected in positive mode and 13 in negative mode) were differentially expressed between patients with ALL and control patients; these metabolites were selected as potential biomarkers. Based on IPA analysis, glycerophospholipid metabolism is deregulated in patients with ALL and may represent an underlying metabolic pathway associated with disease progression. Metabolomics can be used to analyze the metabolic activity of ALL patients compared to healthy controls. The data we provide here suggest that glycerophospholipid metabolism may be a key mechanism underlying disease progression and development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Redirecting T cells with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Andrea; Magnani, Chiara F; Tettamanti, Sarah; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Biagi, Ettore

    2017-08-23

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Nowadays the survival rate is around 85%. Nevertheless, an urgent clinical need is still represented by primary refractory and relapsed patients who do not significantly benefit from standard approaches, including chemo-radiotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). For this reason, immunotherapy has so far represented a challenging novel treatment opportunity, including, as the most validated therapeutic options, cancer vaccines, donor-lymphocyte infusions and tumor-specific immune effector cells. More recently, unexpected positive clinical results in ALL have been achieved by application of gene-engineered chimeric antigen expressing (CAR) T cells. Several CAR designs across different trials have generated similar response rates, with Complete Response (CR) of 60-90% at 1 month and an Event-Free Survival (EFS) of 70% at 6 months. Relevant challenges anyway remain to be addressed, such as amelioration of technical, cost and feasibility aspects of cell and gene manipulation and the necessity to face the occurrence of relapse mechanisms. This review describes the state of the art of ALL immunotherapies, the novelties in terms of gene manipulation approaches and the problems emerged from early clinical studies. We describe and discuss the process of clinical translation, including the design of a cell manufacturing protocol, vector production and regulatory issues. Multiple antigen targeting and combination of CAR T cells with molecular targeted drugs have also been evaluated as latest strategies to prevail over immune-evasion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Promoter DNA Methylation Pattern Identifies Prognostic Subgroups in Childhood T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Borssén, Magnus; Palmqvist, Lars; Karrman, Kristina; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Heldrup, Jesper; Forestier, Erik; Roos, Göran; Degerman, Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has improved, but there is a considerable fraction of patients experiencing a poor outcome. There is a need for better prognostic markers and aberrant DNA methylation is a candidate in other malignancies, but its potential prognostic significance in T-ALL is hitherto undecided. Design and Methods Genome wide promoter DNA methylation analysis was performed in pediatric T-ALL samples (n = 43) using arrays covering >27000 CpG sites. Clinical outcome was evaluated in relation to methylation status and compared with a contemporary T-ALL group not tested for methylation (n = 32). Results Based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), T-ALL samples were subgrouped as CIMP+ (high methylation) and CIMP− (low methylation). CIMP− T-ALL patients had significantly worse overall and event free survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively) compared to CIMP+ cases. CIMP status was an independent factor for survival in multivariate analysis including age, gender and white blood cell count. Analysis of differently methylated genes in the CIMP subgroups showed an overrepresentation of transcription factors, ligands and polycomb target genes. Conclusions We identified global promoter methylation profiling as being of relevance for subgrouping and prognostication of pediatric T-ALL. PMID:23762353

  12. Increased Body Mass Index during Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Significant and Underestimated Complication.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen C; Marsh, Julie A; Rath, Shoshana R; Kotecha, Rishi S; Gough, Hazel; Taylor, Mandy; Walwyn, Thomas; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine H; Choong, Catherine S

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Design. We undertook a retrospective review of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and treated with modern COG protocols (n = 80) to determine longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of obesity compared with a healthy reference population. Results. At diagnosis, the majority of patients (77.5%) were in the healthy weight category. During treatment, increases in BMI z-scores were greater for females than males; the prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3% to 44.8% (P < 0.004) for females but remained relatively unchanged for males (9.8% to 13.7%, P = 0.7). Longitudinal analysis using linear mixed-effects identified associations between BMI z-scores and time-dependent interactions with sex (P = 0.0005), disease risk (P < 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), and BMI z-score (P < 0.0001) at diagnosis and total dose of steroid during maintenance (P = 0.01). Predicted mean BMI z-scores at the end of therapy were greater for females with standard risk ALL irrespective of age at diagnosis and for males younger than 4 years of age at diagnosis with standard risk ALL. Conclusion. Females treated on standard risk protocols and younger males may be at greatest risk of becoming obese during treatment for ALL. These subgroups may benefit from intervention strategies to manage BMI during treatment for ALL.

  13. Increased Body Mass Index during Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Significant and Underestimated Complication

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Helen C.; Marsh, Julie A.; Rath, Shoshana R.; Kotecha, Rishi S.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Cole, Catherine H.; Choong, Catherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective & Design. We undertook a retrospective review of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and treated with modern COG protocols (n = 80) to determine longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of obesity compared with a healthy reference population. Results. At diagnosis, the majority of patients (77.5%) were in the healthy weight category. During treatment, increases in BMI z-scores were greater for females than males; the prevalence of obesity increased from 10.3% to 44.8% (P < 0.004) for females but remained relatively unchanged for males (9.8% to 13.7%, P = 0.7). Longitudinal analysis using linear mixed-effects identified associations between BMI z-scores and time-dependent interactions with sex (P = 0.0005), disease risk (P < 0.0001), age (P = 0.0001), and BMI z-score (P < 0.0001) at diagnosis and total dose of steroid during maintenance (P = 0.01). Predicted mean BMI z-scores at the end of therapy were greater for females with standard risk ALL irrespective of age at diagnosis and for males younger than 4 years of age at diagnosis with standard risk ALL. Conclusion. Females treated on standard risk protocols and younger males may be at greatest risk of becoming obese during treatment for ALL. These subgroups may benefit from intervention strategies to manage BMI during treatment for ALL. PMID:26101530

  14. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abdalrahman, Hadel M; Youssef, Doaa M; Abd Alhady, Mohamed A; Ali, Adel S A; Abd Elbasset, Maha Aly; Hashim, Hiatham M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents.The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients.The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents' low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents' reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients.Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents.

  15. Feasibility and Initial Effectiveness of Home Exercise During Maintenance Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Friedman, Debra L.; Smith, Webb A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods Participants were children with ALL, age 5-10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and post-study testing evaluated strength, flexibility, fitness and motor function. Results Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7±7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements ≥5% occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-minute-walk-test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. PMID:24979081

  16. Feasibility and initial effectiveness of home exercise during maintenance therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Friedman, Debra L; Smith, Webb A; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-01-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for patients with ALL undergoing maintenance therapy. Participants were aged 5 to 10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and poststudy testing addressed strength, flexibility, fitness, and motor function. Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7 ± 7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements of 5% or more occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-Minute Walk Test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy.

  17. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Sherief, Laila M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abdalrahman, Hadel M.; Youssef, Doaa M.; Alhady, Mohamed A Abd; Ali, Adel SA; Elbasset, Maha Aly Abd; Hashim, Hiatham M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents. The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients. The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents’ low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents’ reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients. Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents. PMID:26705211

  18. Integrated genomic analysis of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Laura E; Meyer, Julia A; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Wong, Nicholas; Yang, Wenjian; Condos, Gregory; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth; Saffery, Richard; Relling, Mary V; Bhojwani, Deepa; Morrison, Debra J; Carroll, William L

    2011-11-10

    Despite an increase in survival for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the outcome after relapse is poor. To understand the genetic events that contribute to relapse and chemoresistance and identify novel targets of therapy, 3 high-throughput assays were used to identify genetic and epigenetic changes at relapse. Using matched diagnosis/relapse bone marrow samples from children with relapsed B-precursor ALL, we evaluated gene expression, copy number abnormalities (CNAs), and DNA methylation. Gene expression analysis revealed a signature of differentially expressed genes from diagnosis to relapse that is different for early (< 36 months) and late (≥ 36 months) relapse. CNA analysis discovered CNAs that were shared at diagnosis and relapse and others that were new lesions acquired at relapse. DNA methylation analysis found increased promoter methylation at relapse. There were many genetic alterations that evolved from diagnosis to relapse, and in some cases these genes had previously been associated with chemoresistance. Integration of the results from all 3 platforms identified genes of potential interest, including CDKN2A, COL6A2, PTPRO, and CSMD1. Although our results indicate that a diversity of genetic changes are seen at relapse, integration of gene expression, CNA, and methylation data suggest a possible convergence on the WNT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  19. Distribution of common genetic subgroups in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in four developing countries.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rubina; Nancy, Nirmala; Naing, Win P; Ali, Sarah; Dar, Lalit; Khan, Baldip K; Padua, Rose A; Carr, Robert

    2010-07-15

    An international project was conducted to identify the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-specific fusion genes (ETV6-RUNX1,MLL-AF4,TCF3-PBX1, and BCR-ABL1) in developing countries to provide additional prognostic information at diagnosis. A total of 181 children with newly diagnosed ALL were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at laboratories in India, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Sudan, following a common protocol. To our knowledge, this report is novel in its report from these countries, except India. Across the four countries, the ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion gene was present in only 5% of cases. All the positive samples were from children aged 1 to 10 years, in whom the prevalence of this fusion gene, which is associated with good prognosis, was 7.4% (9 out of 121 samples), a much lower rate than reported from Western populations. In the 18 ALL cases tested in Sudan, a notable excess of MLL-AF4 (17%) and BCR-ABL1 (22%) fusion genes was found. This study highlights the need for wider international surveys of the molecular epidemiology of ALL.

  20. Paternal intake of folate and vitamins B6 and B12 before conception and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Miller, Margaret; Greenop, Kathryn R; Bower, Carol; Attia, John; Marshall, Glenn M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Milne, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    We investigated whether paternal dietary intake of folate before conception is associated with the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a nationwide case-control study. Data on dietary folate intake during the 6 months before the child's conception were collected from 285 case fathers and 595 control fathers using a dietary questionnaire. Nutrient intake was quantified using a customized computer software package based on Australian food composition databases. Data on folate intake were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for study-matching variables, total energy, and potentially confounding variables. In a subset of 229 cases and 420 controls, data on vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 intake were also analyzed. No consistent associations were seen with paternal dietary intake of folate or vitamin B6. Higher levels of paternal dietary vitamin B12 were appeared to be associated with an increased risk of childhood ALL, with those in the highest tertile of consumption having an OR of 1.51 (0.97, 2.36). The use of supplements containing folate and vitamins B6 or B12 was rare. We did not find any biologically plausible evidence that paternal nutrition in the period leading up to conception was associated with childhood ALL. Our finding for vitamin B12 may be a chance finding, given the number of analyses performed, or be attributable to participation bias because parents with a tertiary education had the lowest level of B12 intake and tertiary education was more common among control than case parents.

  1. Exposure to house painting and the use of floor treatments and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Milne, Elizabeth; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Fritschi, Lin; Attia, John; Cole, Catherine; Armstrong, Bruce K

    2011-05-15

    Painting in the home has been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aim of this analysis was to investigate whether exposure to house painting or floor treatments before birth or during childhood increased the risk of childhood ALL. Data from 389 cases and 876 frequency-matched controls were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for study matching variables and potential confounders. Overall, there was little evidence of an increased risk with painting inside the house in the year before the pregnancy, during the pregnancy, or after the child's birth; however, the risk appeared to be increased in certain circumstances. The odds ratio (OR) for more than three rooms being painted during pregnancy was 1.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01, 2.80]. The OR for someone other than the parents painting inside the house in the year before the pregnancy was 2.37 (95% CI 1.30, 4.30) and 3.07 (95% CI 1.46, 6.46) when more than three rooms were painted. The OR for the mother painting the outside of the house with oil-based paint in the year before the pregnancy was 2.97 (95% CI 1.06, 8.33). No association was found with having floor treatments in any time period. We found some evidence of an increased risk of ALL associated with house painting. An apparently increased risk associated with someone other than the parents painting inside the house may be related to the amount of paint used and the intensity of the dose received. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  2. Application of Glutamine-enriched nutrition therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Han, Yueqin; Zhang, Fengzhi; Wang, Jinshen; Zhu, Yanping; Dai, Jianhua; Bu, Yueqing; Yang, Qiaozhi; Xiao, Yingying; Sun, Xiaojing

    2016-07-11

    We investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln)-enriched nutritional therapy during chemotherapy on the nutritional status and immune function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We enrolled 48 children who were newly diagnosed with ALL in our department during the period of 2013.1-2014.12. The patients (follow random number table) were randomly divided into the control group (peptamen) and the treatment group (peptamen + glutamine), 24 cases in each group. The remission induction regimens were all based on VDLP (D) chemotherapy (VCR (Vincrisstine), DNR (Daunomycin), L-ASP (L-Asparagiase), Prednisolone and Dexamethasone). The treatment group received Gln-enriched nutritional therapy every day during the full course of chemotherapy,and the control group is as same as the treatment group except without glutamine. The indicators of general nutritional status, such as weight, height, and triceps skinfold thickness, and the indicators of biochemical tests, such as serum albumin, prealbumin, creatinine-height index, retinol binding protein, and urinary hydroxyproline index, were compared between the two groups at the end of the first, second, third and the fourth week when the chemotherapy was completed. And in the fourth week, flow cytometry was applied to detect the levels of T cell subsets and the activities of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of the two groups. 1. after 4 weeks nutritional therapy, there is no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the two groups of children in weight, height and other indicators. 2. At the end of 2 weeks treatment, the level of prealbumin (PA) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) is higher in treatment group than that in the control group (P <0.05), at the end of 3 weeks treatment, the thickness of triceps skinfold is higher (P <0.05) than that in the control group; 3. At the end of 3 and 4 weeks, the concentrations serum ALB, PA, RBP and UHI were higher than in the control group (P <0.05); 4

  3. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. A childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome-wide association study identifies novel sex-specific risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep K.; Lupo, Philip J.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Saxena, Anshul; Kennedy, Amy E.; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Mills, Ken I.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs more frequently in males. Reasons behind sex differences in childhood ALL risk are unknown. In the present genome-wide association study (GWAS), we explored the genetic basis of sex differences by comparing genotype frequencies between male and female cases in a case-only study to assess effect-modification by sex. The case-only design included 236 incident cases of childhood ALL consecutively recruited at the Texas Children's Cancer Center in Houston, Texas from 2007 to 2012. All cases were non-Hispanic whites, aged 1 to 10 years, and diagnosed with confirmed B-cell precursor ALL. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina HumanCoreExome BeadChip on the Illumina Infinium platform. Besides the top 100 statistically most significant results, results were also analyzed by the top 100 highest effect size with a nominal statistical significance (P <0.05). The statistically most significant sex-specific association (P = 4 × 10−6) was with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4813720 (RASSF2), an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for RASSF2 in peripheral blood. rs4813720 is also a strong methylation QTL (meQTL) for a CpG site (cg22485289) within RASSF2 in pregnancy, at birth, childhood, and adolescence. cg22485289 is one of the hypomethylated CpG sites in ALL compared with pre-B cells. Two missense SNPs, rs12722042 and 12722039, in the HLA-DQA1 gene yielded the highest effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] ∼ 14; P <0.01) for sex-specific results. The HLA-DQA1 SNPs belong to DQA1∗01 and confirmed the previously reported male-specific association with DQA1∗01. This finding supports the proposed infection-related etiology in childhood ALL risk for males. Further analyses revealed that most SNPs (either direct effect or through linkage disequilibrium) were within active enhancers or active promoter regions and had regulatory effects on gene expression levels. Cumulative data suggested that

  5. A childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome-wide association study identifies novel sex-specific risk variants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sandeep K; Lupo, Philip J; Scheurer, Michael E; Saxena, Anshul; Kennedy, Amy E; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Mills, Ken I; McCauley, Jacob L; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs more frequently in males. Reasons behind sex differences in childhood ALL risk are unknown. In the present genome-wide association study (GWAS), we explored the genetic basis of sex differences by comparing genotype frequencies between male and female cases in a case-only study to assess effect-modification by sex.The case-only design included 236 incident cases of childhood ALL consecutively recruited at the Texas Children's Cancer Center in Houston, Texas from 2007 to 2012. All cases were non-Hispanic whites, aged 1 to 10 years, and diagnosed with confirmed B-cell precursor ALL. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina HumanCoreExome BeadChip on the Illumina Infinium platform. Besides the top 100 statistically most significant results, results were also analyzed by the top 100 highest effect size with a nominal statistical significance (P <0.05).The statistically most significant sex-specific association (P = 4 × 10) was with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4813720 (RASSF2), an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for RASSF2 in peripheral blood. rs4813720 is also a strong methylation QTL (meQTL) for a CpG site (cg22485289) within RASSF2 in pregnancy, at birth, childhood, and adolescence. cg22485289 is one of the hypomethylated CpG sites in ALL compared with pre-B cells. Two missense SNPs, rs12722042 and 12722039, in the HLA-DQA1 gene yielded the highest effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] ∼ 14; P <0.01) for sex-specific results. The HLA-DQA1 SNPs belong to DQA1*01 and confirmed the previously reported male-specific association with DQA1*01. This finding supports the proposed infection-related etiology in childhood ALL risk for males. Further analyses revealed that most SNPs (either direct effect or through linkage disequilibrium) were within active enhancers or active promoter regions and had regulatory effects on gene expression levels.Cumulative data suggested that RASSF2 rs4813720

  6. Screening survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Hasan; Sarper, Nazan; Kılıç, Suar Çakı; Gelen, Sema Aylan; Zengin, Emine

    2012-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors were screened for risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Forty-four ALL survivors in first remission were enrolled. Twenty-six also received 12-18 Gy cranial radiotherapy (RT). Patients' body mass indexes (BMIs) at dignosis and during the study were compared. Metabolic syndrome (MS) evaluation was performed in patients, parents, and siblings older than 6 years. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) index of the survivors was also calculated. In survivors with impaired fasting glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Thyroid functions and IGF-1 and/or IGFBP-3 levels of the survivors who received cranial RT were evaluated. Median age of the survivors was 11.5 years (6-23). At diagnosis, mean BMI percentile was 46.7 (3-95) and mean z-score was -0.09 ± 1.14; during the study, these values rose to 71.1 ± 25.6 (3-100) and 0.8 ± 0.94, respectively (P < .001). One patient (2.2%) and nine survivors (20%) were obese at diagnosis and during the study, respectively (P = .005). Survivors had significantly higher BMI percentile and BMI z-score compared to their siblings (P = .006 and P = .011, respectively). The study group was small and we could not show a correlation of the patients' obesity with RT, thyroid functions, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels. In three survivors (6.8%), there was MS. Maternal and paternal MS was not found as a risk factor for MS of the survivors (P = .1, P = .5, respectively). The HOMA index revealed insulin resistance (IR) in 12 (27.2%) of the survivors, whereas OGTT revealed abnormal glucose regulation and/or IR in four. As a conclusion, ALL survivors have high risk for obesity and MS.

  7. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: clinical facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug dosing. Because of significant interindividual and intraindividual variations in drug disposition and pharmacodynamics, vigorous dose adjustments are needed to obtain a target degree of myelosuppression. As the normal white blood cell counts vary by patients' ages and ethnicity, and also within age groups, identical white blood cell levels for 2 patients may not reflect the same treatment intensity. Measurements of intracellular levels of cytotoxic metabolites of 6MP and MTX can identify nonadherent patients, but therapeutic target levels remains to be established. A rise in serum aminotransferase levels during maintenance therapy is common and often related to high levels of methylated 6MP metabolites. However, except for episodes of hypoglycemia, serious liver dysfunction is rare, the risk of permanent liver damage is low, and aminotransferase levels usually normalize within a few weeks after discontinuation of therapy. 6MP and MTX dose increments should lead to either leukopenia or a rise in aminotransferases, and if neither is experienced, poor treatment adherence should be considered. The many genetic polymorphisms that determine 6MP and MTX disposition, efficacy, and toxicity have precluded implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance therapy is as important as the more intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments

  8. Anthropometry in Long-Term Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Childhood and Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Collins, Laura; Beaumont, Lesley; Cranston, Amy; Savoie, Stefanie; Nayiager, Trishana; Barr, Ronald

    2017-06-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is an inadequate measure of nutritional status in children and adolescents with cancer as it does not distinguish muscle from adipose tissue. However, arm anthropometry offers simple assessments of fat mass and lean body mass; especially valuable in low- and middle-income countries where the great majority of young people with cancer live and access to sophisticated expensive measures of body composition is markedly limited. The nutritional status of 75 long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was assessed by arm anthropometry, in addition to BMI, in a cross-sectional cohort study. Normal ranges for triceps skin fold thickness (TSFT, a surrogate for fat mass) and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC, a surrogate for lean body mass) were between the 15th and 85th percentiles for age and sex. Overweight/obesity was classified as a TSFT >85th percentile and sarcopenia as an MUAC <15th percentile. Height normalized indices for TSFT and MUAC were also calculated. Overweight/obesity was identified in 1/3 of subjects by a BMI >25 and by TSFT; and 20% of the subjects had a TSFT >95th percentile. Only two subjects were sarcopenic. None met the combined criteria for sarcopenic obesity. TSFT and MUAC/height indices did not add sensitivity to identification of sarcopenia or obesity. TSFT is a useful measure of overweight/obesity in this population, but MUAC does not identify a notable proportion with sarcopenia. Further resolution may be provided by more sophisticated measures of body composition.

  9. Epigenetic landscape correlates with genetic subtype but does not predict outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Alem S; Lafta, Fadhel M; Schwalbe, Edward C; Nakjang, Sirintra; Cockell, Simon J; Iliasova, Alice; Enshaei, Amir; Schwab, Claire; Rand, Vikki; Clifford, Steven C; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Chris D; Vora, Ajay; Harrison, Christine J; Moorman, Anthony V; Strathdee, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Although children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) generally have a good outcome, some patients do relapse and survival following relapse is poor. Altered DNA methylation is highly prevalent in ALL and raises the possibility that DNA methylation-based biomarkers could predict patient outcome. In this study, genome-wide methylation analysis, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip platform, was carried out on 52 diagnostic patient samples from 4 genetic subtypes [ETV6-RUNX1, high hyperdiploidy (HeH), TCF3-PBX1 and dic(9;20)(p11–13;q11)] in a 1:1 case-control design with patients who went on to relapse (as cases) and patients achieving long-term remission (as controls). Pyrosequencing assays for selected loci were used to confirm the array-generated data. Non-negative matrix factorization consensus clustering readily clustered samples according to genetic subgroups and gene enrichment pathway analysis suggested that this is in part driven by epigenetic disruption of subtype specific signaling pathways. Multiple bioinformatics approaches (including bump hunting and individual locus analysis) were used to identify CpG sites or regions associated with outcome. However, no associations with relapse were identified. Our data revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 and dic(9;20) subtypes were mostly associated with hypermethylation; conversely, TCF3-PBX1 and HeH were associated with hypomethylation. We observed significant enrichment of the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathway in TCF3-PBX1 as well as an enrichment of genes involved in immunity and infection pathways in ETV6-RUNX1 subtype. Taken together, our results suggest that altered DNA methylation may have differential impacts in distinct ALL genetic subtypes. PMID:26237075

  10. The treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Guatemala: Biologic features, treatment hurdles, and results.

    PubMed

    Antillón, Federico G; Blanco, Jessica G; Valverde, Patricia D; Castellanos, Mauricio; Garrido, Claudia P; Girón, Veronica; Letona, Tomas R; Osorio, Emilia J; Borrayo, Dyna A; Mack, Ricardo A; Melgar, Mario A; Lorenzana, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Raul C; Metzger, Monika; Conter, Valentino; Rossi, Emanuela; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2017-02-01

    The National Pediatric Oncology Unit (UNOP) is the only pediatric hemato-oncology center in Guatemala. Patients ages 1 to 17 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated according to modified ALL Intercontinental Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (IC-BFM) 2002 protocol. Risk classification was based on age, white blood cell count, immunophenotype, genetics (when available), and early response to therapy. From July 2007 to June 2014, 787 patients were treated, including 160 who had standard-risk ALL, 450 who had intermediate-risk ALL, and 177 who had high-risk ALL. The induction death rate was 6.6%, and the remission rate was 92.9%. The rates of death and treatment abandonment during first complete remission were 4.8% and 2.5%, respectively. At a median observation time of 3.6 years, and with abandonment considered an event, the 5-year event-free survival and overall survival estimates ( ± standard error) were 56.2% ± 2.1% and 64.1% ± 2.1%, respectively, with a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 28.9% ± 2.0%. Twenty-one of 281 patients (7.5%) investigated were positive for the ets variant 6/runt-related transcription factor 1 (ETV6/RUNX1) fusion. A well organized center in a low-middle-income country can overcome the disadvantages of malnutrition and reduce abandonment. Outcomes remain suboptimal because of late diagnosis, early death, and a high relapse rate, which may have a partly genetic basis. Earlier diagnosis, better management of complications, and better knowledge of ALL will improve outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:436-448. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Ras activation in normal white blood cells and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    von Lintig, F C; Huvar, I; Law, P; Diccianni, M B; Yu, A L; Boss, G R

    2000-05-01

    Ras is an important cellular switch, relaying growth-promoting signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. In cultured cells, Ras is activated by various hematopoietic cytokines and growth factors, but the activation state of Ras in peripheral WBCs and bone marrow cells has not been studied nor has Ras activation been assessed in cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using an enzyme-based method, we assessed Ras activation in peripheral WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells from normal subjects and from children with T-cell ALL (T-ALL) and B-lineage ALL (B-ALL). In normal subjects, we found mean Ras activations of 14.3, 12.5, and 17.2% for peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells, respectively. All three of these values are higher than we have found in other normal human cells, compatible with constitutive activation of Ras by cytokines and growth factors present in serum and bone marrow. In 9 of 18 children with T-ALL, Ras activation exceeded two SDs above the mean of the corresponding cells from normal subjects, whereas in none of 11 patients with B-ALL did Ras show increased activation; activating genetic mutations in ras occur in less than 10% of ALL patients. Thus, Ras is relatively activated in peripheral blood WBCs, lymphocytes, and bone marrow cells compared with other normal human cells, and Ras is activated frequently in T-ALL but not in B-ALL. Increased Ras activation in T-ALL compared with B-ALL may contribute to the more aggressive nature of the former disease.

  12. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate Maintenance Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Clinical Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Stine N.; Frandsen, Thomas L.; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug dosing. Because of significant interindividual and intraindividual variations in drug disposition and pharmacodynamics, vigorous dose adjustments are needed to obtain a target degree of myelosuppression. As the normal white blood cell counts vary by patients’ ages and ethnicity, and also within age groups, identical white blood cell levels for 2 patients may not reflect the same treatment intensity. Measurements of intracellular levels of cytotoxic metabolites of 6MP and MTX can identify nonadherent patients, but therapeutic target levels remains to be established. A rise in serum aminotransferase levels during maintenance therapy is common and often related to high levels of methylated 6MP metabolites. However, except for episodes of hypoglycemia, serious liver dysfunction is rare, the risk of permanent liver damage is low, and aminotransferase levels usually normalize within a few weeks after discontinuation of therapy. 6MP and MTX dose increments should lead to either leukopenia or a rise in aminotransferases, and if neither is experienced, poor treatment adherence should be considered. The many genetic polymorphisms that determine 6MP and MTX disposition, efficacy, and toxicity have precluded implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance therapy is as important as the more intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments

  13. Deficient innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and gene expression response to radiation in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wing; Neale, Geoffrey; Behm, Fred; Iyengar, Rekha; Finkelstein, David; Kastan, Michael B; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-06-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms. Radiation and chemotherapy can cause mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities and induce genomic instability. Host immunity and appropriate DNA damage responses are critical inhibitors of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine the long-term effects of ALL treatment on immune function and response to DNA damage. Comparative studies on 14 survivors in first complete remission and 16 siblings were conducted. In comparison to siblings on the cells that were involved in adaptive immunity, the patients had either higher numbers (CD19+ B cells and CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) or similar numbers (alphabetaT cells and CD45RO+/RA- memory T cells) in the blood. In contrast, patients had lower numbers of all lymphocyte subsets involved in innate immunity (gammadeltaT cells and all NK subsets, including KIR2DL1+ cells, KIR2DL2/L3+ cells, and CD16+ cells), and lower natural cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells. Thymopoiesis was lower in patients, as demonstrated by less CD45RO-/RA+ naïve T cell and less SjTREC levels in the blood, whereas the Vbeta spectratype complexity score was similar. Array of gene expression response to low-dose radiation showed that about 70% of the probesets had a reduced response in patients. One of these genes, SCHIP-1, was also among the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the whole-genome scanning by SNP microarray analysis. ALL survivors were deficient in innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and DNA damage responses to radiation. These defects may contribute to their increased likelihood of second malignancy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deficient Innate Immunity, Thymopoiesis, and Gene Expression Response to Radiation in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing; Neale, Geoffrey; Behm, Fred; Iyengar, Rekha; Finkelstein, David; Kastan, Michael B.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms. Radiation and chemotherapy can cause mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities and induce genomic instability. Host immunity and appropriate DNA damage responses are critical inhibitors of carcinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine the long-term effects of ALL treatment on immune function and response to DNA damage. Methods Comparative studies on 14 survivors in first complete remission and 16 siblings were conducted. Results In comparison to siblings on the cells that were involved in adaptive immunity, the patients had either higher numbers (CD19+ B cells and CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) or similar numbers (αβT cells and CD45RO+/RA− memory T cells) in the blood. In contrast, patients had lower numbers of all lymphocyte subsets involved in innate immunity (γδT cells and all NK subsets, including KIR2DL1+ cells, KIR2DL2/L3+ cells, and CD16+ cells), and lower natural cytotoxicity against K562 leukemia cells. Thymopoiesis was lower in patients, as demonstrated by less CD45RO−/RA+ Naïve T cell and less SjTREC levels in the blood, whereas the Vβ spectratype complexity score was similar. Array of gene expression response to low-dose radiation showed that about 70% of the probesets had a reduced response in patients. One of these genes, SCHIP-1, was also among the top-ranked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during the whole genome scanning by SNP microarray analysis. Conclusion ALL survivors were deficient in innate immunity, thymopoiesis, and DNA damage responses to radiation. These defects may contribute to their increased likelihood of second malignancy. PMID:20413363

  15. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-14

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-18

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  17. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. Specific expression of novel long non-coding RNAs in high-hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Simon; Caron, Maxime; St-Onge, Pascal; Gioia, Romain; Richer, Chantal; Oualkacha, Karim; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pre-B cell childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B cALL) is a heterogeneous disease involving many subtypes typically stratified using a combination of cytogenetic and molecular-based assays. These methods, although widely used, rely on the presence of known chromosomal translocations, which is a limiting factor. There is therefore a need for robust, sensitive, and specific molecular biomarkers unaffected by such limitations that would allow better risk stratification and consequently better clinical outcome. In this study we performed a transcriptome analysis of 56 pre-B cALL patients to identify expression signatures in different subtypes. In both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), we identified subtype-specific gene signatures distinguishing pre-B cALL subtypes, particularly in t(12;21) and hyperdiploid cases. The genes up-regulated in pre-B cALL subtypes were enriched in bivalent chromatin marks in their promoters. LncRNAs is a new and under-studied class of transcripts. The subtype-specific nature of lncRNAs suggests they may be suitable clinical biomarkers to guide risk stratification and targeted therapies in pre-B cALL patients. PMID:28346506

  19. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-08-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18-30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone.

  20. Specific expression of novel long non-coding RNAs in high-hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Mathieu; Drouin, Simon; Caron, Maxime; St-Onge, Pascal; Ouimet, Manon; Gioia, Romain; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Vidal, Ramon; Richer, Chantal; Oualkacha, Karim; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pre-B cell childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B cALL) is a heterogeneous disease involving many subtypes typically stratified using a combination of cytogenetic and molecular-based assays. These methods, although widely used, rely on the presence of known chromosomal translocations, which is a limiting factor. There is therefore a need for robust, sensitive, and specific molecular biomarkers unaffected by such limitations that would allow better risk stratification and consequently better clinical outcome. In this study we performed a transcriptome analysis of 56 pre-B cALL patients to identify expression signatures in different subtypes. In both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), we identified subtype-specific gene signatures distinguishing pre-B cALL subtypes, particularly in t(12;21) and hyperdiploid cases. The genes up-regulated in pre-B cALL subtypes were enriched in bivalent chromatin marks in their promoters. LncRNAs is a new and under-studied class of transcripts. The subtype-specific nature of lncRNAs suggests they may be suitable clinical biomarkers to guide risk stratification and targeted therapies in pre-B cALL patients.

  1. The Impact of Prospective Telemedicine Implementation in the Management of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Francisco; Shaikh, Faisal; Rivera, Gaston; Ribeiro, Raul; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim

    2017-04-19

    A gap in childhood cancer outcomes remains between developed and developing countries. Persistence of this gap may be caused by financial, social, or educational disparities. Twinning and distance learning initiatives may improve such disparities. Integrating telemedicine into pediatric oncology twinning programs enhances education and facilitates patient-centered capacity building. We performed an analysis of Web-based meetings held from August 2005 through July 2009 between the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the Instituto Materno Infantil de Pernambuco (IMIP) in Recife, Brazil. We determined the effect of these online conferences on the development and implementation of an innovative protocol for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at IMIP. Meetings occurred in 45 months of the 48-month study period with an average of two meetings per month. A total of 163 new patients were discussed during the study period; we retrieved documentation of patient-related discussions for 147 of them, constituting 286 discussions. On average, each patient was discussed 1.9 times (range, 1-15 discussions/patient). Compared with that of the era predating the online meetings (1993-2005), overall mortality, early death, and relapse of patients with ALL decreased after the telemedicine program was instituted at IMIP. Personal dedication and institutional support are essential for successful telemedicine initiatives. Documentation and archival of meetings are important for accurately measuring outcomes and developing methods for improved care. Integration of telemedicine into twinning programs facilitates communication about interventions, leading to improved outcomes of pediatric patients with cancer.

  2. Absolute lymphocyte count at the end of induction therapy is a prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Takahashi, Hironobu; Moriwaki, Kensuke; Saito, Atsuro; Kozaki, Aiko; Ishida, Toshiaki; Yanai, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kubokawa, Ikuko; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have reported that the absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) during induction therapy is predictive of treatment outcome in de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, the significance of ALC on outcomes remains controversial. In the present study, we assessed the significance of ALC at day 29 (ALC-29), the end of induction therapy, on outcomes in our Japanese cohort. The outcomes of 141 patients aged ≤18 years with newly diagnosed ALL who were enrolled on the JACLS ALL-02 at our hospitals were analyzed in terms of ALC-29. Patients with ALC-29 ≥750/μL (n = 81) had a superior 5-year EFS (95.2 ± 2.7 vs 84.3 ± 4.8 %, P = 0.016) and OS (100 vs 87.0 ± 4.7 %, P = 0.0062). A multivariate analysis identified ALC-29 ≥750/μL as a significant predictor of improved EFS and OS after controlling for confounding factors. A multiple linear regression model revealed a significant inverse relationship between the percentage of blasts in bone marrow on day 15 and ALC-29 (P = 0.005). These results indicate that ALC is a simple prognostic factor in childhood ALL, and, thus, has the potential to refine current risk algorithms.

  3. Early evaluation of immune reconstitution following allogeneic CD3/CD19-depleted grafts from alternative donors in childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, A; González-Vicent, M; Valentín, J; Aleo, E; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J; Vicario, J L; Ramírez, M; Díaz, M A

    2012-11-01

    Graft engineering procedures for hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) may improve the chance of success in matched unrelated donor (MUD) and haploidentical donor transplantations. Successful donor immune reconstitution is important to mediate GVL effects in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT. We prospectively investigated early immune reconstitution and clinical outcome in 30 CD3/CD19-depleted MUD (n=15) or HP (n=15) HSCTs for high-risk childhood leukemia using a fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy. The graft consisted of a mean of 10.5 × 10(6)/kg CD34+, 77 × 10(3)/kg CD3+ and 39 × 10(6)/kg CD56+ cells. After transplantation, 86% of the patients engrafted. In all, 13% of patients had >grade 3 acute GVHD. Natural killer (NK) cell, DC and T-cell recovery achieved normal values within the first 60 days after transplantation. DC recovery was dominated by the DC2(-) subset. NK-cell phenotype was altered and cytotoxicity was lower compared with their donors. EFS was 50±9% (73±11% for those in CR1 and 26±11% for those with advanced disease). Faster DC2(-) recovery was associated with better outcome, especially in the MUD setting. In summary, CD3/CD19-depleted HSCT with fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy resulted in favorable patient survival, and rapid NK, DC and T-cell recovery.

  4. Cytotoxic T cell response against the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yotnda, P; Garcia, F; Peuchmaur, M; Grandchamp, B; Duval, M; Lemonnier, F; Vilmer, E; Langlade-Demoyen, P

    1998-07-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are potent effector cells that could provide long term antitumor immunity if induced by appropriate vaccines. CTL recognize 8-14 amino acid-long peptides processed intracellularly and presented by MHC class I molecules. A well-characterized example of a potential tumor antigen in childhood pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) results from the chromosomal translocation 12;21 leading to the fusion of the ETV6 and AML1 genes. This translocation is observed in > 25% of ALL-patients. In this study, we have examined whether the chimeric ETV6-AML1 protein could serve as a tumor specific antigen for CTL in HLA-A2.1 individuals. We have identified a nonapeptide (RIAECILGM), encoded by the fusion region of the ETV6-AML1 protein, that binds to HLA-A2.1 molecules and induces specific primary CTL in peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors. These CTL specifically lysed HLA-A2.1 tumor cells endogeneously expressing the ETV6-AML fusion protein. CTL with similar functional capacities were found with high frequencies and cloned from one patient's bone marrow indicating that ETV6-AML1-specific anti-ALL CTL are, at least in some patients, spontaneously stimulated and might participate to host antileukemia defense.

  5. Adverse neuropsychological effects associated with cumulative doses of corticosteroids to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Pépin, A J; Cloutier-Bergeron, A; Malboeuf-Hurtubise, C; Achille, M; Krajinovic, M; Laverdière, C; Lippé, S; Marcoux, S; Sinnett, D; Sultan, S

    2016-11-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) are an essential component of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatments (cALL). Although there is evidence that daily doses of CS can have neuropsychological effects, few studies have investigated the role of cumulative doses of CS in short- and long-term neuropsychological effects in cALL. The aims of this review were to identify the measures used for documenting adverse neuropsychological effects (ANEs) of CS treatment and to study the association between cumulative doses of CS and the presence of ANEs. Twenty-two articles met the inclusion criteria. A variety of measures were used to evaluate outcomes in the domains of emotion, behaviour, neurocognition, and fatigue/sleep. The results suggest that we cannot conclude in favour of an association between the cumulative dosage of CS and ANEs. Yet, several factors including the heterogeneity of measures used to evaluate outcomes and reporting biases may limit the scope of the results. We offer several recommendations that could help improve the future published evidence on ANEs in relation to CS treatment in cALL.

  6. Prognostic value of MRD-dynamics in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the MB-2002/2008 protocols.

    PubMed

    Meleshko, Alexander N; Savva, Natalia N; Fedasenka, Uladzimir U; Romancova, Alexandra S; Krasko, Olga V; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2011-10-01

    Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) during the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by RQ-PCR analysis of clonal Ig/TCR rearrangements is used for risk group stratification in European treatment protocols. In Belarus patients with childhood ALL are treated according to ALL-MB protocols, which do not use MRD-based risk stratification. To evaluate the prognostic significance of MRD for ALL-MB-2002/2008 protocols, MRD was quantified by RQ-PCR in 68 ALL patients at four time points: on day 15, on day 36, before and after maintenance therapy (MT). MRD positivity, as well as quantitative level of MRD were analyzed and compared between patients who stayed in remission and relapsed. Relapse-free survival revealed to be significantly associated with MRD levels at different time points. Unfavorable prognosis was shown for MRD≥10(-3) on day 36 (p<0.001), and any positive MRD before (p<0.001) and after (p=0.001) MT. Multivariate Cox regression analysis proved MRD as independent significant prognosis factor at day 36 (p=0.005) and before MT (p=0.001). We conclude, that MRD quantified by RQ-PCR in children with ALL treated with ALL-MB protocols is feasible and independently associated with outcome. MRD may be a suitable parameter for treatment stratification in MB protocols in future.

  7. Polymorphisms of ABCC5 and NOS3 genes influence doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krajinovic, M; Elbared, J; Drouin, S; Bertout, L; Rezgui, A; Ansari, M; Raboisson, M-J; Lipshultz, S E; Silverman, L B; Sallan, S E; Neuberg, D S; Kutok, J L; Laverdière, C; Sinnett, D; Andelfinger, G

    2016-11-01

    Anthracyclines are efficient chemotherapy agents. However, their use is limited by anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (CT). We investigated the influence of polymorphisms in doxorubicin metabolic and functional pathways on late-onset CT as estimated by echocardiography in 251 childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL) patients. Association analyses revealed a modulating effect of two variants: A-1629 T in ABCC5, an ATP-binding cassette transporter, and G894T in the NOS3 endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene. Individuals with the ABCC5 TT-1629 genotype had an average of 8-12% reduction of ejection (EF) and shortening fractions (SF; EF: P<0.0001, and SF: P=0.001, respectively). A protective effect of the NOS3 TT894 genotype on EF was seen in high-risk patients (P=0.02), especially in those who did not receive dexrazoxane (P=0.002). Analysis of an additional cohort of 44 cALL patients replicated the ABCC5 association but was underpowered for NOS3. In summary, we identified two biomarkers that may contribute to cALL anthracycline CT risk stratification.

  8. Polymorphism in multidrug resistance-associated protein gene 3 is associated with outcomes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M; Sauty, G; Labuda, M; Gagné, V; Rousseau, J; Moghrabi, A; Laverdière, C; Sinnett, D; Krajinovic, M

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug resistance-related proteins (MRPs) 2, 3 and 5 are involved in the efflux of drugs used in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Polymorphisms of these genes were investigated for an association with treatment responses in 273 childhood ALL patients. The MRP3 A-189 allele of the regulatory AT polymorphism was associated with reduced event-free survival (P=0.01). The results remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons and in the multivariate analysis. Among patients with an event, the A-189 carriers had significantly higher methotrexate plasma levels (P=0.03). MRP3 A-189 also conferred four times higher risk of a relapse in central nervous system (P=0.01). Patients with this allele tended to have lower frequency of thrombocytopenia grade 2 (P=0.06). Gene reporter assay showed that the haplotype tagged by the A-189 had higher promoter activity (P≤0.01). In conclusion, MRP3 A-189 T polymorphism was associated with treatment responses in ALL, likely due to the change in MRP3 efflux.

  9. DNA variants in region for noncoding interfering transcript of dihydrofolate reductase gene and outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shakfa, Fidaa; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Brukner, Ivan; Milacic, Iva; Ansari, Marc; Beaulieu, Patrick; Moghrabi, Albert; Laverdière, Caroline; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Neuberg, Donna; Kutok, Jeffery L; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja

    2009-11-15

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the major target of methotrexate, a key component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. We recently reported an association of DHFR promoter polymorphisms with ALL outcome. Lower event-free survival correlated with haplotype *1, defined by A(-317) and C(-1610) alleles. Haplotype *1 was also associated higher DHFR expression. Here, we analyzed adjacent 400-bp region participating in DHFR regulation as both a major promoter and a noncoding minor transcript. Six polymorphisms were identified, of which five were single nucleotide polymorphisms and one was length polymorphism composed of variable number of 9-bp elements and 9-bp insertion/deletion. Haplotype analysis including all promoter polymorphisms revealed diversification of haplotype *1 into five subtypes (*1a-*1e). DNA variations of major promoter/noncoding transcript region and haplotype *1 subtypes were subsequently analyzed for the association with ALL outcome. Lower event-free survival was associated with an A allele of G(308)A polymorphism (P = 0.02) and with *1b haplotype (P = 0.01). This association was particularly striking in high-risk patients (P = 0.001) and was subsequently confirmed in independent patient cohort (P = 0.02). Haplotype *1b was the only haplotype *1 subtype associated with higher mRNA levels. The study provides a new insight into DHFR regulatory variations predisposing to an event in ALL patients.

  10. Chemokines and relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A role in migration and in resistance to antileukemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Ana M; Martínez, Carolina; González, Miguel; Luque, Alfonso; Melen, Gustavo J; Martínez, Jesús; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Lassaletta, Álvaro; Madero, Luís; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We studied whether chemokines may have a role in relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We compared the levels of chemokine receptors in marrow samples from 82 children with ALL at diagnosis versus 15 at relapses, and quantified the levels of chemokines in central system fluid (CSF) samples. The functional role of specific chemokines was studied in vitro and in vivo. The expression of some chemokine receptors was upregulated upon leukemic relapse, both in B- and in T-ALL, and in cases of medullary and extramedullary involvement. CXCL10 induced chemotaxis in leukemic cell lines and in primary leukemic cells, depending upon the levels of CXCR3 expression. CXCL10 specifically diminished chemotherapy-induced apoptosis on ALL cells expressing CXCR3, partially inhibiting caspase activation and maintaining the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, immunodeficient mice engrafted with CXCR3-expressing human leukemic cells showed decreased infiltration of marrow, spleen, and CNS after receiving a CXCR3-antagonist molecule. CXCR3 signaling in ALL may have a dual function: chemotactic for the localisation of leukemic blasts in specific niches, and it may also confer resistance to chemotherapy, enhancing the chances for relapses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, J J; Parker, G S; Rosen, S; Prenney, B; Healey, R; Caldwell, G G

    1986-01-01

    Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents. PMID:3083476

  12. Long-term results of the Japanese Childhood Cancer and Leukemia Study Group studies 811, 841, 874 and 911 on childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, M; Shimomura, Y; Asami, K; Kikuta, A; Watanabe, A; Horikoshi, Y; Matsushita, T; Kanegane, H; Ohta, S; Iwai, A; Mugishima, H; Koizumi, S

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed the long-term outcomes of 1021 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), enrolled in four successive clinical trials (ALL811, ALL841, ALL874 and ALL911) between 1981 and 1993. All patients received risk-adopted therapy according to leukocyte count and age at the time of diagnosis. The median follow-up durations of the four studies were 17.8 years in ALL811, 15.5 years in ALL841, 11.9 years in ALL874 and 15.8 years in ALL911. Patients' event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates at 12 years were 41.0 and 54.3% in ALL811, 50.2 and 60.2% in ALL841, 57.3 and 64.7% in ALL874, and 63.4 and 71.7% in ALL911, respectively. Thus, cure can become a reality for about 70% of children with ALL. There is, however, still a significant difference in survival outcomes according to risk group. Late effects were observed in 70 patients out of 834 (8.4%); hepatitis and short stature were most commonly reported. Reduction of late adverse effects for all patients and development of new treatment strategies for very-high-risk patients are major issues for upcoming trials to address.

  13. Evaluation of Memory Impairment in Aging Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Cranial Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranial radiotherapy (CRT) is a known risk factor for neurocognitive impairment in survivors of childhood cancer and may increase risk for mild cognitive impairment and dementia in adulthood. Methods We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with 18 Gy (n = 127) or 24 Gy (n = 138) CRT. Impairment (age-adjusted score >1 standard deviation below expected mean, two-sided exact binomial test) on the Wechsler Memory Scale IV (WMS-IV) was measured. A subset of survivors (n = 85) completed structural and functional neuroimaging. Results Survivors who received 24 Gy, but not 18 Gy, CRT had impairment in immediate (impairment rate = 33.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 25.9% to 42.4%; P < .001) and delayed memory (impairment rate = 30.2%, 95% CI = 22.6% to 38.6%; P < .001). The mean score for long-term narrative memory among survivors who received 24 Gy CRT was equivalent to that for individuals older than 69 years. Impaired immediate memory was associated with smaller right (P = .02) and left (P = .008) temporal lobe volumes, and impaired delayed memory was associated with thinner parietal and frontal cortices. Lower hippocampal volumes and increased functional magnetic resonance imaging activation were observed with memory impairment. Reduced cognitive status (Brief Cognitive Status Exam from the WMS-IV) was identified after 24 Gy (18.5%, 95% CI = 12.4% to 26.1%; P < .001), but not 18 Gy (8.7%, 95% CI = 4.4% to 15.0%; P = .11), CRT, suggesting a dose–response effect. Employment rates were equivalent (63.8% for 24 Gy CRT and 63.0% for 18 Gy CRT). Conclusions Adult survivors who received 24 Gy CRT had reduced cognitive status and memory, with reduced integrity in neuroanatomical regions essential in memory formation, consistent with early onset mild cognitive impairment. PMID:23584394

  14. Insulin Resistance and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Victor, Ronald G.; Church, Timothy S.; Snell, Peter G.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A.; Ross, Robert; Janiszewski, Peter M.; Turoff, Alicia J.; Brooks, Sandra; Vega, Gloria Lena

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of insulin resistance and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional evaluation of 118 survivors of childhood ALL (median age, 23.0 years; range, 18 to 37 years), insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Sex-specific comparisons were made with a cohort of 30- to 37-year-old individuals from the same region participating in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS, N = 782). ALL survivors were stratified by treatment with and without cranial radiotherapy (CRT). Results Female ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.6, 95% CI, 3.6 to 5.7; no CRT, mean 3.3, 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.8) in comparison with DHS women (mean 2.4, 95% CI, 2.2 to 2.7). Eighty percent of women treated with CRT had at least three of six CVD risk factors, and they were significantly more likely to have three or more risk factors compared with DHS women (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 2.15 to 16.47). Male ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.0, 95% CI, 2.8 to 5.6; no CRT, mean 3.4, 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.9) in comparison with DHS men (mean 2.3, 95% CI, 2.1 to 2.6), but were not more likely to have multiple CVD risk factors. Conclusion ALL survivors had an increased prevalence of insulin resistance in comparison with a cohort of older individuals from the same community. Importantly, women treated with CRT seem to have an increased prevalence of multiple CVD risk factors, warranting close monitoring and risk-reducing strategies. PMID:19564534

  15. ARID5B Genetic Polymorphisms Contribute to Racial Disparities in the Incidence and Treatment Outcome of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Cheng, Cheng; Devidas, Meenakshi; Pei, Deqing; Fan, Yiping; Yang, Wenjian; Neale, Geoff; Scheet, Paul; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Eng, Celeste; Dean, Michael; Antillon, Frederico; Winick, Naomi J.; Martin, Paul L.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Reaman, Gregory H.; Carroll, William L.; Loh, Mignon; Evans, William E.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hunger, Stephen P.; Relling, Mary V.; Yang, Jun J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Recent genome-wide screens have identified genetic variations in ARID5B associated with susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We sought to determine the contribution of ARID5B single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to racial disparities in ALL susceptibility and treatment outcome. Patients and Methods We compared the association between ARID5B SNP genotype and ALL susceptibility in whites (> 95% European genetic ancestry; 978 cases and 1,046 controls) versus in Hispanics (> 10% Native American ancestry; 330 cases and 541 controls). We determined the relationships between ARID5B SNP genotype and ALL relapse risk in 1,605 children treated on the Children's Oncology Group (COG) P9904/9905 clinical trials. Results Among 49 ARID5B SNPs interrogated, 10 were significantly associated with ALL susceptibility in both whites and Hispanics (P < .05), with risk alleles consistently more frequent in Hispanics than in whites. rs10821936 exhibited the most significant association in both races (P = 8.4 × 10−20 in whites; P = 1 × 10−6 in Hispanics), and genotype at this SNP was highly correlated with local Native American genetic ancestry (P = 1.8 × 10−8). Multivariate analyses in Hispanics identified an additional SNP associated with ALL susceptibility independent of rs10821936. Eight ARID5B SNPs were associated with both ALL susceptibility and relapse hazard; the alleles related to higher ALL incidence were always linked to poorer treatment outcome and were more frequent in Hispanics. Conclusion ARID5B polymorphisms are important determinants of childhood ALL susceptibility and treatment outcome, and they contribute to racial disparities in this disease. PMID:22291082

  16. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols.

  17. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols. PMID:25254091

  18. Longitudinal Assessment of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on a Contemporary Chemotherapy Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Conklin, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with CNS-directed chemotherapy are at risk for neurocognitive deficits. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the neurodevelopmental trajectory in this vulnerable population. Methods Patients enrolled in the St. Jude Total Therapy Study XV, which omitted prophylactic cranial radiation therapy in all patients, completed comprehensive neuropsychological assessments at induction (n = 142), end of maintenance (n = 243), and 2 years after completion of therapy (n = 211). We report on longitudinal change in neurocognitive function and predictors of neurocognitive outcomes 2 years after completing therapy. Results Neurocognitive function was largely age appropriate 2 years after completing therapy; however, the overall group demonstrated significant attention deficits and a significantly greater frequency of learning problems as compared with national normative data (all P ≤ .005). Higher-intensity CNS-directed chemotherapy conferred elevated risk for difficulties in attention, processing speed, and academics (all P ≤ .01). The rate and direction of change in performance and caregiver-reported attention difficulties differed significantly by age at diagnosis and sex. End-of-therapy attention problems predicted lower academic scores 2 years later, with small to moderate effect sizes (│r│= 0.17 to 0.25, all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Two years after chemotherapy-only treatment, neurocognitive function is largely age appropriate. Nonetheless, survivors remain at elevated risk for attention problems that impact real-world functioning. Attention problems at the end of therapy predicted decreased academics 2 years later, suggesting an amplified functional impact of discrete neurocognitive difficulties. Age at diagnosis and patient sex may alter neurocognitive development in survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy-only protocols. PMID:26858334

  19. Long-Term Effect of Cranial Radiotherapy on Pituitary-Hypothalamus Area in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Follin, Cecilia; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2016-09-01

    Survival rates of childhood cancer have improved markedly, and today more than 80 % of those diagnosed with a pediatric malignancy will become 5-year survivors. Nevertheless, survivors exposed to cranial radiotherapy (CRT) are at particularly high risk for long-term morbidity, such as endocrine insufficiencies, metabolic complications, and cardiovascular morbidity. Deficiencies of one or more anterior pituitary hormones have been described following therapeutic CRT for primary brain tumors, nasopharyngeal tumors, and following prophylactic CRT for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Studies have consistently shown a strong correlation between the total radiation dose and the development of pituitary deficits. Further, age at treatment and also time since treatment has strong implications on pituitary hormone deficiencies. There is evidence that the hypothalamus is more radiosensitive than the pituitary and is damaged by lower doses of CRT. With doses of CRT <50 Gy, the primary site of radiation damage is the hypothalamus and this usually causes isolated GH deficiency (GHD). Higher doses (>50 Gy) may produce direct anterior pituitary damage, which contributes to multiple pituitary deficiencies. The large group of ALL survivors treated with CRT in the 70-80-ties has now reached adulthood, and these survivors were treated mainly with 24 Gy, and the vast majority of these patients suffer from GHD. Further, after long-term follow-up, insufficiencies in prolactin (PRL) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been reported and a proportion of these patients were also adrenocoticotrophic hormone (ACTH) deficient. CRT to the hypothalamus causes neuroendocrine dysfunction, which means that the choice of GH test is crucial for the diagnosis of GHD.

  20. Heterogeneous cytogenetic subgroups and outcomes in childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia: a retrospective international study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yinmei; Abla, Oussama; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; de Bont, Eveline; Chang, Tai-Tsung; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Elitzur, Sarah; Fynn, Alcira; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Liang, Der-Cherng; Lee, Vincent; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; De Moerloose, Barbara; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rodriguez, Laura; Van Roy, Nadine; Shen, Shuhong; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Yeoh, Allen E. J.; Zimmermann, Martin; Raimondi, Susana C.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive clinical studies of patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) are lacking. We performed an international retrospective study on 490 patients (age ≤18 years) with non–Down syndrome de novo AMKL diagnosed from 1989 to 2009. Patients with AMKL (median age 1.53 years) comprised 7.8% of pediatric AML. Five-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 43.7% ± 2.7% and 49.0% ± 2.7%, respectively. Patients diagnosed in 2000 to 2009 were treated with higher cytarabine doses and had better EFS (P = .037) and OS (P = .003) than those diagnosed in 1989 to 1999. Transplantation in first remission did not improve survival. Cytogenetic data were available for 372 (75.9%) patients: hypodiploid (n = 18, 4.8%), normal karyotype (n = 49, 13.2%), pseudodiploid (n = 119, 32.0%), 47 to 50 chromosomes (n = 142, 38.2%), and >50 chromosomes (n = 44, 11.8%). Chromosome gain occurred in 195 of 372 (52.4%) patients: +21 (n = 106, 28.5%), +19 (n = 93, 25.0%), +8 (n = 77, 20.7%). Losses occurred in 65 patients (17.5%): –7 (n = 13, 3.5%). Common structural chromosomal aberrations were t(1;22)(p13;q13) (n = 51, 13.7%) and 11q23 rearrangements (n = 38, 10.2%); t(9;11)(p22;q23) occurred in 21 patients. On the basis of frequency and prognosis, AMKL can be classified to 3 risk groups: good risk—7p abnormalities; poor risk—normal karyotypes, –7, 9p abnormalities including t(9;11)(p22;q23)/MLL-MLLT3, –13/13q-, and –15; and intermediate risk—others including t(1;22)(p13;q13)/OTT-MAL (RBM15-MKL1) and 11q23/MLL except t(9;11). Risk-based innovative therapy is needed to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26215111

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    BADR, MOHAMED AHMED; HASSAN, TAMER HASAN; EL-GERBY, KHALED MOHAMED; LAMEY, MOHAMED EL-SAYED

    2013-01-01

    The issue of delayed neurological damage as a result of treatment is becoming increasingly important now that an increased number of children survive treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Following modification of the treatment protocols, severe symptomatic late effects are rare, and most adverse effects are detected by sensitive imaging methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or by neuropsychological testing. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of late central nervous system (CNS) damage by MRI and clinical examination in children treated for ALL. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the pediatric oncology unit of Zagazig University, Egypt, and included 25 patients who were consecutively enrolled and treated according to the modified Children’s Cancer Group (CCG) 1991 protocol for standard risk ALL and the modified CCG 1961 protocol for high-risk ALL and who had survived more than 5 years from the diagnosis. All relevant data were collected from patients’ medical records; particularly the data concerning the initial clinical presentation and initial brain imaging. All patients were subjected to thorough history and full physical examination with special emphasis on the neurological system. MRI of the brain was performed for all patients. The mean age of patients was 6.9±3.04 years at diagnosis and was 12.9±3.2 years at the time of study. The patients comprised 14 boys and 11 girls. Abnormal MRI findings were detected in six patients (24%). They were in the form of leukoencephalopathy in two patients (8%), brain atrophy in two patients (8%), old infarct in one patient (4%) and old hemorrhage in one patient (4%). The number of abnormal MRI findings was significantly higher in high-risk patients, patients who had CNS manifestations at diagnosis and patients who had received cranial irradiation. We concluded that cranial irradiation is associated with higher incidence of MRI changes in children

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Badr, Mohamed Ahmed; Hassan, Tamer Hasan; El-Gerby, Khaled Mohamed; Lamey, Mohamed El-Sayed

    2013-02-01

    The issue of delayed neurological damage as a result of treatment is becoming increasingly important now that an increased number of children survive treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Following modification of the treatment protocols, severe symptomatic late effects are rare, and most adverse effects are detected by sensitive imaging methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or by neuropsychological testing. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of late central nervous system (CNS) damage by MRI and clinical examination in children treated for ALL. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the pediatric oncology unit of Zagazig University, Egypt, and included 25 patients who were consecutively enrolled and treated according to the modified Children's Cancer Group (CCG) 1991 protocol for standard risk ALL and the modified CCG 1961 protocol for high-risk ALL and who had survived more than 5 years from the diagnosis. All relevant data were collected from patients' medical records; particularly the data concerning the initial clinical presentation and initial brain imaging. All patients were subjected to thorough history and full physical examination with special emphasis on the neurological system. MRI of the brain was performed for all patients. The mean age of patients was 6.9±3.04 years at diagnosis and was 12.9±3.2 years at the time of study. The patients comprised 14 boys and 11 girls. Abnormal MRI findings were detected in six patients (24%). They were in the form of leukoencephalopathy in two patients (8%), brain atrophy in two patients (8%), old infarct in one patient (4%) and old hemorrhage in one patient (4%). The number of abnormal MRI findings was significantly higher in high-risk patients, patients who had CNS manifestations at diagnosis and patients who had received cranial irradiation. We concluded that cranial irradiation is associated with higher incidence of MRI changes in children treated

  3. Heterogeneous cytogenetic subgroups and outcomes in childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia: a retrospective international study.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hiroto; Zhou, Yinmei; Abla, Oussama; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H Berna; de Bont, Eveline; Chang, Tai-Tsung; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Elitzur, Sarah; Fynn, Alcira; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Liang, Der-Cherng; Lee, Vincent; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; De Moerloose, Barbara; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rodriguez, Laura; Van Roy, Nadine; Shen, Shuhong; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Yeoh, Allen E J; Zimmermann, Martin; Raimondi, Susana C

    2015-09-24

    Comprehensive clinical studies of patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) are lacking. We performed an international retrospective study on 490 patients (age ≤18 years) with non-Down syndrome de novo AMKL diagnosed from 1989 to 2009. Patients with AMKL (median age 1.53 years) comprised 7.8% of pediatric AML. Five-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 43.7% ± 2.7% and 49.0% ± 2.7%, respectively. Patients diagnosed in 2000 to 2009 were treated with higher cytarabine doses and had better EFS (P = .037) and OS (P = .003) than those diagnosed in 1989 to 1999. Transplantation in first remission did not improve survival. Cytogenetic data were available for 372 (75.9%) patients: hypodiploid (n = 18, 4.8%), normal karyotype (n = 49, 13.2%), pseudodiploid (n = 119, 32.0%), 47 to 50 chromosomes (n = 142, 38.2%), and >50 chromosomes (n = 44, 11.8%). Chromosome gain occurred in 195 of 372 (52.4%) patients: +21 (n = 106, 28.5%), +19 (n = 93, 25.0%), +8 (n = 77, 20.7%). Losses occurred in 65 patients (17.5%): -7 (n = 13, 3.5%). Common structural chromosomal aberrations were t(1;22)(p13;q13) (n = 51, 13.7%) and 11q23 rearrangements (n = 38, 10.2%); t(9;11)(p22;q23) occurred in 21 patients. On the basis of frequency and prognosis, AMKL can be classified to 3 risk groups: good risk-7p abnormalities; poor risk-normal karyotypes, -7, 9p abnormalities including t(9;11)(p22;q23)/MLL-MLLT3, -13/13q-, and -15; and intermediate risk-others including t(1;22)(p13;q13)/OTT-MAL (RBM15-MKL1) and 11q23/MLL except t(9;11). Risk-based innovative therapy is needed to improve patient outcomes. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Neurologic morbidity and quality of life in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raja B.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ledet, Davonna S.; Morris, E. Brannon; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.; Krull, Kevin R.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Crom, Debbie; Browne, Emily; Zhu, Liang; Rai, Shesh; Srivastava, Deokumar; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with potentially neurotoxic drugs and neurologic complications in long-term survivors are inadequately studied. This study investigated neurologic morbidity and its effect on quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Methods Prospective, single institution, cross-sectional, institutional review board-approved study of long-term ALL survivors. Participants were recruited from institutional clinics. Participants answered an investigator-administered questionnaire followed by evaluation by a neurologist. Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed. Results Of the 162 participants recruited over a 3-year period, 83.3 % reported at least one neurologic symptom of interest, 16.7 % had single symptom, 11.1 % had two symptoms, and 55.6 % had three or more symptoms. Symptoms were mild and disability was low in the majority of participants with neurologic symptoms. Median age at ALL diagnosis was 3.9 years (0.4–18.6), median age at study enrollment was 15.7 years (6.9–28.9), and median time from completion of ALL therapy was 7.4 years (1.9–20.3). On multivariable analyses, female sex correlated with presence of dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, and neuropathy; use of≥10 doses of triple intrathecal chemotherapy correlated with uri-nary incontinence, back pain, and neuropathy; cranial radiation with ataxia; history of ALL relapse with fatigue; and CNS leukemia at diagnosis with seizures. Decline in mental QOL was associated with migraine and tension type headaches, while physical QOL was impaired by presence of dizziness and falls. Overall, good QOL and physical function was maintained by a majority of participants. Conclusions Neurologic symptoms were present in 83 % long-term ALL survivors. Symptoms related morbidity and QOL impairment is low in majority of survivors. Female sex, ≥10 doses of intrathecal chemotherapy, and history of ALL relapse predispose to impaired QOL

  5. Small molecule XIAP inhibitors cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells and overcome Bcl-2-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Fakler, Melanie; Loeder, Sandra; Vogler, Meike; Schneider, Katja; Jeremias, Irmela; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2009-02-19

    Defects in apoptosis contribute to poor outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), calling for novel strategies that counter apoptosis resistance. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that small molecule inhibitors of the antiapoptotic protein XIAP cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis in childhood acute leukemia cells. XIAP inhibitors at subtoxic concentrations, but not a structurally related control compound, synergize with TRAIL to trigger apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of acute leukemia cells, whereas they do not affect viability of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting some tumor selectivity. Analysis of signaling pathways reveals that XIAP inhibitors enhance TRAIL-induced activation of caspases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release in a caspase-dependent manner, indicating that they promote a caspase-dependent feedback mitochondrial amplification loop. Of note, XIAP inhibitors even overcome Bcl-2-mediated resistance to TRAIL by enhancing Bcl-2 cleavage and Bak conformational change. Importantly, XIAP inhibitors kill leukemic blasts from children with ALL ex vivo and cooperate with TRAIL to induce apoptosis. In vivo, they significantly reduce leukemic burden in a mouse model of pediatric ALL engrafted in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Thus, XIAP inhibitors present a promising novel approach for apoptosis-based therapy of childhood ALL.

  6. Comparative study of quality of life of adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Clélia Marta Casellato; Cristofani, Lilian Maria; Cornacchioni, Ana Lucia Beltrati; Odone, Vicente; Kuczynski, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze and compare the health-related quality of life of adult survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor amongst themselves and in relation to healthy participants. Methods Ninety participants aged above 18 years were selected and divided into three groups, each comprising 30 individuals. The Control Group was composed of physically healthy subjects, with no cancer history; and there were two experimental groups: those diagnosed as acute lymphocytic leukemia, and those as Wilms’ Tumor. Quality of life was assessed over the telephone, using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results Male survivors presented with better results as compared to female survivors and controls in the Vitality domain, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (p=0.042) and Wilms’ tumor (p=0.013). For acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, in Social aspects (p=0.031), Mental health (p=0.041), and Emotional aspects (p=0.040), the latter also for survivors of Wilms’ tumor (p=0.040). The best results related to the Functional capacity domain were recorded for the experimental group that had a late diagnosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia. There were significant differences between groups except for the Social and Emotional domains for self-perceived health, with positive responses that characterized their health as good, very good, and excellent. Conclusion Survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia showed no evidence of relevant impairment of health-related quality of life. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (via telephone) can be a resource to access and evaluate survivors. PMID:26537509

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  8. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  13. Prevalence and predictors of anxiety and depression after completion of chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kunin-Batson, Alicia S; Lu, Xiaomin; Balsamo, Lyn; Graber, Kelsey; Devidas, Meenakshi; Hunger, Stephen P; Carroll, William L; Winick, Naomi J; Mattano, Leonard A; Maloney, Kelly W; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2016-05-15

    The months immediately after the completion of treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are often regarded as a stressful time for children and families. In this prospective, longitudinal study, the prevalence and predictors of anxiety and depressive symptoms after the completion of treatment were examined. Participants included 160 children aged 2 to 9 years with standard-risk ALL who were enrolled on Children's Oncology Group protocol AALL0331. Parents completed standardized rating scales of their children's emotional-behavioral functioning and measures of coping and family functioning at approximately 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months after diagnosis and again 3 months after the completion of chemotherapy. At 3 months off therapy, approximately 24% of survivors had at-risk/clinically elevated anxiety scores and 28% had elevated depression scores, which are significantly higher than the expected 15% in the general population (P = .028 and .001, respectively). Patients with elevated anxiety 1 month after diagnosis were at greater risk of off-therapy anxiety (odds ratio, 4.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-12.73 [P = .022]) and those with elevated depressive symptoms 6 months after diagnosis were at greater risk of off-therapy depression (odds ratio, 7.88; 95% confidence interval, 2.61-23.81 [P = .0002]). In adjusted longitudinal analyses, unhealthy family functioning (P = .008) and less reliance on social support coping (P = .009) were found to be associated with risk of emotional distress. Children from Spanish-speaking families (P = .05) also were found to be at a greater risk of distress. A significant percentage of children experience emotional distress during and after therapy for ALL. These data provide a compelling rationale for targeted early screening and psychosocial interventions to support family functioning and coping skills. Cancer 2016;122:1608-17. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  14. Integration of high-resolution methylome and transcriptome analyses to dissect epigenomic changes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Busche, Stephan; Ge, Bing; Vidal, Ramon; Spinella, Jean-François; Saillour, Virginie; Richer, Chantal; Healy, Jasmine; Chen, Shu-Huang; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel; Pastinen, Tomi

    2013-07-15

    B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Although the genetic determinants underlying disease onset remain unclear, epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation are suggested to contribute significantly to leukemogenesis. Using the Illumina 450K array, we assessed DNA methylation in matched tumor-normal samples of 46 childhood patients with pre-B ALL, extending single CpG-site resolution analysis of the pre-B ALL methylome beyond CpG-islands (CGI). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of CpG-site neighborhood, gene, or microRNA (miRNA) gene-associated methylation levels separated the tumor cohort according to major pre-B ALL subtypes, and methylation in CGIs, CGI shores, and in regions around the transcription start site was found to significantly correlate with transcript expression. Focusing on samples carrying the t(12;21) ETV6-RUNX1 fusion, we identified 119 subtype-specific high-confidence marker CpG-loci. Pathway analyses linked the CpG-loci-associated genes with hematopoiesis and cancer. Further integration with whole-transcriptome data showed the effects of methylation on expression of 17 potential drivers of leukemogenesis. Independent validation of array methylation and sequencing-derived transcript expression with Sequenom Epityper technology and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, respectively, indicates more than 80% empirical accuracy of our genome-wide findings. In summary, genome-wide DNA methylation profiling enabled us to separate pre-B ALL according to major subtypes, to map epigenetic biomarkers specific for the t(12;21) subtype, and through a combined methylome and transcriptome approach to identify downstream effects on candidate drivers of leukemogenesis.

  15. Weight change during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy predicts obesity: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Withycombe, Janice S; Smith, Lynette M; Meza, Jane L; Merkle, Carrie; Faulkner, Melissa Spezia; Ritter, Leslie; Seibel, Nita L; Moore, Ki

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a well documented problem associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with increasing body mass index often observed during therapy. This study aims to evaluate if weight gain, early in therapy, is predictive of obesity at the end of treatment. In this secondary analysis, data from 1,017 high-risk ALL patients previously treated on a Children's Oncology Group protocol (CCG study 1961) were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to examine whether change in BMI z-score at Induction or Delayed Intensification (DI) 1 were predictive of obesity at the end of therapy. The BMI z-score at the beginning of Induction and the change in BMI z-score during Induction were both significant predictors of obesity at the end of therapy. The change in BMI z-score during cycle 1 of DI was not found to be associated with obesity. It is well know that obesity at the beginning of therapy is predictive of obesity at the end of ALL therapy. The new, and more important, finding from this study is that even after adjusting for baseline weight, the increase in BMI z-scores during induction was an independent predictor of obesity at the end of therapy. Most researchers agree that prevention is the best form of treatment for obesity as it is difficult to reverse once it is present. This study suggests that monitoring weight trends during Induction may be useful in guiding healthcare practitioners in identifying which patients are at highest risk for obesity development so that early intervention may occur. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Allele of IKZF1 (Ikaros) Conferring Susceptibility to Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Protects Against Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Swafford, Austin D.-E.; Howson, Joanna M.M.; Davison, Lucy J.; Wallace, Chris; Smyth, Deborah J.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Maisuria-Armer, Meeta; Mistry, Trupti; Lenardo, Michael J.; Todd, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE IKZF1 encoding Ikaros, an essential regulator of lymphopoiesis and immune homeostasis, has been implicated in the development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (C-ALL). Because recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have linked a region of the 3′-UTR of IKZF1 with C-ALL susceptibility, we tested whether IKZF1 is associated with the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS rs10272724 (T>C) near IKZF1 at 7p12 was genotyped in 8,333 individuals with type 1 diabetes, 9,947 control subjects, and 3,997 families of European ancestry. Association was tested using logistic regression in the case-control data and by the transmission disequilibrium test in the families. Expression data for IKZF1 by rs10272724 genotype were obtained using quantitative PCR of mRNA/cDNA generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 88 individuals, whereas expression data for five other neighboring genes were obtained from the online Genevar dataset. RESULTS The minor allele of rs10272724 (C) was found to be protective from type 1 diabetes (odds ratio 0.87 [95% CI 0.83–0.91]; P = 1.1 × 10−11). rs10272724 was not correlated with levels of two transcripts of IKZF1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CONCLUSIONS The major susceptibility genotype for C-ALL confers protection from type 1 diabetes. Our finding strengthens the link between autoimmunity and lymphoid cancers. Further investigation is warranted for the genetic effect marked by rs10272724, its impact on IKZF1, and the role of Ikaros and other family members, Ailios (IKZF3) and Eos (IKZF4), in autoimmunity. PMID:21270240

  17. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Th Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25, 1.55) (using 2,785 cases and 3,635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases and 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases and 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases and 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases and 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases and 2,655 controls), respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants' exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate the associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood.

  18. Risk of hospitalization among survivors of childhood and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to siblings and a general population sample.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy Y; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Fluchel, Mark N; Sweeney, Carol; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-08-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) has a high survival rate, but cancer-related late effects in the early post-treatment years need documentation. Hospitalizations are an indicator of the burden of late effects. We identify rates and risk factors for hospitalization from five to ten years after diagnosis for childhood and adolescent ALL survivors compared to siblings and a matched population sample. 176 ALL survivors were diagnosed at ≤22 years between 1998 and 2008 and treated at an Intermountain Healthcare facility. The Utah Population Database identified siblings, an age- and sex-matched sample of the Utah population, and statewide inpatient hospital discharges. Sex- and birth year-adjusted Poisson models with Generalized Estimating Equations and robust standard errors calculated rates and rate ratios. Cox proportional hazards models identified demographic and clinical risk factors for hospitalizations among survivors. Hospitalization rates for survivors (Rate:3.76, 95% CI=2.22-6.36) were higher than siblings (Rate:2.69, 95% CI=1.01-7.18) and the population sample (Rate:1.87, 95% CI=1.13-3.09). Compared to siblings and population comparisons, rate ratios (RR) were significantly higher for survivors diagnosed between age 6 and 22 years (RR:2.87, 95% CI=1.03-7.97 vs siblings; RR:2.66, 95% CI=1.17-6.04 vs population comparisons). Rate ratios for diagnosis between 2004 and 2008 were significantly higher compared to the population sample (RR:4.29, 95% CI=1.49, 12.32), but not siblings (RR:2.73, 95% CI=0.54, 13.68). Survivors originally diagnosed with high-risk ALL did not have a significantly higher risk than siblings or population comparators. However, high-risk ALL survivors (Hazard ratio [HR]:3.36, 95% CI=1.33-8.45) and survivors diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 (HR:9.48, 95% CI=1.93-46.59) had the highest risk compared to their survivor counterparts. Five to ten years after diagnosis is a sensitive time period for hospitalizations in the ALL population. Survivors of

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. Radiation-induced World Health Organization grade II meningiomas in young patients following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood. Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Oda, Keiko; Sato, Taku; Watanabe, Tadashi; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Ito, Eiji; Matsumoto, Yuka; Ando, Hitoshi; Sakuma, Jun; Kikuta, Atsushi; Hojo, Hiroshi; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutic regimens have been used to successfully treat many children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but have resulted in an increased risk of late central nervous system tumors, most commonly meningioma, particularly in patients who have received cranial irradiation. We treated 3 young patients with World Health Organization grade II meningiomas who had previously received cranial irradiation for the treatment of childhood ALL: a cerebellopontine angle tumor in a 19-year-old woman, a petroclival tumor in a 28-year-old man, and a frontal parasagittal tumor in a 19-year-old woman. These cases were difficult to treat due to the aggressive and invasive biology of the tumors. Therefore, we recommend systematic cranial imaging and long follow-up periods for leukemia survivors to detect brain tumors before progression.

  1. Prognostic factors of childhood and adolescent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: evidence from four decades of US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li; Caywood, Emi H

    2015-10-01

    Growing insight into prognosis of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival has led to improved outcome over time and could be further enhanced through investigation using a large number of patients. To characterize the extent of the association of pediatric AML survival with its identified prognostic factors, we analyzed the United States population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) large dataset of 3442 pediatric AML patients diagnosed and followed between 1973 and 2011 using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified by year of diagnosis. Patients diagnosed between 10 and 19 years of age were at a higher risk of death compared to those diagnosed before age 10 (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.44). African Americans (1.27, 1.09-1.48) and Hispanics (1.15, 1.00-1.32) had an elevated risk of mortality than Caucasians. Compared to the subtype acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML with minimal differentiation (2.44, 1.78-3.35); acute erythroid leukemia (2.34, 1.60-3.40); AML without maturation (1.87, 1.35-2.59); and most other AML subtypes had a higher risk of mortality, whereas AML with inv(16) had a substantially lower risk. Age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity, AML subtype, county level poverty and geographic region appeared as significant prognostic factors of pediatric AML survival in the US. Contrary to previous findings, the subtypes of AML with t(9;11)(p22;q23)MLLT3-MLL, AML without maturation and acute myelomonocytic leukemia emerged to be indicative of poor outcome.

  2. Bacillus cereus Cerebral Abscess During Induction Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dabscheck, Gabriel; Silverman, Lewis; Ullrich, Nicole J

    2015-10-01

    A 5-year-old boy with standard-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic anemia developed fever during induction chemotherapy. The patient had no neurological symptoms. Blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus and neuroimaging studies demonstrated a cerebral abscess. Imaging changes resolved after completion of antibiotics. Bacillus cereus bacteremia is increasingly implicated as the cause of life-threatening infections, including cerebral abscesses, in compromised patients. Positive blood cultures for this organism should prompt neuroimaging and consideration of cerebrospinal fluid sampling, as well as catheter removal. Given the worse outcome with central nervous system involvement, there is a need for increased awareness and early diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised individuals.

  3. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  4. Randomized multicentric Italian study on two treatment regimens for marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M R; Masera, G; Zurlo, M G; Amadori, S; Mandelli, F; Bagnulo, S; Carli, M; Zanesco, L; Dini, G; Guazzelli, C

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a multicentric randomized clinical trial on the treatment of first hematological relapse in childhood ALL. Induction treatment consisted of vincristine, adriamycin, L-asparaginase, and prednisone. Patients achieving complete remission were randomized to two maintenance regimens (A and B). Regimen A consisted of five different drug associations including VM26 and IDMTX in a sequential schedule; Regimen B was essentially classical Spiers schedule for the first year, followed by a milder treatment. Eighty-four of 102 evaluable patients (82%) achieved second complete remission. The two maintenance regimens were similar as regards duration of second complete remission (median duration A, 32 weeks; B, 37 weeks) and toxicity. Better results were obtained in patients relapsing after 12 months from suspension of treatment in first complete remission than in those relapsing within the first year off therapy (82.8% vs. 31.4%). In group A fewer CNS relapses were reported. The two regimens produced results similar to those reported by other authors. The good prognosis in patients relapsing at least 1 year after treatment suspension in first complete remission must be emphasized.

  5. Focal cranial hyperostosis from meningioma: a complication from previous radiation treatment for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2014-03-01

    Nearly 75% of childhood cancer survivors will experience an adverse late effect from previous therapy. In patients previously treated with cranial irradiation, the late effect can manifest as secondary central nervous system tumors. Presented is a case of a 20 year man with a history of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed at age 22 months, treated with chemotherapy and cranial irradiation. He had developed increasing prominence of the top of his head over several months. Plain radiograph showed frontal calvarium thickening with focal "hair-on-end" periosteal reaction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing dural-based mass with transcalvarial extension, confirmed after resection to be meningioma (World Health Organization Grade I). This case illustrates an atypical presentation of a late effect of childhood cancer treatment and highlights the need to be informed about prior treatments received and potential attendant complications.

  6. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  7. [The problems of immunological diagnosis of childhood acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Pituch-Noworolska, Anna

    2003-01-01

    The immunophenotyping of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells is based on staining the cells with monoclonal antibodies against surface and cytoplasmic determinants followed with flow cytometry analysis. The problems of immuno-phenotyping are associated with technical difficulties, changes in expression of determinants and the rare types of leukaemia and haematological disorders typical for newborns and infants. The lack of blast cells within cell suspension obtained for test may be the result of bone marrow disorder (aplastic anaemia, preleukaemic cytopenia) or technical pitfall. The changed expression of determinants on blastic cells observed as weak expression or overexpression or atypical combination of determinants requires a careful interpretation. In the diagnosis of rare types of acute leukaemia (e.g. erythroleukaemia, megakaryoblastic leukaemia, mixed lineage or undifferentiated leukaemia) the additional monoclonal antibodies beyond routine set are needed. A special concern is necessary in diagnosis of newborns and infants leukaemia or bone marrow disorders like myelodisplastic syndrome particularly in children with other systemic diseases e.g. congenital immunological deficiencies, Down's syndrome. The problems of immunophenotyping in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are frequently associated with obtaining a representative material e.g. surgical tumour biopsy, lymph node. In some case the differential diagnosis including small round cell tumours and anaplastic type of lymphoma is necessary what requires an additional set of monoclonal antibodies. Despite of modern technology, morphology, immunophenotyping and histopathology remain the standard of complex diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases and haematopoietic disorders in children.

  8. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  9. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  10. Risk Factors for Acute Leukemia in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Belson, Martin; Kingsley, Beverely; Holmes, Adrianne

    2007-01-01

    Although overall incidence is rare, leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It accounts for 30% of all cancers diagnosed in children younger than 15 years. Within this population, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) occurs approximately five times more frequently than acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and accounts for approximately 78% of all childhood leukemia diagnoses. Epidemiologic studies of acute leukemias in children have examined possible risk factors, including genetic, infectious, and environmental, in an attempt to determine etiology. Only one environmental risk factor (ionizing radiation) has been significantly linked to ALL or AML. Most environmental risk factors have been found to be weakly and inconsistently associated with either form of acute childhood leukemia. Our review focuses on the demographics of childhood leukemia and the risk factors that have been associated with the development of childhood ALL or AML. The environmental risk factors discussed include ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, hydrocarbons, pesticides, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and illicit drug use. Knowledge of these particular risk factors can be used to support measures to reduce potentially harmful exposures and decrease the risk of disease. We also review genetic and infectious risk factors and other variables, including maternal reproductive history and birth characteristics. PMID:17366834

  11. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions.

  13. Increased risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by prenatal and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines: a case control study in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Maral Mazloomi; Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common hematologic malignancies, accounting for one fourth of all childhood cancer cases. Exposure to environmental factors around the time of conception or pregnancy can increase the risk of ALL in the offspring.This study aimed to evaluted the role of prenatal and postnatal exposure to high voltage power lines on the incidence of childhood ALL.This cross-sectional case control study was carried out on 22 cases and 100 controls who were born and lived in low socioeconomic families in Isfahan and hospitalized for therapeutic purposes in different hospitals from 2013-2014.With regard to the underlying risk factors, familial history and parental factors were noted but in this age, socioeonomic and zonal matched case control study, prenatal and childhood exposure to high voltage power lines was considered as the most important environmental risk factors of ALL (p=0.006, OR=3.651, CI 95%, 1.692-7.878). As the population was of low socioeconomic background, use of mobiles, computers and microwave was negligible. Moreover prenatal and postnatal exposure to indoor electrically charged objects was not determined to be a significant environmental factor. Thus, pre and post natal exposure to high voltage power lines and living in pollutant regions as well as familial influence could be described as risk factors of ALL for the first time in a low socioeconomic status Iranian population.

  14. Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

  15. Effects of Methylphenidate on Attention Deficits in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    ALL, Childhood; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L2; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, Philadelphia-Positive; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, Childhood; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L1; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L1; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L2; Brain Tumors; Cancer of the Brain; Cancer of Brain; Malignant Primary Brain Tumors; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant

  16. Differences in Meiotic Recombination Rates in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia at an MHC Class II Hotspot Close to Disease Associated Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Pamela; Urayama, Kevin; Zheng, Jie; Yang, Peng; Ford, Matt; Buffler, Patricia; Chokkalingam, Anand; Lightfoot, Tracy; Taylor, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is a malignant lymphoid disease of which B-cell precursor- (BCP) and T-cell- (T) ALL are subtypes. The role of alleles encoded by major histocompatibility loci (MHC) have been examined in a number of previous studies and results indicating weak, multi-allele associations between the HLA-DPB1 locus and BCP-ALL suggested a role for immunosusceptibility and possibly infection. Two independent SNP association studies of ALL identified loci approximately 37 kb from one another and flanking a strong meiotic recombination hotspot (DNA3), adjacent to HLA-DOA and centromeric of HLA-DPB1. To determine the relationship between this observation and HLA-DPB1 associations, we constructed high density SNP haplotypes of the 316 kb region from HLA-DMB to COL11A2 in childhood ALL and controls using a UK GWAS data subset and the software PHASE. Of four haplotype blocks identified, predicted haplotypes in Block 1 (centromeric of DNA3) differed significantly between BCP-ALL and controls (P = 0.002) and in Block 4 (including HLA-DPB1) between T-ALL and controls (P = 0.049). Of specific common (>5%) haplotypes in Block 1, two were less frequent in BCP-ALL, and in Block 4 a single haplotype was more frequent in T-ALL, compared to controls. Unexpectedly, we also observed apparent differences in ancestral meiotic recombination rates at DNA3, with BCP-ALL showing increased and T-ALL decreased levels compared to controls. In silico analysis using LDsplit sotware indicated that recombination rates at DNA3 are influenced by flanking loci, including SNPs identified in childhood ALL association studies. The observed differences in rates of meiotic recombination at this hotspot, and potentially others, may be a characteristic of childhood leukemia and contribute to disease susceptibility, alternatively they may reflect interactions between ALL-associated haplotypes in this region. PMID:24959916

  17. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Leukemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Leukemia Print A A A ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Leucemia About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the ...

  18. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Wesołowska-Andersen, A; Borst, L; Dalgaard, M D; Yadav, R; Rasmussen, K K; Wehner, P S; Rasmussen, M; Ørntoft, T F; Nordentoft, I; Koehler, R; Bartram, C R; Schrappe, M; Sicheritz-Ponten, T; Gautier, L; Marquart, H; Madsen, H O; Brunak, S; Stanulla, M; Gupta, R; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survival approaches 90%. New strategies are needed to identify the 10–15% who evade cure. We applied targeted, sequencing-based genotyping of 25 000 to 34 000 preselected potentially clinically relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify host genome profiles associated with relapse risk in 352 patients from the Nordic ALL92/2000 protocols and 426 patients from the German Berlin–Frankfurt–Munster (BFM) ALL2000 protocol. Patients were enrolled between 1992 and 2008 (median follow-up: 7.6 years). Eleven cross-validated SNPs were significantly associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups defined by end of induction residual leukemia, white blood cell count and variants in myeloperoxidase (MPO), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), lamin B1 (LMNB1) and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) genes, ATP-binding cassette transporters and glucocorticosteroid transcription regulation pathways. Relapse rates ranged from 4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6–6.3%) for the best group (72% of patients) to 76% (95% CI: 41–90%) for the worst group (5% of patients, P<0.001). Validation of these findings and similar approaches to identify SNPs associated with toxicities may allow future individualized relapse and toxicity risk-based treatments adaptation. PMID:24990611

  19. Genomic profiling of thousands of candidate polymorphisms predicts risk of relapse in 778 Danish and German childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska-Andersen, A; Borst, L; Dalgaard, M D; Yadav, R; Rasmussen, K K; Wehner, P S; Rasmussen, M; Ørntoft, T F; Nordentoft, I; Koehler, R; Bartram, C R; Schrappe, M; Sicheritz-Ponten, T; Gautier, L; Marquart, H; Madsen, H O; Brunak, S; Stanulla, M; Gupta, R; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-02-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survival approaches 90%. New strategies are needed to identify the 10-15% who evade cure. We applied targeted, sequencing-based genotyping of 25 000 to 34 000 preselected potentially clinically relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify host genome profiles associated with relapse risk in 352 patients from the Nordic ALL92/2000 protocols and 426 patients from the German Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) ALL2000 protocol. Patients were enrolled between 1992 and 2008 (median follow-up: 7.6 years). Eleven cross-validated SNPs were significantly associated with risk of relapse across protocols. SNP and biologic pathway level analyses associated relapse risk with leukemia aggressiveness, glucocorticosteroid pharmacology/response and drug transport/metabolism pathways. Classification and regression tree analysis identified three distinct risk groups defined by end of induction residual leukemia, white blood cell count and variants in myeloperoxidase (MPO), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), lamin B1 (LMNB1) and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) genes, ATP-binding cassette transporters and glucocorticosteroid transcription regulation pathways. Relapse rates ranged from 4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-6.3%) for the best group (72% of patients) to 76% (95% CI: 41-90%) for the worst group (5% of patients, P<0.001). Validation of these findings and similar approaches to identify SNPs associated with toxicities may allow future individualized relapse and toxicity risk-based treatments adaptation.

  20. Geographical Distribution and Cluster Detection of Childhood Leukemia in the Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto; Garibaldi-Covarrubias, Roberto; Romo-Rubio, Hugo; Soto-Sumuano, Leonardo; Ruiz-Chávez, Carlos Fernando; Suárez-Arredondo, Mijail; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in childhood. Analyzing the spatial distribution of acute leukemia may generate the identification of risk factors. To study the incidence rate of acute leukemia, its geographic distribution, and cluster detection in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, Mexico. We included children under 15 years of age diagnosed with acute leukemia during the period 2010-2014 in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara. Each case was geo-referenced to street level to latitude and longitude coordinates using Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS). Spatial clusters were found in the location of the acute leukemia cases applying the Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) algorithm with R statistical software. A total of 269 cases of leukemia were registered, 227 (84%) were acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 42 (16%) acute myeloblastic leukemia. The mean age was 6 ± 4 years. The mean incidence of acute leukemia was 6.44 cases/100,000 inhabitants: El Salto 10.12/100,000, Guadalajara 7.55/100,000, and Tlaquepaque 6.74/100,000. The DBSCAN found three clusters, all located within the municipality of Guadalajara. The incidence of acute leukemia in our population is higher than that in Canada and the USA. We found three spatial clusters of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the municipality of Guadalajara, suggesting the presence of local predisposing factors.

  1. Polymorphisms in multidrug resistance-associated protein gene 4 is associated with outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Marc; Sauty, Géraldine; Labuda, Malgorzata; Gagné, Vincent; Laverdière, Caroline; Moghrabi, Albert; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja

    2009-08-13

    Methotrexate and 6-mercaptopurine, important components of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, are substrates for multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP4. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed in MRP4 gene, and 4 variants were identified as tagSNPs with frequency more than or equal to 5%. They were investigated for association with treatment responses in 275 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TC genotype of the regulatory T-1393C polymorphism was associated with better event-free survival (P = .02) and lower methotrexate plasma levels (P = .01). The CA genotype of A934C (Lys304Asn) substitution correlated in contrast with lower event-free survival (P = .02) and higher frequency of high-grade thrombocytopenia (P = .01). Gene reporter assay showed that the promoter haplotype uniquely tagged by the C-1393 allele conferred higher promoter activity compared with remaining haplotypes (P < .001). Further analyses are needed to replicate this pilot study and get closer insight into the functional effect of these polymorphisms.

  2. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenix, P.J.; Kernan, W.J.; Tassinari, M.S.; Schunior, A.; Waber, D.P.; Howes, A.; Tarbell, N.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Central nervous system prophylactic therapy used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia can reduce intelligence quotient scores and impair memory and attention in children. Cranial irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate, and steroids are commonly utilized in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy. How they induce neurotoxicity is unknown. This study employs an animal model to explore the induction of neurotoxicity. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 17 and 18 days of age were administered 18 mg/kg prednisolone, 2 mg/kg methotrexate, and 1000 cGy cranial irradiation. Another 18-day-old group was administered 1000 cGy cranial irradiation but no drugs. Matching controls received saline and/or a sham exposure to radiation. All animals at 6 weeks and 4 months of age were tested for alterations in spontaneous behavior. A computer pattern recognition system automatically recorded and classified individual behavioral acts displayed during exploration of a novel environment. Measures of behavioral initiations, total time, and time structure were used to compare treated and control animals. A permanent sex-specific change in the time structure of behavior was induced by the prednisolone, methotrexate, and radiation treatment but not by radiation alone. Unlike hyperactivity, the effect consisted of abnormal clustering and dispersion of acts in a pattern indicative of disrupted development of sexually dimorphic behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an animal model delineating the agent/agents responsible for the neurotoxicity of central nervous system prophylactic therapy.

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  4. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  5. MicroRNA profiling can classify acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, David C; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Denkers, Fedor; de Menezes, Renée X; Westers, Theresia M; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Smit, Linda

    2013-04-15

    Classification of acute leukemia is based on the commitment of leukemic cells to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage. However, a small percentage of acute leukemia cases lack straightforward immunophenotypical lineage commitment. These leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous category of acute leukemia that cannot be classified as either acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The lack of clear classification of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL is a hurdle in treatment choice for these patients. Here, we compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of 17 cases with acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage and 16 cases of AML, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL), and T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). We show that leukemias of ambiguous lineage do not segregate as a separate entity but exhibit miRNA expression profiles similar to AML, B-ALL, or T-ALL. We show that by using only 5 of the most lineage-discriminative miRNAs, we are able to define acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL. Our results indicate the presence of a myeloid or lymphoid lineage-specific genotype, as reflected by miRNA expression, in these acute leukemias despite their ambiguous immunophenotype. miRNA-based classification of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage might be of additional value in therapeutic decision making.

  6. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. Childhood leukemia around nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M

    1992-12-15

    Epidemiologic studies on the health effects of living near nuclear facilities have been rare and, indeed, radiobiological models would not predict any detectable increase in cancer risk to the general public from the very low levels of radioactivity emitted by nuclear installations. Thus the recent evidence suggesting an excess of childhood leukemias in the vicinity of certain nuclear sites in the United Kingdom has generated considerable controversy. To help resolve the uncertainty and enhance interpretability of results, future epidemiologic studies will need to be designed with great care (and within realistic cost limits). This commentary suggests three areas for methodologic consideration: (i) definition and modelling of radiation exposure; (ii) selection of cancer sites and sensitive subgroups; and (iii) use of incidence or mortality data. Specific suggestions for further epidemiologic research are offered as well.

  8. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia linfoblástica aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  13. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  14. Lymphoid progenitor cells from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia are functionally deficient and express high levels of the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1.

    PubMed

    Purizaca, Jessica; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Vadillo, Eduardo; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Fuentes-Figueroa, Silvestre; Villagomez-Barragán, Horacio; Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Alvarado-Moreno, Antonio; Mayani, Hector; Meza, Isaura; Hernandez, Rosaura; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Pelayo, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent malignancy of childhood. Substantial progress on understanding the cell hierarchy within ALL bone marrow (BM) has been recorded in the last few years, suggesting that both primitive cell fractions and committed lymphoid blasts with immature stem cell-like properties contain leukemia-initiating cells. Nevertheless, the biology of the early progenitors that initiate the lymphoid program remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of lymphoid progenitors from B-cell precursor ALL BM to proliferate and undergo multilineage differentiation. By phenotype analyses, in vitro proliferation assays, and controlled culture systems, the lymphoid differentiation potentials were evaluated in BM primitive populations from B-cell precursor ALL pediatric patients. When compared to their normal counterparts, functional stem and progenitor cell contents were substantially reduced in ALL BM. Moreover, neither B nor NK or dendritic lymphoid-cell populations developed recurrently from highly purified ALL-lymphoid progenitors, and their proliferation and cell cycle status revealed limited proliferative capacity. Interestingly, a number of quiescence-associated transcription factors were elevated, including the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1, which was highly expressed in primitive CD34⁺ cells. Together, our findings reveal major functional defects in the primitive hematopoietic component of ALL BM. A possible contribution of high levels of Gfi-1 expression in the regulation of the stem/progenitor cell biology is suggested.

  15. The TGF-β/SMAD pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rouce, R H; Shaim, H; Sekine, T; Weber, G; Ballard, B; Ku, S; Barese, C; Murali, V; Wu, M-F; Liu, H; Shpall, E J; Bollard, C M; Rabin, K R; Rezvani, K

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system, providing potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that the tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β)/SMAD signaling pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We characterized NK cells in 50 consecutive children with B-ALL at diagnosis, end induction and during maintenance therapy compared with age-matched controls. ALL-NK cells at diagnosis had an inhibitory phenotype associated with impaired function, most notably interferon-γ production and cytotoxicity. By maintenance therapy, these phenotypic and functional abnormalities partially normalized; however, cytotoxicity against autologous blasts remained impaired. We identified ALL-derived TGF-β1 to be an important mediator of leukemia-induced NK cell dysfunction. The TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway was constitutively activated in ALL-NK cells at diagnosis and end induction when compared with healthy controls and patients during maintenance therapy. Culture of ALL blasts with healthy NK cells induced NK dysfunction and an inhibitory phenotype, mediated by activation of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway, and abrogated by blocking TGF-β. These data indicate that by regulating the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, ALL blasts induce changes in NK cells to evade innate immune surveillance, thus highlighting the importance of developing novel therapies to target this inhibitory pathway and restore antileukemic cytotoxicity.

  16. The TGF-β/SMAD pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H.; Shaim, Hila; Sekine, Takuya; Weber, Gerrit; Ballard, Brandon; Ku, Stephanie; Barese, Cecilia; Murali, Vineeth; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Rabin, Karen R.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system, providing potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We characterized NK cells in 50 consecutive children with B-ALL at diagnosis, end-Induction, and during maintenance therapy compared to age-matched controls. ALL-NK cells at diagnosis had an inhibitory phenotype associated with impaired function, most notably IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity. By maintenance, these phenotypic and functional abnormalities partially normalized, however, cytotoxicity against autologous blasts remained impaired. We identified ALL-derived TGF-β1 to be an important mediator of leukemia-induced NK cell dysfunction. The TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway was constitutively activated in ALL-NK cells at diagnosis and end-induction when compared to healthy controls and patients during maintenance. Culture of ALL blasts with healthy NK cells induced NK dysfunction and an inhibitory phenotype, mediated by activation of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway, and abrogated by blocking TGF-β. These data indicate that by regulating the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, ALL blasts induce changes in NK cells to evade innate immune surveillance, thus highlighting the importance of developing novel therapies to target this inhibitory pathway and restore antileukemic cytotoxicity. PMID:26621337

  17. Acute leukemias of ambiguous origin.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Béné, Marie C

    2015-09-01

    This session of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop focused on acute leukemias of ambiguous origin. We provide an overview of mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) as recognized in the current World Health Organization classification and summarize diagnostic criteria for major categories of MPAL: B/myeloid, T/myeloid, B/T, and B/T/myeloid. Most MPAL cases submitted were B/myeloid and T/myeloid MPAL, the most frequent types, but three cases of B/T MPAL were also submitted, and examples of all categories are illustrated. We emphasize that a comprehensive approach to immunophenotyping is required to accurately establish the diagnosis of MPAL. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping using a large panel of antibodies is needed as well as confirmatory immunohistochemical analysis and cytochemistry studies for myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase. We discuss technical issues in determining blast lineage and possible pitfalls in MPAL diagnosis. In particular, rare cases of B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) can express myeloperoxidase but are otherwise consistent with B-ALL and should be treated as such. Last, we review the differential diagnosis between acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with minimal differentiation. There was an agreement that diagnosis of MPAL can be challenging, especially if applied flow cytometry panels are not comprehensive enough. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  18. Childhood leukemia and magnetic fields in infant incubators.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Karin C; Naumburg, Estelle; Anger, Gert; Cnattingius, Sven; Ekbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria

    2002-01-01

    In studies of magnetic field exposure and childhood leukemia, power lines and other electrical installations close to the children's homes constitute the most extensively studied source of exposure. We conducted a study to assess whether exposure to magnetic fields in infant incubators is associated with an increased leukemia risk. We identified all children with leukemia born in Sweden between 1973 and 1989 from the national Cancer Registry and selected at random one control per case, individually matched by sex and time of birth, from the study base. We retrieved information about treatment in infant incubators from medical records. We made measurements of the magnetic fields inside the incubators for each incubator model kept by the hospitals. Exposure assessment was based on measurements of the magnetic field level inside the incubator, as well as on the length of treatment. For acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the risk estimates were close to unity for all exposure definitions. For acute myeloid leukemia, we found a slightly elevated risk, but with wide confidence intervals and with no indication of dose response. Overall, our results give little evidence that exposure to magnetic fields inside infant incubators is associated with an increased risk of childhood leukemia.

  19. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  20. A molecular cytogenetic study of imprinting effect in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the t(1;19)(q23;p13)

    SciTech Connect

    Knops, J.F.; Han, J.; Finley, W.H.

    1994-09-01

    Genomic imprinting (the functional difference between homologous alleles dependent upon parent of origin) seems to play an important role in some forms of recessive tumors as well as in the genetic predisposition to cancer. Recently, this phenomenon has been implicated in reciprocal translocations found in hematological malignancies. Cytogenetic polymorphism studies on the t(9;22) chromosome in chronic myelogenous leukemia have shown chromosome 9 to be paternal in origin while chromosome 22 is maternally derived in all the cases studied. We developed a molecular technique using chromosome microdissection and polymerase chain reaction (CMPCR) to study the possible involvement of genomic imprinting in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the t(1;19). This technique has an advantage over conventional molecular techniques because it can distinguish the translocated chromosome from the normal homologue. Amplification of highly polymorphic microsatellite loci was performed on the microdissected translocated chromosomes and compared with parental alleles to assess the parent of origin of the chromosome 1 and chromosome 19 involved in the translocation. Parental origin of the derivative chromosomes 1 and 19 has been evaluated in six children with pre-B cell ALL and t(1;19)(q23;p13). The ratio of maternal:paternal:uncertain origin was 3:2:1 for chromosome 1 and 1:3:2 for chromosome 19. Thus far, the data do not indicate a strong parent of origin bias for this specific ALL associated translocation. Although genomic imprinting does not appear to be involved in this subgroup of childhood ALL patients, this technique can be used to determine parental origin of aberrant chromosomes in other hematological malignancies.

  1. Treatment of isolated testicular relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an Italian multicenter study. Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica.

    PubMed

    Uderzo, C; Grazia Zurlo, M; Adamoli, L; Zanesco, L; Aricò, M; Calculli, G; Comelli, A; Cordero di Montezemolo, L; Di Tullio, M T; Guazzelli, C

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1980 and April 1987, 49 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in isolated testicular and first leukemia relapse (ITR) were enrolled in the Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) multicenter study REC80-ITR. According to the Rome Workshop criteria, 77% were at standard and 23% at high initial prognostic risk. In 33% of the cases, ITR occurred during first treatment. The REC80-ITR protocol consisted of an induction phase regimen of vincristine (VCR), cytarabine (ARA-C), methotrexate (MTX), and asparaginase (L-asp), and bilateral testicular irradiation, and CNS prophylaxis with intrathecal MTX and a maintenance phase with a multidrug rotating regimen. Total treatment duration was 30 months. The median time of observation after ITR was 51 months. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival and disease-free survival (DFS) at 4 years were 67.7% and 41%, respectively. Patients who had an ITR on therapy or within the first off-therapy year showed the poorest outcome. The DFS at 3 years was 20%, 47.6%, and 100%, respectively, for children who had an ITR on treatment (n = 16), within the first year of treatment withdrawal (n = 22), or later (n = 10) (P = .001). Patients with an asymptomatic occult testicular infiltrate at treatment discontinuation had a very unfavorable prognosis. Eighty-one percent of second relapses involved the bone marrow. In our experience, children presenting an early ITR (ie, within 6 months of treatment withdrawal) need a very aggressive treatment because of the high probability of an underlying systemic disease. On the other hand, patients with a late ITR seem to have a truly local recurrence and can apparently be cured by standard protocols, as shown in protocol REC80-ITR.

  2. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Physical Activity in Long-term Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Childhood and Adolescence: A Cross-sectional Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Nayiager, Trishana; Barr, Ronald D; Anderson, Loretta; Cranston, Amy; Hay, John

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity (PA) and elevated overweight/obesity (OW/OB) rates are common in survivors of cancer in childhood, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bony morbidity, including fractures, is also prevalent among survivors of ALL. This study examined the interrelationships of PA, measured in hours by the Habitual Activity Estimation Scale; OW/OG, defined by body mass index; and fractures (yes/no) in survivors of ALL (n=75) more than 10 years after diagnosis. All had been treated using protocols of the Dana Farber Cancer Institute Childhood ALL Consortium. The median age was 21.15 years and time from diagnosis 15.07 years, and 27 subjects had experienced fractures. More than 30% of the total sample were OW/OB. There was no correlation of body mass index with present PA. There were no significant differences between those with/without fractures in terms of age, sex, time from diagnosis, and the prevalence of OW/OB. Subjects with fractures during treatment reported more total activity on typical weekend days than those without fractures (mean 8.8 vs. 6.9 h, P<0.01). There was no significant difference on weekdays. Higher activity on weekends suggests that fractures may have occurred more commonly in those who had a more active lifestyle before, during, and after treatment.

  4. A heritable missense polymorphism in CDKN2A confers strong risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is preferentially selected during clonal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle M.; de Smith, Adam J.; Hansen, Helen M.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Gonseth, Semira; Endicott, Alyson A.; Xiao, Jianqiao; Rice, Terri; Fu, Cecilia H.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Wiencke, John K.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Ma, Xiaomei; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes that are associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A lead SNP was found to occur on chromosome 9p21.3, a region that is deleted in 30% of childhood ALLs, suggesting the presence of causal polymorphisms linked to ALL risk. We used SNP genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping of a multiethnic ALL case-control population (Ncases=1464, Ncontrols=3279) to identify variants of large effect within 9p21.3. We identified a CDKN2A missense variant (rs3731249) with 2% allele frequency in controls that confers three-fold increased risk of ALL in children of European-ancestry (OR=2.99; P=1.51×10−9) and Hispanic children (OR=2.77; P=3.78×10−4). Moreover, of 17 patients whose tumors displayed allelic imbalance at CDKN2A, 14 preferentially retained the risk allele and lost the protective allele (PBinomial=0.006), suggesting that the risk allele provides a selective advantage during tumor growth. Notably, the CDKN2A variant was not significantly associated with melanoma, glioblastoma, or pancreatic cancer risk, implying that this polymorphism specifically confers ALL risk but not general cancer risk. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that coding polymorphisms of large effect can underlie GWAS “hits” and that inherited polymorphisms may undergo directional selection during clonal expansion of tumors. PMID:26527286

  5. A comparison of neurocognitive functioning in children previously randomized to dexamethasone or prednisone in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kadan-Lottick, Nina S; Brouwers, Pim; Breiger, David; Kaleita, Thomas; Dziura, James; Liu, Haibei; Chen, Lu; Nicoletti, Megan; Stork, Linda; Bostrom, Bruce; Neglia, Joseph P

    2009-08-27

    In previous clinical trials of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), dexamethasone resulted in higher event-free survival rates than prednisone, presumably due to greater central nervous system penetration. Dexamethasone's association with long-term neurocognitive toxicity is unknown. In this multisite study, we measured neurocognitive functioning in 92 children with standard-risk ALL, 1 to 9.99 years at diagnosis, at a mean of 9.8 years after randomization to prednisone (n = 41) or dexamethasone (n = 51) on Children's Cancer Group (CCG) 1922. No significant overall differences in mean neurocognitive and academic performance scores were found between the prednisone and dexamethasone groups after adjusting for age, sex, and time since diagnosis. The exception was that patients receiving dexamethasone scored one-third of a standard deviation worse on word reading (98.8 +/- 1.7 vs 104.9 +/- 1.8; P = .02). There were no group differences in the distribution of test scores or the parents' report of neurologic complications, psychotropic drug use, and special education. Further analyses suggested for the dexamethasone group, older age of diagnosis was associated with worse neurocognitive functioning; for the prednisone group, younger age at diagnosis was associated with worse functioning. In conclusion, our study did not demonstrate any meaningful differences in long-term cognitive functioning of childhood ALL patients based on corticosteroid randomization. This study is registered with http://www.clinicaltrials.gov under NCT00085176.

  6. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25, 1.55) (using (2,785 cases, 3635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases, 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases, 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases, 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases, 2,655 controls) respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukaemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants’ exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukaemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood. PMID:26061779

  8. A recurrent stop-codon mutation in succinate dehydrogenase subunit B gene in normal peripheral blood and childhood T-cell acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Bora E

    2007-05-09

    Somatic cytidine mutations in normal mammalian nuclear genes occur during antibody diversification in B lymphocytes and generate an isoform of apolipoprotein B in intestinal cells by RNA editing. Here, I describe that succinate dehydrogenase (SDH; mitochondrial complex II) subunit B gene (SDHB) is somatically mutated at a cytidine residue in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and T-cell acute leukemia. Germ line mutations in the SDHB, SDHC or SDHD genes cause hereditary paraganglioma (PGL) tumors which show constitutive activation of homeostatic mechanisms induced by oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To determine the prevalence of a mutation identified in the SDHB mRNA, 180 samples are tested. An SDHB stop-codon mutation c.136C>T (R46X) is present in a significant fraction (average = 5.8%, range = less than 1 to 30%, n = 52) of the mRNAs obtained from PBMCs. In contrast, the R46X mutation is present in the genomic DNA of PBMCs at very low levels. Examination of the PBMC cell-type subsets identifies monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells as primary sources of the mutant transcript, although lesser contributions also come from B and T lymphocytes. Transcript sequence analyses in leukemic cell lines derived from monocyte, NK, T and B cells indicate that the mutational mechanism targeting SDHB is operational in T-cell acute leukemia. Accordingly, substantial levels (more than 3%) of the mutant SDHB transcripts are detected in five of 20 primary childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) bone marrow samples, but in none of 20 B-ALL samples. In addition, distinct heterozygous SDHB missense DNA mutations are identified in Jurkat and TALL-104 cell lines which are derived from T-ALLs. The identification of a recurrent, inactivating stop-codon mutation in the SDHB gene in normal blood cells suggests that SDHB is targeted by a cytidine deaminase enzyme. The SDHB mutations in normal PBMCs and leukemic T cells might play a role in cellular pre

  9. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common cancer in children and teens, accounting for almost 1 out of 3 cancers. Overall, ... For reprint requests, please see our Content Usage Policy . About Childhood Leukemia What Is Childhood Leukemia? What ...

  10. Polymorphisms in GRIA1 gene are a risk factor for asparaginase hypersensitivity during the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rajić, Vladan; Debeljak, Maruša; Goričar, Katja; Jazbec, Janez

    2015-01-01

    l-asparaginase is an effective antineoplastic agent used in chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The drug effect may be compromised by an elicited immune response, resulting in the production of anti-asparaginase antibodies causing an anaphylactic reaction or silent inactivation of the enzyme. To elucidate possible genetic predisposition for inter-individual differences in asparaginase hypersensitivity, we studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GRIA1 gene in 146 pediatric patients treated with l-asparaginase. Allergic reaction to l-asparaginase occurred in 49.3% of patients. We observed a statistically significant association between SNPs in the GRIA1 gene and the occurrence of asparaginase allergy: rs4958351 with p = 0.003, rs4958676 with p = 0.005, rs6889909 with p = 0.005, rs6890057 with p = 0.005 and rs10070447 with p = 0.006. We found a statistically significant correlation between asparaginase allergy and event-free survival (p-value 0.005).

  11. Anxiety, depression, stress, and cortisol levels in mothers of children undergoing maintenance therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Neu, Madalynn; Matthews, Ellyn; King, Nancy A; Cook, Paul F; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare anxiety, depression, and stress between mothers of children during maintenance treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and matched controls. Twenty-six mothers were recruited from the hematology unit at a children's hospital, and 26 mothers were recruited from the community. Participants were matched to their child's age and gender. Mothers completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Perceived Stress Sale, and collected salivary cortisol 4 times a day for 3 consecutive days. Compared with mothers of healthy children, anxiety scores did not differ (P=.10), but depression scores were higher (P=.003) in mothers of children with ALL. More mothers in the ALL group scored above the cutoff of 7 indicating clinical anxiety (46%) and depressive symptoms (27%). A trend toward increased stress was found in mothers in the ALL group. No difference was found in overall daily cortisol (area under the curve), daily decrease in cortisol (slope), and cortisol awakening response. Mothers of children with ALL experienced emotional symptoms many months after the initial diagnosis.

  12. Treatment strategies and regimens of graduated intensity for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in low-income countries: A proposal.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Stephen P; Sung, Lillian; Howard, Scott C

    2009-05-01

    Cure rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are 80-85% in high-income countries (HICs) in North America and Western Europe. However, cure rates are much lower in many low-income countries (LICs), where most cases of ALL occur. Over the past several decades partnerships ("twinning") between HIC and LIC pediatric oncology programs have led to major improvements in outcome for children with ALL in some LICs, often by developing time and resource intensive relationships that allow LIC centers to treat children with regimens similar or identical to those used in HICs. However, the resources are not available in most LICs to allow immediate introduction of intensive ALL treatment regimens similar to those used in HICs. With these thoughts in mind, we present a proposal for a systematic and graduated approach to ALL diagnosis, risk classification, and treatment in LICs. We have based the strategy and the proposed regimens on those developed by the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and Children's Oncology Group (COG) over the past several decades, beginning with a first level regimen similar to CCG therapy of the early 1980s and then layering on successive treatment intensifications proven effective in randomized clinical trials. Simple monitoring rules are included to help centers decide when they are ready to add new treatment components. This proposal provides a framework that LIC centers can use to provide effective ALL therapy, particularly in regions of the world where few children are currently being cured.

  13. Pentoxifylline during steroid window phase at induction to remission increases apoptosis in childhood with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramella, O; Ortiz-Lazareno, P C; Jiménez-López, X; Gallegos-Castorena, S; Hernández-Flores, G; Medina-Barajas, F; Meza-Arroyo, J; Jave-Suárez, L F; Lerma-Díaz, J M; Sánchez-Zubieta, F; Bravo-Cuellar, A

    2016-04-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) has been shown to increase chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. A clinical trial was developed to evaluate the effect of the addition of PTX to the induction steroid window phase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Thirty-two children were enrolled on this study. Children with a new diagnosis of ALL were randomly assigned to receive prednisone (PRD) 40 mg/m(2)/day only during the 7-day treatment pre-phase (PRD group, 11 patients) or to receive PRD with PTX (10 mg/kg/day) (PTX group, 11 patients); the control group included children with normal bone marrow (10 patients). Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) was performed at diagnosis (day -7) in all groups, and at day 0 (end of PRD window) for patients with ALL (PRD and PTX groups). Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry (FC) using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) stains. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Apoptotic index at day -7 was similar in all groups. However, at day 0 post-treatment, apoptosis was significantly higher in the PTX group than in the PRD group (p < 0.001). There were no serious adverse effects associated with PTX. PTX potentiates blast apoptosis induced by PRD in children with ALL during steroid window phase.

  14. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  15. Effects of a home-based exercise program on metabolic risk factors and fitness in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Liisa S; Kemppainen, Jukka; Niinikoski, Harri; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Kapanen, Jukka; Arola, Mikko; Heinonen, Olli J

    2012-07-15

    Long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The prevalence of insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic risk factors is increased in ALL survivors, and insufficient physical activity (PA) and low cardiopulmonary fitness are common. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simple, inexpensive home-based exercise program on cardiometabolic risk factors and fitness in long-term ALL survivors. Seventeen 16- to 30-year-old survivors of childhood ALL (age at diagnosis ≤16 years) were recruited to a 16-week home-based exercise program. Peak oxygen uptake (VO(2 peak)), muscle strength, and metabolic risk factors were studied before and after the exercise program. Fasting plasma insulin (P = 0.01), HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment, insulin resistance) (P = 0.002), waist circumference (P = 0.003), waist-to-hip ratio (P = 0.002), fat percent (P = 0.04), and supine diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.03) decreased during the program, while weight and body mass index remained unchanged. VO(2 peak) and maximal work load (W/kg) improved by 5% (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively) during the exercise program. The results of the Sit-Up test, Back extensor test, and Full Squatting test improved as well (P = 0.01, P = 0.002, and P = 0.0004, respectively). A simple home-based exercise program was effective in improving cardiometabolic risk factor status and fitness in young adult survivors of childhood ALL. Simple exercise programs should be recommended to this population with increased risk of CVD to improve metabolic risk factor status and fitness. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 polymorphism is associated with the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Bahari, Gholamreza; Naderi, Majid; Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding regulatory RNAs, are key regulators of gene expression. The impact of Pri-miR-34b/c rs4938723 variant on development of various cancers is still controversial. In the present study, we examined whether a rs4938723 variant located at the promoter region of Pri-miR-34b/c is associated with childhood ALL. A total of 110 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 120 healthy children were recruited to participate in this study. The rs4938723 variant was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The rs4938723 variant decreased the risk of ALL in heterozygous (TC vs OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.28-0.84, p = 0.012, TC vs TT) and overdominant (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.30-0.89, p = 0.0.020, TC vs TT + CC): OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 0.67-2.59, p = 0.498; C vs T: OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.75-1.31, p = 0.986) inheritance models tested. The C allele significantly decreased the risk of childhood ALL compared to T allele (OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.33-0.83, p = 0.006). Our findings proposed an association between Pri-miR-34 b/c rs4938723 variant and risk of childhood ALL development in a sample of Iranian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ARID5B, CEBPE and PIP4K2A Germline Genetic Polymorphisms and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mexican Patients: A MIGICCL Study.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Torres Escalante, José Luis; Alvarez-Olmos, Enrique; González-Montalvoc, Pablo Miguel; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Sansón, Aurora Medina; Leal, Yelda A; Ramos-Cervantes, María Teresa; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Ortiz-Maganda, Mónica Patricia; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Pérez-Saldivar, Maria Luisa; Velazquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Amador-Sanchez, Raquel; Solis-Labastida, Karina Anastacia; Rámirez-Bello, Julian; Fragoso, José Manuel; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of childhood cancer-related deaths worldwide. Multiples studies have shown that ALL seems to be originated by an interaction between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors. The ARID5B polymorphisms are among the most reproducible ALL associated-risk alleles in different populations. The aim of the present study was to examine the contribution of ARID5B, CEBPE, and PIP4K2 risk alleles for the development of ALL in children from Mexico City and Yucatan, Mexico. A study was conducted with a total of 761 unrelated subjects. Two hundred eighty five ALL cases (111 from Yucatan and 174 from Mexico City) and 476 healthy subjects. Genotyping included the rs7088318 (PIP4K2A), rs10821936 (ARID5B), rs7089424 (ARID5B) and rs2239633 (CEBPE) polymorphisms. Associations between ALL and rs10821936 and rs7089424 ARID5B SNPs were found (OR = 1.9, 95% CI (1.5-2.4) and OR = 2.0, 95% CI (1.6-2.5), respectively). Moreover, a higher risk was observed in the homozygous risk genotypes of carriers from Mexico City (OR = 3.1, 95% CI (2.0-4.9) and OR 3.1, CI 95% (2.0-4.8), respectively). Otherwise, the rs7088318 (PIP4K2A) and rs2239633 (CEBPE) polymorphisms were not associated with ALL risk. Our analysis suggests that ARID5B confers risk for childhood ALL in a Mexican population. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of CYP1A1, GSTP1 and XRCC1 genes polymorphisms on toxicity and response to chemotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abo-Bakr, Asmaa; Mossallam, Ghada; El Azhary, Nevin; Hafez, Hanafy; Badawy, Ragia

    2017-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. The interindividual genetic variations in drug metabolizing enzymes and DNA repair genes influence the efficacy and toxicity of numerous chemotherapeutic drugs affecting the treatment outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of drug metabolizing CYP1, GSTP1 and DNA repair (XRCC1) genes polymorphisms on the toxicity and response to chemotherapy in childhood ALL. Ninety seven ALL pediatric patients were genotyped for CYP1A1, GSTP1 ILe105Val and XRCC1 Arg194Tryp single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using PCR-RFLP. No statistically significant differences were observed between the wild and variant (homozygous and heterozygous) genotypes of the polymorphisms studied in CYP1A1, GSTP1 or XRCC1 genes regarding age, total leukocyte count, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic or risk group. The SNPs in CYP1A1, GSTP1 and XRCC1 genes did not show significant association with complete remission (CR) rate, overall survival (OS) or event free survival (EFS). However, XRCC1 Arg194Trp SNP was associated with higher drug toxicity; carriers of variant genotypes (CT and TT) had a significantly higher frequency of myelosuppression compared to those with the wild CC genotype (21/43[48.8%]) compared to (14/54[25.9%]) (p=0.020). The analysis of the combined effect of studied SNPs did not show any significant association with patient outcome. Our study reported a significant association between the DNA repair gene polymorphism and myelosuppression in childhood ALL patients. Adjustment of the dose of chemotherapeutic agents according to XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism may improve outcome in cases with risk of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  20. NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T), PON1 rs662 (Q192R), and PON1 rs854560 (L55M) polymorphisms segregate the risk of childhood acute leukemias according to age range distribution.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Gonçalves, Bruno Alves; Vasconcelos, Gisele M; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Andrade, Camilla; Faro, Alessandra; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Emerenciano, Mariana; de Camargo, Beatriz; Bernstain, Luna; Neves, Cynthia Curvello; Agareno, Jozina Maria de Andrade; de Carvalho, Lilian Maria Burlacchini; Araújo, Flávia Nogueira Serafim; de Brito, Nilma Pimentel; Magalhães, Isis Q; Cordoba, José Carlos; Pimenta, Flávia; Gadelha, Andreia; Cartaxo, Eloísa; Basegio, Rosania Maria; Mnayarji, Atalla; Souza, Marcelo S; Arencibia, Alejandro; Melaragno, Renato; Cóser, Virgínia Maria; Lafayete, Thereza Christina; Koifman, Sergio

    2012-11-01

    The risk of developing childhood leukemia has been associated with gene polymorphisms that decrease the activity of detoxifying metabolic enzymes and enzymes involved in systemic oxidative stress. We investigated the NQO1 and PON1 polymorphisms for associations with susceptibility to childhood leukemia. Samples from 1,027 Brazilian children (519 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL; 107 acute myeloid leukemia, AML; 401 controls) were analyzed. TaqMAN real-time assays were used to determine the NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T), PON1 rs662 (Q192R), and PON1 rs854560 (L55M) frequencies. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of polymorphisms with cases and controls, with age and somatic fusion genes (MLL-r and ETV6-RUNX1) as covariables. Children with at least one NQO1 variant allele were at lower risk for developing infant AML (odds ratio (OR) 0.26, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.10-0.68); no association was detected for ALL. PON1 rs854560 (L55M) was associated with an increased risk of developing childhood leukemia (LM + MM, OR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.32-2.81). The PON1 rs662 R192R genotype had a statistically significant decreased frequency in ALL (OR 0.64, 95 % CI 0.43-0.93). Infant ALL cases were more likely to harbor homozygous PON1 rs854560 alleles than controls (OR 1.72, 95 % CI 1.03-2.89); at least one M allele was associated with an increased risk of ALL in children older than 1 year (OR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.17-3.3). The NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T), PON1 rs854560 (L55M), and PON1 rs662 (Q192R) polymorphisms modified risk depending on leukemia subtype (decreased in AML, increased and decreased in ALL, respectively), age strata, and variant genotype combinations.

  1. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Long-term results of Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group trials for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1984-1999.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, M; Ohara, A; Manabe, A; Kumagai, M; Shimada, H; Kikuchi, A; Mori, T; Saito, M; Akiyama, M; Fukushima, T; Koike, K; Shiobara, M; Ogawa, C; Kanazawa, T; Noguchi, Y; Oota, S; Okimoto, Y; Yabe, H; Kajiwara, M; Tomizawa, D; Ko, K; Sugita, K; Kaneko, T; Maeda, M; Inukai, T; Goto, H; Takahashi, H; Isoyama, K; Hayashi, Y; Hosoya, R; Hanada, R

    2010-02-01

    We report the long-term results of Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group's studies L84-11, L89-12, L92-13, and L95-14 for 1846 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which were conducted between 1984 and 1999. The value of event-free survival (EFS)+/-s.e. was 67.2+/-2.2% at 10 years in L84-11, which was not improved in the following two studies, and eventually improved to 75.0+/-1.8% at 10 years in L95-14 study. The lower EFS of the L89-12 reflected a high rate of induction failure because of infection and delayed remission in very high-risk patients. The L92-13 study was characterized by short maintenance therapy; it resulted in poor EFS, particularly in the standard-risk (SR) group and boys. Females did significantly better than males in EFS in the early three studies. The gender difference was not significant in overall survival, partly because >60% of the males survived after the testicular relapse. Randomized studies in the former three protocols revealed that intermediate- or high-dose methotrexate therapy significantly reduced the testicular relapse rate. In the L95-14 study, gender difference disappeared in EFS. Contrary to the results of larger-scale studies, the randomized control study in the L95-14 reconfirmed with updated data that dexamethasone 8 mg/m(2) had no advantage over prednisolone 60 mg/m(2) in the SR and intermediate-risk groups. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was assigned to 100, 80, 44, and 44% of the patients in the studies, respectively. Isolated central nervous system relapse rates decreased to <2% in the last two trials. Secondary brain tumors developed in 12 patients at 8-22 years after cranial irradiation. Improvement of the remission induction rates and the complete omission of irradiation are currently main objectives in our studies.

  4. Novel susceptibility variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in ethnically diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Yang, Wenjian; Perez-Andreu, Virginia; Devidas, Meenakshi; Fan, Yiping; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Scheet, Paul; Burchard, Esteban González; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Torgerson, Dara G; Dean, Michael; Winick, Naomi J; Martin, Paul L; Camitta, Bruce M; Bowman, W Paul; Willman, Cheryl L; Carroll, William L; Mullighan, Charles G; Bhojwani, Deepa; Hunger, Stephen P; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V; Loh, Mignon L; Yang, Jun J

    2013-05-15

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the incidence of ALL varies by ethnicity. Although accumulating evidence indicates inherited predisposition to ALL, the genetic basis of ALL susceptibility in diverse ancestry has not been comprehensively examined. We performed a multiethnic genome-wide association study in 1605 children with ALL and 6661 control subjects after adjusting for population structure, with validation in three replication series of 845 case subjects and 4316 control subjects. Association was tested by two-sided logistic regression. A novel ALL susceptibility locus at 10p12.31-12.2 (BMI1-PIP4K2A, rs7088318, P = 1.1 × 10(-11)) was identified in the genome-wide association study, with independent replication in European Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans (P = .001, .009, and .04, respectively). Association was also validated at four known ALL susceptibility loci: ARID5B, IKZF1, CEBPE, and CDKN2A/2B. Associations at ARID5B, IKZF1, and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants were consistent across ethnicity, with multiple independent signals at IKZF1 and BMI1-PIP4K2A loci. The frequency of ARID5B and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants differed by ethnicity, in parallel with ethnic differences in ALL incidence. Suggestive evidence for modifying effects of age on genetic predisposition to ALL was also observed. ARID5B, IKZF1, CEBPE, and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants cumulatively conferred strong predisposition to ALL, with children carrying six to eight copies of risk alleles at a ninefold (95% confidence interval = 6.9 to 11.8) higher ALL risk relative to those carrying zero to one risk allele at these four single nucleotide polymorphisms. These findings indicate strong associations between inherited genetic variation and ALL susceptibility in children and shed new light on ALL molecular etiology in diverse ancestry.

  5. Markers of apoptosis and proliferation related gene products as predictors of treatment outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohammad; Al-Tonbary, Youssef; El-Bayoumi, Mohammed A; Hatem, Nadia; Hawas, Samia; Mansour, Ahmed; Marzouk, Iman; Hafez, Mona M; Yahia, Sohier; Farahat, Nahla

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize markers of apoptosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in relation to treatment outcome of the disease. The study was performed on 34 children with ALL and 39 healthy children as a control group. Apoptosis was assessed by cell morphology; DNA fragmentation; ELISA and RT-PCR for CD95, CD95L, BcL-2 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB); and flow cytometry for CD95, CD40, CD49d and CD11a. Apoptosis was significantly lower in patients than controls. Apoptosis detected by CD95 ligand was significantly lower in cases with no remission after treatment than those who achieved remission. Anti-apoptotic factors: CD40, BcL-2, and NF-kappaB were all found to be higher in cases than controls and in cases with no remission than those achieved remission. CD49d was significantly lower in cases than controls, and significantly lower in cases with who did not achieve remission. CD11a levels were similar in the various groups. Delayed apoptosis of ALL cells is genetically controlled either directly or indirectly by a network of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. CD40 appeared to stimulate both T and B lineage and is considered the most potent influencer and predictor of resistance to therapy. Inhibitors for the activity of CD40, Bcl-2 and NF-kappaB as well as stimulants to CD95 could have a potential therapeutic benefit.

  6. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Nicaragua: long-term results in the context of an international cooperative program.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Carlos; Lucchini, Giovanna; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Malta, Alberto; Conter, Valentino; Flores, Andronica; Biondi, Andrea; Tognoni, Gianni; Arguello, Mercedes; Cavalli, Franco; Silvestri, Daniela; Lacayo, Fulgencio Baez; Masera, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the results of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in Nicaragua from 1995 to 2005 in the context of an international cooperation program. Patients <18 years with ALL were treated with two consecutive protocols (1995 and 2000). After a steroid prophase, a three-drug induction was administered in protocol 1995, and a four-drug induction, including asparaginase, was administered in protocol 2000. In protocol 2000, a modified BFM phase IB with cyclophosphamide, 6-mercaptopurine and cytosine arabinoside was administered to patients at high risk (HR), who also received IV methotrexate (500 mg/m(2)) in the consolidation phase. Reinduction consisted of dexamethasone, vincristine, doxorubicin, cytosine arabinoside, and 6-thioguanine administered over 7 (protocol 1995) or 4 (protocol 2000) weeks; reinduction was repeated twice for patients at HR. Maintenance consisted of p.o. 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, and vincristine and dexamethasone pulses were added in the 2000 study. The total duration of therapy was 24 months. In total, 540 patients were treated. Overall, 7% of patients died during induction, and 9% abandoned treatment. At 5 and 10 years from diagnosis, event-free survival (EFS) rates of 38.1% and 36.6%, respectively, and overall survival rates of 48.0% and 39.6%, respectively, were obtained, considering abandonment as an event. In our experience, a 10-year EFS of 36.6% was achieved in a country with limited resources. Factors limiting a higher success rate were treatment abandonment and a high relapse rate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Childhood leukemia: electric and magnetic fields as possible risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, Joseph D; Kavet, Robert; McCormick, David L; Poole, Charles; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Thomas J; Valberg, Peter A; Van Etten, R A; Weaver, James C

    2003-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have reported associations between measures of power-line electric or magnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukemia. The basis for such associations remains unexplained. In children, acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents approximately three-quarters of all U.S. leukemia types. Some risk factors for childhood leukemia have been established, and others are suspected. Pathogenesis, as investigated in animal models, is consistent with the multistep model of acute leukemia development. Studies of carcinogenicity in animals, however, are overwhelmingly negative and do not support the hypothesis that EMF exposure is a significant risk factor for hematopoietic neoplasia. We may fail to observe effects from EMFs because, from a mechanistic perspective, the effects of EMFs on biology are very weak. Cells and organs function despite many sources of chemical "noise" (e.g., stochastic, temperature, concentration, mechanical, and electrical noise), which exceed the induced EMF "signal" by a large factor. However, the inability to detect EMF effects in bioassay systems may be caused by the choice made for "EMF exposure." "Contact currents" or "contact voltages" have been proposed as a novel exposure metric, because their magnitude is related to measured power-line magnetic fields. A contact current occurs when a person touches two conductive surfaces at different voltages. Modeled analyses support contact currents as a plausible metric because of correlations with residential magnetic fields and opportunity for exposure. The possible role of contact currents as an explanatory variable in the reported associations between EMFs and childhood leukemia will need to be clarified by further measurements, biophysical analyses, bioassay studies, and epidemiology. PMID:12782499

  8. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  12. Effects of radiation on testicular function in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children Cancer Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Sklar, C.A.; Robison, L.L.; Nesbit, M.E.; Sather, H.N.; Meadows, A.T.; Ortega, J.A.; Kim, T.H.; Hammond, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Testicular function was evaluated in 60 long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). All the patients were treated on two consecutive Children Cancer Study Group protocols and received identical chemotherapy and either 18 or 24 Gy radiation therapy (RT) to one of the following fields: craniospinal plus 12 Gy abdominal RT including the gonads (group 1); craniospinal (group 2); or cranial (group 3). The median age at the time of their last evaluation was 14.5 years (range, 10.5 to 25.7), which took place a median of 5.0 years (range, 1 to 10.3) after discontinuing therapy. The incidence of primary germ cell dysfunction as judged by raised levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and/or reduced testicular volume was significantly associated with field of RT; 55% of group 1, 17% of group 2, and 0% of group 3 were abnormal (P = .002). Leydig cell function, as assessed by plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, and pubertal development, was unaffected in the majority of subjects regardless of RT field. These data indicate that in boys undergoing therapy for ALL, germ cell dysfunction is common following testicular irradiation and can occur following exposure to scattered irradiation from craniospinal RT. In contrast, Leydig cell function appears resistant to direct irradiation with doses as high as 12 Gy.

  13. A genome-wide association study identifies risk loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia at 10q26.13 and 12q23.1

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, J; Kumar, R; Henrion, M Y R; Moorman, A V; Rachakonda, P S; Hosen, I; da Silva Filho, M I; Holroyd, A; Dobbins, S E; Koehler, R; Thomsen, H; Irving, J A; Allan, J M; Lightfoot, T; Roman, E; Kinsey, S E; Sheridan, E; Thompson, P D; Hoffmann, P; Nöthen, M M; Heilmann-Heimbach, S; Jöckel, K H; Greaves, M; Harrison, C J; Bartram, C R; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Hemminki, K; Houlston, R S

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To identify new susceptibility loci for the largest subtype of ALL, B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL), we conducted a meta-analysis of two GWASs with imputation using 1000 Genomes and UK10K Project data as reference (totaling 1658 cases and 7224 controls). After genotyping an additional 2525 cases and 3575 controls, we identify new susceptibility loci for BCP-ALL mapping to 10q26.13 (rs35837782, LHPP, P=1.38 × 10−11) and 12q23.1 (rs4762284, ELK3, P=8.41 × 10−9). We also provide confirmatory evidence for the existence of independent risk loci at 9p21.3, but show that the association marked by rs77728904 can be accounted for by linkage disequilibrium with the rare high-impact CDKN2A p.Ala148Thr variant rs3731249. Our data provide further insights into genetic susceptibility to ALL and its biology. PMID:27694927

  14. A genome-wide association study identifies risk loci for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia at 10q26.13 and 12q23.1.

    PubMed

    Vijayakrishnan, J; Kumar, R; Henrion, M Y R; Moorman, A V; Rachakonda, P S; Hosen, I; da Silva Filho, M I; Holroyd, A; Dobbins, S E; Koehler, R; Thomsen, H; Irving, J A; Allan, J M; Lightfoot, T; Roman, E; Kinsey, S E; Sheridan, E; Thompson, P D; Hoffmann, P; Nöthen, M M; Heilmann-Heimbach, S; Jöckel, K H; Greaves, M; Harrison, C J; Bartram, C R; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Hemminki, K; Houlston, R S

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To identify new susceptibility loci for the largest subtype of ALL, B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL), we conducted a meta-analysis of two GWASs with imputation using 1000 Genomes and UK10K Project data as reference (totaling 1658 cases and 7224 controls). After genotyping an additional 2525 cases and 3575 controls, we identify new susceptibility loci for BCP-ALL mapping to 10q26.13 (rs35837782, LHPP, P=1.38 × 10(-11)) and 12q23.1 (rs4762284, ELK3, P=8.41 × 10(-9)). We also provide confirmatory evidence for the existence of independent risk loci at 9p21.3, but show that the association marked by rs77728904 can be accounted for by linkage disequilibrium with the rare high-impact CDKN2A p.Ala148Thr variant rs3731249. Our data provide further insights into genetic susceptibility to ALL and its biology.

  15. Living near overhead high voltage transmission power lines as a risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza; Tarjoman, Termeh; Abadi, Alireza; Yavari, Parvin

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate association of living near high voltage power lines with occurrence of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Through a case-control study 300 children aged 1-18 years with confirmed ALL were selected from all referral teaching centers for cancer. They interviewed for history of living near overhead high voltage power lines during at least past two years and compared with 300 controls which were individually matched for sex and approximate age. Logistic regression, chi square and paired t-tests were used for analysis when appropriate. The case group were living significantly closer to power lines (P<0.001). More than half of the cases were exposed to two or three types of power lines (P<0.02). Using logistic regression, odds ratio of 2.61 (95%CI: 1.73 to 3.94) calculated for less than 600 meters far from the nearest lines against more than 600 meters. This ratio estimated as 9.93 (95%CI: 3.47 to 28.5) for 123 KV, 10.78 (95%CI: 3.75 to 31) for 230 KV and 2.98 (95%CI: 0.93 to 9.54) for 400 KV lines. Odds of ALL decreased 0.61 for every 600 meters from the nearest power line. This study emphasizes that living close to high voltage power lines is a risk for ALL.

  16. An animal model to study toxicity of central nervous system therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Effects on growth and craniofacial proportion

    SciTech Connect

    Schunior, A.; Zengel, A.E.; Mullenix, P.J.; Tarbell, N.J.; Howes, A.; Tassinari, M.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Many long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have short stature, as well as craniofacial and dental abnormalities, as side effects of central nervous system prophylactic therapy. An animal model is presented to assess these adverse effects on growth. Cranial irradiation (1000 cGy) with and without prednisolone (18 mg/kg i.p.) and methotrexate (2 mg/kg i.p.) was administered to 17- and 18-day-old Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. Animals were weighed 3 times/week. Final body weight and body length were measured at 150 days of age. Femur length and craniofacial dimensions were measured directly from the bones, using calipers. For all exposed groups there was a permanent suppression of weight gain with no catch-up growth or normal adolescent growth spurt. Body length was reduced for all treated groups, as were the ratios of body weight to body length and cranial length to body length. Animals subjected to cranial irradiation exhibited microcephaly, whereas those who received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy demonstrated altered craniofacial proportions in addition to microcephaly. Changes in growth patterns and skeletal proportions exhibited sexually dimorphic characteristics. The results indicate that cranial irradiation is a major factor in the growth failure in exposed rats, but chemotherapeutic agents contribute significantly to the outcome of growth and craniofacial dimensions.

  17. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Impact of sleep, fatigue, and systemic inflammation on neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Brinkman, Tara M; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Mzayek, Yasmin; Liu, Wei; Banerjee, Pia; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Srivastava, Deokumar; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Krull, Kevin R

    2017-09-01

    Long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, which may be associated with fatigue, sleep problems, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress. We examined these associations among survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy only. Survivors of childhood ALL (male, n = 35 and female, n = 35; mean age, 14.3 years [standard deviation, 4.7 years] and mean years from diagnosis, 7.4 years [standard deviation, 1.9 years]) completed neurocognitive testing, behavioral ratings, and reported sleep quality and fatigue symptoms 5 years after diagnosis. Serum was collected concurrently and assayed for interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. General linear modeling was used to assess associations among biomarkers and functional outcomes, adjusting for age and stratified by sex. Survivors performed worse than population norms on executive function and processing speed and reported more behavioral problems (P < .05 adjusted for multiple comparison). In female survivors, fatigue was associated with poor executive function (r = 0.41; P = .02), processing speed (r = 0.56; P < .001), and attention (r = 0.36-0.55; P < .05). Female survivors with frequent nighttime awakening displayed more inattention (P = .01), hyperactivity (P = .03), and aggression (P = .01). Worse executive function, processing speed, and behavioral symptoms were observed in female survivors with higher levels of IL-6, IL-1β, and hsCRP (P < .05). Male survivors with high levels of TNF-α demonstrated worse organization (P = .03), but no significant associations between neurocognitive outcomes and sleep/fatigue measures were observed. Neurocognitive function in female survivors of childhood ALL appears more susceptible to the effects of sleep disturbance and fatigue. Systemic inflammation may

  19. Utility of Global Longitudinal Strain by Echocardiography to Detect Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Long-Term Adult Survivors of Childhood Lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Jon R; Massey, Richard; Dalen, Håvard; Kanellopoulos, Adriani; Hamre, Hanne; Fosså, Sophie D; Ruud, Ellen; Kiserud, Cecilie E; Aakhus, Svend

    2016-08-01

    Measuring left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) is recommended in screening of long-term cancer survivors for cardiotoxicity. However, there are limited data on GLS in this setting, in particular in survivors with apparently normal LV function without risk factors of impaired GLS. In the present study, we measured GLS in 191 adult survivors of childhood lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with normal LV ejection fraction and fractional shortening (FS) and without known hypertension, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction, or stroke. We compared GLS in the survivors with 180 controls. Mean GLS was -19.0 ± 2.2% in the survivor group and -21.4 ± 2.0% in the controls (p <0.001). Impaired GLS, defined as mean - 1.96 SDs in the control group, occurred in 53 of 191 survivors (28%). We included survivors with impaired LV ejection fraction and/or FS or traditional risk factors (n = 231 in all) in multiple regression analyses to explore associations with previous cancer treatment. Survivors treated with mediastinal radiotherapy had an odds ratio of impaired GLS of 5.2 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 12) compared with other survivors. Survivors treated with cumulative anthracycline doses >300 mg/m(2) had an odds ratio of 4.8 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 14) of impaired GLS. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a high proportion of LV dysfunction assessed by GLS in apparently healthy adult survivors of childhood cancer. Impaired GLS was associated with previous exposure to mediastinal radiotherapy and high doses of anthracyclines. The prognostic role of measuring GLS in this specific patient population should be examined in prospective studies.

  20. Improving risk stratification of patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Glutathione-S-Transferases polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Riccheri, María C.; Nuñez, Myriam; Alfonso, Graciela; Gueron, Geraldine; De Siervi, Adriana; Vazquez, Elba; Cotignola, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of genotype at Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) diagnosis as a genetic predictor of disease outcome is under constant study. However, results are inconclusive and seem to be population specific. We analyzed the predictive value of germline polymorphisms for childhood ALL relapse and survival. We retrospectively recruited 140 Argentine patients with de novo ALL. Genotypes were analyzed using PCR-RFLP (GSTP1 c.313A > G, MDR1 c.3435T > C, and MTHFR c.665C > T) and multiplex PCR (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null). Patients with the GSTP1 c.313GG genotype had an increased risk for relapse in univariate (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.03–6.82, p = 0.04) and multivariate (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.17–8.83, p = 0.02) models. The combined genotype slightly increased risk for relapse in the univariate (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.09–7.32, p = 0.03) and multivariate (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.14–7.79, p = 0.03) models for patients with 2/3-risk-genotypes (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null, GSTP1 c.313GG). The Recurrence-Free Survival (RFS) was shorter for GSTP1 c.313GG (p = 0.025) and 2/3-risk-genotypes (p = 0.021). GST polymorphisms increased the risk of relapse and RFS of patients with childhood ALL. The inclusion of these genetic markers in ALL treatment protocols might improve risk stratification and reduce the number of relapses and deaths. PMID:27058755

  1. Improving risk stratification of patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Glutathione-S-Transferases polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of relapse.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Daiana B; Abbate, Mercedes; Riccheri, María C; Nuñez, Myriam; Alfonso, Graciela; Gueron, Geraldine; De Siervi, Adriana; Vazquez, Elba; Cotignola, Javier

    2017-01-03

    The inclusion of genotype at Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) diagnosis as a genetic predictor of disease outcome is under constant study. However, results are inconclusive and seem to be population specific. We analyzed the predictive value of germline polymorphisms for childhood ALL relapse and survival. We retrospectively recruited 140 Argentine patients with de novo ALL. Genotypes were analyzed using PCR-RFLP (GSTP1 c.313A > G, MDR1 c.3435T > C, and MTHFR c.665C > T) and multiplex PCR (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null). Patients with the GSTP1 c.313GG genotype had an increased risk for relapse in univariate (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.03-6.82, p = 0.04) and multivariate (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.17-8.83, p = 0.02) models. The combined genotype slightly increased risk for relapse in the univariate (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.09-7.32, p = 0.03) and multivariate (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.14-7.79, p = 0.03) models for patients with 2/3-risk-genotypes (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null, GSTP1 c.313GG). The Recurrence-Free Survival (RFS) was shorter for GSTP1 c.313GG (p = 0.025) and 2/3-risk-genotypes (p = 0.021). GST polymorphisms increased the risk of relapse and RFS of patients with childhood ALL. The inclusion of these genetic markers in ALL treatment protocols might improve risk stratification and reduce the number of relapses and deaths.

  2. Novel Susceptibility Variants at 10p12.31-12.2 for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Ethnically Diverse Populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the incidence of ALL varies by ethnicity. Although accumulating evidence indicates inherited predisposition to ALL, the genetic basis of ALL susceptibility in diverse ancestry has not been comprehensively examined. Methods We performed a multiethnic genome-wide association study in 1605 children with ALL and 6661 control subjects after adjusting for population structure, with validation in three replication series of 845 case subjects and 4316 control subjects. Association was tested by two-sided logistic regression. Results A novel ALL susceptibility locus at 10p12.31-12.2 (BMI1-PIP4K2A, rs7088318, P = 1.1×10−11) was identified in the genome-wide association study, with independent replication in European Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans (P = .001, .009, and .04, respectively). Association was also validated at four known ALL susceptibility loci: ARID5B, IKZF1, CEBPE, and CDKN2A/2B. Associations at ARID5B, IKZF1, and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants were consistent across ethnicity, with multiple independent signals at IKZF1 and BMI1-PIP4K2A loci. The frequency of ARID5B and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants differed by ethnicity, in parallel with ethnic differences in ALL incidence. Suggestive evidence for modifying effects of age on genetic predisposition to ALL was also observed. ARID5B, IKZF1, CEBPE, and BMI1-PIP4K2A variants cumulatively conferred strong predisposition to ALL, with children carrying six to eight copies of risk alleles at a ninefold (95% confidence interval = 6.9 to 11.8) higher ALL risk relative to those carrying zero to one risk allele at these four single nucleotide polymorphisms. Conclusions These findings indicate strong associations between inherited genetic variation and ALL susceptibility in children and shed new light on ALL molecular etiology in diverse ancestry. PMID:23512250

  3. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  4. Father's occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents and childhood acute leukemia: a new method to assess exposure (a case-control study)

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Saldivar, Maria Luisa; Ortega-Alvarez, Manuel Carlos; Fajardo-Gutierrez, Arturo; Bernaldez-Rios, Roberto; del Campo-Martinez, Maria de los Angeles; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Palomo-Colli, Miguel Angel; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Borja-Aburto, Victor Hugo; Rodriguez-Rivera, Maria de Jesus; Vargas-Garcia, Victor Manuel; Zarco-Contreras, Jesus; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Mejia-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical research has not been able to establish whether a father's occupational exposures are associated with the development of acute leukemia (AL) in their offspring. The studies conducted have weaknesses that have generated a misclassification of such exposure. Occupations and exposures to substances associated with childhood cancer are not very frequently encountered in the general population; thus, the reported risks are both inconsistent and inaccurate. In this study, to assess exposure we used a new method, an exposure index, which took into consideration the industrial branch, specific position, use of protective equipment, substances at work, degree of contact with such substances, and time of exposure. This index allowed us to obtain a grade, which permitted the identification of individuals according to their level of exposure to known or potentially carcinogenic agents that are not necessarily specifically identified as risk factors for leukemia. The aim of this study was to determine the association between a father's occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents and the presence of AL in their offspring. Methods From 1999 to 2000, a case-control study was performed with 193 children who reside in Mexico City and had been diagnosed with AL. The initial sample-size calculation was 150 children per group, assessed with an expected odds ratio (OR) of three and a minimum exposure frequency of 15.8%. These children were matched by age, sex, and institution with 193 pediatric surgical patients at secondary-care hospitals. A questionnaire was used to determine each child's background and the characteristics of the father's occupation(s). In order to determine the level of exposure to carcinogenic agents, a previously validated exposure index (occupational exposure index, OEI) was used. The consistency and validity of the index were assessed by a questionnaire comparison, the sensory recognition of the work area, and an expert's opinion. Results The

  5. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. How Is Childhood Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Classification based on how the leukemia cells look (morphology) In the past, doctors used the French-American- ... of AML are classified mainly based on their morphology (how they look under the microscope). There are ...

  7. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Redefining transplant in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Rob; Goldstone, Anthony H; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2011-12-01

    Assigning the correct treatment to those with acute leukemia is challenging and requires careful assessment of both the disease and the patient. Our ability to assign relapse risk to disease is evolving and incorporates cytogenetics, molecular lesions, and assessment of minimal residual disease after initial treatment. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (alloHCPT) is one of the most efficacious treatments available to the physician. In adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) despite the treatment risk, patients with a matched sibling who achieve CR should be referred for transplant. Prospective trials investigating the role of unrelated donors are in progress. There is little prospective evidence, but nonetheless encouraging data, to support referring older patients for alloHPCT using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), all high-risk patients and the majority of intermediate-risk patients with a matched sibling should be offered alloHPCT in CR1. In addition there is evidence that some patients previously assigned as good-risk would benefit from sibling transplant. Use of unrelated donors will expand the numbers eligible for transplant and should be considered when a matched-sibling is not available particularly in high-risk patients. Similarly to ALL, the use of RIC is allowing transplantation to be offered to those deemed too old or unfit for myeloablative conditioning. The importance of enrolling patients into suitable prospective clinical trials cannot be overstated.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Risk-directed therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Results of the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica '82 studies.

    PubMed

    Vecchi, V; Aricò, M; Basso, G; Ceci, A; Madon, E; Mandelli, F; Masera, G; Massimo, L; Pession, A; Zanesco, L

    1993-10-15

    In 1982, the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) started its third-generation study, aiming to improve previous results obtained by AIEOP '79 study and to deliver a standardized treatment to most Italian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We treated 902 children (older than 1 year and younger than 15 years of age) with newly diagnosed ALL in multicenter studies of risk-directed therapy (111 low risk [LR] from Study 8201; 570 average risk [AR] from Study 8202; and 117 and 104 high risk [HR] from Studies 8303 and 8503, respectively). Induction therapy was composed of vincristine, prednisone, and asparaginase for LR or AR patients and these agents plus daunorubicin, (Study 8503) or vincristine, prednisone, cytarabine, and intermediate-dose methotrexate (Study 8303) for HR patients. Central nervous system (CNS) preventive therapy consisted of intrathecal methotrexate only (LR), intrathecal methotrexate plus 18 Gy cranial irradiation (AR and HR Study 8503), or high-dose (HD) cytarabine (HR Study 8303). Reinduction therapy was vincristine/prednisone/daunorubicin for AR patients with cyclophosphamide added for HR patients in Study 8303 and HD asparaginase in Study 8503. LR patients did not receive intensification therapy. Continuation therapy comprised 6-mercaptopurine plus methotrexate and monthly pulses with vincristine plus prednisone for all patients, except for HR patients in Study 8303 who also received teniposide plus cytarabine. Weekly HD asparaginase was also given in Study 8503. Duration of treatment was 24 months for Studies 8201 and 8202, 15 months for Study 8303, and 22 months for Study 8503. The overall complete remission (CR) rate was 94.7% (97.3% for LR, 94.9% for AR, and 93.2% for HR). Overall 7-year event-free survival (EFS) was 53.6% (standard error [SE], 1.8). EFS was 60.8% in LR (SE, 4.7), 60.6% in AR at 7 years (SE, 4.7), and 18.5% in Study 8303 (HR) at 5 years (SE, 3.8). Because of the poor result in HR

  13. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  15. Dietary Protein Intake and Lean Muscle Mass in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Report From the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Alexandra M.; Gibson, Todd M.; Lu, Lu; Kaste, Sue C.; DeLany, James P.; Partin, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Nelson, Heather H.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for low lean muscle mass and muscle weakness, which may contribute to inactivity and early development of chronic diseases typically seen in older adults. Although increasing protein intake, in combination with resistance training, improves lean muscle mass in other populations, it is not known whether muscular tissue among survivors of ALL, whose impairments are treatment-related, will respond similarly. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate associations among dietary protein intake, resistance training, and lean muscle mass in survivors of ALL and age-, sex-, and race-matched controls. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Lean muscle mass was determined with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, dietary information with 24-hour recalls, and participation in resistance training with a questionnaire. Participants were 365 survivors of ALL (52% male; 87% white; median age=28.5 years, range=23.6–31.7) and 365 controls with no previous cancer. Results Compared with controls, survivors of ALL had lower lean muscle mass (55.0 versus 57.2 kg, respectively) and lower percentage of lean muscle mass (68.6% versus 71.4%, respectively) than controls. Similar proportions of survivors (71.1%) and controls (69.7%) met recommended dietary protein intake (0.8 g/kg/d). Survivors (45.4%) were less likely to report resistance training than controls (53.8%). In adjusted models, 1-g higher protein intake per kilogram of body mass per day was associated with a 7.9% increase and resistance training ≥1×wk, with a 2.8% increase in lean muscle mass. Limitations The cross-sectional study design limits temporal evaluation of the association between protein intake and lean muscle mass. Conclusions The findings suggest that survivors of childhood ALL with low lean muscle mass may benefit from optimizing dietary protein intake in combination with resistance training. Research is needed to

  16. Dietary Protein Intake and Lean Muscle Mass in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Report From the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Boland, Alexandra M; Gibson, Todd M; Lu, Lu; Kaste, Sue C; DeLany, James P; Partin, Robyn E; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; Howell, Carrie R; Nelson, Heather H; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-07-01

    Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for low lean muscle mass and muscle weakness, which may contribute to inactivity and early development of chronic diseases typically seen in older adults. Although increasing protein intake, in combination with resistance training, improves lean muscle mass in other populations, it is not known whether muscular tissue among survivors of ALL, whose impairments are treatment-related, will respond similarly. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations among dietary protein intake, resistance training, and lean muscle mass in survivors of ALL and age-, sex-, and race-matched controls. This was a cross-sectional study. Lean muscle mass was determined with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, dietary information with 24-hour recalls, and participation in resistance training with a questionnaire. Participants were 365 survivors of ALL (52% male; 87% white; median age=28.5 years, range=23.6-31.7) and 365 controls with no previous cancer. Compared with controls, survivors of ALL had lower lean muscle mass (55.0 versus 57.2 kg, respectively) and lower percentage of lean muscle mass (68.6% versus 71.4%, respectively) than controls. Similar proportions of survivors (71.1%) and controls (69.7%) met recommended dietary protein intake (0.8 g/kg/d). Survivors (45.4%) were less likely to report resistance training than controls (53.8%). In adjusted models, 1-g higher protein intake per kilogram of body mass per day was associated with a 7.9% increase and resistance training ≥1×wk, with a 2.8% increase in lean muscle mass. The cross-sectional study design limits temporal evaluation of the association between protein intake and lean muscle mass. The findings suggest that survivors of childhood ALL with low lean muscle mass may benefit from optimizing dietary protein intake in combination with resistance training. Research is needed to determine whether resistance training with protein supplementation

  17. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  18. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  19. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  3. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  4. Relapse of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and outcomes at a reference center in Latin America: organomegaly at diagnosis is a significant clinical predictor.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Pinzón-Uresti, Mónica Andrea; Jiménez-Castillo, Raúl Alberto; Colunga-Pedraza, Julia Esther; González-Llano, Óscar; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2017-06-03

    Relapse is the major cause of treatment failure in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of childhood; it is more frequent among high-risk patients from low-middle income than from high-income countries. The frequency, sites and outcome of relapsed ALL in children of northeast Mexico over a decade was documented. A retrospective analysis of 246 children belonging to a low-income group <16 years with de novo ALL during 2004-2015 was performed. Five-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Data on time, site, response to therapy and final outcome of relapse were analyzed. Hazard ratios (HRs) of relapse and death were estimated by the Cox regression model. Very early relapse was defined as that occurring in <18 months, early relapse between 18 and 36 months, and late relapse >36 months from diagnosis, respectively. Eighty-seven (35.4%) children relapsed. Five-year OS was 82.6% in children without relapse vs. 42% for relapsed patients. Bone marrow (BM) was the most frequent site of relapse (51.72%). Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapses occurred in 29.9%. Five-year OS was 11.2% for BM and 15.5% for early relapse. HR of relapse for organomegaly was 3.683, 2.247 for an initial white blood cell count >50 000 × 10(9)/l and 1.169 for positive minimal residual disease status. A high rate of very early, CNS, and BM relapse with a considerably low 5-year OS requiring reassessment of therapy was documented. Organomegaly at diagnosis was a highly significant clinical predictor for relapse.

  5. Calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation provides no added benefit to nutritional counseling to improve bone mineral density in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Kaste, S C; Qi, A; Smith, K; Surprise, H; Lovorn, E; Boyett, J; Ferry, R J; Relling, M V; Shurtleff, S A; Pui, C H; Carbone, L; Hudson, M M; Ness, K K

    2014-05-01

    We sought to improve lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS-BMD) in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using calcium and cholecalciferol supplementation. This double-blind, placebo-controlled trial randomized 275 participants (median age, 17 [9-36.1] years) with age- and gender-specific LS-BMD Z-scores <0 to receive nutritional counseling with supplementation of 1,000 mg/day calcium and 800 International Unit cholecalciferol or placebo for 2 years. The primary outcome was change in LS-BMD assessed by quantitative computerized tomography (QCT) at 24 months. Linear regression models were employed to identify the baseline risk factors for low LS-BMD and to compare LS-BMD outcomes. Pre-randomization LS-BMD below the mean was associated with male gender (P = 0.0024), White race (P = 0.0003), lower body mass index (P < 0.0001), and cumulative glucocorticoid doses of ≥ 5,000 mg (P = 0.0012). One hundred eighty-eight (68%) participants completed the study; 77% adhered to the intervention. Mean LS-BMD change did not differ between survivors randomized to supplements (0.33 ± 0.57) or placebo (0.28 ± 0.56). Participants aged 9-13 years and those 22-35 years had the greatest mean increases in LS-BMD (0.50 ± 0.66 and 0.37 ± 0.23, respectively). Vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25[OH]D <30 ng/ml) found in 296 (75%), was not associated with LS-BMD outcomes (P = 0.78). Cholecalciferol and calcium supplementation provides no added benefit to nutritional counseling for improving LS-BMD among adolescent and young adult survivors of ALL (93% of whom had LS-BMD Z-scores above the mean at study entry). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  7. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-01-01

    Background Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Design and Methods Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. Results The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53±10% and 76±2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases

  8. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria.

    PubMed

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53+/-10% and 76+/-2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases. The small numbers of MPAL cases

  9. Advances in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Tim R

    2004-01-01

    Current literature. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a stem cell disorder characterized by an overproduction of lymphoblasts in the bone marrow that eventually spill into circulation, producing lymphocytosis. As with the other acute leukemias, the most common symptoms experienced by patients include fatigue, bleeding, and recurrent infections resulting from the suppression of normal hematopoiesis in the bone marrow by the accumulating blasts. ALL primarily affects children and exhibits the best response to standard chemotherapy as compared to acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML). Further, remission rates are highest among ALL patients, many of whom are experiencing sustained remissions suggesting cure. In light of early treatment successes, researchers began to investigate modifications of standard treatment regimens to accommodate variability in weight, age, and response to therapy among children with ALL. Individualized treatment plans were implemented where some patients received a reduced intensity course of therapy to minimize drug toxicity while others received drug intensification to maximize response. More recently, research efforts have been directed at the elucidation of leukemogenic mechanisms implicated in ALL to identify specific protein mutants that can be used to design drugs tailored to interfere with the activity of these mutant protein targets. Identification of chimeric proteins produced from chromosomal translocations and gene expression profiles from microarray analyses are the primary techniques used to identify the potential therapeutic targets. Several reliable prognostic indicators have been identified and are being used to improve therapeutic planning and outcome prediction in ALL patients. Individualized treatment regimens have been developed based on the specific characteristics of each patient to minimize treatment related adverse events and maximize response. Through the use of cytogenetic, molecular, and microarray testing, ALL

  10. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  11. Neuropsychological Functioning in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb, Roger N.; Regan, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological functioning of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent central-nervous-system prophylactic treatment. Findings replicated past research in showing survivors perform poorly on visual-motor integration tasks and develop a Nonverbal Learning Disability. Findings offer recommendations for future research and…

  12. Neuropsychological Functioning in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb, Roger N.; Regan, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological functioning of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent central-nervous-system prophylactic treatment. Findings replicated past research in showing survivors perform poorly on visual-motor integration tasks and develop a Nonverbal Learning Disability. Findings offer recommendations for future research and…

  13. Alteration of the SETBP1 gene and splicing pathway genes SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 in childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Hye-Ran; Baek, Hee-Jo; Kook, Hoon; Cho, Duck; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent somatic SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) and splicing pathway gene mutations have recently been found in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. These mutations have been comprehensively analyzed in adult AML, but not in childhood AML. We investigated possible alteration of the SETBP1, splicing factor 3B subunit 1 (SF3B1), U2 small nuclear RNA auxiliary factor 1 (U2AF1), and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) genes in childhood AML. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses were performed to reveal chromosomal and genetic alterations. Sequence alterations in the SETBP1, SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes were examined by using direct sequencing in a cohort of 53 childhood AML patients. Childhood AML patients did not harbor any recurrent SETBP1 gene mutations, although our study did identify a synonymous mutation in one patient. None of the previously reported aberrations in the mutational hotspot of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were identified in any of the 53 patients. Alterations of the SETBP1 gene or SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 genes are not common genetic events in childhood AML, implying that the mutations are unlikely to exert a driver effect in myeloid leukemogenesis during childhood.

  14. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with translocation t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two additional chromosomal aberrations involving chromosomes 1, 6, and 13: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wafa, Abdulsamad; As'sad, Manar; Liehr, Thomas; Aljapawe, Abdulmunim; Al Achkar, Walid

    2017-04-07

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13), which results in the TCF3-PBX1 chimeric gene, is one of the most frequent rearrangements observed in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It appears in both adult and pediatric patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia at an overall frequency of 3 to 5%. Most cases of pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia carrying the translocation t(1;19) have a typical immunophenotype with homogeneous expression of CD19, CD10, CD9, complete absence of CD34, and at least diminished CD20. Moreover, the translocation t(1;19) correlates with known clinical high risk factors, such as elevated white blood cell count, high serum lactate dehydrogenase levels, and central nervous system involvement; early reports indicated that patients with translocation t(1;19) had a poor outcome under standard treatment. We report the case of a 15-year-old Syrian boy with pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal karyotype with a der(19)t(1;19)(q21.1;p13.3) and two yet unreported chromosomal aberrations: an interstitial deletion 6q12 to 6q26 and a der(13)t(1;13)(q21.1;p13). According to the literature, cases who are translocation t(1;19)-positive have a significantly higher incidence of central nervous system relapse than patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia without the translocation. Of interest, central nervous system involvement was also seen in our patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an unbalanced translocation t(1;19) with two additional chromosomal aberrations, del(6)(q12q26) and t(1;13)(q21.3;p13), which seem to be recurrent and could influence clinical outcome. Also the present case confirms the impact of the translocation t(1;19) on central nervous system relapse, which should be studied for underlying mechanisms in future.

  17. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As kids enter the teen years, osteosarcoma (bone ... With Cancer Adjust Leukemia Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Osteosarcoma Brain Tumors Cancer Center Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Balancing Academics and ...

  18. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s ... myeloid leukemia . Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  20. Intraventricular meningioma after cranial irradiation for childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Huse, Jason T; Dunkel, Ira J; Steinherz, Peter G; Haque, Sofia; Khakoo, Yasmin

    2010-10-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common brain tumors in adults. They are most commonly located over the cerebral convexities and are infrequently found in an intraventricular location. Ionizing cranial radiation is a risk factor for late occurrence of meningiomas within the radiation field. While pathologic grading of meningiomas is straightforward, significant variability often exists between pathologists in applying standard grading criteria. This has implications for prognosis. Radiation-induced meningiomas may also have predilection to recur. The authors describe a case of an intraventricular meningioma occurring 23 years after cranial irradiation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  2. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  3. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  4. Shorter Maintenance Therapy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: The Experience of the Prospective, Randomized Brazilian GBTLI ALL-93 Protocol.

    PubMed

    Brandalise, Silvia R; Viana, Marcos B; Pinheiro, Vitória R P; Mendonça, Núbia; Lopes, Luiz F; Pereira, Waldir V; Lee, Maria L M; Pontes, Elitânia M; Zouain-Figueiredo, Gláucia P; Azevedo, Alita C A C; Pimentel, Nilma; Fernandes, Maria Z; Oliveira, Hilda M; Vianna, Sônia R; Scrideli, Carlos A; Werneck, Fernando A; Álvares, Maria N; Boldrini, Érica; Loggetto, Sandra R; Bruniera, Paula; Mastellaro, Maria J; Souza, Eni M; Araújo, Rogério A; Bandeira, Flávia; Tan, Doralice M; Carvalho, Nelson A; Salgado, Maria A S

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance therapy is an important phase of the childhood ALL treatment, requiring 2-year long therapy adherence of the patients and families. Weekly methotrexate with daily 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) constitutes the backbone of maintenance therapy. Reduction in the maintenance therapy could overweight problems related with poverty of children with ALL living in limited-income countries (LIC). To compare, prospectively, the EFS rates of children with ALL treated according to two maintenance regimens: 18 vs. 24 months duration. From October 1993 to September 1999, 867 consecutive untreated ALL patients <18 years of age were treated according to the Brazilian Cooperative Group for Childhood ALL Treatment (GBTLI) ALL-93 protocol. Risk classification was based exclusively on patient's age and leukocyte count (NCI risk group) and clinical extra medullary involvement of the disease. Data were analyzed by the intention-to-treat approach. Fourteen patients (1.6%) were excluded: wrong diagnosis (n = 7) and previous corticosteroid (n = 7). Of the 853 eligible patients, 421 were randomly allocated, at study enrollment, to receive 18-month (group 1) and 432 to receive 24-month (group 2) maintenance therapy. Complete remission rate was achieved in 96% of the patients (817/853). Twenty-eight patients (3.4%) died during the induction phase. Thirty-four patients (4.0%) were lost to follow-up. The overall EFS was 66.1 ± 1.7% at 15 years. No difference was seen according to maintenance: EFS15y was 65.8 ± 2.3% (group 1) and 66.3 ± 2.3% (group 2; p = 0.79). No difference between regimens was detected after stratifying the analyses according to factors associated with adverse prognosis in this study (age group <1 year or >10 years and high WBC at diagnosis). Overall death in remission rate was 6.85% (56 patients). Deaths during maintenance were 13 in group 1 and 12 in group 2, all due to infection. Over 15 years of follow-up, two patients both from

  5. Acute childhood leukemias and exposure to magnetic fields generated by high voltage overhead power lines - a risk factor in Iran.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Abbas Ali H Pour; Arabi, M A Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Many investigators have studied the effects of Extremely Low Frequency-Magnetic Fields generated by ordinary and domestic power lines, as a risk factor in acute leukaemias of children, but there are limited information available regarding very high voltage overhead power lines. Children in developing countries sometimes live very close to such structures and we have registered several patients with acute leukaemias appearing in clusters. In the present study we have analyzed 60 consecutively diagnosed patients with acute leukaemias, and 59 matched controls in a provincial capital city in North-Western Iran. After provision of consent, a detailed form was filled in, and a visit to the present (or previous) residential areas of both groups was arranged. The locations of the very high voltage power lines (123, 230, 400 kilo volts), were noted in each area, if present, and their distances from the houses under study were detected. The expected intensities of the Magnetic Fields (B) were calculated having the mean intensity of the electrical current and other line characteristics, by means of relevant equations. Fourteen patients in the case group (23.5%) were living near the high voltage power lines in distances < or = 500 meters. (Mean B = 0.6 microTeslas, microT). In the control group at the same distance, the figure was 2 children (3.3%) (Mean B = 0.35 microT). Statistically, the likelihood of leukaemia was increased considerably in this distance (Odds ratio (OR) = 8.67, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.74- 58.4, P value= 0.001). On the other hand 15 pts (25 %) in the leukaemia group were experiencing Magnetic fields above 0.45 microT in comparison to 5 in the control group ( 8.5% )(OR = 3.60, 95% CI = 1.11-12.39, P = 0.01). More children in developing countries like Iran live close to very high voltage lines, and they experience relatively more harmful effects from the Magnetic Fields, in comparison with children in developed countries. Residence near very high

  6. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-26

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid