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Sample records for acute clinical disease

  1. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-01-01

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials. PMID:24976913

  2. Acute Marchiafava-Bignami disease: clinical and serial MRI correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Prakashini, Koteshwara; Polnaya, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a form of toxic demyelinating disease more often seen in chronic alcoholics. The disease process typically involves the corpus callosum and clinically often presents with altered sensorium, neurocognitive defects or seizures with acute cases often deteriorating to comatose state. The death rate is high. We report a rare case of MBD with complete clinical recovery. A 50-year-old male patient presented in an unconscious state and underwent MRI of the brain which showed significant lesions involving the corpus callosum. Following treatment with thiamine and supportive therapy, he improved clinically and a follow-up MRI revealed significant resolution of the earlier lesions. Diffusion-weighted MRI showed the changes more conspicuously as compared with conventional imaging. The clinical resolution corresponded well with the MRI pattern. The case highlights that diffusion-weighted MRI is an extremely useful tool in evaluation and prognostication of MBD. PMID:24850553

  3. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  4. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  5. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  6. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  7. Postpartum Acute Pulmonary Oedema with Sub clinical Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    R, Padmaja; Gande, Sri Krishna Padma Challa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Acute dyspnea with pulmonary oedema in postpartum is uncommon but life-threatening event. Contributing factors for pulmonary oedema include, administration of tocolytics, underlying cardiac disease, iatrogenic fluid overload and preeclampsia acounting 0.08% of pregnancies. Pulmonary embolism, amniotic fluid embolism, pneumonia, aspiration and pulmonary oedema are some of the potentially devastating conditions that should be considered by the attending physician. Here, we report a case of postpartum acute pulmonary oedema referred to causality after an emergency caesarean section in a private hospital. No matter what the underlying pathology, prompt administration and appropriate resuscitation is always the first priority. Only after the patient has been stabilized attention must be turned to diagnosis and specific treatment. A diagnosis of severe Mitral Stenosis, probably of rheumatic origin was made after stabilizing the patient. PMID:25859501

  8. Acute Hepatic Phenotype of Wilson Disease: Clinical Features of Acute Episodes and Chronic Lesions Remaining in Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisao; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Yahata, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Hiroki; Momose, Kenji; Isaji, Ryohei; Sasaki, Youji; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Wakusawa, Shinya; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism, and an international group for the study of WD (IGSW) has proposed three phenotypes for its initial presentation: acute hepatic, chronic hepatic, and neurologic phenotypes. Characterization of the acute hepatic phenotype may improve our understanding of the disease. Methods: Clinical features of 10 WD patients with the acute hepatic phenotype and characteristics of chronic lesions remaining in survivors were assessed by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) guidelines. Results: All six patients younger than 30 years had survived an acute episode of hemolytic anemia with residual liver disease of cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. The acute episode was self-limiting in two of the four patients over the age of 30 years and progressed to acute liver failure in the other two patients. One of the two survivors had residual liver disease of chronic hepatitis, while the other had chronic hepatitis and neurologic disease. Neurologic disease remained in a patient who successfully received a liver transplantation. During acute episodes, serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) changed rapidly along with anemia. Liver-specific ALT levels were age-dependently correlated with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Enzyme reduction was milder for AST than ALT, which resulted in a high AST/ALT ratio in the anemic stage. The anemic stage in two patients transformed to acute liver failure. Conclusions: All survivors of an acute episode of the acute hepatic phenotype had residual liver disease or both liver and neurologic diseases. The rapid changes in liver enzymes during the acute episode and the liver and neurologic diseases remaining in survivors may provide a better understanding of WD. PMID:26807378

  9. [Clinical pathway management of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on state machine].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian; Hao, Liwei; Cheng, Yuanxiong; Xu, Tongliang; Song, Yingnuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a clinical pathway of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) based on state machine. Clinical event-driven response was utilized to control workflow execution of the AECOPD clinical pathway. By comparison with the traditional clinical pathway management, clinical numerical results showed that the proposed method was better in hospitalization days, average hospitalization expense and aberration rate, and better handled the variability in the AECOPD clinical pathway execution. PMID:24752111

  10. Clinical Scenarios in Acute Kidney Injury: Parenchymal Acute Kidney Injury-Tubulo-Interstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is the most common type of acute kidney injury (AKI) related to parenchymal damage (90% of cases). It may be due to a direct kidney injury, such as sepsis, drugs, toxins, contrast media, hemoglobinuria and myoglobinuria, or it may be the consequence of a prolonged systemic ischemic injury. Conventional ultrasound (US) shows enlarged kidneys with hypoechoic pyramids. Increased volume is largely sustained by the increase of anteroposterior diameter, while longitudinal axis usually maintains its normal length. Despite the role of color Doppler in AKI still being debated, many studies demonstrate that renal resistive indexes (RIs) vary on the basis of primary disease. Moreover, several studies assessed that higher RI values are predictive of persistent AKI. Nevertheless, due to the marked heterogeneity among the studies, further investigations focused on timing of RI measurement and test performances are needed. Acute interstitial nephritis is also a frequent cause of AKI, mainly due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics administration. The development of acute interstitial nephritis is due to an immunological reaction against nephritogenic exogenous antigens, processed by tubular cells. In acute interstitial nephritis, as well as in ATN, conventional US does not allow a definitive diagnosis. Kidneys appear enlarged and widely hyperechoic due to interstitial edema and inflammatory infiltration. Also, in this condition, hemodynamic changes are closely correlated to the severity and the progression of the anatomical damage. PMID:27169885

  11. Age, Predisposing Diseases, and Ultrasonographic Findings in Determining Clinical Outcome of Acute Acalculous Inflammatory Gallbladder Diseases in Children.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Yong; Chang, Eun Jae; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated clinical factors such as age, gender, predisposing diseases and ultrasonographic findings that determine clinical outcome of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder diseases in children. The patients were divided into the four age groups. From March 2004 through February 2014, clinical data from 131 children diagnosed as acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease by ultrasonography were retrospectively reviewed. Systemic infectious diseases were the most common etiology of acute inflammatory gallbladder disease in children and were identified in 50 patients (38.2%). Kawasaki disease was the most common predisposing disease (28 patients, 21.4%). The incidence was highest in infancy and lowest in adolescence. The age groups were associated with different predisposing diseases; noninfectious systemic disease was the most common etiology in infancy and early childhood, whereas systemic infectious disease was the most common in middle childhood and adolescence (P = 0.001). Gallbladder wall thickening was more commonly found in malignancy (100%) and systemic infection (94.0%) (P = 0.002), whereas gallbladder distension was more frequent in noninfectious systemic diseases (60%) (P = 0.000). Ascites seen on ultrasonography was associated with a worse clinical course compared with no ascites (77.9% vs. 37.7%, P = 0.030), and the duration of hospitalization was longer in patients with ascites (11.6 ± 10.7 vs. 8.0 ± 6.6 days, P = 0.020). In conclusion, consideration of age and predisposing disease in addition to ultrasonographic gallbladder findings in children suspected of acute acalculous inflammatory gallbladder disease might result in better outcomes. PMID:27550491

  12. Clinical outcome of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome mimicking acute biliary disease

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Yong; Kim, Jin Il; Cheung, Dae Young; Cho, Se Hyun; Park, Soo-Heon; Han, Joon-Yeol; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. METHODS: The clinical courses of patients that visited St. Mary’s Hospital with abdominal pain from January 2005 to December 2006 and were diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome were examined. RESULTS: Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome was identified in 22 female patients of childbearing age; their mean age was 31.0 ± 8.1 years. Fourteen of these cases presented with pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, and six patients presented with pain only in the lower abdomen. The first impression at the time of visit was acute cholecystitis or cholangitis in 10 patients and acute appendicitis or pelvic inflammatory disease in eight patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed by abdominal computer tomography (CT), and the results of abdominal sonography were normal for 10 of these patients. Chlamydia trichomatis was isolated from 18 patients. Two patients underwent laparoscopic adhesiotomy and 20 patients were completely cured by antibiotic treatment. CONCLUSION: For women of childbearing age with acute pain in the upper right abdomen alone or together with pain in the lower abdomen, Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome should be considered during differential diagnosis. Moreover, in cases suspected to be Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, abdominal CT, rather than abdominal sonography, assists in the diagnosis. PMID:19058334

  13. Clinical and multimodal imaging characteristics of acute Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease unassociated with clinically evident exudative retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sonia; Khochtali, Sana; Kahloun, Rim; Ammous, Dhiaeddine; Jelliti, Bechir; Ben Yahia, Salim; Zaouali, Sonia; Khairallah, Moncef

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and multimodal imaging findings in acute Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease without clinically evident exudative retinal detachment (ERD). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 18 patients (36 eyes), diagnosed with acute VKH disease without clinically evident ERD. All patients underwent complete ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), B-scan ultrasonography, fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Of 18 patients, twelve (66.7 %) were female and 6 (33.3 %) were male. Mean age was 39 years (range, 23-60). Ten patients had been referred with an erroneous diagnosis of primary optic nerve disorder (8; 44.4 %) or isolated anterior uveitis (2; 11.1 %). Anterior chamber or vitreous inflammatory reaction was noted in 22 eyes (61.1 %), each. Fundus findings included optic disc swelling in 30 eyes (83.3 %), retinal striae in 20 eyes (55.5 %), and yellowish deep lesions in 3 eyes (8.3 %). OCT showed a shallow, localized subclinical ERD in 18 eyes (50 %), and retinal pigment epithelial folds in 23 eyes (63.9 %). B-scan ultrasonography showed diffuse, low- to medium-reflective choroidal thickening in all eyes. FA disclosed delayed choroidal perfusion in at least one eye of all patients (100 %), mild pinpoint leakage in 21 eyes (58.3 %), optic disc hyperfluorescence in 35 eyes (97.2 %) and choroidal folds in 13 eyes (36.1 %). ICGA findings included delayed choroidal perfusion in 24 eyes (66.7 %), decrease in the number of large choroidal vessels in 36 eyes (100 %), fuzzy choroidal vessels in 35 eyes (97.2 %), and hypofluorescent dark dots in 28 eyes (77.8 %). The association of bilateral optic disc edema with retinal striae and intraocular inflammatory reaction highly suggests acute VKH disease. A multimodal imaging approach including fundus photography, OCT, B-scan ultrasonography, FA, and ICGA provides important clues for the definite diagnosis and

  14. A RESPIRATORY DISEASE MODEL FOR ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC CROSS-PROTECTION FOLLOWING HETEROLOGOUS ACUTE-TYPE PRRSV CHALLENGE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute-type PRRS outbreaks were first observed in 1996. They are characterized by severe reproductive and respiratory clinical disease losses (including sow mortalities) in PRRSV “immune” herds (regularly vaccinated or systematically exposed). This study was designed to document and validate the inef...

  15. Transcranial near-infrared laser therapy applied to promote clinical recovery in acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to treat neurodegeneration is noninvasive transcranial near-infrared laser therapy (NILT), which appears to promote acute neuroprotection by stimulating mitochondrial function, thereby increasing cellular energy production. NILT may also promote chronic neuronal function restoration via trophic factor-mediated plasticity changes or possibly neurogenesis. Clearly, NILT is a treatment that confers neuroprotection or neurorestoration using pleiotropic mechanisms. The most advanced application of NILT is for acute ischemic stroke based upon extensive preclinical and clinical studies. In laboratory settings, NILT is also being developed to treat traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. There is some intriguing data in the literature that suggests that NILT may be a method to promote clinical improvement in neurodegenerative diseases where there is a common mechanistic component, mitochondrial dysfunction and energy impairment. This article will analyze and review data supporting the continued development of NILT to treat neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22145842

  16. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  17. Prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation on clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Aashay; Agnihotri, Kanishk; Pau, Dhaval; Patel, Samir; Thakkar, Badal; Nalluri, Nikhil; Asti, Deepak; Kanotra, Ritesh; Kadavath, Sabeeda; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Achint; Sheikh, Azfar; Patel, Neil; Badheka, Apurva O; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Paydak, Hakan; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia, which is now on course to reach epidemic proportions in the elderly population. AF is a commonly encountered comorbidity in patients with cardiac and major non-cardiac diseases. Morbidity and mortality associated with AF makes it a major healthcare burden. The objective of our article is to determine the prognostic impact of AF on acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Multiple studies have been conducted to determine if AF has an independent role in the overall mortality of such patients. Our review suggests that AF has an independent adverse prognostic impact on the clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26225200

  18. International, Multicenter Standardization of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Clinical Data Collection: A Report from the Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew C; Young, Rachel; Devine, Steven; Hogan, William J; Ayuk, Francis; Bunworasate, Udomsak; Chanswangphuwana, Chantiya; Efebera, Yvonne A; Holler, Ernst; Litzow, Mark; Ordemann, Rainer; Qayed, Muna; Renteria, Anne S; Reshef, Ran; Wölfl, Matthias; Chen, Yi-Bin; Goldstein, Steven; Jagasia, Madan; Locatelli, Franco; Mielke, Stephan; Porter, David; Schechter, Tal; Shekhovtsova, Zhanna; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a leading cause of morbidity and nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. The clinical staging of GVHD varies greatly between transplant centers and is frequently not agreed on by independent reviewers. The lack of standardized approaches to handle common sources of discrepancy in GVHD grading likely contributes to why promising GVHD treatments reported from single centers have failed to show benefit in randomized multicenter clinical trials. We developed guidelines through international expert consensus opinion to standardize the diagnosis and clinical staging of GVHD for use in a large international GVHD research consortium. During the first year of use, the guidance followed discussion of complex clinical phenotypes by experienced transplant physicians and data managers. These guidelines increase the uniformity of GVHD symptom capture, which may improve the reproducibility of GVHD clinical trials after further prospective validation. PMID:26386318

  19. Pulmonary fibrosis following pneumonia due to acute Legionnaires' disease. Clinical, ultrastructural, and immunofluorescent study.

    PubMed

    Chastre, J; Raghu, G; Soler, P; Brun, P; Basset, F; Gibert, C

    1987-01-01

    During a recent nosocomial outbreak, 20 critically ill patients with acute Legionnaires' disease were admitted to the intensive care unit of Hopital Bichat, Paris. Pulmonary specimens were obtained at surgery or immediately after death in 12 patients and were examined by light, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopy. Five of these 12 patients showed evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. In all of these five patients, infection with Legionella pneumophila was evidenced by bacteriologic methods, and other diseases known to cause fibrosis were excluded. The condition of four patients deteriorated rapidly with respiratory failure, and they died with pulmonary fibrosis. Only one patient finally recovered but was left with pulmonary sequelae. Two distinctive morphologic patterns were observed, one in which interstitial fibrosis was predominant and one in which intra-alveolar organization and fibrosis were also present. The alveolar epithelial lining and the basement membranes were disrupted in all patients, as evidenced by ultrastructural observations and by immunofluorescent studies showing gaps in the distribution of type 4 collagen and laminin. Types 1 and 3 collagen accumulated in areas corresponding to thickened interstitium and intra-alveolar fibrosis. Thus, some patients who survive the acute pneumonia of Legionnaires' disease may develop pulmonary fibrosis, and this process may lead to functional impairment or death despite prompt and appropriate treatment. PMID:3539546

  20. [Acute ischemic spinal cord disease. Spinal cord infarction. A clinical study and MRI in 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Pau Serradell, A

    1994-01-01

    Acute spinal cord infarction (ASCI) occurs infrequently and may have diverse causes. The diagnosis of ASCI, and particularly of an anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS) can be confirmed nowadays by MRI, whereas in the past only necropsy confirmation was possible. Pathophysiology and long-term prognosis may be better known at present and treatments more consistent. We present the longitudinal study and clinical features of 8 patients suffering from ASCI. All of them were personally studied and had MRI examinations, often with sequential studies. three groups must be considered: one included 4 cases of ASAS at cervical level, the second 2 cases of ASAS at thoracic level and the third group with infarction of the conus medullaris (ICM), one of them developed during surgical repair of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm. Motor and sensory sequelae were assessed in each case together with possible etiological factors. In conclusion, recovery after ASAS tends to be dependent on the severity of the initial deficit. At cervical level, clinical and morphological findings argue in favour of an extrinsic selective compression of the C7 right radiculo-medullary artery as responsible for the ASA. At thoracic level, the artery preferentially occluded seems to be the sulco-commisural artery as a consequence of disc compression. Finally, an underlying peculiarity of the pattern of arterial supply is a probable predisposing factor for ICM. Generally, the long-term prognosis of ASCI is not necessarily bad. PMID:7801036

  1. Clinical pathway for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: method development and five years of experience

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Koichi; Yasui, Maya; Nishimura, Takashi; Oga, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials, evidence-based medicine, clinical guidelines, and total quality management are some of the approaches used to render science-based health care services. The clinical pathway for hospitalized patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is poorly established, although a clinical pathway is an integral part of total quality management. Aim To evaluate the outcomes of patients hospitalized with AECOPD in Japan, treated with a clinical pathway following published guidelines. Methods Prospective data were collected for patients with AECOPD admitted to a general hospital over a 5-year period since 2003. The clinical pathway was designed to establish general rules for the entire treatment protocol. The clinical pathway indicates which treatments and interventions should be performed, and when. In this study, health care providers were required to check the clinical pathway sheets to determine the next step of treatment. Results This study analyzed 276 hospitalizations in 165 patients. The clinical pathway was interrupted and defined as a dropout in 45 cases (16.3%). Nine patients died during hospitalization (3.3%). Oxygen was administered in 232 hospitalizations (84.1%). Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) treatment was administered in 110 hospitalizations (39.9%). The rate of intubation in those cases where NPPV treatment had been administered was 8.2% (9 cases out of 110). The average length of stay (LOS) was 20.3 days, and the median value was 15 days. The LOS was longer than 30 days in 34 admissions (12.3%), mainly due to complications. Conclusion AECOPD can be managed using a clinical pathway. This clinical pathway could fill the gap between guidelines and clinical practice. PMID:21760723

  2. Acute Atherothrombotic Disease and Severe Bleeding: A Difficult Clinical Presentation in Medical Practice.

    PubMed

    Căldăraru, Cristina; Popa, C; Fruntelată, Ana; Bălănescu, Ş

    2015-01-01

    Management of antithrombotic therapy in elderly patients with unstable atherothrombotic disease and increased risk of bleeding is a major clinical challenge. We report the case of a 79 year- old diabetic man with rheumatoid arthritis on both oral corticosteroids and NSAID therapy with mild renal dysfunction, who presented to our hospital because of disabling claudication. Prior to admission he had several episodes of TIA. He also had recurrent small rectal bleeding and mild anemia attributed to his long-standing hemorrhoid disease. Angiography showed a sub-occlusive left internal carotid artery stenosis associated with a significant LAD stenosis and complex peripheral artery disease. Cataclysmic bleeding and hemorrhagic shock occurred in the third day post admission. Withdrawal of all antithrombotic treatment, blood transfusion and emergency sigmoidectomy were performed for bleeding colonic diverticulosis. Subsequently antiplatelet therapy was reinitiated and the patient successfully underwent left carotid artery endarterectomy and LAD stenting. He was discharged from hospital on the 21(st) day post admission and is doing well at 24 months follow-up. PMID:26939212

  3. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  4. Clinical and pathological manifestations of cardiovascular disease in rat models: the influence of acute ozone exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper shows that rat models of cardiovascular diseases have differential degrees of underlying pathologies at a young age. Rodent models of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and metabolic disorders are used for examining susceptibility variations to environmental exposures. How...

  5. Six Month Freedom from Treatment Failure is an Important Endpoint for Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Jagasia, Madan; Goodman, Stacey; Greer, John P.; Chen, Heidi; Chinratanalab, Wichai; Kassim, Adetola A.; Engelhardt, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the ASBMT 6 month (m) freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) as a predictor of survival for patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) requiring treatment. Adult patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from February 2007 to March 2009 who were enrolled in a prospective biomarker clinical trial and developed aGVHD requiring systemic corticosteroids by day +100 were included (N=44). Six month FFTF was defined per ASBMT guidelines [absence of death, malignancy relapse/progression, or systemic immunosuppression change within 6 months of starting steroids and before chronic GVHD development]. aGVHD was treated with systemic corticosteroids in 44 patients. Day 28 response after steroid initiation (CR+VGPR+PR) occurred in 38 (87%) patients, but only 28 (64%) HCT recipients met the 6 m FFTF endpoint. Day 28 response predicted 6 m FFTF. Achieving 6 m FFTF was associated with improved 2 year (y) overall survival (OS) [81% vs. 48%, P= 0.03)] and decreased 2 y non-relapse mortality [8% vs. 49% (P= 0.01)]. In multivariate analysis, 6 m FFTF continued to predict improved OS (HR, 0.27; P=0.03). The 6 m FFTF endpoint measures fixed outcomes, predicts long-term therapeutic success, and could be less prone to measurement error than aGVHD clinical response at day 28. PMID:24096824

  6. Differential expression of Trypanosoma cruzi I associated with clinical forms of Chagas disease: overexpression of oxidative stress proteins in acute patient isolate.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M L; Solari, A; González, C I

    2011-08-24

    Chagas disease has a variable clinical course with different manifestations and heterogenous geographical distribution. Some studies suggest that this clinical variability could be influenced by the genetic variability of T. cruzi. Here we present the differential protein expression among trypomastigotes and amastigotes of T. cruzi group I isolates from patients with acute and chronic form of Chagas disease from Santander, Colombia. A total of 29 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF and LC-MS/MS; twenty in trypomastigote and nine in amastigote stage. The 29 proteins identified were grouped in 7 functional categories: 1) metabolism 31%, 2) assembly of cytoskeleton 13.7%, 3) protein destination 13.7%, 4) defenses antioxidants 20.6%, 5) protein synthesis and cellular cycle 13.7%, 6) catabolism 6.8%, and 7) adhesion 3.4%. Tryparedoxin peroxidase, lipoamide dehydrogenase, tyrosine amino transferase and HSP70 were overexpressed in the acute Chagas isolate. Tryparedoxin peroxidase overexpression in the acute isolate was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Most of these proteins are associated with resistance to oxidative stress facilitating their survival within host cells. Therefore, these proteins may represent virulence factors associated with the development of the acute form of the disease and could be used as biomarkers of the clinical course of disease and as drug targets. PMID:21642025

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the clinical management of an acute exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, J; Wedzicha, J

    2004-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impose a considerable burden of morbidity, mortality, and health care cost. Management guidelines outlining best practice, based largely on consensus expert opinion, were produced by a number of organisations during the last decade. Current interest in the field is high. This has resulted in the publication of many further studies which have extended our understanding of the pathology involved and provided, for the first time, an evidence base for many of the therapeutic options. In this review we aim to bring the non-specialist reader up to date with current management principles and the evidence underlying such interventions. PMID:15356350

  8. Focus on acute diarrhoeal disease

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, Fabio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Nardone, Gerardo; Pilotto, Alberto; Zamparo, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea is an alteration of normal bowel movement characterized by an increase in the water content, volume, or frequency of stools. Diarrhoea needs to be classified according to the trends over time (acute or chronic) and to the characteristics of the stools (watery, fatty, inflammatory). Secretory diarrhoeas, mostly acute and of viral aetiology in more than 70% of cases, are by far the most important subtype of diarrhoeas in terms of frequency, incidence and mortality (over 2.5 million deaths/year in developing countries). Natural and synthetic opiates such as morphine, codeine, and loperamide which react with endogenous opiates (enkephalins, beta-endorphins, dynorphins) mainly act on intestinal motility and slow down transit. An antidiarrhoeal drug developed in recent years, racecadotril, acts as an enkephalinase inhibitor. Clinical studies have shown that it is just as effective as loperamide in resolving acute diarrhoea but with greater reduction in pain and abdominal distension. Some studies have explored the prevalence of diarrhoea in old age. An epidemiological study carried out in Italy by 133 General Practitioners on 5515 elderly outpatients reported a prevalence of diarrhoea, defined according to the Rome criteria, of 9.1%. Infectious diseases (19%) and drug use (16%) were the most common causes of diarrhoea in old age. Regardless of the cause, the treatment of elderly patients with diarrhoea must include rehydration and nutritional support. Every year, more than 50 million tourists travel from industrialized countries to places where hygiene levels are poor. At least 75% of those travelling for short periods mention health problems, and in particular traveller’s diarrhoea. PMID:19610134

  9. Leigh's Disease: The Acute Clinical Course of a Two-Year-Old Child with Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zinka, Bettina; Buettner, Andreas; Graw, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    We report the untypical clinical course of a previously healthy two-year-old girl, who died suddenly and unexpectedly after an episode of vomiting. At forensic autopsy no other pathological findings could be diagnosed than multiple reddish, sunken areas in brain stem, mesencephalon, and pons. Histologically they presented as areas of spongiosis of the neuropil with prominent endothelial hyperplasia and vascular proliferation whereas nerve cells were well preserved. On the basis of the characteristic neuropathological findings in combination with the age of the child, we had to take into consideration that the child might have died from subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy (Leigh's Disease) despite the untypical, fulminant clinical course. PMID:20593000

  10. Leigh's Disease: The Acute Clinical Course of a Two-Year-Old Child with Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Zinka, Bettina; Buettner, Andreas; Graw, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    We report the untypical clinical course of a previously healthy two-year-old girl, who died suddenly and unexpectedly after an episode of vomiting. At forensic autopsy no other pathological findings could be diagnosed than multiple reddish, sunken areas in brain stem, mesencephalon, and pons. Histologically they presented as areas of spongiosis of the neuropil with prominent endothelial hyperplasia and vascular proliferation whereas nerve cells were well preserved. On the basis of the characteristic neuropathological findings in combination with the age of the child, we had to take into consideration that the child might have died from subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy (Leigh's Disease) despite the untypical, fulminant clinical course. PMID:20593000

  11. Clinical utility of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy for acute respiratory failure in patients with hematological disease.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kaito; Kurosawa, Shuhei; Hino, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Keita; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Hattori, Keiichro; Igarashi, Aiko; Watakabe, Kyoko; Senoo, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Hagino, Takeshi; Doki, Noriko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Iino, Toshihiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    A high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a newly developed device that enables high-flow oxygen therapy for patients with serious cardiopulmonary problems, but there are few data regarding its use in patients with hematological disease. The efficacy and tolerability of HFNCs for patients who developed ARF during the treatment of various hematological diseases was evaluated. Fifty-six patients underwent HFNC therapy during the last 2 years, and the causes of ARF were mainly pneumonia (n = 37) or acute congestive heart failure (n = 7). Only 11 patients (20 %) showed a good response to HFNC therapy, and remaining 45 patients (80 %) failed to respond to the initial HFNC therapy and, therefore, underwent second-line therapy including endotracheal intubation with mechanical ventilation (n = 15), non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (n = 1), or narcotic palliation alone (n = 29). Thus, HFNC appear not to be a viable treatment option in 4 out of 5 patients in this cohort of patients with hematological disease, but it was well tolerated in most patients (96 %); no major complications except for nasal soreness (n = 2) were observed. Multivariate analysis showed that the cause of ARF (pneumonia, odds ratio 11.2, 95 % CI 1.76-71.5, p = 0.01) was the only risk factor for treatment failure. PMID:27186476

  12. Clinical follow-up of responses to treatment with benznidazol in Amazon: a cohort study of acute Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Valente, Vera da Costa; Coura, José Rodrigues; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Junqueira, Angela Cristina Veríssimo; Santos, Laura Cristina; Ferreira, Alberto Gomes; de Macedo, Roberto Cavalleiro

    2013-01-01

    A total of 179 individuals with acute Chagas disease mainly transmitted by oral source, from Pará and Amapá State, Amazonian, Brazil were included during the period from 1988 to 2005. Blood samples were used to survey peripheral blood for T. cruzi hemoparasites by quantitative buffy coat (QBC), indirect xenodiagnosis, blood culture and serology to detection of total IgM and anti-T. cruzi IgG antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and indirect hemagglutination assay (HA). All assays were performed pre-treatment (0 days) and repeated 35 (±7) and 68 (±6) days after the initiation of treatment with benznidazol and every 6 months while remained seropositive. The endpoint of collection was performed in 2005. Total medium period of follow-up per person was 5.6 years. Also, a blood sample was collected from 72 randomly chosen treated patients to perform polimerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Proportions of subjects with negative or positive serology according to the number of years after treatment were compared. In the endpoint of follow-up we found 47 patients (26.7%) serologically negative, therefore considered cured and 5 (2.7%) exhibited mild cardiac Chagas disease. Other 132 patients had persistent positive serologic tests. The PCR carried out in 72 individuals was positive in 9.8%. Added, there was evidence of therapeutic failure immediately following treatment, as demonstrated by xenodiagnosis and blood culture methods in 2.3% and 3.5% of cases, respectively. There was a strong evidence of antibody clearing in the fourth year after treatment and continuous decrease of antibody titers. Authors suggest that control programs should apply operational researches with new drug interventions four years after the acute phase for those treated patients with persistently positive serology. PMID:23724050

  13. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis, the Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad F; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is an acute form of alcoholic liver disease with variable severity that develops in patients who usually have a history of prolonged and recent alcohol abuse. The diagnosis is clinical and depends on history, physical examination, and laboratory derangements. Liver biopsy is diagnostic but not universally performed, and noninvasive diagnostic modalities are under development. Scoring systems are used to assess severity of disease, predict mortality, and guide decisions for initiation of specific therapies. The natural history and long-term outcomes of alcoholic hepatitis, including recurrence, progression to cirrhosis, and mortality, vary and depend partly on abstinence from alcohol use. PMID:27373612

  14. Preclinical models of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease: how predictive are they for a successful clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-06-23

    Despite major advances in recent years, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To improve our therapeutic armory against GVHD, preclinical evidence is most frequently generated in mouse and large animal models of GVHD. However, because every model has shortcomings, it is important to understand how predictive the different models are and why certain findings in these models could not be translated into the clinic. Weaknesses of the animal GVHD models include the irradiation only-based conditioning regimen, the homogenous donor/recipient genetics in mice, canine or non-human primates (NHP), anatomic site of T cells used for transfer in mice, the homogenous microbial environment in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the lack of pharmacologic GVHD prevention in control groups. Despite these major differences toward clinical allo-HCT, findings generated in animal models of GVHD have led to the current gold standards for GVHD prophylaxis and therapy. The homogenous nature of the preclinical models allows for reproducibility, which is key for the characterization of the role of a new cytokine, chemokine, transcription factor, microRNA, kinase, or immune cell population in the context of GVHD. Therefore, when carefully balancing reasons to apply small and large animal models, it becomes evident that they are valuable tools to generate preclinical hypotheses, which then have to be rigorously evaluated in the clinical setting. In this study, we discuss several clinical approaches that were motivated by preclinical evidence, novel NHP models and their advantages, and highlight the recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of GVHD. PMID:26994149

  15. Type and location of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations influence clinical characteristics and disease outcome of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koszarska, Magdalena; Bors, Andras; Feczko, Angela; Meggyesi, Nora; Batai, Arpad; Csomor, Judit; Adam, Emma; Kozma, Andras; Orban, Tamas I; Lovas, Nora; Sipos, Andrea; Karaszi, Eva; Dolgos, Janos; Fekete, Sandor; Reichardt, Judit; Lehoczky, Eniko; Masszi, Tamas; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka

    2013-05-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic effect of IDH1/2 mutations together followed by an individual analysis of each substitution in a Hungarian cohort consisting of 376 patients with AML. IDH1(mut) and IDH2(mut) were mutually exclusive, detected in 8.5% and 7.5% of cases, respectively. IDH1/2(mut) was associated with: older age (p = 0.001), higher average platelet count (p = 0.001), intermediate karyotype (p < 0.0001), NPM1(mut) (p = 0.022) and lower mRNA expression level of ABCG2 gene (p = 0.006). Overall survival (OS), remission and relapse rates were not different in IDH1(mut) or IDH2(mut) vs. IDH(neg). IDH1(mut) and IDH2(mut) were associated differently with NPM1(mut); co-occurrence was observed in 14.3% of IDH1 R132C vs. 70% of R132H carriers (p = 0.02) and in 47.4% of IDH2 R140Q vs. 0% of R172K carriers (p = 0.02). IDH1 R132H negatively influenced OS compared to IDH(neg) (p = 0.02) or R132C (p = 0.019). Particular amino acid changes affecting the same IDH1 codon influence the clinical characteristics and treatment outcome in AML. PMID:23039322

  16. Experimental Chagas' disease in rhesus monkeys. I. Clinical, parasitological, hematological and anatomo-pathological studies in the acute and indeterminate phase of the disease.

    PubMed

    Bonecini-Almeida, M da G; Galvão-Castro, B; Pessoa, M H; Pirmez, C; Laranja, F

    1990-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were infected subcutaneously with 1.0 x 10(4) to 1.5 x 10(4) metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi (Colombian strain). Parasitological and immunological parameters were evaluated in these animals for periods of 1 month to over 3 years. A chagoma was observed between the 3rd and the 13th day after infection (a.i.) and patent parasitaemia between the 13th and 59th day a.i.. Thereafter, parasites were demonstrated only by haemoculture and/or xenodiagnosis. Circulating specific IgM and IgG antibodies were observed as early as in the 2nd week a.i. IgG levels persisted until the end of the experiment, but IgM antibodies were detectable nine months a.i. Haematological alterations comprised leucocytosis and lymphocytosis. Electrocardiographic alterations were minor and transient, similar to those observed in non-lethal human acute Chagas' myocarditis. Myocarditis and myositis, characterized by multiple foci of lympho-histiocyte inflammatory infiltrate, were present in monkeys sacrificed on the 41st, 70th and 76th day but not in the animal sacrificed 3 years and 3 months a. i.. The results suggest that Chagas' disease in rhesus monkeys reproduces the acute and indeterminate phases of human Chagas' disease. PMID:2128360

  17. Acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J. H.; Wilson, J.

    1973-01-01

    76 cases of acute Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (acute infantile spinal muscular atrophy) have been reviewed. The cases comprise an unselected consecutive series in which rigid diagnostic criteria have been applied. The natural history of the disease has been investigated. In at least one-third of cases the disease is manifest before or at delivery. All cases have shown delayed milestones by 5 months of age: 95% are dead by 18 months. Cumulative frequency curves for age at onset and age at death figures are presented for use both as prognostic guidelines and as aids in the management of sibs of index cases. Diagnosis, management, and genetic implications are discussed. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4712772

  18. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  19. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  20. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  1. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  2. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation.

  3. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires de; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation. PMID:27438214

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex disorder of heterogeneous etiologies characterized by a consistent, recognizable pattern of lung injury. Extensive epidemiologic studies and clinical intervention trials have been conducted to address the high mortality of this disorder and have provided significant insight into the complexity of studying new therapies for this condition. The existing clinical investigations in ARDS will be highlighted in this review. The limitations to current definitions, patient selection, and outcome assessment will be considered. While significant attention has been focused on the parenchymal injury that characterizes this disorder and the clinical support of gas exchange function, relatively limited focus has been directed to hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular dysfunction equally prominent in the disease. The limited available clinical information in this area will also be reviewed. The current standards for cardiopulmonary management of the condition will be outlined. Current gaps in our understanding of the clinical condition will be highlighted with the expectation that continued progress will contribute to a decline in disease mortality. PMID:22034606

  5. A diagnostic window for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease prior to visible clinical symptoms in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) poses a major limitation for broader therapeutic application of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Early diagnosis of aGVHD remains difficult and is based on clinical symptoms and histopathological evaluation of tissue biopsies. Thus, current aGVHD diagnosis is limited to patients with established disease manifestation. Therefore, for improved disease prevention it is important to develop predictive assays to identify patients at risk of developing aGVHD. Here we address whether insights into the timing of the aGVHD initiation and effector phases could allow for the detection of migrating alloreactive T cells before clinical aGVHD onset to permit for efficient therapeutic intervention. Methods Murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched and minor histocompatibility antigen (miHAg) mismatched allo-HCT models were employed to assess the spatiotemporal distribution of donor T cells with flow cytometry and in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Daily flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells allowed us to identify migrating alloreactive T cells based on homing receptor expression profiles. Results We identified a time period of 2 weeks of massive alloreactive donor T cell migration in the blood after miHAg mismatch allo-HCT before clinical aGVHD symptoms appeared. Alloreactive T cells upregulated α4β7 integrin and P-selectin ligand during this migration phase. Consequently, targeted preemptive treatment with rapamycin, starting at the earliest detection time of alloreactive donor T cells in the peripheral blood, prevented lethal aGVHD. Conclusions Based on this data we propose a critical time frame prior to the onset of aGVHD symptoms to identify alloreactive T cells in the peripheral blood for timely and effective therapeutic intervention. PMID:23692886

  6. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management

    PubMed Central

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%. PMID:17876868

  7. Acute Effects of Outdoor Air Pollution on Emergency Department Visits Due to Five Clinical Subtypes of Coronary Heart Diseases in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Juan; He, Mingzhen; Zhu, Weiying

    2014-01-01

    Background Air pollution can be a contributing cause to the development and exacerbation of coronary heart disease (CHD), but there is little knowledge about the acute effects of air pollution on different clinical subtypes of CHD. Methods We conducted a time-series study to investigate the association of air pollution (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm [PM10], sulfur dioxide [SO2], and nitrogen dioxide [NO2]) on emergency department (ED) visits due to five different subtypes of CHD in Shanghai, China, from 2010 to 2012. We applied an over-dispersed Poisson generalized addictive model to analyze the associations after controlling for the seasonality, day of the week, and weather conditions. Results We identified a total of 47 523 ED visits for CHD. A 10-µg/m3 increase in the present-day concentrations of PM10, SO2, and NO2 was associated with respective increases of 1.10% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33%–1.87%), 0.90% (95% CI −0.14%–1.93%), and 1.44% (95% CI 0.63%–2.26%) for total ED visits for CHD. These associations varied greatly by clinical type, with strong effects on sudden cardiac death, moderate effects on acute myocardial infarction and angina, weak effects on ischemic cardiomyopathy, and no effect on occult CHD. The associations were stronger among people aged 65 years or more than in younger individuals and in the cool season versus the warm one. Conclusions Outdoor air pollution may have different effects of air pollution on 5 subtypes of CHD. Our results might be useful for the primary prevention of various subtypes of CHD exacerbated by air pollution. PMID:24998952

  8. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  9. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  10. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. PMID:27169556

  11. Clinical manifestation of mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Magner, Martin; Kolářová, Hana; Honzik, Tomáš; Švandová, Ivana; Zeman, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MD) represent a clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases associated with dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Our aim was to illustrate the most common clinical presentation of MD on the example of selected diseases and syndromes. The minimal prevalence of MD is estimated as 1 to 5,000. MD may manifest at any age since birth until late-adulthood with acute manifestation or as a chronic progressive disease. Virtually any organ may be impaired, but the organs with the highest energetic demands are most frequently involved, including brain, muscle, heart and liver. Some MD may manifest as a characteristic cluster of clinical features (e.g. MELAS syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome). Diagnostics includes detailed history, the comprehensive clinical examination, results of specialized examinations (especially cardiology, visual fundus examination, brain imaging, EMG), laboratory testing of body fluids (lactate, aminoacids, organic acids), and analysis of bioptic samples of muscle, skin, and liver, eventually. Normal lactate level in blood does not exclude the possibility of MD. Although the aimed molecular genetic analyses may be indicated in some of mitochondrial diseases, the methods of next generation sequencing come into focus. Examples of treatment are arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome, ketogenic diet in pyruvate oxidation disorders or quinone analogs in patients with LHON. Conclusion: The clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial disorder is often delayed, or the disease remains undiagnosed. The correct diagnosis and adequate treatment can improve prognosis of the patient. Access to genetic counseling is also of great importance. PMID:26982751

  12. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  13. Gorham's disease: clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents. PMID:26229923

  14. [Acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Damak, H; Décosterd, D

    2015-09-30

    Neuromuscular diseases can affect all respiratory muscles, leading to acute respiratory failure, which is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in those patients. Two situations must be distinguished. 1) Acute respiratory failure as part of a neuromuscular disorder of acute onset and possibly reversible (Guillain-Barre syndrome, myasthenic crisis...). 2) Acute respiratory failure occurring in a patient with an already advanced neuromuscular disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy...). This article describes the neuromuscular acute respiratory failure in these different aspects, discusses its initial management in the emergency department and identifies the parameters that have to be monitored. PMID:26619704

  15. A predictive instrument to improve coronary-care-unit admission practices in acute ischemic heart disease. A prospective multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pozen, M W; D'Agostino, R B; Selker, H P; Sytkowski, P A; Hood, W B

    1984-05-17

    Each year 1.5 million patients are admitted to coronary-care units (CCUs) for suspected acute ischemic heart disease; for half of these, the diagnosis is ultimately "ruled out." In this study, conducted in the emergency rooms of six New England hospitals ranging in type from urban teaching centers to rural nonteaching hospitals, we sought to develop a diagnostic aid to help emergency room physicians reduce the number of their CCU admissions of patients without acute cardiac ischemia. From data on 2801 patients, we developed a predictive instrument for use in a hand-held programmable calculator, which requires only 20 seconds to compute a patient's probability of having acute cardiac ischemia. In a prospective trial that included 2320 patients in the six hospitals, physicians' diagnostic specificity for acute ischemia increased when the probability value determined by the instrument was made available to them. Rates of false-positive diagnosis decreased without any increase in rates of false-negative diagnosis. Among study patients with a final diagnosis of "not acute ischemia," the number of CCU admissions decreased 30 per cent, without any increase in missed diagnoses of ischemia. The proportion of CCU admissions that represented patients without acute ischemia dropped from 44 to 33 per cent. Widespread use of this predictive instrument could reduce the number of CCU admissions in this country by more than 250,000 per year. PMID:6371525

  16. Clinical and Pathologic Features of Secondary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Amy S.; Aoki, Joseph; Levis, Mark; Cowan, Kathleen; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Vuica-Ross, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a relatively common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that has an excellent prognosis. In contrast, secondary acute myeloid leukemias, including therapy-related AML and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes, have a relatively poor prognosis. We identified 9 cases of APL at our institution in which there was a history of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chronic immunosuppression, or antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. The clinical and pathologic findings in these cases of secondary APL were compared with the clinical and pathologic findings in cases of de novo APL. We found that secondary and de novo APL had abnormal promyelocytes with similar morphologic and immunophenotypic features, comparable cytogenetic findings, comparable rates of FMS-like tyrosine kinase mutations, and similar rates of recurrent disease and death. These data suggest that secondary APL is similar to de novo APL and, thus, should be considered distinct from other secondary acute myeloid neoplasms. PMID:22338051

  17. Clinical cases in acute intoxication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean B; Maguire, Jennifer; Mauck, Karen F

    2009-12-01

    Over 2.5 million accidental and intentional drug-related poisonings are reported annually in the United States. Early diagnosis and management of patients who present with acute intoxication can significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. The initial evaluation of patients with suspected or proven intoxications should focus on hemodynamic stability, mental status, and respiratory function. However, early recognition of toxic ingestion is paramount to implementing life-saving treatments. Important historical clues are often found in a social history that considers intravenous drug use, alcohol use, and any access or exposure to illicit substances. A patient's medication list should also be scrutinized for psychoactive or sedative medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants or opioids. In this article we present case-based discussions of the specific diagnosis and management of 5 commonly occurring acute intoxication syndromes. PMID:20877175

  18. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  19. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  20. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  1. Clinical Utility of Sequential Minimal Residual Disease Measurements in the Context of Risk-based Therapy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Jeha, Sima; Cheng, Cheng; Bowman, W Paul; Sandlund, John T; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Inaba, Hiroto; Bhojwani, Deepa; Gruber, Tanja A; Leung, Wing H; Downing, James R; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V; Campana, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The level of minimal residual disease (MRD) during remission induction is the most important prognostic indicator in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We determined the clinical significance of MRD in the context of a prospective clinical study in which sequential MRD measurements were used to guide treatment decisions. Methods Between 2000 and 2007, 498 evaluable patients with newly diagnosed ALL were enrolled in St. Jude Study XV. Risk of relapse was provisionally classified as low, standard or high according to presenting clinical and laboratory features. Final risk assignment to determine treatment intensity was based mainly on MRD levels measured on days 19 and 46 of remission induction, and on week 7 of continuation treatment. Additional MRD determinations were made on weeks 17, 48 and 120 (end of therapy). Findings Regardless of the provisional risk classification, 10-year event-free survival was significantly inferior for patients with MRD ≥1% on day 19 compared with that of patients having lower MRD levels: 69.2% (95% CI 49.6–82.4, n=36) versus 95.5% (91.7–97.5, n=244) (p<0.001) for the provisional low-risk group and 65.1% (50.7–76.2, n=56) versus 82.9% (75.6–88.2, n=142) (p=0.008) for the provisional standard-risk group. Twelve patients with provisional low-risk ALL and MRD ≥1% on day 19 but negative MRD (<0.01%) on day 46 were treated for standard-risk ALL and had a 10-year event-free survival of 88.9% (43.3–98.4). For the 244 provisional low-risk patients, an MRD level of <1% on day 19 predicted a superior outcome, regardless of the MRD level on day 46. Among provisional standard-risk patients with MRD <1% on day 19, the 15 with persistent MRD on day 46 tended to have an inferior 10-year event-free survival compared with the 126 lacking detectable MRD (72.7% [42.5–88.8] versus 84.0% [76.3–89.4], p=0.06) after receiving the same post-remission treatment for standard-risk ALL. Among patients attaining MRD

  2. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  3. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in a patient with Crohn's disease and exposure to infliximab: a rare clinical presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Farhan; Vivekanandarajah, Abhirami; Haddad, Housam; Shutty, Christopher M; Hurford, Matthew T; Dai, Qun

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of potent immunosuppressive and chemotherapeutic medications for various diseases, there is an increased incidence of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. They are the result of mutational rearrangement and historically, have a grave prognosis compared with de novo myeloid neoplasms. We did a short review on various types of myeloid leukaemias reported after therapy with antitumour necrosis factor and also report, to the best of our knowledge, one among the very few cases of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukaemia in a patient on infliximab therapy for refractory Crohn's disease. The patient responded well to the traditional treatment and is in complete remission for more than 5 years. PMID:24842356

  4. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  5. The Possible Diagnostic and Prognostic Use of Systemic Chemokine Profiles in Clinical Medicine—The Experience in Acute Myeloid Leukemia from Disease Development and Diagnosis via Conventional Chemotherapy to Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reikvam, Håkon; Fredly, Hanne; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes; Bruserud, Øystein

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines are important regulators of many different biological processes, including (i) inflammation with activation and local recruitment of immunocompetent cells; (ii) angiogenesis as a part of inflammation or carcinogenesis; and (iii) as a bridge between the coagulation system and inflammation/immune activation. The systemic levels of various chemokines may therefore reflect local disease processes, and such variations may thereby be used in the routine clinical handling of patients. The experience from patients with myeloproliferative diseases, and especially patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), suggests that systemic plasma/serum cytokine profiles can be useful, both as a diagnostic tool and for prognostication of patients. However, cytokines/chemokines are released by a wide range of cells and are involved in a wide range of biological processes; the altered levels may therefore mainly reflect the strength and nature of the biological processes, and the optimal clinical use of chemokine/cytokine analyses may therefore require combination with organ-specific biomarkers. Chemokine levels are also altered by clinical procedures, therapeutic interventions and the general status of the patients. A careful standardization of sample collection is therefore important, and the interpretation of the observations will require that the overall clinical context is considered. Despite these limitations, we conclude that analysis of systemic chemokine/cytokine profiles can reflect important clinical characteristics and, therefore, is an important scientific tool that can be used as a part of future clinical studies to identify clinically relevant biomarkers. PMID:23430540

  6. Acute graft-vs-host disease: pathobiology and management.

    PubMed

    Goker, H; Haznedaroglu, I C; Chao, N J

    2001-03-01

    Acute graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to safe allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. GVHD occurs when transplanted donor T lymphocytes react to foreign host cells. It causes a wide variety of host tissue injuries. This review focuses on the pathobiological basis, clinical aspects, and current management strategies of acute GVHD. Afferent phase of acute GVHD starts with myeloablative conditioning, i.e., before the infusion of the graft. Total-body irradiation (TBI) or high-dose chemotherapy regimens cause extensive damage and activation in host tissues, which release inflammatory cytokines and enhance recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. Recognition of the foreign host antigens by donor T cells and activation, stimulation, and proliferation of T cells is crucial in the afferent phase. Effector phase of acute GVHD results in direct and indirect damage to host cells. The skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver are major target organs of acute GVHD. Combination drug prophylaxis in GVHD is essential in all patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Steroids have remained the standard for the treatment of acute GVHD. Several clinical trials have evaluated monoclonal antibodies or receptor antagonist therapy for steroid-resistant acute GVHD, with different successes in a variety of settings. There are some newer promising agents like mycophenolate mofetil, glutamic acid-lysine-alanine-tyrosine (GLAT), rapamycin, and trimetrexate currently entering in the clinical studies, and other agents are in development. Future experimental and clinical studies on GVHD will shed further light on the better understanding of the disease pathobiology and generate the tools to treat malignant disorders with allogeneic HSCT with specific graft-vs-tumor effects devoid of GVHD. PMID:11274753

  7. Update on pathogenesis and clinical management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Santamaría, Dulce M; Taxonera, Carlos; Giner, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), defined as the acute nonbacterial inflammatory condition of the pancreas, is derived from the early activation of digestive enzymes found inside the acinar cells, with variable compromise of the gland itself, nearby tissues and other organs. So, it is an event that begins with pancreatic injury, elicits an acute inflammatory response, encompasses a variety of complications and generally resolves over time. Different conditions are known to induce this disorder, although the innermost mechanisms and how they act to develop the disease are still unknown. We summarize some well established aspects. A phase sequence has been proposed: etiology factors generate other conditions inside acinar cells that favor the AP development with some systemic events; genetic factors could be involved as susceptibility and modifying elements. AP is a disease with extremely different clinical expressions. Most patients suffer a mild and limited disease, but about one fifth of cases develop multi organ failure, accompanied by high mortality. This great variability in presentation, clinical course and complications has given rise to the confusion related to AP related terminology. However, consensus meetings have provided uniform definitions, including the severity of the illness. The clinical management is mainly based on the disease´s severity and must be directed to correct the underlying predisposing factors and control the inflammatory process itself. The first step is to determine if it is mild or severe. We review the principal aspects to be considered in this treatment, as reflected in several clinical practice guidelines. For the last 25 years, there has been a global increase in incidence of AP, along with many advances in diagnosis and treatment. However, progress in knowledge of its pathogenesis is scarce. PMID:22737590

  8. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  9. The outcome of prophylactic intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone in cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages of disease after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis with norfloxacin, intravenous ciprofloxacin, or ceftriaxone has been recommended for cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage but little is known about intravenous cefazolin. This study aimed to compare the outcome of intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone as prophylactic antibiotics among cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages, and to identify the associated risk factors. The medical records of 713 patients with acute variceal bleeding who had received endoscopic procedures from were reviewed. Three hundred and eleven patients were entered for age-matched adjustment after strict exclusion criteria. After the adjustment, a total of 102 patients were enrolled and sorted into 2 groups according to the severity of cirrhosis: group A (Child's A patients, n = 51) and group B (Child's B and C patients, n = 51). The outcomes were prevention of infection, time of rebleeding, and death. Our subgroup analysis results failed to show a significant difference in infection prevention between patients who received prophylactic cefazolin and those who received ceftriaxone among Child's A patients (93.1% vs. 90.9%, p = 0.641); however, a trend of significance in favor of ceftriaxone prophylaxis (77.8% vs. 87.5%, p = 0.072) was seen among Child's B and C patients. More rebleeding cases were observed in patients who received cefazolin than in those who received ceftriaxone among Child's B and C patients (66.7% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.011) but not in Child's A patients (32% vs. 40.9%, p = 0.376). The risk factors associated with rebleeding were history of bleeding and use of prophylactic cefazolin among Child's B and C patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that prophylactic intravenous cefazolin may not be inferior to ceftriaxone in preventing infections and reducing rebleeding among Child's A cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal bleeding. Prophylactic intravenous ceftriaxone yields

  10. Suspected acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as an outcome measure in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has become an important outcome measure in clinical trials. This study aimed to explore the concept of suspected acute exacerbation as an outcome measure. Methods Three investigators retrospectively reviewed subjects enrolled in the Sildenafil Trial of Exercise Performance in IPF who experienced a respiratory serious adverse event during the course of the study. Events were classified as definite acute exacerbation, suspected acute exacerbation, or other, according to established criteria. Results Thirty-five events were identified. Four were classified as definite acute exacerbation, fourteen as suspected acute exacerbation, and seventeen as other. Definite and suspected acute exacerbations were clinically indistinguishable. Both were most common in the winter and spring months and were associated with a high risk of disease progression and short-term mortality. Conclusions In this study one half of respiratory serious adverse events were attributed to definite or suspected acute exacerbations. Suspected acute exacerbations are clinically indistinguishable from definite acute exacerbations and represent clinically meaningful events. Clinical trialists should consider capturing both definite and suspected acute exacerbations as outcome measures. PMID:23848435

  11. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  12. The Outcome of Prophylactic Intravenous Cefazolin and Ceftriaxone in Cirrhotic Patients at Different Clinical Stages of Disease after Endoscopic Interventions for Acute Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis with norfloxacin, intravenous ciprofloxacin, or ceftriaxone has been recommended for cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage but little is known about intravenous cefazolin. This study aimed to compare the outcome of intravenous cefazolin and ceftriaxone as prophylactic antibiotics among cirrhotic patients at different clinical stages, and to identify the associated risk factors. The medical records of 713 patients with acute variceal bleeding who had received endoscopic procedures from were reviewed. Three hundred and eleven patients were entered for age-matched adjustment after strict exclusion criteria. After the adjustment, a total of 102 patients were enrolled and sorted into 2 groups according to the severity of cirrhosis: group A (Child’s A patients, n = 51) and group B (Child’s B and C patients, n = 51). The outcomes were prevention of infection, time of rebleeding, and death. Our subgroup analysis results failed to show a significant difference in infection prevention between patients who received prophylactic cefazolin and those who received ceftriaxone among Child’s A patients (93.1% vs. 90.9%, p = 0.641); however, a trend of significance in favor of ceftriaxone prophylaxis (77.8% vs. 87.5%, p = 0.072) was seen among Child’s B and C patients. More rebleeding cases were observed in patients who received cefazolin than in those who received ceftriaxone among Child’s B and C patients (66.7% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.011) but not in Child’s A patients (32% vs. 40.9%, p = 0.376). The risk factors associated with rebleeding were history of bleeding and use of prophylactic cefazolin among Child’s B and C patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that prophylactic intravenous cefazolin may not be inferior to ceftriaxone in preventing infections and reducing rebleeding among Child’s A cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute variceal bleeding. Prophylactic intravenous

  13. Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Khan, Misbba; Davis, Debra E

    2014-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease include ataxia and tremor, as well as nystagmus, dysarthria, and cognitive dysfunction. Recognition of the cerebellar pattern of disease can aid in the prompt and correct diagnosis and lead to appropriate treatment and rehabilitation to minimize disability. PMID:25439285

  14. Beryllium disease: a clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.L.

    1980-02-01

    A relatively new occupational disease, beryllium poisoning, is discussed. The history of this respiratory disease among workers after beryllium exposure from extraction and alloy manufacturing is not well documented in the US Attempts by industry to delay investigations into beryllium toxicity are described. The specific incidents occurring at a fluorescent lamp manufacturing plant in Salem, Massachusetts are presented. Clinical observations of chronic beryllium disease are discussed. Symptoms are described. The current status of diagnosis and treatment of beryllium poisoning is presented.

  15. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  16. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Kathleen A; McKay, Ryan T; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a "snapshot" in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision-making and

  17. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  18. Analyzing acute procedural pain in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Tan, Gabriel; Amihai, Ido; Jensen, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    Because acute procedural pain tends to increase with procedure time, assessments of pain management strategies must take that time relationship into account. Statistical time-course analyses are, however, complex and require large patient numbers to detect differences. The current study evaluated the abilities of various single and simple composite measures such as averaged pain or individual patient pain slopes to detect treatment effects. Secondary analyses were performed with the data from 3 prospective randomized clinical trials that assessed the effect of a self-hypnotic relaxation intervention on procedural pain, measured every 10-15 minutes during vascular/renal interventions, breast biopsies, and tumor embolizations. Single point-in-time and maximal pain comparisons were poor in detecting treatment effects. Linear data sets of individual patient slopes yielded the same qualitative results as the more complex repeated measures analyses, allowing the use of standard statistical approaches (eg, Kruskal-Wallis), and promising analyses of smaller subgroups, which otherwise would be underpowered. With nonlinear data, a simple averaged score was highly sensitive in detecting differences. Use of these 2 workable and relatively simple approaches may be a first step towards facilitating the development of data sets that could enable meta-analyses of data from acute pain trials. PMID:24731852

  19. Advances in the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Liren; Wu, Zhengcheng; Shen, Jianliang

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been widely used for the treatment of hematologic malignant and non-malignant hematologic diseases and other diseases. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic transplantation. Acute GVHD may occur in 30% of transplant recipients, which is a syndrome of erythematous skin eruption, cholestatic liver disease and intestinal dysfunction, resulting from the activation of donor T lymphocytes by host antigen-presenting cells, resulting in an immune-mediated inflammatory response. Recent scientific advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis involved in the development of acute GVHD and clinical investigation have provided more effective therapeutic strategies for acute GVHD. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances in the treatment of acute GVHD. PMID:23802653

  20. Oxidants in Acute and Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mannam, Praveen; Srivastava, Anup; Sugunaraj, Jaya Prakash; Lee, Patty J; Sauler, Maor

    2015-01-01

    Oxidants play an important role in homeostatic function, but excessive oxidant generation has an adverse effect on health. The manipulation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) can have a beneficial effect on various lung pathologies. However indiscriminate uses of anti-oxidant strategies have not demonstrated any consistent benefit and may be harmful. Here we propose that nuanced strategies are needed to modulate the oxidant system to obtain a beneficial result in the lung diseases such as Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). We identify novel areas of lung oxidant responses that may yield fruitful therapies in the future. PMID:25705575

  1. Trends in Clinical, Demographic, and Biochemical Characteristics of Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction From 2003 to 2008: A Report From the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Coronary Artery Disease Program

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nathan M.; Laskey, Warren K.; Cox, Margueritte; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Cannon, Christopher P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2012-01-01

    Background An analysis of the changes in the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with acute myocardial infarction could identify successes and failures of risk factor identification and treatment of patients at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Methods and Results We reviewed data collected from 138 122 patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted from 2003 to 2008 to hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines Coronary Artery Disease program. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory characteristics were analyzed for each year stratified on the electrocardiogram at presentation. Patients with non–ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction were older, more likely to be women, and more likely to have hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and a history of past cardiovascular disease than were patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. In the overall patient sample, significant trends were observed of an increase over time in the proportions of non–ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction, patient age of 45 to 65 years, obesity, and female sex. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus decreased over time, whereas the prevalences of hypertension and smoking were substantial and unchanging. The prevalence of “low” high-density lipoprotein increased over time, whereas that of “high” low-density lipoprotein decreased. Stratum-specific univariate analysis revealed quantitative and qualitative differences between strata in time trends for numerous demographic, clinical, and biochemical measures. On multivariable analysis, there was concordance between strata with regard to the increase in prevalence of patients 45 to 65 years of age, obesity, and “low” high-density lipoprotein and the decrease in prevalence of “high” low-density lipoprotein. However, changes in trends in age distribution, sex ratio, and prevalence of smokers and the magnitude of change in diabetes mellitus prevalence

  2. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. PMID:25743769

  3. Clinical outcomes of acute myocarditis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; McCrindle, B; Bohn, D; Wilson, G; Taylor, G; Freedom, R; Smallhorn, J; Benson, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe clinical outcomes of a paediatric population with histologically confirmed lymphocytic myocarditis.
DESIGN—A retrospective review between November 1984 and February 1998.
SETTING—A major paediatric tertiary care hospital.
PATIENTS—36 patients with histologically confirmed lymphocytic myocarditis.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Survival, cardiac transplantation, recovery of ventricular function, and persistence of dysrhythmias.
RESULTS—Freedom from death or cardiac transplantation was 86% at one month and 79% after two years. Five deaths occurred within 72 hours of admission, and one late death at 1.9 years. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was used in four patients, and three patients underwent heart replacement. 34 patients were treated with intravenous corticosteroids. In the survivor/non-cardiac transplantation group (n = 29), the median follow up was 19 months (range 1.2-131.6 months), and the median period for recovery of a left ventricular ejection fraction to > 55% was 2.8 months (range 0-28 months). The mean (SD) final left ventricular ejection and shortening fractions were 66 (9)% and 34 (8)%, respectively. Two patients had residual ventricular dysfunction. No patient required antiarrhythmic treatment. All survivors reported no cardiac symptoms or restrictions in physical activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Our experience documents good outcomes in paediatric patients presenting with acute heart failure secondary to acute lymphocytic myocarditis treated with immunosuppression. Excellent survival and recovery of ventricular function, with the absence of significant arrhythmias, continued cardiac medications, or restrictions in physical activity were the normal outcomes.


Keywords: myocarditis; paediatric cardiology; immunosuppression PMID:10409542

  4. Clinical Decision-Making Tool for Safe and Effective Prescription of Exercise in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Results From an Interdisciplinary Delphi Survey and Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Reid, W. Darlene; Chung, Frank; Kirkham, Ashley; Brooks, Dina; Goodridge, Donna; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Hoens, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise is recommended for people with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), yet there is little information to guide safe and effective mobilization and exercise for these patients. Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a clinical decision-making tool to guide health care professionals in the assessment, prescription, monitoring, and progression of mobilization and therapeutic exercise for patients with AECOPD. Design and Methods A 3-round interdisciplinary Delphi panel identified and selected items based on a preselected consensus of 80%. These items were summarized in a paper-based tool titled Mobilization in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD-Mob). Focus groups and questionnaires were subsequently used to conduct a sensibility evaluation of the tool. Results Nine researchers, 13 clinicians, and 7 individuals with COPD identified and approved 110 parameters for safe and effective exercise in AECOPD. These parameters were grouped into 5 categories: (1) “What to Assess Prior to Mobilization,” (2) “When to Consider Not Mobilizing or to Discontinue Mobilization,” (3) “What to Monitor During Mobilization for Patient Safety,” (4) “How to Progress Mobilization to Enhance Effectiveness,” and (5) “What to Confirm Prior to Discharge.” The tool was evaluated in 4 focus groups of 18 health care professionals, 90% of whom reported the tool was easy to use, was concise, and would guide a health care professional who is new to the acute care setting and working with patients with AECOPD. Limitations The tool was developed based on published evidence and expert opinion, so the applicability of the items to patients in all settings cannot be guaranteed. The Delphi panel consisted of health care professionals from Canada, so items may not be generalizable to other jurisdictions. Conclusions The AECOPD-Mob provides practical and concise information on safe and

  5. Clinical Manifestation of Self-Limiting Acute Retinal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Borkowski, Piotr; Szczepanik, Szymon; Moneta-Wielgoś, Joanna; Kęcik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper was to present a case series of self-limiting, peripheral acute retinal necrosis and to demonstrate efficacy of treatment with valacyclovir in patients resistant to acyclovir. The diagnosis was made on ophthalmoscopic examination and positive serum tests for herpes viruses. Material/Methods Ten patients (6F and 4M) aged 19–55 years were diagnosed and treated for self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The following endpoints were reported: visual outcomes, clinical features, disease progression, treatment, and complications. Patients received only symptomatic treatment because they did not consent to vitreous puncture. Results Peripheral, mild retinitis was diagnosed in all eyes at baseline. Initially, all patients were treated with systemic acyclovir (800 mg, 5 times a day), prednisone (typically 40–60 mg/day), and aspirin in an outpatient setting. In 6 patients, treatment was discontinued at 6 months due to complete resolution of the inflammatory process. Four patients with immune deficiency showed signs and symptoms of chronic inflammation. Two patients did not respond to acyclovir (2 non-responders); however, those patients were successfully treated with valacyclovir. Complete resolution of inflammatory lesions was observed in 8 patients. In 2 patients, the disease progressed despite treatment – 1 female patient after kidney transplant who stopped the prescribed medications, and 1 male patient with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome who experienced breakthrough symptoms on-treatment. He died due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Neurological complications (encephalitis and meningitis) were observed in 2 female patients. Prophylactic laser photocoagulation was performed in 1 subject. Conclusions A series of cases of self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is presented. This clinical form of ARN can resemble toxoplasmic retinitis in some cases. Oral antiviral medications provide an effective alternative to

  6. Clinical approach to chronic beryllium disease and other nonpneumoconiotic interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa A

    2002-10-01

    Exposures in the workplace result in a diverse set of diseases ranging from the pneumoconiosis to other interstitial lung diseases to acute lung injury. Physician awareness of the potential disease manifestations associated with specific exposures is important in defining these diseases and in preventing additional disease. Most occupational diseases mimic other forms of lung disease, including pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and bronchiolitis. A "sarcoidosis"-like syndrome, usually limited to the lungs, may result from exposure to bioaerosols and a number of metals. Exposure to beryllium in the workplace produces a granulomatous lung disease clinically indistinguishable from sarcoidosis, chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Beryllium's ability to produce a beryllium-specific immune response is used in the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests to confirm a diagnosis of CBD and exclude sarcoidosis. Exposure to other metals must also be considered in the differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis. When an individual presents acutely with ARDS or acute lung injury, an acute inhalational exposure must be considered. Exposure to a number of irritant substances at high levels may cause a "chemical pneumonitis" or acute lung injury, depending on the solubility and physicochemical properties of the substance. Some of the most notable agents include nitrogen and sulfur oxides, phosgene, and smoke breakdown products. Ingestion of paraquat may also result in an ARDS syndrome, with pulmonary fibrosis eventually resulting. Bronchiolitis is a rare manifestation of inhalational exposures but must also be considered in the clinical evaluation of inhalational exposure. PMID:12362066

  7. Pathophysiology and Clinical Work-Up of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known in the past as acute renal failure, is a syndrome characterized by the rapid loss of kidney excretory function. It is usually diagnosed by the accumulation of end products of nitrogen metabolism (urea and creatinine) or decreased urine output or both. AKI is the clinical consequence of several disorders that acutely affect the kidney, causing electrolytes and acid-base imbalance, hyperhydration and loss of depurative function. AKI is common in critical care patients in whom it is often secondary to extrarenal events. No specific therapies can attenuate AKI or accelerate renal function recovery; thus, the only treatment is supportive. New diagnostic techniques such as renal biomarkers might improve early diagnosis. Also ultrasonography helps nephrologists in AKI diagnosis, in order to describe and follow kidney alterations and find possible causes of AKI. Renal replacement therapy is a life-saving treatment if AKI is severe. If patients survive to AKI, and did not have previous chronic kidney disease (CKD), they typically recover to dialysis independence. However, evidence suggests that patients who have had AKI are at increased risk of subsequent CKD. PMID:27169469

  8. Acute Cerebellitis in Children: A Many-Faceted Disease.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Liora; Shkalim-Zemer, Vered; Levinsky, Yoel; Abdallah, Wafa; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther; Straussberg, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Acute cerebellitis is a rare inflammatory condition. It may have a benign, self-limiting course or present as a fulminant disease resulting in severe cerebellar damage or even sudden death. We present the clinical, laboratory, and radiologic data in 9 children diagnosed with acute cerebellitis, who were identified by database search in our pediatric medical center from January 2000 to November 2014. The main presenting symptom was headache, and the main presenting sign was ataxia. Bilateral diffuse hemispheric involvement was the most common imaging finding at presentation. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was the most common infectious pathogen found. Treatment included steroids in all cases, antibiotics in 4, and intravenous immunoglobulins in 6. Six patients had a full recovery, and 3 had residual neurologic complications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for diagnosis. The course of acute cerebellitis varies from a commonly benign and self-limiting disease to an occasionally fulminant disease, resulting in severe cerebellar damage or sudden death. PMID:26961264

  9. Feline heartworm disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L; Atwell, Richard B

    2008-04-01

    Feline heartworm disease is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted by mosquitoes in heartworm-endemic areas worldwide. While dogs are the definitive hosts for this parasite, cats can also be infected, and the overall prevalence in cats is between 5% and 10% of that in dogs in any given area. The spectrum of feline presentations varies from asymptomatic infections to chronic respiratory signs, sometimes accompanied by chronic vomiting to acute death with no premonitory signs. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of tests, including antigen and antibody serology, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. As treatment with heartworm adulticidal drugs can be life-threatening and heartworm infection in cats is often self-limiting, infected cats are frequently managed with supportive treatment (corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and anti-emetics). Surgical removal of filariae using extraction devices may be considered in some acute cases where immediate curative treatment is necessary, but filarial breakage during the procedure may result in an acute fatal shock-like reaction. Necropsy findings are mainly pulmonary and include muscular hypertrophy of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles on histopathology. A number of safe and effective macrocytic lactone drugs are available for prophylaxis in cats. These drugs can kill a range of larval and adult life-cycle stage heartworms, which may be advantageous in cases of owner compliance failure or when heartworm infection status is undetermined at the time prophylaxis is commenced. An index of suspicion for feline heartworm disease is warranted in unprotected cats with respiratory signs, and perhaps chronic vomiting, in areas where canine heartworm disease is endemic. Many cats, once diagnosed and with appropriate supportive care and monitoring, will resolve their infection and be free of clinical signs. PMID:18042416

  10. Pulmonary hypertension during acute respiratory diseases in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bardi-Peti, Luiza; Ciofu, Eugen Pascal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives:The study was undertaken to assess whether previously healthy infants with acute respiratory diseases develop elevated pulmonary artery pressures and to identify which type of disease is associated with pulmonary hypertension. Material and Methods:We performed 2D and Doppler echocardiography in 137 infants, aged between 1 and 12 month, from November 2007 to December 2009. 75 infants had acute respiratory diseases (49 bronchiolitis, 16 interstitial pneumonia, 3 bronchopneumonia, 6 episodic wheezing, 1 lobar pneumonia) and 62 were in the control group. We excluded children with congenital heart diseases and other conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension. The method of time to peak velocity corrected for heart rate was used to estimate pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We analysed 2 age-subgroups: 1-2 months and 2-12 months. A Student’s t-test for independent samples was used to compare the mean values of variables. Outcomes:Increased mean pulmonary pressures (>25mmHg) were measured in 18 infants with respiratory diseases, with the next distribution: 14 bronchiolitis, 2 bronchopneumonia, 1 episodic wheezing, 1 interstitial pneumonia. The values were categorized as mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mean PAP were significantly increased in subjects with clinically bronchoobstructive disease (bronchiolitis, episodic wheezing, bronchopneumonia) vs. control (p=0.05 in first age-subgroup and<0.001 in second age-subgroup). In infants with bronchoobstructive disease hospitalization was significantly longer in patients with pulmonary hypertension vs. normal PAP (p= 0.04 in first age-subgroup and 0.005 in second age-subgroup). In patients with bronchoobstructive diseases, mean PAPm and PAPs were significantly increased in subjects with a moderate/severe episode of wheezing at admission vs. a mild episode (p=0.02). Mean PAPm and PAPs were increased in subjects with interstitial pneumonia vs. control, but without statistic significance

  11. Clinical manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Green, Peter H R; Krishnareddy, Suneeta; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-based condition affecting multiple organ systems. Clinical manifestations are manifold in form and number due to the multisystem nature of CD. There has been a progressive change in the clinical manifestations over the recent decades with fewer patients, both adults and children, presenting with a diarrheal, classical form. This, in children, is seen in only the youngest, while growth issues, screening at-risk groups and recurrent abdominal pain are the most common modes of presentation among children. Among adults, diarrhea is the most common presentation followed by anemia. Screening at-risk groups, metabolic bone disease and incidental recognition at endoscopy performed for reflux are the other main modes of presentation. The bulk of those with CD remain undiagnosed. The symptoms are often common, and increased medical education should lead to greater awareness in the medical community and an increased rate of diagnosis. PMID:25925914

  12. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries), leukocyte rolling and adhesion and the microvascular endothelial-dependent response were analyzed over a period of fifteen days using intravital video-microscopy. We also evaluated cerebral oxidative stress with the thiobarbituric acid reactive species TBARS method. Compared with the non-infected group, acute CD significantly induced cerebral functional microvascular alterations, including (i) functional capillary rarefaction, (ii) increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, (iii) the formation of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, and (iv) alteration of the endothelial response to acetylcholine. Moreover, cerebral oxidative stress increased in infected animals. We concluded that acute CD in mice induced cerebral microvasculopathy, characterized by a reduced incidence of perfused capillaries, a high number of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, a marked increase in leukocyte-endothelium interactions and brain arteriolar endothelial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. These results suggest the involvement of cerebral microcirculation alterations in the neurological manifestations of CD. PMID:25010691

  13. Hemophagocytosis in the Acute Phase of Fatal Kawasaki Disease in a 4 Month-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Vehbi; Karaaslan, Erhan; Özer, Samet; Gümüşer, Rüveyda; Yılmaz, Resul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis predominately affecting coronary arteries. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can complicate the course of Kawasaki disease. Rare cases of secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease have been reported. Case Report: We report here a 4 month-old girl with diffuse coronary ectasia and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring during the acute phase of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Conclusion: Due to the large overlap in clinical symptoms, the presence of atypical findings for Kawasaki disease should suggest the possible diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in these patients. PMID:27606147

  14. Correlations between severity of clinical signs and histopathological changes in 60 dogs with spinal cord injury associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Henke, D; Vandevelde, M; Doherr, M G; Stöckli, M; Forterre, F

    2013-10-01

    The outcome of spinal surgery in dogs with absent voluntary motor function and nociception following intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation is highly variable, which likely attests to differences in the severity of spinal cord damage. This retrospective study evaluated the extent to which neurological signs correlated with histologically detected spinal cord damage in 60 dogs that were euthanased because of thoracolumbar IVD herniation. Clinical neurological grades correlated significantly with the extent of white matter damage (P<0.001). However, loss of nociception also occurred in 6/31 (19%) dogs with relatively mild histological changes. The duration of clinical signs, Schiff-Sherrington posture, loss of reflexes and pain on spinal palpation were not significantly associated with the severity of spinal cord damage. Although clinical-pathological correlation was generally good, some clinical signs frequently thought to indicate severe cord injury did not always correlate with the degree of cord damage, suggesting functional rather than structural impairment in some cases. PMID:23702280

  15. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long

  16. HLA-DRB1 shared epitope genotyping using the revised classification and its association with circulating autoantibodies, acute phase reactants, cytokines and clinical indices of disease activity in a cohort of South African rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The revised shared epitope (SE) concept in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the presence (S) or absence (X) of the SE RAA amino acid motif at positions 72 to 74 of the third hypervariable region of the various human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles. The purpose of this study was to investigate SE subtypes on the basis of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for the classification of RA in a cohort of South African RA patients (n = 143) and their association with clinical and circulating biomarkers of disease activity (autoantibodies, acute phase reactants and cytokines). Methods Genomic DNA was analysed using high-resolution recombinant sequence-specific oligonucleotide PCR typing of the HLA-DRB1 allele. Subtypes of the SE were classified according to the amino acids at positions 72 to 74 for the RAA sequence, and further sub-divided according to the amino acids at positions 70 and 71, which either contribute to (S2, S3P), or negate (S1, S3D) RA susceptibility. Disease activity was assessed on the basis of (1) Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using C-reactive protein (CRP), (2) rheumatoid factor (RF), (3) CRP and (4) serum amyloid A by nephelometry, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (aCCP) by an immunofluorometric procedure, and cytokines by multiplex bead array technology. Results Of the 143 RA patients, 81 (57%) were homozygous (SS) and 50 (35%) were heterozygous (SX) for the SE alleles with significant overexpression of S2 and S3P (respective odds ratios (ORs) 5.3 and 5.8; P < 0.0001), and 12 (8%) were classified as no SE allele (XX). Both the SS and SX groups showed a strong association with aCCP positivity (OR = 10.2 and P = 0.0010, OR = 9.2 and P = 0.0028, respectively) relative to the XX group. Clinical scores and concentrations of the other biomarkers of disease activity (RF, CRP and T helper cell type 1 (Th1), Th2, macrophage and fibroblast cytokines) were also generally higher in the SS group than

  17. Pharmacotherapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Rouabhia, Samir; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute form of alcohol induced liver disease with a poor prognosis that is seen in the patients who consume large quantities of alcohol. The diagnosis of AH is based on the appropriate alcohol intake history and is supported with clinical and histological features, and several scoring systems. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay for treating severe AH with pentoxifylline used as an alternative to steroids in addition to total alcohol abstinence. Liver transplantation is a possible therapeutic option for severe AH. Among the anti-craving medications able to improve abstinence rate, baclofen seems to be effective and safe in the alcoholic patients affected by severe liver damage. PMID:24605014

  18. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnostic Challenges in Acute Porphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Henry; Krishnasamy, Vikram P.; Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza

    2013-01-01

    The porphyrias are a group of disorders characterized by an enzyme deficiency in the heme biosynthetic pathway. These can be classified into either erythropoietic or hepatic forms depending on the site of the major enzyme deficiency. The diagnosis of acute porphyrias, however, can be very challenging due to overlapping features amongst the various types. Initial suspicion is based on a myriad of clinical manifestations, which then are confirmed by laboratory testing where available. Genetic testing is now also available for the different types of porphyrias, aiding in the definitive diagnosis. Here, we present a challenging case of porphyria in a patient with end-stage renal disease and present the diagnostic challenges associated with the case and the ways forward. PMID:23476835

  19. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  20. Huntington's disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Roos, Raymund A C

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD). The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more) on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation) are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which results in patients

  1. Huntington's disease: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by unwanted choreatic movements, behavioral and psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Prevalence in the Caucasian population is estimated at 1/10,000-1/20,000. Mean age at onset of symptoms is 30-50 years. In some cases symptoms start before the age of 20 years with behavior disturbances and learning difficulties at school (Juvenile Huntington's disease; JHD). The classic sign is chorea that gradually spreads to all muscles. All psychomotor processes become severely retarded. Patients experience psychiatric symptoms and cognitive decline. HD is an autosomal dominant inherited disease caused by an elongated CAG repeat (36 repeats or more) on the short arm of chromosome 4p16.3 in the Huntingtine gene. The longer the CAG repeat, the earlier the onset of disease. In cases of JHD the repeat often exceeds 55. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and signs in an individual with a parent with proven HD, and is confirmed by DNA determination. Pre-manifest diagnosis should only be performed by multidisciplinary teams in healthy at-risk adult individuals who want to know whether they carry the mutation or not. Differential diagnoses include other causes of chorea including general internal disorders or iatrogenic disorders. Phenocopies (clinically diagnosed cases of HD without the genetic mutation) are observed. Prenatal diagnosis is possible by chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis. Preimplantation diagnosis with in vitro fertilization is offered in several countries. There is no cure. Management should be multidisciplinary and is based on treating symptoms with a view to improving quality of life. Chorea is treated with dopamine receptor blocking or depleting agents. Medication and non-medical care for depression and aggressive behavior may be required. The progression of the disease leads to a complete dependency in daily life, which results in patients

  2. Advancing the Minimal Residual Disease Concept in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B; Mulé, Matthew P; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past 60 years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and preclinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (non-APL) AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption, including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients, and finally the need to involve patients in decision-making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  3. Acute myeloid leukaemia as a cause of acute ischaemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    van Haelst, P.L.; Schot, B.; Hoendermis, E.S.; van den Berg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is almost invariably the result of atherosclerotic degeneration of the coronary arteries. However, other causes of ischaemic heart disease should always be considered. Here we describe two patients with a classic presentation of ischaemic heart disease resulting from acute leukaemia. The pathophysiological mechanisms of acute leukaemia leading to ischaemic heart disease are discussed. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1BFigure 2 PMID:25696595

  4. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination. PMID:26496907

  5. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  6. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines. PMID:27399018

  7. Cryoglobulins in acute and chronic liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Florin-Christensen, A.; Roux, María E. B.; Arana, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cryoglobulins were detected in the sera of thirteen patients with acute viral hepatitis and of twelve with chronic hepatic diseases (active chronic hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cryptogenic cirrhosis). Their nature and antibody activity was studied. In both groups, most of them consisted of mixed cryoimmunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and/or IgA), but some were single-class immunoglobulins with one or both types of light chains. Unusual components were also found. α1-fetoprotein was present in four cryoprecipitates: in two as the single constituent and in two associated to immunoglobulins; hepatitis-associated antigen co-existed in one of the latter. Some cryoglobulins showed antibody activity against human IgG, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antigens. In one case, the IgM-kappa of the cryoprecipitate had antibody activity against α1-fetoprotein; this antigen was also present in the cryoprecipitate, suggesting immune-complex formation. Autoantibodies were also looked for in the sera of the twenty-five patients; apart from the most common ones, antibodies to α1-fetoprotein were found in two patients. PMID:4143195

  8. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  9. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14−30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in

  10. [Pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of sporadic cerebral small vessel disease].

    PubMed

    Staszewski, Jacek; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Skrobowska, Ewa; Pawlik, Rafał; Brodacki, Bogdan; Stępień, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Sporadic small vessel disease (sSVD) is one of the most common vascular disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is the main cause of lacunar stokes, hemorrhages to deep brain regions and chronic CNS diseases such as vascular parkinsonism and dementia. Beside a high and growing incidence of sSVD especially in the elderly population, the knowledge of ethiopathogenesis and optimal treatment of sSVD have not been established. The article summarizes different clinical manifestations (acute and chronic) as well as heterogenous radiologic changes found in CNS neuroimaging. PMID:26802696

  11. Myeloperoxidase and coronary arterial disease: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roman, Raquel Melchior; Wendland, Andrea Elisabet; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2008-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme derived of leukocytes that catalyze formation of numerous reactive oxidant species. Besides members of the innate host defense, evidences have been proving the contribution of these oxidants to tissue injury during inflammation. MPO participates in proatherogenic biological activities related to the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including initiation, propagation and acute complications of atherosclerotic process. Thereby, MPO and its inflammatory cascade represents an attractive target for prognostical investigation and therapeutics in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this review, we present the state of the art in the understanding of biological actions to clinical evidences of the relationship between MPO and coronary arterial disease. Several studies point to the independent effect of MPO levels in the evolution of disease and incidence of events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the additional predictive value of MPO levels in the cardiovascular risk assessment, to incorporate it to the clinical practice as marker of plaque vulnerability, is still not consistent. Additional studies are necessary to confirm its role in the different forms of presentation of ischemic disease, besides the standardization of the assay, fundamental point for transition of this marker from research atmosphere to use in clinical routine: : from laboratory to clinical practice. PMID:18660935

  12. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  13. Extramedullary Disease in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: Two-In-One Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Francesco; Specchia, Giorgina

    2011-01-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), extramedullary disease (EMD) is particularly rare and shows special clinical and biological features. It is estimated that about 3–5% of APL patients will suffer extramedullary relapse. The most common site of EMD in APL is the central nervous system (CNS). At present, there are still many issues of EMD in APL needing further clarification, including pathogenesis, risk factors, prognosis and treatment. A better understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying EMD is important to be able to devise more effective CNS prophylaxis and induction-consolidation therapeutic strategies. PMID:22220263

  14. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348 PMID:26001791

  15. [Acute pancreatitis with hypertriglyceridemia--an underestimated disease?].

    PubMed

    Wild, Wolfgang; Tajjiou, Morad; Ferschke, Melanie; Bormann, Fabian; Dörr, Pius; Schwarzbach, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare, but since a long time well known etiology for acute pancreatitis. It could occure alone or coactive with other triggers like alcohlic excess. Nevertheless it found no approach to the current classifications and parameters of prognosis of the acute pancreatitis. We refer about two patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis, whose initial disease was limited on the tail of the pancreas with just a circumscripted or--in the other case--no necrosis. However, in both cases and although a consequent treatment started immediately, a serious process developed including a life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome in one case, which necessitated an extracorporal membrane oxygenation. PMID:26710203

  16. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  17. [Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis as an imported disease].

    PubMed

    van Crevel, R; van der Ven, A J; Meis, J F; Kullberg, B J

    1997-06-21

    A previously healthy 44-year-old male traveller presented with a dry cough, fever and an abnormal chest X-ray after a stay in Guatemala, where he had explored bat caves. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis was diagnosed after culture of Histoplasma capsulatum from bronchial washings. A favourable response was seen upon treatment with itraconazole for six weeks. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis should be considered in a healthy traveller returning with fever from the USA or subtropical areas. PMID:9380167

  18. [Clinical picture and pathomorphology of acute coenuriasis in sheep].

    PubMed

    Angelov, A K; Belchev, L

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and morphological investigations were carried out in the case of two enzootics of coenurosis in weaned lambs. The disease was established in two flocks of 180 and 160 animals, respectively. Outbreaks were recorded two weeks after they were put on premises where dogs untreated for worms had been kept. Instable gait and incoordinated movements of the head and limbs were observed along with circling movements of the body, loss of herd instinct, and lay ill for a long time. Morphologically, hyperemia was seen in the meninges, hemispheres, cerebellum, and the basal portions of the brain, with swelling of the tissue, numerous oncospheres, and purulent and necrotic foci. Histopathologically, there were in the acute stages great numbers of parasite passages with detritus mass, hemorrhages, purulent-and-necrotic meningoencephalitis, and higher counts of neutrophile and eosinophile granulocytes. Besides, in the subacute cases there were histiocytes and lymphoid and gigantic alien cells. Differential diagnosis should take into consideration listeriosis, cerebrocortical necrosis, estrosis monesiosis, and enterotoxemia. PMID:3765379

  19. Clinical, histopathologic & immunologic features of cutaneous lesions in acute meningococcaemia.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Mukherjee, A; Chandra, M; Sehgal, S K; Saxena, U; Jain, A K; Wadhwa, A

    1990-01-01

    Fifty children with culture proven acute meningococcaemia were studied during the winter outbreak of the disease in 1986-87. Purpuric lesions were seen in 60 per cent, erythematous papules in 32 per cent, faint pink macules in 28 per cent, conjunctival petechiae in 10 per cent and herpes labialis in 20 per cent. Histopathology of skin lesions showed that the primary damage was to the dermal vessels, the extent of damage depending on the type of skin involvement. Diplococci in Gram's stained sections were seen frequently in purpuric as compared to the other skin lesions. They were located in degenerating neutrophils, endothelial cells, fibrin clots or freely in the vascular lumen. Electron microscopic study showed vascular changes accompanied by a perivascular phagocytic response. Both light and electronmicroscopy indicated the involvement of the coagulative mechanism in the pathogenesis of meningococcaemia. However, clinical parameters of clotting were often within normal limits. In the case of a child (who died eventually), a low platelet count and prolonged coagulation indices were observed. Sera from some of the children were tested for the presence of antibodies against meningococci by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies were detected in the sera and they may have a role in regulating the severity and course of the illness. The significance of immunoglobulin deposits in the skin lesions is not clear. PMID:2111800

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inherited renal disease and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Emma, Francesco; Montini, Giovanni; Parikh, Samir M; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as key players in genetic and acquired renal diseases. Most mitochondrial cytopathies that cause renal symptoms are characterized by tubular defects, but glomerular, tubulointerstitial and cystic diseases have also been described. For example, defects in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis and the mitochondrial DNA 3243 A>G mutation are important causes of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in children and in adults, respectively. Although they sometimes present with isolated renal findings, mitochondrial diseases are frequently associated with symptoms related to central nervous system and neuromuscular involvement. They can result from mutations in nuclear genes that are inherited according to classic Mendelian rules or from mutations in mitochondrial DNA, which are transmitted according to more complex rules of mitochondrial genetics. Diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders involves clinical characterization of patients in combination with biochemical and genetic analyses. In particular, prompt diagnosis of CoQ10 biosynthesis defects is imperative because of their potentially reversible nature. In acute kidney injury (AKI), mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the physiopathology of tissue injury, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis has an important role in the recovery of renal function. Potential therapies that target mitochondrial dysfunction or promote mitochondrial regeneration are being developed to limit renal damage during AKI and promote repair of injured tissue. PMID:26804019

  1. Ticagrelor for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease: insights from the PARTHENON clinical development program.

    PubMed

    Held, Peter; Himmelmann, Anders; Ditmarsch, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Ticagrelor (P2Y12 receptor antagonist) is presently indicated for preventing atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome and patients with a history of myocardial infarction. The PARTHENON clinical development program comprises five randomized, controlled, cardiovascular, indication-seeking outcome studies, aiming to evaluate ticagrelor across the spectrum of patients with atherothrombotic disease. Results of two large-scale trials support a benefit for ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome (PLATO; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00391872) and in patients with a history of myocardial infarction (PEGASUS-TIMI 54; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01225562). Ongoing trials will provide information on the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (SOCRATES; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01994720), peripheral artery disease (EUCLID; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01732822) and coronary artery disease in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (THEMIS: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01991795). PMID:27160944

  2. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  3. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  4. Clinical Presentation of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Survey of 800 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Cenci, Caterina; Monti, Simonetta; Poli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal disease that is still underdiagnosed. The objective of our study was to reappraise the clinical presentation of PE with emphasis on the identification of the symptoms and signs that prompt the patients to seek medical attention. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 800 patients with PE from two different clinical settings: 440 were recruited in Pisa (Italy) as part of the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISAPED); 360 were diagnosed with and treated for PE in seven hospitals of central Tuscany, and evaluated at the Atherothrombotic Disorders Unit, Firenze (Italy), shortly after hospital discharge. We interviewed the patients directly using a standardized, self-administered questionnaire originally utilized in the PISAPED. The two samples differed significantly as regards age, proportion of outpatients, prevalence of unprovoked PE, and of active cancer. Sudden onset dyspnea was the most frequent symptom in both samples (81 and 78%), followed by chest pain (56 and 39%), fainting or syncope (26 and 22%), and hemoptysis (7 and 5%). At least one of the above symptoms was reported by 756 (94%) of 800 patients. Isolated symptoms and signs of deep vein thrombosis occurred in 3% of the cases. Only 7 (1%) of 800 patients had no symptoms before PE was diagnosed. Conclusions/Significance Most patients with PE feature at least one of four symptoms which, in decreasing order of frequency, are sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain, fainting (or syncope), and hemoptysis. The occurrence of such symptoms, if not explained otherwise, should alert the clinicians to consider PE in differential diagnosis, and order the appropriate objective test. PMID:22383978

  5. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  6. A Case of Primary HIV Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus Coinfection Presenting with Widespread Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Singer, Elyse J.; Bonelli, Laura; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Coinfection of HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may occur given the shared routes of transmission, and the clinical presentations of each process overlap. We present a case of acute HIV-1 and CMV coinfection presenting with an acute febrile illness complicated by meningitis, hepatitis, and retinopathy. This and other similar cases demonstrate the need to consider CMV coin-fection in acute HIV-1 disease, particularly in situations with significant end-organ damage. PMID:24476962

  7. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  8. Eosinophilic cardiac disease: Molecular, clinical and imaging aspects.

    PubMed

    Séguéla, Pierre-Emmanuel; Iriart, Xavier; Acar, Philippe; Montaudon, Michel; Roudaut, Raymond; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilia may be responsible for cardiac injuries of widely varying severity, from acute myocarditis to endomyocardial fibrosis. In this review, we present both the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these lesions and their clinical and paraclinical aspects. Numerous aetiologies can lead to severe eosinophilia, but these are mainly represented by hypersensitivity reactions, rheumatological diseases and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Because cardiac involvement may be extremely severe, echocardiography should be always performed in the context of eosinophilia and appropriate therapeutics should be started rapidly in order to limit the progression of the disease. PMID:25858537

  9. Clinical and morphological correlations in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slujitoru, Anca Stefania; Enache, Andreea Lorena; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Rolea, Elisabeta; Stocheci, Cristina Mariana; Pop, O T; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathological changes in twenty-seven cases of acute ischemic stroke, aged between 65 and 75 years. All deaths occurred within 30 days after stroke. The aim of our study was to establish the clinical and histological correlations in acute ischemic stroke to detect prognostic factors. Brain lesions after acute stroke were observed in all regions. Our study describes the heterogeneity of brain injury after acute ischemic stroke with the participation of all brain components and the chronology in which these lesions develop and evolve. By histological and immunohistochemical studies, we identified neuronal, glial and vascular damage. The neurons had undergone in the area of lesion a process of necrosis, ballooning or condensation process. In the ischemic penumbra, we observed the presence of red neurons. Vascular lesions were represented by the discontinuity of capillaries, always associated with a marked perivascular edema. The following clinical and morphological correlations were established: liquefactive necrosis, astrocyte gliosis, phagocytosis phenomena are the more intense the later the death of the patient; apoptosis phenomena are the more intense the faster the death of the patient; the entire cerebral microcirculation presented microscopic modifications following the ischemic strokes, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made; the major neurological complications of the ischemic stroke - the hemorrhagic transformation phenomena, cerebral edema, were microscopically objectified, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made. PMID:23303014

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  11. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  13. Xuan Bai Cheng Qi formula as an adjuvant treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of the syndrome type phlegm-heat obstructing the lungs: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat AECOPD as adjunctive therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the TCM formula Xuan Bai Cheng Qi as an adjuvant therapy for AECOPD patients with the syndrome type of phlegm-heat obstructing the lungs. Methods A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 244 patients were divided into the intervention group (n = 122, treated with conventional medicine and Xuan Bai Cheng Qi) and the control group (n = 122, treated with conventional medicine and placebo). Total symptom scores (cough, phlegm, wheezing, chest congestion) before treatment and at 3, 5, 7, 10 days post-treatment were recorded. Lung function, arterial blood gas, serum inflammatory cytokines, oxidation/anti-oxidation index were observed before treatment and at the end of the 10-day treatment. Results A total of 242 patients completed the study. The full analysis set (FAS) population was 244 and the per-protocol analysis set (PPS) population was 229. After the 10-day treatment, symptom scores of the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group were significantly lower over time compared with the control group (FAS: mean difference -1.84, 95% CI -2.66 to -1.03, P < .001; PPS: mean difference -1.87, 95% CI -2.71 to -1.03, P < .001). FEV1, FVC, and FEV1%pred were significantly higher over time in the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group compared with those in the control group (day 10, FAS and PPS: P < .05). PaO2 and PaCO2 were significantly improved in the Xuan Bai Cheng Qi group (day 10, FAS and PPS: P < .05). Xuan Bai Cheng Qi was also found to ameliorate cytokine levels and oxidation/antioxidant index compared with placebo. There were no differences in safety variables and adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions Xuan Bai Cheng Qi formula appears to be a

  14. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  15. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient's tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a "one-by-one" administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  16. [Crohn's disease. Clinical and therapeutical considerations].

    PubMed

    Paşalega, M; Calotă, F; Paraliov, T; Meşină, C; Vîlcea, D; Tomescu, P; Pănuş, A; Tenea, T; Mirea, C; Traşcă, E; Ene, D; Vasile, I

    2005-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract of unknown etiology. Most commonly the disease affects the small bowel, the colon and the rectum. The acute and aggressive forms can evolve fast, mimicking an acute surgical illness, requiring surgical intervention in emergency. Surgical therapeutical option, in this condition, must be determined strictly by establishing a correct intraoperative diagnosis, through macroscopic features and histologic evidence. Because it is an incurable disease with variable evolution, marked by recurrence, that involves repeated surgical intervention, the surgical treatment (often resection), must be most conservative from the small bowel. We present 3 cases of surgical interventions with emergency characteristics (bowel obstruction through fitobezoar, colonic tumors obstruction of colon splenic angle, urachal infected tumors). In these cases the diagnosis was established intraoperatively and the surgical intervention was adapted to the particular cases. PMID:16372678

  17. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP). PMID:24809927

  18. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This document provides healthcare practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in guidelines development, and do not address the particulars of the Canadian healthcare environment. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections, and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused. Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability rather than

  19. Acute Phase Reactants as Novel Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. S.; Jadhav, A. B.; Hassan, A.; Meng, Qing H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute phase reaction is a systemic response which usually follows a physiological condition that takes place in the beginning of an inflammatory process. This physiological change usually lasts 1-2 days. However, the systemic acute phase response usually lasts longer. The aim of this systemic response is to restore homeostasis. These events are accompanied by upregulation of some proteins (positive acute phase reactants) and downregulation of others (negative acute phase reactants) during inflammatory reactions. Cardiovascular diseases are accompanied by the elevation of several positive acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, white blood cell count, secretory nonpancreatic phospholipase 2-II (sPLA2-II), ferritin, and ceruloplasmin. Cardiovascular disease is also accompanied by the reduction of negative acute phase reactants such as albumin, transferrin, transthyretin, retinol-binding protein, antithrombin, and transcortin. In this paper, we will be discussing the biological activity and diagnostic and prognostic values of acute phase reactants with cardiovascular importance. The potential therapeutic targets of these reactants will be also discussed. PMID:24049653

  20. Expert consensus on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bai-qiang; Cai, Shao-xi; Chen, Rong-chang; Cui, Li-ying; Feng, Yu-lin; Gu, Yu-tong; Huang, Shao-guang; Liu, Rong-yu; Liu, Guang-nan; Shi, Huan-zhong; Shi, Yi; Song, Yuan-lin; Sun, Tie-ying; Wang, Chang-zheng; Wang, Jing-lan; Wen, Fu-qiang; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Yong-jian; Yan, Xi-xin; Yao, Wan-zhen; Yu, Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Jin-ping; Liu, Jie; Bai, Chun-xue

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that severely threatens human health. Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is a major cause of disease progression and death, and causes huge medical expenditures. This consensus statement represents a description of clinical features of AECOPD in the People’s Republic of China and a set of recommendations. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for community physicians, pulmonologists and other health care providers for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AECOPD. PMID:24812503

  1. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia: Clinical features, Classification, and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-12-01

    Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE.Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging.Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing.AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  2. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management.

    PubMed

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; El Kerouiti, Zakaria; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought. PMID:26328000

  3. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; Kerouiti, Zakaria El; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought PMID:26328000

  4. Antigenuria in infants with acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Freilij, H L; Corral, R S; Katzin, A M; Grinstein, S

    1987-01-01

    Detection and partial characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi soluble antigens (SAg) in urine, as well as demonstration of parasite circulating antigens (CAg) in serum from pediatric patients with acute (10 patients) and congenital (10 patients) Chagas' disease, are reported. Classical techniques for parasite detection and antibody serology were also conducted in both groups. Samples collected before the onset of parasiticidal drug treatment were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for SAg and CAg demonstration. The control population consisted of 6 children with acute toxoplasmosis, 6 with cutaneous leishmaniasis, and 20 healthy individuals. Patients with acute cases were 100% positive for both SAg and CAg, whereas patients with congenital disease were 80% CAg positive and 100% SAg positive. Controls yielded negative results in all cases. Partial characterization of SAg from two patients with acute disease was performed by iodination, affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Two different antigenic glycoproteins (80 kilodaltons, pI 6 to 6.5 and 55 kilodaltons, pI 6.5 to 7) were identified by these methods. Traditional serology and classical parasitologic tests failed, each in a different way, to provide an accurate diagnosis in the total of our patients. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for SAg detection proved to be the most effective procedure for achieving early and precise proof of infection in acute and congenital cases of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:3098778

  5. Clinical update in sexually transmitted diseases-2014.

    PubMed

    Fanfair, Robyn Neblett; Workowski, Kimberly A

    2014-02-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their associated syndromes are extremely common in clinical practice. Early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and partner management are important to ensure sexual, physical, and reproductive health in our patients. PMID:24493491

  6. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia. PMID:26876264

  7. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  8. Clinical review: Stem cell therapies for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - hope or hype?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has led to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for this devastating disease. Mesenchymal stem cells appear closest to clinical translation, given the evidence that they may favourably modulate the immune response to reduce lung injury, while maintaining host immune-competence and also facilitating lung regeneration and repair. The demonstration that human mesenchymal stem cells exert benefit in the endotoxin-injured human lung is particularly persuasive. Endothelial progenitor cells also demonstrate promise in reducing endothelial damage, which is a key pathophysiological feature of ALI. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are at an earlier stage in the translational process, but offer the hope of directly replacing injured lung tissue. The lung itself also contains endogenous stem cells, which may ultimately offer the greatest hope for lung diseases, given their physiologic role in replacing and regenerating native lung tissues. However, significant deficits remain in our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action of stem cells, their efficacy in relevant pre-clinical models, and their safety, particularly in critically ill patients. These gaps need to be addressed before the enormous therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALI/ARDS can be realised. PMID:22424108

  9. Pathogenesis of Acute Kidney Injury: Foundation for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, involving factors such as vasoconstriction, leukostasis, vascular congestion, cell death, and abnormal immune modulators and growth factors. Many targeted clinical therapies have failed, are inconclusive, or have yet to be tested. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of AKI, it may be naïve to expect one therapeutic intervention would have success. Some examples of detrimental processes that can be blocked in pre-clinical models to improve kidney function and survival are apoptotic cell death in tubular epithelial cells, complement-mediated immune system activation, and impairment of cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Modalities with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality in AKI include vasodilators, growth factors, anti-inflammatory agents, and cell-based therapies. Pharmacological agents that target these diverse pathways are being used clinically for other indications. Using combinatorial approaches in future clinical trials may improve our ability to prevent and treat AKI. PMID:21530035

  10. The epidemiology and outcome of acute renal failure and the impact on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Clay A; Schoolwerth, Anton C

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. Recent publications have highlighted changes in the epidemiology and improvement in mortality that was long thought to be static despite improvements in clinical care. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts, such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease. Two brief case reports are offered to help frame the context and clinical impact of this disorder, followed by a review of some of the recent literature that addresses these points. PMID:17150044

  11. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  12. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  13. Mitochondrial Disease: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Translational Science, and Clinical Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ben; Cohen, Bruce; Copeland, William; Maria, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial medicine provides a metabolic perspective on the pathology of conditions linked with inadequate oxidative phosphorylation. Dysfunction in the mitochondrial machinery can result in improper energy production, leading to cellular injury or even apoptosis. Clinical presentations are often subtle, so clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to make early diagnoses. Symptoms could include muscle weakness and pain, seizures, loss of motor control, decreased visual and auditory functions, metabolic acidosis, acute developmental regression, and immune system dysfunction. The 2013 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe accepted clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial disease produced from various mitochondrial mutations, (2) discuss contemporary understanding of molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathology, (3) highlight the systemic effects produced by dysfunction within the mitochondrial machinery, and (4) introduce current strategies that are being translated from bench to bedside as potential therapeutics. PMID:24916430

  14. Monitoring of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Two highly sensitive methods, multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR), are increasingly used to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD) and to guide risk-adapted management in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). An independent prognostic impact has been demonstrated for MRD levels obtained by both methods. MFC has been found particularly useful for assessment of early clearance of malignant cells and after consolidation therapy. At the latter checkpoint, MRD levels quantified by RQ-PCR in AML with fusion genes also have the strongest prognostic power. In addition, highly predictive initial expression levels have been identified by RQ-PCR. Both methods are capable of early detection of relapse. Through the use of all available markers including NPM1 mutations and FLT3 mutations in addition to fusion genes, RQ-PCR-based MRD assessment is possible in more than half of patients, whereas MFC is applicable to most AML cases. With a sensitivity of 10(-4) (PML-RARA) to 10(-7) (patient-specific primers, FLT3 and NPM1 mutations), RQ-PCR is more sensitive in most cases. Large clinical trials will determine the exact role and place of immunologic and RQ-PCR-based monitoring of MRD in the therapy of patients with AML. PMID:18000811

  15. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  16. A rare cause of acute abdominal disease: two reports of caecal diverticulum perforation.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, İbrahim; Eren, Abdülkadir

    2016-05-01

    Diverticulum of the caecum is a rare lesion. From a clinical point of view, the inflammation it causes can mimic symptoms of acute appendicitis, causing difficulties in diagnosis and thus prescription of appropriate treatment. It is almost impossible to differentiate this disease from acute appendicitis through physical examination alone, and radiological imaging may also prove insufficient. For this reason, it is common to perioperatively diagnose diverticula of the caecum. Two cases of patients who underwent surgery for perforated caecal diverticula are presently described. PMID:27598596

  17. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  18. Nonurgent aortic disease: clinical-radiological diagnosis of aortitis.

    PubMed

    Cabero Moyano, J; Andreu Magarolas, M; Castañer González, E; Gallardo Cistaré, X; Belmonte Castan, E

    2013-01-01

    Aortitis is a pathological term designating inflammation of the aortic wall, regardless of its cause. The clinical presentation of aortitis is nonspecific and variable. Symptoms include abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss; acute phase reactants may also be elevated. Aortitis can be caused by a wide spectrum of entities, including from infectious processes to autoimmune diseases (Takayasu arteritis and giant cell arteritis are among the most common of these causing aortitis), and the prognosis and treatment of these entities vary widely. Various imaging techniques can be used to evaluate the lumen and wall of the aorta (such as multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, or PET-CT). This review focuses on the most common diseases that cause aortitis and on the clinical and radiological findings that are most useful for diagnosing and treating this condition appropriately. PMID:23891316

  19. [Sudeck disease--pathology, clinical aspects and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R H; Buch, K

    1998-06-01

    In our opinion the etiology of Sudeck's disease (acute reflex bone atrophy) plays a decisive role in therapeutic planning. The therapy is based on clinical and radiological findings. Physiotherapy addresses the symptom complex of pain, hyperemia, edema formation, and limitations of movement which act in a vicious circle and its intensity is modified according to the prevailing clinical and possibly also radiological findings. A strict coupling of the therapy to a classification according to stage is not recommended. Pharmacological therapy is merely a supporting element and focuses on the sympathetic overexcitability. The best therapy for Sudeck's disease is prophylaxis. Interventions collected under the general term early functional mobilization are, especially after surgical measures, a major factor in the avoidance of neurovegetative dysregulation in the sense of sympathetic reflex dystrophy. PMID:9738286

  20. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  1. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  2. VNI Cures Acute and Chronic Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, Fernando; Dobish, Mark C.; Nde, Pius N.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Johnson, Candice A.; Waterman, Michael R.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a deadly infection caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Afflicting approximately 8 million people in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem proliferating beyond the traditional geographical borders, mainly because of human and vector migration. Because the disease is endemic in low-resource areas, industrial drug development has been lethargic. The chronic form remains incurable, there are no vaccines, and 2 existing drugs for the acute form are toxic and have low efficacy. Here we report the efficacy of a small molecule, VNI, including evidence of its effectiveness against chronic Chagas disease. VNI is a potent experimental inhibitor of T. cruzi sterol 14α-demethylase. Nontoxic and highly selective, VNI displays promising pharmacokinetics and administered orally to mice at 25 mg/kg for 30 days cures, with 100% cure rate and 100% survival, the acute and chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:23372180

  3. An Imaging Diagnostic Protocol in Children with Clinically Suspected Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Matias; Antonio de Medeiros Lima, Marco; Corrêa, Patricia; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate a new diagnostic strategy using clinical findings followed by ultrasound (US) and, in selected cases, MRI. This study included 166 children presenting signs and symptoms suggesting acute appendicitis. Cases classified as suggesting appendicitis according to clinical exams had to be referred to surgery, whereas the other cases were discharged. Unclear cases were evaluated using US. If the US results were considered inconclusive, patients underwent MRI. Of the 166 patients, 78 (47%) had acute appendicitis and 88 (53%) had other diseases. The strategy under study had a sensitivity of 96 per cent, specificity of 100 per cent, positive predictive value of 100 per cent, negative predictive value of 97 per cent, and accuracy of 98 per cent. Eight patients remained undiagnosed and underwent MRI. After MRI two girls presented normal appendixes and were discharged. One girl had an enlarged appendix on MRI and appendicitis could have been confirmed by surgery. In the other five patients, no other sign of the disease was detected by MRI such as an inflammatory mass, free fluid or an abscess in the right iliac fossa. All of them were discharged after clinical observation. In the vast majority of cases the correct diagnosis was reached by clinical and US examinations. When clinical assessment and US findings were inconclusive, MRI was useful to detect normal and abnormal appendixes and valuable to rule out other abdominal pathologies that mimic appendicitis. PMID:27215717

  4. Acute stroke revealing Takayasu's arteritis in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Gil; Zalmanovich, Anat; Golan, Yitzhak; Jonas Kimchi, Tali; Barenboim, Erez

    2016-08-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male with Crohn's disease exhibited acute ischaemic stroke as the first manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis. Stroke as the first clinical manifestation of Takayasu's arteritis has been rarely reported. Though rare in Western countries, Takayasu's arteritis should be considered as a possibility in young patients presenting with stroke. Both Takayasu's arteritis and Crohn's disease may increase the risk of ischaemic stroke. Furthermore, their coexistence is much higher than that expected by chance and suggest a pathophysiological link between these diseases. PMID:27075786

  5. Antimicrobial therapy of acute diarrhoea: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoea is one of the most commonly occurring diseases. This article presents a review of the current state of the treatment of acute infectious diarrhoea, as well as of the most important pathogens. The general principles of the therapy of diarrhoea are exemplified, followed by a description of the targeted antimicrobial therapy of the most important bacterial gastrointestinal infections, including salmonellosis, shigellosis and Campylobacter infections, as well as infections with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, yersiniosis and cholera. Diarrhoea caused by toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains has increased in incidence and in severity. These infections will therefore be described in detail, including important new aspects of treatment. Symptomatic therapy is still the most important component of the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. However, empirical antibiotic therapy should be considered for severely ill patients with a high frequency of stools, fever, bloody diarrhoea, underlying immune deficiency, advanced age or significant comorbidities. Increasing resistance, in particular against fluoroquinolones, must be taken into consideration. Therapy with motility inhibitors is not recommended for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and severe colitis. The macrocyclic antibiotic fidaxomicin can reduce the rate of recurrent disease in CDI. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of faecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment option for multiple recurrences of CDI is increasing. In conclusion, the treatment of acute diarrhoea is still primarily supportive. General empirical antibiotic therapy for acute diarrhoea is not evidence-based. PMID:26641310

  6. Disease-mongering through clinical trials.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, María; Saborido, Cristian; Teira, David

    2015-06-01

    Our goal in this paper is to articulate a precise concept of at least a certain kind of disease-mongering, showing how pharmaceutical marketing can commercially exploit certain diseases when their best definition is given through the success of a treatment in a clinical trial. We distinguish two types of disease-mongering according to the way they exploit the definition of the trial population for marketing purposes. We argue that behind these two forms of disease-mongering there are two well-known problems in the statistical methodology of clinical trials (the reference class problem and the distinction between statistical and clinical significance). Overcoming them is far from simple. PMID:25863220

  7. Clinical case seminar in pediatric thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Szinnai, G; Léger, J; Bauer, A J; Pearce, E N; Ramos, H E; Canalli, M H; Onigata, K; Elisei, R; Radetti, G; Polak, M; Van Vliet, G; Deladoëy, J

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid diseases cover a large spectrum of congenital and acquired forms, ranging from congenital primary or central hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid disease, iodine deficiency, rare genetic defects of thyroid hormone action, metabolism and cell membrane transport to benign nodules and malignant tumors. The previous 15 papers of the textbook Paediatric Thyroidology gave a systematic overview of the current knowledge and guidelines on all these diseases. In this final paper, the authors collected a series of patient histories from their clinics illustrating frequently encountered clinical problems and providing key learning points and references to each case. Although not fully comprehensive, it aims at providing relevant clinical knowledge on thyroid diseases of the neonate, the child, and the adolescent. PMID:25231455

  8. Adenosine Signaling During Acute and Chronic Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Xia, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling nucleoside that is produced following tissue injury, particularly injury involving ischemia and hypoxia. The production of extracellular adenosine and its subsequent signaling through adenosine receptors plays an important role in orchestrating injury responses in multiple organs. There are four adenosine receptors that are widely distributed on immune, epithelial, endothelial, neuronal and stromal cells throughout the body. Interestingly, these receptors are subject to altered regulation following injury. Studies in mouse models and human cells and tissues have identified that the production of adenosine and its subsequent signaling through its receptors plays largely beneficial roles in acute disease states, with the exception of brain injury. In contrast, if elevated adenosine levels are sustained beyond the acute injury phase, adenosine responses can become detrimental by activating pathways that promote tissue injury and fibrosis. Understanding when during the course of disease adenosine signaling is beneficial as opposed to detrimental and defining the mechanisms involved will be critical for the advancement of adenosine based therapies for acute and chronic diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss key observations that define the beneficial and detrimental aspects of adenosine signaling during acute and chronic disease states with an emphasis on cellular processes such as inflammatory cell regulation, vascular barrier function and tissue fibrosis. PMID:23340998

  9. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  10. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  11. Acute Schistosomiasis in Brazilian Traveler: The Importance of Tourism in The Epidemiology of Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history. PMID:22844623

  12. Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage.

    PubMed

    Duray, P H; Steere, A C

    1988-01-01

    Lyme disease is capable of producing a wide variety of clinical pathologic conditions and lesions having in common histologic features of collagen-vascular disease. The plasma cell is an omnipotent inflammatory responder in most tissues involved by Lyme disease, ranging from relatively acute to lesions that have gone on for years. Vascular thickening also seems to be prominent, and in the dermis is accompanied by scleroderma-like collagen expansion. The disease in some ways resembles the responses seen in lupus erythematosus such as mild cerebritis with lymphocytes and plasma cells in the leptomeninges. Lymphoplasmacytic panniculitis of Lyme disease resembles lupus profundus, both in the infiltrate and the plasma cell-blood vessel relationship. The onion skin thickened vessels of the synovia resemble the vessels of lupus spleens, while the scleradermoid thickening of the dermis and various skin lesions of stage III Lyme disease suggest a collagen-vascular disorder. Finally, the perivascular lymphoid infiltrate in clinical myositis does not differ from that seen in polymyositis or dermatomyositis. All of these histologic derangements suggest immunologic damage in response to persistence of the spirochete, however few in number. PMID:2847622

  13. [Clinical aspects of the Niigata Minamata disease].

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Hirota, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2015-01-01

    The Minamata disease was discovered in the Minamata region, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, in 1956. Symptoms of this disease included cerebellar ataxia, sensory disturbance, narrowing of the visual field, and hearing and speech disturbances. In 1965, similar conditions were identified in persons living around the Agano River area, Niigata Prefecture, Japan and accordingly termed as the Niigata Minamata disease or the second Minamata disease. Both the diseases have been attributed to poisoning with methyl mercury that was generated during the production of acetaldehyde using mercury as a catalyst. The discharged methyl mercury accumulated in fishes and shellfishes and caused poisoning on consumption. This review discusses the history, clinical presentation including atypical forms, and autopsy findings of the Niigata Minamata disease. In addition, it highlights the problems about criteria for official recognition and the therapeutic trial for this disease. PMID:25585433

  14. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  15. [Pathogenesis and clinical condition of hyperphosphatemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Hamano, Naoto; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is essential mineral to life, which has the multiple roles like postural maintenance or production of energy in the cells. Phosphate overload is harmful and compensatory mechanisms exist. Phosphate is abolished through kidneys and target organ of the compensatory mechanism is also kidneys. It is necessary to evaluate renal function and source of phosphate for estimating the cause of hyperphosphatemia. Acute hyperphosphatemia may cause severe acute kidney injury and avoidance of massive phosphate overload is needed. Chronic hyperphosphatemia have an impact on prognosis because the risk of cardiovascular event increases. Adequate restriction of phosphate intake and use of phosphate absorbent is needed for improvement of prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26813500

  16. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  17. Improved BVDV1b challenge model for evaluating efficacy of protection against clinical signs following acute infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Efficacy of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccines in preventing acute infections is evaluated based on reduction of clinical disease. While high virulence BVDV2 strains are used in U.S. vaccine efficacy studies, the BVDV1 strain, NY-1, made available by the USDA as a challenge ...

  18. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  20. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  1. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  2. Significance of Cerebral Blood Flow Analysis in the Acute Stage after Revascularization Surgery for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMURA, Miki; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology characterized by steno-occlusive changes at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery, either bilaterally or unilaterally, and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Surgical revascularization such as extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass is the preferred procedure for moyamoya disease. Despite the favorable long-term outcome, cerebral infarction and hyperperfusion syndrome are potential complications of this procedure, which can lead to neurological deterioration in the acute stage. In light of the similar clinical presentations between perioperative ischemia and hyperperfusion, it is essential to attempt a prompt cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement in the acute stage after EC-IC bypass for moyamoya disease to differentiate these distinct pathologies, because the management of cerebral ischemia and hyperperfusion is contradictory to each other. Routine CBF analysis by single-photon emission computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging not only facilitated a safer perioperative management but also provided important information about dynamic pathology of the hemodynamic conversion in the acute stage after revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease. We represent the current status of CBF analysis during the perioperative period of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease, and sought to discuss its significance and efficacy to avoid surgical complications. PMID:26369873

  3. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  4. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  5. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  6. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  7. [Acute cardiovascular disease and job retention].

    PubMed

    Fantoni-Quinton, Sophie; Tellart, Anne-Sophie; Cambier-Langrand, Evodie; Fassier, Jean Baptiste; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Since it allows a better quality of life, return to work must be considered ever since the early stages of the health care pathway following a cardiovascular disease. Seeing the occupational physician beforehand, so as to anticipate the return to work, is crucial. Dialogue between cardiologists, general practitioners and occupational physician, still observing medical confidentiality, must allow a better quality of return to work. Being recognized as a handicapped worker is a key element in the prevention of socio-professional exclusion. Even when dealing with long sick leave, permanent functional injuries or job loss, guiding the patients towards the appropriate person can improve return to work and job retention in the long term. PMID:27021479

  8. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  9. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  10. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  11. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  12. Clinical potential of elacytarabine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rein, Lindsay A M; Rizzieri, David A

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been treated for over four decades with standard induction chemotherapy including seven days of cytosine arabinoside (cytarabine, ara-C) infusion. Cytarabine, while effective in killing leukemic cells, is subject to development of several resistance mechanisms rendering the drug ineffective in many patients. Elacytarabine, a lipophilic 5'-elaidic acid ester or nucleoside analogue of cytosine arabinoside, was created with the intent of overcoming resistance mechanisms including reduced expression of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) required for cytarabine entry into cells, as well as increased activity of cytidine deaminase (CDA) which breaks down the active metabolite of cytarabine, ara-CTP. Elacytarabine enters cells independently of transporters, has a longer half life compared with cytarabine and is not subject to deactivation by CDA. Preclinical data were encouraging although subsequent clinical studies have failed to show superiority of elacytarabine compared with standard of care as monotherapy in patients with AML. Clinical trials utilizing elacytarabine in combination with anthracyclines are ongoing. Use of hENT1 expression as a predictive marker for cytarabine or elacytarabine response has been studied with no conclusive validation to date. Despite promising early results, the jury is still out in regards to this novel agent as an effective alternative to standard cytarabine therapy in acute leukemias, especially in combination with additional agents such as anthracyclines. PMID:25469211

  13. Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy: A clinical checkmate

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Rashid, Mahjabeen; Balek, Mark; Park, Chong

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in pregnancy is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Management of these patients can be challenging as little is known about the optimal management strategy. Medications routinely used may have harmful effects on the pregnancy outcome. In addition, AMI could occur in the absence of atherosclerotic disease. We describe optimal management strategy by eliciting the management of a 45-year-old female with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. We recommend early use of coronary angiography to define the pathology in such cases. Radial artery assess should be preferred. Pregnant patients with AMI due to atherosclerotic disease should be given a 325 mg of aspirin and 600 mg of clopidogrel and either balloon angioplasty or bare metal stent should be used for revascularization. Percutaneous coronary intervention with heparin is preferred over bivalirudin and later should be reserved for patients with severe heparin allergy. PMID:23993012

  14. Acute renal failure in children. An ultrasonographic-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vergesslich, K A; Sommer, G; Wittich, G R; Balzar, E; Weninger, M; Ponhold, W

    1987-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) may be due to obstructive uropathy or renal parenchymal disease. Twenty-five children with acute renal failure secondary to renal parenchymal disease underwent ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys. Changes of renal size and cortical echogenicity were correlated with renal function. All patients presented with bilaterally enlarged kidneys with the exception of those in the neonatal age group (12%). Improvement in renal function resulted in normalization of renal size. With regard to cortical echogenicity two groups were formed. Group A comprised 11 patients whose kidneys had the same echogenicity as the liver, while in group B the kidneys were more echogenic (14 patients). Cortical echogenicity was always increased. Determination of creatinine levels showed a statistically significant difference between group A (3.32 mg% +/- 1.40 S.D.) and group B (5.95 mg% +/- 1.96 S.D.), p less than 0.001. Changes in renal function were paralleled by rapid changes in renal size and cortical echogenicity. PMID:3319623

  15. In the Clinic. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Ian G

    2015-07-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of gastroesophageal reflux disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:26148292

  16. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously. PMID:27032222

  17. Recurrent abdominal and cervical pains. An unusual clinical presentation of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lahat, E; Azizi, E; Eshel, G; Mundel, G

    1986-03-01

    Most cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) present with arthritis, carditis or choreiform movements. However, a variety of clinical manifestations which are not included in the modified Jones criteria can be the presenting symptoms of the disease. We describe a case of a 10-year-old boy with ARF who presented with recurrent episodes of abdominal and cervical pain who later developed an active carditis which established the diagnosis of ARF. A high degree of suspicion and an awareness of the less common manifestations of ARF are necessary to make an early diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment in certain cases of ARF. PMID:3583777

  18. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  19. In the clinic. Sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H

    2011-09-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of sickle cell disease focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. Readers can complete the accompanying CME quiz for 1.5 credits. Only ACP members and individual subscribers can access the electronic features of In the Clinic. Non-subscribers who wish to access this issue of In the Clinic can elect "Pay for View." Subscribers can receive 1.5 category 1 CME credits by completing the CME quiz that accompanies this issue of In the Clinic. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including PIER (Physicians' Information and Education Resource) and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing division and with assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from PIER and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult www.acponline.org, http://pier.acponline.org, and other resources referenced within each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:21893620

  20. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  1. Use of the Modified SNOT-16 in Primary Care Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Acute Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, Jane; Spitznagel, Edward; Piccirillo, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine the reliability, validity, responsiveness and the minimal important difference (MID) for the SNOT-16 in the measurement of disease-specific quality of life in adults with acute rhinosinusitis Study Design Randomized controlled trial to evaluate antibiotic treatment for acute rhinosinusitis Setting Ten community practices in St Louis, MO Subjects and Methods The modified SNOT-16 was completed at baseline (by both face-to-face and telephone interviews) and by telephone interview at 3, 7 and 10 days by 166 adults with acute rhinosinusitis diagnosed clinically using standardized criteria (36% male, 78% Caucasian). Considering severity and frequency, subjects rated how much they were bothered by each item using a 4-point scale. The mean SNOT-16 score (ranging from 0, no problem to 3, large problem) was compared to the subjects’ global assessment of change to evaluate responsiveness and the MID. Results The instrument was easy to use and took < 5 minutes to complete. The SNOT-16 score identified statistically significant differences in the hypothesized direction for those reporting more or less severe symptoms (p=0.0161) and more or less bother (p<0.0001) demonstrating construct-related validity. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.82 to 0.91 demonstrating high internal consistency. There was a statistically significant decrease in scores with time (MANOVA, p<0.0001). The effect sizes at days 3, 7, and 10 were 1.45, 2.34 and 2.90 respectively, indicating high sensitivity to clinical change. The Minimum Important Difference (MID) was 0.5 units. Conclusion The modified SNOT-16 is a valid instrument to assess effectiveness of interventions to improve disease-specific QOL in adults with acute rhinosinusitis. PMID:21844413

  2. A previously unknown reovirus of bat origin is associated with an acute respiratory disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Crameri, Gary; Hyatt, Alex; Yu, Meng; Tompang, Mohd Rosli; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer; Crameri, Sandra; Kumarasamy, Verasingam; Eaton, Bryan T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory infections constitute the most widespread human infectious disease, and a substantial proportion of them are caused by unknown etiological agents. Reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were first isolated from humans in the early 1950s and so named because they were not associated with any known disease. Here, we report a previously unknown reovirus (named “Melaka virus”) isolated from a 39-year-old male patient in Melaka, Malaysia, who was suffering from high fever and acute respiratory disease at the time of virus isolation. Two of his family members developed similar symptoms ≈1 week later and had serological evidence of infection with the same virus. Epidemiological tracing revealed that the family was exposed to a bat in the house ≈1 week before the onset of the father's clinical symptoms. Genome sequence analysis indicated a close genetic relationship between Melaka virus and Pulau virus, a reovirus isolated in 1999 from fruit bats in Tioman Island, Malaysia. Screening of sera collected from human volunteers on the island revealed that 14 of 109 (13%) were positive for both Pulau and Melaka viruses. This is the first report of an orthoreovirus in association with acute human respiratory diseases. Melaka virus is serologically not related to the different types of mammalian reoviruses that were known to infect humans asymptomatically. These data indicate that bat-borne reoviruses can be transmitted to and cause clinical diseases in humans. PMID:17592121

  3. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. PMID:26135330

  4. The Burden of Acute Disease in Mahajanga, Madagascar – A 21 Month Study

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vijay C.; Andriamalala, Clara N.; Reynolds, Teri A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts to develop effective and regionally-appropriate emergency care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are hindered by a lack of data on both the burden of disease in the region and on the state of existing care delivery mechanisms. This study describes the burden of acute disease presenting to an emergency unit in Mahajanga, Madagascar. Methods and Findings Handwritten patient registries on all emergency department patients presenting between 1 January 2011 and 30 September 2012 were reviewed and data entered into a database. Data included age, sex, diagnosis, and disposition. We classified diagnoses into Clinical Classifications Software (CCS) multi-level categories. The population was 53.5% male, with a median age of 31 years. The five most common presenting conditions were 1) Superficial injury; contusion, 2) Open wounds of head; neck; and trunk, 3) Open wounds of extremities, 4) Intracranial injury, and 5) Unspecified injury and poisoning. Trauma accounted for 48%, Infectious Disease for 15%, Mental Health 6.1%, Noncommunicable 29%, and Neoplasms 1.2%. The acuity seen was high, with an admission rate of 43%. Trauma was the most common reason for admission, representing 19% of admitted patients. Conclusions This study describes the burden of acute disease at a large referral center in northern Madagascar. The Centre Hôpitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga sees a high volume of acutely ill and injured patients. Similar to other reports from the region, trauma is the most common pathology observed, though infectious disease was responsible for the majority of adult mortality. Typhoid fever other intestinal infections were the most lethal CCS-coded pathologies. By utilizing a widely understood classification system, we are able to highlight contrasts between Mahajanga’s acute and overall disease burden as well as make comparisons between this region and the rest of the globe. We hope this study will serve to guide the development of context

  5. Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Diseases: The Clinical Approach.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Río, Manuel; Caballero, Manuel Moreno; Górriz Sáez, Juan Manuel; Mínguez-Castellanos, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of clinical questions for which there are no easy answers, even for well-trained doctors. The diagnostic tool commonly used to assess cognitive impairment in neurodegenerative diseases is based on established clinical criteria. However, the differential diagnosis between disorders can be difficult, especially in early phases or atypical variants. This takes on particular importance when it is still possible to use an appropriate treatment. To solve this problem, physicians need to have access to an arsenal of diagnostic tests, such as neurofunctional imaging, that allow higher specificity in clinical assessment. However, the reliability of diagnostic tests may vary from one to the next, so the diagnostic validity of a given investigation must be estimated by comparing the results obtained from "true" criteria to the "gold standard" or reference test. While pathological analysis is considered to be the gold standard in a wide spectrum of diseases, it cannot be applied to neurological processes. Other approaches could provide solutions, including clinical patient follow-up, creation of a data bank or use of computer-aided diagnostic algorithms. In this article, we discuss the development of different methodological procedures related to analysis of diagnostic validity and present an example from our own experience based on the use of I-123-ioflupane-SPECT in the study of patients with movement disorders. The aim of this chapter is to approach the problem of diagnosis from the point of view of the clinician, taking into account specific aspects of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:26567736

  6. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  7. The clinical course of bronchiolitis associated with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Shazberg, G.; Revel-Vilk, S.; Shoseyov, D.; Ben-Ami, A.; Klar, A.; Hurvitz, H.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common bacterial co-infection of viral bronchiolitis.
AIMS—To evaluate the influence of AOM on the clinical course of bronchiolitis.
SUBJECTS—150 children younger than 24 months old, diagnosed with bronchiolitis, hospitalised between December 1997 and May 1999.
METHODS—Body temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and the need for oxygen supplementation were recorded on admission and daily throughout hospitalisation. Complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and assay for respiratory syncytial virus were performed on admission. All children were examined daily for the appearance of AOM. The clinical course of children with bronchiolitis and AOM was compared to those without AOM.
RESULTS—AOM was diagnosed in 79/150 (53%) children with bronchiolitis. Most were diagnosed within the first two days of hospitalisation. No significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings on admission and on daily follow up between children with and without AOM.
CONCLUSIONS—This 2.5 year prospective study showed no difference in the course of bronchiolitis, whether an ear infection was present or not.

 PMID:10999866

  8. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios. PMID:27575346

  9. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  10. Clinical biomarkers in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Jarullah, Jummanah; Marouf, Samy; Hindawi, S.I.; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder caused by a single gene. Various blood and urine biomarkers have been identified in SCD which are associated with laboratory and medical history. Biomarkers have been proven helpful in identifying different interconnected disease-causing mechanisms of SCD, including hypercoagulability, hemolysis, inflammation, oxidative stress, vasculopathy, reperfusion injury and reduced vasodilatory responses in endothelium, to name just a few. However, there exists a need to establish a panel of validated blood and urine biomarkers in SCD. This paper reviews the current contribution of biochemical markers associated with clinical manifestation and identification of sub-phenotypes in SCD. PMID:25561879

  11. Acute clinical benefits of chest wall-stretching exercise on expired tidal volume, dyspnea and chest expansion in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a single case study.

    PubMed

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Pothongsunun, Prapas; Yankai, Araya; Pratanaphon, Sainatee

    2009-10-01

    Chest physical therapy (CPT) has an important role in a medical team to assist in resolving the critical problems deriving from chronic lung disease. These critical problems include increased secretion volume, difficult breathing or dyspnea, ineffective coughing, inability to be weaned off a ventilator, and physical deterioration resulting from low aerobic capacity and endurance after prolonged bed rest. The inability to be weaned off a ventilator does not only result from secretion production or muscle weakness, but other conditions including chest stiffness or immobility. The procedure to increase chest mobility includes specific chest stretching and mobilization. Chest wall-stretching exercises were composed of thoracic rotation and anterior compression with stretching in sitting position, trunk extension and rib torsion in supine lying, and lateral stretching in side lying. These exercises were given to the patient as a regular daily program along with postural drainage, percussion, breathing exercise and limb exercises. The expired tidal volume, dyspnea level, and chest expansion were evaluated and clinical efficiency was analyzed during CPT, compared to Pre-CPT and Post-CPT with Bloom table. The results showed a significant clinical improvement of expired tidal volume, reduction in dyspnea level, and increase in chest expansion. PMID:19761957

  12. Congenital von Willebrand's disease and clinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S; Qureshi, W; Donthireddy, V; Kuriakose, P

    2013-03-01

    Data from case reports and systematic reviews suggest an association of Hypothyroidism and Acquired von Willebrand's syndrome. It is not known if congenital von Willebrand's disease is associated with hypothyroidism in a similar way. The aim of this study was to identify the association of congenital von Willebrand's disease (VWD) with clinical hypothyroidism. A total of 350 cases of congenital VWD were initially screened from our institution database from 1985 to 2010. A careful review of patient records was carried out to see if patients truly had congenital VWD and coexisting clinical hypothyroidism. Patients with uncertain diagnoses or other bleeding disorders were excluded, leading to 197 patients remaining in the final sample. A random age- and sex-matched parallel control group was also obtained from the hospital database. Of 197 patients (mean age 43.8 ± 17.5 years, women 72%) of congenital VWD, 32/197 (16%) were diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism, while only 11/197 (5.6%) of the matched controls were clinically hypothyroid. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated that VWD was an independent predictor of developing clinical hypothyroidism (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.65-7.22, P = 0.001). The proportion of patients diagnosed with clinical hypothyroidism was more in the VWD group (P < 0.0001). Our analysis shows a strong association of clinical hypothyroidism in patients with congenital VWD, but future studies will be required to delineate a pathological mechanism. In our opinion, clinicians should consider checking thyroid function in the newly diagnosed and established cases of congenital VWD. PMID:23171382

  13. Desmopressin in adult urological disease: clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, Salvatore; Ciciliato, Stefano; Toffoli, Laura; Silvestri, Tommaso; Casotto, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin is a synthetic analogue of arginine vasopressin, commercially available since 1974. Desmopressin is proven effective for the treatment primary nocturnal enuresis and polyuria. It has been considered by several investigators for the treatment of nocturia with positive results and is now an established treatment for this indication. In this review, we assessed the available clinical data on desmopressin in adult urological disease. PMID:26541674

  14. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Methods Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Results Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29–155; p < 0.001) and performance status (≥2; odds ratio = 4.22; 95% confidence interval = 1.06–20.8; p = 0.049) were significant predictive factors. Further analysis of the 84 patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease revealed that involvement of more than 10% of the lung field was the only independent predictive factor associated with the risk of acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0–37.4); p = 0.038). Conclusions Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied

  15. Acute Warfarin Toxicity as Initial Manifestation of Metastatic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Nihar; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Near complete infiltration of the liver secondary to metastasis from the head and neck cancer is a rare occurrence. The prognosis of liver failure associated with malignant infiltration is extremely poor; the survival time of patients is extremely low. We present a case of acute warfarin toxicity as initial manifestation of metastatic liver disease. Our patient is a 64-year-old woman presenting with epigastric pain and discomfort, found to have unrecordable International Normalized Ratio. She rapidly deteriorated with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, profound shock requiring high dose vasopressor infusion, severe coagulopathy, worsening liver enzymes with worsening of lactic acidosis and severe metabolic abnormalities, and refractory to aggressive supportive care and died in less than 48 hours. Autopsy revealed that >90% of the liver was replaced by tumor masses. PMID:27042361

  16. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  17. Crohn’s disease: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Francis; Khalil, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease is increasing in prevalence worldwide. It arises from a complex interplay between both genetic predisposition and environmental influence. A search of databases and clinical practice guidelines was performed to provide the most up-to-date evidence-based approach for diagnosing and managing patients with Crohn’s disease. No single gold standard investigation exists. Whilst full ileocolonoscopy with biopsies remains the mainstay for diagnosis, other less invasive imaging modalities are being actively considered in the workup, as well as the use of serological markers. Management should incorporate dietary and lifestyle modifications where necessary, the use of medications in induction and remission of disease, and consideration of surgical intervention where medical therapy has failed. PMID:26557891

  18. Evidence-based Clinical Management of Acute Malignant Colorectal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Takaya; Joh, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Acute malignant colorectal obstruction (AMCO) is an emergency associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Emergency surgery is standard therapy for AMCO, and 1-stage surgery without colostomy is preferable, but it is occasionally difficult in the emergency setting. A self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) enables noninvasive colonic decompression and subsequent 1-stage surgery, which has been widely applied for CRC with AMCO. However, recent accumulation of high-quality evidence has highlighted some problems and the limited efficacy of SEMS for AMCO. In palliative settings, SEMS placement reduces hospital stay and short-term complication rates, whereas it increases the frequency of long-term complications, such as delayed perforation. SEMS placement does not seem compatible with recent standard chemotherapy including bevacizumab. As a bridge to surgery, while SEMS placement provides a lower clinical success rate than emergency surgery, it can facilitate primary anastomosis without stoma. However, evidence regarding long-term survival outcomes with SEMS in both palliative and bridge to surgery settings is lacking. The efficacy of transanal colorectal tube placement, another endoscopic treatment, has been reported, but its clinical evidence level is low due to the limited number of studies. This review article comprehensively summarizes the current knowledge about surgical and endoscopic management of CRC with AMCO. PMID:26796083

  19. UNUSUAL CLINICAL CASES THAT MIMIC ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS.

    PubMed

    Duman, Özgür; Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Gencpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Gümüş, Hakan; Okuyaz, Çetin; Hazar, Volkan; Haspolat, Şenay

    2015-09-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated monophasic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which poses a diagnostic challenge. We report on six cases of different etiologies that mimicked the clinical and radiologic findings of ADEM. The cases were collected from four different reference hospitals in Turkey. The same radiologist from the Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine examined the magnetic resonance images of all patients. Three (50%) patients had antecedent infections. Initial symptoms of the patients were as follows: fever in 50%, altered consciousness in 33.3% and convulsions in 16.7% of patients. Neurologic examination showed long tract signs in 83.3%, ataxia in 50% and altered consciousness in 50% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis only in case 6. Four patients received steroid pulse therapy and one of these initially underwent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. The patients' definitive diagnoses were as follows: paraspinal neuroblastoma-associated paraneoplastic syndrome; histiocytic sarcoma; mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes; and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in one patient each, while two patients had hemophagocytic syndrome. The present case series demonstrated difficulties in diagnosing ADEM while revealing extremely rare disorders that mimic ADEM radiologically and clinically. PMID:26666111

  20. Acute heart failure: inotropic agents and their clinical uses.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Masao; Hori, Masatsugu

    2006-11-01

    Inotropic agents are indispensable for the improvement of cardiac contractile dysfunction in acute or decompensated heart failure. Clinically available agents, including sympathomimetic amines (dopamine, dobutamine, noradrenaline) and selective phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors (amrinone, milrinone, olprinone and enoximone) act via cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated facilitation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilisation. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors also have a vasodilatory action, which plays a role in improving haemodynamic parameters in certain patients, and are termed inodilators. The available inotropic agents suffer from risks of Ca2+ overload leading to arrhythmias, myocardial cell injury and ultimately, cell death. In addition, they are energetically disadvantageous because of an increase in activation energy and cellular metabolism. Furthermore, they lose their effectiveness under pathophysiological conditions, such as acidosis, stunned myocardium and heart failure. Pimobendan and levosimendan (that act by a combination of an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity and phosphodiesterase-3 inhibition) appear to be more beneficial among existing agents. Novel Ca2+ sensitisers that are under basic research warrant clinical trials to replace available inotropic agents. PMID:17059376

  1. Acute kidney injury: from clinical to molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The RIFLE classification was introduced in 2004 to describe the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and to define its clinical stage, based upon the serum creatinine level and urine output. The same criteria, although slightly modified, are used in the other scoring systems AKIN and KDIGO. Mortality and morbidity remain high in AKI, suggesting that current diagnostic methods are suboptimal, poorly accurate, and often timely inadequate in detecting the presence of early kidney injury. Conversely, a growing body of evidence indicates that new AKI biomarkers can be used to both rule out AKI and to assess high-risk conditions or the presence of subclinical forms. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or cell cycle arrest biomarkers seem to be sensitive and specific enough to be used in conjunction with existing markers of AKI for better classifying renal injury as well as dysfunction. Improvements in diagnosis, risk identification, stratification, prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring may improve prevention and protection from organ damage and help to identify patients at risk, allowing individualized therapy. In this view, we may say that AKI diagnosis has finally moved from clinical to molecular level with potential benefits for the patients because similar progress has been shown in other disciplines. PMID:27384344

  2. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  3. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  4. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  5. Effect of IMOD™ on the inflammatory process after acute ischemic stroke: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Considering the role of inflammation in acute cerebrovascular accidents, anti-inflammatory treatment has been considered as an option in cerebrovascular diseases. Regarding the properties of Setarud (IMOD™) in immune regulation, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of this medication in treating patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 99 patients with their first ever acute ischemic stroke were divided into two groups of IMOD™ (n = 49) and control (n = 50). The control group underwent routine treatment and the intervention group underwent routine treatment plus daily intermittent infusion of IMOD™ (250mg on the first day and then 375mg into DW5% serum during a 30-minute period for 7 days). The serum levels of inflammatory markers were evaluated on the first day (baseline) and on 4th and 7th days. Data were analyzed and the results were compared. Results and major conclusion 58 males (58.6%) and 41 females (41.4%) with a mean age of 67.00 ± 8.82 years, who had their first ever stroke attack, were enrolled in this trial. Treatment with IMOD™ showed a decreasing trend in IL-6 levels compared to the control group (p = 0.04). In addition, the treatment resulted in the control of increasing serum levels of hsCRP after 7 days compared to the control group (p = 0.02). There was an insignificant decrease in TNF-α and IL-1 levels in the IMOD™ group. Considering the prominent role of inflammation after an ischemic cerebral damage, it appears that treatment with IMOD™ improves the inflammatory profile. Therefore, IMOD™ (Setarud) might be considered as a therapeutic option in the acute ischemic stroke. However, future studies are necessary on its long-term results and clinical efficacy. PMID:23514014

  6. Association of inflammatory bowel disease risk loci with sarcoidosis, and its acute and chronic subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Nothnagel, M; Franke, A; Jacobs, G; Saadati, H R; Gaede, K I; Rosenstiel, P; Schürmann, M; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schreiber, S; Hofmann, S

    2011-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a complex granulomatous inflammatory disorder that shares several clinical and pathogenic features with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Postulating a common genetic basis of inflammatory diseases, we tested 106 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are known or have been suggested to be associated with IBD for a potential association with sarcoidosis and its acute and chronic subphenotypes. We genotyped 1,996 German sarcoidosis patients, comprising 648 acutely and 1,161 chronically affected individuals, 2,622 control subjects, and 342 German trios with affected offspring using SNPlex™ technology. The nonsynonymous SNP rs11209026 (Arg381Gln) in the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor (IL23R) gene was associated with chronic sarcoidosis (OR 0.63; p = 5.58×10(-5)), which was supported by the result of a transmission disequilibrium test analysis in the independent family sample (OR 0.50; p = 0.031). Marker rs12035082 located at chromosome 1q24.3 was found to be associated with the acute subphenotype (OR 1.36; p = 6.80×10(-7)) and rs916977 (HERC2 locus; OR 1.30; p = 4.49×10(-5)) was associated with sarcoidosis. Our results highlight the potential importance of the IL-23 signalling pathway for the development of chronic sarcoidosis. The finding links sarcoidosis pathogenesis to other inflammatory conditions and may contribute to new hypotheses on disease mechanisms. PMID:20650992

  7. Uromodulin storage diseases: clinical aspects and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco; Caridi, Gianluca; Rampoldi, Luca; Tardanico, Regina; Izzi, Claudia; Pirulli, Doroti; Amoroso, Antonio; Casari, Giorgio; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2004-12-01

    The recent discovery of mutations in the uromodulin gene ( UMOD ) in patients with medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy (FJHN), and glomerulocystic kidney disease (GCKD) provides the opportunity for a revision of pathogenic aspects and puts forth the basis for a renewed classification. This review focuses on clinical, pathological, and cell biology advances in UMOD -related pathological states, including a review of the associated clinical conditions described to date in the literature. Overall, 31 UMOD mutations associated with MCKD2 and FJHN (205 patients) and 1 mutation associated with GCKD (3 patients) have been described, with a cluster at exons 4 and 5. Most are missense mutations causing a cysteine change in uromodulin sequence. No differences in clinical symptoms between carriers of cysteine versus polar residue changes have been observed; clinical phenotypes invariably are linked to classic MCKD2/FJHN. A common motif among all reports is that many overlapping symptoms between MCKD2 and FJHN are present, and a separation between these 2 entities seems unwarranted or redundant. Cell experiments with mutant variants indicated a delay in intracellular maturation and export dynamics, with consequent uromodulin storage within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Patchy uromodulin deposits in tubule cells were found by means of immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy showed dense fibrillar material in the ER. Mass spectrometry showed only unmodified uromodulin in urine of patients with UMOD mutations. Lack of uromodulin function(s) is associated with impairments in tubular function, particularly the urine-concentrating process, determining water depletion and hyperuricemia. Intracellular uromodulin trapping within the ER probably has a major role in determining tubulointerstitial fibrosis and renal failure. We propose the definition of uromodulin storage diseases for conditions with proven UMOD mutations

  8. From the nephrologist's point of view: diversity of causes and clinical features of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Bienholz, Anja; Wilde, Benjamin; Kribben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome with multiple entities. Although AKI implies renal damage, functional impairment or both, diagnosis is solely based on the functional parameters of serum creatinine and urine output. The latest definition was provided by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) working group in 2012. Independent of the underlying disease, and even in the case of full recovery, AKI is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the patient's individual risk profile and the diversity of causes and clinical features of AKI is pivotal for optimization of prophylaxes, diagnosis and therapy of each form of AKI. A differentiated and individualized approach is required to improve patient mortality, morbidity, long-term kidney function and eventually the quality of life. In this review, we provide an overview of the different clinical settings in which specific forms of AKI may occur and point out possible diagnostic as well as therapeutic approaches. Secifically AKI is discussed in the context of non-kidney organ failure, organ transplantation, sepsis, malignancy and autoimmune disease. PMID:26251707

  9. Mutations in epigenetic modifiers in acute myeloid leukemia and their clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hsin-An; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in genes that encode proteins crucial in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription in hematologic malignancies. Somatic mutations in epigenetic modifiers, including IDH1, IDH2, TET2, DNAMT3A, ASXL1, MLL and EZH2 are enriched in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), especially those with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Here we describe the clinic-biologic features of AML patients with these mutations, their prognostic relevance and potential as therapeutic targets. The epigenetic alterations are present as the early pre-leukemic events and usually remain stable during disease evolution, implying the potential to be biomarkers for minimal residual disease monitoring. The high frequency of mutations in epigenetic modifiers and their prognostic implications shed light on the development of epigenetic therapy. PMID:26789100

  10. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  11. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  12. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances. PMID:26474316

  13. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Saini, S; Gupta, N; Batra, G; Arora, D R

    2003-01-01

    Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7%) were monomicrobial and 16(43.2%) were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%), vaginal discharge (70%) and irregular bleeding (40%) and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS), Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy. PMID:17643017

  14. Aspirin as Primary Prevention of Acute Coronary Heart Disease Events

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Stephen P.; Hovater, Martha; Brown, Todd M.; Howard, George; Safford, Monika M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Aspirin for primary prophylaxis is controversial. This study evaluated associations between prophylactic aspirin use and incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) events. Methods and Results The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study was accessed for aspirin use examining black and white hazards for incident CHD, for men and women, each adjusting incrementally for sampling, sociodemographics, and CHD risk factors. Stratified models examined risks across strata of the Framingham risk score, and all-cause mortality. 23,949 participants (mean 64 yo), had 503 incident events over a 3.5 year follow-up. Prophylactic aspirin use was not associated with incident acute CHD, HR 1.05 (95% CI 0.86, 1.29). Modeling had little impact on the HR (1.09 {95% CI 0.89, 1.33) nor did the addition of risk factors (HR 1.00 {95% CI 0.81, 1.23). Aspirin use was not associated with incident CHD for any Framingham risk level. Findings were similar when including all aspirin users (not just those taking aspirin prophylactically), and when examining associations with all-cause mortality. There was no excess hospitalized bleeding in the aspirin users. Conclusion Aspirin was not associated with lower risk for incident acute CHD overall, or within race, gender, or Framingham Risk Score. PMID:26413491

  15. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  16. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ischemic heart disease comorbidity: overview of mechanisms and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Malagù, Michele; Mascetti, Susanna; Biscaglia, Simone; Ceconi, Claudio; Papi, Alberto; Contoli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    In the last few years, many studies focused their attention on the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), showing that these diseases are mutually influenced. Many different biological processes such as hypoxia, systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, heightened platelet reactivity, arterial stiffness and right ventricle modification interact in the development of the COPD-IHD comorbidity, which therefore deserves special attention in early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with COPD-IHD comorbidity have a worst outcome, when compared to patients with only COPD or only IHD. These patients showed a significant increase on risk of adverse events and of hospital readmissions for recurrent myocardial infarction, heart failure, coronary revascularization, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Taken together, these complications determine a significant increase in mortality. In most cases death occurs for cardiovascular cause, soon after an acute exacerbation of COPD or a cardiovascular adverse event. Recent data regarding incidence, mechanisms and prognosis of this comorbidity, along with the development of new drugs and interventional approaches may improve the management and long-term outcome of COPD-IHD patients. The aim of this review is to describe the current knowledge on COPD-IHD comorbidity. Particularly, we focused our attention on underlying pathological mechanisms and on all treatment and strategies that may improve and optimize the clinical management of COPD-IHD patients. PMID:25645653

  18. Alcoholic liver disease: pathologic, pathogenetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K G; Zimmerman, H J; Ray, M B

    1991-02-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Other liver diseases of genetic origin, but with a curious association with alcohol intake, are hemochromatosis and porphyria cutanea tarda. The attribution of chronic hepatitis to alcohol intake remains speculative, and the association may reflect hepatitis C infection. Hepatic injury attributed to alcohol includes the changes reported in the fetal alcohol syndrome. Steatosis, the characteristic consequence of excess alcohol intake, is usually macrovesicular and rarely microvesicular. Acute intrahepatic cholestasis, which in rare instances accompanies steatosis, must be distinguished from other causes of intrahepatic cholestasis (e.g., drug-induced) and from mechanical obstruction of the intrahepatic bile ducts (e.g., pancreatitis, choledocholithiasis) before being accepted. Alcoholic hepatitis (steatonecrosis) is characterized by a constellation of lesions: steatosis, Mallory bodies (with or without a neutrophilic inflammatory response), megamitochondria, occlusive lesions of terminal hepatic venules, and a lattice-like pattern of pericellular fibrosis. All these lesions mainly affect zone 3 of the hepatic acinus. Other changes, observed at the ultrastructural level, are of importance in progression of the disease. They include widespread cytoplasmic shedding, and capillarization and defenestration of sinusoids. Progressive fibrosis complicating alcoholic hepatitis eventually leads to cirrhosis that is typically micronodular but can evolve to a mixed or macronodular pattern. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in 5 to 15% of patients with alcoholic liver disease. The clinical syndrome of alcoholic liver disease is the result of three factors--parenchymal insufficiency, portal hypertension and the clinical consequences of extrahepatic damage produced by alcohol. At the several phases of the life history of alcoholic liver disease, the individual factors play a different role. The clinical

  19. Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with polycystic kidney disease. A case presenting with acute focal bacterial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Huang, J J; Lin, X Z; Ruaan, M K; Lin, C Y; Chang, T T; Shu, H F; Chow, N H

    1992-12-01

    Congenital cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic biliary ducts (Caroli's disease), until recently, has been infrequently recognized. It is often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We hereby report a case with Caroli's disease, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and CHF: This 24-year-old female patient initially presented with acute bacterial nephritis (ABN). Renal ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged kidneys with multiple cysts. Because her parents showed no renal cyst on ultrasonographic examination, she received further studies. Abdominal ultrasonography showed cystic dilatation of the biliary tree. Computed tomography (CT) with meglumine lotroxinate (biliscopin) infusion study and hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of Caroli's disease. Liver biopsy revealed CHF: The radiographic and scintigraphic pictures are hereby illustrated and CT with biliscopin infusion study is emphasized. We conclude that if radiologic evidence of renal cystic lesions is absent in the parents of patients with PKD, the coexistence of Caroli's disease and CHF should be considered. The clinical pictures of ABN in this patient are also discussed. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of ABN in a patient with PKD and Caroli's disease, and it showed good response to antibiotic therapy. PMID:1468163

  20. Advanced clinical insights & practice: ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Benner, Randall W; Zavarella, Matthew S

    2008-03-01

    This issue sees the debut of a new series of continuing education articles. The series, Advanced Clinical Insights & Practice, is designed to provide continuing education to an ever-expanding realm of paramedicine that needs more of it: the critical care transport paramedic. Secondly, and equally important, are the benefits that can be reaped by other certification levels reading this feature. For EMT-Basics and Intermediates, it will provide a great enhancement to your core knowledge, although most of the interventions discussed will be beyond your traditional scope. For paramedics, it will augment both your pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment/management skills of diseases and injuries discussed. Ultimately though, it is hoped that anyone who reads these articles will become a better clinician. The next article will appear in the July issue. PMID:18814637

  1. Rare disease clinical trials: Power in numbers.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) encompass a collection of genetic muscle diseases with proximal-predominant weakness of the limbs. Thirty-two of these disorders are named via the common nomenclature, including 8 autosomal-dominant (LGMD1A-H) and 24 autosomal-recessive (LGMD2A-X) disorders.(1) In addition, numerous other genetic muscle diseases, including Bethlem myopathy, dystrophinopathies, ryanodine receptor-associated myopathies, and many more, may clinically present with similar proximal-predominant weakness.(2) Therefore, current genetic testing panels targeting neuromuscular weakness frequently encompass >75 genes. These disorders are quite rare, each with minimum prevalence estimates of 0.01-0.60 cases per 100,000 persons.(3) LGMD2A (attributable to mutations in the gene for calpain-3) and LGMD2B (attributable to mutations in the gene for dysferlin) consistently are the 2 most prevalent LGMD subtypes in a variety of ethnic cohorts. PMID:27540592

  2. [Acute abdominal pain in the emergency department - a clinical algorithm for adult patients].

    PubMed

    Trentzsch, H; Werner, J; Jauch, K-W

    2011-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain represents the cardinal symptom behind a vast number of possible under-lying causes including several ones that re-quire surgical treatment. It is the most common sur-gical emergency, the most common cause for a surgical consultation in the emergency department and the most common cause for non-trauma related hospital admissions. The golden mis-sion statement is to rapidly identify whether the underlying cause requires an urgent or even immediate surgical intervention. However, behind the same cardinal symptom one may encounter harmless or non-urgent problems. By employing diagnostic means cost effectively and with the aim to avoid unnecessary exposure of the patient to X-rays in mind, the challenge remains to identify patients with an indication for emergency surgery from those who suffer from a less serious condition and thus can be treated conservatively and without any pressure of time. Dealing with such a highly complex decision-making process calls for a clinical algorithm. Many publications are available that have scrutinised the different aspects of the initial assessment and the emergency management of acute abdominal pain. How-ever, the large body of evidence seems to miss articles that describe a formally correct priority- and problem-based approach. Clinical algorithms apply to complex disease states such as acute abdominal pain and translate them into one clearly laid out, logically coordinated and systematic overall process. Our intention is to devel-op such an algorithm to approach acute abdominal pain from the surgeon's point of view. Based on daily practice and with reference to available literature, it is the aim of this study to define a work flow that simply summarises all steps in-volved and defines the required decision process in order to form the intellectual basis for an evidence-based clinical algorithm. The result is illustrated as a first draft of such an evidence-based algorithm to allow emergency evaluation of

  3. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage. PMID:26604942

  4. Combined Molecular and Clinical Prognostic Index for Relapse and Survival in Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Dufour, Annika; Benthaus, Tobias; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Maharry, Kati S.; Schneider, Stephanie; Ksienzyk, Bianka; Mellert, Gudrun; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Kakadia, Purvi M.; Unterhalt, Michael; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian; Braess, Jan; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Heinecke, Achim; Krug, Utz; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Buechner, Thomas; Woermann, Bernhard; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Marcucci, Guido; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Hoster, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cytogenetically normal (CN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the largest and most heterogeneous cytogenetic AML subgroup. For the practicing clinician, it is difficult to summarize the prognostic information of the growing number of clinical and molecular markers. Our purpose was to develop a widely applicable prognostic model by combining well-established pretreatment patient and disease characteristics. Patients and Methods Two prognostic indices for CN-AML (PINA), one regarding overall survival (OS; PINAOS) and the other regarding relapse-free survival (RFS; PINARFS), were derived from data of 572 patients with CN-AML treated within the AML Cooperative Group 99 study (www.aml-score.org). Results On the basis of age (median, 60 years; range, 17 to 85 years), performance status, WBC count, and mutation status of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3-internal tandem duplication, patients were classified into the following three risk groups according to PINAOS and PINARFS: 29% of all patients and 32% of 381 responding patients had low-risk disease (5-year OS, 74%; 5-year RFS, 55%); 56% of all patients and 39% of responding patients had intermediate-risk disease (5-year OS, 28%; 5-year RFS, 27%), and 15% of all patients and 29% of responding patients had high-risk disease (5-year OS, 3%; 5-year RFS, 5%), respectively. PINAOS and PINARFS stratified outcome within European LeukemiaNet genetic groups. Both indices were confirmed on independent data from Cancer and Leukemia Group B/Alliance trials. Conclusion We have developed and validated, to our knowledge, the first prognostic indices specifically designed for adult patients of all ages with CN-AML that combine well-established molecular and clinical variables and that are easily applicable in routine clinical care. The integration of both clinical and molecular markers could provide a basis for individualized patient care through risk-adapted therapy of CN-AML. PMID:24711548

  5. Clinical Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury Following Snake Bite Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Dharod, Mrudul V; Patil, Tushar B; Deshpande, Archana S; Gulhane, Ragini V; Patil, Mangesh B; Bansod, Yogendra V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Snake bite envenomation is a major public health concern in developing countries. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is as important cause of mortality in patients with vasculotoxic snake bite. Aims: This study was to evaluate the clinical profile of snake bite patients and to determine the predictors of developing AKI following snake bite. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty-one patients with snake envenomation were included. Eighty-seven patients developed AKI (Group A) and 194 (Group B) did not. History, examination findings and investigations results were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: In group A, 61 (70.11%) patients were male and in group B, 117 (60.30%) patients were male. Out of 281 patients, 232 had cellulitis, 113 had bleeding tendencies, 87 had oliguria, 76 had neuroparalysis, and 23 had hypotension at presentation. After multivariate analysis, bite to hospital time (P = 0.016), hypotension (P = 0.000), albuminuria (P = 0.000), bleeding time (P = 0.000), prothrombin time (P = 0.000), hemoglobin (P = 0.000) and total bilirubin (P = 0.010) were significant independent predictors of AKI. Conclusions: AKI developed in 30.96% of patients with snake bite, leading to mortality in 39.08% patients. Factors associated with AKI are bite to hospital time, hypotension, albuminuria, prolonged bleeding time, prolonged prothrombin time, low hemoglobin and a high total bilirubin. PMID:24350071

  6. Clinical decision rules for acute bacterial meningitis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Alain; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Zeni, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) requires rapid diagnosis so that suitable treatment can be instituted within 60 minutes of admitting the patient. The cornerstone of diagnostic examination is lumbar puncture, which enables microbiological analysis and determination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical characteristics. However, microbiological testing is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out this diagnosis. With regard to the analysis of standard CSF cytochemical characteristics (polymorphonuclear count, CSF glucose and protein concentration, and CSF:serum glucose), this is often misleading. Indeed, the relatively imprecise nature of the cutoff values for these BM diagnosis markers can make their interpretation difficult. However, there are two markers that appear to be more efficient than the standard ones: CSF lactate and serum procalcitonin levels. Scores and predictive models are also available; however, they only define a clinical probability, and in addition, their use calls for prior validation on the population in which they are used. In this article, we review current methods of BM diagnosis. PMID:27307768

  7. Treatment strategies in the left main coronary artery disease associated with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Ahmet; Cakmak, Mahmut

    2015-10-01

    Significant left main coronary artery (LMCA) stenosis is not rare and reported 3 to 10% of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Unprotected LMCA intervention is a still clinical challenge and surgery is still going to be a traditional management method in many cardiac centers. With a presentation of drug eluting stent (DES), extensive use of IVUS and skilled operators, number of such interventions increased rapidly which lead to change in recommendation in the guidelines regarding LMCA procedures in the stable angina (Class 2a recommendation for ostial and shaft lesion and class 2b recommendation for distal bifurcation lesion). However, there was not clear consensus about the management of unprotected LMCA lesion associated with acute myocardial infarction (MI) with a LMCA culprit lesion itself or distinct culprit lesion of other major coronary arteries. Surgery could be preferred as an obligatory management strategy even in the high risk patients. With this review, we aimed to demonstrate treatment strategies of LMCA disease associated with acute coronary syndrome, particularly acute myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, we presented a short case series with LMCA lesion and ST elevated acute MI in which culprit lesion placed either in the left anterior descending artery or circumflex artery. We reviewed the current medical literature and propose simple algorithm for management. PMID:26557745

  8. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  9. Moyamoya Disease: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Although its etiology remains unknown, recent genetic studies identified RNF213 in the 17q25-ter region as an important susceptibility gene of MMD among East Asian populations. Possibly because of genetic differences, MMD is relatively common in people living in East Asian countries such as Korea and Japan, compared to those in the Western Hemisphere. The prevalence of MMD appears to be slightly lower among Chinese, compared to Koreans or Japanese. There are two peaks of incidence with different clinical presentations, at around 10 years and 30-40 years. The peak appears to occur later in women than men. In children, ischemic symptoms, especially transient ischemic attacks, are predominant. Intellectual decline, seizures, and involuntary movements are also more common in this age group. In contrast, adult patients present with intracranial hemorrhage more often than pediatric patients. In patients with MMD, intracerebral hemorrhage is more often accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage than in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. These different age peaks and different clinical presentations in each age group are also observed in MMD patients in the USA. Catheter angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomographic angiography are noninvasive diagnostic methods. High-resolution vessel wall MR imaging also helps diagnose MMD by revealing concentric vessel wall narrowing with basal collaterals. PMID:26846755

  10. Choosing Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trial populations.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Monsell, Sarah E

    2014-03-01

    To assist investigators in making design choices, we modeled Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. We used longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes data, retention rates, and the proportions of trial-eligible cognitively normal participants age 65 and older in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to model trial sample sizes, the numbers needed to enroll to account for drop out, and the numbers needed to screen to successfully complete enrollment. We examined how enrichment strategies affected each component of the model. Relative to trials enrolling 65-year-old individuals, trials enriching for older (minimum 70 or 75) age required reduced sample sizes, numbers needed to enroll, and numbers needed to screen. Enriching for subjective memory complaints reduced sample sizes and numbers needed to enroll more than age enrichment, but increased the number needed to screen. We conclude that Alzheimer's disease prevention trials can enroll elderly participants with minimal effect on trial retention and that enriching for older individuals with memory complaints might afford efficient trial designs. PMID:24119546

  11. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: a clinical study of 12 episodes in 11 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, H; Sandoval, L; Wainstein, A; Ribalta, J; Donoso, S; Smok, G; Rosenberg, H; Meneses, M

    1994-01-01

    Twelve episodes of acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) were diagnosed in 11 patients during the past 18 years in a general hospital in Santiago, Chile, with a prevalence of 1 per 15,900 deliveries. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy started between the 31st and 38th weeks of pregnancy, with malaise, vomiting, jaundice, and lethargy as the main clinical manifestations. Polydipsia (in nine episodes) and skin pruritus (in seven episodes) were unusual clinical findings. In two patients, pruritus started two and four weeks before AFLP, suggesting that an intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy preceded AFLP in those patients. Considering the current prevalence of both diseases in Chile, their association should be considered fortuitous. In another patient, two consecutive pregnancies were affected by AFLP, raising to three the number of reported patients with recurrent AFLP. In 11 episodes, liver biopsies supported the diagnosis of AFLP by showing small and midsized vacuolar cytoplasmic transformation as the most prominent histopathological feature. Positive intracellular fat staining was found in the four samples analysed. Studies by electron microscopy showed megamitochondria with paracrystalline inclusions in four samples. All the mothers survived, but fetal mortality was 58.3%. Several extrahepatic complications delayed maternal recovery for up to four weeks after delivery. This study confirms an improvement in maternal prognosis in AFLP, discusses the possibility of an epidemiological association with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and increases the number of patients reported with recurrent AFLP. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8307428

  12. [Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbation: preclinical differential diagnostic and emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Friege, B; Friege, L; Pelz, J; Weber, M; von Spiegel, T; Schröder, S

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are the most common causes of obstructive pulmonary diseases and acute dyspnoea. In the preclinical emergency situation a distinction between bronchial asthma and exacerbated COPD is difficult because symptoms are similar. Although the preclinical measures differ only marginally, a differential diagnosis from other causes of respiratory obstruction and acute dyspnoea, such as cardiac decompensation, anaphylaxis, aspiration of foreign bodies, tension pneumothorax and inhalation trauma is necessary because alternative treatment options are required. In the treatment of COPD and bronchial asthma inhalative bronchodilatory beta(2)-mimetics are the first choice especially for serious obstructive emergencies because there is an unfavorable relationship between effect and side-effects for the intravenous route. Dosable aerosols, nebulization and if necessary, continuous nebulization, are appropriate application forms even for serious obstructive crises with the need of a respirator. In these cases a minimal inspiratory flow in patients is not required. Theophylline only plays a minor role to beta(2)-mimetics and anticholinergics as a bronchodilator in asthma and COPD guidelines, even in serious obstructive diseases. For severe asthma attacks the administration of magnesium is a possible additional option. Systemic intravenous administration of steroids has an anti-inflammatory effect and for this reason is the second column of treatment for both diseases. Invasive ventilation remains a last resort to ensure respiratory function and indications for this are given in patients with clinical signs of impending exhaustion of breathing. PMID:19424670

  13. Improving Alzheimer's disease phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Barry D; Carrillo, Maria C; Ryan, J Michael; Gold, Michael; Gallagher, Kim; Grundman, Michael; Berman, Robert M; Ashwood, Timothy; Siemers, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many drugs have been studied as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease, but only four have demonstrated sufficient efficacy to be approved as treatments, of which three are in the same class. This lack of success has raised questions both in the pharmaceutical industry and academia about the future of Alzheimer's disease therapy. The high cost and low success rate of drug development across many disease areas can be attributed, in large part, to late-stage clinical failures (Schachter and Ramoni, Nat Rev Drug Discov 2007;6:107-8). Thus, identifying in phase II, or preferably phase I, drugs that are likely to fail would have a dramatic impact on the costs associated with developing new drugs. With this in mind, the Alzheimer's Association convened a Research Roundtable on June 23 and 24, 2011, in Washington, DC, bringing together scientists from academia, industry, and government regulatory agencies to discuss strategies for improving the probability of phase II trial results predicting success when considering the go/no-go decision-making process leading to the initiation of phase III. PMID:23164548

  14. Frequency of Distinguishing Clinical Features in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Narsing A.; Gupta, Amod; Dustin, Laurie; Chee, Soon Phaik; Okada, Annabelle A.; Khairallah, Moncef; Bodaghi, Bahram; Lehoang, Phuc; Accorinti, Massimo; Mochizuki, Manabu; Prabriputaloong, Tisha; Read, Russell W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the frequency of occurrence of limited clinical features which distinguish patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease from those with non-VKH uveitis. Design Comparative case series. Participants 1147 total patients. Methods All patients with bilateral ocular inflammatory disease presenting to any of ten uveitis centers in the three month period between 2006-January-01 and 2006-March-31 (inclusive) were asked to participate. The clinical and historical features of disease were obtained from the participants via direct interview and chart review. Patients were stratified based on whether they were diagnosed with VKH disease or non-VKH uveitis for statistical analysis. Main Outcome Measures Presence or absence of various clinical features in the two populations. Results Of 1147 patients, 180 were diagnosed with VKH disease and 967 with non-VKH uveitis. Hispanics and Asians were more likely to be diagnosed with VKH than non-VKH disease compared to other ethnicities. In acute disease, the finding of exudative retinal detachment was most likely to be found in VKH disease with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100 and negative predictive value (NPV) of 88.4, while in chronic disease, sunset glow fundus was most likely to be found, with a PPV of 94.5 and NPV of 89.2. Conclusions Numerous clinical findings have been described in the past as important in the diagnosis of VKH. The current study reveals that of these, two are highly specific to this entity in an ethnically and geographically diverse group of patients with non-traumatic bilateral uveitis. These clinical findings are 1. exudative retinal detachment during acute disease and 2. sunset glow fundus during the chronic phase of the disease. PMID:20036008

  15. Cerebral blood flow changes with acute cocaine intoxication: clinical correlations with SPECT, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Mena, I; Giombetti, R J; Miller, B L; Garrett, K; Villanueva-Meyer, J; Mody, C; Goldberg, M A

    1994-01-01

    In summary, these data suggest that widespread primary or secondary cerebral vasoconstriction is common in patients with neurological complications from cocaine. In most patients, SPECT showed wide-spread hypoperfusion in regions that had no clear clinical significance (e.g., the periventricular area). In many, the SPECT was performed more than 24 hours after the onset of neurological symptomatology. These findings raise several questions. It has been assumed that these SPECT changes in patients with acute neurological symptoms are temporary, although it will be important to determine whether these areas of hypoperfusion persist after symptoms have abated. Recently, Holman and colleagues (1991) found multifocal and deep areas of hypoperfusion with SPECT in 16 of 18 patients with a history of chronic cocaine abuse. Although most of the subjects tested positive for cocaine, several had abstained from cocaine use for weeks prior to the study. All 18 subjects had neuropsychological deficits, 13 mild and 5 moderate. Similarly, Pascual-Leone and colleagues (1991) have shown that CT scan atrophy strongly correlates with the duration of cocaine abuse, suggesting that brain injury may occur with continued use of cocaine. It is the authors' concern that cocaine abuse might produce permanent changes in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, brain SPECT was found to be a useful procedure in the evaluation of acute cocaine intoxication. Brain SPECT revealed focal cortical lesions not seen on head CT or MRI, which corresponded to clinical deficits. In addition, [99mTc]HMPAO brain SPECT had a characteristic scalloped appearance, and this may be a marker for acute intoxication with cocaine. This study further supports the contention that cocaine causes neurological disease by its vasoconstrictive action. PMID:7603541

  16. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32–0.41; P=0.0009–0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential

  17. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-02-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32-0.41; P=0.0009-0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential role of

  18. Globalization of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies are increasingly being tested in global clinical trials. A search of ClincalTrials.gov revealed that of 269 currently active trials, 28% are currently being conducted in the United States; the majority of trials and the majority of trial sites are ex-US. The US has the largest number of trial sites of any single country; cumulatively, nearly half of all sites are outside the US. The US conducts more trials in all phases of drug development but has a greater proportion of phase 3 trials. The increasing importance of global participants in clinical trials emphasizes the importance of considering the ethnic and international factors that may influence trial outcome. The International Conference on Harmonization guidelines divide ethnic factors that may affect drug development into intrinsic and extrinsic influences. These include language, cultural factors, educational levels, the general level of health and standard of care, as well as nutrition and diet. Ethnic influences on pharmacokinetics are known for some metabolic pathways. The biology of AD may also differ among the world's populations. The frequency of the apolipoprotein e4 allele, a major risk factor for AD, differs internationally. Genetic variations might also affect inflammatory, excitotoxic, and oxidative components of AD. Diagnostic standards and experience vary from country to country. Levels of practitioner training and experience, diagnostic approaches to AD, and attitudes regarding aging and AD may differ. Experience and sophistication with regard to clinical trial conduct also vary within and between countries. Experience with conducting the necessary examinations, as well as the linguistic and cultural validity of instrument translations, may affect trial outcomes. Operational and regulatory aspects of clinical trials vary and provide important barriers to seamless conduct of multiregional clinical trials. Collection and testing of biological samples, continuous

  19. Managing the acutely ill adult with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marvelle

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition, affecting the structure of the haemoglobin. SCD is a long-term chronic condition which is manifested by periods of acute painful sickling crisis, known as vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) and is the cause of 90% of sickle cell-related hospital admissions. SCD is one of the most common genetic conditions worldwide and in the UK there are approximately 12,500 people living with it (Streetly et al,1997; Howard et al, 2008), making it more common than cystic fibrosis, yet there still remains many challenges in managing these patients when they become acutely ill. Lack of awareness and understanding of the illness, concerns regarding addiction and limited attention to the psycho-social implications of the illness, leads to less than effective care for this patient group when they are hospitalized. The aims of this article are to outline the pathophysiology of SCD, identify the causes of VOC and discuss the key principles of nursing management for patients experiencing a VOC. PMID:22306637

  20. A randomized study of the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, N.K.C.; Kersey, J.H.; Robison, L.L.; McGlave, P.B.; Woods, W.G.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.; Goldman, A.I.; Nesbit, M.E., Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease is a major problem in allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. We performed a randomized study to compare the effectiveness of two regimens in the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease. Thirty-five patients received methotrexate alone, and 32 received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone. Of the patients who received methotrexate alone, 48 percent had acute graft-versus-host disease, as compared with 21 per cent of those who received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone (P = 0.01). The age of the recipient was a significant factor in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease: Older patients had a higher incidence of the disease (P = 0.001). We conclude that the combination of methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone significantly decreased the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and should be used to prevent this disorder in patients receiving allogeneic marrow transplants.

  1. Diverticular disease as a chronic illness: evolving epidemiologic and clinical insights.

    PubMed

    Strate, Lisa L; Modi, Rusha; Cohen, Erica; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2012-10-01

    Diverticular disease imposes a significant burden on Western and industrialized societies. The traditional pathogenesis model posits that low dietary fiber predisposes to diverticulosis, and fecalith obstruction prompts acute diverticulitis that is managed with broad-spectrum antibiotics or surgery. However, a growing body of knowledge is shifting the paradigm of diverticular disease from an acute surgical illness to a chronic bowel disorder composed of recurrent abdominal symptoms and considerable psychosocial impact. New research implicates a role for low-grade inflammation, sensory-motor nerve damage, and dysbiosis in a clinical picture that mimics irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and even inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Far from being an isolated event, acute diverticulitis may be the catalyst for chronic symptoms including abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and "post-diverticulitis IBS." In addition, studies reveal lower health-related quality of life in patients with chronic diverticular disease vs. controls. Health-care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for the multifaceted presentations of diverticular disease, and remain aware that it might contribute to long-term emotional distress beyond traditional diverticulitis attacks. These developments are prompting a shift in therapeutic approaches from widespread antimicrobials and supportive care to the use of probiotics, mesalamine, and gut-directed antibiotics. This review addresses the emerging literature regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of chronic, symptomatic diverticular disease, and provides current answers to common clinical questions. PMID:22777341

  2. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  3. Oxygen therapy in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Simon E; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A

    2014-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the history of this debilitating lung condition. Associated health care utilization and morbidity are high, and many patients require supplemental oxygen or ventilatory support. The last 2 decades have seen a substantial increase in our understanding of the best way to manage the respiratory failure suffered by many patients during this high-risk period. This review article examines the evidence underlying supplemental oxygen therapy during exacerbations of COPD. We first discuss the epidemiology and pathophysiology of respiratory failure in COPD during exacerbations. The rationale and evidence underlying oxygen therapy, including the risks when administered inappropriately, are then discussed, along with further strategies for ventilatory support. We also review current recommendations for best practice, including methods for improving oxygen provision in the future. PMID:25404854

  4. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  5. Risk Factors for Acute Toxoplasma gondii Diseases in Taiwan: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ting-Yi; Kuo, Ming-Chu; Chen, Chang-Hsun; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Kao, Cheng-Feng; Ji, Dar-Der; Fang, Chi-Tai

    2014-01-01

    Although human toxoplasmosis is a notifiable disease in Taiwan since 2007, little is known about its risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the risk factors for acute Toxoplasma gondii diseases in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide population-based case-control study. Cases of acute human toxoplasmosis notified to the Taiwan Centers for Diseases Control (Taipei, Taiwan) during 2008–2013 were compared with controls that were randomly selected from healthy T. gondii-seronegative blood donors who participated in a nationwide T. gondii seroepidemiologic study during 2009–2010. Cases and controls were matched according to age, gender and residency at an 1∶8 ratio. Structured questionnaires were used to gather information regarding risk factors. A total of 30 laboratory-confirmed acute T. gondii disease cases and 224 controls were enrolled. The most common clinical manifestation of the cases was flu-like symptoms (n = 20), followed by central nervous system disease (n = 4), ocular diseases (n = 3), abortion (n = 2), and congenital infection (n = 1). Multivariate conditional logistic regression showed that raw clam consumption (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–9.9) and having a cat in the household (adjusted OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.1–7.9) were two independent risk factors for acute T. gondii disease. We conclude that raw shellfish consumption and domestic cat exposure were risk factors for acquiring acute T. gondii diseases in Taiwan. This finding may guide future research and control policies. PMID:24609112

  6. A Rare Clinical Presentation of Darier's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferizi, Mybera; Begolli-Gerqari, Antigona; Luzar, Bostjan; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Ferizi, Mergita

    2013-01-01

    Darier's disease, also known as keratosis follicularis or dyskeratosis follicularis, is a rare disorder of keratinization. It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Its manifestation appears as hyperkeratotic papules, primarily affecting seborrheic areas on the head, neck, and thorax and less frequently on the oral mucosa. When oral manifestations are present, the palatal and alveolar mucosae are primarily affected. They are usually asymptomatic and are discovered in routine dental examination. Histologically, the lesions are presented as suprabasal clefts in the epithelium with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells represented by “corps ronds and grains”. This paper reports a case of a 53-year-old woman that was admitted to our clinic with more than 10-year history of keratotic papules, presented on the hands and feet, nose, ears, genitalia, and whitish lesions on palatal mucosae. PMID:23573430

  7. Myocardial uptake of indium-111-labeled antimyosin in acute subendocardial infarction: Clinical, histochemical, and autoradiographic correlation of myocardial necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, R.C.; McSherry, B.A.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Indium-111-labeled antimyosin has been utilized in the diagnosis and localization of acute transmural myocardial infarction. The present report describes a patient who presented with a massive subendocardial infarction. Two days after the injection of antimyosin, the patient's clinical status markedly deteriorated and he expired. Postmortem examination demonstrated severe three-vessel coronary artery disease with extensive myocyte death in the endocardium. Autoradiography and histochemical staining of the prosected heart demonstrated high correlation for myocardial necrosis and corresponded to clinical evidence for diffuse subendocardial infarction.

  8. Clinical studies in lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boudes, Pol F

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) consist of over 40 diseases, some of which are amenable to treatment. In this review, we consider the regulatory context in which LSDs studies are performed, highlight design specificities and explore operational challenges. Orphan drug legislations, both in Europe and US, were effective to stimulate LSDs drug development. However, regulators flexibilities toward approval vary leading to global discrepancies in access to treatments. Study designs are constrained because few patients can be studied. This implies LSDs treatments need to demonstrate large levels of clinical efficacy. If not, an appropriate level of evidence is difficult to achieve. While biomarkers could address this issue, none have been truly accepted as primary outcome. Enrichment of study population can increase the chance of success, especially with clinical outcomes. Adaptive designs are operationally challenging. Innovative methods of analysis can be used, notably using a patient as his/her own control and responder analysis. The use of extension phases and patient registries as a source of historical comparison can facilitate data interpretation. Operationally, few patients are available per centers and multiple centers need to be initiated in multiple countries. This impacts time-lines and budget. In the future, regulators flexibility will be essential to provide patients access to innovative treatments. PMID:25003011

  9. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient’s AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response. PMID:26660431

  10. Clinical Characteristics and Factors Influencing the Occurrence of Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia in Korean Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) is an uncommon inflammatory lung disease, and limited data exist concerning the clinical characteristics and factors that influence its occurrence. We retrospectively reviewed the records of AEP patients treated at Korean military hospitals between January 2007 and December 2013. In total, 333 patients were identified; their median age was 22 years, and all were men. All patients presented with acute respiratory symptoms (cough, sputum, dyspnea, or fever) and had elevated levels of inflammatory markers including median values of 13,185/µL for white blood cell count and 9.51 mg/dL for C-reactive protein. All patients showed diffuse ground glass opacity/consolidation, and most had pleural effusion (n = 265; 80%) or interlobular septal thickening (n = 265; 85%) on chest computed tomography. Most patients had normal body mass index (n = 255; 77%), and only 30 (9%) patients had underlying diseases including rhinitis, asthma, or atopic dermatitis. Most patients had recently changed smoking habits (n = 288; 87%) and were Army personnel (n = 297; 89%).The AEP incidence was higher in the Army group compared to the Navy or Air Force group for every year (P = 0.002). Both the number of patients and patients with high illness severity (oxygen requirement, intensive care unit admission, and pneumonia severity score class ≥ III) tended to increase as seasonal temperatures rose. We describe the clinical characteristics of AEP and demonstrate that AEP patients have recently changed smoking habits and work for the Army. There is an increasing tendency in the numbers of patients and those with higher AEP severity with rising seasonal temperatures. PMID:26839479

  11. Clinical imaging of vascular disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Covic, Adrian; London, Gerard; Vervloet, Marc; Goldsmith, David; Gorriz, Jose Luis; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    Arterial wall calcification, once considered an incidental finding, is now known to be a consistent and strong predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. It is also commonly encountered in radiologic examinations as an incidental finding. Forthcoming bench, translational, and clinical data seek to establish this and pre-calcification changes as surrogate imaging biomarkers for noninvasive prognostication and treatment follow-up. Emerging paradigms seek to establish vascular calcification as a surrogate marker of disease. Imaging of pre-calcification and decalcification events may prove more important than imaging of the calcification itself. Data-driven approaches to screening will be necessary to limit radiation exposure and prevent over-utilization of expensive imaging techniques. PMID:26898824

  12. Acute Increase of Children's Conjunctivitis Clinic Visits by Asian Dust Storms Exposure - A Spatiotemporal Study in Taipei, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Lien, Yi-Jen; Yang, Chiang-Hsin; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health impacts of Asian dust storms (ADS) have been widely investigated and discussed in respiratory disease, but no study has examined the association between ADS events and their impact on eye diseases, especially in children. The impact of ADS events on the incidence of children's conjunctivitis is examined by analyzing the data from children's clinic visits registered in the 41 districts of Taipei area in Taiwan during the period 2002–2007. The structural additive regression modeling approach was used to assess the association between ADS events and clinic visits for conjunctivitis in children with consideration of day-of-the-week effects, temperature, and air quality levels. This study identifies an acute increase in the relative rate for children's conjunctivitis clinic visits during ADS periods with 1.48% (95% CI = 0.79, 2.17) for preschool children (aged <6 years old) and 9.48% (95% CI = 9.03, 9.93) for schoolchildren (aged ≥6 years old), respectively. The relative rates during post-ADS periods were still statistically significant, but much lower than those during ADS periods. The spatial analysis presents geographic heterogeneity of children's conjunctivitis clinic visits where higher relative rates were more likely observed in the most populated districts Compared to previous ADS studies related to respiratory diseases, our results reveals significantly acute impacts on children's conjunctivitis during ADS periods, and much influence on schoolchildren. Vulnerable areas were also identified in high density population. PMID:25347189

  13. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  14. First presentation of Addison's disease as hyperkalaemia in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Maki, Sara; Kramarz, Caroline; Maria Heister, Paula; Pasha, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder that frequently presents with non-specific symptoms, but may deteriorate rapidly into life-threatening Addisonian crisis if left untreated. Diagnosis can be difficult in patients without a suggestive medical history. We describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with acute kidney injury and hyperkalaemia, resistant to treatment with insulin/dextrose and calcium gluconate. On clinical examination, he was found to be hyperpigmented; a subsequent random serum cortisol of 49 nmol/L affirmed the preliminary diagnosis of Addison's disease. The patient's hyperkalaemia improved on treatment with hydrocortisone, and a follow-up morning adrenocorticotropic hormone of 1051 ng/L confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27170604

  15. Immune Responses in Acute and Convalescent Patients with Mild, Moderate and Severe Disease during the 2009 Influenza Pandemic in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Kristin G.-I.; Cox, Rebecca Jane; Tunheim, Gro; Berdal, Jan Erik; Hauge, Anna Germundsson; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Peters, Bjoern; Oftung, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of immune responses influencing clinical severity during pandemic influenza infection is important for improved treatment and vaccine development. In this study we recruited 46 adult patients during the 2009 influenza pandemic and characterized humoral and cellular immune responses. Those included were either acute hospitalized or convalescent patients with different disease severities (mild, moderate or severe). In general, protective antibody responses increased with enhanced disease severity. In the acute patients, we found higher levels of TNF-α single-producing CD4+T-cells in the severely ill as compared to patients with moderate disease. Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a subset of acute patients with peptide T-cell epitopes showed significantly lower frequencies of influenza specific CD8+ compared with CD4+ IFN-γ T-cells in acute patients. Both T-cell subsets were predominantly directed against the envelope antigens (HA and NA). However, in the convalescent patients we found high levels of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells directed against conserved core antigens (NP, PA, PB, and M). The results indicate that the antigen targets recognized by the T-cell subsets may vary according to the phase of infection. The apparent low levels of cross-reactive CD8+ T-cells recognizing internal antigens in acute hospitalized patients suggest an important role for this T-cell subset in protective immunity against influenza. PMID:26606759

  16. Clinical and laboratory predictive markers for acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection during the febrile stage is essential for adjusting appropriate management. This study is to identify the predictive markers of clinical and laboratory findings in the acute stage of dengue infection during a major outbreak of dengue virus type 1 that occurred in southern Taiwan during 2007. A retrospective, hospital-based study was conducted at a university hospital in southern Taiwan from January to December, 2007. Patient who was reported for clinically suspected dengue infection was enrolled. Laboratory-positive dengue cases are confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of specific dengue IgM, fourfold increase of dengue-specific IgG titers in convalescent serum, or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of dengue virus. Results The suspected dengue cases consist of 100 children (≤ 18 years) and 481 adults. Among the 581 patients, 67 (67%) children and 309 (64.2%) adults were laboratory-confirmed. Patients who had laboratory indeterminate were excluded. Most cases were uncomplicated and 3.8% of children and 2.9% of adults developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The overall mortality rate in those with DHF/DSS was 7.1%, and the average duration of hospitalization was 20 days. The most common symptoms/signs at admission were myalgia (46.8%), petechiae (36.9%) and nausea/vomiting (33.5%). The most notable laboratory findings included leukopenia (2966 ± 1896/cmm), thrombocytopenia (102 ± 45 × 103/cmm), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (45 ± 10 s), and elevated serum levels of aminotransferase (AST, 166 ± 208 U/L; ALT, 82 ± 103 U/L) and low C - reactive protein (CRP) (6 ± 11 mg/L). Based on the clinical features for predicting laboratory-confirmed dengue infection, the sensitivities of typical rash, myalgia, and positive tourniquet test are 59.2%, 46.8%, and 34.2%, while the specificities for

  17. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention

  18. IgG4-related disease manifesting as an acute gastric-pericardial fistula.

    PubMed

    Frydman, James; Grunner, Shahar; Kluger, Yoram

    2014-11-28

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized entity linked initially to autoimmune pancreatitis and has been subsequently described in nearly every organ system. Men over the age of 50 represent the most affected demographic group and a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria has been developed to aid treating clinicians. Though elevated levels of IgG4 in the serum are suggestive of the disease, definitive diagnosis is made on histopathology. Treatment is tailored to the clinical presentation with corticosteroid therapy known to have proven efficacy. Gastric manifestations of the IgG4-related disease primarily come in two varieties, notably chronic ulceration or pseudotumor formation. Autoimmune pancreatitis conveys increased risk for IgG4-related disease of the stomach, which is independent of Helicobacter pylori status. In this case report, we present an acute gastric-pericardial fistula secondary to IgG4-related disease that required urgent operative management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing this complication of IgG4-related disease. PMID:25469052

  19. IgG4-related disease manifesting as an acute gastric-pericardial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, James; Grunner, Shahar; Kluger, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a recently recognized entity linked initially to autoimmune pancreatitis and has been subsequently described in nearly every organ system. Men over the age of 50 represent the most affected demographic group and a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria has been developed to aid treating clinicians. Though elevated levels of IgG4 in the serum are suggestive of the disease, definitive diagnosis is made on histopathology. Treatment is tailored to the clinical presentation with corticosteroid therapy known to have proven efficacy. Gastric manifestations of the IgG4-related disease primarily come in two varieties, notably chronic ulceration or pseudotumor formation. Autoimmune pancreatitis conveys increased risk for IgG4-related disease of the stomach, which is independent of Helicobacter pylori status. In this case report, we present an acute gastric-pericardial fistula secondary to IgG4-related disease that required urgent operative management. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the medical literature describing this complication of IgG4-related disease. PMID:25469052

  20. Acute flaccid myelitis: A clinical review of US cases 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Messacar, Kevin; Schreiner, Teri L; Van Haren, Keith; Yang, Michele; Glaser, Carol A; Tyler, Kenneth L; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2016-09-01

    This review highlights clinical features of the increasing cases of acute flaccid paralysis associated with anterior myelitis noted in the United States from 2012 to 2015. Acute flaccid myelitis refers to acute flaccid limb weakness with spinal cord gray matter lesions on imaging or evidence of spinal cord motor neuron injury on electrodiagnostic testing. Although some individuals demonstrated improvement in motor weakness and functional deficits, most have residual weakness a year or more after onset. Epidemiological evidence and biological plausibility support an association between enterovirus D68 and the recent increase in acute flaccid myelitis cases in the United States. Ann Neurol 2016;80:326-338. PMID:27422805

  1. Prospective Study on the Clinical Course and Outcomes in Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Roubinian, Nareg; Gajic, Ognjen; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C.; Wu, Ping; Grimes, Barbara; Norris, Philip J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gandhi, Manish J.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Hirschler, Nora V.; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Matthay, Michael A.; Toy, Pearl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. Design Prospective case study with controls. Setting University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Patients We prospectively enrolled 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 164 transfused controls, and 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, and prolonged hypoxemia compared with controls. Of the patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 29 of 37 patients (78%) required initiation of mechanical ventilation and 13 of 53 (25%) required initiation of vasopressors. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury had an increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased days in the ICU and hospital compared with controls. There were 15 of 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury (17%) who died, whereas 61 of 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (42%) died and 7 of 164 of controls (4%) died. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had evidence of more systemic inflammation with increases in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in platelets compared with controls. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury also had a statistically significant increase in plasma interleukin-8, interleukin-10, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist posttransfusion compared with controls. Conclusions In conclusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition

  2. Contribution of Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with the Clinical Presentation of Acute Liver Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Luca, Angelo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Minervini, Marta Ida; Vizzini, Giovanni; Arcadipane, Antonio; Gridelli, Bruno

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. Acute liver failure (ALF) treated with conservative therapy has a poor prognosis, although individual survival varies greatly. In these patients, the eligibility for liver transplantation must be quickly decided. The aim of this study was to assess the role of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) in the management of patients with the clinical presentation of ALF. Methods. Seventeen patients with the clinical presentation of ALF were referred to our institution during a 52 month period. A TJLB was performed using the Cook Quick-Core needle biopsy. Clinical data, procedural complications, and histologic findings were evaluated. Results. Causes of ALF were virus hepatitis B infection in 7 patients, drug toxicity in 4, mushroom in 1, Wilson's disease in 1, and unknown origin in 4. TJLB was technically successful in all patients without procedure-related complications. Tissue specimens were satisfactory for diagnosis in all cases. In 14 of 17 patients the initial clinical diagnosis was confirmed by TJLB; in 3 patients the initial diagnosis was altered by the presence of unknown cirrhosis. Seven patients with necrosis <60% were successfully treated with medical therapy; 6 patients with submassive or massive necrosis ({>=}85%) were treated with liver transplantation. Four patients died, 3 had cirrhosis, and 1 had submassive necrosis. There was a strict statistical correlation (r = 0.972, p < 0.0001) between the amount of necrosis at the frozen section examination and the necrosis found at routine histologic examination. The average time for TJLB and frozen section examination was 80 min. Conclusion. In patients with the clinical presentation of ALF, submassive or massive liver necrosis and cirrhosis are predictors of poor prognosis. TLJB using an automated device and frozen section examination can be a quick and effective tool in clinical decision-making, especially in deciding patient selection and the best timing for liver transplantation.

  3. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  4. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Acute Diarrheal Infections in Adults.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Mark S; DuPont, Herbert L; Connor, Bradley A

    2016-05-01

    Acute diarrheal infections are a common health problem globally and among both individuals in the United States and traveling to developing world countries. Multiple modalities including antibiotic and non-antibiotic therapies have been used to address these common infections. Information on treatment, prevention, diagnostics, and the consequences of acute diarrhea infection has emerged and helps to inform clinical management. In this ACG Clinical Guideline, the authors present an evidence-based approach to diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute diarrhea infection in both US-based and travel settings. PMID:27068718

  5. Endothelial-cell injury in cutaneous acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. S.; Beschorner, W. E.; Farmer, E. R.; Di Gennaro, K. A.; Saral, R.; Santos, G. W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of an erythematous skin rash and hemorrhagic complications in acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) suggest that the vasculature may be involved in the immunopathologic process. We reviewed endothelial and vascular histopathologic changes on light microscopy and on immunoperoxidase stained sections of skin biopsies obtained from 41 HLA-identical allogeneic marrow transplant recipients with at least grade 2 GVHD. Biopsies taken from 14 allogeneic HLA-identical bone marrow transplant recipients who never developed GVHD were used as controls. Sections were evaluated for evidence of immunologic vascular injury using the rank file analysis of histologic features, expression of HLA-DR antigen, and the distribution of fibrin and factor VIII-related antigen (F VIII RAg). Patients with acute GVHD had significantly greater intimal lymphocytic infiltrates, perivascular nuclear dust deposition, perivascular F VIII Rag extravasation and deposition and vascular proliferation than controls. We find significantly greater endothelial injury in GVHD patients, which may represent primary immunologic injury to the vasculature. The clinical findings in acute GVHD probably result from cumulative endothelial as well as epithelial injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2596572

  6. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  7. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Methods: Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. Results: In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. Conclusions: A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes. PMID:25674124

  8. Early warning and clinical outcome prediction of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, En-Qiang; Zeng, Fan; Zhou, Ling-Yun; Tang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is an increasingly recognized fatal liver disease encompassing a severe acute exacerbation of liver function in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Despite the introduction of an artificial liver support system and antiviral therapy, the short-term prognosis of HBV-ACLF is still extremely poor unless emergency liver transplantation is performed. In such a situation, stopping or slowing the progression of CHB to ACLF at an early stage is the most effective way of reducing the morbidity and mortality of HBV-ACLF. It is well-known that the occurrence and progression of HBV-ACLF is associated with many factors, and the outcomes of HBV-ACLF patients can be significantly improved if timely and appropriate interventions are provided. In this review, we highlight recent developments in early warning and clinical outcome prediction in patients with HBV-ACLF and provide an outlook for future research in this field. PMID:26576085

  9. Variable clinical course in acute necrotizing encephalopathy and identification of a novel RANBP2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Sell, Katharina; Storch, Katja; Hahn, Gabriele; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Ramantani, Georgia; Jackson, Sandra; Neilson, Derek; von der Hagen, Maja; Hehr, Ute; Smitka, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare disease presenting with rapidly progressing encephalopathy. It usually occurs in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections. The hallmarks of ANE are the neuroradiological findings of multiple symmetric lesions in the thalami, midbrain, pons and brainstem. Most cases are sporadic and non recurrent. However, recurrent or familial forms of ANE due to mutations in RANBP2 gene have been reported. It has been suggested to give these cases the term ANE1. We report the clinical course in two male infants (P1, P2) with ANE1 and a variable clinical course and outcome. One patient is heterozygous for the most common RANBP2 missense mutation p.Thr585Met. In the other patient we observed a novel de novo missense mutation p.Trp681Cys in the RANBP2 gene causing recurrent ANE. Clinical and radiological features are presented and differential diagnoses are discussed. This report adds to the current knowledge of the phenotype in ANE, caused by mutations in RANBP2 gene. PMID:26923722

  10. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  11. A clinical review of Lyme disease in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Patil, Naveen; Bariola, J Ryan; Saccente, Michael; Vyas, Keyur S; Bradsher, Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. Since it was first described more than 30 years ago, Lyme disease has generated a great deal of controversy. Lyme disease is not endemic in Arkansas, and testing for Borrelia burgdorferi can lead to clinical confusion, unnecessary treatment and excess cost. This article will present a brief review of Lyme disease, with an emphasis on what is known regarding Lyme disease in Arkansas. PMID:20218039

  12. Alcoholic liver disease: Clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Manuela G; Malnick, Stephen; Maor, Yaakov; Nanau, Radu M; Melzer, Ehud; Ferenci, Peter; Seitz, Helmut K; Mueller, Sebastian; Mell, Haim; Samuel, Didier; Cohen, Lawrence B; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Osna, Natalia A; Ganesan, Murali; Thompson, Kyle J; McKillop, Iain H; Bautista, Abraham; Bataller, Ramon; French, Samuel W

    2015-12-01

    The present review spans a broad spectrum of topics dealing with alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including clinical research, translational research, pathogenesis and therapies. A special accent is placed on alcohol misuse, as alcohol is a legally commercialized and taxable product. Drinking alcohol, particularly from a young age, is a major health problem. Alcoholism is known to contribute to morbidity and mortality. A systematic literature search was performed in order to obtain updated data (2008-2015). The review is focused on genetic polymorphisms of alcohol metabolizing enzymes and the role of cytochrome p450 2E1 and iron in ALD. Alcohol-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is also discussed in the presence or absence of co-morbidities such as viral hepatitis C as well as therapeutic the role of innate immunity in ALD-HCV. Moreover, emphasis was placed on alcohol and drug interactions, as well as liver transplantation for end-stage ALD. Finally, the time came to eradicate alcohol-induced liver and intestinal damage by using betaine. PMID:26342547

  13. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  14. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Griggs, David W; Prinsen, Michael J; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A; Arnett, Stacy D; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K M; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J

    2016-05-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil-treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  15. Sexually, transmitted disease in clinic patients in Salisbury, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Latif, A S

    1981-01-01

    During the three months between December 1979 and February 1980, 2867 patients attended a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. Of the 929 (32.4%) patients examined and interviewed clinical and laboratory finding showed that chancroid was the commonest disease (38.4%) and gonorrhoea almost as common (35.3%) in men. Pelvic inflammatory disease was the commonest disease (47.0%) and gonorrhoea the next commonest (22.7%) in women. PMID:6894561

  16. Reduced myo-inositol and total choline measured with cerebral MRS in acute thyrotoxic Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Elberling, T V; Danielsen, E R; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Waldemar, G; Thomsen, C

    2003-01-14

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in the acute thyrotoxic phase of Graves' disease suggest involvement of brain processes. Short-echo-time proton MRS was used to measure the cerebral metabolite profile in newly diagnosed and untreated Graves' disease. Sixteen patients with Graves' disease and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were studied. The patients had significantly reduced total choline and myo-inositol in the acute phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis compared with the healthy volunteers. PMID:12525741

  17. Transcript profiling differentiates healthy control, sub-clinical and clinical Johne's disease in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s Disease (JD), a ruminant infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is characterized by a long latent period followed by an aggressive acute phase in which the animal experiences diarrhea and extreme wasting. The absence of symptoms and low levels of ...

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Increases Infant Acute Respiratory Illness Severity, but not Childhood Asthma.

    PubMed

    Valet, Robert S; Carroll, Kecia N; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Minton, Patricia A; Woodward, Kimberly B; Liu, Zhouwen; Hartert, Tina V

    2014-03-01

    It is unknown whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) during infancy affects infant bronchiolitis severity or childhood asthma inception. Four hundred thirty-two infants presenting with acute respiratory illness due to bronchiolitis or upper respiratory infection were studied. The primary exposure was the parental report of a previous GERD diagnosis. Outcomes included bronchiolitis severity at initial presentation and childhood asthma diagnosis at age 4. Infants with parentally reported GERD had a higher bronchiolitis severity score (range=0-12, clinically significant difference=0.5), indicating more severe disease, than infants without reported GERD (median 5.5 [interquartile range 3.5-9.0] among those with reported GERD versus 4.0 [1.0-7.0] among those without, P=0.005). This association persisted after adjusting for infant age, race, gender, and secondhand smoke exposure by a propensity score (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-3.46, P=0.02). The parental report of GERD during infancy was not associated with the parental report of asthma diagnosis at age 4. GERD during infancy may contribute to acute respiratory illness severity, but is not associated with asthma diagnosis at age 4. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24669353

  19. A Puzzle of Vestibular Physiology in a Meniere's Disease Acute Attack

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Marta; Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present for the first time the functional evaluation of each of the vestibular receptors in the six semicircular canals in a patient diagnosed with Meniere's disease during an acute attack. A 54-year-old lady was diagnosed with left Meniere's disease who during her regular clinic review suffers an acute attack of vertigo, with fullness and an increase of tinnitus in her left ear. Spontaneous nystagmus and the results in the video head-impulse test (vHIT) are shown before, during, and after the attack. Nystagmus was initially left beating and a few minutes later an upbeat component was added. No skew deviation was observed. A decrease in the gain of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) and the presence of overt saccades were observed when the stimuli were in the plane of the left superior semicircular canal. At the end of the crisis nystagmus decreased and vestibuloocular reflex returned to almost normal. A review of the different possibilities to explain these findings points to a hypothetical utricular damage. PMID:26167320

  20. A Clinical Skills Instruction Program: The Acute Abdomen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laube, Douglas W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effective evaluation of the acutely ill female implies a thorough examination that integrates skills representing three learning domains. This process should include: a thorough medical history, a physical examination, good patient-physician rapport, and development of an efficacious management plan. A University of Iowa simulation approach is…

  1. Association of disease activity with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Kondo, Harumi; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to identify risk factors for acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during tocilizumab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This is a retrospective, case-control study. We reviewed 395 consecutive RA patients who received tocilizumab. First, we divided the patients according to the presence (RA-ILD) or absence of ILD (non-ILD) assessed by chest X-ray or high-resolution computed tomography, and compared them for characteristics relevant to RA-ILD. Subsequently, focusing on the patients with RA-ILD, we assessed their baseline characteristics and clinical courses comparing patients with acute exacerbation to those without. Comparing 78 with ILD and 317 without ILD, the following were identified as factors related to RA-ILD on multivariate analysis: age 60 years or older (OR 4.5, 95 % CI 2.2-9.4, P < 0.0001), smoking habit (OR 2.9, 95 % CI 1.5-5.5, P = 0.002), and high rheumatoid factor levels (OR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.4-5.5, P = 0.002). Of 78 RA-ILD patients, six developed acute exacerbation during tocilizumab treatment. The median duration between the initiation of tocilizumab treatment and the acute exacerbation occurrence was 48 weeks. While baseline characteristics did not differ between acute exacerbation and non-acute exacerbation groups, patients experiencing acute exacerbation had significantly higher Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) at 24 weeks (20.8 vs. 6.2, P = 0.019). Univariate analysis showed that CDAI > 10 at 24 weeks was a risk factor for acute exacerbation (OR 4.7, 95 % CI 2.1-10.4, P = 0.02). Uncontrolled arthritis activity during tocilizumab treatment may be associated with acute exacerbation of RA-ILD, suggesting post-treatment monitoring of disease activity is important not only with respect to RA itself but also for RA-ILD. PMID:27072347

  2. High prevalence of and potential mechanisms for chronic kidney disease in patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Mami, Iadh; Schmitt, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; François, Arnaud; Rabant, Marion; Nochy, Dominique; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Xu-Dubois, Yichum; Thervet, Eric; Puy, Hervé; Karras, Alexandre

    2015-08-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder of the synthesis of heme caused by a deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), leading to the overproduction of the porphyrin precursors δ-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and biological characteristics, the renal pathology, and the cellular mechanisms of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP. A total of 415 patients with HMBS deficiency followed up in the French Porphyria Center were enrolled in 2003 in a population-based study. A follow-up study was conducted in 2013, assessing patients for clinical, biological, and histological parameters. In vitro models were used to determine whether porphyrin precursors promote tubular and endothelial cytotoxicity. Chronic kidney disease occurred in up to 59% of the symptomatic AIP patients, with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate of ~1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) annually. Proteinuria was absent in the vast majority of the cases. The renal pathology was a chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, associated with a fibrous intimal hyperplasia and focal cortical atrophy. Our experimental data provide evidence that porphyrin precursors promote endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and epithelial phenotypic changes in proximal tubular cells. In conclusion, the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease associated with AIP should be considered in cases of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy and/or focal cortical atrophy with severe proliferative arteriosclerosis. PMID:25830761

  3. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  4. Clinical Use of Next-Generation Sequencing in the Diagnosis of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Németh, Dániel; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Kósa, János Pál; Tobiás, Bálint; Balla, Bernadett; Folhoffer, Anikó; Krolopp, Anna; Lakatos, Péter András; Szalay, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Wilson's disease is a disorder of copper metabolism which is fatal without treatment. The great number of disease-causing ATP7B gene mutations and the variable clinical presentation of WD may cause a real diagnostic challenge. The emergence of next-generation sequencing provides a time-saving, cost-effective method for full sequencing of the whole ATP7B gene compared to the traditional Sanger sequencing. This is the first report on the clinical use of NGS to examine ATP7B gene. Materials and Methods. We used Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine in four heterozygous patients for the identification of the other mutations and also in two patients with no known mutation. One patient with acute on chronic liver failure was a candidate for acute liver transplantation. The results were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results. In each case, the diagnosis of Wilson's disease was confirmed by identifying the mutations in both alleles within 48 hours. One novel mutation (p.Ala1270Ile) was found beyond the eight other known ones. The rapid detection of the mutations made possible the prompt diagnosis of WD in a patient with acute liver failure. Conclusions. According to our results we found next-generation sequencing a very useful, reliable, time-saving, and cost-effective method for diagnosing Wilson's disease in selected cases. PMID:26819605

  5. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers. PMID:27458590

  6. Clinical Use of Next-Generation Sequencing in the Diagnosis of Wilson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Dániel; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Kósa, János Pál; Tobiás, Bálint; Balla, Bernadett; Folhoffer, Anikó; Krolopp, Anna; Lakatos, Péter András; Szalay, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Wilson's disease is a disorder of copper metabolism which is fatal without treatment. The great number of disease-causing ATP7B gene mutations and the variable clinical presentation of WD may cause a real diagnostic challenge. The emergence of next-generation sequencing provides a time-saving, cost-effective method for full sequencing of the whole ATP7B gene compared to the traditional Sanger sequencing. This is the first report on the clinical use of NGS to examine ATP7B gene. Materials and Methods. We used Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine in four heterozygous patients for the identification of the other mutations and also in two patients with no known mutation. One patient with acute on chronic liver failure was a candidate for acute liver transplantation. The results were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results. In each case, the diagnosis of Wilson's disease was confirmed by identifying the mutations in both alleles within 48 hours. One novel mutation (p.Ala1270Ile) was found beyond the eight other known ones. The rapid detection of the mutations made possible the prompt diagnosis of WD in a patient with acute liver failure. Conclusions. According to our results we found next-generation sequencing a very useful, reliable, time-saving, and cost-effective method for diagnosing Wilson's disease in selected cases. PMID:26819605

  7. Clinical and biological role of secretory phospholipase A2 in acute respiratory distress syndrome infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Secretory phospholipase A2 is supposed to play a role in acute lung injury but no data are available for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It is not clear which enzyme subtypes are secreted and what the relationships are between enzyme activity, biophysical and biochemical parameters, and clinical outcomes. We aimed to measure the enzyme and identify its subtypes and to study its biochemical and biophysical effect. The secondary aim was to correlate enzyme activity with clinical outcome. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 24 infants with ARDS and 14 controls with no lung disease. Samples were assayed for secretory phospholipase A2 and molecules related to its activity and expression. Western blotting and captive bubble surfactometry were also performed. Clinical data were real time downloaded. Results Tumor necrosis factor-α (814 (506-2,499) vs. 287 (111-1,315) pg/mL; P = 0.04), enzyme activity (430 (253-600) vs. 149 (61-387) IU/mL; P = 0.01), free fatty acids (4.3 (2.8-8.6) vs. 2 (0.8-4.6) mM; P = 0.026), and minimum surface tension (25.6 ± 6.1 vs. 18 ± 1.8 mN/m; P = 0.006) were higher in ARDS than in controls. Phospholipids are lower in ARDS than in controls (76.5 (54-100) vs. 1,094 (536-2,907) μg/mL; P = 0.0001). Three enzyme subtypes were identified (-IIA, -V, -X), although in lower quantities in controls; another subtype (-IB) was mainly detected in ARDS. Significant correlations exist between enzyme activity, free fatty acids (ρ = 0.823; P < 0.001), and surface tension (ρ = 0.55; P < 0.028). Correlations also exist with intensive care stay (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001), PRISM-III24 (ρ = 0.79; P< 0.001), duration of ventilation (ρ = 0.53; P = 0.002), and oxygen therapy (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001). Conclusions Secretory phospholipase A2 activity is raised in pediatric ARDS and constituted of four subtypes. Enzyme correlates with some inflammatory mediators, surface tension, and major clinical outcomes. Secretory

  8. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  9. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  10. Use of corticosteroids during acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Jin

    2015-11-01

    In spite of initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment, a significant number of patients are unresponsive to it and are at a higher risk for coronary artery lesions. Corticosteroids have been used as a secondary drug or used in combination with IVIG. Three options of using corticosteroids for the treatment of patients during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, have been considered. The first is their use exclusively for patients unresponsive to IVIG treatment. The second is their use in combination with IVIG as the routine first line therapy for all patients. The last is the use in the combination as the first line therapy for selected patients at a high risk being unresponsive to initial IVIG. However, it is uncertain that the corticosteroids as the second line treatment are better than the additional IVIG in patients unresponsive to initial IVIG. The combination of corticosteroids and IVIG as the routine first line therapy also have not enough evidences. The last option of using corticosteroids - the combination of corticosteroids and IVIG in patients at high risk of unresponsiveness, is a properly reasonable treatment strategy. However, there have been no globally standardized predictive models for the unresponsiveness to initial IVIG treatment. Therefore, future investigations to determine the best predictive model are necessary. PMID:26566486

  11. Use of corticosteroids during acute phase of Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Jin

    2015-01-01

    In spite of initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment, a significant number of patients are unresponsive to it and are at a higher risk for coronary artery lesions. Corticosteroids have been used as a secondary drug or used in combination with IVIG. Three options of using corticosteroids for the treatment of patients during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, have been considered. The first is their use exclusively for patients unresponsive to IVIG treatment. The second is their use in combination with IVIG as the routine first line therapy for all patients. The last is the use in the combination as the first line therapy for selected patients at a high risk being unresponsive to initial IVIG. However, it is uncertain that the corticosteroids as the second line treatment are better than the additional IVIG in patients unresponsive to initial IVIG. The combination of corticosteroids and IVIG as the routine first line therapy also have not enough evidences. The last option of using corticosteroids - the combination of corticosteroids and IVIG in patients at high risk of unresponsiveness, is a properly reasonable treatment strategy. However, there have been no globally standardized predictive models for the unresponsiveness to initial IVIG treatment. Therefore, future investigations to determine the best predictive model are necessary. PMID:26566486

  12. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. PMID:27388683

  13. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Julianna V. F.; Haverkos, Bradley M.; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Benson, Don M.; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Devine, Steven M.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3–4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13–1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation. PMID:26140610

  14. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  15. Cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease. A clinical update from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Charles A; Asinger, Richard W; Berger, Alan K; Charytan, David M; Díez, Javier; Hart, Robert G; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kasiske, Bertram L; McCullough, Peter A; Passman, Rod S; DeLoach, Stephanie S; Pun, Patrick H; Ritz, Eberhard

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high, and the presence of CKD worsens outcomes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CKD is associated with specific risk factors. Emerging evidence indicates that the pathology and manifestation of CVD differ in the presence of CKD. During a clinical update conference convened by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO), an international group of experts defined the current state of knowledge and the implications for patient care in important topic areas, including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, atrial fibrillation, peripheral arterial disease, and sudden cardiac death. Although optimal strategies for prevention, diagnosis, and management of these complications likely should be modified in the presence of CKD, the evidence base for decision making is limited. Trials targeting CVD in patients with CKD have a large potential to improve outcomes. PMID:21750584

  16. Clinical and Research Considerations for Patients With Hypertensive Acute Heart Failure: A Consensus Statement from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and the Heart Failure Society of America Acute Heart Failure Working Group.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean P; Levy, Phillip D; Martindale, Jennifer L; Dunlap, Mark E; Storrow, Alan B; Pang, Peter S; Albert, Nancy M; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David J; Lenihan, Daniel J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn M; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Butler, Javed

    2016-08-01

    Management approaches for patients in the emergency department (ED) who present with acute heart failure (AHF) have largely focused on intravenous diuretics. Yet, the primary pathophysiologic derangement underlying AHF in many patients is not solely volume overload. Patients with hypertensive AHF (H-AHF) represent a clinical phenotype with distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that result in elevated ventricular filling pressures. To optimize treatment response and minimize adverse events in this subgroup, we propose that clinical management be tailored to a conceptual model of disease based on these mechanisms. This consensus statement reviews the relevant pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, approach to therapy, and considerations for clinical trials in ED patients with H-AHF. PMID:27262665

  17. Differences in Clinical Outcomes Between Patients With ST-Elevation Versus Non-ST-Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han

    2009-01-01

    In Korea, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been increasing rapidly. Twelve-month clinical outcomes for 13,133 patients with acute myocardial infarction enrolled in the nationwide prospective Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry study were analyzed according to the presence or absence of ST-segment elevation. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were younger, more likely to be men and smokers, and had poorer left ventricular function with a higher incidence of cardiac death compared to patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). NSTEMI patients had a higher prevalence of 3-vessel and left main coronary artery disease with complex lesions, and were more likely to have co-morbidities. The in-hospital and 1-month survival rates were higher in NSTEMI patients than in STEMI patients. However, 12-month survival rates was not different between the two groups. In conclusion, NSTEMI patients have worse clinical outcomes than STEMI patients, and therefore should be treated more intensively during clinical follow-up. PMID:19949634

  18. [Relationship between child day-care attendance and acute infectious disease. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Sangrador, Carlos; Barajas Sánchez, M Verisima; Muñoz Martín, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Child day-care attendance is considered to be an acute early childhood disease risk factor, the studies available however not affording the possibility of fully quantifying this risk. A systematic review of clinical trials and cohort studies was conducted, in which the effects child day-care attendance had on the health of young children based on the Cochrane Collaboration, PubMed and Spanish Medical Index databases, without any time or language-related limits, were analyzed and rounded out with analyses of referenced works and an additional EMBASE search. The methodological quality was evaluated by means of personalized criteria. Pooling measures (relative risks, incidence density ratios and weighted mean differences) were calculated with their confidence intervals, assuming random effects models. A significant increase was found to exist of a risk consistent over time and among different social and geographical environments. Considering the most methodologically-stringent studies with adjusted effect estimates, child day-care attendance was related to an increased risk of upper respiratory tract infection (RR=1,88), acute otitis media (RR=1,58), otitis media with fluid draining (RR=2,43), lower respiratory tract infections (overall RR=210; acute pneumonia RR=1.70; broncholitis RR=1,80; bronchitis RR=2,10) and gastroenteritis (RR=1,40). Child day-care attendance could be responsible for 33%-50% of the episodes of respiratory infection and gastroenteritis among the exposed population. In conclusion, it can be said that the risk for childhood health attributable to the child day-care attendance is discreet but of high-impact. This information has some major implications for research, clinical practice, healthcare authorities and society as a whole. PMID:17639680

  19. Pulmonary Artery Dilation and Right Ventricular Function in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Numano, Fujito; Shimizu, Chisato; Tremoulet, Adriana H; Dyar, Dan; Burns, Jane C; Printz, Beth F

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery inflammation and aneurysm formation are the most common complications of Kawasaki disease (KD). Valvulitis and myocarditis are also well described and may lead to valvar regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction. However, functional changes in the right heart have rarely been reported. We noted several acute KD patients with dilated pulmonary arteries (PA) and thus sought to systematically characterize PA size and right-heart function in an unselected cohort of KD patients cared for at a single clinical center. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic data from 143 acute KD subjects were analyzed. PA dilation was documented in 23 subjects (16.1 %); these subjects had higher median right ventricle myocardial performance index (RV MPI), higher ratio of early tricuspid inflow velocity to tricuspid annular early diastolic velocity (TV E/e'), and lower median TV e' velocity compared to the non-PA dilation group (0.50 vs 0.38 p < 0.01, 4.2 vs 3.6 p < 0.05, and 13.5 vs 15.2 cm/s p < 0.01, respectively). Almost all subjects with PA dilation had improved PA Z-score, RV MPI, and TV E/e' in the subacute phase (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in indices of left ventricle function between PA dilation group and non-PA dilation group. In summary, PA dilation was documented in 16 % of acute KD subjects. These subjects were more likely to have echocardiographic indices consistent with isolated RV dysfunction that improved in the subacute phase. The long-term consequence of these findings will require longitudinal studies of this patient population. PMID:26681305

  20. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil. PMID:26670404

  1. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  2. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  3. Association of global weather changes with acute coronary syndromes: gaining insights from clinical trials data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Westerhout, Cynthia M.; Boersma, Eric; Armstrong, Paul W.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the identification of global weather parameters and patient characteristics associated with a type of heart attack in which there is a sudden partial blockage of a coronary artery. This type of heart attack does not demonstrate an elevation of the ST segment on an electrocardiogram and is defined as a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Data from the Global Summary of the Day database was linked with the enrollment and baseline data for a phase III international clinical trial in NSTE-ACS in four 48-h time periods covering the week prior to the clinical event that prompted enrollment in the study. Meteorological events were determined by standardizing the weather data from enrollment dates against an empirical distribution from the month prior. These meteorological events were then linked to the patients' geographic region, demographics and comorbidities to identify potential susceptible populations. After standardization, changes in temperature and humidity demonstrated an association with the enrollment event. Additionally there appeared to be an association with gender, region and a history of stroke. This methodology may provide a useful global insight into assessing the biometeorologic component of diseases from international data.

  4. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    PubMed Central

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  5. Nephropathy in dietary hyperoxaluria: A potentially preventable acute or chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Glew, Robert H; Sun, Yijuan; Horowitz, Bruce L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Barry, Marc; Fair, Joanna R; Massie, Larry; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria can cause not only nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, but also renal parenchymal disease histologically characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals throughout the renal parenchyma, profound tubular damage and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Hyperoxaluric nephropathy presents clinically as acute or chronic renal failure that may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This sequence of events, well recognized in the past in primary and enteric hyperoxalurias, has also been documented in a few cases of dietary hyperoxaluria. Estimates of oxalate intake in patients with chronic dietary hyperoxaluria who developed chronic kidney disease or ESRD were comparable to the reported average oxalate content of the diets of certain populations worldwide, thus raising the question whether dietary hyperoxaluria is a primary cause of ESRD in these regions. Studies addressing this question have the potential of improving population health and should be undertaken, alongside ongoing studies which are yielding fresh insights into the mechanisms of intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate, and into the mechanisms of development of oxalate-induced renal parenchymal disease. Novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for treating all types of hyperoxaluria are expected to develop from these studies. PMID:25374807

  6. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  7. Glycosphingolipid analysis in a naturally occurring ovine model of acute neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Karageorgos, Litsa; Hein, Leanne; Rozaklis, Tina; Adams, Melissa; Duplock, Stephen; Snel, Marten; Hemsley, Kim; Kuchel, Tim; Smith, Nicholas; Hopwood, John J

    2016-07-01

    Gaucher disease arises from mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene which encodes an enzyme required for the lysosomal catabolism of glucosylceramide. We have identified a naturally occurring mutation in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene in sheep that leads to Gaucher disease with acute neurological symptoms. Here we have examined the clinical phenotype at birth and subsequently quantified lipids in Gaucher lamb brain, in order to characterise the disorder. Enzyme activity assessments showed that a reduction in β-glucocerebrosidase activity to 1-5% of wild-type occurs consistently across newborn Gaucher lamb brain regions. We analyzed glucosylceramide, glucosylsphingosine, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside profiles in brain, liver, and spleen, and observed 30- to 130-fold higher glucosylceramide, and 500- to 2000-fold higher glucosylsphingosine concentrations in Gaucher diseased lambs compared to wild-type. Significant increases of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and gangliosides [GM1, GM2, GM3] concentrations were also detected in the brain. As these glycosphingolipids are involved in many cellular events, an imbalance or disruption of the cell membrane lipid homeostasis would be expected to impair normal neuronal function. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of glycosphingolipids in various brain regions in a large animal model of neuronal disease, which permits the mechanistic investigation of lipid deregulation and their contribution to neurodegenerative process. PMID:26976737

  8. [Acute poisoning with selected hepatotoxic agents: biochemistry of toxic effect, clinical symptoms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rusiński, Piotr; Kołaciński, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses etiopathogenesis, clinical symptoms and treatment in acute poisoning with hepatotoxic agents. The liver is a critical organ in acute poisoning with Amanita phalloides, carbon tetrachloride, iron compounds and isonicotinic acid hydrazide. Based on literature reports and own experience the authors present the current outlook on the specific treatment of acute poisoning with these xenobiotics. Special consideration was given to biochemical etiopathogenesis of hepatoxicity: oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and impaired homeostasis of calcium ions and glutathione. Basic principles were also discussed of conservative treatment in hepatic encephalopathy due to toxic liver necrosis. PMID:14569886

  9. Clinical Research in Acute Fatal Illness: Lessons From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Clinical research to evaluate the effectiveness of life support systems in acute fatal illness has unique problems of logistics, ethics, and consent. There have been 10 prospective comparative trials of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in acute fatal respiratory failure, utilizing different study designs. The trial designs were prospective controlled randomized, prospective adaptive randomized, sequential, and matched pairs. The trials were reviewed with regard to logistics, ethics, consent, statistical methods, economics, and impact. The matched pairs method is the best study design for evaluation of life support systems in acute fatal illness. PMID:25223826

  10. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  11. [Critical evaluation and predictive value of clinical presentation in out-patients with acute community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Mayaud, C; Fartoukh, M; Prigent, H; Parrot, A; Cadranel, J

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic probability of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends on data related to age and clinical and radiological findings. The critical evaluation of data in the literature leads to the following conclusions: 1) the prevalence of CAP in a given population with acute respiratory disease is 5% in outpatients and 10% in an emergency care unit. This could be as low as 2% in young people and even higher than 40% in hospitalized elderly patients; 2) the collection of clinical data is linked to the way the patient is examined and to the expertise of the clinician. The absolute lack of "vital signs" has a good negative predictive value in CAP; presence of unilateral crackles has a good positive predictive value; 3) there is a wide range of X-ray abnormalities: localized alveolar opacities; interstitial opacities, limited of diffused. The greatest radiological difficulties are encountered in old people with disorders including chronic respiratory or cardiac opacities and as a consequence of the high prevalence of bronchopneumonia episodes at this age; 4) among patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT) infections, the blood levels of leukocytes, CRP and procalcitonine are higher in CAP patients, mainly when their disease has a bacterial origin. Since you have not a threshold value reliably demonstrated in large populations with LRT infections or acute respiratory disease, presence or absence of these parameters could only be taken as a slight hint for a CAP diagnosis. PMID:17084571

  12. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  13. The clinical presentation and management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dobson, R; Burgess, M I; Pritchard, D M; Cuthbertson, D J

    2014-04-15

    Carcinoid heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Although cases of carcinoid syndrome and severe carcinoid heart disease requiring urgent intervention are well described, many patients with significant carcinoid heart disease may have insidious symptoms or even be asymptomatic. As haemodynamically significant carcinoid heart disease may be clinically silent, specific and individualised considerations must be made as to the most appropriate clinical criteria and time point at which surgical valve replacement should be undertaken in patients with carcinoid heart disease. PMID:24636550

  14. Acute dermatitis in farmed trout: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Peeler, E J; Ryder, D; Thrush, M A; Mewett, J; Hulland, J; Feist, S W

    2014-12-01

    A new skin condition, known as puffy skin disease (PSD), emerged in farmed rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) in 2002. The number of new cases increased considerably from 2006. Clinical signs include white or grey skin patches, which become raised and red with excessive mucous production and scale loss. Fish are inappetant and lose condition. Histologically, the key feature is epithelial hyperplasia. We undertook a questionnaire study of trout farmers in England and Wales to investigate prevalence and risk factors. PSD was reported on 37% (n = 49) of rainbow trout sites, located in 28 river catchments. The increase in cases from 2006 onwards was mirrored by the increase in red mark syndrome (RMS). Prevalence and severity of PSD were highest in the summer months. The presence of PSD was associated with RMS (OR = 9.7, P < 0.001). Sites receiving live rainbow trout in the previous 12 months were considerably more likely to have PSD (OR = 5.3. P < 0.01), which suggests an infectious aetiology. The size of affected fish and prevalence varied between farms, indicating that farm-level factors are important. Future research should further investigate the aetiology of PSD and practices to manage the disease. PMID:24720525

  15. [Castleman's disease: considerations on a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Spaghi, A; Costa, D; Gangarossa, I; Albergati, M G; Castoldi, O; Nastasi, G

    1989-01-01

    A case of a patient with angiofollicular lymph-node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease), of the plasma cell type, is described. The course of the disease evolved from an unilateral inguinal adenopathy to a generalised intraabdominal adenopathy which took the patient to death. Diagnostic and therapeutic aspects are discussed. PMID:2739529

  16. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) registry--leading the charge for National Cardiovascular Disease (NCVD) Database.

    PubMed

    Chin, S P; Jeyaindran, S; Azhari, R; Wan Azman, W A; Omar, I; Robaayah, Z; Sim, K H

    2008-09-01

    Coronary artery disease is one of the most rampant non-communicable diseases in the world. It begins indolently as a fatty streak in the lining of the artery that soon progresses to narrow the coronary arteries and impair myocardial perfusion. Often the atherosclerotic plaque ruptures and causes sudden thrombotic occlusion and acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI) or unstable angina (UA). This phenomenon is called acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and is the leading cause of death not only in Malaysia but also globally. In order for us to tackle this threat to the health of our nation we must arm ourselves with reliable and accurate information to assess current burden of disease resources available and success of current strategies. The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) registry is the flagship of the National Cardiovascular Disease Database (NCVD) and is the result of the dedicated and untiring efforts of doctors and nurses in both public and private medical institutions and hospitals around the country, ably guided and supported by the National Heart Association, the National Heart Foundation, the Clinical Research Centre and the Ministry of Health of Malaysia. Analyses of data collected throughout 2006 from 3422 patients with ACS admitted to the 12 tertiary cardiac centres and general hospitals spanning nine states in Malaysia in this first report has already revealed surprising results. Mean age of patients was 59 years while the most consistent risk factor for STEMI was active smoking. Utilization of medications was high generally. Thirty-day mortality for STEMI was 11%, for NSTEMI 8% and UA 4%. Thrombolysis (for STEMI only) reduced in-hospital and 30-day mortality by nearly 50%. Percutaneous coronary intervention or PCI also reduced 30-day mortality for patients with non-ST elevation MI and unstable angina. The strongest determinants of mortality appears to be Killip Class and age of the patient. Fewer women received

  17. Bilateral Olecranon Bursitis – A Rare Clinical presentation of Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Deposition Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jignesh; Girishkumar; Mruthyunjaya; Rupakumar, C. S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPPD) is the most common form of crystal arthropathy second only to gout. Common clinical presentation is an acute monoarticular arthritis commonly occurring in knee joints. We presented a case of bilateral olecranon bursitis in a calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Case Report: A 42-year-old female patient is presented with golf ball sized painless swellings in the posterior aspect of her elbows. Elbow joints were clinically normal except for restriction of terminal flexion. X-ray showed mild erosion at the tip of olecranon. Excision biopsy of the swelling showed positive birefringent calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals on the inner wall of the specimen on polarized light microscopy. Conclusion: Bilateral olecranon bursitis may be part of the extraarticular manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease with good prognosis following in toto bursa excision. PMID:27298934

  18. Drugs under preclinical and clinical study for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Joe Antony; Salmani, Jumah Masoud Mohammad; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy has modernized the treatment of both chronic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies and combinational drugs has increased the survival rate of patients. Preclinical studies with various agents have resulted in positive outputs with Phase III trial drugs and monoclonal antibodies entering clinical trials. Most of the monoclonal antibodies target the CD20 and CD22 receptors. This has led to the approval of a few of these drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on the drugs under preclinical and clinical study in the ongoing efforts for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27382259

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of porcine acute phase proteins in meat juice for detecting disease at abattoir.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, A M; Martínez-Subiela, S; Cerón, J J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate whether acute phase protein (APP) determinations could assist Official Veterinarians carrying out work in slaughterhouses. To test this hypothesis, the diagnostic accuracy of APP determinations in meat juice of pigs was analysed to differentiate between healthy and diseased pigs. One hundred and one pigs of two different origins were classified into two groups according to their health status (healthy and diseased pigs), which was determined by a veterinary clinical examination on the farm. To assess the pigs' immune status, against the main porcine diseases, serological analyses were monitored. A general idea of the degree of disease coverage was analysed by examining organ lesions postmortem. Haptoglobin (Hp) and C reactive protein (CRP) were measured in meat juice samples. 72.13 per cent of pigs appeared to be seropositive for the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, and almost 86.2 per cent of them had concomitant infections with other pathogens, such as Porcine circovirus type 2 or Swine influenza virus. Median Hp and CRP concentrations were significantly higher in diseased animals at different stages of the production chain, when compared with levels found in healthy finishing pigs (P<0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed the highest sensitivity-specificity pairs, nearly 80-90 per cent, at cut-off levels of 83 and 10 µg/ml for Hp and CRP determinations, respectively, with high AUCs 0.9. This cut-off could be useful for veterinary inspections at the time of slaughter, to differentiate between the carcase of a healthy animal and the carcase of an animal suffering from a systemic disease, which should be completely condemned. PMID:26101294

  20. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, S.; Nasir, K.; Drohlia, M. F.; Salman, B.; Ahmad, A.

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  1. Frequency of kidney diseases and clinical indications of pediatric renal biopsy: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, S; Nasir, K; Drohlia, M F; Salman, B; Ahmad, A

    2016-01-01

    Kidney biopsy occupies a fundamental position in the management of kidney diseases. There are very few renal pathology studies available in the literature from developing world. This study scrutinized the frequency and clinicopathological relationship of kidney biopsies done at the kidney center from 1997 to 2013 amongst pediatric patients. Kidney allograft biopsy were excluded. The specimen was examined under light microscopy and immunofluorescence while electron microscopy was not done. The study includes 423 patients, mean age was 10.48 ± 4.58 years, males 245 (57.9%) were more than females 178 (42.1%). Nephrotic syndrome 314 (74.2%) was the most common clinical presentation followed by acute nephritic syndrome 35 (8.3%) and acute renal failure 24 (5.7%). Primary glomerulonephritis (PGN) was the most common group of diseases, seen in 360 (85.1%) followed by secondary glomerulonephritis (SGN) in 27 (6.4%) and tubulointerstitial nephritis in 21 (5.0%). Among PGN, minimal change disease (MCD) was the most dominant disease, with 128 (30.3%) cases followed by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis FSGS in 109 (25.8%) and membranous glomerulonephropathy in 27 (6.4%). Lupus nephritis (LN) was the leading cause of glomerular disease in SGN followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome. In conclusion, MCD is the most common histological finding, especially in younger children and FSGS is second to it. SGN is rare, and the most common disease in this category is LN while tubulointerstitial and vascular diseases are infrequent. PMID:27194835

  2. ACG Clinical Guideline: Management of Patients With Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Strate, Lisa L; Gralnek, Ian M

    2016-04-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based on clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high- and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 h of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high-risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection, or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, computed tomographic angiography, and angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding, particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis) should generally resume aspirin as soon as possible after bleeding ceases and at least within 7 days. The

  3. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers.

    PubMed

    Levine, John E; Hogan, William J; Harris, Andrew C; Litzow, Mark R; Efebera, Yvonne A; Devine, Steven M; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L M

    2014-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD. PMID:25455279

  4. Improved accuracy of acute graft-versus-host disease staging among multiple centers

    PubMed Central

    Levine, John E.; Hogan, William J.; Harris, Andrew C.; Litzow, Mark R.; Efebera, Yvonne A.; Devine, Steven M.; Reshef, Ran; Ferrara, James L.M.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical staging of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) varies significantly among bone marrow transplant (BMT) centers, but adherence to long-standing practices poses formidable barriers to standardization among centers. We have analyzed the sources of variability and developed a web-based remote data entry system that can be used by multiple centers simultaneously and that standardizes data collection in key areas. This user-friendly, intuitive interface resembles an online shopping site and eliminates error-prone entry of free text with drop-down menus and pop-up detailed guidance available at the point of data entry. Standardized documentation of symptoms and therapeutic response reduces errors in grade assignment and allows creation of confidence levels regarding the diagnosis. Early review and adjudication of borderline cases improves consistency of grading and further enhances consistency among centers. If this system achieves widespread use it may enhance the quality of data in multicenter trials to prevent and treat acute GVHD. PMID:25455279

  5. Acute Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, Lara; Lemiale, Virginie; Lapidus, Nathanael; Lorillon, Gwenael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD) may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce. Patients and Methods Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression. Results Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT) fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) (1.20–17.33); OR, 7.68; (1.78–33.22) and OR 10.60; (2.25–49.97) respectively). Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005–0.21)). In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality. Conclusion Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival. PMID:25115557

  6. BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia: a new entity? Analysis of clinical and molecular features.

    PubMed

    Neuendorff, Nina Rosa; Burmeister, Thomas; Dörken, Bernd; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare subtype of AML that is now included as a provisional entity in the 2016 revised WHO classification of myeloid malignancies. Since a clear distinction between de novo BCR-ABL+ AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blast crisis is challenging in many cases, the existence of de novo BCR-ABL+ AML has been a matter of debate for a long time. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that BCR-ABL+ AML is in fact a distinct subgroup of AML. In this study, we analyzed all published cases since 1975 as well as cases from our institution in order to present common clinical and molecular features of this rare disease. Our analysis shows that BCR-ABL predominantly occurs in AML-NOS, CBF leukemia, and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The most common BCR-ABL transcripts (p190 and p210) are nearly equally distributed. Based on the analysis of published data, we provide a clinical algorithm for the initial differential diagnosis of BCR-ABL+ AML. The prognosis of BCR-ABL+ AML seems to depend on the cytogenetic and/or molecular background rather than on BCR-ABL itself. A therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib is reasonable, but-due to a lack of systematic clinical data-their use cannot be routinely recommended in first-line therapy. Beyond first-line treatment of AML, the use of TKI remains an individual decision, both in combination with intensive chemotherapy and/or as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each single case, potential benefits have to be weighed against potential risks. PMID:27297971

  7. Consensus diagnostic histopathological criteria for acute gastrointestinal graft versus host disease improve interobserver reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Andreas; Mottok, Anja; Mesteri, Ildiko; Cardona, Diana M; Janin, Anne; Kühl, Anja A; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Brunner, Andrea; Shulman, Howard M; Negri, Giovanni; Tzankov, Alexandar; Huber, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD) is a clinically important complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Its diagnosis relies on clinical and histopathological findings. In order to evaluate and improve inter-institutional diagnostic agreement on histological diagnosis and grading of acute gastrointestinal GvHD, we conducted a round robin test, which included 33 biopsies from 23 patients after HSCT. Five pathologists from different institutions independently evaluated the original sections from the biopsies submitted for diagnosis. Based on their results, consensus qualitative criteria for the assessment of typical histological features of GvHD (e.g., apoptosis, crypt destruction, mucosa denudation) were proposed, including detailed descriptions as well as histological images. In a second round robin test with involvement of the same pathologists, the reproducibility of both diagnosis and grading had improved. Remaining differences were mostly related to differential diagnostic considerations, including viral infection or toxic side effects of medication, which should be resolved by integrating histopathological findings with proper clinical information. PMID:26164839

  8. The acute cardiorenal syndrome: burden and mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Nijst, Petra; Mullens, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Worsening renal function during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure, so-called acute cardio-renal syndrome, is very common and complicates the treatment course. The underlying pathophysiology of worsening renal function (WRF) involves variable contributions of renal hemodynamics, neurohormonal activity, and oxidative stress. Historically, WRF has been associated with adverse outcomes. However, emerging data support therapeutic strategies that permit WRF while effectively treating congestion as they are associated with improved outcomes. PMID:25135470

  9. Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young Ju; Hyun, Myung Chul; Choi, Bong Seok; Chun, So Young; Cho, Min Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery. PMID:25120320

  10. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    PubMed

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications. PMID:24667111

  11. Relaxin for the Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Pharmacology, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tien M H; Goland, Sorel; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity, and its treatment requires an increasing investment of the health care system. Whereas success in treating chronic heart failure has been achieved over the last decades, several pharmacological approaches for acute heart failure have been introduced but have failed to demonstrate any clinical benefit. Serelaxin is a recombinant human relaxin-2 vasoactive peptide that causes systemic and renal vasodilation. Data suggest that the clinical benefits may be attributable to a potential combination of multiple actions of serelaxin, including improving systemic, cardiac, and renal hemodynamics, and protecting cells and organs from damage via neurohormonal, anti-inflammatory, antiremodeling, antifibrotic, anti-ischemic, and proangiogenic effects. Recently, a number of clinical trials have demonstrated that serelaxin infusion over 48 hours improved dyspnea with more rapid relief of congestion during the first days after admission for heart failure. In addition, administration of serelaxin diminished cardiac, renal, and hepatic damage, which were associated with improved long-term mortality. Available data support substantial clinical benefits and significant promise for serelaxin as a treatment option for patients with acute heart failure. This review focuses on the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of serelaxin and provides a detailed discussion of the clinical evidence for this novel therapy in acute heart failure. PMID:26331289

  12. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  13. [Clinical manifestations of adult celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Malamut, G; Cellier, C

    2013-06-01

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy due to gluten intake in genetically predisposed persons (HLA DQ2/DQ8). Celiac disease occurs in adults and children at rates approaching 1% of population in Europe and USA. Celiac disease is extremely various and anaemia, oral aphthous stomatis, amenorrhea or articular symptoms may be the only revealing symptoms. Diagnosis releases on evidence of histological villous atrophy in proximal small bowel and presence of specific serum antibodies. Treatment relies on eviction of gluten. Gluten free diet allows prevention of malignant complications such as small bowel adenocarcinoma and lymphoma and osteopenia. The main cause of resistance to gluten free diet is its bad observance. On the contrary, serious complications of celiac disease, such as clonal refractory celiac sprue and intestinal T-cell lymphoma need to be screen. PMID:21621928

  14. The clinical examination for neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Glass, Eric N; Kent, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Neuromuscular disease can present even the most astute clinician with a challenging diagnostic dilemma. This article focuses on the neuroanatomy and the historical, physical, and neurologic examination findings observed in many of the neuromuscular disorders affecting dogs and cats. In addition, some common laboratory tests and imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease, including routine radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, are discussed. A brief discussion of sensory nerve disorders is also presented. PMID:11785724

  15. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  16. Perihepatic nodes detected by point-of-care ultrasound in acute hepatitis and acute-on-chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Feng, I Che; Wang, Szu Jen; Sheu, Ming Jen; Koay, Lok-Beng; Lin, Ching Yih; Ho, Chung Han; Sun, Chi Shu; Kuo, Hsing Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the manifestations of perihepatic lymph nodes during the episode of acute hepatitis flare by point-of-care ultrasonography. METHODS: One hundred and seventy-six patients with an episode of acute hepatitis flare (ALT value > 5 × upper normal limit) were enrolled retrospectively. Diagnosis of etiology of the acute hepatitis flare was based on chart records and serological and virological assays. The patients were categorized into two groups (viral origin and non-viral origin) and further defined into ten subgroups according to the etiologies. An ultrasonograpy was performed within 2 h to 72 h (median, 8 h). The maximum size of each noticeable lymph node was measured. Correlation between clinical parameters and nodal manifestations was analyzed RESULTS: Enlarged lymph nodes (width ≥ 5mm) were noticeable in 110 (62.5%) patients, mostly in acute on chronic hepatitis B (54.5%). The viral group had a higher prevalence rate (89/110 = 80.9%) and larger nodal size (median, 7 mm) than those of the non-viral group (21/66 = 31.8%; median, 0 mm) (P < 0.001 for both). Meanwhile, there were significant differences in the nodal size between acute and chronic viral groups (P < 0.01), and between acute hepatitis A and non-hepatitis A viral groups (P < 0.001). In logistical regression analysis, the nodal width still showed strong significance in multivariate analysis (P < 0.0001) to stratify the two groups. The area under the curve of ROC was 0.805, with a sensitivity of 80.9%, a specificity of 68.2%, positive predictive value of 80.92%, negative predictive value of 68.18%, and an accuracy of 76.14%. CONCLUSION: Point-of-care ultrasonography to detect perihepatic nodal change is valuable for clarifying the etiologies in an episode of acute hepatitis flare. PMID:26640338

  17. A review of unilateral acute idiopatic maculopathy related to hand-foot-mouth disease with a representative case.

    PubMed

    Duman, Reşat; Duman, Nilay; Kutluksaman, Bünyamin; Çetinkaya, Ersan; İnan, Sibel; İnan, Ümit Übeyt

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review unilateral acute maculopathy associated with hand-foot-mouth disease with a representative case. Clinical course of a 24-year-old male case with unilateral acute idiopatic maculopathy documented by multimodal imaging is presented, and a review of similar cases is given. On initial examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/200 in the left eye. Fundoscopy revealed grayish-yellowish subretinal exudate, and fluorescein angiography demonstrated irregular mottled hyperfluorescence at the central macula. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography demonstrated disruption of ellipsoid layer, which partially resolved on follow-up examinations. Best-corrected visual acuity increased to 20/20 at 3 months, with persistent retinal changes, and mild disruption of ellipsoid layer and persistent mild metamorphopsia. Although hand-foot-mouth disease is usually benign and self-limited in childhood, it may be rarely associated with unilateral vision loss due to maculopathy, especially at early adulthood in both sexes. Vision loss associated with this eruption is acute and reversible in most cases, despite some residual pigmentary and scarring changes in all cases and persistent mild visual loss in some cases. Exact pathophysiology, the causes of variability of clinical features, adulthood onset, unilateral involvement, and role of multimodal imaging are issues which need to be clarified with further research. PMID:26494476

  18. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  19. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  20. Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and Cardiovascular Diseases: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Medić, Branislava; Rovčanin, Branislav; Basta Jovanović, Gordana; Radojević-Škodrić, Sanja; Prostran, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent findings concerning pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies, cardiovascular disease (CVD) still stays the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal dysfunction, especially acute kidney injury (AKI). Early detection of patients with impaired renal function with cardiovascular risk may help ensure more aggressive treatment and improve clinical outcome. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a new, promising marker of kidney damage which is currently the focus of countless studies worldwide. Some recent animal and human studies established KIM-1 as an important marker of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and reliable predictor of development and prognosis of AKI. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in USA acclaimed KIM-1 as an AKI biomarker for preclinical drug development. Recent data suggest the importance of monitoring of KIM-1 for early diagnosis and clinical course not only in patients with various forms of AKI and other renal diseases but also in patients with cardiorenal syndrome, heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiothoracic surgical interventions in the pediatric emergency setting, and so forth. The aim of this review article is to summarize the literature data concerning KIM-1 as a potential novel marker in the early diagnosis and prediction of clinical outcome of certain cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26697493

  1. Cardiorenal syndrome: acute kidney injury secondary to cardiovascular disease and role of protein-bound uraemic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Krum, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and kidney disease are closely interrelated. Disease of one organ can induce dysfunction of the other, ultimately leading to failure of both. Clinical awareness of synergistic adverse clinical outcomes in patients with coexisting CVD and kidney disease or ‘cardiorenal syndrome (CRS)’ has existed. Renal dysfunction, even mild, is a strong independent predictor for poor prognosis in CVD patients. Developing therapeutic interventions targeting acute kidney injury (AKI) has been limited due mainly to lack of effective tools to accurately detect AKI in a timely manner. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and kidney injury molecule-1 have been recently demonstrated to be potential candidate biomarkers in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, further validation of AKI biomarkers is needed in other CVD settings, especially acute decompensated heart failure and acute myocardial infarction where AKI commonly occurs. The other concern with regard to understanding the pathogenesis of renal complications in CVD is that mechanistically oriented studies have been relatively rare. Pre-clininal studies have shown that activation of renal inflammation–fibrosis processes, probably triggered by haemodynamic derangement, underlies CVD-associated renal dysfunction. On the other hand, it is postulated that there still are missing links in the heart–kidney connection in CRS patients who have significant renal dysfunction. At present, non-dialysable protein-bound uraemic toxins (PBUTs) appear to be the main focus in this regard. Evidence of the causal role of PBUTs in CRS has been increasingly demonstrated, mainly focusing on indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS). Both IS and pCS are derived from colonic microbiotic metabolism of dietary amino acids, and hence the colon has become a target of treatment in addition to efforts to improve dialysis techniques for better removal of PBUTs. Novel therapy targeting the site of toxin

  2. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  3. Clinical Trials in Rare Disease: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Erika F.; Adams, Heather R.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses constitute one of many groups of rare childhood diseases for which disease-modifying treatments are non-existent. Disease-specific barriers to therapeutic success include incomplete understanding of disease pathophysiology and limitations of treatments that cannot adequately cross the blood-brain barrier to access the central nervous system. Therapeutic development in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses shares many challenges with other rare diseases, such as incomplete understanding of natural history to inform trial design, need for alternatives to the randomized controlled clinical trial, requirement for more sensitive outcome measures to quantify disease, limited access to resources required to mount a clinical trial (including funding), and difficulties of recruiting a small sample to participation. Solutions to these barriers will require multicenter collaboration, partnership with patient organizations, training a new generation of researchers interested in rare diseases, and leveraging existing resources. PMID:24014509

  4. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  5. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: report of five cases and systematic review of clinical and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, C; Derlino, F; Brazzelli, V; D'Ospina, R D; Borroni, G

    2014-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare, drug-related pustular eruption usually starting from folds with edema and erythema and with subsequent spreading. Clinically AGEP is characterized by the sudden appearance of dozen of sterile, non follicular, small pustules on erythematous and edematous skin. Mild non erosive mucosal involvement, mostly oral, may sometimes occur. Fever, neutrophilia and peripheral blood eosinophilia (in a third of patients) are present. Other skin signs such as facial edema, purpura, target-like lesions and blisters have been described but are not typical for AGEP. Diagnostic criteria for AGEP were established by an international committee of experts, the European Study of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions (EuroSCAR). The most relevant histopathological feature is represented by the detection of non-follicular subcorneal and/or intracorneal spongiform pustules that are usually large, contiguous and tend to coalesce. After elimination of the causative drug, pustules usually spontaneously disappear in a few days with desquamation and the reaction fully resolves within 15 days. Internal organs are not usually involved and no systemic treatment is required. Withdrawal of the culprit drug is mandatory. Although AGEP is a self-limiting disease with a favourable prognosis, secondary infections are a not infrequent complication in patients in poor general medical conditions. The reported mortality is about 5%. The most severe cases are associated with drug rechallenge. PMID:24819755

  6. Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease: Novel Biological Insights.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Takanori; Reddy, Pavan; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent insights into intestinal homeostasis and uncovering of new pathways and targets have greatly reconciled our understanding of GVHD pathophysiology and will reshape contemporary GVHD prophylaxis and treatment. Gastrointestinal (GI) GVHD is the major cause of mortality. Emerging data indicate that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their niche Paneth cells are targeted, resulting in dysregulation of the intestinal homeostasis and microbial ecology. The microbiota and their metabolites shape the immune system and intestinal homeostasis, and they may alter host susceptibility to GVHD. Protection of the ISC niche system and modification of the intestinal microbiota and metabolome to restore intestinal homeostasis may, thus, represent a novel approach to modulate GVHD and infection. Damage to the intestine plays a central role in amplifying systemic GVHD by propagating a proinflammatory cytokine milieu. Molecular targeting to inhibit kinase signaling may be a promising approach to treat GVHD, ideally via targeting the redundant effect of multiple cytokines on immune cells and enterocytes. In this review, we discuss insights on the biology of GI GVHD, interaction of microflora and metabolome with the hosts, identification of potential new target organs, and identification and targeting of novel T cell-signaling pathways. Better understanding of GVHD biology will, thus, pave a way to develop novel treatment strategies with great clinical benefits. PMID:26453971

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Silk Patch in Acute Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Joong Seob; Kim, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The silk patch is a thin transparent patch that is produced from silk fibroin. In this study, we investigated the treatment effects of the silk patch in patients with traumatic tympanic membrane perforation (TTMP). Methods The closure rate, otorrhea rate, and closure time in all patients and the closure time in successful patients were compared between the paper patch and silk patch groups. Results Demographic data (gender, site, age, traumatic duration, preoperative air-bone gap, and perforation size and location) were not significantly different between the two groups. The closure rate and otorrhea rate were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the closure time was different between the two groups (closure time of all patients, P=0.031; closure time of successful patients, P=0.037). Conclusion The silk patch which has transparent, elastic, adhesive, and hyper-keratinizing properties results in a more efficient closure time than the paper patch in the treatment of TTMP patients. We therefore believe that the silk patch should be recommended for the treatment of acute tympanic membrane perforation. PMID:26045909

  8. Relation of metabolic syndrome with long-term mortality in acute and stable coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Yaron; Havakuk, Ofer; Halkin, Amir; Revivo, Miri; Berliner, Shlomo; Herz, Itzhak; Weiss-Meilik, Ahuva; Sagy, Yael; Keren, Gad; Finkelstein, Ariel; Banai, Shmuel

    2015-02-01

    Past studies examining the effects of the metabolic syndrome (MS) on prognosis in postangiography patients were limited in size or were controversial in results. The aim of the study was to examine the association of the MS and the risk for long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients undergoing coronary angiography for various clinical indications. Medical history, physical examination, and laboratory values were used to diagnose patients with the MS. Cox regression models were used to analyze the effect of MS on long-term all-cause mortality. We prospectively recruited 3,525 consecutive patients with a mean age of 66 ± 22 years (range 24 to 97) and 72% men. Thirty percent of the cohort had MS. Patients with MS were more likely to have advanced coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome (p <0.001). Patients with MS had more abnormalities in their metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers regardless of their clinical presentation. A total of 495 deaths occurred during a mean follow-up period of 1,614 ± 709 days (median 1,780, interquartile range 1,030 to 2,178). MS was associated with an increased risk of death in the general cohort (hazard ratio [HR] 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 1.56, p = 0.02). MS had a significant effect on mortality in stable patients (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.18, p = 0.01), whereas it did not have a significant effect on mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.44, p = 0.42). In conclusion, MS is associated with increased mortality in postangiography patients. Its adverse outcome is mainly seen in patients with stable angina. PMID:25499926

  9. Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

  10. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  11. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  12. Bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology (BCIDO) dataset.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Claire L; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the Bacterial Infectious Diseases Ontology (BCIDO) dataset related to research published in http:dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.jbi.2015.07.014 [1], and contains the Protégé OWL files required to run BCIDO in the Protégé environment. BCIDO contains 1719 classes and 39 object properties. PMID:27508237

  13. Haemophilus haemolyticus Isolates Causing Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Briere, Elizabeth C.; Katz, Lee S.; Cohn, Amanda C.; Clark, Thomas A.; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    We report seven cases of Haemophilus haemolyticus invasive disease detected in the United States, which were previously misidentified as nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. All cases had different symptoms and presentations. Our study suggests that a testing scheme that includes reliable PCR assays and standard microbiological methods should be used in order to improve H. haemolyticus identification. PMID:22573587

  14. EEG in ischaemic stroke: quantitative EEG can uniquely inform (sub-)acute prognoses and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Finnigan, Simon; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of (sub-)acute ischaemic stroke (IS) employing quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) methods, in concert with other assessments, are reviewed. Numerous outcomes from hundreds of patients collectively indicate that (sub-)acute QEEG indices from standard systems can uniquely inform clinical management, particularly prognostication of outcomes from IS. Two classes of QEEG indices have proven particularly informative. The first quantifies the power of abnormal, slow activity relative to that of faster activity and the second, interhemispheric voltage asymmetry (broadband). Both have been identified as statistically significant predictors of outcomes assessed (via routine clinical scales) in the weeks and months following IS. Furthermore both have demonstrated higher predictive value than concomitant neurological assessments and scales, and to improve upon outcome prediction afforded by neuroimaging alone. These indices also may continuously provide unique, real-time insights into the efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, prior to clinical changes. Two key applications of QEEG which should prove valuable for future clinical management of IS are: (1) continuous, acute monitoring to inform about the efficacy of thrombolysis and decisions about potential additional interventions, and; (2) brief, subacute recording to inform outcome prognostication and clinical decisions about, for example, rehabilitation strategies. Ongoing research and technological developments will continue to facilitate clinical translation of QEEG investigations reviewed herein. PMID:22858178

  15. Gaining entry-level clinical competence outside of the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne; Taper, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, an emphasis has been placed on dietetic interns' attainment of entry-level clinical competence in acute care facilities. The perceived risks and benefits of acquiring entry-level clinical competence within long-term and acute care clinical environments were examined. The study included a purposive sample of recent graduates and dietitians (n=14) involved in an integrated internship program. Study subjects participated in in-depth individual interviews. Data were thematically analyzed with the support of data management software QSR N6. Perceived risks and benefits were associated with receiving clinical training exclusively in either environment; risks in one area surfaced as benefits in the other. Themes that emerged included philosophy of care, approach to practice, working environment, depth and breadth of experience, relationships (both client and professional), practice outcomes, employment opportunities, and attitude. Entry-level clinical competence is achievable in both acute and long-term care environments; however, attention must be paid to identified risks. Interns who consider gaining clinical competence exclusively in one area can reduce risks and better position themselves for employment in either practice area by incorporating an affiliation in the other area into their internship program. PMID:18334052

  16. One Health and emerging infectious diseases: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Peter; Conti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    To date, there has been little articulation of specific One Health clinical activities for veterinary and human health care providers regarding emerging infectious diseases, yet they could play a critical role. Under current clinical paradigms, both human and animal health professionals routinely diagnose and treat zoonotic infectious diseases in their patients, but tend to work in parallel with little cross-professional communication or coordination of care. For this to evolve toward a One Health model, both types of clinicians need to see how individual cases can be "sentinel events" indicating environmental risk for disease emergence, and develop mechanisms of rapid communication about these risks. Human and animal clinicians also need to take a more proactive and preventive approach to zoonotic diseases that includes the occupational health of animal workers in farms, laboratories, veterinary clinics, and other settings, as well as the recognition of increased risk among immunocompromised individuals in contact with animals. This requires training in One Health clinical competencies including the ability to diagnose and treat zoonotic diseases, implement preventive care interventions for individual patients, provide occupational health services for animal workers, recognize sentinel cases, report cases to public heath and clinical colleagues, and assess and help to intervene with environmental factors driving infectious disease risk in humans and animals. To provide an evidence base for such competency training, there is a need for development and testing of innovative protocols for One Health clinical collaborations. PMID:22976348

  17. Clinical Diagnostic Clues in Crohn's Disease: A 41-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, C.; Galleguillos, L.; Benavides, E.; Quintana, J. C.; Zúñiga, A.; Duarte, I.; Klaassen, J.; Kolbach, M.; Soto, R. M.; Iacobelli, S.; Álvarez, M.; O'Brien, A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data? PMID:23213555

  18. Using Clinical Trial Simulators to Analyse the Sources of Variance in Clinical Trials of Novel Therapies for Acute Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Weverling, Gerrit-Jan; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background About 90% of drugs fail in clinical development. The question is whether trials fail because of insufficient efficacy of the new treatment, or rather because of poor trial design that is unable to detect the true efficacy. The variance of the measured endpoints is a major, largely underestimated source of uncertainty in clinical trial design, particularly in acute viral infections. We use a clinical trial simulator to demonstrate how a thorough consideration of the variability inherent in clinical trials of novel therapies for acute viral infections can improve trial design. Methods and Findings We developed a clinical trial simulator to analyse the impact of three different types of variation on the outcome of a challenge study of influenza treatments for infected patients, including individual patient variability in the response to the drug, the variance of the measurement procedure, and the variance of the lower limit of quantification of endpoint measurements. In addition, we investigated the impact of protocol variation on clinical trial outcome. We found that the greatest source of variance was inter-individual variability in the natural course of infection. Running a larger phase II study can save up to $38 million, if an unlikely to succeed phase III trial is avoided. In addition, low-sensitivity viral load assays can lead to falsely negative trial outcomes. Conclusions Due to high inter-individual variability in natural infection, the most important variable in clinical trial design for challenge studies of potential novel influenza treatments is the number of participants. 100 participants are preferable over 50. Using more sensitive viral load assays increases the probability of a positive trial outcome, but may in some circumstances lead to false positive outcomes. Clinical trial simulations are powerful tools to identify the most important sources of variance in clinical trials and thereby help improve trial design. PMID:27332704

  19. The Effects of Acute Blood Loss for Diagnostic Bloodwork and Fluid Replacement in Clinically Ill Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marx, James O; Jensen, JanLee A; Seelye, Stacie; Walton, Raquel M; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great value of diagnostic bloodwork for identifying disease in animals, the volume of blood required for these analyses limits its use in laboratory mice, particularly when they are clinically ill. We sought to determine the effects of acute blood loss (ABL) following blood collection for diagnostic bloodwork in healthy mice compared with streptozotocin-induced diabetic and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-treated dehydrated mice. ABL caused several mild changes in the control mice, with significant decreases in body weight, temperature, and activity in both experimental groups; increased dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice; and a significant drop in the blood pressure of the diabetic mice. To determine whether these negative outcomes could be ameliorated, we treated mice with intraperitoneal lactated Ringers solution either immediately after or 30 min before ABL. Notably, preABL administration of fluids helped prevent the worsening of the dehydration and azotemia in the DSS-treated mice and the changes in blood pressure in the diabetic mice. However, fluid administration provided no benefit in control of blood pressure when administered after ABL in the diabetic mice. Furthermore, fluid therapy did not prevent ABL-induced drops in body weight and activity. Although one mouse not receiving fluid therapy became moribund at the 24-h time point, no animals died during the 24-h study. This investigation demonstrates that blood for diagnostic bloodwork can be collected safely from clinically ill mice and that preemptive fluid therapy mitigates some of the negative changes associated with this blood loss. PMID:26141445

  20. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome. PMID:26209500

  1. Relationship between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Cui, Meng-Meng; Fan, Da; Zhang, De-Shan; Lian, Hui-Xin; Yin, Zhao-Yin; Li, Jin

    2015-03-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon in which dry particulate pollutants obscure the sky. Haze has been associated with chronic diseases, but its relationship with acute diseases is less clear. We aimed to determine the association between haze and acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, in order to determine the influence of haze on human health. We compared the number of cases of acute cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases in Beijing Emergency Center between 2006 and 2013, with haze data from Beijing Observatory. The relationship between the number of hazy days and the number of cases of the above types of diseases was analyzed using univariate analyses. Both the number of cases and the number of hazy days showed a rising trend. The average number of cases per day for all three diseases was higher on hazy days than on non-hazy days. There was a positive correlation between the number of hazy days and the number of cases, and this correlation showed a hysteretic quality. Haze has an influence on acute cardiovascular (CVDs), cerebrovascular (CBDs), and respiratory system (RSDs) diseases. Haze seems to have an additive effect, since the associations between haze and number of cases were stronger in the following month than in the preceding month. The increasing trend in the number of hazy days might worsen the problem of haze-related diseases. PMID:25292298

  2. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  3. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor.

  4. [The acute visual hallucinosis in infancy. Clinical, neurophysiological and psychodevelopmental aspects and differential typology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Eggers, C

    1975-09-01

    By introducing the definition "hallucinosis" (Wernicke) it has become possible to confine the psychoses of organic origin more closely. Therefore, this term should also be used in pediatry and pedopsychiatry in order to designate cases with corresponding clinical aspects. Thus, accordance to the phenomenological characteristics of such syndromes as described in this paper, it is justified to emphasize that the acute hallucinosis in children is a special type of disease as compared to other psychoses caused by exogenic influences in this age group. The 10 case reports deal with visual hallucinoses which turned out to be characteristically different compared to those in adults. Hallucinating children at the age of 3 to 9 years predominantly visualized animals and legendary beings. Contrary to findings in adults, scenic and systematized visions were scarcely noticed, which psychodevelopmentally may be attributed to the fact that creative power in children is still little pronounced. Etiologically intoxications and infectious diseases were the cause for the visual hallucinations of the 10 children described. In the development of visual hallucinations somatic and psychic factors are significant. They have been discussed on the basis of today's knowledge. As today, however, there exists no satisfactory theory concerning the conditions favoring the development of hallucinations. To explain the somatogenesis of visual hallucinations three theories have been outlined, based on the present neurophysiological findings. It has been worked out that especially in children emotion plays an essential role in the origin of hallucinations. In infancy and early school age, while rational control of reality is still suppressed to a great extent, domination of emotional life goes along with lack of differentiation. At the same time the difference between imagination and perception is still little precise; therefore, phenomena, impressing as hallucinations in the adult, occur with

  5. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K.; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. Since the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers prior to the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multi-national, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  6. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jane S; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P

    2010-11-15

    The basic aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. As the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers before the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multinational, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow-up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  7. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha M.; Ghanem, Khalil G.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Wright, Scott M.; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  8. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha M; Ghanem, Khalil G; Auwaerter, Paul G; Wright, Scott M; Melia, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  9. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  10. Machine learning on Parkinson's disease? Let's translate into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio

    2016-06-15

    Machine learning techniques represent the third-generation of clinical neuroimaging studies where the principal interest is not related to describe anatomical changes of a neurological disorder, but to evaluate if a multivariate approach may use these abnormalities to predict the correct classification of previously unseen clinical cohort. In the next few years, Machine learning will revolutionize clinical practice of Parkinson's disease, but enthusiasm should be turned down before removing some important barriers. PMID:26743974

  11. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  12. Ebola virus disease candidate vaccines under evaluation in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen A; Jahrling, Peter B; Bavari, Sina; Kuhn, Jens H

    2016-09-01

    Filoviruses are the etiological agents of two human illnesses: Ebola virus disease and Marburg virus disease. Until 2013, medical countermeasure development against these afflictions was limited to only a few research institutes worldwide as both infections were considered exotic due to very low case numbers. Together with the high case-fatality rate of both diseases, evaluation of any candidate countermeasure in properly controlled clinical trials seemed impossible. However, in 2013, Ebola virus was identified as the etiological agent of a large disease outbreak in Western Africa including almost 30,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths, including case exportations to Europe and North America. These large case numbers resulted in medical countermeasure development against Ebola virus disease becoming a global public-health priority. This review summarizes the status quo of candidate vaccines against Ebola virus disease, with a focus on those that are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27160784

  13. Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update.

    PubMed

    Holtan, Shernan G; Pasquini, Marcelo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2014-07-17

    Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need. PMID:24914140

  14. Acute graft-versus-host disease: a bench-to-bedside update

    PubMed Central

    Holtan, Shernan G.; Pasquini, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, many novel approaches to early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) have been translated from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight recent discoveries in the context of current aGVHD care. The most significant innovations that have already reached the clinic are prophylaxis strategies based upon a refinement of our understanding of key sensors, effectors, suppressors of the immune alloreactive response, and the resultant tissue damage from the aGVHD inflammatory cascade. In the near future, aGVHD prevention and treatment will likely involve multiple modalities, including small molecules regulating immunologic checkpoints, enhancement of suppressor cytokines and cellular subsets, modulation of the microbiota, graft manipulation, and other donor-based prophylaxis strategies. Despite long-term efforts, major challenges in treatment of established aGVHD still remain. Resolution of inflammation and facilitation of rapid immune reconstitution in those with only a limited response to corticosteroids is a research arena that remains rife with opportunity and urgent clinical need. PMID:24914140

  15. Extracoporeal photopheresis treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Flinn, Aisling M.; Gennery, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) continues to be a major obstacle to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thymic damage secondary to aGvHD along with corticosteroids and other non-selective T lymphocyte-suppressive agents used in the treatment of aGvHD concurrently impair thymopoiesis and negatively impact on immunoreconstitution of the adaptive immune compartment and ultimately adversely affect clinical outcome. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an alternative therapeutic strategy that appears to act in an immunomodulatory fashion, potentially involving regulatory T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. By promoting immune tolerance and simultaneously avoiding systemic immunosuppression, ECP could reduce aGvHD and enable a reduction in other immunosuppression, allowing thymic recovery, restoration of normal T lymphopoiesis, and complete immunoreconstitution with improved clinical outcome. Although the safety and efficacy of ECP has been demonstrated, further randomised controlled studies are needed as well as elucidation of the underlying mechanisms responsible and the effect of ECP on thymic recovery. PMID:27408705

  16. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kongrueng, J; Yingkajorn, M; Bunpa, S; Sermwittayawong, N; Singkhamanan, K; Vuddhakul, V

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was isolated from shrimp of five farms located in the Pattani and Songkhla provinces of southern Thailand. Using a PCR method targeted to the unique DNA sequences derived from the plasmid (AP2 primers) and the toxin gene (AP3 primers) of V. parahaemolyticus that caused acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), a total of 33 of 108 isolates were positive. In contrast, all 63 and 66 isolates of clinical and environmental V. parahaemolyticus, respectively, obtained previously from 2008 to 2014 from the same area were negative. This implied that these strains were likely to be the cause of the outbreak of AHPND in this area. Intestinal samples proved to be a better source for the isolation of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND than the hepatopancreas. All isolates were investigated for haemolytic activity, virulence genes, serotypes, genotypes and antibiotic susceptibility. All the AHPND isolates had a unique O antigen, but small variations of the K antigens were detected from different farms. In addition, the DNA profiles of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND isolates were similar, but distinct from those clinical and environmental isolates. It is postulated that the causative agent of AHPND might have originated from one clone and then slightly different serotypes subsequently developed. PMID:25287127

  17. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2016-02-01

    No studies to date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and (2) identify biopsychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with SCD. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥ 10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of biopsychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD, with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  18. Minimal residual disease diagnostics in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: need for sensitive, fast, and standardized technologies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Brüggemann, Monika; Orfao, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) has become routine clinical practice in frontline treatment of virtually all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in many adult ALL patients. MRD diagnostics has proven to be the strongest prognostic factor, allowing for risk group assignment into different treatment arms, ranging from significant treatment reduction to mild or strong intensification. Also in relapsed ALL patients and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, MRD diagnostics is guiding treatment decisions. This is also why the efficacy of innovative drugs, such as antibodies and small molecules, are currently being evaluated with MRD diagnostics within clinical trials. In fact, MRD measurements might well be used as a surrogate end point, thereby significantly shortening the follow-up. The MRD techniques need to be sensitive (≤10−4), broadly applicable, accurate, reliable, fast, and affordable. Thus far, flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes (allele-specific oligonucleotide [ASO]-PCR) are claimed to meet these criteria, but classical flow cytometry does not reach a solid 10−4, whereas classical ASO-PCR is time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, 2 high-throughput technologies are being explored, ie, high-throughput sequencing and next-generation (multidimensional) flow cytometry, both evaluating millions of sequences or cells, respectively. Each of them has specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25999452

  19. Use of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Rapid Detection and Serotyping of Acute Respiratory Disease-Associated Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J.; Thach, Dzung; Walter, Elizabeth; Metzgar, David; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The cessation of the adenovirus vaccination program for military trainees has resulted in several recent acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. In the absence of vaccination, rapid detection methods are necessary for the timely implementation of measures to prevent adenovirus transmission within military training facilities. To this end, we have combined a fluorogenic real-time multiplex PCR assay with four sets of degenerate PCR primers that target the E1A, fiber, and hexon genes with a long oligonucleotide microarray capable of identifying the most common adenovirus serotypes associated with adult respiratory tract infections (serotypes 3, 4, 7, 16, and 21) and a representative member of adenovirus subgroup C (serotype 6) that is a common cause of childhood ARD and that often persists into adulthood. Analyses with prototype strains demonstrated unique hybridization patterns for representative members of adenovirus subgroups B1, B2, C, and E, thus allowing serotype determination. Microarray-based sensitivity assessments revealed lower detection limits (between 1 and 100 genomic copies) for adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) and Ad7 cell culture lysates, clinical nasal washes, and throat swabs and purified DNA from clinical samples. When adenovirus was detected from coded clinical samples, the results obtained by this approach demonstrated an excellent concordance with those obtained by the more established method of adenovirus identification as well as by cell culture with fluorescent-antibody staining. Finally, the utility of this method was further supported by its ability to detect adenoviral coinfections, contamination, and, potentially, recombination events. Taken together, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the simple and rapid diagnostic method developed for the unequivocal identification of ARD-associated adenoviral serotypes from laboratory or clinical samples that can be completed in 1.5 to 4.0 h. PMID:15243087

  20. Concise Review: Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease: Immunobiology, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Nelson J.

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention, and treatment of acute GVHD. Specifically, we explain how new discoveries in immunology have expanded our understanding of GVHD, in which tissue damage from chemotherapy or radiation results in cytokine release, which activates T cells, resulting in proliferation and differentiation, trafficking to target organs, and tissue destruction and inflammation. Insights into the mechanisms of this disease relate directly to the development of preventive strategies and therapies, such as immunosuppression, T-cell depletion, calcineurin inhibitors, CCR5 antagonists, gut decontamination, extracorporeal photopheresis, and more. We also discuss how GVHD affects the gut, liver, and skin, as well as diagnosis, grading, and scoring. We end by examining future directions of treatment, including new immunomodulators and biomarkers. Understanding the immunobiology of GVHD and developing effective preventions and treatments are critical to the continuing success of AHSCT. PMID:23283494

  1. Optimizing nonpharmacological management following an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Samantha L; Goldstein, Roger; Desveaux, Laura; Tulloch, Verity; Brooks, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Though the guidelines for the optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following an acute exacerbation (AE) are well established, issues associated with poor adherence to nonpharmacological interventions such as self-management advice and pulmonary rehabilitation will impact on hospital readmission rates and health care costs. Systems developed for clinically stable patients with COPD may not be sufficient for those who are post-exacerbation. A redesign of the manner in which such interventions are delivered to patients following an AECOPD is necessary. Addressing two or more components of the chronic care model is effective in reducing health care utilization in patients with COPD, with self-management support contributing a key role. By refining self-management support to incorporate the identification and treatment of psychological symptoms and by providing health care professionals adequate time and training to deliver respiratory-specific advice and self-management strategies, adherence to nonpharmacological therapies following an AE may be enhanced. Furthermore, following up patients in their own homes allows for the tailoring of advice and for the delivery of consistent health care messages which may enable knowledge to be retained. By refining the delivery of nonpharmacological therapies following an AECOPD according to components of the chronic care model, adherence may be improved, resulting in better disease management and possibly reducing health care utilization. PMID:25378920

  2. Telomere shortening in enterocytes of patients with uncontrolled acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Sebastian; Ventura Ferreira, Mónica S; Heudobler, Daniel; Huber, Elisabeth; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Gremse, Felix; Schmid, Karin; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Ziegler, Patrick; Jost, Edgar; Blasco, Maria A; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Holler, Ernst; Beier, Fabian

    2015-11-26

    Acute intestinal graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) refractory to immunosuppressive treatment is a serious complication after allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The underlying mechanisms of refractory aGVHD of the gut are not fully understood. Although telomere length (TL) reflects the replicative history of a cell, critically short telomeres have been associated with replicative exhaustion and tissue failure. In this study, we demonstrate that enterocytes of patients with refractory intestinal aGVHD show significantly increased proliferation, which translates into significant and critical telomere attrition following HSCT as compared with unaffected patients undergoing HSCT. Calculated telomere loss in aGVHD patients is 190 bp/wk, thereby massively exceeding physiological steady-state TL shortening rates such as in lymphocytes (∼50 bp/y). Our data support the hypothesis that increased compensatory proliferation following continued tissue damage can result in massive telomere loss in enterocytes of aGVHD patients. The present study introduces aGVHD-triggered increased cellular turnover and telomere loss with subsequent replicative exhaustion as a mechanism for refractory gut GVHD that is compatible with the long-term clinical aspect of the disease and provides a basis for stem cell protective therapies in the treatment of aGVHD. PMID:26486788

  3. Acute myocardial ischemia in adults secondary to missed Kawasaki disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Sherif R Y; El Said, Galal; Daniels, Lori B; Burns, Jane C; El Said, Howaida; Sorour, Khaled A; Gharib, Soliman; Gordon, John B

    2015-02-15

    Coronary artery aneurysms that occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki disease (KD) patients may remain clinically silent for decades and then thrombose resulting in myocardial infarction. Although KD is now the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in Asia, the United States, and Western Europe, the incidence of KD in Egypt is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that young adults in Egypt presenting with acute myocardial ischemia may have coronary artery lesions because of KD in childhood. We reviewed a total of 580 angiograms of patients ≤40 years presenting with symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Coronary artery aneurysms were noted in 46 patients (7.9%), of whom 9 presented with myocardial infarction. The likelihood of antecedent KD as the cause of the aneurysms was classified as definite (n = 10), probable (n = 29), or equivocal (n = 7). Compared with the definite and probable groups, the equivocal group had more traditional cardiovascular risk factors, smaller sized aneurysms, and fewer coronary arteries affected. In conclusion, in a major metropolitan center in Egypt, 6.7% of adults aged ≤40 years who underwent angiography for evaluation of possible myocardial ischemia had lesions consistent with antecedent KD. Because of the unique therapeutic challenges associated with these lesions, adult cardiologists should be aware that coronary artery aneurysms in young adults may be because of missed KD in childhood. PMID:25555655

  4. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26264780

  5. Renal and urological diseases of the newborn neonatal acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Kirtida

    2014-01-01

    Survival of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit has improved over the past decades reflecting improvements in obstetric, delivery room and neonatal intensive care, however, morbidity remains significant. Acute kidney injury is a common occurrence in these neonates and despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology and management of acute kidney injury in full term and preterm infants, the mortality remains as high as 61%. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that despite recovery from the acute injury, these infants are at risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease later in life. Emphasis on improving our capability to detect renal insult and injury early, before renal failure occurs, and identification of novel therapeutic agents to prevent and treat acute kidney injury may impact mortality and morbidity. This review focuses on our current knowledge of acute kidney injury in the newborn, approaches to investigating and managing this complication and what future trends in this field may bring. PMID:25088261

  6. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  7. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  8. Clinical, Electroencephalographic, and Neuroradiological Outcome Predictors in Acute Nonhypoxic Encephalopathy: A Nine-Year Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Marked impairment of consciousness, brain lesion on neuroimaging, and nonreactive electroencephalographic (EEG) background activity are established outcome predictors in patients with hypoxic encephalopathy. In this observational cohort study, we aimed to assess the predictive value of clinical, neuroimaging and EEG characteristics for outcome in different types of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathic patients. All adult intensive care unit patients from a tertiary academic medical care center with clinical and EEG evidence of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathy were included from 2004 to 2012. Clinical data, neuroimaging studies, EEG characteristics, and outcome were assessed. In-hospital death was the main outcome. Median age of 262 patients was 65 years (range 18-98 years). Mortality was 12.6%. In Poisson regression analyses, older age (P=.02), intracranial hemorrhage (P=.008), coma (P=.012), and nonreactive EEG background activity (P<.0001) were independently associated with death with nonreactive EEG being the strongest predictor (relative risk 3.74; 95% confidence interval 2.02-6.91). Subgroup analysis revealed no significant effect modification for the predictive value of nonreactive EEG by the presence or absence of coma and different types of acute brain lesions. In conclusion, this study identifies and quantifies the independent predictive value of older age, intracranial hemorrhage, coma, and nonreactive EEG for death, in patients with different types of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathy. These results add further credence to the limited body of evidence that EEG provides important prognostic information in different types of acute encephalopathy not related to hypoxic brain injury. Further studies are warranted to analyze the robustness of this predictor in larger subpopulations with specific etiologies of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathies. PMID:25828484

  9. Transplantation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells for acute thoracolumbar disc disease with no deep pain perception in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Kim, Wan Hee

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-four dogs with no deep pain perception due to acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease underwent decompression surgery within 1 week of diagnosis. All dogs underwent hemilaminectomy. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) were transplanted into the injured spinal cord parenchyma for the AD-MSCs transplant dogs. Long-term outcome was evaluated at the end of the follow-up period (> 6 months). AD-MSCs combination treatment showed better recovery outcomes compared to decompression surgery alone. These results indicate that this stem cell therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome the limitations of treatment for spinal cord injury in clinical medicine. PMID:27051350

  10. Implementing clinical guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: barriers and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Overington, Jeff D.; Huang, Yao C.; Abramson, Michael J.; Brown, Juliet L.; Goddard, John R.; Bowman, Rayleen V.; Fong, Kwun M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic lung disease characterised by progressive fixed airflow limitation and acute exacerbations that frequently require hospitalisation. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of COPD are now widely available. However, the uptake of these COPD guidelines in clinical practice is highly variable, as is the case for many other chronic disease guidelines. Studies have identified many barriers to implementation of COPD and other guidelines, including factors such as lack of familiarity with guidelines amongst clinicians and inadequate implementation programs. Several methods for enhancing adherence to clinical practice guidelines have been evaluated, including distribution methods, professional education sessions, electronic health records (EHR), point of care reminders and computer decision support systems (CDSS). Results of these studies are mixed to date, and the most effective ways to implement clinical practice guidelines remain unclear. Given the significant resources dedicated to evidence-based medicine, effective dissemination and implementation of best practice at the patient level is an important final step in the process of guideline development. Future efforts should focus on identifying optimal methods for translating the evidence into everyday clinical practice to ensure that patients receive the best care. PMID:25478199

  11. Clinical MRI for iron detection in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Maija; Ruottinen, Hanna; Soimakallio, Seppo; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    We studied nonheme iron in Parkinson's disease (PD) using clinically available MRI in 36 patients and 21 healthy volunteers. The subjects underwent thorough clinical investigation, including 3-T MRI. Quantitative R2* was able to reflect symptoms of PD. In addition, the clinically used susceptibility-weighted imaging differentiated between controls and patients, whereas T2-weighted imaging did not. Disease-related changes were present not only in substantia nigra but also in globus pallidus. Such changes are associated with neurodegeneration, reflecting the severity of motor impairment. PMID:23522789

  12. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  13. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  14. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; De Sousa, Andréa Silvestre; Sperandio Da Silva, Gilberto Marcelo; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Machado, Carolina Romero Cardoso; Brasil, Patrícia; De Castro, Liane; Da Silva, Sidnei; Georg, Ingebourg; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; do Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  15. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease.

    PubMed

    Squiers, John J; Edwards, Anthony G; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient's peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  16. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clinical integrative physiology.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Denis E; Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Webb, Katherine; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral airway dysfunction, inhomogeneous ventilation distribution, gas trapping, and impaired pulmonary gas exchange are variably present in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article provides a cogent physiologic explanation for the relentless progression of activity-related dyspnea and exercise intolerance that all too commonly characterizes COPD. The spectrum of physiologic derangements that exist in smokers with mild airway obstruction and a history compatible with COPD is examined. Also explored are the perceptual and physiologic consequences of progressive erosion of the resting inspiratory capacity. Finally, emerging information on the role of cardiocirculatory impairment in contributing to exercise intolerance in patients with varying degrees of airway obstruction is reviewed. PMID:24507837

  18. Gut microbiota and related diseases: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Cogliandro, Rosanna; Antonucci, Alexandra; Gabusi, Veronica; Frisoni, Chiara; De Giorgio, Roberto; Grasso, Valentina; Serra, Mauro; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal microbiota is essential for gut homeostasis. Specifically, the microorganisms inhabiting the gut lumen interact with the intestinal immune system, supply key nutrients for the major components of the gut wall, and modulate energy metabolism. Host-microbiome interactions can be either beneficial or deleterious, driving gastrointestinal lymphoid tissue activities and shaping gut wall structures. This overview briefly focuses on the potential role played by abnormalities in gut microbiota and relative responses of the gastrointestinal tract in the determination of important pathological conditions such as the irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer. PMID:20865476

  19. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians. PMID:15052668

  20. Clinical and epidemiological implications of meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Meredith; Galwankar, S

    2005-07-01

    Meningococcal disease is caused by Neisseria meningitidis and is an infection which rapidly progresses to multiorgan failure. It was a major killer in the epidemics of the 1980's in the United States. With the advent of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in the 1990s, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis have become the most common causes of bacterial meningitis in the United States. This article provides a review of the meningococcal illness and attempts to update current information regarding the same. PMID:16190134

  1. [Treatment of acute respiratory tract diseases in cattle with Bisolvon in combination with either enrofloxacin, cefquinome, ceftiofur or florfenicol].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Philipp, H; Hamel, U; Quirke, J F

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of the present clinical studies was to determine the clinical efficacy of a combined parenteral and oral treatment with Bisolvon in combination with antibiotics in bovines suffering from acute respiratory disease. To this end four trials were conducted in respiratory diseased bovines; a total of 619 animals were evaluated. The animals were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups within each study and were treated either with enrofloxacin, cefquinome, ceftiofur or florfenicol. The Bisolvon group was additionally treated with Bisolvon over 5 consecutive days. Daily clinical examinations were carried out over a period of 6 days. The clinical respiratory score, the primary parameter, representing a summation of the scoring points for the parameters respiratory rate, nasal discharge, spontaneous coughing, lung sounds and grade of dyspnoea and the clinical index score, which additionally included the general parameters fever, demeanour and feed intake, were significantly lower in the Bisolvon groups compared to the controls at all examinations after initiation of therapy in all trials with the exception of day 2 in one study. Lower values correspond to a less severe clinical condition. This consistent result as well as the evaluation of the single parameters are indicative of an acceleration of the recovery of the animals additionally treated with Bisolvon. PMID:9646401

  2. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  3. Applying the results of large clinical trials in the management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, J P; Schwartz, G G

    1996-01-01

    Mortality from acute myocardial infarction has declined in recent years, largely due to the widespread application of new pharmacologic and mechanical interventions that have been tested in large, prospective, randomized clinical trials. For practicing generalists, we review the key data from such trials that have shaped the current management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We discuss the roles of thrombolytic therapy, coronary angioplasty, nitrates, beta- and calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, magnesium, and antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic agents. In addition, we highlight critical unanswered questions in the management of this disorder. PMID:8775936

  4. Application values of clinical nursing pathway in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIHUA; GAO, JIANMEI; WEI, SHUFANG; WANG, DONGHAI

    2016-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage accounts for approximately 25% of strokes for elderly patients. Consequently, treatments to improve prognosis should be identified. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical values of the application of clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage. Between January 2013 and January 2015, 92 patients diagnosed with acute intracerebral hemorrhage were enrolled in the study based on the guidelines recommended for providing appropriate surgical or conservative treatment and the sequence of admission. The 92 patients were randomly divided into the control and observation groups. Patients in the control group underwent routine nursing mode prior to and after admission, and underwent clinical nursing path model (hierarchical partitioning prior to admission to hospital plus general professional program of nursing in hospital) was applied to the observation group. Barthel index scores for the observation group were significantly higher than that of the control group. The length of hospital stay for patients in the observation group was significantly lower while the average score for patients' satisfaction on nursing care while in hospital was significantly higher than that of the control group, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The incidence of complications such as fever, infection, bedsore, gastrointestinal function, electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition, in the observation group was significantly lower, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The functional independence measure (FIM) and Fugl-Meyer scores after 6 months for the observation group were significantly higher, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). In conclusion, application of the clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage significantly improved the clinical effects and nursing satisfaction, reduced adverse reactions, and had a greater clinical application value. PMID

  5. High resolution of Trypanosoma cruzi amastigote antigen in serodiagnosis of different clinical forms of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T K; Hoshino-Shimizu, S; Nakamura, P M; Andrade, H F; Umezawa, E S

    1993-01-01

    The serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease, a highly prevalent disorder in South American countries, is usually made by the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote antigen. In this study, we assess the diagnostic performance of the immunofluorescence test with T. cruzi (Y strain) amastigote antigen from an LLC-MK2-infected cell supernatant in comparison with a test with the conventional epimastigote antigen. A total of 238 serum samples from patients in the acute and chronic phases of the disease, with the chronic indeterminate, cardiac, and digestive forms, and from nonchagasic individuals were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA antibodies. The reactivity of the amastigote antigen in terms of geometric mean titers was 2 to 4 times higher than that of the epimastigote antigen. Clear-cut results were obtained with the amastigote antigen, with no overlapping of true and false positives. IgG antibodies to amastigotes were found in all patients with Chagas' disease, whereas all sera from nonchagasic patients were negative, except for those from patients with visceral leishmaniasis, in which 63% cross-reactivity was observed. IgM antibodies to amastigotes were detected in 100% of sera from patients with acute Chagas' disease and in 7.5% of sera from patients with chronic Chagas' disease, whereas IgA antibodies were found in 60% of sera from patients in the acute phase and in 33% of sera from patients in the chronic phase. Despite the cross-reactivity observed with sera from visceral leishmaniasis patients, the IgG immunofluorescence test with the amastigote antigen had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency. No relationship was observed between the class-specific antibodies or their titers and the clinical forms of patients in the chronic phase. Amastigotes from the cell culture supernatant proved to be useful as an alternative antigen to epimastigotes because of their high resolution in the serodiagnosis of Chagas

  6. Assessment of Inflammation in an Acute on Chronic Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Machtaler, Steven; Knieling, Ferdinand; Luong, Richard; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound (US) molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing inflammation in preclinical, murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. These models, however, initiated acute inflammation on previously normal colons, in contrast to patients where acute exacerbations are often in chronically inflamed regions. In this study, we explored the potential of dual P- and E-selectin targeted US imaging for assessing acute inflammation on a murine quiescent chronic inflammatory background. Methods: Chronic colitis was induced using three cycles of 4% DSS in male FVB mice. Acute inflammation was initiated 2 weeks after the final DSS cycle through rectal administration of 1% TNBS. Mice at different stages of inflammation were imaged using a small animal ultrasound system following i.v. injection of microbubbles targeted to P- and E-selectin. In vivo imaging results were correlated with ex vivo immunofluorescence and histology. Results: Induction of acute inflammation resulted in an increase in the targeted US signal from 5.5 ± 5.1 arbitrary units (a.u.) at day 0 to 61.0 ± 45.2 a.u. (P < 0.0001) at day 1, 36.3 ± 33.1 a.u. at day 3, returning to levels similar to control at day 5. Immunofluorescence showed significant increase in the percentage of P- and E-selectin positive vessels at day 1 (P-selectin: 21.0 ± 7.1% of vessels; P < 0.05; E-selectin: 16.4 ±3.7%; P < 0.05) compared to day 0 (P-selectin: 10.3 ± 5.7%; E-selectin: 7.3 ± 7.0%). Conclusions: Acute inflammation can be accurately measured in a clinically relevant murine model of chronic IBD using ultrasound molecular imaging with a dual P- and E- selectin-targeted contrast agent. PMID:26379784

  7. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed. PMID:26142172

  8. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  9. Psychiatric Disease and Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Seale, Gary S; Schaefer, Lynn A; Temple, Richard O; Foreman, Jack; Elliott, Timothy R

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can include depression, anxiety, and psychosis, as well as other maladaptive behaviors and personality changes. The epidemiologic data of psychiatric disorders post-TBI vary widely, although the incidence and prevalence rates typically are higher than in the general population. Although the experience of psychiatric symptoms may be temporary and may resolve in the acute period, many patients with TBI can experience psychopathology that is persistent or that develops in the post-acute period. Long-term psychiatric disorder, along with cognitive and physical sequelae and greater risk for substance use disorders, can pose a number of life-long challenges for patients and their caregivers, as they can interfere with participation in rehabilitation as well as limit functional independence in the community. The current review of the literature considers the common psychiatric problems affecting individuals with TBI in the post-acute period, including personality changes, psychosis, executive dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and substance misuse. Although treatment considerations (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) are referred to, an extensive description of such protocols is beyond the scope of the current review. The impact of persistent psychiatric symptoms on perceived caregiver burden and distress is also discussed. PMID:25629222

  10. New trends of an old disease: the acute post infectious glomerulonephritis at the beginning of the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Piero; Musetti, Claudio; Barreca, Antonella; Mazzucco, Gianna

    2014-06-01

    The association between acute renal disease and infection has been known since the mid '800s: acute post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) is a reactive immunological process against the kidney secondary to an infection, classically caused by a Streptococcus. The typical clinical presentation of PIGN is an acute nephritic syndrome with macro- or microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, hypertension, edema and renal function impairment of variable degree. The histology is characterized by an intracapillary glomerular proliferation, but may rarely be associated with an extracapillary proliferation. The classical childhood form is still present nowadays, even with severe cases, in developing countries, while in the last decades it almost disappeared in industrialized countries, where post-infectious GN are often found in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities. These clinical variants are usually related to other infective agents, like Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin resistant (MRSA) and susceptible, and may be characterized by an IgA-dominant deposition. Kidney biopsy is rarely needed, especially in the child, while in the adult or old patient a biopsy is warranted if there is an atypical presentation or evolution, like rapidly progressive renal failure, absent or delayed function recovery, persisting low C3, nephrotic range proteinuria and persisting high proteinuria. Current therapy strategies rely on culture-guided systemic antibiotics, especially in the old patient, in which MRSA are relatively frequent, support therapy and only in very selected cases on steroids. These latter cases include the rare PIGN with crescents and those with a severe interstitial inflammation. PMID:24777751

  11. A network approach to clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    Network biology has become a powerful tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms triggering neurodegeneration. Recent developments in network biology have led to the discovery of disease-causing genes, diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets for several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Network-based approaches have provided the molecular rationale for the relationship among cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, and have uncovered unexpected links between apparently unrelated diseases. Here, we summarize the recent advances in network biology to untangle the molecular underpinnings giving rise to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that network analysis provides a feasible and practical tool for identifying biologically meaningful biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25455073

  12. Clinical and Molecular Features of POLG-Related Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.; Saneto, Russell P.; Copeland, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The inability to replicate mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol γ) leads to a subset of mitochondrial diseases. Many mutations in POLG, the gene that encodes pol γ, have been associated with mitochondrial diseases such as myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) disorders, Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA), ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS), and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). This chapter explores five important topics in POLG-related disease: (1) clinical symptoms that identify and distinguish POLG-related diseases, (2) molecular characterization of defects in polymerase activity by POLG disease variants, (3) the importance of holoenzyme formation in disease presentation, (4) the role of pol γ exonuclease activity and mutagenesis in disease and aging, and (5) novel approaches to therapy and avoidance of toxicity based on primary research in pol γ replication. PMID:23545419

  13. A Clinical Review of Tick-Borne Diseases in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Beebe, Alexandria; Chaudhury, Arun; Haselow, Dirk; Patil, Sowmya; Weinstein, Sue; Taffner, Richard; Patil, Naveen

    2016-05-01

    Tick-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted by ticks harboring wide variety of pathogens. Arkansas is reported as one of the states with a high incidence of tick-borne diseases. In Arkansas the four most frequently occurring tick-borne diseases are Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, also known as Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis), Ehrlichiosis, Tularemia and Anaplasmosis. Lyme disease, on the other hand, is not acquired in Arkansas and is only acquired by traveling to states where Lyme disease is endemic. The majority of tick-borne diseases are diagnosed based on a history of tick bite or exposure and the individual's clinical presentation. The recognition of specific symptoms requires prompt treatment to prevent long-term sequelae. Hence, knowledge of tick-borne diseases and preventive measures can help reduce the risks associated with the infection. PMID:27263175

  14. Inflammatory bowel disease: clinics and pathology. Do inflammatory bowel disease and periodontal disease have similar immunopathogeneses?

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, P

    2001-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two chronic, tissue-destructive, clinical entities Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) both apparently caused by immunological overreaction (hypersensitivity) to commensal gut bacteria. Under normal conditions the intestinal immune system shows a down-regulating tone ('oral tolerance') against dietary antigens and the indigenous microbiota. This local homeostasis is disturbed in IBD, leading to hyperactivation of T helper 1 (Th1) cells with abundant secretion of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and production of IgG antibodies against commensal bacteria. In addition, UC includes genetically determined autoimmunity, particularly IgG1-mediated cytotoxic epithelial attack. Breaching of the epithelium is the best-defined event underlying abrogation of oral tolerance, but immune deviation caused by cytokines fiom irritated epithelial cells or subepithelial elements (for example, mast cells, natural killer cells, macrophages) may also be involved. Endogenous infection with local hypersensitivity likewise causes periodontal disease, reflecting 'frustrated' immune elimination mechanisms entertained by antigens from dental plaque. Altogether, perturbation of a tightly controlled cytokine network, with abnormal crosstalk between several cell types, apparently explains the progressive immunopathology of chronic inflammatory mucosal diseases in general. This adverse development will be influenced by numerous immunity genes, the dosage and potential pathogeniciy of commensal bacteria, general health, nutritional status, and psychological factors. Several targets for new therapy have tentatively been identified to block immunopathological mechanisms in IBD, and inhibition of TNF has a striking beneficial effect in CD, supporting a central role of this cytokine. PMID:11570527

  15. Elemental diet as primary treatment of acute Crohn's disease: a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Moráin, C; Segal, A W; Levi, A J

    1984-06-23

    Acute exacerbations of Crohn's disease are usually treated with prednisolone or potentially more toxic immunosuppressive drugs or by surgery. In pilot studies replacing the normal diet by a protein free elemental diet also induced remission. A controlled trial was therefore conducted in which 21 patients acutely ill with exacerbations of Crohn's disease were randomised to receive either prednisolone 0.75 mg/kg/day or an elemental diet (Vivonex) for four weeks. Assessment at four and 12 weeks showed that the patients treated with the elemental diet had improved as much as and by some criteria more than the steroid treated group. Elemental diet is a safe and effective treatment for acute Crohn's disease. PMID:6428577

  16. Acute Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Responses to Resistance Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Volaklis, Konstantinos A.; Smilios, Ilias; Spassis, Apostolos T.; Zois, Christos E.; Douda, Helen T.; Halle, Martin; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the inflammatory effects of resistance exercise in healthy and even less in diseased individuals such as cardiac patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the acute pro- and anti-inflammatory responses during resistance exercise (RE) in patients with coronary artery disease. Eight low risk patients completed two acute RE protocols at low (50% of 1 RM; 2x18 rps) and moderate intensity (75% of 1 RM; 3x8 rps) in random order. Both protocols included six exercises and had the same total load volume. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after and 60 minutes after each protocol for the determination of lactate, TNFα, INF-γ, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, and hsCRP concentrations. IL-6 and IL-10 levels increased (p < 0.05) immediately after both RE protocols with no differences between protocols. INF-γ was significantly lower (p < 0.05) 60 min after the low intensity protocol, whereas TGF-β1 increased (p < 0.05) immediately after the low intensity protocol. There were no differences in TNF-& and hs-CRP after both RE protocols or between protocols. The above data indicate that acute resistance exercise performed at low to moderate intensity in low risk, trained CAD patients is safe and does not exacerbate the inflammation associated with their disease. Key points Acute resistance exercise is safe without exacerbating inflammation in patients with CAD. Both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) elicit desirable pro-and anti-inflammatory responses. With both exercise intensities (50 and 75% of 1 RM) acceptable clinical hemodynamic alterations were observed. PMID:25729295

  17. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Verheij, Theo J.M.; Sachs, Alfred P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. Methods: We conducted a block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial at 54 primary care practices (68 family physicians) in the Netherlands between Dec. 30, 2008, and Apr. 28, 2011. Adult patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis were randomly assigned to receive either prednisolone 30 mg/d or placebo for 7 days and asked to complete a symptom diary for 14 days. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7. Results: Of the 185 patients included in the trial (93 in the treatment group, 92 in the placebo group), 2 withdrew from the study and 9 were excluded from the primary analysis because of incomplete symptom reporting. The remaining 174 patients (88 in the treatment group, 86 in the placebo group) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The proportions of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7 were 62.5% (55/88) in the prednisolone group and 55.8% (48/86) in the placebo group (absolute risk difference 6.7%, 95% confidence interval −7.9% to 21.2%). The groups were similar with regard to the decrease over time in the proportion of patients with total symptoms (combined symptoms of runny nose, postnasal discharge, nasal congestion, cough and facial pain) and health-related quality of life. Adverse events were mild and did not differ significantly between the groups. Interpretation: Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy had no clinically relevant beneficial effects among patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Netherlands Trial Register

  18. Clinical pharmacology of novel anti-Alzheimer disease modifying medications.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Leggio, Gian Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have been directed to develop "disease-modifying" medications to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD), able to halt or slow the pathological process. Because the earlier the treatment starts, the greater is the possibility of efficacy, it is important to set up biomarkers for early diagnosis of functional brain abnormalities, before the clinical manifestation of the overt disease. Up to now, strategies to develop disease-modifying drugs have mainly targeted β amyloid (Aβ, accumulation, aggregation, clearance) and/or tau protein (phosphorylation and aggregation). Active and passive immunotherapy is the main strategy aimed at increasing Aβ clearance. Unfortunately several candidate diseasemodifying drugs have failed in phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD. More recently, in phase III studies, bapineuzumab has been discontinued because it did not prove clinically effective (despite its significant effect on biomarkers), while solaneuzumab has been found effective in slowing AD progression. Several methological problems have been recently pointed out to explain the lack of clinical efficacy of novel disease-modifying drug-treatments; moreover, new insights in pathophysiology of AD give the premise to develop novel drug targeting. Clinical trials recently completed and/or still ongoing are discussed in the present review. PMID:23931438

  19. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  20. Creating an effective clinical registry for rare diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig Ma; Kievit, Wietske; Andrade, Raul J; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Drenth, Joost Ph

    2016-06-01

    The exposure of clinicians to patients with rare gastrointestinal diseases is limited. This hurts clinical studies, which impedes accumulation of scientific knowledge on the natural disease course, treatment outcomes and prognosis in these patients. An excellent method to detect patterns on an aggregate level that would not be possible to discover in individual cases, is a registry study. This paper aims to describe a template to create a successful international registry for rare diseases. We focus mainly on rare hepatic diseases, but lessons from this paper serve other fields in medicine, as well. PMID:27403298

  1. Creating an effective clinical registry for rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    D’Agnolo, Hedwig MA; Kievit, Wietske; Andrade, Raul J; Karlsen, Tom Hemming; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of clinicians to patients with rare gastrointestinal diseases is limited. This hurts clinical studies, which impedes accumulation of scientific knowledge on the natural disease course, treatment outcomes and prognosis in these patients. An excellent method to detect patterns on an aggregate level that would not be possible to discover in individual cases, is a registry study. This paper aims to describe a template to create a successful international registry for rare diseases. We focus mainly on rare hepatic diseases, but lessons from this paper serve other fields in medicine, as well. PMID:27403298

  2. How to predict clinical relapse in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Digby, Richard John; Bellanova, Matteo; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a natural course characterized by alternating periods of remission and relapse. Disease flares occur in a random way and are currently unpredictable for the most part. Predictors of benign or unfavourable clinical course are required to facilitate treatment decisions and to avoid overtreatment. The present article provides a literature review of the current evidence on the main clinical, genetic, endoscopic, histologic, serologic and fecal markers to predict aggressiveness of inflammatory bowel disease and discuss their prognostic role, both in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. No single marker seems to be reliable alone as a flare predictor, even in light of promising evidence regarding the role of fecal markers, in particular fecal calprotectin, which has reported good results recently. In order to improve our daily clinical practice, validated prognostic scores should be elaborated, integrating clinical and biological markers of prognosis. Finally, we propose an algorithm considering clinical history and biological markers to intercept patients with high risk of clinical relapse. PMID:26811644

  3. Clinical correlates of complicated grief among individuals with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Stefano; Gesi, Camilla; Abelli, Marianna; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco; Bertoli, Daniele; Borelli, Lucia; Michi, Paola; Oligeri, Claudia; Balbarini, Alberto; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed at exploring bereavement and complicated grief (CG) symptoms among subjects without a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) at the time of a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to evaluate the relationship of CG symptoms and ACS. Method Overall, 149 subjects with ACS (namely, acute myocardial infarct with or without ST-segment elevation or unstable angina), with no previous history of CHD, admitted to three cardiac intensive care units were included and evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief (SCI-CG), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36). Results Of the total sample of 149 subjects with ACS, 118 (79.2%) met criteria for DSM-5 persistent complex bereavement disorder. Among these, subjects who lost a partner, child, or sibling were older (P=0.008), less likely to be working (P=0.032), and more likely to be suffering from hypertension (P=0.021), returned higher scores on the SCI-CG (P=0.001) and developed the index ACS more frequently between 12 and 48 months after the death than those who lost a parent or another relative (P≤0.0001). The occurrence of ACS 12–48 months (P=0.019) after the loss was positively correlated with SCI-CG scores. An inverse relationship with SCI-CG scores was observed for patients who experienced ACS more than 48 months after the loss (P=0.005). The SCI-CG scores significantly predicted lower scores on the “general health” domain of MOS-SF-36 (P=0.030), as well as lower scores on “emotional well-being” domain (P=0.010). Conclusion A great proportion of subjects with ACS report the loss of a loved one. Among these, the loss of a close relative and the severity of CG symptoms are associated with poorer health status. Our data corroborate previous data indicating a strong relationship between CG symptoms and severe cardiac problems. PMID:26504390

  4. Outcomes before and after the Implementation of a Critical Pathway for Patients with Acute Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyu Chul; Lee, Hye Sun; Park, Joon Min; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Ko, Young-Guk; Park, Incheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, can be life-threatening vascular conditions. In this study, we compared outcomes before and after the implementation of a critical pathway (CP) for patients with acute aortic disease at the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective observational cohort study. The CP was composed of two phases: PRE-AORTA for early diagnosis and AORTA for prompt treatment. We compared patients who were diagnosed with acute aortic disease between pre-period (January 2010 to December 2011) and post-period (July 2012 to June 2014). Results Ninety-four and 104 patients were diagnosed with acute aortic disease in the pre- and post-periods, respectively. After the implementation of the CP, 38.7% of acute aortic disease cases were diagnosed via PRE-AORTA. The door-to-CT time was reduced more in PRE-AORTA-activated patients [71.0 (61.0, 115.0) min vs. 113.0 (56.0, 170.5) min; p=0.026]. During the post-period, more patients received emergency intervention than during the pre-period (22.3% vs. 36.5%; p=0.029). Time until emergency intervention was reduced in patients, who visited the ED directly, from 378.0 (302.0, 489.0) min in the pre-period to 200.0 (170.0, 299.0) min in the post-period (p=0.001). The number of patients who died in the ED declined from 11 to 4 from the pre-period to the post-period. Hospital mortality decreased from 26.6% to 14.4% in the post-period (p=0.033). Conclusion After the implementation of a CP for patients with acute aortic disease, more patients received emergency intervention within a shorter time, resulting in improved hospital mortality. PMID:26996561

  5. Extracorporeal liver assist device to exchange albumin and remove endotoxin in acute liver failure: Results of a pivotal pre-clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Karla C.L.; Baker, Luisa A.; Stanzani, Giacomo; Alibhai, Hatim; Chang, Yu Mei; Jimenez Palacios, Carolina; Leckie, Pamela J.; Giordano, Paola; Priestnall, Simon L.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Goldring, Christopher E.; Park, B. Kevin; Andreola, Fausto; Agarwal, Banwari; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Davies, Nathan A.; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims In acute liver failure, severity of liver injury and clinical progression of disease are in part consequent upon activation of the innate immune system. Endotoxaemia contributes to innate immune system activation and the detoxifying function of albumin, critical to recovery from liver injury, is irreversibly destroyed in acute liver failure. University College London-Liver Dialysis Device is a novel artificial extracorporeal liver assist device, which is used with albumin infusion, to achieve removal and replacement of dysfunctional albumin and reduction in endotoxaemia. We aimed to test the effect of this device on survival in a pig model of acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. Methods Pigs were randomised to three groups: Acetaminophen plus University College London-Liver Dialysis Device (n = 9); Acetaminophen plus Control Device (n = 7); and Control plus Control Device (n = 4). Device treatment was initiated two h after onset of irreversible acute liver failure. Results The Liver Dialysis Device resulted in 67% reduced risk of death in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure compared to Control Device (hazard ratio = 0.33, p = 0.0439). This was associated with 27% decrease in circulating irreversibly oxidised human non-mercaptalbumin-2 throughout treatment (p = 0.046); 54% reduction in overall severity of endotoxaemia (p = 0.024); delay in development of vasoplegia and acute lung injury; and delay in systemic activation of the TLR4 signalling pathway. Liver Dialysis Device-associated adverse clinical effects were not seen. Conclusions The survival benefit and lack of adverse effects would support clinical trials of University College London-Liver Dialysis Device in acute liver failure patients. PMID:25937432

  6. Proteases in cardiometabolic diseases: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and other developed countries. Metabolic syndrome, including obesity, diabetes/insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia is a major threat for public health in the modern society. It is well established that metabolic syndrome contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease collective called as cardiometabolic disease. Despite documented studies in the research field of cardiometabolic disease, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Proteases are enzymes that break down proteins, many of which have been implicated in various diseases including cardiac disease. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), calpain, cathepsin and caspase are among the major proteases involved in cardiac remodeling. Recent studies have also implicated proteases in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Elevated expression and activities of proteases in atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, obesity/insulin-associated heart disease as well as hypertensive heart disease have been documented. Furthermore, transgenic animals that are deficient in or over-express proteases allow scientists to understand the causal relationship between proteases and cardiometabolic disease. Mechanistically, MMPs and cathepsins exert their effect on cardiometabolic diseases mainly through modifying the extracellular matrix. However, MMP and cathepsin are also reported to affect intracellular proteins, by which they contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. On the other hand, activation of calpain and caspases has been shown to influence intracellular signaling cascade including the NF-κB and apoptosis pathways. Clinically, proteases are reported to function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases. More importantly, the inhibitors of proteases are credited with beneficial cardiometabolic profile, although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying these salutary effects are still under investigation. A better

  7. Do mouse models of allergic asthma mimic clinical disease?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Experimental mouse models of allergic asthma established almost 10 years ago offered new opportunities to study disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapeutics. These models focused on the factors governing the allergic immune response, on modeling clinical behavior of allergic asthma, and led to insights into pulmonary pathophysiology. Although mouse models rarely completely reproduce all the features of human disease, after sensitization and respiratory tract challenges with antigen, wild-type mice develop a clinical syndrome that closely resembles allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), increased IgE, mucus hypersecretion, and eventually, airway remodeling. There are, however, differences between mouse and human physiology that threaten to limit the value of mouse models. Three examples of such differences relate to both clinical manifestations of disease and underlying pathogenesis. First, in contrast to patients who have increased methacholine-induced AHR even when they are symptom-free, mice exhibit only transient methacholine-induced AHR following allergen exposure. Second, chronic allergen exposure in patients leads to chronic allergic asthma, whereas repeated exposures in sensitized mice causes suppression of disease. Third, IgE and mast cells, in humans, mediate early- and late-phase allergic responses, though both are unnecessary for the generation of allergic asthma in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that mouse models of allergic asthma are not exact replicas of human disease and thus, question the validity of these models. However, observations from mouse models of allergic asthma support many existing paradigms, although some novel discoveries in mice have yet to be verified in patients. This review presents an overview of the clinical aspects of disease in mouse models of allergic asthma emphasizing (1). the factors influencing the pathophysiological responses during

  8. Predicting the severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants: should we use a clinical score or a biomarker?

    PubMed

    Amat, Flore; Henquell, Cécile; Verdan, Matthieu; Roszyk, Laurence; Mulliez, Aurélien; Labbé, André

    2014-11-01

    Krebs von den Lungen 6 antigen (KL-6) has been shown to be a useful biomarker of the severity of Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. To assess the correlation between the clinical severity of acute bronchiolitis, serum KL-6, and the causative viruses, 222 infants with acute bronchiolitis presenting at the Pediatric Emergency Department of Estaing University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France, were prospectively enrolled from October 2011 to May 2012. Disease severity was assessed with a score calculated from oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, and respiratory effort. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was collected to screen for a panel of 20 respiratory viruses. Serum was assessed and compared with a control group of 38 bronchiolitis-free infants. No significant difference in KL-6 levels was found between the children with bronchiolitis (mean 231 IU/mL ± 106) and those without (230 IU/mL ± 102), or between children who were hospitalized or not, or between the types of virus. No correlation was found between serum KL-6 levels and the disease severity score. The absence of Human Rhinovirus was a predictive factor for hospitalization (OR 3.4 [1.4-7.9]; P = 0.006). Older age and a higher oxygen saturation were protective factors (OR 0.65[0.55-0.77]; P < 0.0001 and OR 0.67 [0.54-0.85] P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that in infants presenting with bronchiolitis for the first time, clinical outcome depends more on the adaptive capacities of the host than on epithelial dysfunction intensity. Many of the features of bronchiolitis are affected by underlying disease and by treatment. PMID:24374757

  9. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  10. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281 PMID:26469868

  11. Best practice guidelines on clinical management of acute attacks of porphyria and their complications.

    PubMed

    Stein, Penelope; Badminton, Mike; Barth, Julian; Rees, David; Stewart, M Felicity

    2013-05-01

    The British and Irish Porphyria Network guidelines describe best practice in the clinical assessment, investigation and management of acute porphyria attacks and their complications, including severe attacks with neuropathy. Acute attacks of porphyria may occur in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP) and hereditary coproporphyria (HCP). Aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria (ADP) is a very rare autosomal recessive porphyria; only six cases substantiated by mutation analysis have yet been described in the literature. Urinary porphobilinogen (PBG) is always raised in an acute attack due to AIP, VP or HCP and this analysis is essential to confirm the diagnosis. A positive result in a qualitative or semi-quantitative screening test must be followed by PBG quantitation at the earliest opportunity. However in a severely ill patient, treatment should not be delayed. Removal of precipitating factors, effective analgesia and control of symptoms with safe medication, attention to nutrition and fluid balance are essential. The indications for use of intravenous haem arginate are set out, together with advice on its administration. A small proportion of acute porphyria patients develop recurrent attacks and management options that may be considered include gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues, 'prophylactic' regular haem arginate infusion or ultimately, liver transplantation. PMID:23605132

  12. Clinical Implications of Cluster Analysis-Based Classification of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Correlation with Bedside Hemodynamic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Desai, Nihar; Wilson, Francis; Schulte, Phillip; Dunning, Allison; Jacoby, Daniel; Allen, Larry; Fiuzat, Mona; Rogers, Joseph; Felker, G. Michael; O’Connor, Christopher; Patel, Chetan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Classification of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is based on subjective criteria that crudely capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping of the syndrome may help improve therapeutic strategies. Objective To derive cluster analysis-based groupings for patients hospitalized with ADHF, and compare their prognostic performance to hemodynamic classifications derived at the bedside. Methods We performed a cluster analysis on baseline clinical variables and PAC measurements of 172 ADHF patients from the ESCAPE trial. Employing regression techniques, we examined associations between clusters and clinically determined hemodynamic profiles (warm/cold/wet/dry). We assessed association with clinical outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. Likelihood ratio tests were used to compare the prognostic value of cluster data to that of hemodynamic data. Results We identified four advanced HF clusters: 1) male Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, multiple comorbidities, lowest B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels; 2) females with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, few comorbidities, most favorable hemodynamics; 3) young African American males with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, most adverse hemodynamics, advanced disease; and 4) older Caucasians with ischemic cardiomyopathy, concomitant renal insufficiency, highest BNP levels. There was no association between clusters and bedside-derived hemodynamic profiles (p = 0.70). For all adverse clinical outcomes, Cluster 4 had the highest risk, and Cluster 2, the lowest. Compared to Cluster 4, Clusters 1–3 had 45–70% lower risk of all-cause mortality. Clusters were significantly associated with clinical outcomes, whereas hemodynamic profiles were not. Conclusions By clustering patients with similar objective variables, we identified four clinically relevant phenotypes of ADHF patients, with no discernable relationship to hemodynamic profiles, but distinct associations with adverse outcomes. Our analysis

  13. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in acute coronary syndromes: clinical evidence, tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent (DES) is routine treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, permanent metallic caging of the vessel has several shortcomings, such as side branch jailing and impossibility of late lumen enlargement. Moreover, DES PCI is affected by vasomotion impairment. In ACS a high thrombus burden and vasospasm lead to a higher risk of acute and late acquired stent malapposition than in stable patients. This increases the risk of acute, late and very late stent thrombosis. In this challenging clinical setting, the implantation of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) could represent an appealing therapeutic option. Temporary vessel scaffolding has proved to have several advantages over metallic stent delivery, such as framework reabsorption, late lumen enlargement, side branch patency, and recovery of physiological reactivity to vasoactive stimuli. In the thrombotic environment of ACS, BVS implantation has the benefit of capping the thrombus and the vulnerable plaque. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds also seems to reduce the incidence of angina during follow-up. Acute coronary syndromes patients may therefore benefit more from temporary polymeric caging than from permanent stent platform implantation. The aim of this review is to update the available knowledge concerning the use of BVS in ACS patients, by analyzing the potential pitfalls in this challenging clinical setting and presenting tricks to overcome these limitations. PMID:26677353

  14. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in acute coronary syndromes: clinical evidence, tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent (DES) is routine treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, permanent metallic caging of the vessel has several shortcomings, such as side branch jailing and impossibility of late lumen enlargement. Moreover, DES PCI is affected by vasomotion impairment. In ACS a high thrombus burden and vasospasm lead to a higher risk of acute and late acquired stent malapposition than in stable patients. This increases the risk of acute, late and very late stent thrombosis. In this challenging clinical setting, the implantation of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) could represent an appealing therapeutic option. Temporary vessel scaffolding has proved to have several advantages over metallic stent delivery, such as framework reabsorption, late lumen enlargement, side branch patency, and recovery of physiological reactivity to vasoactive stimuli. In the thrombotic environment of ACS, BVS implantation has the benefit of capping the thrombus and the vulnerable plaque. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds also seems to reduce the incidence of angina during follow-up. Acute coronary syndromes patients may therefore benefit more from temporary polymeric caging than from permanent stent platform implantation. The aim of this review is to update the available knowledge concerning the use of BVS in ACS patients, by analyzing the potential pitfalls in this challenging clinical setting and presenting tricks to overcome these limitations. PMID:26677353

  15. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  16. [Clinical application of blood matching with hemolytic test in vitro for transfusion treatment of crisis puerpera with acute hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Tang, Cong-Hai; Gan, Wei-Wei; Wu, A-Yang; Yang, Hui-Cong; Zhang, Tian-Xin; Huang, Yan Xue; Qiu, Lu-Zhen; Chen, Hong-Pu; Lin, Feng-Li

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to establish the matching method of hemolytic test in vitro, and to guide the transfusion treatment for puerpera with acute hemolytic disease. The donor's erythrocytes were sensibilized by all the antibodies in plasma of patient in vitro and were added with complement, after incubation for 6.5 hours at 38 °C, the hemolysis or no hemolysis were observed. It is safe to transfuse if the hemolysis did not occur. The results showed that when the matching difficulty happened to puerpera with acute hemolytic disease, the compatible donor could be screened by hemolytic test in vitro. There were no untoward effects after transfusion of 6 U leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte suspension. The all hemoglobin, total bilirubins, indirect bilirubin, reticulocyte, D-dimex and so on were rapidly improved in patient after transfusion , showing obvious clinical efficacy of treatment. It is concluded that when the matching results can not judge accurately compatible or incompatible through the routine method of cross matching, the agglutinated and no-hemolytic erythrocytes can be screened by hemolytic test in vitro and can be transfused with good efficacy; the hemoglobin level can be promoted rapidly, and no untoward effects occur. PMID:25130835

  17. National data elements for the clinical management of acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chew, Derek P B; Allan, Roger M; Aroney, Constantine N; Sheerin, Noella J

    2005-05-01

    Patients with acute coronary syndromes represent a clinically diverse group and their care remains heterogeneous. These patients account for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality in Australia. Optimal patient outcomes depend on rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification and the effective implementation of proven therapies, as advocated by clinical guidelines. The challenge is in effectively applying evidence in clinical practice. Objectivity and standardised quantification of clinical practice are essential in understanding the evidence-practice gap. Observational registries are key to understanding the link between evidence-based medicine, clinical practice and patient outcome. Data elements for monitoring clinical management of patients with acute coronary syndromes have been adapted from internationally accepted definitions and incorporated into the National Health Data Dictionary, the national standard for health data definitions in Australia. Widespread use of these data elements will assist in the local development of "quality-of-care" initiatives and performance indicators, facilitate collaboration in cardiovascular outcomes research, and aid in the development of electronic data collection methods. PMID:15865580

  18. Fatal Outcome of Multiple Clinical Presentations of Human Herpesvirus 8-related Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vijgen, Sandrine; Wyss, Caroline; Meylan, Pascal; Bisig, Bettina; Letovanec, Igor; Manuel, Oriol; Pascual, Manuel; de Leval, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-related disease described after solid organ transplantation. Multicentric Castleman disease and hemophagocytic syndrome are other potential HHV-8-induced entities but are less frequently reported. We describe the case of a liver transplant recipient who presented with an acute febrile illness 1 year after transplantation with a rapidly fatal outcome. Autopsy revealed 3 distinct HHV-8-related entities: Kaposi sarcoma, HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease with microlymphomas and a severe hemophagocytic syndrome. Retrospective serologic tests suggested that HHV-8 was likely transmitted by the seropositive donor at the time of transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of copresentation of 3 clinical presentations of HHV-8-mediated human disease in the post-transplant setting. Considering the absence of systematic screening of organ donors/recipients for HHV-8 infection, HHV-8-related illness should be suspected in transplant recipients who present with acute febrile illness, systemic symptoms, lymphadenopathies, and/or multiorgan failure to rapidly document the diagnosis and provide timely an adequate treatment. PMID:26120765

  19. Low acute hematological toxicity during chemotherapy predicts reduced disease control in advanced Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Brosteanu, O; Hasenclever, D; Loeffler, M; Diehl, V

    2004-03-01

    Chemotherapy-treated patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease (HD) differ considerably in acute hematotoxicity. Hematotoxicity may be indicative of pharmacological and metabolic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that low hematotoxicity might correlate with reduced systemic dose and thus reduced disease control. A total of 266 patients with advanced HD treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (COPP-ABVD) were analyzed (HD6 trial of the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group). The reported WHO grade of leukocytopenia was averaged over chemotherapy cycles given and weighted with the reciprocal dose intensity of the corresponding cycle. The low and high toxicity groups were defined in retrospect as having had an averaged WHO grade of leukocytopenia 2.1, respectively. The independent impact of low hematological toxicity on freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) was assessed multivariately adjusting for the international prognostic score for advanced HD. The results were validated in two independent cohorts [181 patients treated with COPP-ABVD (HD9-trial) and 250 patients treated with COPP-ABV-ifosfamide, methotrexate, etoposide, and prednisone (IMEP) (HD6 trial)]. The 5-year FFTF rates were 68% for patients with high toxicity vs 47% for patients with low toxicity [multivariate relative risk (RR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.0, p=0.0002]. Patients with low toxicity received significantly higher nominal dose ( p=0.02) and dose intensity ( p<0.0001). This finding was confirmed in both validation cohorts (multivariate RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.8, p=0.01 and RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.01-2.26, p=0.04, respectively). Patients with low hematotoxicity have significantly higher failure rates despite higher doses and dose intensity. Hematotoxicity is an independent prognostic factor for treatment outcome. This observation suggests a strategy of individualized dosing adapted to hematotoxicity

  20. Proteases in cardiometabolic diseases: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Nair, Sreejayan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. and other developed country. Metabolic syndrome, including obesity, diabetes/insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia is major threat for public health in the modern society. It is well established that metabolic syndrome contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease collective called as cardiometabolic disease. Despite documented studies in the research field of cardiometabolic disease, the underlying mechanisms are far from clear. Proteases are enzymes that break down proteins, many of which have been implicated in various diseases including cardiac disease. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), calpain, cathepsin and caspase are among the major proteases involved in cardiac remodeling. Recent studies have also implicated proteases in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Elevated expression and activities of proteases in atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, obesity/insulin-associated heart disease as well as hypertensive heart disease have been documented. Furthermore, transgenic animals that are deficient in or overexpress proteases allow scientists to understand the causal relationship between proteases and cardiometabolic disease. Mechanistically, MMPs and cathepsins exert their effect on cardiometabolic diseases mainly through modifying the extracellular matrix. However, MMP and cathepsin are also reported to affect intracellular proteins, by which they contribute to the development of cardiometabolic diseases. On the other hand, activation of calpain and caspases has been shown to influence intracellular signaling cascade including the NF-κB and apoptosis pathways. Clinically, proteases are reported to function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases. More importantly, the inhibitors of proteases are credited with beneficial cardiometabolic profile, although the exact molecular mechanisms underlying these salutary effects are still under investigation. A better

  1. Mechanical thrombectomy in pediatric acute ischemic stroke: Clinical outcomes and literature review.

    PubMed

    Madaelil, Thomas P; Kansagra, Akash P; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2016-08-01

    There are limited data on outcomes of mechanical thrombectomy for pediatric stroke using modern devices. In this study, we report two cases of pediatric acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy, both with good angiographic result (TICI 3) and clinical outcome (no neurological deficits at 90 days). In addition, we conducted a literature review of all previously reported cases describing the use of modern thrombectomy devices. Including our two cases, the aggregate rate of partial or complete vessel recanalization was 100% (22/22), and the aggregate rate of favorable clinical outcome was 91% (20/22). This preliminary evidence suggests that mechanical thrombectomy with modern devices may be a safe and effective treatment option in pediatric patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26945589

  2. Clinical and prognostic significance of lung thallium uptake on rest imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, D.; Lahiri, A.; Raftery, E.B. )

    1990-01-15

    Exercise-induced pulmonary uptake of thallium-201 in patients with ischemic heart disease is probably due to transient pulmonary edema and left ventricular failure induced by exercise. The significance of increased lung uptake of thallium-201 at rest after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been described. Ninety-six patients admitted with chest pain for suspected AMI or unstable angina underwent thallium-201 imaging at rest. Using conventional diagnostic criteria, 62 had AMI, 12 had unstable angina and 22 had neither. Increased lung uptake of thallium-201 was present in 24 of the total 96 (25%) patients, 20 of the 62 (32%) patients with AMI and 4 of 34 (13%) patients with no evidence of infarction. In the AMI group, those with increased lung thallium-201 uptake had a higher mean +/- standard deviation segmental thallium-201 defect score (22 +/- 7 vs 12 +/- 8, p less than 0.0001), lower ejection fraction (35 +/- 14 vs 49 +/- 14%, p less than 0.002), higher peak creatine kinase levels (2,410 +/- 1,247 vs 1,496 +/- 1,228 IU/liter, p less than 0.01), higher wall motion abnormality score (25 +/- 13 vs 13 +/- 12, p less than 0.0001), increased incidence of clinical in-hospital heart failure (15 of 20 vs 7 of 42, p less than 0.0001) and higher short-term mortality (4 of 20 vs 1 of 42, p less than 0.02) compared to those without increased lung thallium-201 uptake.

  3. Clinical significance of thymidine kinase in Egyptian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Saad, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Sohair A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy, representing one-third of pediatric cancers. Thymidine kinase-1 (TK-1) is expressed in proliferating cells so elevated TK-1 indicates active tumor growth. Objective: To study the clinical significance of TK-1 in children with ALL. Patients and Methods: This study was carried out on 40 children with newly diagnosed ALL who were admitted to Oncology Unit, Pediatric department, Tanta University (26 males and 14 females) with their ages ranged from 4 to 10 years and 30 healthy children of matched age and sex as a control group. For all patients the following were done: Complete blood picture, bone marrow examination, immunophenotyping and TK-1 serum levels. Results: Mean TK-1 level was significantly higher in patients at diagnosis than controls and significantly higher in patients with unfavorable outcome than patients with favorable outcome. Mean TK-1 level was significantly higher in patients in relapse than patients in remission and controls. No significant differences in mean TK-1 level between patients in remission and controls. There were statistically significant differences in disease free survival and overall survival between patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome. Conclusion: From this study we concluded that TK is a helpful marker in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with ALL. Recommendations: Thymidine kinase-1 should be routinely assessed at diagnosis and during follow-up in ALL patients for better diagnostic and prognostic assessment and should be taken in consideration in designing future therapeutic strategies based on patients-specific risk factors. PMID:25992345

  4. Epigenetics Meets Genetics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical Impact of a Novel Seven-Gene Score

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Yan, Pearlly; Maharry, Kati; Frankhouser, David; Nicolet, Deedra; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Bucci, Donna; Curfman, John P.; Whitman, Susan P.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Mendler, Jason H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Becker, Heiko; Bär, Constance; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Wetzler, Meir; Carter, Thomas H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Stone, Richard M.; Volinia, Stefano; Bundschuh, Ralf; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Molecular risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is largely based on genetic markers. However, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, deregulate gene expression and may also have prognostic impact. We evaluated the clinical relevance of integrating DNA methylation and genetic information in AML. Methods Next-generation sequencing analysis of methylated DNA identified differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with prognostic mutations in older (≥ 60 years) cytogenetically normal (CN) patients with AML (n = 134). Genes with promoter DMRs and expression levels significantly associated with outcome were used to compute a prognostic gene expression weighted summary score that was tested and validated in four independent patient sets (n = 355). Results In the training set, we identified seven genes (CD34, RHOC, SCRN1, F2RL1, FAM92A1, MIR155HG, and VWA8) with promoter DMRs and expression associated with overall survival (OS; P ≤ .001). Each gene had high DMR methylation and lower expression, which were associated with better outcome. A weighted summary expression score of the seven gene expression levels was computed. A low score was associated with a higher complete remission (CR) rate and longer disease-free survival and OS (P < .001 for all end points). This was validated in multivariable models and in two younger (< 60 years) and two older independent sets of patients with CN-AML. Considering the seven genes individually, the fewer the genes with high expression, the better the outcome. Younger and older patients with no genes or one gene with high expression had the best outcomes (CR rate, 94% and 87%, respectively; 3-year OS, 80% and 42%, respectively). Conclusion A seven-gene score encompassing epigenetic and genetic prognostic information identifies novel AML subsets that are meaningful for treatment guidance. PMID:24378410

  5. Maximising Acute Kidney Injury Alerts – A Cross-Sectional Comparison with the Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Simon; Marks, Angharad; Ali, Tariq; Clark, Laura; Fluck, Nick; Prescott, Gordon J.; Simpson, William G.; Black, Corri

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is serious and widespread across healthcare (1 in 7 hospital admissions) but recognition is often delayed causing avoidable harm. Nationwide automated biochemistry alerts for AKI stages 1-3 have been introduced in England to improve recognition. We explored how these alerts compared with clinical diagnosis in different hospital settings. Methods We used a large population cohort of 4464 patients with renal impairment. Each patient had case-note review by a nephrologist, using RIFLE criteria to diagnose AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We identified and staged AKI alerts using the new national NHS England AKI algorithm and compared this with nephrologist diagnosis across hospital settings. Results Of 4464 patients, 525 had RIFLE AKI, 449 had mild AKI, 2185 had CKD (without AKI) and 1305 were of uncertain chronicity. NHS AKI algorithm criteria alerted for 90.5% of RIFLE AKI, 72.4% of mild AKI, 34.1% of uncertain cases and 14.0% of patients who actually had CKD.The algorithm identified AKI particularly well in intensive care (95.5%) and nephrology (94.6%), but less well on surgical wards (86.4%). Restricting the algorithm to stage 2 and 3 alerts reduced the over-diagnosis of AKI in CKD patients from 14.0% to 2.1%, but missed or delayed alerts in two-thirds of RIFLE AKI patients. Conclusion Automated AKI detection performed well across hospital settings, but was less sensitive on surgical wards. Clinicians should be mindful that restricting alerts to stages 2-3 may identify fewer CKD patients, but including stage 1 provides more sensitive and timely alerting. PMID:26125553

  6. Fatigue in liver disease: Pathophysiology and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Mark G

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue is the most commonly encountered symptom in patients with liver disease, and it has a significant impact on their quality of life. However, although some progress has been made with regard to the understanding of the processes which may generate fatigue in general, the underlying cause(s) of liver disease-associated fatigue remain incompletely understood. The present review describes recent advances which have been made in our ability to measure fatigue in patients with liver disease in the clinical setting, as well as in our understanding of potential pathways which are likely important in the pathogenesis of fatigue associated with liver disease. Specifically, experimental findings suggest that fatigue associated with liver disease likely occurs as a result of changes in neurotransmission within the brain. In conclusion, a reasonable approach to help guide in the management of the fatigued patient with liver disease is presented. PMID:16550262

  7. Pediatric kidney disease: tracking onset and improving clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carlton M; Charlton, Jennifer R; Ferris, Maria E; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Warady, Bradley A; Moxey-Mims, Marva M

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies confirm that much of adult kidney disease may have its origins in childhood, often as a result of abnormal or suboptimal fetal kidney development. Understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of CKD in children is rapidly evolving because of robust longitudinal clinical data, identification of monogenic mutations related to common causes of CKD, and improved knowledge of factors that influence the onset and progression of CKD. The Kidney Research National Dialogue, supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, asked the research and clinical communities to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve understanding of kidney function and diseases. This commentary outlines high-priority research objectives to assess factors associated with the predisposition to develop renal disease in children, and address the unique challenges in treating this population. PMID:24651076

  8. Efficacy of enrofloxacin in the treatment of naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis.

    PubMed

    Suojala, L; Simojoki, H; Mustonen, K; Kaartinen, L; Pyörälä, S

    2010-05-01

    The efficacy of the combination of systemic enrofloxacin (5mg/kg twice with a 24-h interval, first dose i.v., second dose s.c.) and the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent ketoprofen (3mg/kg i.m. or 4 mg/kg per os daily for 1 to 3 d) treatment was compared with antiinflammatory treatment only in dairy cows with naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis. A total of 132 cows with acute clinical mastitis and with confirmed growth of E. coli in a pretreatment milk sample were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Response to treatment was evaluated clinically and by bacteriological culturing and determination of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity on d 2 and 21 posttreatment. Enrofloxacin treatment did not increase bacteriological (90.5% of treated vs. 86.8% of nontreated cured) or clinical cure (46.7% of treated vs. 57.1% of nontreated cured), cow survival (95.3% of treated vs. 92.7% of nontreated), or quarter milk production assessed 21 d posttreatment (21.8 vs. 29.3% return to preinfection level for nontreated cows), nor did it decrease mammary gland tissue damage estimated using determination of milk NAGase activity (24.0+/-0.3 vs. 18.3+/-1.3 pmol of 4-methylumbelliferone per min per microL for nontreated cows). Treatment did not influence the number of study cows remaining in the herd after 6 mo (71.9% of treated vs. 80.6% of nontreated). The only significant effects of enrofloxacin were enhancing the bacteriological cure (odds ratio=3.32 for treated cows) and decreasing the clinical cure (odds ratio=0.05 for treated cows) on d 2 posttreatment. Our results did not support the use of enrofloxacin to treat acute clinical E. coli mastitis. PMID:20412909

  9. Clinical Trial Design Issues in Mild to Moderate Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The field of clinical trials and therapeutics in Alzheimer Disease (AD) is little more than 20 years old. Considerable progress has been made in crafting appropriate designs for clinical trials of promising therapeutic agents for AD. This article reviews basic issues in diagnostic criteria, choice of outcome measures, duration of trials and analytic strategies. Through trial and error, a general set of strategies has evolved for the assessment of putative therapies for mild to moderate AD. The experience of the past two decades has set the stage for discovering the next generation of anti-AD drugs and introducing those therapies at milder stages of the disease. PMID:19057167

  10. Predicting Clinical Scores from Magnetic Resonance Scans in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stonnington, Cynthia M.; Chu, Carlton; Klöppel, Stefan; Jack, Clifford R; Ashburner, John; Frackowiak, Richard S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Machine learning and pattern recognition methods have been used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from individual MRI scans. Another application of such methods is to predict clinical scores from individual scans. Using relevance vector regression (RVR), we predicted individuals' performances on established tests from their MRI T1 weighted image in two independent datasets. From Mayo Clinic, 73 probable AD patients and 91 cognitively normal (CN) controls completed the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Dementia Rating Scale (DRS), and Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) within 3 months of their scan. Baseline MRI's from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) comprised the other dataset; 113 AD, 351 MCI, and 122 CN subjects completed the MMSE and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale—Cognitive subtest (ADAS-cog) and 39 AD, 92 MCI, and 32 CN ADNI subjects completed MMSE, ADAS-cog, and AVLT. Predicted and actual clinical scores were highly correlated for the MMSE, DRS, and ADAS-cog tests (P<.0001). Training with one dataset and testing with another demonstrated stability between datasets. DRS, MMSE, and ADAS-Cog correlated better than AVLT with whole brain grey matter changes associated with AD. This result underscores their utility for screening and tracking disease. RVR offers a novel way to measure interactions between structural changes and neuropsychological tests beyond that of univariate methods. In clinical practice, we envision using RVR to aid in diagnosis and predict clinical outcome. PMID:20347044

  11. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  12. [Acute glaucine syndrome in the physician's practice: the clinical picture and potential danger].

    PubMed

    Rovinskiĭ, V I

    2006-01-01

    The author describes a clinical symptom complex which appears in some patients as a central nervous system side-effect of conventional doses of glaucine, a non-narcotic antitussive preparation, used in outpatients; the symptom complex is described by the author as acute glaucine syndrome (AGS). Clinical manifestations of AGS are the following: 1) very prominent fatigue, which occurs acutely after taking a conventional dose of glaucine and making any kind of professional activity impossible at the moment; 2) very prominent sleepiness, which occurs acutely together with fatigue and is always combined with it; 3) unusual clear but somewhat estranged perception of the environment: the patient sees and understands everything and is oriented well enough, but cannot take a clear and adequate action, 4) full recovery of the impaired functions after the drug is discontinued; 5) AGS recurrence after the drug is taken again. The hallucination-like effect of glaucine, described earlier by the author of this article, which is manifested by bright and colorful visual images, may be considered a facultative AGS component. The author stresses a potential danger of AGS development in persons who control moving mechanisms or vehicles and adduces some clinical observations. PMID:17243616

  13. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. The Role of Echocardiography in Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Parsaee, Mozhgan; Maleki, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Echocardiography is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which provides information regarding cardiac function and hemodynamics. It is the most frequently used cardiovascular diagnostic test after electrocardiography and chest X-ray. However, in a patient with acute chest pain, Transthoracic Echocardiography is essential both for diagnosing acute coronary syndrome, zeroing on the evaluation of ventricular function and the presence of regional wall motion abnormalities, and for ruling out other etiologies of acute chest pain or dyspnea, including aortic dissection and pericardial effusion. Echocardiography is a versatile imaging modality for the management of patients with chest pain and assessment of left ventricular systolic function, diastolic function, and even myocardial and coronary perfusion and is, therefore, useful in the diagnosis and triage of patients with acute chest pain or dyspnea. This review has focused on the current applications of echocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:23646042

  15. Acute myocardial infarction following scorpion sting in a case with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Satish, K; Singla, Vivek; Ravindranath, K S

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) following a scorpion sting has been very rarely reported in the previous literature. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms include severe hypotension due to hypovolaemic shock and coronary spasm with subsequent thrombosis of coronary vessels developed after the release of vasoactive, inflammatory and thrombogenic substances contained in the scorpion venom. All of the previously reported cases had normal coronary angiogram. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with severe scorpion sting and was treated with prazosin. But a few hours later, she developed acute anterior wall MI. Coronary angiogram revealed the presence of significant stenosis in coronary arteries. As acute MI owing to significant coronary artery disease can be evident after severe scorpion envenomation, so every case of acute coronary syndrome following scorpion sting needs early diagnosis, thorough cardiovascular evaluation and appropriate treatment. PMID:23715842

  16. Baseline Prevalence of Heart Diseases, Hypertension, Diabetes, and Obesity in Persons with Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Potential Threats in the Recovery Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases impede the recovery trajectory of acutely injured persons with traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). This study compares the odds of prevalent heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity between persons with TSCI and persons with lower extremity fractures (LEF) who were discharged from acute care facilities. Methods: 1,776 patients with acute TSCI (cases) and 1,780 randomly selected patients with LEF (controls) discharged from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2009, from all nonfederal hospitals were identified. Data extracted from uniform billing files were compared between cases and controls in a multivariable logistic regression model controlling for sociodemographic and clinical covariables. Results: Thirty percent of patients with acute TSCI had at least 1 of 4 conditions compared with 18% of patients with LEF (P < .0001). Persons with acute TSCI were 4 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.65–9.97) to have obesity, 2.7 times more likely to have heart disease (P < .001), 2 times more likely to have hypertension (P < .001), and 1.7 times more likely to have diabetes (P = .044) at the onset of TSCI. Disproportionately more Blacks than Whites have TSCI and chronic diseases. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is an increased burden of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic diseases among persons with acute TSCI compared with LEF trauma controls. Unattended comorbid conditions will affect quality of life and the recovery process. This warrants continuous monitoring and management of chronic diseases during the rehabilitation process. PMID:23960701

  17. A Method of Treatment of Purulent-Inflammatory Diseases of the Hand in Outpatient Clinic with Using Electromagnetic Microwave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenok, L.; Grimalsky, V.; De La Hidalga-W., J.

    2006-09-01

    The report is devoted to applications of the microwave therapy. 50 patients with acute purulent-inflammatory diseases of the hand were examined with using our method of treatment with electromagnetic (EM) microwave field in an outpatient clinic. We used a portable apparatus that operates in the millimeter (mm) wave range in 4 regimes. The intensity of EM radiation was 2-10 mW/cm2. A peculiarity of the method was an absence of any antibacterial medicine during the treatment. We conclude that using EM microwave fields seems very efficient in a complex treatment of acute purulent-inflammatory diseases of the hand in an outpatient clinic. An interpretation of the obtained results is given due to the resonant character of the interaction of EM radiation with molecular and cellular structures.

  18. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  19. Soluble DNAM-1, as a Predictive Biomarker for Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Minoru; Shibuya, Kazuko; Hirochika, Rei; Kanemoto, Miyoko; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Okada, Masafumi; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Cho, Yukiko; Kojima, Hiroshi; Teshima, Takanori; Imamura, Masahiro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Because diagnosis of aGVHD is exclusively based on clinical symptoms and pathological findings, reliable and noninvasive laboratory tests for accurate diagnosis are required. An activating immunoreceptor, DNAM-1 (CD226), is expressed on T cells and natural killer cells and is involved in the development of aGVHD. Here, we ident