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Sample records for acute clinical symptoms

  1. [Acute poisoning with selected hepatotoxic agents: biochemistry of toxic effect, clinical symptoms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rusiński, Piotr; Kołaciński, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses etiopathogenesis, clinical symptoms and treatment in acute poisoning with hepatotoxic agents. The liver is a critical organ in acute poisoning with Amanita phalloides, carbon tetrachloride, iron compounds and isonicotinic acid hydrazide. Based on literature reports and own experience the authors present the current outlook on the specific treatment of acute poisoning with these xenobiotics. Special consideration was given to biochemical etiopathogenesis of hepatoxicity: oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and impaired homeostasis of calcium ions and glutathione. Basic principles were also discussed of conservative treatment in hepatic encephalopathy due to toxic liver necrosis. PMID:14569886

  2. Depression in acute and chronic aphasia: symptoms, pathoanatomical-clinical correlations and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, M; Bartels, C; Wallesch, C W

    1993-01-01

    Depressive alterations were investigated in 21 acute and 21 chronic aphasic patients with single left sided strokes. The assessment of depression was based on a psychometrically evaluated German version of the Cornell Scale for Depression (CDS) and the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC). No significant difference was found concerning depression sum-scores between the two aphasic groups. The acute group, however, exhibited significantly higher ratings in items related to physical signs of depression and disturbances of cyclic functions. Patients corresponding to the RDC-syndrome of major depression were only found in the acute group. Neither age, sex nor degree of hemiparesis discriminated the patients on the severity of depressive symptoms. In the acute patient group, nonfluency of aphasia was the only parameter that could be identified which had an effect on the mood symptom scores. A CT scan analysis in the acute patient group showed an association between the severity of depression and anterior lesions. A significant correlation was found between CDS sum-scores and the proximity of the anterior border of the lesion to the frontal pole of the hemisphere whereas the volume of lesions seemed to have no effect on depressive alterations in acute aphasic patients. Superimposition of the lesions of the aphasic patients with major depressive disorders showed a common subcortical lesion area involving putaminal and external pallidal structures. Images PMID:8509782

  3. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  4. [Clinical symptoms and circumastances of acute poisonings with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina)].

    PubMed

    Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Druzdz, Artur; Naskret, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Mushroom poisonings in Poland are quite common, especially in summer and autumn, but fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and panther cap (Amanita pantherina) are rather rare cause of these intoxications. Fly agaric is a cause of deliberate poisoning, whereas panther cap poisoning also happens accidentally. The main toxins of these two mushrooms are ibotenic acid (pantherine, agarine), muscimol, muscazone and muscaridine. The other bioactive substances are stizolobic and stizolobinic acids and aminodicarboxyethylthiopropanoic acids. All these compounds are responsible for diverse picture of intoxication. An analysis of patients with Amanita muscaria and Amanita pantherina poisoning hospitalized in the Poznan Departament of Toxicology revealed that symptoms occurred after 30 minutes to 2 hours with vomiting, hallucinations, restlessness, increased psychomotor drive and central nervous system depression. Other antycholinergic symptoms like tachycardia and increased blood pressure, mydriasis, dry and red skin were seen only in a few cases. Acute respiratory failure was the most dangerous symptom observed in the course of poisoning. PMID:22010435

  5. Multiple sclerosis presenting with acute remitting psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, W B

    1979-01-01

    Two patients are described in whom acute symptoms of apparently primary psychiatric disease could be diagnosed in retrospect as due to multiple sclerosis. In both patients the initial symptoms recovered completely. In a third patient, also presenting with mental symptoms, this diagnosis would not have been suspected on clinical grounds but is suggested by the results of modern diagnostic techniques. Images PMID:501386

  6. Assessing a dysphoric arousal model of acute stress disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of rape and bank robbery victims

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) into the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) research has focused on the ability of ASD to predict PTSD rather than focusing on addressing ASD's underlying latent structure. The few existing confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of ASD have failed to reach a clear consensus regarding ASD's underlying dimensionality. Although, the discrepancy in the results may be due to varying ASD prevalence rates, it remains possible that the model capturing the latent structure of ASD has not yet been put forward. One such model may be a replication of a new five-factor model of PTSD, which separates the arousal symptom cluster into Dysphoric and Anxious Arousal. Given the pending DSM-5, uncovering ASD's latent structure is more pertinent than ever. Objective Using CFA, four different models of the latent structure of ASD were specified and tested: the proposed DSM-5 model, the DSM-IV model, a three factor model, and a five factor model separating the arousal symptom cluster. Method The analyses were based on a combined sample of rape and bank robbery victims, who all met the diagnostic criteria for ASD (N = 404) using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale. Results The results showed that the five factor model provided the best fit to the data. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that the dimensionality of ASD may be best characterized as a five factor structure which separates dysphoric and anxious arousal items into two separate factors, akin to recent research on PTSD's latent structure. Thus, the current study adds to the debate about how ASD should be conceptualized in the pending DSM-5. PMID:22893845

  7. A diagnostic window for the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease prior to visible clinical symptoms in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) poses a major limitation for broader therapeutic application of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Early diagnosis of aGVHD remains difficult and is based on clinical symptoms and histopathological evaluation of tissue biopsies. Thus, current aGVHD diagnosis is limited to patients with established disease manifestation. Therefore, for improved disease prevention it is important to develop predictive assays to identify patients at risk of developing aGVHD. Here we address whether insights into the timing of the aGVHD initiation and effector phases could allow for the detection of migrating alloreactive T cells before clinical aGVHD onset to permit for efficient therapeutic intervention. Methods Murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatched and minor histocompatibility antigen (miHAg) mismatched allo-HCT models were employed to assess the spatiotemporal distribution of donor T cells with flow cytometry and in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Daily flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells allowed us to identify migrating alloreactive T cells based on homing receptor expression profiles. Results We identified a time period of 2 weeks of massive alloreactive donor T cell migration in the blood after miHAg mismatch allo-HCT before clinical aGVHD symptoms appeared. Alloreactive T cells upregulated α4β7 integrin and P-selectin ligand during this migration phase. Consequently, targeted preemptive treatment with rapamycin, starting at the earliest detection time of alloreactive donor T cells in the peripheral blood, prevented lethal aGVHD. Conclusions Based on this data we propose a critical time frame prior to the onset of aGVHD symptoms to identify alloreactive T cells in the peripheral blood for timely and effective therapeutic intervention. PMID:23692886

  8. Glucocorticoids improve acute dizziness symptoms following acute unilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrío, Angel; Yañez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Sanchez-Blanco, Carmen; Pérez, Pedro Blanco; González-Sanchez, Enrique; Sanchez, Luis Alberto Guardado; Kaski, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Acute unilateral vestibulopathy (AUV) is characterized by acute vertigo, nausea, and imbalance without neurological deficits or auditory symptomatology. Here, we explore the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on the degree of canal paresis in patients with AUV, and critically, establish its relationship with dizziness symptom recovery. We recruited consecutive patients who were retrospectively assigned to one of the two groups according to whether they received glucocorticoid treatment (n = 32) or not (n = 44). All patients underwent pure-tone audiometry, bithermal caloric testing, MRI brain imaging, and were asked to complete a dizziness handicap inventory on admission to hospital and just prior to hospital discharge. In the treatment group, the canal paresis at discharge was significantly lower than in the control group (mean ± SD % 38.04 ± 21.57 versus 82.79 ± 21.51, p < 0.001). We also observed a significant reduction in the intensity of nystagmus in patients receiving glucocorticoid treatment compared to the non-treatment group (p = 0.03). DHI test score was significantly lower at discharge in the treatment group (mean ± SD % 23.15 ± 12.40 versus 64.07 ± 12.87, p < 0.001), as was the length of hospital stay (2.18 ± 1.5 days versus 3.6 ± 1.7 days, p = 0.002). Glucocorticoid treatment leads to acute symptomatic improvement, with a reduced hospital stay and reduction in the intensity of acute nystagmus. Our findings suggest that glucocorticoids may accelerate vestibular compensation via a restoration of peripheral vestibular function, and therefore has important clinical implications for the treatment of AUV. PMID:26459091

  9. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2016-02-01

    No studies to date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and (2) identify biopsychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with SCD. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥ 10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of biopsychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD, with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  10. Psychological symptoms and intermittent hypertension following acute microwave exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.; Holmes, C.K.; McManamon, T.V.; Wedding, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    Two men who were accidently, acutely irradiated with X-band microwave radiation have been followed up clinically for 12 months. Both men developed similar psychological symptoms, which included emotional lability, irritability, headaches, and insomnia. Several months after the incidents, hypertension was diagnosed in both patients. No organic basis for the psychological problems could be found nor could any secondary cause for the hypertension. A similar syndrome following microwave exposure has been described by the East Europeans. The two cases we report, with comparable subjective symptoms and hypertension following a common exposure, provide further strong, circumstantial evidence of cause and effect. A greater knowledge of the mechanisms involved in bioeffects which may be induced by radiofrequency and microwave radiation is definitely needed.

  11. [Negative symptoms: clinical and psychometric aspects].

    PubMed

    Adida, M; Azorin, J-M; Belzeaux, R; Fakra, E

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations performing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis have suggested that negative symptoms are multidimensional, including evidence for at least two distinct negative symptom subdomains: diminished expression and amotivation. Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH - MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. PMID:26776385

  12. Prevalence of Acute Symptoms among Workers in Printing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify socioeconomic situation factors and behavioral factors associated with the prevalence of acute symptoms among 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Results. Acute symptoms comprised dizziness, drowsiness, eye irritation, light-headedness, rhinitis, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, nausea/vomiting, exacerbation of asthma, allergic skin reaction, and visual disorder. The prevalence of symptoms was consistently higher among workers in the printing process than among other workers. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol were not associated with an increased prevalence of acute symptoms among these printing-factory workers. Conclusion. The significant associations were found between personal protective equipment and personal hygiene and prevalence of acute symptoms in printing workers. PMID:25386365

  13. Acute Stress Symptoms in Young Children with Burns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Frederick J.; Saxe, Glenn; Ronfeldt, Heidi; Drake, Jennifer E.; Burns, Jennifer; Edgren, Christy; Sheridan, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms are a focus of much research with older children, but little research has been conducted with young children, who account for about 50% of all pediatric burn injuries. This is a 3-year study of 12- to 48-month-old acutely burned children to assess acute traumatic stress outcomes. The aims were to…

  14. Vomiting as the main presenting symptom of acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Osundwa, V M; Dawod, S T

    1989-11-01

    Vomiting as a dominant symptom in a patient with acute asthma is reported. The traditionally recognized triad of cough, tachypnea and wheezing were absent or trivial whenever this patient presented with persistent vomiting. A careful history, laboratory evaluation and a course of bronchodilators eventually ascertained that the episodes of vomiting were due to attacks of acute asthma. It is suggested that acute asthma be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent and/or severe vomiting in children. PMID:2603727

  15. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Beth A.; Kohl, Krista L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N=479) between the ages of 8 to 17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and one month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01), and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, re-experiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), re-experiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's rho = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery. PMID:24337685

  16. Acute Symptoms after a Community Hydrogen Fluoride Spill

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to describe the demographic characteristics, and clinical signs and symptoms of patients who visited a general hospital because of the release of chemically hazardous hydrogen fluoride that occurred on September 27, 2012 in Gumi City, Korea. Methods The medical records at 1 general hospital 9 km from the accident site were reviewed using a standardized survey format. There were 1,890 non-hospitalized and 12 hospitalized patients exposed to hydrogen fluoride between September 27 and October 13 2012. Results Among the 12 hospitalized patients, 11 were discharged within 1 week and the other was hospitalized for 10 days. The chief complaints were respiratory symptoms such as hemoptysis and shortness of breath, gastrointestinal symptoms, neurologic symptoms, sore throat, and lip burn. The number of non-hospitalized patients exhibited a bimodal distribution, peaking on the first and twelfth days after the accident. Their chief complaints were sore throat (24.1%), headache (19.1%), cough (13.1%), and eye irritation (9.2%); some patients were asymptomatic (6.2%). Patients who visited the hospital within 3 days (early patients) of the spill more often had shortness of breath (27.0%) and nausea (6.3%) as the chief complaints than patients who visited after 3 days (late patients) (3.5% and 2.6%, respectively). However, cough and rhinorrhea were more common in the late patients (14.0% and 3.3%, respectively) than in the early patients (5.0% and 0.0%, respectively). Patients who were closer to the accident site more often had shortness of breath and sputum as the chief complaints than patients who were farther away. The mean serum calcium concentration was 9.37 mg/dL (range: 8.4–11.0 mg/dL); none of the patients had a decreased serum calcium level. Among 48 pulmonary function test results, 4 showed decreased lung function. None of the patients had abnormal urine fluoride levels on the eighth day after exposure. Conclusions Patients

  17. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes. PMID:20038672

  18. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  19. The clinics of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Rastelli, Gianni

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification and management of patients with chest pain continues to be challenging despite considerable efforts made in the last decades by many clinicians and researchers. The throutful evaluation necessitates that the physicians have a high index of suspicion for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and always keep in mind the myriad of often subtle and atypical presentations of ischemic heart disease, especially in certain patient populations such as the elderly ones. In this article we aim to review and discuss the available evidence on the value of clinical presentation in patients with a suspected ACS, with special emphasis on history, characteristics of chest pain, associated symptoms, atypical presentations, precipitating and relieving factors, drugs, clinical rules and significance of clinical Gestalt. PMID:27294087

  20. Ethnoracial Variations in Acute PTSD Symptoms Among Hospitalized Survivors of Traumatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Kari A.; Sue, Stanley; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Unützer, Jürgen; Wang, Jin; Rivara, Frederick P.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; Zatzick, Douglas F.

    2011-01-01

    Ethnoracial minority status contributes to an increased risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after trauma exposure, beyond other risk factors. A population-based sampling frame was used to examine the associations between ethnoracial groups and early PTSD symptoms while adjusting for relevant clinical and demographic characteristics. Acutely injured trauma center inpatients (N = 623) were screened with the PTSD Checklist. American Indian and African American patients reported the highest levels of posttraumatic stress and preinjury cumulative trauma burden. African American heritage was independently associated with an increased risk of higher acute PTSD symptom levels. Disparities in trauma history, PTSD symptoms, and event related factors emphasize the need for acute care services to incorporate culturally competent approaches for treating these diverse populations. PMID:20564368

  1. [Clinical symptoms and signs in Kimmerle anomaly].

    PubMed

    Split, Wojciech; Sawrasewicz-Rybak, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to consider Kimmerle anomaly (ponticulus posterior of the atlas) as an anatomic variant, which can cause a set of clinical symptoms and signs. A hundred and eight patients, 58 females and 50 males at the age of 18-59 years (M. 36.9 years, SD = 9.6) with radiologically verified Kimmerle anomaly were examined. A control group comprised 40 healthy subjects at the similar age range. The diagnosis of headaches was based on the criteria proposed by the IHS. A character of headaches, their localization, frequency, duration, number of days with headaches per year, circumstances associated with their onset and concomitant symptoms were evaluated. All the patients were subjected to electrophysiological studies (ENG, EEG and VEP). The results were statistically analyzed using a SPSS/PC+ computer system. It was revealed that clinical symptoms and signs in Kimmerle anomaly occurred most frequently in the third and fourth decade of life (65% of cases). These were most often tension-type headaches (50% of cases with headaches), vascular headaches (26% of cases) and neuralgia (24% of cases). Intensity of headaches was high. Headaches were accompanied by other complaints like vertigo (59% of cases) and in one third of cases--nausea. About 10% of patients also suffered from vomiting, paresthesia, dizziness, short periods of loss of consciousness. Sporadically--tinitus, drop attack, and vegetative symptoms. In cases without pain the most frequent signs were short periods of loss of consciousness, dizziness, and also nausea and dizziness. The EEG examination revealed pathology in 40% of patients with Kimmerle anomaly. The ENG examination in more than 33% of anomaly cases showed injury in the central part of vestibular system. Improper answers were reported in about 75% of the patients during the VEP examination. PMID:12428570

  2. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure.

    PubMed

    Barber, Beth A; Kohl, Krista L; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2014-03-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N = 479) between the ages of 8-17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and 1 month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01) and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, reexperiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), reexperiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's ρ = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery. PMID:24337685

  3. An exploration of comorbid symptoms and clinical correlates of clinically significant hoarding symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brian J.; Tolin, David F.; Frost, Randy O.; Steketee, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Background Hoarding Disorder is currently being considered for inclusion in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, yet remains poorly understood. Consensus is building that hoarding may constitute a separate disorder, although comorbidity remains high and complicates the diagnostic picture. The purpose of this investigation was to explore patterns of comorbidity among people who engage in hoarding behavior in order to better understand its clinical presentation and phenomenology. Methods Data were collected from a large internet sample (N = 363) of people who self-identified as having hoarding problems, met criteria for clinically significant hoarding, and completed all measures for this study. Participants self-reported their symptoms of disorders commonly co-occurring with hoarding (obsessive compulsive disorder [OCD], depression, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]), along with other clinical problems. Results: Latent class analysis results indicated that the participants were grouped into three classes: “non-comorbid” hoarding (42%), hoarding with depression (42%), and hoarding with depression and inattention (16%). Conclusions Depression symptoms were the most commonly co-occurring symptom in this sample. Contrary to previous theory relating to hoarding etiology, OCD symptoms were not significantly co-occurring and a large percentage of the study participants were free from comorbid symptoms of OCD, depression, and ADHD. This suggests that hoarding disorder is not primarily the consequence of other psychiatric conditions. Implications for DSM-5, clinical treatment, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:23213052

  4. An update of clinical management of acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Pischik, Elena; Kauppinen, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is due to a deficiency of the third enzyme, the hydroxymethylbilane synthase, in heme biosynthesis. It manifests with occasional neuropsychiatric crises associated with overproduction of porphyrin precursors, aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The clinical criteria of an acute attack include the paroxysmal nature and various combinations of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, muscle weakness, or mental symptoms, in the absence of other obvious causes. Intensive abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, acute peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy usually with seizures or psychosis are the key symptoms indicating possible acute porphyria. More than fivefold elevation of urinary porphobilinogen excretion together with typical symptoms of an acute attack is sufficient to start a treatment. Currently, the prognosis of the patients with AIP is good, but physicians should be aware of a potentially fatal outcome of the disease. Mutation screening and identification of type of acute porphyria can be done at the quiescent phase of the disease. The management of patients with AIP include following strategies: A, during an acute attack: 1) treatment with heme preparations, if an acute attack is severe or moderate; 2) symptomatic treatment of autonomic dysfunctions, polyneuropathy and encephalopathy; 3) exclusion of precipitating factors; and 4) adequate nutrition and fluid therapy. B, during remission: 1) exclusion of precipitating factors (education of patients and family doctors), 2) information about on-line drug lists, and 3) mutation screening for family members and education about precipitating factors in mutation-positive family members. C, management of patients with recurrent attacks: 1) evaluation of the lifestyle, 2) evaluation of hormonal therapy in women, 3) prophylactic heme therapy, and 4) liver transplantation in patients with severe recurrent attacks. D, follow-up of the AIP

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  6. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  7. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined. PMID:25002781

  8. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Detweiler, Mark B

    2014-07-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined. PMID:25002781

  9. Acute Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and Clinical Response to Parenteral Doxycycline

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Anthony W.; Malkasian, Kay L.; Marshall, John R.; Guze, Lucien B.

    1975-01-01

    The bacteriology of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and clinical response to parenteral doxycycline were evaluated in 30 patients. Only 3 of 21 cul-de-sac cultures from PID patients were sterile, whereas all 8 normal control subjects yielded negative results (P< 0.005). Poor correlation was observed between cervical and cul-de-sac cultures. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, isolated from the cervix in 17 patients (57%), was recovered from the cul-de-sac only once. Streptococcus, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, coliforms, and other organisms normally present in the vagina were the predominant isolates recovered from the cul-de-sac. Parenteral doxycycline resulted in rapid resolution of signs and symptoms (within 48 h) in 20 of 27 evaluable patients (74%). In five others, signs and symptoms of infection abated within 4 days. The remaining two patients failed to respond; in both cases, adnexal masses developed during doxycycline therapy. Gonococci were eradicated from the cervix in all but one patient who, nevertheless, had a rapid defervescence of symptoms. There was no clear-cut correlation between the clinical response and in vitro susceptibility of cul-de-sac isolates to doxycycline. These data confirm the usefulness of broad-spectrum antibiotics in acute PID. Culdocentesis is a reliable means of obtaining material for the bacteriological diagnosis of acute PID; however, the pathogenetic role and relative importance of gonococci and various other bacteria in acute PID need to be clarified further. PMID:1169908

  10. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  11. Sensory symptoms in Parkinson's disease: Clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingxin; Li, Man; Ye, Dawei; Jiang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Shu, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common forms of neurodegenerative disease in the elderly population and is typically manifested by motor symptoms and nonmotor symptoms and signs. Nonmotor symptoms, such as sensory symptoms, have been regarded as the significant features of this disease. These symptoms often occur in early stages of PD and influence quality of life. However, researchers suggest that the sensory symptoms of PD are frequently unrecognized by clinicians and remain untreated. The disorders include pain, olfactory disturbance, and visual dysfunction input on the underlying sensory abnormality. This Review focuses on the clinical features, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment strategies for sensory symptoms of PD from both clinical studies and basic research, providing a comprehensive overview of the sensory symptoms in PD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26948282

  12. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  13. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  14. Clinical outcomes of acute myocarditis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; McCrindle, B; Bohn, D; Wilson, G; Taylor, G; Freedom, R; Smallhorn, J; Benson, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To describe clinical outcomes of a paediatric population with histologically confirmed lymphocytic myocarditis.
DESIGN—A retrospective review between November 1984 and February 1998.
SETTING—A major paediatric tertiary care hospital.
PATIENTS—36 patients with histologically confirmed lymphocytic myocarditis.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Survival, cardiac transplantation, recovery of ventricular function, and persistence of dysrhythmias.
RESULTS—Freedom from death or cardiac transplantation was 86% at one month and 79% after two years. Five deaths occurred within 72 hours of admission, and one late death at 1.9 years. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was used in four patients, and three patients underwent heart replacement. 34 patients were treated with intravenous corticosteroids. In the survivor/non-cardiac transplantation group (n = 29), the median follow up was 19 months (range 1.2-131.6 months), and the median period for recovery of a left ventricular ejection fraction to > 55% was 2.8 months (range 0-28 months). The mean (SD) final left ventricular ejection and shortening fractions were 66 (9)% and 34 (8)%, respectively. Two patients had residual ventricular dysfunction. No patient required antiarrhythmic treatment. All survivors reported no cardiac symptoms or restrictions in physical activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Our experience documents good outcomes in paediatric patients presenting with acute heart failure secondary to acute lymphocytic myocarditis treated with immunosuppression. Excellent survival and recovery of ventricular function, with the absence of significant arrhythmias, continued cardiac medications, or restrictions in physical activity were the normal outcomes.


Keywords: myocarditis; paediatric cardiology; immunosuppression PMID:10409542

  15. Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In order to understand the etiological burden of disease associated with acute health symptoms (e.g. gastrointestinal [GI], respiratory, dermatological), it is important to understand how common exposures influence these symptoms. Exposures to familiar and unfamiliar ...

  16. Defining and measuring negative symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Recent attention has focused on negative symptoms as a target for new therapeutic approaches including pharmacological agents, medical devices, and psychosocial treatments. Each of these approaches requires an instrument for measuring the severity of negative symptoms as well as changes in severity over time. The instrument selected should provide coverage for the domains of negative symptoms; it should be sensitive to change; it should be reliable and relatively brief; and it should be useful for large international trials. These criteria were used to evaluate a number of older instruments including the Schedule for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment Scale (NSA). Two newer scales, the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) were developed following a National Institute of Mental Health consensus meeting and addressed some of the shortcomings of earlier instruments. PMID:24275698

  17. Guilt is associated with acute stress symptoms in children after road traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Ann-Christin; Zehnder, Daniel; Landolt, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although previous research has consistently found considerable rates of acute stress disorder (ASD) in children with accidental injuries, knowledge about determinants of ASD remains incomplete. Guilt is a common reaction among children after a traumatic event and has been shown to contribute to posttraumatic stress disorder. However, its relationship to ASD has never been examined. Objective This study assessed the prevalence of ASD in children and adolescents following road traffic accidents (RTAs). Moreover, the association between peritraumatic guilt and ASD was investigated relying on current cognitive theories of posttraumatic stress and controlling for female sex, age, socioeconomic status (SES), injury severity, inpatient treatment, pretrauma psychopathology, and maternal posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Methods One hundred and one children and adolescents (aged 7–16 years) were assessed by means of a clinical interview approximately 10 days after an RTA. Mothers were assessed by questionnaires. Results Three participants (3.0%) met diagnostic criteria for full ASD according to DSM-IV, and 17 (16.8%) for subsyndromal ASD. In a multivariate regression model, guilt was found to be a significant predictor of ASD severity. Female sex, outpatient treatment, and maternal PTSS also predicted ASD severity. Child age, SES, injury severity, and pretraumatic child psychopathology were not related to ASD severity. Conclusions Future research should examine the association between peritraumatic guilt and acute stress symptoms in more detail. Moreover, guilt appraisals in the acute phase after an accident might be a relevant target for clinical attention. PMID:26514158

  18. Changes in the Neuropsychological Correlates of Clinical Dimensions between the Acute and Stable Phase of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillem, F.; Ganeva, E.; Pampoulova, T.; Stip, E.; Lalonde, P.; Sasseville, M.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the neuropsychological correlates of the symptom dimensions of schizophrenia vary with the clinical state in patients followed from the acute to stable the phase of the illness. Fifteen patients were assessed for symptoms (SAPS-SANS) and undergone a complete neuropsychological assessment at two…

  19. Clinical cases in acute intoxication.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean B; Maguire, Jennifer; Mauck, Karen F

    2009-12-01

    Over 2.5 million accidental and intentional drug-related poisonings are reported annually in the United States. Early diagnosis and management of patients who present with acute intoxication can significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. The initial evaluation of patients with suspected or proven intoxications should focus on hemodynamic stability, mental status, and respiratory function. However, early recognition of toxic ingestion is paramount to implementing life-saving treatments. Important historical clues are often found in a social history that considers intravenous drug use, alcohol use, and any access or exposure to illicit substances. A patient's medication list should also be scrutinized for psychoactive or sedative medications, such as tricyclic antidepressants or opioids. In this article we present case-based discussions of the specific diagnosis and management of 5 commonly occurring acute intoxication syndromes. PMID:20877175

  20. Acute Stress Symptoms in Children: Results From an International Data Archive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Palmieri, Patrick A.; Rork, Kristine; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Kenardy, Justin; Kohser, Kristen L.; Landolt, Markus A.; Le Brocque, Robyne; Marsac, Meghan L.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Nixon, Reginald D.V.; Bui, Eric; McGrath, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms and to examine proposed "DSM-5" symptom criteria in relation to concurrent functional impairment in children and adolescents. Method: From an international archive, datasets were identified that included assessment of acute traumatic stress reactions and concurrent…

  1. Nomothetic and Idiographic Symptom Change Trajectories in Acute-Phase Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We tested nomothetic and idiographic convergence and change in three symptom measures during acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT) for depression and compared outcomes among patients showing different change patterns. Method Outpatients (N = 362; 69% women; 85% white; age mean = 43 years) with DSM-IV recurrent major depressive disorder completed the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Hamilton, 1960), Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh 1961), and Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report (Rush, Gullion, Basco, Jarrett, & Trivedi, 1996) on 14 occasions, and pre-/post-CT measures of social-interpersonal functioning and negative cognitive content. Results The three symptom measures marked the same severity and change constructs, and we offer improved formulas for inter-measure score conversions via their common factor. Pre-post CT symptom reductions were large (ds 1.71-1.92), and nomothetic symptom curves were log-linear (larger improvements earlier and smaller improvements later in CT). Nonetheless, only 30% of individual patients showed clear log-linear changes, whereas other patients showed linear (e.g., steady decreases; 20%), one-step (e.g., a quick drop; 16%), and unclassified (34%) patterns. Log-linear, linear, and one-step patients were generally similar to one another and superior to unclassified patients post-CT in symptom levels, response and stable remission rates, social-interpersonal functioning, and cognitive content (median d = 0.69). Conclusions Reaching a low-symptom “destination” at the end of CT via any coherent “path” is more important in the short-term than which path patients take. We discuss implications for theories of change, clinical monitoring of individuals’ progress in CT, and the need to investigate long-term outcomes of patients with differing symptom change patterns. PMID:23627652

  2. Evaluating the Clinical Utility of the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT): A Clinical Series.

    PubMed

    Suesse, Mareike; Wong, Vivien W C; Stamper, Laura L; Carpenter, Katherine N; Scott, Richard B

    2015-01-01

    Performance validity tests (PVTs) are not widely used beyond medico-legal contexts in the UK. A UK survey suggests clinicians have reservations about their accuracy in clinical settings. This study sought to explore the validity of PVTs in an acute adult neuropsychology setting and to establish a potential "false positive" (FP) base rate. Failures on the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) in a consecutive clinical series of 405 patients were evaluated systematically and allocated to groups depending on clinical context. All failures were checked against the test's "dementia profile". Of the 405 participants, 329 passed the MSVT (81.2%), while 76 participants (18.8%) failed based on standard criteria. A 5.2% rate of potentially 'unexplained' failures was found. Other reasons for failure were classified as: presumed malingered neurocognitive dysfunction (4.6%), dementia/significant cognitive impairment (3.7%), technical/visual problems (1.8%), and "unexplained failure" with contributory factors (2.4%). These results suggest test specificity between 0.95 and 0.90. Most of the clinically significantly impaired patients matched the dementia profile (86.7%). Our results support the sensitivity, but not the specificity, of the dementia profile. However, approximately 1 in 20 patients failed the MSVT despite an otherwise unremarkable neuropsychological presentation; moreover, mood and pain may affect MSVT performance. Clinical implications for interpreting test scores are discussed. PMID:25798743

  3. Lay Public's Knowledge and Decisions in Response to Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cytryn, Kayla N.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Cimino, James J.; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Despite public health initiatives targeting rapid action in response to symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), people continue to delay in going to a hospital when experiencing these symptoms due to lack of recognition as cardiac-related. The objective of this research was to characterize lay individuals' knowledge of symptoms of acute myocardial…

  4. Signs or Symptoms of Acute HIV Infection in a Cohort Undergoing Community-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nella; Camacho, Martha; Gianella, Sara; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed signs and symptoms in 90 patients diagnosed with acute HIV infection in a community-based program that offered universal HIV-1 nucleic acid amplification testing. Forty-seven (52%) patients reported ongoing signs or symptoms at the time of testing. Another 25 (28%) reported signs or symptoms that had occurred during the 14 days before testing. PMID:26890854

  5. Signs or Symptoms of Acute HIV Infection in a Cohort Undergoing Community-Based Screening.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Green, Nella; Camacho, Martha; Gianella, Sara; Mehta, Sanjay R; Smith, Davey M; Little, Susan J

    2016-02-01

    We analyzed signs and symptoms in 90 patients diagnosed with acute HIV infection in a community-based program that offered universal HIV-1 nucleic acid amplification testing. Forty-seven (52%) patients reported ongoing signs or symptoms at the time of testing. Another 25 (28%) reported signs or symptoms that had occurred during the 14 days before testing. PMID:26890854

  6. [Clinical criteria of acute epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Grössing, N

    1992-08-01

    In a retrospective study 368 epidural hematomas are presented, treated from 1970 until August 1991. The clinical course and manifestation of acute epidural hematomas is commented on by means of own cases. Assessing the success of treatment, it could be demonstrated that the prompter diagnosis reduced the lethal outcome of epidural hematoma to 6.6%. PMID:1413279

  7. Clinical Presentation of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Survey of 800 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Miniati, Massimo; Cenci, Caterina; Monti, Simonetta; Poli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal disease that is still underdiagnosed. The objective of our study was to reappraise the clinical presentation of PE with emphasis on the identification of the symptoms and signs that prompt the patients to seek medical attention. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 800 patients with PE from two different clinical settings: 440 were recruited in Pisa (Italy) as part of the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISAPED); 360 were diagnosed with and treated for PE in seven hospitals of central Tuscany, and evaluated at the Atherothrombotic Disorders Unit, Firenze (Italy), shortly after hospital discharge. We interviewed the patients directly using a standardized, self-administered questionnaire originally utilized in the PISAPED. The two samples differed significantly as regards age, proportion of outpatients, prevalence of unprovoked PE, and of active cancer. Sudden onset dyspnea was the most frequent symptom in both samples (81 and 78%), followed by chest pain (56 and 39%), fainting or syncope (26 and 22%), and hemoptysis (7 and 5%). At least one of the above symptoms was reported by 756 (94%) of 800 patients. Isolated symptoms and signs of deep vein thrombosis occurred in 3% of the cases. Only 7 (1%) of 800 patients had no symptoms before PE was diagnosed. Conclusions/Significance Most patients with PE feature at least one of four symptoms which, in decreasing order of frequency, are sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain, fainting (or syncope), and hemoptysis. The occurrence of such symptoms, if not explained otherwise, should alert the clinicians to consider PE in differential diagnosis, and order the appropriate objective test. PMID:22383978

  8. Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2014-12-01

    The infection of the nervous system by the cystic larvae of Taenia solium (neurocysticercosis) is a frequent cause of seizure disorders. Neurocysticercosis is endemic or presumed to be endemic in many low-income countries. The lifecycle of the worm and the clinical manifestations of neurocysticercosis are well established, and CT and MRI have substantially improved knowledge of the disease course. Improvements in immunodiagnosis have further advanced comprehension of the pathophysiology of this disease. This knowledge has led to individualised treatment approaches that account for the involvement of parenchymal or extraparenchymal spaces, the number and form of parasites, and the extent of degeneration and associated inflammation. Clinical investigations are focused on development of effective treatments and reduction of side-effects induced by treatment, such as seizures, hydrocephalus, infarcts, and neuroinjury. PMID:25453460

  9. Pineal region tumors: Clinical symptoms and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; des Portes, V; Berlier, P; Mottolese, C

    2015-01-01

    The present paper investigates the clinical picture and the different clinical signs that reveal pineal region tumors or appear during the course of the follow-up. Biological malignancy and tumor extension determine the semiology and its setting up mode. Typical endocrine signs, dominated by abnormal puberty development, are frequently a part of the clinical scene. Bifocal or ectopic localization in the hypothalamic-pituitary region is accompanied by other endocrine signs such as ante- or post-pituitary insufficiencies which occur several months or even years after the first neurological signs appear. Due to a mass syndrome and obstructive hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension signs are frequent but unspecific. A careful ophthalmologic examination is essential to search upward gaze paralysis and other signs of the Parinaud's tetrad or pentad. Midbrain dysfunction, including extrinsic aqueduct stenosis, are also prevalent. Except for abnormal pubertal signs, hyper-melatoninemia (secretory tumors) or a-hypo-melatoninemia (tumors destructing pineal) generally remains dormant. Some patients present sleep problems such as narcolepsy or sleepiness during the daytime as well as behavioral problems. This suggests a hypothalamic extension rather than a true consequence of melatonin secretion anomalies. Similarly, some patients may present signs of a "pinealectomized" syndrome, including (cluster) headaches, tiredness, eventually responsive to melatonin. PMID:24439798

  10. The Relationship Between Borderline Personality Disorder and Major Depression in Later Life: Acute Versus Temperamental Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Galione, Janine N.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A recent issue in the personality disorder field is the prevalence and course of Axis II symptoms in later life. Focusing on the presentation of personality disorder criteria over time may have some utility in exploring the relationship between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depression in older adults. Temperamental personality symptoms are relatively resistant to change but tend to be nonspecific to disorders, while acute symptoms remit relatively quickly. We predicted that temperamental BPD symptoms would be positively correlated with a history of depression and did not expect to find a relationship between major depression and acute BPD symptoms. Method One thousand six hundred and thirty participants between the ages of 55 and 64 were recruited to participate in a community-based longitudinal study representative of the St. Louis area. Participants completed a battery of assessments at baseline, including diagnostic interviews for all ten personality disorders and major depressive disorder. Results Temperamental and acute BPD symptoms were significantly correlated with a history of major depression. After adjustments were made for the effects of temperamental symptoms on depression, acute symptoms were no longer correlated with a history of depression. As predicted, temperamental symptoms remained significantly related to depression, even after controlling for the effects of acute symptoms. BPD acute symptoms showed a unique negative correlation with the amount of time following remission from a depressive episode. Conclusions Overall, this study supports associations between major depression and borderline personality in older adults. The findings indicate that a history of major depression is primarily related to stable BPD symptoms related to emotional distress, which are more prevalent in older adults compared to acute features. PMID:23567384

  11. COPD management: role of symptom assessment in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Thys; Miravitlles, Marc; Kocks, Janwillem WH

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with a variety of symptoms that significantly impair health-related quality of life. Despite this, COPD treatment and its management are mainly based on lung function assessments. There is increasing evidence that conventional lung function measures alone do not correlate well with COPD symptoms and their associated impact on patients’ everyday lives. Instead, symptoms should be assessed routinely, preferably by using patient-centered questionnaires that provide a more accurate guide to the actual burden of COPD. Numerous questionnaires have been developed in an attempt to find a simple and reliable tool to use in everyday clinical practice. In this paper, we review three such patient-reported questionnaires recommended by the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, ie, the modified Medical Research Council questionnaire, the clinical COPD questionnaire, and the COPD Assessment Test, as well as other symptom-specific questionnaires that are currently being developed. PMID:24143085

  12. Early Clinical Signs and Symptoms of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miedzinski, Lil J.

    1992-01-01

    Early clinical signs and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus infection are protean and can reflect the effects of the virus or represent early manifestations of an illness associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Knowledge of a patient's potential risk for HIV infection and of the natural history of the illness allow early signs and symptoms to be recognized. Early intervention can delay progression to AIDS. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21221397

  13. Etiological and Clinical Features of Childhood Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Polanczyk, Guilherme; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Cannon, Mary; Ambler, Antony; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Houts, Renate; Odgers, Candice L.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Context It has been reported that childhood psychotic symptoms are common in the general population and may signal neurodevelopmental processes that lead to schizophrenia. However, it is not clear whether these symptoms are associated with the same extensive risk factors established for adult schizophrenia. Objective To examine the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms by testing whether these symptoms share the risk factors and clinical features of adult schizophrenia. Design Prospective, longitudinal cohort study of a nationally representative birth cohort in Great Britain. Participants A total of 2232 twelve-year-old children followed up since age 5 years (retention, 96%). Main Outcome Measure Children’s self-reported hallucinations and delusions. Results Children’s psychotic symptoms are familial and heritable and are associated with social risk factors (eg, urbanicity); cognitive impairments at age 5; home-rearing risk factors (eg, maternal expressed emotion); behavioral, emotional, and educational problems at age 5; and comorbid conditions, including self-harm. Conclusions The results provide a comprehensive picture of the construct validity of children’s self-reported psychotic symptoms. For researchers, the findings indicate that children who have psychotic symptoms can be recruited for neuroscience research to determine the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. For clinicians, the findings indicate that psychotic symptoms in childhood are often a marker of an impaired developmental process and should be actively assessed. PMID:20368509

  14. Audit of the Use of Regular Haem Arginate Infusions in Patients with Acute Porphyria to Prevent Recurrent Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Joanne T; Guppy, Simon; Stein, Penelope; Cox, Timothy M; Badminton, Michael; Gardiner, Tricia; Barth, Julian H; Stewart, M Felicity; Rees, David C

    2015-01-01

    The National Acute Porphyria Service (NAPS) provides acute care support and clinical advice for patients in England with active acute porphyria requiring haem arginate treatment and patients with recurrent acute attacks.This audit examined the benefits and complications of regular haem arginate treatment started with prophylactic intent to reduce the frequency of recurrent acute attacks in a group of patients managed through NAPS. We included 22 patients (21 female and 1 male) and returned information on diagnosis, indications for prophylactic infusions, frequency and dose, analgesia, activity and employment and complications including thromboembolic disease and iron overload.The median age at presentation with porphyria was 21 years (range 9-44), with acute abdominal pain as the predominant symptom. Patients had a median of 12 (1-400) attacks before starting prophylaxis and had received a median of 52 (0-1,350) doses of haem arginate. The median age at starting prophylaxis was 28 years (13-58) with a median delay of 4 years (0.5-37) between presentation and prophylaxis. The frequency of prophylactic haem arginate varied from 1 to 8 per month, and 67% patients were documented as having a reduction in pain frequency on prophylaxis. Only one patient developed clinically significant iron overload and required iron chelation, but the number of venous access devices required varied from 1 to 15, with each device lasting a median of 1.2 years before requiring replacement. Six patients stopped haem arginate and in three this was because their symptoms had improved. Prophylactic haem arginate appears to be beneficial in patients with recurrent acute porphyria symptoms, but maintaining central venous access may prove challenging. PMID:25762493

  15. Change in Psychosocial Functioning and Depressive Symptoms during Acute-Phase Cognitive Therapy for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Todd W.; Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Carmody, Thomas; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is highly prevalent, is recurrent, and impairs people’s work, relationships, and leisure. Acute-phase treatments improve psychosocial impairment associated with MDD, but how these improvements occur is unclear. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that reductions in depressive symptoms exceed, precede, and predict improvements in psychosocial functioning. Method Patients with recurrent MDD (N = 523; 68% women, 81% Caucasian; M = 42 years old) received acute-phase Cognitive Therapy (CT; Beck, Rush, Shaw & Emery, 1979). We measured functioning and symptom severity with the Social Adjustment Scale—Self-Report (Weissman & Bothwell, 1976), Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (Leon et al., 1999), Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Hamilton, 1960) and Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology—Self-Report (Rush et al., 1996). We tested cross-lagged correlations between functioning and symptoms measured at baseline and the beginning, middle and end of acute phase CT. Results Pre- to post- treatment improvement in psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms was large and inter-correlated. Depressive symptoms improved more and sooner than did psychosocial functioning. But among four assessments across the course of treatment, improvements in functioning more strongly predicted later improvement in symptoms than vice versa. Conclusions Improvements in psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms correlate substantially during acute-phase CT, and improvements in functioning may play a role in subsequent symptom reduction during acute-phase CT. PMID:21781377

  16. Clinical Symptoms and Risk Factors in Cerebral Microangiopathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Okroglic, Sandra; Widmann, Catherine N.; Urbach, Horst; Scheltens, Philip; Heneka, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM) remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated retrospectively in a cohort of CM patients. Methods Patients treated at the Department of Neurology, University of Bonn for CM (n = 223; 98m, 125f; aged 77.32±9.09) from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical symptoms, blood chemistry, potential risk factors, demographic data and ratings of vascular pathology in the brain based on the Wahlund scale were analyzed using Pearson's chi square test and one-way ANOVA. Results Progressive cognitive decline (38.1%), gait apraxia (27.8%), stroke-related symptoms and seizures (24.2%), TIA-symptoms (22%) and vertigo (17%) were frequent symptoms within the study population. Frontal lobe WMLs/lacunar infarcts led to more frequent presentation of progressive cognitive decline, seizures, gait apraxia, stroke-related symptoms, TIA, vertigo and incontinence. Parietooccipital WMLs/lacunar infarcts were related to higher frequencies of TIA, seizures and incontinence. Basal ganglia WMLs/lacunar infarcts were seen in patients with more complaints of gait apraxia, vertigo and incontinence. Age (p = .012), arterial hypertension (p<.000), obesity (p<.000) and cerebral macroangiopathy (p = .018) were positively related to cerebral lesion load. For increased glucose level, homocysteine, CRP and D-Dimers there was no association. Conclusion This underlines the association of CM with neurological symptoms upon admission in a topographical manner. Seizures and vertigo are symptoms of CM which may have been missed in previous studies. In addition to confirming known risk factors such as aging and arterial hypertension, obesity appears to increase the risk as well. Since the incidence of CM is increasing, future studies should

  17. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  18. Clinical Guideline for Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoru; Takei, Mineo; Nishizawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Kato, Kumiko; Gotoh, Momokazu; Yoshimura, Yasukuni; Takeyama, Masami; Ozawa, Hideo; Shimada, Makoto; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Yoshida, Masaki; Tomoe, Hikaru; Yokoyama, Osamu; Koyama, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    The "Japanese Clinical Guideline for Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms," published in Japan in November 2013, contains two algorithms (a primary and a specialized treatment algorithm) that are novel worldwide as they cover female lower urinary tract symptoms other than urinary incontinence. For primary treatment, necessary types of evaluation include querying the patient regarding symptoms and medical history, examining physical findings, and performing urinalysis. The types of evaluations that should be performed for select cases include evaluation with symptom/quality of life (QOL) questionnaires, urination records, residual urine measurement, urine cytology, urine culture, serum creatinine measurement, and ultrasonography. If the main symptoms are voiding/post-voiding, specialized treatment should be considered because multiple conditions may be involved. When storage difficulties are the main symptoms, the patient should be assessed using the primary algorithm. When conditions such as overactive bladder or stress incontinence are diagnosed and treatment is administered, but sufficient improvement is not achieved, the specialized algorithm should be considered. In case of specialized treatment, physiological re-evaluation, urinary tract/pelvic imaging evaluation, and urodynamic testing are conducted for conditions such as refractory overactive bladder and stress incontinence. There are two causes of voiding/post-voiding symptoms: lower urinary tract obstruction and detrusor underactivity. Lower urinary tract obstruction caused by pelvic organ prolapse may be improved by surgery. PMID:26789539

  19. Clinical neuroprediction: Amygdala reactivity predicts depressive symptoms 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Whitney I; Hyde, Luke W; Shaw, Daniel S; Forbes, Erika E; Monk, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    Depression is linked to increased amygdala activation to neutral and negatively valenced facial expressions. Amygdala activation may be predictive of changes in depressive symptoms over time. However, most studies in this area have focused on small, predominantly female and homogenous clinical samples. Studies are needed to examine how amygdala reactivity relates to the course of depressive symptoms dimensionally, prospectively and in populations diverse in gender, race and socioeconomic status. A total of 156 men from predominately low-income backgrounds completed an fMRI task where they viewed emotional facial expressions. Left and right amygdala reactivity to neutral, but not angry or fearful, facial expressions relative to a non-face baseline at age 20 predicted greater depressive symptoms 2 years later, controlling for age 20 depressive symptoms. Heightened bilateral amygdala reactivity to neutral facial expressions predicted increases in depressive symptoms 2 years later in a large community sample. Neutral facial expressions are affectively ambiguous and a tendency to interpret these stimuli negatively may reflect to cognitive biases that lead to increases in depressive symptoms over time. Individual differences in amygdala reactivity to neutral facial expressions appear to identify those at most risk for a more problematic course of depressive symptoms across time. PMID:26865423

  20. Perfusion-CT - Can We Predict Acute Pancreatitis Outcome within the First 24 Hours from the Onset of Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Pieńkowska, Joanna; Gwoździewicz, Katarzyna; Skrobisz-Balandowska, Katarzyna; Marek, Iwona; Kostro, Justyna; Szurowska, Edyta; Studniarek, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is still a significant clinical problem which is associated with a highly mortality. The aim of this study was the evaluation of prognostic value of CT regional perfusion measurement performed on the first day of onset of symptoms of AP, in assessing the risk of developing severe form of acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods 79 patients with clinical symptoms and biochemical criteria indicative of acute pancreatitis (acute upper abdominal pain, elevated levels of serum amylase and lipase) underwent perfusion CT within 24 hours after onset of symptoms. The follow-up examinations were performed after 4–6 days to detect progression of the disease. Perfusion parameters were compared in 41 people who developed severe form of AP (pancreatic and/or peripancreatic tissue necrosis) with parameters in 38 consecutive patients in whom course of AP was mild. Blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time and permeability surface area product were calculated in the three anatomic pancreatic subdivisions (head, body and tail). At the same time the patient's clinical status was assessed by APACHE II score and laboratory parameters such as CRP, serum lipase and amylase, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP and bilirubin were compared. Results Statistical differences in the perfusion parameters between the group of patients with mild and severe AP were shown. Blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time were significantly lower and permeability surface area product was significantly higher in patients who develop severe acute pancreatitis and presence of pancreatic and/or peripancreatic necrosis due to pancreatic ischemia. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of evaluated on admission severity of pancreatitis assessed using APACHE II score and laboratory tests. Conclusions CT perfusion is a very useful indicator for prediction and selection patients in early stages of acute pancreatitis who are at risk of

  1. Clinical Manifestation of Self-Limiting Acute Retinal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Borkowski, Piotr; Szczepanik, Szymon; Moneta-Wielgoś, Joanna; Kęcik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper was to present a case series of self-limiting, peripheral acute retinal necrosis and to demonstrate efficacy of treatment with valacyclovir in patients resistant to acyclovir. The diagnosis was made on ophthalmoscopic examination and positive serum tests for herpes viruses. Material/Methods Ten patients (6F and 4M) aged 19–55 years were diagnosed and treated for self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The following endpoints were reported: visual outcomes, clinical features, disease progression, treatment, and complications. Patients received only symptomatic treatment because they did not consent to vitreous puncture. Results Peripheral, mild retinitis was diagnosed in all eyes at baseline. Initially, all patients were treated with systemic acyclovir (800 mg, 5 times a day), prednisone (typically 40–60 mg/day), and aspirin in an outpatient setting. In 6 patients, treatment was discontinued at 6 months due to complete resolution of the inflammatory process. Four patients with immune deficiency showed signs and symptoms of chronic inflammation. Two patients did not respond to acyclovir (2 non-responders); however, those patients were successfully treated with valacyclovir. Complete resolution of inflammatory lesions was observed in 8 patients. In 2 patients, the disease progressed despite treatment – 1 female patient after kidney transplant who stopped the prescribed medications, and 1 male patient with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome who experienced breakthrough symptoms on-treatment. He died due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Neurological complications (encephalitis and meningitis) were observed in 2 female patients. Prophylactic laser photocoagulation was performed in 1 subject. Conclusions A series of cases of self-limiting acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is presented. This clinical form of ARN can resemble toxoplasmic retinitis in some cases. Oral antiviral medications provide an effective alternative to

  2. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  3. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  4. Gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis: Impact on clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Munster, Caspar E P; Jonkman, Laura E; Weinstein, Henry C; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Geurts, Jeroen J G

    2015-09-10

    Traditionally, multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a disease primarily affecting the white matter (WM). However, the development of some clinical symptoms such as cognitive impairment cannot be fully explained by the severity of WM pathology alone. During the past decades it became clear that gray matter (GM) damage of the brain is also of major importance in patients with MS. Thanks to improved magnetic resonance imaging techniques, the in vivo detection of GM pathology became possible, enabling a better understanding of the manifestation of various clinical symptoms, such as cognitive impairment. Using higher field strengths and specific sequences, detection of cortical lesions was increased. However, despite these improvements, visualization of cortical MS lesions remains difficult (only about 30-50% of histopathologically confirmed lesions can be detected at 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)). Furthermore, more research is needed to understand the exact interplay of cortical lesions, GM atrophy and WM pathology in the development of clinical symptoms. In this review, we summarize the historical background that preceded current research and provide an overview of the current knowledge on clinical consequences of GM pathology in MS in terms of disability, cognitive impairment and other clinically important signs such as epileptic seizures. PMID:26164500

  5. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  6. Occurrence and Correlates of Symptom Persistence Following Acute Dengue Fever in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Eric S.; Williams, Maya; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Ocaña, Victor; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Marks, Morgan A.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes an acute febrile illness generally considered to result in either complete recovery or death. Some reviews describe persistent symptoms after the febrile phase, although empirical data supporting this phenomenon is scarce. We evaluated symptom persistence in acute febrile DENV-infected and DENV-negative (controls) individuals from Peru. Self-reported solicited symptoms were evaluated at an acute and a follow-up visit, occurring 10–60 days after symptom onset. Rate of persistence of at least one symptom was 7.7% and 10.5% for DENV infected and control subjects, respectively (P < 0.01). The DENV-infected individuals had lower rates of persistent respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, headache, and fatigue, but higher rates of persistent rash compared with controls. Older age and female gender were positively associated with symptom persistence. As dengue cases continue to increase annually, even a relatively low frequency of persistent symptoms may represent a considerable worldwide morbidity burden. PMID:24470564

  7. Occurrence and correlates of symptom persistence following acute dengue fever in Peru.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Eric S; Williams, Maya; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Ocaña, Victor; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Marks, Morgan A

    2014-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes an acute febrile illness generally considered to result in either complete recovery or death. Some reviews describe persistent symptoms after the febrile phase, although empirical data supporting this phenomenon is scarce. We evaluated symptom persistence in acute febrile DENV-infected and DENV-negative (controls) individuals from Peru. Self-reported solicited symptoms were evaluated at an acute and a follow-up visit, occurring 10-60 days after symptom onset. Rate of persistence of at least one symptom was 7.7% and 10.5% for DENV infected and control subjects, respectively (P < 0.01). The DENV-infected individuals had lower rates of persistent respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, headache, and fatigue, but higher rates of persistent rash compared with controls. Older age and female gender were positively associated with symptom persistence. As dengue cases continue to increase annually, even a relatively low frequency of persistent symptoms may represent a considerable worldwide morbidity burden. PMID:24470564

  8. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  9. Primary renal magnesium wasting: an unusual clinical picture of exercise-induced symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stark, Christopher M; Nylund, Cade M; Gorman, Gregory H; Lechner, Brent L

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium is one of the most abundant cations in the human body and plays a key role as a metabolic enzyme cofactor and regulatory ion for neurons and cardiomyocytes. Hypomagnesemia due to isolated primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical condition typically associated with neurological hyperexcitability. Exercise-related gastrointestinal symptoms are caused by ischemic, mechanical, or neurohormonal changes. The role of hypomagnesemia in gastrointestinal symptoms is not well understood. We present a case of a 15-year-old male who presented with exercise-induced abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, who was found to have profound hypomagnesemia and inappropriately elevated fractional excretion of magnesium (FEMg). Testing for multiple intrinsic and extrinsic etiologies of renal magnesium wasting was inconclusive. He was diagnosed with primary renal magnesium wasting and his symptoms resolved acutely with intravenous magnesium sulfate and with long-term oral magnesium chloride. Primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical entity that can cause extreme hypomagnesemia. It has not been associated previously with exercise-induced gastrointestinal symptoms. The effects of hypomagnesemia on the human gastrointestinal tract are not well established. This case offers unique insights into the importance of magnesium homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. Exercise-induced splanchnic hypoperfusion may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms observed in this chronically hypomagnesemic patient. PMID:27117800

  10. Bordetella pertussis in infants hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms remains a concern

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preliminary results suggest that pertussis infection might be considered in infants during a seasonal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak. Methods In order to analyze clinical features and laboratory findings in infants with pertussis hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms during a seasonal RSV outbreak, we conducted a retrospective single-center study on 19 infants with pertussis (6 boys; median age 72 days) and 19 matched controls (RSV-bronchiolitis), hospitalized from October 2008 to April 2010. B. pertussis and RSV were detected from nasopharyngeal washes with Real Time-PCR. Results Infants with pertussis were less often breastfeed than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (63.2% vs 89.5%; p <0.06). Clinically, significantly fewer infants with pertussis than controls had more episodes of whooping cough (63.2% vs 0.0%; p < 0.001) and also less frequently fever at admission (15.8% vs 68.4%; p <0.01), apnea (52.6% vs 10.5%; p <0.006), and cyanosis (52.6% vs 10.5%; p < 0.006). Infants with pertussis had more often no abnormal chest sounds on auscultation than infants with RSV bronchiolitis (0% vs 42,1%; p < 0.005). The absolute blood lymphocyte and eosinophil counts were higher in infants with B. pertussis than in controls with bronchiolitis (23886 ± 16945 vs 10725 ± 4126 cells/mm3, p < 0.0001 and 13.653 ± 10.430 vs 4.730 ± 2.400 cells/mm3, p < 0.001). The molecular analysis of 2 B. pertussis isolates for ptxA1, ptxP3, and prn2 genes showed the presence of gene variants. Conclusions When infants are hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms, physicians should suspect a pertussis infection, seek for specific clinical symptoms, investigate lymphocyte and eosinophil counts and thus diagnose infection early enough to allow treatment. PMID:24209790

  11. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  12. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis, the Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Dugum, Mohannad F; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is an acute form of alcoholic liver disease with variable severity that develops in patients who usually have a history of prolonged and recent alcohol abuse. The diagnosis is clinical and depends on history, physical examination, and laboratory derangements. Liver biopsy is diagnostic but not universally performed, and noninvasive diagnostic modalities are under development. Scoring systems are used to assess severity of disease, predict mortality, and guide decisions for initiation of specific therapies. The natural history and long-term outcomes of alcoholic hepatitis, including recurrence, progression to cirrhosis, and mortality, vary and depend partly on abstinence from alcohol use. PMID:27373612

  13. Disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in non-clinical children.

    PubMed

    Muris, Peter; van der Heiden, Simone; Rassin, Eric

    2008-06-01

    There is clear evidence in the adult literature that disgust sensitivity is implicated in various psychopathological syndromes. The current study examined the link between disgust sensitivity and psychopathological symptoms in youths. In a sample of non-clinical children aged 9-13 years, disgust sensitivity was assessed by two self-report questionnaires (i.e., the Disgust Scale and the Disgust Sensitivity Questionnaire) and a behavioural test. Furthermore, children completed scales for measuring the personality trait of neuroticism and various types of psychopathological symptoms. Results showed that disgust measures had sufficient to good convergent validity. Further, significant positive correlations were found between disgust sensitivity and symptoms of specific phobias (i.e., spider phobia, blood-injection phobia, small-animal phobia), social phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and eating problems, and these links were not attenuated when controlling for neuroticism. The possible role of disgust sensitivity in the aetiology of child psychopathology is discussed. PMID:17433251

  14. Nocturnal symptoms and sleep disturbances in clinically stable asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Inder Mohan; Khanna, Puneet; Shah, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    Presence of nocturnal symptoms is related to asthma severity. Clinically stable asthmatic children, too, report frequent nocturnal symptoms and sleep disturbances. The study determined these parameters in stable, asthmatic children, in their home environment. This case-control, questionnaire-based study in 70 school-going children comprised 40 asthmatics (Group 1) and 30, age/gender matched, healthy children (Group 2). Parents maintained peak expiratory flow (PEF) and sleep diaries for one week. Group 1 had significantly lower mean morning (250.3 vs. 289.1 I/minute) and mean evening PEF values (261.7 vs. 291.3 I/minute). Group 1 (38.95%), reported frequent nocturnal symptoms like cough (36.90%), breathlessness (32.80%), wheeze (27.68%) and chest tightness (14.35%). Sleep disturbances, significant in Group 1 (38, 95% vs. 14.35%), included daytime sleepiness (24.60%), daytime tiredness (20.50%), difficulty in maintaining sleep (15.38%), early morning awakening (14.35%), struggle against sleep during daytime (12.30%), and involuntarily falling asleep (17.43%). On a scale of 1-6, Group 1 scored significant sleep disturbances/patient (3 vs. 0.8); lethargy/tiredness in morning (2.9 vs. 2.2), poorer sleep quality (4.7 vs. 5.4), less parents' satisfaction with child's sleep (4.5 vs. 5.5) and daytime fitness (4.1 vs. 5.3). Group 1, when exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (22, 55%), reported significant nocturnal symptoms (18/22, 81%) and reduced mean morning and evening PEF values (17/22, 77%). It is concluded that clinically stable, asthmatic children reported increased nocturnal symptoms, sleep disturbances and poorer sleep quality. Lack of awareness of asthma-sleep association and its clinical implications could lead to poor asthma control and impaired daytime activity. PMID:17136879

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex disorder of heterogeneous etiologies characterized by a consistent, recognizable pattern of lung injury. Extensive epidemiologic studies and clinical intervention trials have been conducted to address the high mortality of this disorder and have provided significant insight into the complexity of studying new therapies for this condition. The existing clinical investigations in ARDS will be highlighted in this review. The limitations to current definitions, patient selection, and outcome assessment will be considered. While significant attention has been focused on the parenchymal injury that characterizes this disorder and the clinical support of gas exchange function, relatively limited focus has been directed to hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular dysfunction equally prominent in the disease. The limited available clinical information in this area will also be reviewed. The current standards for cardiopulmonary management of the condition will be outlined. Current gaps in our understanding of the clinical condition will be highlighted with the expectation that continued progress will contribute to a decline in disease mortality. PMID:22034606

  16. MDMA, cannabis, and cocaine produce acute dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-Van der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; van Wel, Janelle; Bosker, Wendy M; Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; Spronk, Desirée B; Jan Verkes, Robbert; Merckelbach, Harald; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2015-08-30

    Some drugs of abuse may produce dissociative symptoms, but this aspect has been understudied. We explored the dissociative potential of three recreational drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cannabis, and cocaine) during intoxication and compared their effects to literature reports of dissociative states in various samples. Two placebo-controlled studies were conducted. In Study 1 (N=16), participants received single doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg of MDMA, and placebo. In Study 2 (N=21), cannabis (THC 300 µg/kg), cocaine (HCl 300 mg), and placebo were administered. Dissociative symptoms as measured with the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS) significantly increased under the influence of MDMA and cannabis. To a lesser extent, this was also true for cocaine. Dissociative symptoms following MDMA and cannabis largely exceeded those observed in schizophrenia patients, were comparable with those observed in Special Forces soldiers undergoing survival training, but were lower compared with ketamine-induced dissociation. Cocaine produced dissociative symptoms that were comparable with those observed in schizophrenia patients, but markedly less than those in Special Forces soldiers and ketamine users. Thus, MDMA and cannabis can produce dissociative symptoms that resemble dissociative pathology. The study of drug induced dissociation is important, because it may shed light on the mechanisms involved in dissociative psychopathology. PMID:26003508

  17. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Kiderman, Alexander; Crawford, James; Murphy, Sara; Marshall, Kathryn; Pelusso, Constanza

    2016-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications. PMID:26727256

  18. Usefulness of cervical magnetic resonance imaging for detecting type A acute aortic dissection with acute stroke symptoms.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Hirata, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD) sometimes presents with acute stroke-like symptoms. When intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) therapy is considered for acute ischemic stroke, TAAAD must be excluded. Painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke may be easily missed. Two cases of painless TAAAD presenting with acute stroke in which IV-tPA therapy was considered are reported. In these cases, cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was useful for detecting TAAAD, and IV-tPA therapy was canceled. The mottled high signal ("snowstorm") in the common carotid artery on cervical MRA is specific for TAAAD. We have thus named this phenomenon the "snowstorm sign" and believe it can help diagnose TAAAD. PMID:27118510

  19. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management

    PubMed Central

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%. PMID:17876868

  20. Cognitive influences on health symptoms from acute chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Dalton, P

    1999-11-01

    Symptom reports, perceived adverse health effects, and public health concerns are increasingly precipitated by the perception of chemical odors. This study examined the interaction between health cognitions, odor perception, and symptom reports. A group of 180 healthy men and women were exposed to 1 of 3 ambient odors, normatively rated as healthful (methyl salicylate, or wintergreen), harmful (butanol or alcohol), and ambiguous (isobomyl acetate, or balsam), after receiving 1 of 3 odorant characterizations (harmful, healthful, and neutral). Individuals given a harmful bias reported significantly more health symptoms following exposure and more intense odor and irritation during exposure than did those given a neutral or healthful bias. The overall pattern of results suggests that many of the health-related effects of exposure to odorants are mediated not by a direct agency of odors but by cognitive variables, such as mental models of the relationship between environmental odors and health. PMID:10619531

  1. Relationship between Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Annette; Boas, Mark; Gallaway, Michael; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Rouse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The percentage of children who are symptomatic has been shown to increase with the number of signs of convergence insufficiency (CI). Our goal was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the severity of the clinical signs of CI and symptom level reported in children with 3-sign symptomatic CI. Methods The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) enrolled 221 children with symptomatic CI from ages 9 to 17 years. Inclusion criteria included the following three signs of CI: (1) exophoria at near at least 4Δ greater than at distance, (2) insufficient positive fusional vergence (PFV) at near, and (3) a receded near point of convergence (NPC) of ≥ 6cm break. The relationships between the severity of each sign of CI (mild, moderate and severe) and the level of symptoms as measured by the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) at baseline were evaluated. Results Mean CISS scores were not significantly different between mild, moderate or severe exophoria (p=0.60), PFV blur (p=0.99), Sheard's criterion (p=0.89) or NPC break (p=0.84). There was also no difference in the frequency of subjects scoring at mild, moderate or severe levels on the CISS and the severity of each sign of CI. Correlations between individual clinical signs and the CISS score were very low and not statistically significant. Conclusions Among symptomatic children with a CISS score ≥ 16 and three clinical signs of CI, there is no further association between the severity of the clinical signs and their level of symptoms. PMID:23958713

  2. Effect of Tamoxifen and Lithium on Treatment of Acute Mania Symptoms in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Elham; Arman, Sorror; Najafi, Mostafa; Shayegh, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies have supported the role of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors in the physiopathology and treatment of bipolar disorder in adults. Tamoxifen is one of the drugs with the effect of PKC inhibition. This study aimed to determine the effect of tamoxifen on the rate of improvement mania symptoms in the sample of children and adolescents with acute mania. Materials & Methods In this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial study, registered in www.irct.ir with the code of IRCT201410126418N3, overall 44 patients with bipolar disorder with acute manic episode were randomly assigned into treatment and control groups. The serum levels of lithium and tamoxifen among the participants in the treatment groups were 0.8 -1.1 mg and 20-40 mg per day respectively. Serum level of lithium among participants in the control group was similar. The main comparisons were made based on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Children Depression Inventory (CDI) scores of the participants at baseline and at the end of each study week. The pharmacological side effects of serum level of lithium were examined weekly. Analysis of Covariance(ANCOVA) test was used for the statistical analysis. Results There was no difference in the baseline score of YMRS and CDI in the treatment and control groups while a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) in these scores was found between and within the groups. Conclusion The addition of tamoxifen to lithium causes a significant difference in reducing the symptoms of mania and depression in the treatment group compared to the control group. PMID:27247580

  3. Identifying Clinically Meaningful Fatigue with the Fatigue Symptom Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kristine A.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Small, Brent J.; Munster, Pamela N.; Andrykowski, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) has been used extensively to assess and measure fatigue in a number of clinical populations. The purpose of the present study was to further establish its utility by examining its operating characteristics and determining the optimal cutoff score for identifying clinically meaningful fatigue. The SF-36 Vitality scale, a measure widely used to identify individuals with significant fatigue-related disability, was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the FSI. Results indicate that a score of 3 or greater on those items assessing fatigue in the past week is the optimal cutoff score for identifying clinically meaningful fatigue. Individuals who scored at or above the cutoff also reported significantly greater fatigue interference, more days of fatigue on average, and fatigue a greater proportion of each day in the past week. Findings suggest that the FSI can be used to discriminate effectively between individuals with and without clinically meaningful fatigue. PMID:18495413

  4. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  5. Analyzing acute procedural pain in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Tan, Gabriel; Amihai, Ido; Jensen, Mark P

    2014-07-01

    Because acute procedural pain tends to increase with procedure time, assessments of pain management strategies must take that time relationship into account. Statistical time-course analyses are, however, complex and require large patient numbers to detect differences. The current study evaluated the abilities of various single and simple composite measures such as averaged pain or individual patient pain slopes to detect treatment effects. Secondary analyses were performed with the data from 3 prospective randomized clinical trials that assessed the effect of a self-hypnotic relaxation intervention on procedural pain, measured every 10-15 minutes during vascular/renal interventions, breast biopsies, and tumor embolizations. Single point-in-time and maximal pain comparisons were poor in detecting treatment effects. Linear data sets of individual patient slopes yielded the same qualitative results as the more complex repeated measures analyses, allowing the use of standard statistical approaches (eg, Kruskal-Wallis), and promising analyses of smaller subgroups, which otherwise would be underpowered. With nonlinear data, a simple averaged score was highly sensitive in detecting differences. Use of these 2 workable and relatively simple approaches may be a first step towards facilitating the development of data sets that could enable meta-analyses of data from acute pain trials. PMID:24731852

  6. Acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: clinical expressions, therapeutic insights, and role of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosetti, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach of patients with suspected acute diverticulitis remains debated. On the one hand, a scoring system with the best predictive value in diagnosing acute diverticulitis has been developed in order to reduce the use of computed tomography (CT) scan, while, on the other hand, patients with a high probability of acute diverticulitis should benefit from CT scan from a clinical viewpoint, ensuring that they will receive the most appropriate treatment. The place and classification of CT scan for acute diverticulitis need to be reassessed. If the management of uncomplicated acute diverticulitis, abscess, and fecal peritonitis is now well codified, urgent surgical or medical treatment of hemodynamically stable patients presenting with intraperitoneal air or fluid without uncontrolled sepsis is still under discussion. Furthermore, the indications for laparoscopic lavage are not yet well established. It is known for years that episode(s) of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis may induce painful recurrent bowel symptoms, known as symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease and irritable bowel syndrome-like diverticular disease. These two clinical expressions of diverticular disease, that may darken quality of life, are treated medically aimed at symptom relief. The possible place of surgery should be discussed. Clinical and CT scan classifications should be separated entities. PMID:27574459

  7. Role of delta-Aminolevulinic Acid in the Symptoms of Acute Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Lai, Jennifer C.; Meister, Raymond K.; Blanc, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attacks of neuropathic pain, usually abdominal, are characteristic of the acute porphyrias and are accompanied by overproduction of heme-precursor molecules, specifically delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen. The basis for the acute symptoms in these diseases has been speculative. Methods We review genetic acute porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia, and an acquired condition, lead poisoning. All perturb heme synthesis and present with a very similar pain syndrome. Results While each of these conditions has characteristic urine biochemistry, all exhibit excess delta-aminolevulinic acid. Moreover, in all, treatment with hemin reduces delta-aminolevulinic acid and relieves symptoms. In contrast, use of recombinant porphobilinogen deaminase to knock down porphobilinogen in acute porphyria was ineffective. Conclusion There is now convincing evidence that delta-aminolevulinic acid is the cause of pain in the acute porphyrias. The efficacy of hemin infusion is due mainly, if not entirely, to its inhibition of hepatic delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase-1, the enzyme that catalyzes delta-aminolevulinic acid formation. Delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase-1 is a rational target for additional therapies to control symptoms in acute porphyria. PMID:25446301

  8. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Verheij, Theo J.M.; Sachs, Alfred P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed, uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. Methods: We conducted a block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial at 54 primary care practices (68 family physicians) in the Netherlands between Dec. 30, 2008, and Apr. 28, 2011. Adult patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis were randomly assigned to receive either prednisolone 30 mg/d or placebo for 7 days and asked to complete a symptom diary for 14 days. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7. Results: Of the 185 patients included in the trial (93 in the treatment group, 92 in the placebo group), 2 withdrew from the study and 9 were excluded from the primary analysis because of incomplete symptom reporting. The remaining 174 patients (88 in the treatment group, 86 in the placebo group) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. The proportions of patients with resolution of facial pain or pressure on day 7 were 62.5% (55/88) in the prednisolone group and 55.8% (48/86) in the placebo group (absolute risk difference 6.7%, 95% confidence interval −7.9% to 21.2%). The groups were similar with regard to the decrease over time in the proportion of patients with total symptoms (combined symptoms of runny nose, postnasal discharge, nasal congestion, cough and facial pain) and health-related quality of life. Adverse events were mild and did not differ significantly between the groups. Interpretation: Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy had no clinically relevant beneficial effects among patients with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Netherlands Trial Register

  9. Association of Interleukin-8 and Neutrophils with Nasal Symptom Severity During Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Kelsey M.; Hayney, Mary S.; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Using a large data set (n = 811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (rs = 0.082, P = 0.022; rs = 0.080, P = 0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r = 0.13, P = <0.00001; r = 0.18, P = <0.003), plugged nose (r = 0.045, P = 0.003; r = 0.14, P = 0.058), and sneezing (r = −0.02, P = <0.0001; r = −0.0055, P = 0.31). Neutrophils correlate with some quality of life measures such as sleeping well (r = 0.15, P = 0.026). Thus, the study demonstrates that IL-8 and neutrophils are correlated with severity of nasal symptoms during acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. PMID:25132248

  10. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. PMID:25743769

  11. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios. PMID:27575346

  12. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Sex Differences in Symptoms Reported on the 13‐Item Acute Coronary Syndrome Checklist

    PubMed Central

    DeVon, Holli A.; Rosenfeld, Anne; Steffen, Alana D.; Daya, Mohamud

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical symptoms are part of the risk stratification approaches used in the emergency department (ED) to evaluate patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of 13 symptoms for a discharge diagnosis of ACS in women and men. Methods and Results The sample included 736 patients admitted to 4 EDs with symptoms suggestive of ACS. Symptoms were assessed with the 13‐item validated ACS Symptom Checklist. Mixed‐effects logistic regression models were used to estimate sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of each symptom for a diagnosis of ACS, adjusting for age, obesity, diabetes, and functional status. Patients were predominantly male (63%) and Caucasian (70.5%), with a mean age of 59.7±14.2 years. Chest pressure, chest discomfort, and chest pain demonstrated the highest sensitivity for ACS in both women (66%, 66%, and 67%) and men (63%, 69%, and 72%). Six symptoms were specific for a non‐ACS diagnosis in both women and men. The predictive value of shoulder (odds ratio [OR]=2.53; 95% CI=1.29 to 4.96) and arm pain (OR 2.15; 95% CI=1.10 to 4.20) in women was nearly twice that of men (OR=1.11; 95% CI=0.67 to 1.85 and OR=1.21; 95% CI=0.74 to 1.99). Shortness of breath (OR=0.49; 95% CI=0.30 to 0.79) predicted a non‐ACS diagnosis in men. Conclusions There were more similarities than differences in symptom predictors of ACS for women and men. PMID:24695650

  13. Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animals#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animalsWhitney S. Krueger1,2, Elizabeth D. Hilborn2, Timothy J. Wade21Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA2Environmental Public Health Division, Office of Research and Development, U...

  14. Symptom Differences in Acute and Chronic Presentation of Childhood Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four child abuse victims, age 5-13, were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children with the acute form of PTSD exhibited such symptoms as difficulty falling asleep, hypervigilance, nightmares, and generalized anxiety. Children exhibiting chronic PTSD exhibited increased detachment, restricted range of affect,…

  15. Gender differences in symptom predictors associated with acute coronary syndrome: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Asgar Pour, Hossein; Norouzzadeh, Reza; Heidari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-03-01

    Signs and symptoms (typical and atypical symptoms) of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) differ between men and women. Identification of gender differences has implications for both health care providers and the general public. The aim of this study was to determine the symptom predictors of the acute coronary syndromes in men and women. In this prospective study, nurse data collectors directly observed 256 men and 182 women (N = 438) with symptoms suggestive of ACS in the Emergency Departments of eight hospitals in Tehran. ACS was eventually diagnosed in 183 (57.2%) men and 137 (42.8%) women on the basis of standard electrocardiogram and cardiac enzyme (CPK-MB) level. In men, chest symptoms (OR = 3.22, CI = 0.137-0.756, P = 0.009), dyspnea (OR = 2.65, CI = 1.78-4.123 P = 0.001) and diaphoresis (OR = 2.175, CI = 1.020-4.639, P = 0.044) were significantly associated with the diagnosis of ACS 3.78, 2.72 and 1.87 times more than in women having these symptoms, respectively. These results indicated that chest symptoms, diaphoresis and dyspnea were the more pronounced typical symptoms of ACS in men compared to women. Additionally, the numbers of typical symptoms can be considered as more predictive of ACS in men (OR = 1.673, CI = 1.211-2.224, P < 0.001) than women (OR = 1.271, CI = 1.157-2.331, P = 0.212). Therefore, clinicians need to take men showing typical symptoms into consideration carefully. PMID:26216449

  16. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism.

    PubMed

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; van Hulst, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and submarine escape. In the underwater environment, CAGE is caused by trapped air, which expands and leads to lung vessel rupture when ambient pressure decreases during ascent. Pressure decrease also occurs during hypobaric activities such as flying and, therefore, CAGE may theoretically be a risk in hypobaric exposure. We reviewed the available literature on this subject. Identified were 12 cases of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. Based on these cases, we discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. The low and slow pressure decrease during most hypobaric activities (as opposed to diving) account for the low incidence of CAGE during these exposures and suggest that severe air trapping must be present to cause barotrauma. This is also suggested by the large prevalence of air filled cysts in the case reports reviewed. We recommend considering CAGE in all patients presenting with acute central neurological injury during or shortly after pressure decrease such as flying. A CT scan of head and chest should be performed in these patients. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be initiated as soon as possible in cases of proven or probable CAGE. PMID:23156097

  17. The Usefulness of the TOAST Classification and Prognostic Significance of Pyramidal Symptoms During the Acute Phase of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Dziadkowiak, Edyta; Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Justyna; Guziński, Maciej; Noga, Leszek; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The symptoms in the acute phase could imitate acute peripheral vestibular disorders or a brainstem lesion. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification in cerebellar stroke and the impact of clinical features on the prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients with diagnosed ischemic cerebellar infarction. We studied the clinical features and compared them based on the location of the ischemic lesion and its distribution in the posterior interior cerebellar artery (PICA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territories. According to the TOAST classification, stroke was more prevalent in atrial fibrillation (26/107) and when the lesion was in the PICA territory (39/107). Pyramidal signs occurred in 29/107 of patients and were more prevalent when the lesion was distributed in more than two vascular regions (p = 0.00640). Mortality was higher among patients with ischemic lesion caused by cardiac sources (p = 0.00094) and with pyramidal signs (p = 0.00640). The TOAST classification is less useful in assessing supratentorial ischemic infarcts. Cardioembolic etiology, location of the ischemic lesion, and pyramidal signs support a negative prognosis. PMID:26041073

  18. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  19. UNUSUAL CLINICAL CASES THAT MIMIC ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS.

    PubMed

    Duman, Özgür; Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Gencpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Gümüş, Hakan; Okuyaz, Çetin; Hazar, Volkan; Haspolat, Şenay

    2015-09-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated monophasic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which poses a diagnostic challenge. We report on six cases of different etiologies that mimicked the clinical and radiologic findings of ADEM. The cases were collected from four different reference hospitals in Turkey. The same radiologist from the Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine examined the magnetic resonance images of all patients. Three (50%) patients had antecedent infections. Initial symptoms of the patients were as follows: fever in 50%, altered consciousness in 33.3% and convulsions in 16.7% of patients. Neurologic examination showed long tract signs in 83.3%, ataxia in 50% and altered consciousness in 50% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis only in case 6. Four patients received steroid pulse therapy and one of these initially underwent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. The patients' definitive diagnoses were as follows: paraspinal neuroblastoma-associated paraneoplastic syndrome; histiocytic sarcoma; mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes; and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in one patient each, while two patients had hemophagocytic syndrome. The present case series demonstrated difficulties in diagnosing ADEM while revealing extremely rare disorders that mimic ADEM radiologically and clinically. PMID:26666111

  20. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  1. Acute effects of a winter air pollution episode on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of children

    SciTech Connect

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B. )

    1993-09-01

    The acute respiratory effects of a wintertime air pollution episode were studied in a general population sample of 112 children who were 7-12 y of age and who lived in a nonurban community. Spirometry was performed on 6 d, with a fixed interval of 3 wk between successive tests. During an air pollution episode, an additional pulmonary function test was made. Acute respiratory symptoms of the children were noted in a diary. Ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microns, and nitrogen dioxide were considered as exposure variables. The association of air pollution with pulmonary function and prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms was assessed by individual linear regression analysis and time series analysis, respectively. In February 1991, an air pollution episode occurred during which daily average sulfur dioxide concentrations were slightly above 100 micrograms/m3, and particulate matter (with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns) concentrations reached 174 micrograms/m3. During the episode, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and maximal mid-expiratory flow were lower than on baseline tests. Significant negative associations were found between the concentration of sulfur dioxide, black smoke, and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microns. No association between prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms and the concentration of these compounds was found.

  2. [Clinical significance of psychotic-like symptoms in youth].

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Maija; Therman, Sebastian; Granö, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of the psychotic type are relatively common in young persons, but seldom result in the development of an actual psychotic disorder. Psychotic-like symptoms in the young are, however, associated with more severe psychiatric symptoms and a less favorable prognosis, whereby their identification is important in psychiatric treatment. A symptom-oriented approach is important in the treatment: instead of the possible risk of psychosis, focus will be on the actual situation, taking the total symptom picture and the person's life situation into consideration. Cognitive psychotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment for psychotic-like symptoms. PMID:27132292

  3. Acute stress symptoms during the second Lebanon war in a random sample of Israeli citizens.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miri; Yahav, Rivka

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) and acute stress symptoms (ASS) in Israel during the second Lebanon war. A telephone survey was conducted in July 2006 of a random sample of 235 residents of northern Israel, who were subjected to missile attacks, and of central Israel, who were not subjected to missile attacks. Results indicate that ASS scores were higher in the northern respondents; 6.8% of the northern sample and 3.9% of the central sample met ASD criteria. Appearance of each symptom ranged from 15.4% for dissociative to 88.4% for reexperiencing, with significant differences between northern and central respondents only for reexperiencing and arousal. A low ASD rate and a moderate difference between areas subjected and not subjected to attack were found. PMID:18302184

  4. A Humanized Clinically Calibrated Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Model for Hypokinetic Motor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Patrick; Spiros, Athan; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of Parkinson's disease with dopamine-centric approaches such as L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, although very successful, is in need of alternative treatment strategies, both in terms of disease modification and symptom management. Various non-dopaminergic treatment approaches did not result in a clear clinical benefit, despite showing a clear effect in preclinical animal models. In addition, polypharmacy is common, sometimes leading to unintended effects on non-motor cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To explore novel targets for symptomatic treatment and possible synergistic pharmacodynamic effects between different drugs, we developed a computer-based Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) platform of the closed cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical basal ganglia loop of the dorsal motor circuit. This mechanism-based simulation platform is based on the known neuro-anatomy and neurophysiology of the basal ganglia and explicitly incorporates domain expertise in a formalized way. The calculated beta/gamma power ratio of the local field potential in the subthalamic nucleus correlates well (R (2) = 0.71) with clinically observed extra-pyramidal symptoms triggered by antipsychotics during schizophrenia treatment (43 drug-dose combinations). When incorporating Parkinsonian (PD) pathology and reported compensatory changes, the computer model suggests a major increase in b/g ratio (corresponding to bradykinesia and rigidity) from a dopamine depletion of 70% onward. The correlation between the outcome of the QSP model and the reported changes in UPDRS III Motor Part for 22 placebo-normalized drug-dose combinations is R (2) = 0.84. The model also correctly recapitulates the lack of clinical benefit for perampanel, MK-0567 and flupirtine and offers a hypothesis for the translational disconnect. Finally, using human PET imaging studies with placebo response, the computer model predicts well the placebo response for chronic treatment, but not for acute

  5. Giardia intestinalis genotypes: Risk factors and correlation with clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Mahdy, A K; Surin, Johari; Wan, K L; Mohd-Adnan, A; Al-Mekhlafi, M S Hesham; Lim, Y A L

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to identify genotypes related risk factors of Giardia intestinalis in an Orang Asli (aboriginal) community in Pahang, Malaysia. Stool samples were collected from 321 individuals aged between 2 and 76 years old, of whom 160 were males and 161 were females. Faecal samples were processed with trichrome staining technique for the primary identification of G. intestinalis. Molecular identification was carried out by the amplification of a partial SSU rRNA gene using nested PCR. PCR products were purified and genotyped. 42 samples successfully amplified from the 76 positive faecal samples, only 1 was Assemblage A, the rest were Assemblage B. Risk analysis based on the detected genotypes of Giardia using univariate analysis and logistic regression identified three significant risk factors of giardiasis caused by assemblage B which included children clinical symptoms of giardiasis (OR=2.4, 95% CI=1.13-5.12, p=0.019). Females infected with Assemblage B were at higher risk of manifesting gastroenteritis signs and symptoms (OR=3.9, 95% CI=1.50-10.31, p=0.004). It has been concluded that giardiasis is still a public health problem in Orang Asli community and most commonly caused by assemblage B. The dynamic of transmission is most probably anthroponotic which is human to human either directly or indirectly through contaminated food. This route of transmission should be considered in the control strategy of the disease. Mass treatment together with health education could be the most practical intervention for reducing the infection. Those at high risk should receive more attention from public health authorities. PMID:19560431

  6. Acute air pollution-related symptoms among residents in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-01-01

    Open burnings (forest fires, agricultural, and garbage burnings) are the major sources of air pollution in Chiang Mai, Thailand. A time series prospective study was conducted in which 3025 participants were interviewed for 19 acute symptoms with the daily records of ambient air pollutants: particulate matter less than 10 microm in size (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3). PM10 was positively associated with blurred vision with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.009. CO was positively associated with lower lung and heart symptoms with adjusted ORs of 1.137 and 1.117. NO2 was positively associated with nosebleed, larynx symptoms, dry cough, lower lung symptoms, heart symptoms, and eye irritation with the range of adjusted ORs (ROAORs) of 1.024 to 1.229. SO2 was positively associated with swelling feet, skin symptoms, eye irritation, red eyes, and blurred vision with ROAORs of 1.205 to 2.948. Conversely, O3 was negatively related to running nose, burning nose, dry cough, body rash, red eyes, and blurred vision with ROAORs of 0.891 to 0.979. PMID:24645417

  7. Preliminary Study of Acute Changes in Emotion Processing in Trauma Survivors with PTSD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xie, Hong; Cotton, Andrew S.; Duval, Elizabeth R.; Tamburrino, Marijo B.; Brickman, Kristopher R.; Elhai, Jon D.; Ho, S. Shaun; McLean, Samuel A.; Ferguson, Eric J.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests traumatic experience can rapidly alter brain activation associated with emotion processing. However, little is known about acute changes in emotion neurocircuits that underlie PTSD symptom development. To examine acute alterations in emotion circuit activation and structure that may be linked to PTSD symptoms, thirty-eight subjects performed a task of appraisal of emotional faces as their brains were functionally and structurally studied with MRI at both two weeks and three months after motor vehicle collision (MVC). As determined by symptoms reported in the PTSD Checklist at three months, sixteen survivors developed probable PTSD, whereas the remaining 22 did not meet criteria for PTSD diagnosis (non-PTSD). The probable PTSD group had greater activation than the non-PTSD group in dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC and vmPFC) while appraising fearful faces within two weeks after MVC and in left insular cortex (IC) three months after MVC. dmPFC activation at two weeks significantly positively correlated with PTSD symptom severity at two weeks (R = 0.462, P = 0.006) and three months (R = 0.418, p = 0.012). Changes over time in dmPFC activation and in PTSD symptom severity were also significantly positively correlated in the probable PTSD group (R = 0.641, P = 0.018). A significant time by group interaction was found for volume changes in left superior frontal gyrus (SFG, F = 6.048, p = 0.019) that partially overlapped dmPFC active region. Between two weeks and three months, left SFG volume decreased in probable PTSD survivors. These findings identify alterations in frontal cortical activity and structure during the early post-trauma period that appear to be associated with development of PTSD symptoms. PMID:27415431

  8. Surveillance of Acute Respiratory Infections Using Community-Submitted Symptoms and Specimens for Molecular Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Jennifer; Rowe, Aaron; Brownstein, John S.; Chunara, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Participatory systems for surveillance of acute respiratory infection give real-time information about infections circulating in the community, yet to-date are limited to self-reported syndromic information only and lacking methods of linking symptom reports to infection types. We developed the GoViral platform to evaluate whether a cohort of lay volunteers could, and would find it useful to, contribute self-reported symptoms online and to compare specimen types for self-collected diagnostic information of sufficient quality for respiratory infection surveillance. Volunteers were recruited, given a kit (collection materials and customized instructions), instructed to report their symptoms weekly, and when sick with cold or flu-like symptoms, requested to collect specimens (saliva and nasal swab). We compared specimen types for respiratory virus detection sensitivity (via polymerase-chain-reaction) and ease of collection. Participants were surveyed to determine receptivity to participating when sick, to receiving information on the type of pathogen causing their infection and types circulating near them. Between December 1 2013 and March 1 2014, 295 participants enrolled in the study and received a kit. Of those who reported symptoms, half (71) collected and sent specimens for analysis. Participants submitted kits on average 2.30 days (95 CI: 1.65 to 2.96) after symptoms began. We found good concordance between nasal and saliva specimens for multiple pathogens, with few discrepancies. Individuals report that saliva collection is easiest and report that receiving information about what pathogen they, and those near them, have is valued and can shape public health behaviors. Community-submitted specimens can be used for the detection of acute respiratory infection with individuals showing receptivity for participating and interest in a real-time picture of respiratory pathogens near them. PMID:26075141

  9. Subjective Symptoms of Schizophrenia in Research and the Clinic: The Basic Symptom Concept

    PubMed Central

    Schultze-Lutter, Frauke

    2009-01-01

    Recent focus on early detection and intervention in psychosis has renewed interest in subtle psychopathology beyond positive and negative symptoms. These are self-experienced subclinical disturbances termed basic symptoms (BS). The phenomenologies of BS and their development in the course of psychotic disorders will be described. PMID:19074497

  10. Symptoms of Autism and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in Clinically Referred Youth with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Examined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) symptoms in a clinically referred, non-ASD sample (N = 1160; ages 6-18) with and without oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Mothers and teachers completed "DSM-IV"-referenced symptom checklists. Youth with ODD were subdivided into angry/irritable symptom (AIS) or…

  11. Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peggy B.; Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the frequency and nature of mental health problems and symptoms among a group of 51 inner city male adolescents attending a teen health clinic. Results indicated participants experienced significant mental health problems and symptoms, such as relationship problems, problems with time and money, and symptoms of anger, depression, and…

  12. The Theoretical Construction of a Classification of Clinical Somatic Symptoms in Psychosomatic Medicine Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fanmin; Sun, Xueli; Yang, Bangxiang; Shen, Hong; Liu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objective This article adopts the perspective of psychosomatic medicine to present and test a theoretical model of the classification of clinical somatic symptoms. The theoretical model consists of four dimensions: emotional somatic symptoms, biological somatic symptoms, imaginative somatic symptoms, and cognitive somatic symptoms. Method A clinical somatic symptom classification scale was developed according to the theoretical model. A total of 542 participants completed the clinical somatic symptoms classification scale. The data were analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results The results confirmed the theoretical model. The analyses found that the proposed theoretical structure of the scale was good, as indicated by factor loadings and fit indices, and that the scale had good reliability and construct validity. Conclusions Based on the interpretation of the clinical symptoms of psychosomatic medicine, the treatment of chronic non-infectious diseases includes at least three dimensions: the first is the etiological treatment, the second is the pathophysiological and pathopsychological dimension, and the third is symptomatic treatment. The unified psychosomatic point of view and diverse clinical thinking modes are aimed at identifying different classes of somatic symptoms and important prerequisites for the treatment of these symptoms. We registered the study with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry and it was approved by the West China Hospital, Sichuan University ethics committee. Trial registration: The registration number is ChiCTR-OCS-14004632 (time: 2014-05-12). PMID:27525701

  13. The mixed blessing of treating symptoms in acute vestibular failure--evidence from a 4-aminopyridine experiment.

    PubMed

    Beck, Roswitha; Günther, Lisa; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Böning, Guido; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Early symptomatic treatment of acute unilateral vestibulopathy is thought to impede the course of ensuing central vestibular compensation (VC). Despite the great clinical importance of this hypothesis there is no experimental evidence of its validity. The present study addressed this question by investigating the direct effect of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) on ocular motor and postural symptoms in acute unilateral vestibulopathy as well as its long-term consequences for VC in a rat model of chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). After UL, one group of Sprague-Dawley rats was treated with 4-AP p.o. (1mg/kg/day), another with 0.9% NaCl solution p.o. for 3days. Behavioural testing for symptoms of vestibular tone imbalance was done 1day before and 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, 21, and 30days after UL. In addition, sequential whole-brain [(18)F]-FDG-μPET was performed before and 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30days after UL to examine and visualize 4-AP-induced modulation of VC. Administration of 4-AP on days 1-3 significantly improved postural imbalance 2h after administration compared to that in controls. This effect was only transient. Remarkably, the 4-AP group had a prolonged and impaired course of postural compensation compared to that of controls. The μPET revealed a significant increase of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in the vestibulocerebellum 2h after administration of 4-AP. However, the 4-AP group exhibited a persistent asymmetry of rCGM after day 3 in the vestibular nuclei and posterolateral thalami. In conclusion, this study confirms the hypothesis that early pharmacological abatement of vestibular symptoms impedes VC. PMID:25157903

  14. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  15. Carotid Atherosclerosis Does Not Predict Coronary, Vertebral, or Aortic Atherosclerosis in Patients with Acute Stroke Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine whether significant atherosclerotic disease in the carotid arteries predicts significant atherosclerotic disease in the coronary arteries, vertebral arteries, or aorta in patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke. METHODS Atherosclerotic disease was imaged using computed tomography angiography (CTA) in a prospective study of 120 consecutive patients undergoing emergent CT evaluation for symptoms of stroke. Using a comprehensive CTA protocol that captured the carotid arteries, coronary arteries, vertebral arteries, and aorta, we evaluated these arteries for the presence and severity of atherosclerotic disease. Significant atherosclerotic disease was defined as > 50% stenosis in the carotid, coronary, and vertebral arteries, or ≥ 4mm thickness and encroaching in the aorta. Presence of any and significant atherosclerotic disease were compared in the different types of arteries assessed. RESULTS Of these 120 patients, 79 had CTA exams of adequate image quality and were evaluated in this study. Of these 79 patients, 33 had significant atherosclerotic disease. In 26 of these 33 patients (79%), significant disease was isolated to one type of artery, most often to the coronary arteries (N = 14; 54%). Non-significant atherosclerotic disease was more systemic and involved multiple arteries. CONCLUSIONS Significant atherosclerotic disease in the carotid arteries does not predict significant atherosclerotic disease in the coronary arteries, vertebral arteries, or aorta in patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke. Significant atherosclerotic disease is most often isolated to one type of artery in these patients, while non-significant atherosclerotic disease tends to be more systemic. PMID:20595672

  16. Clinical and Pathologic Features of Secondary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Amy S.; Aoki, Joseph; Levis, Mark; Cowan, Kathleen; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Vuica-Ross, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a relatively common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that has an excellent prognosis. In contrast, secondary acute myeloid leukemias, including therapy-related AML and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes, have a relatively poor prognosis. We identified 9 cases of APL at our institution in which there was a history of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chronic immunosuppression, or antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. The clinical and pathologic findings in these cases of secondary APL were compared with the clinical and pathologic findings in cases of de novo APL. We found that secondary and de novo APL had abnormal promyelocytes with similar morphologic and immunophenotypic features, comparable cytogenetic findings, comparable rates of FMS-like tyrosine kinase mutations, and similar rates of recurrent disease and death. These data suggest that secondary APL is similar to de novo APL and, thus, should be considered distinct from other secondary acute myeloid neoplasms. PMID:22338051

  17. [Acute glaucine syndrome in the physician's practice: the clinical picture and potential danger].

    PubMed

    Rovinskiĭ, V I

    2006-01-01

    The author describes a clinical symptom complex which appears in some patients as a central nervous system side-effect of conventional doses of glaucine, a non-narcotic antitussive preparation, used in outpatients; the symptom complex is described by the author as acute glaucine syndrome (AGS). Clinical manifestations of AGS are the following: 1) very prominent fatigue, which occurs acutely after taking a conventional dose of glaucine and making any kind of professional activity impossible at the moment; 2) very prominent sleepiness, which occurs acutely together with fatigue and is always combined with it; 3) unusual clear but somewhat estranged perception of the environment: the patient sees and understands everything and is oriented well enough, but cannot take a clear and adequate action, 4) full recovery of the impaired functions after the drug is discontinued; 5) AGS recurrence after the drug is taken again. The hallucination-like effect of glaucine, described earlier by the author of this article, which is manifested by bright and colorful visual images, may be considered a facultative AGS component. The author stresses a potential danger of AGS development in persons who control moving mechanisms or vehicles and adduces some clinical observations. PMID:17243616

  18. Clinical symptoms cannot predict influenza infection during the 2013 influenza season in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Campe, H; Heinzinger, S; Hartberger, C; Sing, A

    2016-04-01

    For influenza surveillance and diagnosis typical clinical symptoms are traditionally used to discriminate influenza virus infections from infections by other pathogens. During the 2013 influenza season we performed a multiplex assay for 16 different viruses in 665 swabs from patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) to display the variety of different pathogens causing ARI and to test the diagnostic value of both the commonly used case definitions [ARI, and influenza like illness (ILI)] as well as the clinical judgement of physicians, respectively, to achieve a laboratory-confirmed influenza diagnosis. Fourteen different viruses were identified as causing ARI/ILI. Influenza diagnosis based on clinical signs overestimated the number of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases and misclassified cases. Furthermore, ILI case definition and physicians agreed in only 287/651 (44%) cases with laboratory confirmation. Influenza case management has to be supported by laboratory confirmation to allow evidence-based decisions. Epidemiological syndromic surveillance data should be supported by laboratory confirmation for reasonable interpretation. PMID:26388141

  19. Clinical Documents Clustering Based on Medication/Symptom Names Using Multi-View Nonnegative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yuan; Pan, Xuelian; Li, Guangrong; Hu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Clinical documents are rich free-text data sources containing valuable medication and symptom information, which have a great potential to improve health care. In this paper, we build an integrating system for extracting medication names and symptom names from clinical notes. Then we apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and multi-view NMF to cluster clinical notes into meaningful clusters based on sample-feature matrices. Our experimental results show that multi-view NMF is a preferable method for clinical document clustering. Moreover, we find that using extracted medication/symptom names to cluster clinical documents outperforms just using words. PMID:26011887

  20. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2013-11-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  1. CT Angiography and Presentation NIH stroke Scale in Predicting TIA in Patients Presenting with Acute Stroke Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bedriye; Selph, James; Burdine, Joselyn; Graham, Cole Blease; Sen, Souvik

    2014-01-01

    Patient candidacy for acute stroke intervention, is currently assessed using brain computed tomography angiography (CTA) evidence of significant stenosis/occlusion (SSO) with a high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) (>6). This study examined the association between CTA without significant stenosis/occlusion (NSSO) and lower NIHSS (≤ 6) with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and other good clinical outcomes at discharge. Patients presenting <8 hours from stroke symptom onset, had an NIHSS assessment and brain CTA performed at presentation. Good clinical outcomes were defined as: discharge diagnosis of TIA, modified Rankin Score [mRS] ≤ 1, and home as the discharge disposition. Eighty-five patients received both an NIHSS at presentation and a CTA at 4.2 ± 2.2 hours from stroke symptom onset. Patients with NSSO on CTA as well as those with NIHSS≤6 had better outcomes at discharge (p<0.001). NIHSS ≤ 6 were more likely than NSSO (p=0.01) to have a discharge diagnosis of TIA (p<0.001). NSSO on CTA and NIHSS ≤ 6 also correlated with fewer deaths (p<0.001). Multivariable analyses showed NSSO on CTA (Adjusted OR: 5.8 95% CI: 1.2-27.0, p=0.03) independently predicted the discharge diagnosis of TIA. Addition of NIHSS ≤ 6 to NSSO on CTA proved to be a stronger independent predictor of TIA (Adjusted OR 18.7 95% CI: 3.5-98.9, p=0.001). PMID:24851234

  2. Initial Development and Preliminary Validation of a New Negative Symptom Measure: The Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS)

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Courtney; Blanchard, Jack J.; Bennett, Melanie; Horan, William P.; Kring, Ann; Gur, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing scale development process, this study provides an initial examination of the psychometric properties and validity of a new interview-based negative symptom instrument, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), in outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N = 37). The scale was designed to address limitations of existing measures and to comprehensively assess five consensus-based negative symptoms: asociality, avolition, anhedonia (consummatory and anticipatory), affective flattening, and alogia. Results indicated satisfactory internal consistency reliability for the total CAINS scale score and promising inter-rater agreement, with clear areas identified in need of improvement. Convergent validity was evident in general agreement between the CAINS and alternative negative symptom measures. Further, CAINS subscales significantly correlated with relevant self-report emotional experience measures as well as with social functioning. Discriminant validity of the CAINS was strongly supported by its small, non-significant relations with positive symptoms, general psychiatric symptoms, and depression. These preliminary data on an early beta-version of the CAINS provide initial support for this new assessment approach to negative symptoms and suggest directions for further scale development. PMID:20869848

  3. Cases of acute gastroenteritis due to calicivirus in outbreaks: clinical differences by age and aetiological agent.

    PubMed

    Sala, M R; Broner, S; Moreno, A; Arias, C; Godoy, P; Minguell, S; Martínez, A; Torner, N; Bartolomé, R; de Simón, M; Guix, S; Domínguez, A

    2014-08-01

    The Caliciviridae family includes norovirus and sapovirus, which both cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Currently, norovirus is the most common cause of AGE in all age groups in many countries. We analysed clinical differences in reported cases of acute gastroenteritis caused by caliciviruses (AGC) by age group and agent involved. We conducted a descriptive study of AGE outbreaks reported to the Public Health Agency of Catalonia (Spain) in 2010 and 2011. The odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association between clinical symptoms and age. Clinical differences between the <15 years and ≥15 years age groups were statistically significant: children more frequently presented with vomiting (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 2.56-4.13), abdominal pain (OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.60-4.12), fever (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.17-1.96) and nausea (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.19-1.85). Comparing clinical manifestations of sapovirus and norovirus infection in children aged <15 years, cases caused by norovirus more frequently presented with vomiting and fever (p <0.001), and cases caused by sapovirus more frequently presented with diarrhoea (p 0.013). Determination of the clinical differences associated with cases in outbreaks according to the age of the majority of cases and the symptoms most frequently detected may aid decision making and guide aetiological investigations and the adoption of prevention and control measures. PMID:24382267

  4. Clinical utility of the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory validity scales to screen for symptom exaggeration following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Brickell, Tracey A; Lippa, Sara M; French, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical utility of three recently developed validity scales (Validity-10, NIM5, and LOW6) designed to screen for symptom exaggeration using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). Participants were 272 U.S. military service members who sustained a mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating traumatic brain injury (TBI) and who were evaluated by the neuropsychology service at Walter Reed Army Medical Center within 199 weeks post injury. Participants were divided into two groups based on the Negative Impression Management scale of the Personality Assessment Inventory: (a) those who failed symptom validity testing (SVT-fail; n = 27) and (b) those who passed symptom validity testing (SVT-pass; n = 245). Participants in the SVT-fail group had significantly higher scores (p<.001) on the Validity-10, NIM5, LOW6, NSI total, and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) clinical scales (range: d = 0.76 to 2.34). Similarly high sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive power (PPP), and negative predictive (NPP) values were found when using all three validity scales to differentiate SVT-fail versus SVT-pass groups. However, the Validity-10 scale consistently had the highest overall values. The optimal cutoff score for the Validity-10 scale to identify possible symptom exaggeration was ≥19 (sensitivity = .59, specificity = .89, PPP = .74, NPP = .80). For the majority of people, these findings provide support for the use of the Validity-10 scale as a screening tool for possible symptom exaggeration. When scores on the Validity-10 exceed the cutoff score, it is recommended that (a) researchers and clinicians do not interpret responses on the NSI, and (b) clinicians follow up with a more detailed evaluation, using well-validated symptom validity measures (e.g., Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form, MMPI-2-RF, validity scales), to seek confirmatory evidence to support an hypothesis of symptom exaggeration

  5. Links between Disorganized Attachment Classification and Clinical Symptoms in School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borelli, Jessica L.; David, Daryn H.; Crowley, Michael J.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Research examining the links between disorganized attachment and clinical symptoms largely has neglected middle childhood due to lack of available measurement tools. The few studies that have examined these links in other developmental phases have found higher clinical symptoms in disorganized individuals. Our study extended this research by using…

  6. Activation of brain NOP receptors attenuates acute and protracted alcohol withdrawal symptoms in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Economidou, Daina; Cippitelli, Andrea; Stopponi, Serena; Braconi, Simone; Clementi, Stefano; Ubaldi, Massimo; Martin-Fardon, Rèmi; Weiss, Friedbert; Massi, Maurizio; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alcohol withdrawal, refers to a cluster of symptoms that may occur from suddenly ceasing the use of alcohol after chronic or prolonged ingestion. These symptoms make alcohol abstinence difficult and increase the risk of relapse in recovering alcoholics. In previous studies, we demonstrated that treatment with N/OFQ significantly reduces alcohol consumption and attenuates alcohol-seeking behaviour induced by environmental conditioning factors or by stress in rats. In the present study we evaluated whether activation of brain NOP receptors may also attenuate alcohol withdrawal signs in rats. METHODS For this purpose animals were subjected to a 6 day chronic alcohol intoxication (by intragastric administration) and at 8, 10 and 12 hours following cessation of alcohol exposure they were treated intracerebroventricularly (ICV) with N/OFQ (0.0, 1.0 and 3.0 μg/rat). Somatic withdrawal signs were scored after ICV treatment. In a subsequent experiment, to evaluate N/OFQ effects on alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety another group of rats was subjected to ethanol intoxication and after one week was tested for anxiety behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM). In the last experiment an additional group of rats was tested for anxiety elicited by acute ethanol intoxication (hangover anxiety). For this purpose, animals received an acute dose (3.0 g/kg) of 20% alcohol and 12-h later were tested in the EPM following ICV N/OFQ (0.0, 1.0 and 2.0μg/rat). RESULTS Results showed that N/OFQ significantly reduced the expression of somatic withdrawal signs and reversed anxiety-like behaviors associated with both chronic and acute alcohol intoxication. N/OFQ did not affect anxiety scores in nondependent animals. CONCLUSIONS The present findings suggest that the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system may represent a promising target for the development of new treatments to ameliorate alcohol withdrawal symptoms. PMID:21223310

  7. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing. PMID:27242926

  8. Cumulative Adversity Sensitizes Neural Response to Acute Stress: Association with Health Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongju; Tsou, Kristen A; Ansell, Emily B; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative adversity (CA) increases stress sensitivity and risk of adverse health outcomes. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations in humans remain unclear. To understand neural responses underlying the link between CA and adverse health symptoms, the current study assessed brain activity during stress and neutral-relaxing states in 75 demographically matched, healthy individuals with high, mid, and low CA (25 in each group), and their health symptoms using the Cornell Medical Index. CA was significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (P=0.01) in all participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results indicated significant associations between CA scores and increased stress-induced activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, striatum, right amygdala, hippocampus, and temporal regions in all 75 participants (p<0.05, whole-brain corrected). In addition to these regions, the high vs low CA group comparison revealed decreased stress-induced activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the high CA group (p<0.01, whole-brain corrected). Specifically, hypoactive medial OFC and hyperactive right hippocampus responses to stress were each significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (p<0.01). Furthermore, an inverse correlation was found between activity in the medial OFC and right hippocampus (p=0.01). These results indicate that high CA sensitizes limbic–striatal responses to acute stress and also identifies an important role for stress-related medial OFC and hippocampus responses in the effects of CA on increasing vulnerability to adverse health consequences. PMID:24051900

  9. Xyloglucan for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pleșea Condratovici, Cătălin; Bacarea, Vladimir; Piqué, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xyloglucan, a film-forming agent, improves intestinal mucosa resistance to pathologic damage. The efficacy, safety, and time of onset of the antidiarrheal effect of xyloglucan were assessed in children with acute gastroenteritis receiving oral rehydration solution (ORS). Methods. This randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter, clinical trial included children (3 months–12 years) with acute gastroenteritis of infectious origin. Children were randomized to xyloglucan and ORS, or ORS only, for 5 days. Diarrheal symptoms, including stool number/characteristics, and safety were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 5 days and by fulfillment of a parent diary card. Results. Thirty-six patients (58.33% girls) were included (n = 18/group). Patients receiving xyloglucan and ORS had better symptom evolution than ORS-only recipients, with a faster onset of action. At 6 hours, xyloglucan produced a significantly greater decrease in the number of type 7 stools (0.11 versus 0.44; P = 0.027). At days 3 and 5, xyloglucan also produced a significantly greater reduction in types 6 and 7 stools compared with ORS alone. Xyloglucan plus ORS was safe and well tolerated. Conclusions. Xyloglucan is an efficacious and safe option for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children, with a rapid onset of action in reducing diarrheal symptoms. This study is registered with ISRCTN number 65893282. PMID:27212943

  10. Stability of trauma-related symptoms during acute substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eva; Odenwald, Michael; Proescholdt, Margit; Haubold, Anja; Bohnacker, Isabelle; Flögel, Marlene; Linde, Andreas; Müller, Sandra; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Lang, Undine; Walter, Marc; Vogel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and reports of traumatic childhood experiences decline during substance withdrawal. A convenience sample of 34 inpatients of the Psychiatric University Clinics in Basel was recruited and general psychopathological and trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Checklist, Post-Traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in the 1st and 3rd week of substance use treatment. The average age of the sample was 41.9 (SD = 9.1) years, and 26.5% were female. Hyperarousal (Mt1 = 4.51 versus Mt2 = 3.61; z = -2.38, p = .017) and avoidance symptoms (Mt1 = 6.24 versus Mt2 = 4.27; z = -2.59, p = .010) declined significantly, but re-experiencing symptoms (Mt1 = 4.00 versus Mt2 = 3.45; z = -.50, p = .617) did not. Post-traumatic stress disorder assessment, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition criteria, remained constant for 28 of 34 patients. Likewise, self-reported childhood trauma experiences decreased, yet the number of elevated subscale scores remained stable. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are not adequately treated by substance withdrawal alone. Trauma-specific diagnostics can be initiated with sufficient quality as early as the first week of withdrawal treatment. PMID:26670631

  11. Distress related to subclinical negative symptoms in a non-clinical sample: Role of dysfunctional attitudes.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-12-15

    Negative symptoms are a prominent feature of schizophrenia that are intimately linked to poor outcomes characterizing the illness. One mechanistic model suggests that these symptoms are produced and maintained, at least in part, through maladaptive attitudes. Beyond mechanisms, it remains phenomenologically unclear if these symptoms are particularly distressing. In the present study we examined whether subclinical negative symptoms evaluated in a non-clinical sample of young adults (N=370) were distressful or bothersome to participants and, further, whether these symptoms were associated with dysfunctional attitudes. We found that greater severity of subclinical negative symptoms such as amotivation and anhedonia were associated with higher ratings of distress specifically attributable to these symptoms. This relationship held even after controlling for severity of depressive symptoms. Moreover, greater negative symptom burden was associated with greater endorsement of defeatist performance beliefs. Negative symptoms expressed in the general population were found to be particularly distressing. Maladaptive cognitive schemas are implicated in the expression of these symptoms, as well as the amount of distress these symptoms instil. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying negative symptoms, including both neurobiological and cognitive, is needed in order to effectively develop treatment strategies for these disabling symptoms. PMID:26365687

  12. Psychoneurometric operationalization of threat sensitivity: Relations with clinical symptom and physiological response criteria.

    PubMed

    Yancey, James R; Venables, Noah C; Patrick, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative calls for the incorporation of neurobiological approaches and findings into conceptions of mental health problems through a focus on biobehavioral constructs investigated across multiple domains of measurement (units of analysis). Although the constructs in the RDoC system are characterized in "process terms" (i.e., as functional concepts with brain and behavioral referents), these constructs can also be framed as dispositions (i.e., as dimensions of variation in biobehavioral functioning across individuals). Focusing on one key RDoC construct, acute threat or "fear," the current article illustrates a construct-oriented psychoneurometric strategy for operationalizing this construct in individual difference terms-as threat sensitivity (THT+). Utilizing data from 454 adult participants, we demonstrate empirically that (a) a scale measure of THT+ designed to tap general fear/fearlessness predicts effectively to relevant clinical problems (i.e., fear disorder symptoms), (b) this scale measure shows reliable associations with physiological indices of acute reactivity to aversive visual stimuli, and (c) a cross-domain factor reflecting the intersection of scale and physiological indicators of THT+ predicts effectively to both clinical and neurophysiological criterion measures. Results illustrate how the psychoneurometric approach can be used to create a dimensional index of a biobehavioral trait construct, in this case THT+, which can serve as a bridge between phenomena in domains of psychopathology and neurobiology. Implications and future directions are discussed with reference to the RDoC initiative and existing report-based conceptions of psychological traits. PMID:26877132

  13. Demographic and clinical correlates of autism symptom domains and autism spectrum diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y; Constantino, John N; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L; Eng, Charis

    2014-07-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive Autism Network registry. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms were obtained using caregiver-reports on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Demographic and clinical correlates were covariates in regression models predicting social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses evaluated the incremental validity of social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior domains over and above global autism symptoms. Autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was the strongest correlate of caregiver-reported social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. The presence of comorbid diagnoses also increased symptom levels. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms provided significant, but modest, incremental validity in predicting diagnosis beyond global autism symptoms. These findings suggest that autism spectrum disorder diagnosis is by far the largest determinant of quantitatively measured autism symptoms. Externalizing (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and internalizing (anxiety) behavior, low cognitive ability, and demographic factors may confound caregiver-report of autism symptoms, potentially necessitating a continuous norming approach to the revision of symptom measures. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms may provide incremental validity in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104512

  14. Acute Radiation-Induced Nocturia in Prostate Cancer Patients Is Associated With Pretreatment Symptoms, Radical Prostatectomy, and Genetic Markers in the TGF{beta}1 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    De Langhe, Sofie; De Ruyck, Kim; Ost, Piet; Fonteyne, Valerie; Werbrouck, Joke; De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: After radiation therapy for prostate cancer, approximately 50% of the patients experience acute genitourinary symptoms, mostly nocturia. This may be highly bothersome with a major impact on the patient's quality of life. In the past, nocturia is seldom reported as a single, physiologically distinct endpoint, and little is known about its etiology. It is assumed that in addition to dose-volume parameters and patient- and therapy-related factors, a genetic component contributes to the development of radiation-induced damage. In this study, we investigated the association among dosimetric, clinical, and TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia in prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Data were available for 322 prostate cancer patients treated with primary or postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Five genetic markers in the TGF{beta}1 gene (-800 G>A, -509 C>T, codon 10 T>C, codon 25 G>C, g.10780 T>G), and a high number of clinical and dosimetric parameters were considered. Toxicity was scored using an symptom scale developed in-house. Results: Radical prostatectomy (P<.001) and the presence of pretreatment nocturia (P<.001) are significantly associated with the occurrence of radiation-induced acute toxicity. The -509 CT/TT (P=.010) and codon 10 TC/CC (P=.005) genotypes are significantly associated with an increased risk for radiation-induced acute nocturia. Conclusions: Radical prostatectomy, the presence of pretreatment nocturia symptoms, and the variant alleles of TGF{beta}1 -509 C>T and codon 10 T>C are identified as factors involved in the development of acute radiation-induced nocturia. These findings may contribute to the research on prediction of late nocturia after IMRT for prostate cancer.

  15. Trial design innovations: Clinical trials for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J; Zhong, K

    2015-11-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Recent progress has been made with clinical trials, advancing new therapies for psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD), agitation in AD, and apathy in AD. Definitions have emerged for agitation and apathy in patients with cognitive impairment, facilitating recruitment of clinical trial populations. Progress in clinical trial design and the agents being assessed promise to advance therapies for disabling symptoms and improve quality of life for patients and caregivers. PMID:26206713

  16. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation.

  17. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires de; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation. PMID:27438214

  18. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  19. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-01-01

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials. PMID:24976913

  20. Depressive Symptoms, Anatomical Region, and Clinical Outcomes for Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Valencia, Carolina; Werneke, Mark W.; Hart, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines advocate the routine identification of depressive symptoms for patients with pain in the lumbar or cervical spine, but not for other anatomical regions. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of depressive symptoms for patients with musculoskeletal pain across different anatomical regions. Design This was a prospective, associational study. Methods Demographic, clinical, depressive symptom (Symptom Checklist 90–Revised), and outcome data were collected by self-report from a convenience sample of 8,304 patients. Frequency of severe depressive symptoms was assessed by chi-square analysis for demographic and clinical variables. An analysis of variance examined the influence of depressive symptoms and anatomical region on intake pain intensity and functional status. Separate hierarchical multiple regression models by anatomical region examined the influence of depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Results Prevalence of severe depression was higher in women, in industrial and pain clinics, and in patients who reported chronic pain or prior surgery. Lower prevalence rates were found in patients older than 65 years and those who had upper- or lower-extremity pain. Depressive symptoms had a moderate to large effect on pain ratings (Cohen d=0.55–0.87) and a small to large effect on functional status (Cohen d=0.28–0.95). In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms contributed additional variance to pain intensity and functional status for all anatomical locations, except for discharge values for the cervical region. Conclusions Rates of depressive symptoms varied slightly based on anatomical region of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a consistent detrimental influence on outcomes, except on discharge scores for the cervical anatomical region. Expanding screening recommendations for depressive symptoms to include more anatomical regions may be indicated in physical therapy

  1. Harnessing Clinical Psychiatric Data with an Electronic Assessment Tool (OPCRIT+): The Utility of Symptom Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Philip James; Lobo, Sarah Elizabeth Margaret; Rucker, James; Amarasinghe, Myanthi; Anilkumar, Anantha Padmanabha Pillai; Baggaley, Martin; Banerjee, Pallavi; Bearn, Jenny; Broadbent, Matthew; Butler, Matthew; Campbell, Colin Donald; Cleare, Anthony James; Dratcu, Luiz; Frangou, Sophia; Gaughran, Fiona; Goldin, Matthew; Henke, Annika; Kern, Nikola; Krayem, Abdallah; Mufti, Faiza; McIvor, Ronan; Needham-Bennett, Humphrey; Newman, Stuart; Olajide, Dele; O’Flynn, David; Rao, Ranga; Rehman, Ijaz Ur; Seneviratne, Gertrude; Stahl, Daniel; Suleman, Sajid; Treasure, Janet; Tully, John; Veale, David; Stewart, Robert; McGuffin, Peter; Lovestone, Simon; Hotopf, Matthew; Schumann, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Progress in personalised psychiatry is dependent on researchers having access to systematic and accurately acquired symptom data across clinical diagnoses. We have developed a structured psychiatric assessment tool, OPCRIT+, that is being introduced into the electronic medical records system of the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust which can help to achieve this. In this report we examine the utility of the symptom data being collected with the tool. Cross-sectional mental state data from a mixed-diagnostic cohort of 876 inpatients was subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA). Six components, explaining 46% of the variance in recorded symptoms, were extracted. The components represented dimensions of mania, depression, positive symptoms, anxiety, negative symptoms and disorganization. As indicated by component scores, different clinical diagnoses demonstrated distinct symptom profiles characterized by wide-ranging levels of severity. When comparing the predictive value of symptoms against diagnosis for a variety of clinical outcome measures (e.g. ‘Overactive, aggressive behaviour’), symptoms proved superior in five instances (R2 range: 0.06–0.28) whereas diagnosis was best just once (R2∶0.25). This report demonstrates that symptom data being routinely gathered in an NHS trust, when documented on the appropriate tool, have considerable potential for onward use in a variety of clinical and research applications via representation as dimensions of psychopathology. PMID:23520532

  2. Clinical Validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62): Further Evaluation and Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleavey, Andrew A.; Nordberg, Samuel S.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Locke, Benjamin D.; Lockard, Allison J.

    2012-01-01

    Self-report instruments of psychological symptoms are increasingly used in counseling centers but rely on rigorous evaluation of their clinical validity. Three studies reported here (total N = 26,886) investigated the validity of the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62 (CCAPS-62; Locke et al., 2011) as an assessment and…

  3. Symptoms of acute posttraumatic stress disorder in prostate cancer patients following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Ioannis; Yiannopoulou, Konstantina G; Mihalakis, Anastasios; Hatziandonakis, Nikolaos; Constantinides, Constantinos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos; Mitropoulos, Dionisios

    2011-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is increasingly reported in cancer survivors. The authors' objective was to determine the presence of acute posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in prostate cancer (PC) patients following radical prostatectomy. Fifteen patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer were assessed for the presence of PTSD-related symptoms by completing the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS), a month following the procedure. A group of 20 patients who underwent surgery for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) served as the control group. PTSD total scores were significantly higher in PC patients when compared with BPH patients, whose PTSD scores did not differ from those reported in the general population (32.6 ± 18.5 vs. 11.3 ± 9.7, p = .001). PTSD did not vary among PC patients when adjusted for educational status. PTSD symptoms are common among patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and independent of their educational level. Research investigating these aspects of posttreatment psychological adjustment is needed for developing well-targeted psychological interventions. PMID:20483867

  4. Recurrent abdominal and cervical pains. An unusual clinical presentation of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lahat, E; Azizi, E; Eshel, G; Mundel, G

    1986-03-01

    Most cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) present with arthritis, carditis or choreiform movements. However, a variety of clinical manifestations which are not included in the modified Jones criteria can be the presenting symptoms of the disease. We describe a case of a 10-year-old boy with ARF who presented with recurrent episodes of abdominal and cervical pain who later developed an active carditis which established the diagnosis of ARF. A high degree of suspicion and an awareness of the less common manifestations of ARF are necessary to make an early diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment in certain cases of ARF. PMID:3583777

  5. Permanent respiratory impairment and upper airway symptoms despite clinical improvement in patients with reactive airways dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S L; Cordasco, E M; Guidotti, T L

    2001-04-10

    We previously reported clinical findings for 19 patients who developed symptomatic airways hyperactivity following an acute exposure to an inhaled irritant and who were given the diagnosis of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). We now report on nine of these patients who have been followed for a mean of 9 years, allowing assessment of function, symptoms, and comorbidity beyond the early phase of acute airway injury and inflammation. None of the patients have resolved their airway hyper-responsiveness and symptoms completely, although only in one subject, who had a premorbid history of asthma, has the condition progressed. A common feature has been sinusitis and other upper-airway symptoms. We conclude that in this group of patients, RADS presented in a consistent pattern regardless of the cause of airway injury, resolved only partially, even in subjects without a premorbid history of respiratory disease, and was associated with significant secondary morbidity, especially affecting the upper airway. This pattern was evident regardless of smoking status or age at time of exposure. We conclude that for these subjects, RADS was a distinct entity with a consistent natural history that conferred permanent impairment, but did generally improve somewhat over time. PMID:11327398

  6. Best practice guidelines on clinical management of acute attacks of porphyria and their complications.

    PubMed

    Stein, Penelope; Badminton, Mike; Barth, Julian; Rees, David; Stewart, M Felicity

    2013-05-01

    The British and Irish Porphyria Network guidelines describe best practice in the clinical assessment, investigation and management of acute porphyria attacks and their complications, including severe attacks with neuropathy. Acute attacks of porphyria may occur in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP) and hereditary coproporphyria (HCP). Aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria (ADP) is a very rare autosomal recessive porphyria; only six cases substantiated by mutation analysis have yet been described in the literature. Urinary porphobilinogen (PBG) is always raised in an acute attack due to AIP, VP or HCP and this analysis is essential to confirm the diagnosis. A positive result in a qualitative or semi-quantitative screening test must be followed by PBG quantitation at the earliest opportunity. However in a severely ill patient, treatment should not be delayed. Removal of precipitating factors, effective analgesia and control of symptoms with safe medication, attention to nutrition and fluid balance are essential. The indications for use of intravenous haem arginate are set out, together with advice on its administration. A small proportion of acute porphyria patients develop recurrent attacks and management options that may be considered include gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues, 'prophylactic' regular haem arginate infusion or ultimately, liver transplantation. PMID:23605132

  7. Isolated fat pad sign in acute elbow injury: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jie, Kim E; van Dam, Lisette F; Hammacher, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    An isolated fat pad sign (i.e. joint effusion without a visible fracture), commonly seen in acute elbow injury, is associated with occult fracture and treated as such. However, the clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad is unclear, thereby questioning the need for specialized follow-up. In this study, 111 patients (median age 15 years, interquartile range 9-27 years) with an isolated fat pad sign after acute elbow injury were included. The clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad sign was derived from descriptives on pain, elbow function, treatment change, number of revisits and recovery time after 1 week follow-up and long-term follow-up. Treatment alterations were rarely made and none of the patients needed an operative intervention; also, none of the patients had persistent symptoms. The median recovery time was 3 weeks (interquartile range 2-12 weeks). This study shows that, unless symptoms persist or worsen, regular follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic is not needed. PMID:26153882

  8. Cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms in clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Araos Gómez, Pedro; González-Saiz, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-06-30

    Cocaine use is significantly associated with psychiatric co-morbidities of which psychotic symptoms are the most typical. The primary goal of this study is to estimate the life-time prevalence of cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms (CIPS) in a sample of patients without a history of primary psychosis, who attended specific out-patient drug-dependence treatment centres (ODDTCs). This is an observational, cross-sectional design and a consecutive sampling technique. The Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms-Cocaine Induced Psychosis (SAPS-CIP) was used to interview 114 patients who request treatment at specific ODDTCs for problems related to cocaine use. Most patients, 89.5% (95% CIs: 83.8-95.2%) had dependence of cocaine and 84.2% (95% CIs: 77.5-90.9%) showed at least one CIPS. Patients with CIPS had used cocaine more times throughout their lives and had a more frequency of use during the period of higher abuse severity in the last year, had higher severity of dependence score and had fewer abstinence periods greater than 30 days compared with those without CIPS. Cocaine dependency severity scale scores were significantly greater in patients with CIPS compared with those without CIPS. PMID:24679995

  9. Clinical and morphological correlations in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slujitoru, Anca Stefania; Enache, Andreea Lorena; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Rolea, Elisabeta; Stocheci, Cristina Mariana; Pop, O T; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathological changes in twenty-seven cases of acute ischemic stroke, aged between 65 and 75 years. All deaths occurred within 30 days after stroke. The aim of our study was to establish the clinical and histological correlations in acute ischemic stroke to detect prognostic factors. Brain lesions after acute stroke were observed in all regions. Our study describes the heterogeneity of brain injury after acute ischemic stroke with the participation of all brain components and the chronology in which these lesions develop and evolve. By histological and immunohistochemical studies, we identified neuronal, glial and vascular damage. The neurons had undergone in the area of lesion a process of necrosis, ballooning or condensation process. In the ischemic penumbra, we observed the presence of red neurons. Vascular lesions were represented by the discontinuity of capillaries, always associated with a marked perivascular edema. The following clinical and morphological correlations were established: liquefactive necrosis, astrocyte gliosis, phagocytosis phenomena are the more intense the later the death of the patient; apoptosis phenomena are the more intense the faster the death of the patient; the entire cerebral microcirculation presented microscopic modifications following the ischemic strokes, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made; the major neurological complications of the ischemic stroke - the hemorrhagic transformation phenomena, cerebral edema, were microscopically objectified, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made. PMID:23303014

  10. Assessment of menopausal symptoms among women attending various outreach clinics in South Canara District of India

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nitin; Nagaraj, Kondagunta; Saralaya, Vittal; Nelliyanil, Maria; Rao, PP Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Menopausal symptoms experienced by women are known to affect their quality-of-life. The symptoms experienced at menopause are quite variable and their etiology is found to be multifactorial. This study was hence done to assess the pattern and severity of menopausal symptoms and to find out the factors associated with these symptoms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in various outreach clinics of Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. Women in the age group of 40-65 years were included in the study by convenient sampling method. Data regarding menopausal symptom was obtained by interviewing each participant using the menopause rating scale questionnaire. Results: Mean age of the participants were 54.2 ± 7.2 years and mean age of attainment of menopause was 48.4 ± 4.5 years. Mean duration of menopause was found to be 7.5 ± 5.3 years. Commonest symptom reported was joint and muscular discomfort and physical and mental exhaustion seen in 94 (85.4%) participants. The mean number of symptoms reported by participants was 7.6 ± 2.8. Educated women reported significantly more symptoms (F = 2.218, P = 0.047). Somatic and urogenital symptoms were more among perimenopausal women and somatic symptoms were more among postmenopausal women. Fifty-eight (52.7%) participants had one or more severe symptoms. Severe symptoms were most among premenopausal women. Conclusion: The high proportion and severity of menopausal symptoms observed in this study group proves that menopausal symptoms are common and cannot be ignored. More of menopausal clinics are needed for awareness generation, early recognition and treatment of related morbidities. PMID:24970987

  11. NMFBFS: A NMF-Based Feature Selection Method in Identifying Pivotal Clinical Symptoms of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiwei; Meng, Guanmin; Huang, Deshuang; Yue, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive malignancy. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), with the characteristics of syndrome differentiation, plays an important role in the comprehensive treatment of HCC. This study aims to develop a nonnegative matrix factorization- (NMF-) based feature selection approach (NMFBFS) to identify potential clinical symptoms for HCC patient stratification. Methods. The NMFBFS approach consisted of three major steps. Firstly, statistics-based preliminary feature screening was designed to detect and remove irrelevant symptoms. Secondly, NMF was employed to infer redundant symptoms. Based on NMF-derived basis matrix, we defined a novel similarity measurement of intersymptoms. Finally, we converted each group of redundant symptoms to a new single feature so that the dimension was further reduced. Results. Based on a clinical dataset consisting of 407 patient samples of HCC with 57 symptoms, NMFBFS approach detected 8 irrelevant symptoms and then identified 16 redundant symptoms within 6 groups. Finally, an optimal feature subset with 39 clinical features was generated after compressing the redundant symptoms by groups. The validation of classification performance shows that these 39 features obviously improve the prediction accuracy of HCC patients. Conclusions. Compared with other methods, NMFBFS has obvious advantages in identifying important clinical features of HCC. PMID:26579207

  12. Diagnoses and Presenting Symptoms in an Infant Psychiatry Clinic: Comparison of Two Diagnostic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Karen A.; Boyum, Lisa A.; Harmon, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To present data from a general infant psychiatry clinic, including range and frequency of presenting symptoms, relationship between symptoms and diagnoses, and comparison of two diagnostic systems, DSM-IV and Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood (DC: 0-3). Method: A…

  13. The Influence of Depression, Anxiety and Somatization on the Clinical Symptoms and Treatment Response in Patients with Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate the influence of depression, anxiety and somatization on the treatment response for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH). The LUTS/BPH patients were evaluated with the Korean versions of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and the PHQ-15. The primary endpoint was a responder rate defined by the total score of IPSS (≤ 7) at the end of treatment. The LUTS/BPH severity was significantly higher in patients with depression (whole symptoms P = 0.024; storage sub-symptom P = 0.021) or somatization (P = 0.024) than in those without, while the quality of life (QOL) was significantly higher in patients with anxiety (P = 0.038) than in those without. Anxious patients showed significantly higher proportion of non-response (odds ratio [OR], 3.294, P = 0.022) than those without, while somatic patients had a trend toward having more non-responders (OR, 2.552, P = 0.067). Our exploratory results suggest that depression, anxiety and somatization may have some influences on the clinical manifestation of LUTS/BPH. Further, anxious patients had a lower response to treatment in patients with LUTS/BPH. Despite of limitations, the present study demonstrates that clinicians may need careful evaluation of psychiatric symptoms for proper management of patients with LUTS/BPH. Graphical Abstract PMID:25120327

  14. Resolution of acute gastroenteritis symptoms in children and adults treated with a novel polyphenol-based prebiotic

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, Telma; Wotring, Robert; Melville, Chris R; Hargraves, Kara; Kumm, Jochen; Morton, John M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To test efficacy and durability of a polyphenol-based prebiotic treatment for acute gastroenteritis in a 300 patient double-blinded clinical study. METHODS: A two-arm randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted at two public health centers in Managua, Nicaragua. Potential subjects who qualified based on inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Two thirds of the subjects (n = 200) received a single titrated 0.5-2 ounce liquid dose of a novel polyphenol-based prebiotic (AlivaTM) diluted with 2 to eight ounces of oral rehydration solution (ORS). One third of the subjects (n = 100) were randomized to receive two liquid ounces of a taste and color-matched placebo diluted in eight ounces of ORS. The outcome variables measured included stool consistency, stomach discomfort, gas and bloating, and heartburn/indigestion. The study subjects ranked their stool consistency and the severity of their subjective symptoms at specified intervals from immediately prior to treatment, to five days post treatment. All subjects recorded their symptoms in a study diary. The study subjects also recorded the time and consistencies of all stools in their study diary. Stool consistency was compared to the picture and descriptions on the Bristol Stool Chart, and any stool rated greater than Type 4 was considered unformed. The clinical study team reviewed the study diaries with subjects during daily follow-up calls and close-out visits, and recorded the data in case report forms. RESULTS: After receiving a single dose, Aliva treated subjects reported shorter median time to their last unformed stool (1 h 50 min) than placebo treated subjects (67 h 50 min.), a statistically significant difference [95%CI: -3178-(-2018), P = 0.000]. Aliva treated subjects also reported shorter median their time to last unformed stool (TTLUS) (1hrs 50 min) than placebo treated subjects (67 h 50 min), which was also a statistically

  15. Predictors of suppurative complications for acute sore throat in primary care: prospective clinical cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, F D Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Campbell, John; Delaney, Brendan; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective To document whether elements of a structured history and examination predict adverse outcome of acute sore throat. Design Prospective clinical cohort. Setting Primary care. Participants 14 610 adults with acute sore throat (≤2 weeks’ duration). Main outcome measures Common suppurative complications (quinsy or peritonsillar abscess, otitis media, sinusitis, impetigo or cellulitis) and reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms within one month. Results Complications were assessed reliably (inter-rater κ=0.95). 1.3% (177/13 445) of participants developed complications overall and 14.2% (1889/13 288) reconsulted with new or unresolving symptoms. Independent predictors of complications were severe tonsillar inflammation (documented among 13.0% (1652/12 717); odds ratio 1.92, 95% confidence interval 1.28 to 2.89) and severe earache (5% (667/13 323); 3.02, 1.91 to 4.76), but the model including both variables had modest prognostic utility (bootstrapped area under the receiver operator curve 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65), and 70% of complications (124/177) occurred when neither was present. Clinical prediction rules for bacterial infection (Centor criteria and FeverPAIN) also predicted complications, but predictive values were also poor and most complications occurred with low scores (67% (118/175) scoring ≤2 for Centor; 126/173 (73%) scoring ≤2 for FeverPAIN). Previous medical problems, sex, temperature, and muscle aches were independently but weakly associated with reconsultation with new or unresolving symptoms. Conclusion Important suppurative complications after an episode of acute sore throat in primary care are uncommon. History and examination and scores to predict bacterial infection cannot usefully identify those who will develop complications. Clinicians will need to rely on strategies such as safety netting or delayed prescription in managing the uncertainty and low risk of complications. PMID:24277339

  16. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hyo; Park, Samel; Lee, Jung-Won; Hwang, Il-Woong; Moon, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Su-Yeon; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) HCO3 (-), Ca(++)), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. PMID:27366016

  17. The Anion Gap is a Predictive Clinical Marker for Death in Patients with Acute Pesticide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide formulation includes solvents (methanol and xylene) and antifreeze (ethylene glycol) whose metabolites are anions such as formic acid, hippuric acid, and oxalate. However, the effect of the anion gap on clinical outcome in acute pesticide intoxication requires clarification. In this prospective study, we compared the anion gap and other parameters between surviving versus deceased patients with acute pesticide intoxication. The following parameters were assessed in 1,058 patients with acute pesticide intoxication: blood chemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, lactic acid, liver enzymes, albumin, globulin, and urate), urinalysis (ketone bodies), arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes (Na+, K+, Cl- HCO3-, Ca++), pesticide field of use, class, and ingestion amount, clinical outcome (death rate, length of hospital stay, length of intensive care unit stay, and seriousness of toxic symptoms), and the calculated anion gap. Among the 481 patients with a high anion gap, 52.2% had a blood pH in the physiologic range, 35.8% had metabolic acidosis, and 12.1% had acidemia. Age, anion gap, pesticide field of use, pesticide class, seriousness of symptoms (all P < 0.001), and time lag after ingestion (P = 0.048) were significant risk factors for death in univariate analyses. Among these, age, anion gap, and pesticide class were significant risk factors for death in a multiple logistic regression analysis (P < 0.001). In conclusions, high anion gap is a significant risk factor for death, regardless of the accompanying acid-base balance status in patients with acute pesticide intoxication. PMID:27366016

  18. An Imaging Diagnostic Protocol in Children with Clinically Suspected Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Matias; Antonio de Medeiros Lima, Marco; Corrêa, Patricia; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate a new diagnostic strategy using clinical findings followed by ultrasound (US) and, in selected cases, MRI. This study included 166 children presenting signs and symptoms suggesting acute appendicitis. Cases classified as suggesting appendicitis according to clinical exams had to be referred to surgery, whereas the other cases were discharged. Unclear cases were evaluated using US. If the US results were considered inconclusive, patients underwent MRI. Of the 166 patients, 78 (47%) had acute appendicitis and 88 (53%) had other diseases. The strategy under study had a sensitivity of 96 per cent, specificity of 100 per cent, positive predictive value of 100 per cent, negative predictive value of 97 per cent, and accuracy of 98 per cent. Eight patients remained undiagnosed and underwent MRI. After MRI two girls presented normal appendixes and were discharged. One girl had an enlarged appendix on MRI and appendicitis could have been confirmed by surgery. In the other five patients, no other sign of the disease was detected by MRI such as an inflammatory mass, free fluid or an abscess in the right iliac fossa. All of them were discharged after clinical observation. In the vast majority of cases the correct diagnosis was reached by clinical and US examinations. When clinical assessment and US findings were inconclusive, MRI was useful to detect normal and abnormal appendixes and valuable to rule out other abdominal pathologies that mimic appendicitis. PMID:27215717

  19. Multidisciplinary Clinic Dedicated to Treating Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome: Presenting Characteristics of the First 47 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thienemann, Margo; Pearlstein, Jennifer; Crable, Amber; Brown, Kayla; Chang, Kiki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Abrupt, dramatic onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or eating restriction with at least two coinciding symptoms (anxiety, mood dysregulation, irritability/aggression/oppositionality, behavioral regression, cognitive deterioration, sensory or motor abnormalities, or somatic symptoms) defines pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Descriptions of clinical data in such youth are limited. Methods: We reviewed charts of 53 consecutive patients evaluated in our PANS Clinic; 47 met PANS symptom criteria but not all met the requirement for “acute onset.” Patients meeting full criteria for PANS were compared with patients who had a subacute/insidious onset of symptoms. Results: Nineteen of 47 (40%) patients in the study had acute onset of symptoms. In these patients, autoimmune/inflammatory diseases and psychiatric disorders were common in first-degree family members (71% and 78%, respectively). Most acute-onset patients had a relapsing/remitting course (84%), prominent sleep disturbances (84%), urinary issues (58%), sensory amplification (66%), gastrointestinal symptoms (42%), and generalized pain (68%). Inflammatory back pain (21%) and other arthritis conditions (28%) were also common. Suicidal and homicidal thoughts and gestures were common (44% and 17%, respectively) as were violent outbursts (61%). Group A streptococcus (GAS) was the most commonly identified infection at onset (21%) and during flares (74%). Rates of the abovementioned characteristics did not differ between the acute-onset group and the subacute/insidious-onset groups. Low levels of immunoglobulins were more common in the subacute/insidious-onset group (75%) compared with the acute-onset group (22%), but this was not statistically significant (p=0.06). Conclusions: In our PANS clinic, 40% of patients had acute onset of symptoms. However, those with and without acute onset of symptoms had similar symptom presentation, rates of inflammatory conditions

  20. Hereditary angioneurotic edema and thromboembolic diseases: I: How symptoms of acute attacks change with aging.

    PubMed

    Kodama, J; Uchida, K; Kushiro, H; Murakami, N; Yutani, C

    1998-05-01

    Localized edema of the larynx and pharynx leading to death from asphyxia has long been recognized as a characteristic symptom of hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE). Long-term follow-up of younger HANE patients has revealed that transient localized acute attacks of edema affect tissues where the microcirculation maintains the blood supply. However, with aging, HANE attacks precipitate disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or multiple organ failure (MOF). Substitution with a C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) has resulted in a fulminant lethal end with a rapid and profound decrease in antithrombin-III (AT-III) activity. A possible mechanism is as follows: Exogenous stimuli activate plasma proteinase systems with the generation of plasma kallikrein that activates the tissue factor pathway (TF) and liberates bradykinin (BK). In younger patients, BK enhances vascular permeability. In the elderly, activated TF is controlled by tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and generates thrombin, which is the target enzyme of AT-III and precipitates DIC or MOF. In elderly patients, the characteristic symptom of HANE is hypercoagulation by age-related changes in the biosynthesis of AT-III or TFPI. PMID:9652897

  1. Clinical and laboratory predictive markers for acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection during the febrile stage is essential for adjusting appropriate management. This study is to identify the predictive markers of clinical and laboratory findings in the acute stage of dengue infection during a major outbreak of dengue virus type 1 that occurred in southern Taiwan during 2007. A retrospective, hospital-based study was conducted at a university hospital in southern Taiwan from January to December, 2007. Patient who was reported for clinically suspected dengue infection was enrolled. Laboratory-positive dengue cases are confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of specific dengue IgM, fourfold increase of dengue-specific IgG titers in convalescent serum, or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of dengue virus. Results The suspected dengue cases consist of 100 children (≤ 18 years) and 481 adults. Among the 581 patients, 67 (67%) children and 309 (64.2%) adults were laboratory-confirmed. Patients who had laboratory indeterminate were excluded. Most cases were uncomplicated and 3.8% of children and 2.9% of adults developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The overall mortality rate in those with DHF/DSS was 7.1%, and the average duration of hospitalization was 20 days. The most common symptoms/signs at admission were myalgia (46.8%), petechiae (36.9%) and nausea/vomiting (33.5%). The most notable laboratory findings included leukopenia (2966 ± 1896/cmm), thrombocytopenia (102 ± 45 × 103/cmm), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (45 ± 10 s), and elevated serum levels of aminotransferase (AST, 166 ± 208 U/L; ALT, 82 ± 103 U/L) and low C - reactive protein (CRP) (6 ± 11 mg/L). Based on the clinical features for predicting laboratory-confirmed dengue infection, the sensitivities of typical rash, myalgia, and positive tourniquet test are 59.2%, 46.8%, and 34.2%, while the specificities for

  2. Relations between Behavioral Inhibition, Big Five Personality Factors, and Anxiety Disorder Symptoms in Non-Clinical and Clinically Anxious Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vreeke, Leonie J.; Muris, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations between behavioral inhibition, Big Five personality traits, and anxiety disorder symptoms in non-clinical children (n = 147) and clinically anxious children (n = 45) aged 6-13 years. Parents completed the Behavioral Inhibition Questionnaire-Short Form, the Big Five Questionnaire for Children, and the Screen for…

  3. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management.

    PubMed

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; El Kerouiti, Zakaria; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought. PMID:26328000

  4. Acute febrile torticollis in youth: clinical investigation and current management

    PubMed Central

    Ouattassi, Naouar; Chmiel, Mohammed; Kerouiti, Zakaria El; Ridal, Mohammed; Alami, Mohammed Nouredine

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile torticollis in children is a rare and a special clinical picture of variable causes. It may indicate an inflammatory or an infectious pathology affecting any of the anatomical structures of the neck. Treatment is quite clearly defined, and it may be a therapeutic emergency. It is a condition that all ENT specialists must be familiar with since they are most likely to be the first physician to whom such a child is brought PMID:26328000

  5. Pathogenesis of Acute Kidney Injury: Foundation for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is complex, involving factors such as vasoconstriction, leukostasis, vascular congestion, cell death, and abnormal immune modulators and growth factors. Many targeted clinical therapies have failed, are inconclusive, or have yet to be tested. Given the complexity of the pathogenesis of AKI, it may be naïve to expect one therapeutic intervention would have success. Some examples of detrimental processes that can be blocked in pre-clinical models to improve kidney function and survival are apoptotic cell death in tubular epithelial cells, complement-mediated immune system activation, and impairment of cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Modalities with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality in AKI include vasodilators, growth factors, anti-inflammatory agents, and cell-based therapies. Pharmacological agents that target these diverse pathways are being used clinically for other indications. Using combinatorial approaches in future clinical trials may improve our ability to prevent and treat AKI. PMID:21530035

  6. Acute Marchiafava-Bignami disease: clinical and serial MRI correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Prakashini, Koteshwara; Polnaya, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a form of toxic demyelinating disease more often seen in chronic alcoholics. The disease process typically involves the corpus callosum and clinically often presents with altered sensorium, neurocognitive defects or seizures with acute cases often deteriorating to comatose state. The death rate is high. We report a rare case of MBD with complete clinical recovery. A 50-year-old male patient presented in an unconscious state and underwent MRI of the brain which showed significant lesions involving the corpus callosum. Following treatment with thiamine and supportive therapy, he improved clinically and a follow-up MRI revealed significant resolution of the earlier lesions. Diffusion-weighted MRI showed the changes more conspicuously as compared with conventional imaging. The clinical resolution corresponded well with the MRI pattern. The case highlights that diffusion-weighted MRI is an extremely useful tool in evaluation and prognostication of MBD. PMID:24850553

  7. Ularitide for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Mitrovic, Veselin; Peacock, W Frank; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-21

    The short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in acute heart failure is still unacceptably high. There is an unmet need for new therapy options with new drugs with a new mode of action. One of the drugs currently in clinical testing in Phase III is ularitide, which is the chemically synthesized form of the human natriuretic peptide urodilatin. Urodilatin is produced in humans by differential processing of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in distal renal tubule cells. Physiologically, urodilatin appears to be the natriuretic peptide involved in sodium homeostasis. Ularitide exerts its pharmacological actions such as vasodilation, diuresis, and natriuresis through the natriuretic peptide receptor/particulate guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. In animal models of heart failure as well as Phase I and II clinical studies in heart failure patients, ularitide demonstrated beneficial effects such as symptom relief and vasodilation, while still preserving renal function. Subsequently, the pivotal acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) Phase III study, called TRUE-AHF, was started with the objectives to evaluate the effects of ularitide infusion on the clinical status and cardiovascular mortality of patients with ADHF compared with placebo. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical data supporting the potential use of ularitide in the treatment of ADHF. PMID:25670819

  8. International, Multicenter Standardization of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Clinical Data Collection: A Report from the Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew C; Young, Rachel; Devine, Steven; Hogan, William J; Ayuk, Francis; Bunworasate, Udomsak; Chanswangphuwana, Chantiya; Efebera, Yvonne A; Holler, Ernst; Litzow, Mark; Ordemann, Rainer; Qayed, Muna; Renteria, Anne S; Reshef, Ran; Wölfl, Matthias; Chen, Yi-Bin; Goldstein, Steven; Jagasia, Madan; Locatelli, Franco; Mielke, Stephan; Porter, David; Schechter, Tal; Shekhovtsova, Zhanna; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a leading cause of morbidity and nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. The clinical staging of GVHD varies greatly between transplant centers and is frequently not agreed on by independent reviewers. The lack of standardized approaches to handle common sources of discrepancy in GVHD grading likely contributes to why promising GVHD treatments reported from single centers have failed to show benefit in randomized multicenter clinical trials. We developed guidelines through international expert consensus opinion to standardize the diagnosis and clinical staging of GVHD for use in a large international GVHD research consortium. During the first year of use, the guidance followed discussion of complex clinical phenotypes by experienced transplant physicians and data managers. These guidelines increase the uniformity of GVHD symptom capture, which may improve the reproducibility of GVHD clinical trials after further prospective validation. PMID:26386318

  9. Issues and perspectives in designing clinical trials for negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R; Alphs, Larry; Anghelescu, Ion-George; Arango, Celso; Barnes, Thomas R E; Caers, Ivo; Daniel, David G; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Garibaldi, George; Green, Michael F; Harvey, Philip D; Kahn, René S; Kane, John M; Keefe, Richard S E; Kinon, Bruce; Leucht, Stefan; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Malhotra, Anil K; Stauffer, Virginia; Umbricht, Daniel; Wesnes, Keith; Kapur, Shitij; Rabinowitz, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    A number of pharmacological agents for treating negative symptoms in schizophrenia are currently in development. Unresolved questions regarding the design of clinical trials in this area were discussed at an international meeting in Florence, Italy in April 2012. Participants included representatives from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Prior to the meeting, participants submitted key questions for debate and discussion. Responses to the questions guided the discussion during the meeting. The group reached agreement on a number of issues: (1) study subjects should be under the age of 65; (2) subjects should be excluded for symptoms of depression that do not overlap with negative symptoms; (3) functional measures should not be required as a co-primary in negative symptom trials; (4) information from informants should be included for ratings when available; (5) Phase 2 negative symptom trials should be 12weeks and 26weeks is preferred for Phase 3 trials; (6) prior to entry into a negative symptom study, subjects should demonstrate clinical stability for a period of 4 to 6months by collection of retrospective information; and (7) prior to entry, the stability of negative and positive symptoms should be confirmed prospectively for four weeks or longer. The participants could not reach agreement on whether predominant or prominent negative symptoms should be required for study subjects. PMID:24028744

  10. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  11. Impact of clinical and subclinical hypersensitivity to asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara L; Fisher, Vicki

    2014-12-01

    Asparaginase is an essential element of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. It depletes serum asparagine (an amino acid necessary for synthesis of cellular proteins), deprives leukemic blast cells of asparagine, and eventually results in cell death. To gain benefit from asparaginase, asparagine depletion must be ensured by giving intensive therapy and completing the full course of treatment. Three formulations of asparaginase exist; two are derived from Escherichia coli, a native form and pegylated form, and one is derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi (Erwinia asparaginase). Like many large proteins, asparaginases are immunogenic, and some patients develop antibodies to asparaginase. Antibodies may result in clinical hypersensitivity or subclinical hypersensitivity without symptoms, and both can result in a reduction in asparaginase activity and may affect therapeutic benefit. Clinical hypersensitivity is the most common reason for patients to stop asparaginase treatment. Subclinical hypersensitivity can only be identified by laboratory testing; therapeutic monitoring of asparaginase activity is used as a surrogate measure for asparagine depletion. PMID:25427712

  12. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  13. [Acute abdominal pain in the emergency department - a clinical algorithm for adult patients].

    PubMed

    Trentzsch, H; Werner, J; Jauch, K-W

    2011-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain represents the cardinal symptom behind a vast number of possible under-lying causes including several ones that re-quire surgical treatment. It is the most common sur-gical emergency, the most common cause for a surgical consultation in the emergency department and the most common cause for non-trauma related hospital admissions. The golden mis-sion statement is to rapidly identify whether the underlying cause requires an urgent or even immediate surgical intervention. However, behind the same cardinal symptom one may encounter harmless or non-urgent problems. By employing diagnostic means cost effectively and with the aim to avoid unnecessary exposure of the patient to X-rays in mind, the challenge remains to identify patients with an indication for emergency surgery from those who suffer from a less serious condition and thus can be treated conservatively and without any pressure of time. Dealing with such a highly complex decision-making process calls for a clinical algorithm. Many publications are available that have scrutinised the different aspects of the initial assessment and the emergency management of acute abdominal pain. How-ever, the large body of evidence seems to miss articles that describe a formally correct priority- and problem-based approach. Clinical algorithms apply to complex disease states such as acute abdominal pain and translate them into one clearly laid out, logically coordinated and systematic overall process. Our intention is to devel-op such an algorithm to approach acute abdominal pain from the surgeon's point of view. Based on daily practice and with reference to available literature, it is the aim of this study to define a work flow that simply summarises all steps in-volved and defines the required decision process in order to form the intellectual basis for an evidence-based clinical algorithm. The result is illustrated as a first draft of such an evidence-based algorithm to allow emergency evaluation of

  14. Classifying symptom change in eating disorders: clinical significance metrics for the Change in Eating Disorder Symptoms Scale.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Anthony D; Spangler, Diane L

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine clinically significant change criteria and change trajectories for the Change in Eating Disorder Symptoms Scale (CHEDS). Participants included non-eating disordered (n=95) and eating disordered (n=58) samples. The clinical sample was undergoing enhanced cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders. Reliable change indices (RCI), cutscores, and change trajectories were calculated. CHEDS total score RCI was 12 points while the cutscore between eating disordered and non-eating disordered groups was 65. Trajectory models for benchmarking were successfully derived based on initial scores. The change indices and trajectories permit session-by-session analyses and benchmarking of change. These empirically-calibrated indices of patient change and progress allow for empirically-guided treatment decision-making. PMID:26735393

  15. Optimism and Recovery After Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Clinical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Amy; Molloy, Gerard J.; Wikman, Anna; Poole, Lydia; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Optimism is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, but its impact on recovery after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is poorly understood. We hypothesized that greater optimism would lead to more effective physical and emotional adaptation after ACS and would buffer the impact of persistent depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Methods This prospective observational clinical study took place in an urban general hospital and involved 369 patients admitted with a documented ACS. Optimism was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. The main outcomes were physical health status, depressive symptoms, smoking, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption measured 12 months after ACS, and composite major adverse cardiac events (cardiovascular death, readmission with reinfarction or unstable angina, and coronary artery bypass graft surgery) assessed over an average of 45.7 months. Results We found that optimism predicted better physical health status 12 months after ACS independently of baseline physical health, age, sex, ethnicity, social deprivation, and clinical risk factors (B = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.10–1.20). Greater optimism also predicted reduced risk of depressive symptoms (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.74–0.90), more smoking cessation, and more fruit and vegetable consumption at 12 months. Persistent depressive symptoms 12 months after ACS predicted major adverse cardiac events over subsequent years (odds ratio = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.16–5.67), but only among individuals low in optimism (optimism × depression interaction; p = .014). Conclusions Optimism predicts better physical and emotional health after ACS. Measuring optimism may help identify individuals at risk. Pessimistic outlooks can be modified, potentially leading to improved recovery after major cardiac events. PMID:25738438

  16. Clinical and Cognitive Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Tara S.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Asarnow, Joan R.; Langley, Audra; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Depression is the most common comorbidity among adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet little is known about depressive symptoms in childhood OCD. This study examined clinical and cognitive variables associated with depressive symptomatology in 71 youths (62% male, mean age= 12.7 years) with primary OCD. Youths presented with a range of depressive symptoms, with 21% scoring at or above the clinical cutoff on the self-report measure of depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with higher levels of cognitive distortions assessed on measures of insight, perceived control, competence, and contingencies. Depressive symptoms were also linked to older age and more severe OCD. Low perceived control and self-competence and high OCD severity independently predicted depression scores. PMID:20706915

  17. Update on pathogenesis and clinical management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Santamaría, Dulce M; Taxonera, Carlos; Giner, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), defined as the acute nonbacterial inflammatory condition of the pancreas, is derived from the early activation of digestive enzymes found inside the acinar cells, with variable compromise of the gland itself, nearby tissues and other organs. So, it is an event that begins with pancreatic injury, elicits an acute inflammatory response, encompasses a variety of complications and generally resolves over time. Different conditions are known to induce this disorder, although the innermost mechanisms and how they act to develop the disease are still unknown. We summarize some well established aspects. A phase sequence has been proposed: etiology factors generate other conditions inside acinar cells that favor the AP development with some systemic events; genetic factors could be involved as susceptibility and modifying elements. AP is a disease with extremely different clinical expressions. Most patients suffer a mild and limited disease, but about one fifth of cases develop multi organ failure, accompanied by high mortality. This great variability in presentation, clinical course and complications has given rise to the confusion related to AP related terminology. However, consensus meetings have provided uniform definitions, including the severity of the illness. The clinical management is mainly based on the disease´s severity and must be directed to correct the underlying predisposing factors and control the inflammatory process itself. The first step is to determine if it is mild or severe. We review the principal aspects to be considered in this treatment, as reflected in several clinical practice guidelines. For the last 25 years, there has been a global increase in incidence of AP, along with many advances in diagnosis and treatment. However, progress in knowledge of its pathogenesis is scarce. PMID:22737590

  18. Cerebral blood flow changes with acute cocaine intoxication: clinical correlations with SPECT, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Mena, I; Giombetti, R J; Miller, B L; Garrett, K; Villanueva-Meyer, J; Mody, C; Goldberg, M A

    1994-01-01

    In summary, these data suggest that widespread primary or secondary cerebral vasoconstriction is common in patients with neurological complications from cocaine. In most patients, SPECT showed wide-spread hypoperfusion in regions that had no clear clinical significance (e.g., the periventricular area). In many, the SPECT was performed more than 24 hours after the onset of neurological symptomatology. These findings raise several questions. It has been assumed that these SPECT changes in patients with acute neurological symptoms are temporary, although it will be important to determine whether these areas of hypoperfusion persist after symptoms have abated. Recently, Holman and colleagues (1991) found multifocal and deep areas of hypoperfusion with SPECT in 16 of 18 patients with a history of chronic cocaine abuse. Although most of the subjects tested positive for cocaine, several had abstained from cocaine use for weeks prior to the study. All 18 subjects had neuropsychological deficits, 13 mild and 5 moderate. Similarly, Pascual-Leone and colleagues (1991) have shown that CT scan atrophy strongly correlates with the duration of cocaine abuse, suggesting that brain injury may occur with continued use of cocaine. It is the authors' concern that cocaine abuse might produce permanent changes in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, brain SPECT was found to be a useful procedure in the evaluation of acute cocaine intoxication. Brain SPECT revealed focal cortical lesions not seen on head CT or MRI, which corresponded to clinical deficits. In addition, [99mTc]HMPAO brain SPECT had a characteristic scalloped appearance, and this may be a marker for acute intoxication with cocaine. This study further supports the contention that cocaine causes neurological disease by its vasoconstrictive action. PMID:7603541

  19. Clinical Relevance of Vilazodone Treatment in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Categorical Improvement in Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Larry; Mathews, Maju; Ghori, Razi; Edwards, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinically relevant symptom improvement in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) receiving vilazodone by using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a clinician-rated scale used to measure MDD symptom severity and improvement. Method: Pooled data from 2 positive, phase 3, 8-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials in patients with MDD were analyzed. Patients received vilazodone 40 mg/d or placebo; post hoc analyses were conducted on study completers. Depression symptom improvement was evaluated by analyzing the proportions of patients who shifted from the baseline MADRS single-item symptom severity category of ≥ 2 (mild to severe symptoms) to an end-of-study category < 2 (minimal to no symptoms) or from ≥ 4 (moderate to severe symptoms) to ≤ 2 (mild to no symptoms). The proportion of patients who shifted from anxious depression to no anxious depression was also analyzed. Results: The percentage of patients who completed these studies with severity category shift from baseline ≥ 2 to end of study < 2 was significantly higher for vilazodone versus placebo on all MADRS items (odds ratio [OR] range, 1.4–1.7, P < .05) except reduced appetite (OR = 1.3, P = .232). A significantly greater proportion of vilazodone-treated versus placebo-treated patients shifted from baseline ≥ 4 to end of study ≤ 2 on MADRS items of apparent sadness, reported sadness, inner tension, reduced sleep, and lassitude (OR range, 1.5–2.0, P < .05). Additionally, a significantly greater proportion of vilazodone-treated versus placebo-treated patients shifted from anxious depression at baseline to no anxious depression at end of study (OR = 1.5, P = .031). Conclusions: These results suggest that vilazodone treatment is associated with clinically relevant changes in depression symptoms in patients with MDD. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00285376 and NCT00683592 PMID:24940525

  20. Acute symptoms related to air pollution in urban areas: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yunesian, Masud; Asghari, Fariba; Vash, Javad Homayoun; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Farhud, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    Background The harmful effects of urban air pollution on general population in terms of annoying symptoms are not adequately evaluated. This is in contrast to the hospital admissions and short term mortality. The present study protocol is designed to assess the association between the level of exposure to certain ambient air pollutants and a wide range of relevant symptoms. Awareness of the impact of pollution on the population at large will make our estimates of the pertinent covert burden imposed on the society more accurate. Methods/design A cross sectional study with spatial analysis for the addresses of the participants was conducted. Data were collected via telephone interviews administered to a representative sample of civilians over age four in the city. Households were selected using random digit dialling procedures and randomization within each household was also performed to select the person to be interviewed. Levels of exposure are quantified by extrapolating the addresses of the study population over the air pollution matrix of the city at the time of the interview and also for different lag times. This information system uses the data from multiple air pollution monitoring stations in conjunction with meteorological data. General linear models are applied for statistical analysis. Discussion The important limitations of cross-sectional studies on acute effects of air pollution are personal confounders and measurement error for exposure. A wide range of confounders in this study are controlled for in the statistical analysis. Exposure error may be minimised by employing a validated geographical information system that provides accurate estimates and getting detailed information on locations of individual participants during the day. The widespread operation of open air conditioning systems in the target urban area which brings about excellent mixing of the outdoor and indoor air increases the validity of outdoor pollutants levels that are taken as

  1. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  2. Acupuncture Anesthesia and Analgesia for Clinical Acute Pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Acupuncture anesthesia has been practiced in China since about 1960. In Japan, Hyodo reported 30 cases of acupuncture anesthesia in 1972. However, from around 1980, the direction of acupuncture investigations turned from anesthesia to analgesia. Acupuncture analgesia is presently considered a way to activate the body's endogenous analgesic system. Recently, with the rise of acupuncture as one of the most well known CAM therapies, acupuncture or moxibustion treatment has been reported for both acute and chronic pain. Even so, few clinical reports and original articles have been reported in Japan. This review illustrates how acupuncture is being used in Japan for acute pain such as surgical operations, post- operative pain (POP), neuropathic pain, pain associated with teeth extractions and after the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. PMID:18604250

  3. Cortical thickness in relation to clinical symptom onset in preclinical AD.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Corinne; Soldan, Anja; Zhu, Yuxin; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Moghekar, Abhay; Brown, Timothy; Miller, Michael; Albert, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia are preceded by a phase of disease, referred to as 'preclinical AD', during which cognitively normal individuals have evidence of AD pathology in the absence of clinical impairment. This study examined whether a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measure of cortical thickness in brain regions, collectively known as 'AD vulnerable' regions, predicted the time to onset of clinical symptoms associated with MCI and whether cortical thickness was similarly predictive of clinical symptom onset within 7 years post baseline versus progression at a later point in time. These analyses included 240 participants from the BIOCARD study, a cohort of longitudinally followed individuals who were cognitively normal at the time of their MRI (mean age = 56 years). Participants have been followed for up to 18 years (M follow-up = 11.8 years) and 50 participants with MRIs at baseline have developed MCI or dementia over time (mean time to clinical symptom onset = 7 years). Cortical thickness in AD vulnerable regions was based on the mean thickness of eight cortical regions. Using Cox regression models, we found that lower mean cortical thickness was associated with an increased risk of progression from normal cognition to clinical symptom onset within 7 years of baseline (p = 0.03), but not with progression > 7 years from baseline (p = 0.30). Lower cortical thickness was also associated with higher levels of phosphorylated tau, measured in cerebrospinal fluid at baseline. These results suggest that cortical thinning in AD vulnerable regions is detectable in cognitively normal individuals several years prior to the onset of clinical symptoms that are a harbinger of a diagnosis of MCI, and that the changes are more likely to be evident in the years proximal to clinical symptom onset, consistent with hypothetical AD biomarker models. PMID:27408796

  4. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary. PMID:20609317

  5. Predictors of diagnostic neuroimaging delays among adults presenting with symptoms suggestive of acute stroke in Ontario: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Kapral, Moira K.; Li, Shudong; Fang, Jiming; Moody, Alan R.; Krahn, Murray; Laupacis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined the timeliness of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke, but less is known about door-to-imaging time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the timing of neuroimaging among patients with suspected acute stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, and to examine factors associated with delays in neuroimaging. Methods: We included all patients 18 years and older with suspected acute stroke seen at hospitals with neuroimaging capacity within the Ontario Stroke Registry between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2011. We used a hierarchical, multivariable Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between patient and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving timely neuroimaging (≤ 25 min) after arrival in the emergency department. Results: A total of 13 250 patients presented to an emergency department with stroke-like symptoms during the study period. Of the 3984 who arrived within 4 hours after symptom onset, 1087 (27.3%) had timely neuroimaging. The factors independently associated with an increased likelihood of timely neuroimaging were less time from symptom onset to presentation, more severe stroke, male sex, no history of stroke or transient ischemic attack, arrival to hospital from a setting other than home and presentation to a designated stroke centre or an urban hospital. Interpretation: A minority of patients with stroke-like symptoms who presented within the 4-hour thrombolytic treatment window received timely neuroimaging. Neuroimaging delays were influenced by various patient and hospital factors, some of which are modifiable. PMID:27398382

  6. A Humanized Clinically Calibrated Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Model for Hypokinetic Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick; Spiros, Athan; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of Parkinson’s disease with dopamine-centric approaches such as L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, although very successful, is in need of alternative treatment strategies, both in terms of disease modification and symptom management. Various non-dopaminergic treatment approaches did not result in a clear clinical benefit, despite showing a clear effect in preclinical animal models. In addition, polypharmacy is common, sometimes leading to unintended effects on non-motor cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To explore novel targets for symptomatic treatment and possible synergistic pharmacodynamic effects between different drugs, we developed a computer-based Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) platform of the closed cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical basal ganglia loop of the dorsal motor circuit. This mechanism-based simulation platform is based on the known neuro-anatomy and neurophysiology of the basal ganglia and explicitly incorporates domain expertise in a formalized way. The calculated beta/gamma power ratio of the local field potential in the subthalamic nucleus correlates well (R2 = 0.71) with clinically observed extra-pyramidal symptoms triggered by antipsychotics during schizophrenia treatment (43 drug-dose combinations). When incorporating Parkinsonian (PD) pathology and reported compensatory changes, the computer model suggests a major increase in b/g ratio (corresponding to bradykinesia and rigidity) from a dopamine depletion of 70% onward. The correlation between the outcome of the QSP model and the reported changes in UPDRS III Motor Part for 22 placebo-normalized drug-dose combinations is R2 = 0.84. The model also correctly recapitulates the lack of clinical benefit for perampanel, MK-0567 and flupirtine and offers a hypothesis for the translational disconnect. Finally, using human PET imaging studies with placebo response, the computer model predicts well the placebo response for chronic treatment, but not for acute

  7. Pigmented skin patches without scleroderma as a predominant clinical symptom revealing systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Darrigade, A S; Vedie, A L; Gauthier, C; Cario-André, M; Taieb, A; Truchetet, M E; Constans, J; Seneschal, J

    2016-06-01

    Skin induration remains the major clinical symptom of systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease with potentially life-threatening visceral involvement. However, skin induration can be absent in some patients, making the diagnosis difficult to confirm and leading to delay in management. Skin pigmentation abnormalities have been reported in patients with SSc, and can be important to recognize for diagnosis. We report two patients who developed hyperpigmented skin patches without any sign of scleroderma, as a major clinical skin symptom of incipient SSc. PMID:27171356

  8. Use of the Modified SNOT-16 in Primary Care Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Acute Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, Jane; Spitznagel, Edward; Piccirillo, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine the reliability, validity, responsiveness and the minimal important difference (MID) for the SNOT-16 in the measurement of disease-specific quality of life in adults with acute rhinosinusitis Study Design Randomized controlled trial to evaluate antibiotic treatment for acute rhinosinusitis Setting Ten community practices in St Louis, MO Subjects and Methods The modified SNOT-16 was completed at baseline (by both face-to-face and telephone interviews) and by telephone interview at 3, 7 and 10 days by 166 adults with acute rhinosinusitis diagnosed clinically using standardized criteria (36% male, 78% Caucasian). Considering severity and frequency, subjects rated how much they were bothered by each item using a 4-point scale. The mean SNOT-16 score (ranging from 0, no problem to 3, large problem) was compared to the subjects’ global assessment of change to evaluate responsiveness and the MID. Results The instrument was easy to use and took < 5 minutes to complete. The SNOT-16 score identified statistically significant differences in the hypothesized direction for those reporting more or less severe symptoms (p=0.0161) and more or less bother (p<0.0001) demonstrating construct-related validity. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.82 to 0.91 demonstrating high internal consistency. There was a statistically significant decrease in scores with time (MANOVA, p<0.0001). The effect sizes at days 3, 7, and 10 were 1.45, 2.34 and 2.90 respectively, indicating high sensitivity to clinical change. The Minimum Important Difference (MID) was 0.5 units. Conclusion The modified SNOT-16 is a valid instrument to assess effectiveness of interventions to improve disease-specific QOL in adults with acute rhinosinusitis. PMID:21844413

  9. Pathophysiology and Clinical Work-Up of Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), also known in the past as acute renal failure, is a syndrome characterized by the rapid loss of kidney excretory function. It is usually diagnosed by the accumulation of end products of nitrogen metabolism (urea and creatinine) or decreased urine output or both. AKI is the clinical consequence of several disorders that acutely affect the kidney, causing electrolytes and acid-base imbalance, hyperhydration and loss of depurative function. AKI is common in critical care patients in whom it is often secondary to extrarenal events. No specific therapies can attenuate AKI or accelerate renal function recovery; thus, the only treatment is supportive. New diagnostic techniques such as renal biomarkers might improve early diagnosis. Also ultrasonography helps nephrologists in AKI diagnosis, in order to describe and follow kidney alterations and find possible causes of AKI. Renal replacement therapy is a life-saving treatment if AKI is severe. If patients survive to AKI, and did not have previous chronic kidney disease (CKD), they typically recover to dialysis independence. However, evidence suggests that patients who have had AKI are at increased risk of subsequent CKD. PMID:27169469

  10. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  11. A Pilot RCT of Psychodynamic Group Art Therapy for Patients in Acute Psychotic Episodes: Feasibility, Impact on Symptoms and Mentalising Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Montag, Christiane; Haase, Laura; Seidel, Dorothea; Bayerl, Martin; Gallinat, Jürgen; Herrmann, Uwe; Dannecker, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic episodes and justify

  12. Psychosocial function in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Relationship to neurocognition and clinical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Carmen; Sundet, Kjetil; Vaskinn, Anja; Ueland, Torill; Romm, Kristin Lie; Hellvin, Tone; Melle, Ingrid; Friis, Svein; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-09-01

    In line with a dimensional approach to psychopathology, we examined whether psychosocial function and its relationship to neurocognition and clinical symptoms differ across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder subgroups with and without a history of affective or psychotic episodes. From the TOP study, a heterogeneous sample of individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders without (n = 60) and with a history of affective episodes (n = 54); individuals with bipolar spectrum disorders with (n = 64) and without a history of psychosis (n = 56) and healthy controls (n = 268) participated. Psychosocial functioning was measured with the Social Functioning Scale (self-rated) and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (clinician-rated), neurocognition with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, and symptoms with Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Clinician-rated functioning was poorer in schizophrenia groups than in bipolar groups, but self-rated functioning was similar across all clinical groups and poorer than in controls. Neurocognition and current clinical symptoms were associated with psychosocial function in bivariate analyses, but current symptoms had a greater independent contribution to functioning than neurocognition across clinical groups in multivariate analyses. Despite differences in neurocognition and psychosocial function, groups showed the same pattern in prediction of functioning irrespective of DSM-IV or clinical definition. PMID:20509984

  13. Acute fascioliasis--clinical and epidemiological features of four patients in Chile.

    PubMed

    Fica, A; Dabanch, J; Farias, C; Castro, M; Jercic, M I; Weitzel, T

    2012-01-01

    Because of its infrequent and protean presentation and the lack of clinical data, the management of acute infections with the foodborne trematode Fasciola hepatica is challenging. We report four serologically confirmed cases that illustrate our experience with this parasitic infection in Chile. All patients were adults presenting with upper abdominal pain. Other symptoms included fever, nausea/vomiting, and cutaneous manifestations. In all cases, marked eosinophilia was present. All patients lived in an urban environment, and three reported the consumption of raw watercress. Computed tomography (CT) scans showed hypodense hepatic lesions, whereas ultrasonography findings were unremarkable. One patient suffered portal vein thrombosis, which might be a rare complication of acute fascioliasis. All patients were successfully treated with triclabendazole. Our case series demonstrates that patients with acute fascioliasis typically present with a combination of upper abdominal pain, marked eosinophilia, and hypodense hepatic lesions on CT imaging. Diagnosis should be confirmed by serological investigation. A history of recent consumption of raw watercress is an important finding, but in some patients the source of infection remains obscure. PMID:21668579

  14. Acute Limb Ischemia: Surgical Thromboembolectomy and the Clinical Course of Arterial Revascularization at Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ha Song; Kyoung, Kyu-Hyouck; Suh, Byoung Jo; Jun, Si-Youl; Park, Jong Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Surgical thromboembolectomy for acute limb ischemia using Fogarty catheter is basically a blind procedure. Therefore, the complete removal of thromboemboli in all calf arteries is difficult even if completion angiography or radiological intervention is performed. The purpose of this study is to identify whether limb salvage could be achieved if at least one ankle artery was revascularized by surgical thromboembolectomy. We also observed the effectiveness of below-knee popliteal approach. Over 1 year, surgical thromboembolectomy via below-knee popliteal artery was performed on 18 acutely ischemic limbs in 14 consecutive patients. All patients were diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and computed tomography (CT) angiography. Surgical thromboembolectomy was terminated when a pulse was detected by a handheld vascular Doppler device in at least one ankle artery after closing the arteriotomy. Patients were observed during postoperative anticoagulation therapy. Of the 14 patients, 1 died and 1 underwent amputation due to the already necrotized lesion in the foot. After 1 week of anticoagulation therapy, two or more arterial pulses were detected at the ankles in all 15 limbs from the remaining 12 patients. During the 6 to 18 months of follow-up, all 15 limbs were salvaged successfully. In acute limb ischemia, successful limb salvage could be achieved by the revascularization of at least one ankle artery by surgical thromboembolectomy with concomitant anticoagulation therapy. Below-knee popliteal approach is an effective method and is worth for further study compared with other approaches. PMID:24436594

  15. Quantitative EEG findings in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    PubMed Central

    Bjørk, Marte Helene; Sand, Trond; Bråthen, Geir; Linaker, Olav M; Morken, Gunnar; Nilsen, Brigt M; Vaaler, Arne Einar

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with brief depressive episodes and concurrent rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms do not fit current diagnostic criteria and they can be difficult to diagnose and treat in an acute psychiatric setting. We wanted to study whether these patients had signs of more epileptic or organic brain dysfunction than patients with depression without additional symptomatology. Methods Sixteen acutely admitted patients diagnosed with a brief depressive episode as well as another concurrent psychiatric diagnosis were included. Sixteen patients with major depression served as controls. Three electroencephalographic studies (EEG) were visually interpreted and the background activity was also analysed with quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Results The group with brief depression and concurrent symptoms had multiple abnormal features in their standard EEG compared to patients with major depression, but they did not show significantly more epileptiform activity. They also had significantly higher temporal QEEG delta amplitude and interhemispheric temporal delta asymmetry. Conclusion Organic brain dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of patients with brief depressive episodes mixed with rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms. This subgroup of depressed patients should be investigated further in order to clarify the pathophysiology and to establish the optimal evaluation scheme and treatment in an acute psychiatric setting. PMID:19014422

  16. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  17. Clinical, Functional and Health-Related Quality of Life Correlates of Clinically Significant Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Christelle; Ranque, Brigitte; Baubet, Thierry; Bérezné, Alice; Mestre-Stanislas, Caroline; Rannou, François; Papelard, Agathe; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Revel, Michel; Moro, Marie-Rose; Guillevin, Loïc; Poiraudeau, Serge; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify clinical, functional and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) correlates of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Three-hundred-and-eighty-one patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology and/or the Leroy and Medsger criteria for SSc were assessed for visceral involvement, disability and HRQoL (assessed by SF-36). Clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD) (defined cut-off≥8). Results 9.2% the patients had limited SSc, 50.5% limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc), and 40.3% diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Overall, 40.4% and 58.8% of the patients had clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety, respectively. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of depression, patients with clinically significant symptoms of depression had poorer health status, HRQoL mental and physical component, and greater global disability, hand disability and aesthetic impairment. Compared to patients without clinically significant symptoms of anxiety, patients with clinically significant symptoms of anxiety had poorer SF-36 mental and physical component scores. On multivariable analysis, excluding mental component score of SF-36, variables independently associated with clinically significant symptoms of depression and anxiety were global disability and physical component of SF-36, plus female gender for clinically significant symptoms of anxiety only. Remarkably, patients with and without clinically significant psychiatric symptoms were comparable for all disease-related clinical features assessed. Conclusion High levels of clinically significant symptoms of anxiety and depression are observed among SSc patients. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms are rather associated with increased disability and altered HRQoL, than with disease-specific organ manifestations. PMID

  18. Validation of the Spanish version of the Clinical Assessment for Negative Symptoms (CAINS).

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Mezquida, Gisela; Romaguera, Anna; Vilardebò, Irene; Andrés, Helena; Granados, Bianca; Larrubia, Jesús; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J; Sarró, Salvador; Bernardo, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    Negative symptoms are a core feature of schizophrenia and their reliable and valid assessment is a prerequisite for developing effective therapeutic interventions. This study examined the psychometric properties and validity of the Spanish version of a new rating instrument, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). Outpatients and inpatients (N=100) with DSM-IV schizophrenia were administered the translated CAINS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A subsample (N=46) was rated for Parkinsonism using the Extrapyramidal Symptoms Rating Scale (ESRS). The scale showed good inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Both the CAINS overall and the subscales for motivation/pleasure (CAINS-Map) and expression (CAINS-Exp) scores correlated significantly with the SANS and PANSS negative symptom scale. Significant correlations with positive symptoms and general psychopathology were also found, but these reduced and mostly became insignificant when overall severity of illness was controlled for. Significant correlations with depression also disappeared when severity was controlled for. There was a trend-level correlation between the CAINS total score and Parkinsonism, which reflected an association with the CAINS-Exp subscale only. Factor analysis revealed a two-dimensional structure that explained the 67.44% of the variance. Overall, the Spanish version of the CAINS appears to be a valid tool for measuring negative symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26116328

  19. Clinical potential of elacytarabine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rein, Lindsay A M; Rizzieri, David A

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been treated for over four decades with standard induction chemotherapy including seven days of cytosine arabinoside (cytarabine, ara-C) infusion. Cytarabine, while effective in killing leukemic cells, is subject to development of several resistance mechanisms rendering the drug ineffective in many patients. Elacytarabine, a lipophilic 5'-elaidic acid ester or nucleoside analogue of cytosine arabinoside, was created with the intent of overcoming resistance mechanisms including reduced expression of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) required for cytarabine entry into cells, as well as increased activity of cytidine deaminase (CDA) which breaks down the active metabolite of cytarabine, ara-CTP. Elacytarabine enters cells independently of transporters, has a longer half life compared with cytarabine and is not subject to deactivation by CDA. Preclinical data were encouraging although subsequent clinical studies have failed to show superiority of elacytarabine compared with standard of care as monotherapy in patients with AML. Clinical trials utilizing elacytarabine in combination with anthracyclines are ongoing. Use of hENT1 expression as a predictive marker for cytarabine or elacytarabine response has been studied with no conclusive validation to date. Despite promising early results, the jury is still out in regards to this novel agent as an effective alternative to standard cytarabine therapy in acute leukemias, especially in combination with additional agents such as anthracyclines. PMID:25469211

  20. [Basic symptoms in schizophrenia, their clinical study and relevance in research].

    PubMed

    Miret, Salvador; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Peralta, Víctor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Basic symptoms consist of subtle sub-clinical disturbances subjectively experienced by schizophrenia patients. These are mainly related to drive, affect, thinking and language, perception, memory, motor action, central vegetative functions, control of cognitive processes, and stress tolerance. Initially described by Huber, from a phenomenological approach, basic symptoms are part of the earliest features of schizophrenia, and they can evolve along the course of the disorder. Their assessment during the prodromal phase of the disease (together with ultra-high risk criteria) is one of the 2 main approaches that allow the definition of states of clinical risk for the development of psychosis. The present review provides an updated view of the concept of basic symptoms, highlighting its potential value in establishing neurobiological correlates of interest in aetiopathogenic research. PMID:26774677

  1. Prenatal Pregnancy Complications and Psychiatric Symptoms: Children with ASD versus Clinic Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Megan E.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the association between prenatal pregnancy complications (PPC) and childhood psychiatric symptoms in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and non-ASD children who were referred to a psychiatric clinic (Controls). Parents completed a "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale and developmental history questionnaire.…

  2. Clinical and Cognitive Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Youth with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Tara S.; Bergman, R. Lindsey; Asarnow, Joan R.; Langley, Audra; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2010-01-01

    Depression is the most common comorbidity among adults with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), yet little is known about depressive symptoms in childhood OCD. This study examined clinical and cognitive variables associated with depressive symptomatology in 71 youths (62% male, M age = 12.7 years) with primary OCD. Youths presented with a range…

  3. Demographic and Clinical Correlates of Autism Symptom Domains and Autism Spectrum Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Constantino, John N.; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L.; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive…

  4. Psychiatric Symptoms in Preschool Children with PDD and Clinic and Comparison Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Pomeroy, John; Azizian, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study describes and compares the severity of DSM-IV symptoms in preschool children with diagnosed pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), clinic controls, and two community-based samples. Method: Parents (/and teachers) completed the early child inventory-4 (ECI-4), a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale for four samples: PDD (n =…

  5. Youth-caregiver Agreement on Clinical High-risk Symptoms of Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Golembo-Smith, Shana; Bachman, Peter; Senturk, Damla; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Early identification of individuals who will go on to develop schizophrenia is a difficult endeavor. The variety of symptoms experienced by clinical high-risk youth make it difficult to identify who will eventually develop schizophrenia in the future. Efforts are being made, therefore, to more accurately identify at-risk individuals and factors that predict conversion to psychosis. As in most assessments of children and adolescents, however, both youth and parental report of symptomatology and resulting dysfunction are important to assess. The goals of the current study were to assess the extent of cross-informant agreement on the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS), a widely-used tool employed to determine clinical high-risk status. A total of 84 youth-caregiver pairs participated. Youth and caregiver raters displayed moderate overall agreement on SIPS-rated symptoms. Both youth and caregiver ratings of youth symptomatology contributed significantly to predicting conversion to psychosis. In addition, youth age and quality of youth-caregiver relationships appear to be related to cross-informant symptom ratings. Despite differences on individual SIPS domains, the majority of dyads agreed on youth clinical high-risk status. Results highlight the potential clinical utility of using caregiver informants to determine youth psychosis risk. PMID:24092494

  6. Child Anxiety Symptoms Related to Longitudinal Cortisol Trajectories and Acute Stress Responses: Evidence of Developmental Stress Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Gilliam, Kathryn S.; Wright, Dorianne B.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that individuals at risk for internalizing disorders show differential activation levels and/or dynamics of stress-sensitive physiological systems, possibly reflecting a process of stress sensitization. However, there is little longitudinal research to clarify how the development of these systems over time relates to activation during acute stress, and how aspects of such activation map onto internalizing symptoms. We investigated children’s (n=107) diurnal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity via salivary cortisol (morning and evening levels) across 29 assessments spanning 6+ years, and related longitudinal patterns to acute stress responses at the end of this period (age 9–10). Associations with child psychiatric symptoms at age 10 were also examined to determine internalizing risk profiles. Increasing morning cortisol levels across assessments predicted less of a cortisol decline following interpersonal stress at age 9, and higher cortisol levels during performance stress at age 10. These same profiles of high and/or sustained cortisol elevation during psychosocial stress were associated with child anxiety symptoms. Results suggest developmental sensitization to stress—reflected in rising morning cortisol and eventual hyperactivation during acute stress exposure—may distinguish children at risk for internalizing disorders. PMID:25688433

  7. Passive smoking, air pollution, and acute respiratory symptoms in a diary study of student nurses

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Zeger, S. )

    1990-01-01

    A cohort of approximately 100 student nurses in Los Angeles was recruited for a diary study of the acute effects of air pollution. Smoking histories and presence of asthma and other allergies were determined by questionnaire. Diaries were completed daily and collected weekly for as long as 3 yr. Air pollution was measured at a monitoring location within 2.5 miles of the school. Incidence and duration of a symptom were modeled separately. Pack-years of cigarettes were predictive of the number of episodes of coughing (p less than 0.0001) and of bringing up phlegm (p less than 0.0001). Current smoking, rather than cumulative smoking, was a better predictor of the duration of a phlegm episode (p less than 0.0001). Controlling for personal smoking, a smoking roommate increased the risk of an episode of phlegm (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, p less than 0.001), but not of cough. Excluding asthmatics (who may be medicated), increased the odds ratio for passive smoking to 1.76 (p less than 0.0001). In logistic regression models controlling for temperature and serial correlation between days, an increase of 1 SD in carbon monoxide exposure (6.5 ppm) was associated with increased risk of headache (OR = 1.09, p less than 0.001), photochemical oxidants (7.4 pphm) were associated with increased risk of chest discomfort (OR = 1.17, p less than 0.001) and eye irritation (OR = 1.20 p less than 0.001), and nitrogen dioxide (9.1 pphm) was associated with increased risk of phlegm (OR = 1.08 p less than 0.01), sore throats (OR = 1.26, p less than 0.001), and eye irritation (OR = 1.16, p less than 0.001).

  8. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long

  9. Clinical Prediction Models for Sleep Apnea: The Importance of Medical History over Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Berk; Westover, M. Brandon; Rudin, Cynthia; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable contributor to morbidity and mortality. However, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. We used a new machine learning method known as SLIM (Supersparse Linear Integer Models) to test the hypothesis that a diagnostic screening tool based on routinely available medical information would be superior to one based solely on patient-reported sleep-related symptoms. Methods: We analyzed polysomnography (PSG) and self-reported clinical information from 1,922 patients tested in our clinical sleep laboratory. We used SLIM and 7 state-of-the-art classification methods to produce predictive models for OSA screening using features from: (i) self-reported symptoms; (ii) self-reported medical information that could, in principle, be extracted from electronic health records (demographics, comorbidities), or (iii) both. Results: For diagnosing OSA, we found that model performance using only medical history features was superior to model performance using symptoms alone, and similar to model performance using all features. Performance was similar to that reported for other widely used tools: sensitivity 64.2% and specificity 77%. SLIM accuracy was similar to state-of-the-art classification models applied to this dataset, but with the benefit of full transparency, allowing for hands-on prediction using yes/no answers to a small number of clinical queries. Conclusion: To predict OSA, variables such as age, sex, BMI, and medical history are superior to the symptom variables we examined for predicting OSA. SLIM produces an actionable clinical tool that can be applied to data that is routinely available in modern electronic health records, which may facilitate automated, rather than manual, OSA screening. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 159. Citation: Ustun B, Westover MB, Rudin C, Bianchi MT. Clinical prediction models for sleep apnea: the importance of medical history over symptoms

  10. Chronic and Acute Exposures to the World Trade Center Disaster and Lower Respiratory Symptoms: Area Residents and Workers

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Stephen M.; Pillai, Parul S.; Reibman, Joan; Berger, Kenneth I.; Goldring, Roberta; Stellman, Steven D.; Farfel, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed associations between new-onset (post–September 11, 2001 [9/11]) lower respiratory symptoms reported on 2 surveys, administered 3 years apart, and acute and chronic 9/11-related exposures among New York City World Trade Center–area residents and workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. Methods. World Trade Center–area residents and workers were categorized as case participants or control participants on the basis of lower respiratory symptoms reported in surveys administered 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 years after 9/11. We created composite exposure scales after principal components analyses of detailed exposure histories obtained during face-to-face interviews. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine associations between lower respiratory symptoms and composite exposure scales. Results. Both acute and chronic exposures to the events of 9/11 were independently associated, often in a dose-dependent manner, with lower respiratory symptoms among individuals who lived and worked in the area of the World Trade Center. Conclusions. Study findings argue for detailed assessments of exposure during and after events in the future from which potentially toxic materials may be released and for rapid interventions to minimize exposures and screen for potential adverse health effects. PMID:22515865

  11. Successful outcome after endovascular thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke with basis on perfusion-diffusion mismatch after 24 h of symptoms onset

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Tobias A.; Rehman, Azeem A.; Goulart, Carlos R.; Sória, Marília G.; Rizelio, Vanessa; Meneses, Murilo S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although intravenous thrombolysis is the Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within 3 h, combined intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis with endovascular techniques may be able to extend this traditional time window. Case Description: We present the clinical evolution of a 45-year-old male presenting with acute left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a small diffusion restriction at the right basal ganglia with perfusion compromise in the entire right middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Angiography revealed a complete occlusion of MCA at its M1 segment. The patient underwent endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with additional intra-arterial thrombolysis more than 24 hours after the onset of the initial symptoms and experienced complete vessel recanalization. At 1 year, the patient had global independence with minor residual motor impairment in the left arm. Conclusions: We report the case of a successful thrombolytic therapy following AIS performed more than 24 h after the initial symptoms based on the presence of a perfusion-diffusion mismatch. This report is expected to stimulate the development of future prospective studies with special focus on the role of perfusion-diffusion mismatch in patient selection for treatment of AIS, especially in those presenting outside the traditional time window. PMID:27313971

  12. Effect of Black Cohosh (Cimicifuga Racemosa) on Vasomotor Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Nahaee, Jila; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Bayatipayan, Somaye

    2013-01-01

    Introduction:Hot flash is considered to be an early and common symptom of menopause. The present study aimed to determine the impact of black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) on vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women. Methods:This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. This study was performed on 84 postmenopausal women. The participants were randomly divided into control and intervention groups. The participants of the intervention group received one black cohosh tablet per day and the control group received one placebo tablet per day for eight weeks. The severity of vasomotor symptoms and number of hot flashes were recorded during the pre-intervention phase, and 4 and 8 weeks after the intervention. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and ANCOVA tests. The level of significance was considered lower than 0.05. Results:There was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of severity and number of hot flashes in weeks 4 and 8 by controlling the intensity of vasomotor symptoms and number of hot flashes before the intervention. Moreover, using repeated measures ANOVA, the intergroup comparison indicated a significant difference in bothgroups (the test and control groups) in terms of severity of vasomotor symptoms and number of hot flashes. Conclusion:According to the findings of the study, it seems that black cohosh can be used as an effective alternative medicine in relieving menopausal vasomotor symptoms. PMID:25276716

  13. A clinical overview of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Nicola; Lena, Francesco; Di Biasio, Francesca; Cerrone, Gloria; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Although Parkinson's disease (PD) is diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms, including slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity and difficulties with balance and walking, now we are aware that non-motor symptoms are highly prevalent, since they can anticipate motor symptoms and can cause severe consequences. Several studies have shown that non-motor symptoms, such as depression, anxiety and apathy, psychosis (e.g., hallucinations, delusions), sleep disturbance, and pain may have a greater adverse impact on quality of life and health economics compared with motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms can be divided into four domains: neuropsychiatric (e.g., depression, anxiety, apathy, hallucinations, dementia), autonomic (e.g., constipation, orthostatic hypotension, urinary changes, sweating abnormalities), sleep (e.g., insomnia, sleep fragmentation, excessive daytime sleepiness, rapid eye movement, sleep behavioural disorder, restless leg syndrome), and sensory dysfunction (e.g., pain, olfactory dysfunction). This review addresses diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. The causative mechanisms remain complex, since they reflect the widespread brainstem and cortical pathology of PD, with involvement of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine (DA), serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine. The diagnosis is often challenging, especially for psychiatric disorders, and in particular affective disorders, because somatic features of psychopathology may overlap with the movement disorder itself. Treatments used are limited and psychiatric drugs may not be as effective as in general population. Evidence based medicine is quite poor and it still requires well-designed clinical studies. PMID:24873924

  14. Using Natriuretic Peptides for Selection of Patients in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sakima A; Mentz, Robert J; Roessig, Lothar; Mebazza, Alexandre; Longrois, Dan; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed; Abraham, William T

    2015-10-15

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a complex syndrome with presentations ranging from hypotensive cardiogenic shock to hypertensive emergency with pulmonary edema. Most patients with AHF present with worsening of chronic HF signs and symptoms over days to weeks, and significant heterogeneity exists. It can, therefore, be challenging to characterize the overall population. The complexity of defining the AHF phenotype has been cited as a contributing cause for neutral results in most pharmacologic trials in patients with AHF. Dyspnea has been a routine inclusion criterion for AHF for over a decade, but the utility of current instruments for dyspnea assessment has been called into question. Furthermore, the threshold of clinical severity that prompts patient admission of an HF clinic visit may vary substantially across regions in global trials. Therefore, the inclusion of cardiac-specific biomarkers has been incorporated into AHF trials as 1 strategy to support inclusion of the target patient population and potentially enrich the population with patients at risk for clinical outcomes. In conclusion, we discuss strategies to support appropriate patient selection in AHF trials with an emphasis on using biomarker criteria that may improve the likelihood of success with future AHF clinical trials. PMID:26282727

  15. Reliability of nursing assistants' observations of functioning and clinical symptoms and signs.

    PubMed

    Ranhoff, A H

    1997-10-01

    Simple methods for the early detection of function loss and disease in the elderly were evaluated. Such methods might be used by non-professional personnel as case-finding tools for early intervention. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of functional and clinical data collected by non-professional nursing assistants. The study group consisted of sixty elderly short-stay patients in a stable clinical situation, admitted for rehabilitation and aid in a nursing home. Barthel ADL index items and clinical symptoms and signs were scored by nursing assistants and nurses (the reference method). Agreement between scores was assessed by Cohen's kappa statistics and test of marginal homogeneity. All the Barthel items and the clinical symptoms and signs had fair or better agreement (weighted kappa > 0.40). For dressing, chair-to-bed transfer, ambulation, bathing, paresis and edema, the agreement was strong (weighted kappa > 0.75). The reliability of the Barthel sumscores was also acceptable. We concluded that observation of functioning and clinical symptoms and signs by non-professional nursing assistants is reliable. PMID:9458999

  16. Adverse Symptom Event Reporting by Patients vs Clinicians: Relationships With Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoyu; Heller, Glenn; Barz, Allison; Sit, Laura; Fruscione, Michael; Appawu, Mark; Iasonos, Alexia; Atkinson, Thomas; Goldfarb, Shari; Culkin, Ann; Kris, Mark G.; Schrag, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Background In cancer treatment trials, the standard source of adverse symptom data is clinician reporting by use of items from the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Patient self-reporting has been proposed as an additional data source, but the implications of such a shift are not understood. Methods Patients with lung cancer receiving chemotherapy and their clinicians independently reported six CTCAE symptoms and Karnofsky Performance Status longitudinally at sequential office visits. To compare how patient's vs clinician's reports relate to sentinel clinical events, a time-dependent Cox regression model was used to measure associations between reaching particular CTCAE grade severity thresholds with the risk of death and emergency room visits. To measure concordance of CTCAE reports with indices of daily health status, Kendall tau rank correlation coefficients were calculated for each symptom with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 163 patients were enrolled for an average of 12 months (range = 1–28 months), with a mean of 11 visits and 67 (41%) deaths. CTCAE reports were submitted by clinicians at 95% of visits and by patients at 80% of visits. Patients generally reported symptoms earlier and more frequently than clinicians. Statistically significant associations with death and emergency room admissions were seen for clinician reports of fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), constipation (P = .038), and Karnofsky Performance Status (P < .001) but not for patient reports of these items. Higher concordance with EuroQoL EQ-5D questionnaire and global question scores was observed for patient-reported symptoms than for clinician-reported symptoms. Conclusions Longitudinally collected clinician CTCAE assessments better predict unfavorable clinical events, whereas patient reports better reflect daily health status. These perspectives are

  17. Premorbid, clinical and cognitive correlates of primary negative symptoms in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wing Chung; Lau, Charles Fu Chun; Chan, Sherina Suet In; Hui, Christy Lai Ming; Chan, Sherry Kit Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Lin, Jingxia; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2016-08-30

    Negative symptoms are a core psychopathological dimension of psychotic disorders. Previous research on primary negative symptoms (PNS) mostly focused on chronic samples. Data regarding premorbid, clinical and cognitive correlates of PNS in the early illness course are limited and inconsistent. In this study, we assessed 355 Hong Kong Chinese adult patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (FEP) to early intervention service with an aim to examine the prevalence of PNS and its relationships with premorbid adjustment, clinical and cognitive profiles. PNS was defined as the presence of clinically significant negative symptoms excluding depression, positive symptoms and extrapyramidal signs. Results showed that 14.6% of patients exhibited PNS at service entry. PNS group had poorer premorbid social functioning, lower level of insight, and worse performance in Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting and digit symbol tests than non-PNS group. Logistic regression analysis showed that premorbid social functioning and digit symbol test score were independently associated with PNS. Our findings thus indicate that PNS are frequently observed in FEP patients. Deficits in proceeding speed, alongside impaired premorbid social functioning, might be specifically related to PNS in the early illness stage. PMID:27280524

  18. The influence of BMX gene polymorphisms on clinical symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jia; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Che-Mai; Wu, Chung-Che; Ou, Ju-Chi; Tsai, Yan-Rou; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chen, Kai-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders. Most patients diagnosed with mTBI could fully recover, but 15% of patients suffer from persistent symptoms. In recent studies, genetic factors were found to be associated with recovery and clinical outcomes after TBI. In addition, results from our previous research have demonstrated that the bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX), a member of the Tec family of kinases, is highly expressed in rats with TBI. Therefore, our aim in this study was to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of BMX and clinical symptoms following mTBI. Four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) of BMX with minimum allele frequency (MAF) >1% were selected from the HapMap Han Chinese database. Among these polymorphisms, rs16979956 was found to be associated with the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) scores within the first week after head injury. Additionally, another SNP, rs35697037, showed a significant correlation with dizziness symptoms. These findings suggested that polymorphisms of the BMX gene could be a potential predictor of clinical symptoms following mTBI. PMID:24860816

  19. Symptom dimensions, clinical course and comorbidity in men and women with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Torresan, Ricardo C; Ramos-Cerqueira, Ana Teresa A; Shavitt, Roseli G; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; de Mathis, Maria Alice; Miguel, Euripedes C; Torres, Albina R

    2013-09-30

    The study aimed to compare male and female patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) across symptom dimensions, clinical course and comorbidity. A cross-sectional study was undertaken with 858 adult OCD patients (DSM-IV) from the Brazilian Research Consortium on Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders. Patients were evaluated using structured interviews, including the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DY-BOCS) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). The sample was composed of 504 women (58.7%) and 354 men (41.3%) with a mean age of 35.4 years-old (range: 18-77). Men were younger, more frequently single and presented more tics, social phobia and alcohol use disorders. Among men, symptom interference occurred earlier and symptoms of the sexual/religious dimension were more common and more severe. Conversely, women were more likely to present symptoms of the aggressive, contamination/cleaning and hoarding dimension and comorbidity with specific phobias, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, trichotillomania, skin picking and "compulsive" buying. In the logistic regression, female gender remained independently associated with the aggressive and contamination/cleaning dimensions. In both genders the aggressive dimension remained associated with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder, the sexual/religious dimension with major depression and the hoarding dimension with tic disorders. Gender seems to be relevant in the determination of OCD clinical presentation and course and should be considered an important aspect when defining more homogeneous OCD subgroups. PMID:23298952

  20. Research on the Premotor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical and Etiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Edward A.; Ross, G. Webster; Huang, Xuemei; Savica, Rodolfo; Abbott, Robert D.; Ascherio, Alberto; Caviness, John N.; Gao, Xiang; Gray, Kimberly A.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Kamel, Freya; Jennings, Danna; Kirshner, Annette; Lawler, Cindy; Liu, Rui; Miller, Gary W.; Nussbaum, Robert; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Rick, Amy Comstock; Ritz, Beate; Siderowf, Andrew D.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Tröster, Alexander I.; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Background: The etiology and natural history of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are not well understood. Some non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and constipation may develop during the prodromal stage of PD and precede PD diagnosis by years. Objectives: We examined the promise and pitfalls of research on premotor symptoms of PD and developed priorities and strategies to understand their clinical and etiological implications. Methods: This review was based on a workshop, Parkinson’s Disease Premotor Symptom Symposium, held 7–8 June 2012 at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Discussion: Research on premotor symptoms of PD may offer an excellent opportunity to characterize high-risk populations and to better understand PD etiology. Such research may lead to evaluation of novel etiological hypotheses such as the possibility that environmental toxicants or viruses may initiate PD pathogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract or olfactory bulb. At present, our understanding of premotor symptoms of PD is in its infancy and faces many obstacles. These symptoms are often not specific to PD and have low positive predictive value for early PD diagnosis. Further, the pathological bases and biological mechanisms of these premotor symptoms and their relevance to PD pathogenesis are poorly understood. Conclusion: This is an emerging research area with important data gaps to be filled. Future research is needed to understand the prevalence of multiple premotor symptoms and their etiological relevance to PD. Animal experiments and mechanistic studies will further understanding of the biology of these premotor symptoms and test novel etiological hypothesis. Citation: Chen H, Burton EA, Ross GW, Huang X, Savica R, Abbott RD, Ascherio A, Caviness JN, Gao X, Gray KA, Hong JS, Kamel F, Jennings D, Kirshner A, Lawler C, Liu R, Miller GW, Nussbaum R, Peddada SD, Comstock Rick A, Ritz

  1. The clinical course of bronchiolitis associated with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Shazberg, G.; Revel-Vilk, S.; Shoseyov, D.; Ben-Ami, A.; Klar, A.; Hurvitz, H.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common bacterial co-infection of viral bronchiolitis.
AIMS—To evaluate the influence of AOM on the clinical course of bronchiolitis.
SUBJECTS—150 children younger than 24 months old, diagnosed with bronchiolitis, hospitalised between December 1997 and May 1999.
METHODS—Body temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and the need for oxygen supplementation were recorded on admission and daily throughout hospitalisation. Complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and assay for respiratory syncytial virus were performed on admission. All children were examined daily for the appearance of AOM. The clinical course of children with bronchiolitis and AOM was compared to those without AOM.
RESULTS—AOM was diagnosed in 79/150 (53%) children with bronchiolitis. Most were diagnosed within the first two days of hospitalisation. No significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings on admission and on daily follow up between children with and without AOM.
CONCLUSIONS—This 2.5 year prospective study showed no difference in the course of bronchiolitis, whether an ear infection was present or not.

 PMID:10999866

  2. Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r = −0.59, P<0.05; r = −0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

  3. Pharmacotherapy of acute alcoholic hepatitis in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Rouabhia, Samir; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Severe alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute form of alcohol induced liver disease with a poor prognosis that is seen in the patients who consume large quantities of alcohol. The diagnosis of AH is based on the appropriate alcohol intake history and is supported with clinical and histological features, and several scoring systems. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay for treating severe AH with pentoxifylline used as an alternative to steroids in addition to total alcohol abstinence. Liver transplantation is a possible therapeutic option for severe AH. Among the anti-craving medications able to improve abstinence rate, baclofen seems to be effective and safe in the alcoholic patients affected by severe liver damage. PMID:24605014

  4. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnostic Challenges in Acute Porphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Henry; Krishnasamy, Vikram P.; Kasi, Pashtoon Murtaza

    2013-01-01

    The porphyrias are a group of disorders characterized by an enzyme deficiency in the heme biosynthetic pathway. These can be classified into either erythropoietic or hepatic forms depending on the site of the major enzyme deficiency. The diagnosis of acute porphyrias, however, can be very challenging due to overlapping features amongst the various types. Initial suspicion is based on a myriad of clinical manifestations, which then are confirmed by laboratory testing where available. Genetic testing is now also available for the different types of porphyrias, aiding in the definitive diagnosis. Here, we present a challenging case of porphyria in a patient with end-stage renal disease and present the diagnostic challenges associated with the case and the ways forward. PMID:23476835

  5. Suspected acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as an outcome measure in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has become an important outcome measure in clinical trials. This study aimed to explore the concept of suspected acute exacerbation as an outcome measure. Methods Three investigators retrospectively reviewed subjects enrolled in the Sildenafil Trial of Exercise Performance in IPF who experienced a respiratory serious adverse event during the course of the study. Events were classified as definite acute exacerbation, suspected acute exacerbation, or other, according to established criteria. Results Thirty-five events were identified. Four were classified as definite acute exacerbation, fourteen as suspected acute exacerbation, and seventeen as other. Definite and suspected acute exacerbations were clinically indistinguishable. Both were most common in the winter and spring months and were associated with a high risk of disease progression and short-term mortality. Conclusions In this study one half of respiratory serious adverse events were attributed to definite or suspected acute exacerbations. Suspected acute exacerbations are clinically indistinguishable from definite acute exacerbations and represent clinically meaningful events. Clinical trialists should consider capturing both definite and suspected acute exacerbations as outcome measures. PMID:23848435

  6. The effects of childhood abuse on symptom complexity in a clinical sample: mediating effects of emotion regulation difficulties.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Choi, Young Min; Gim, Min Sook; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to first examine whether childhood abuse predicts symptom complexity, as indicated by the number of clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2 in an adult clinical sample. Secondly, we investigated whether emotion regulation difficulties mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. A total of 162 adult outpatients not presenting with psychotic symptoms completed the Korean Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (K-CTQ), Life Events Checklist (LEC), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and Korean Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). Partial correlation analysis results indicated that after controlling for the presence of adulthood trauma, childhood abuse was associated with more symptom complexity, or more clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2. Furthermore, structural equation modeling results showed that emotion regulation difficulties partially mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. These findings indicate that individuals who had experienced childhood abuse evidence simultaneous presentation of diverse clinical symptoms. PMID:24841063

  7. Homeopathic Medications as Clinical Alternatives for Symptomatic Care of Acute Otitis Media and Upper Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nancy N

    2013-01-01

    The public health and individual risks of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and conventional over-the-counter symptomatic drugs in pediatric treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) and upper respiratory infections (URIs) are significant. Clinical research suggests that over-the-counter homeopathic medicines offer pragmatic treatment alternatives to conventional drugs for symptom relief in children with uncomplicated AOM or URIs. Homeopathy is a controversial but demonstrably safe and effective 200-year-old whole system of complementary and alternative medicine used worldwide. Numerous clinical studies demonstrate that homeopathy accelerates early symptom relief in acute illnesses at much lower risk than conventional drug approaches. Evidence-based advantages for homeopathy include lower antibiotic fill rates during watchful waiting in otitis media, fewer and less serious side effects, absence of drug-drug interactions, and reduced parental sick leave from work. Emerging evidence from basic and preclinical science research counter the skeptics' claims that homeopathic remedies are biologically inert placebos. Consumers already accept and use homeopathic medicines for self care, as evidenced by annual US consumer expenditures of $2.9 billion on homeopathic remedies. Homeopathy appears equivalent to and safer than conventional standard care in comparative effectiveness trials, but additional well-designed efficacy trials are indicated. Nonetheless, the existing research evidence on safety supports pragmatic use of homeopathy in order to “first do no harm” in the early symptom management of otherwise uncomplicated AOM and URIs in children. PMID:24381823

  8. Childhood Familial Environment, Maltreatment and Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in a Non-Clinical Sample: A Cognitive Behavioural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Steven; Francis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to determine if cognitive beliefs and schemas mediated the relationship between retrospectively reported childhood events and adult borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and seventy-eight non-clinical participants completed questionnaires measuring BPD symptoms, core beliefs,…

  9. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. PMID:27086254

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptom profile differs based on pathology in patients with clinically diagnosed behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Gabriel C; Banks, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is pathologically heterogeneous. With emerging therapeutics, determining underlying pathology during life is increasingly important. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are prevalent and diagnostic in bvFTD. Methods We assessed the neuropsychiatric profile in patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD as a function of pathology at autopsy. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of bvFTD at initial visit were selected from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. Neuropsychiatric symptoms endorsed on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire were analyzed. Results Of 149 patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD, pathology was primarily Alzheimer's disease in 20.5%. These patients differed from those with underlying frontotemporal lobar degeneration: patients with AD pathology (plaques and tangles) were more likely to have hallucinations, delusions, or agitation. Patients were further differentiated into tau positive (30 % of cases, including Pick's disease, frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism with tau-positive, and other tauopathies) or tau-negative (70% of cases including bvFTD tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions). These patients also differed in some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms seen. Tau-negative cases were more likely to demonstrate depression, delusions, and changes in appetite and eating. Conclusions These preliminary findings contribute to our increasing ability to predict, using simple clinical tools the neuropathological underpinnings of bvFTD during life. PMID:24135712

  11. Expanding concept of clinical conditions and symptoms in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hirohisa; Riku, Yuichi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yoshida, Mari; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-07-28

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is an adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. MSA patients show various phenotypes during the course of their illness including parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic failure, and pyramidal signs. MSA is classified into the parkinsonian (MSA-P) or cerebellar (MSA-C) variant depending on the clinical motor phenotype at presentation. MSA-P and MSA-C are predominant in Western countries and Japan, respectively. The mean age at onset is 55 to 60 years. Prognosis ranges from 6 to 10 years, but some cases survive for more than 15 years. Early and severe autonomic failure is a poor prognostic factor. MSA patients sometimes present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/signs, and the median duration from onset to the concomitant appearance of motor and autonomic symptoms was approximately 2 years in our previous study. As the presence of the combination of motor and autonomic symptoms is essential for the current diagnostic criteria, early diagnosis is difficult when patients present with isolated autonomic failure or motor symptoms/signs. We experienced MSA patients who died before presentation of the motor symptoms/signs diagnostic for MSA (i.e., premotor MSA). Detection of the nature of autonomic failure consistent with MSA and identification of the dysfunctional anatomical sites may increase the probability of a diagnosis of premotor MSA. Dementia is another problem in MSA. Although dementia had been thought to be rare in MSA, frontal lobe dysfunction is observed frequently during the early course of the illness. Magnetic resonance imaging can show progressive cerebral atrophy in longstanding cases. More recently, MSA patients presenting with frontotemporal dementia preceding the presence of motor and autonomic manifestations diagnostic of MSA have been reported. Novel diagnostic criteria based on an expanding concept of the clinical conditions and symptoms of MSA will be needed for the development of disease

  12. Clinical and imaging assessment of acute combat mild traumatic brain injury in Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Mac Donald, Christine L.; Rivet, Dennis; Ritter, John; May, Todd; Barefield, Maria; Duckworth, Josh; LaBarge, Donald; Asher, Dean; Drinkwine, Benjamin; Woods, Yvette; Connor, Michael; Brody, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) will noninvasively reveal white matter changes not present on conventional MRI in acute blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and to determine correlations with clinical measures and recovery. Methods: Prospective observational study of 95 US military service members with mTBI enrolled within 7 days from injury in Afghanistan and 101 healthy controls. Assessments included Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPCSQ), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Military (PCLM), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), conventional MRI, and DTI. Results: Significantly greater impairment was observed in participants with mTBI vs controls: RPCSQ (19.7 ± 12.9 vs 3.6 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), PCLM (32 ± 13.2 vs 20.9 ± 7.1, p < 0.001), BDI (7.4 ± 6.8 vs 2.5 ± 4.9, p < 0.001), and BESS (18.2 ± 8.4 vs 15.1 ± 8.3, p = 0.01). The largest effect size in ANAM performance decline was in simple reaction time (mTBI 74.5 ± 148.4 vs control −11 ± 46.6 milliseconds, p < 0.001). Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced in mTBI compared with controls in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (0.393 ± 0.022 vs 0.405 ± 0.023, p < 0.001). No abnormalities were detected with conventional MRI. Time to return to duty correlated with RPCSQ (r = 0.53, p < 0.001), ANAM simple reaction time decline (r = 0.49, p < 0.0001), PCLM (r = 0.47, p < 0.0001), and BDI (r = 0.36 p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Somatic, behavioral, and cognitive symptoms and performance deficits are substantially elevated in acute blast-related mTBI. Postconcussive symptoms and performance on measures of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and neurocognitive performance at initial presentation correlate with return-to-duty time. Although changes in fractional anisotropy are uncommon and subtle, DTI is more sensitive than conventional MRI in

  13. The Role of Clinical Symptoms in the Diagnosis of Intrathoracic Tuberculosis in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Tameris, Michele D.; Luabeya, Kany Kany A.; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Scriba, Thomas J.; Hussey, Gregory D.; Mahomed, Hassan; Landry, Bernard S.; Hanekom, Willem A.; McShane, Helen; Hatherill, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood tuberculosis (TB) is usually Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) culture negative. Furthermore, clinical presentation may be altered by active case finding, isoniazid prophylaxis and early treatment. We aimed to establish the value of presenting symptoms for intrathoracic TB case diagnosis among young children. Methods: Healthy, HIV-uninfected, South African infants in an efficacy trial of a novel TB vaccine (MVA85A) were followed for 2 years for suspected TB. When suspected, investigation followed a standardized algorithm comprising symptom history, QuantiFERON Gold-in-Tube, chest radiography (CXR), MTB culture and Xpert MTB/RIF from paired gastric lavage and induced sputa. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals describe the associations between symptoms and positive MTB culture or Xpert MTB/RIF, and CXR compatible with intrathoracic TB. Results: Persistent cough was present in 172/1017 (16.9%) of the children investigated for TB. MTB culture/Xpert MTB/RIF was positive in 38/1017 children (3.7%); and CXR was positive, that is, compatible with intrathoracic TB, in 131/1017 children (12.9%). Children with persistent cough had more than triple the odds of a positive MTB culture/Xpert MTB/RIF (adjusted odds ratios: 3.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.5–7.0) and positive CXR (adjusted odds ratios: 3.5, 95% confidence interval: 2.2–5.5). Persistent cough was the only symptom that differentiated children with severe (56.5%) from nonsevere intrathoracic TB disease (28.2%; P = 0.001). Conclusion: Persistent cough was the cardinal diagnostic symptom associated with microbiologic and radiologic evidence, and disease severity, of intrathoracic TB. Symptom-based definitions of TB disease for diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic studies should prioritize persistent cough above other symptoms compatible with childhood TB. PMID:26226446

  14. Pesticide Use and Self-Reported Symptoms of Acute Pesticide Poisoning among Aquatic Farmers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Hanne Klith; Konradsen, Flemming; Jørs, Erik; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphates and carbamates (OPs/CMs) are known for their acetylcholinesterase inhibiting character. A cross-sectional study of pesticide handling practices and self-perceived symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning was conducted using questionnaire-based interviews with 89 pesticide sprayers in Boeung Cheung Ek (BCE) Lake, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The study showed that 50% of the pesticides used belonged to WHO class I + II and personal protection among the farmers were inadequate. A majority of the farmers (88%) had experienced symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning, and this was significantly associated with the number of hours spent spraying with OPs/CMs (OR = 1.14, CI 95%: 1.02–1.28). The higher educated farmers reduced their risk of poisoning by 55% for each extra personal protective measure they adapted (OR = 0.45, CI 95%: 0.22–0.91). These findings suggest that improving safe pesticide management practices among the farmers and enforcing the effective banning of the most toxic pesticides will considerably reduce the number of acute pesticide poisoning episodes. PMID:21234245

  15. Effects of Single Bouts of Walking Exercise and Yoga on Acute Mood Symptoms in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ensari, Ipek; Sandroff, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the acute or immediate effects of walking exercise and yoga on mood in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Such an examination is important for identifying an exercise modality for inclusion in exercise-training interventions that yields mood benefits in MS. We examined the effects of single bouts of treadmill walking and yoga compared with a quiet, seated-rest control condition on acute mood symptoms in MS. Methods: Twenty-four participants with MS completed 20 minutes of treadmill walking, yoga, or quiet rest in a randomized, counterbalanced order with 1 week between sessions. Participants completed the Profile of Mood States questionnaire before and immediately after each condition. Total mood disturbance (TMD) and the six subscales of the Profile of Mood States were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired-samples t tests. Results: There was a significant condition × time interaction on TMD scores (ηp2 = 0.13). Walking and yoga conditions yielded comparable reductions in TMD scores. There was a significant condition × time interaction on vigor (ηp2 = 0.23) whereby walking but not yoga yielded an improvement in vigor. There was a significant main effect of time on anger, confusion, depression, and tension (P < .05) but not on fatigue. Conclusions: Walking and yoga yielded similar improvements in overall acute mood symptoms, and walking improved feelings of vigor. These effects should be further investigated in long-term exercise-training studies. PMID:26917992

  16. The importance of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis of a successfully managed case with De Bakey Type 1 acute aortic dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Salman, A. Ebru; Çeliksoy, Muzaffer; Yetişir, Fahri; Atasoy, Şevket; Katırcıoğlu, Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 aortic dissection is a catastrophic clinical entity originating from the ascending aorta. Clinical suspicion in patients with epigastric pain, chest pain and gastrointestinal symptoms might be life saving. Aortic dissection and acute mesenteric ischemia might be confusing in diagnosis of patients with epigastric pain, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms and high white blood cell count and D-dimer. In this case report of a patient who was admitted to the emergency room with a presentation resembling acute mesenteric ischemia, this diagnosis was excluded within the first 24 hours as a result of clinical suspicion. In this case report, the successful management in diagnosis and treatment of a 30-year-old male patient with type 1 aortic dissection is discussed in light of the literature. PMID:25931881

  17. Evidence-based Clinical Management of Acute Malignant Colorectal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Takaya; Joh, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Acute malignant colorectal obstruction (AMCO) is an emergency associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Emergency surgery is standard therapy for AMCO, and 1-stage surgery without colostomy is preferable, but it is occasionally difficult in the emergency setting. A self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) enables noninvasive colonic decompression and subsequent 1-stage surgery, which has been widely applied for CRC with AMCO. However, recent accumulation of high-quality evidence has highlighted some problems and the limited efficacy of SEMS for AMCO. In palliative settings, SEMS placement reduces hospital stay and short-term complication rates, whereas it increases the frequency of long-term complications, such as delayed perforation. SEMS placement does not seem compatible with recent standard chemotherapy including bevacizumab. As a bridge to surgery, while SEMS placement provides a lower clinical success rate than emergency surgery, it can facilitate primary anastomosis without stoma. However, evidence regarding long-term survival outcomes with SEMS in both palliative and bridge to surgery settings is lacking. The efficacy of transanal colorectal tube placement, another endoscopic treatment, has been reported, but its clinical evidence level is low due to the limited number of studies. This review article comprehensively summarizes the current knowledge about surgical and endoscopic management of CRC with AMCO. PMID:26796083

  18. Acute heart failure: inotropic agents and their clinical uses.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Masao; Hori, Masatsugu

    2006-11-01

    Inotropic agents are indispensable for the improvement of cardiac contractile dysfunction in acute or decompensated heart failure. Clinically available agents, including sympathomimetic amines (dopamine, dobutamine, noradrenaline) and selective phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors (amrinone, milrinone, olprinone and enoximone) act via cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated facilitation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilisation. Phosphodiesterase-3 inhibitors also have a vasodilatory action, which plays a role in improving haemodynamic parameters in certain patients, and are termed inodilators. The available inotropic agents suffer from risks of Ca2+ overload leading to arrhythmias, myocardial cell injury and ultimately, cell death. In addition, they are energetically disadvantageous because of an increase in activation energy and cellular metabolism. Furthermore, they lose their effectiveness under pathophysiological conditions, such as acidosis, stunned myocardium and heart failure. Pimobendan and levosimendan (that act by a combination of an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity and phosphodiesterase-3 inhibition) appear to be more beneficial among existing agents. Novel Ca2+ sensitisers that are under basic research warrant clinical trials to replace available inotropic agents. PMID:17059376

  19. Acute kidney injury: from clinical to molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The RIFLE classification was introduced in 2004 to describe the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and to define its clinical stage, based upon the serum creatinine level and urine output. The same criteria, although slightly modified, are used in the other scoring systems AKIN and KDIGO. Mortality and morbidity remain high in AKI, suggesting that current diagnostic methods are suboptimal, poorly accurate, and often timely inadequate in detecting the presence of early kidney injury. Conversely, a growing body of evidence indicates that new AKI biomarkers can be used to both rule out AKI and to assess high-risk conditions or the presence of subclinical forms. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or cell cycle arrest biomarkers seem to be sensitive and specific enough to be used in conjunction with existing markers of AKI for better classifying renal injury as well as dysfunction. Improvements in diagnosis, risk identification, stratification, prognosis, and therapeutic monitoring may improve prevention and protection from organ damage and help to identify patients at risk, allowing individualized therapy. In this view, we may say that AKI diagnosis has finally moved from clinical to molecular level with potential benefits for the patients because similar progress has been shown in other disciplines. PMID:27384344

  20. Comparison of Alvarado Score Evaluation and Clinical Judgment in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Bassem Abou; Khalil, Mahmoud; Daoud, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency in children, but its diagnosis is sometimes difficult. The aim: of this study is to evaluate retrospectively the Alvarado score in relation to the surgical management based on clinical judgment. Methods: Medical files of 232 children who underwent appendectomy at Makassed General Hospital from January 1997 till December 2006 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, symptoms and signs, laboratory results and imaging findings for all children were recorded. Results: The positive predictive value of our clinical judgment was 86.4% and the negative appendectomy rate was 13.6% based on the pathology results. The reliability of Alvarado score in our population found a PPV of 80.7% and a negative appendectomy rate of 11.3%. A multivariate analysis revealed that anorexia, neutrophils left shift and rebound tenderness are significantly correlated with a correct diagnosis of appendicitis (p = 0.012, 0.023 and 0.046 respectively). Conclusion: Although, Alvarado score provides measurably useful diagnostic information in evaluating children with suspected appendicitis, we found that good clinical judgment remain the main stay of correct diagnosis of appendicitis. PMID:24783903

  1. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  2. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  3. Clinical correlates of complicated grief among individuals with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Stefano; Gesi, Camilla; Abelli, Marianna; Cardini, Alessandra; Lari, Lisa; Felice, Francesca; Di Stefano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Gianfranco; Bovenzi, Francesco; Bertoli, Daniele; Borelli, Lucia; Michi, Paola; Oligeri, Claudia; Balbarini, Alberto; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed at exploring bereavement and complicated grief (CG) symptoms among subjects without a history of coronary heart disease (CHD) at the time of a first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to evaluate the relationship of CG symptoms and ACS. Method Overall, 149 subjects with ACS (namely, acute myocardial infarct with or without ST-segment elevation or unstable angina), with no previous history of CHD, admitted to three cardiac intensive care units were included and evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for Complicated Grief (SCI-CG), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF-36). Results Of the total sample of 149 subjects with ACS, 118 (79.2%) met criteria for DSM-5 persistent complex bereavement disorder. Among these, subjects who lost a partner, child, or sibling were older (P=0.008), less likely to be working (P=0.032), and more likely to be suffering from hypertension (P=0.021), returned higher scores on the SCI-CG (P=0.001) and developed the index ACS more frequently between 12 and 48 months after the death than those who lost a parent or another relative (P≤0.0001). The occurrence of ACS 12–48 months (P=0.019) after the loss was positively correlated with SCI-CG scores. An inverse relationship with SCI-CG scores was observed for patients who experienced ACS more than 48 months after the loss (P=0.005). The SCI-CG scores significantly predicted lower scores on the “general health” domain of MOS-SF-36 (P=0.030), as well as lower scores on “emotional well-being” domain (P=0.010). Conclusion A great proportion of subjects with ACS report the loss of a loved one. Among these, the loss of a close relative and the severity of CG symptoms are associated with poorer health status. Our data corroborate previous data indicating a strong relationship between CG symptoms and severe cardiac problems. PMID:26504390

  4. The Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS): Merging clinical practice, training, and research.

    PubMed

    Youn, Soo Jeong; Castonguay, Louis G; Xiao, Henry; Janis, Rebecca; McAleavey, Andrew A; Lockard, Allison J; Locke, Benjamin D; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this article is to present information about a standardized multidimensional measure of psychological symptoms, the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS; Locke et al., 2011; Locke, McAleavey, et al., 2012; McAleavey, Nordberg, Hayes, et al., 2012), developed to assess difficulties specific to college students' mental health. We provide (a) a brief review and summary of the psychometric and research support for the CCAPS; (b) examples of the use of the CCAPS for various purposes, including clinical, training, policy, and counseling center advocacy; and (c) implications of the integration of routine outcome monitoring and feedback for the future of training, research, and clinical practice. In particular, the article emphasizes how the assimilation of and symbiotic relationship between research and practice can address the scientist-practitioner gap. PMID:26641373

  5. Clinical efficacy of icatibant in the treatment of acute hereditary angioedema during the FAST-3 trial.

    PubMed

    Baş, Murat

    2012-11-01

    Bradykinin is the key mediator of symptoms of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of edema of the skin, mucosa and muscle. Icatibant, a bradykinin B(2) receptor antagonist, is an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment option for acute attacks of type I and II HAE. A Phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, FAST-3 (NCT00912093), was designed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of icatibant in patients presenting with moderate to very severe cutaneous and/or abdominal or mild-to-moderate laryngeal symptoms. Severe laryngeal attacks were treated with open-label icatibant. The controlled phase of FAST-3, completed in October 2010 with results published in December 2011, demonstrated that compared with placebo, icatibant evoked clinically meaningful and statistically significant efficacy across multiple end points in the treatment of type I and II HAE attacks. In addition, icatibant was generally well tolerated and no drug-related serious adverse events were experienced. PMID:23167682

  6. Upper Limb Ischemia: Clinical Experiences of Acute and Chronic Upper Limb Ischemia in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon; Lee, Chung Won; Choi, Jinseok; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Sang-pil

    2015-01-01

    Background Upper limb ischemia is less common than lower limb ischemia, and relatively few cases have been reported. This paper reviews the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical characteristics of upper limb ischemia and analyzes the factors affecting functional sequelae after treatment. Methods The records of 35 patients with acute and chronic upper limb ischemia who underwent treatment from January 2007 to December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 55.03 years, and the number of male patients was 24 (68.6%). The most common etiology was embolism of cardiac origin, followed by thrombosis with secondary trauma, and the brachial artery was the most common location for a lesion causing obstruction. Computed tomography angiography was the first-line diagnostic tool in our center. Twenty-eight operations were performed, and conservative therapy was implemented in seven cases. Five deaths (14.3%) occurred during follow-up. Twenty patients (57.1%) complained of functional sequelae after treatment. Functional sequelae were found to be more likely in patients with a longer duration of symptoms (odds ratio, 1.251; p=0.046) and higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (odds ratio, 1.001; p=0.031). Conclusion An increased duration of symptoms and higher initial serum LDH levels were associated with the more frequent occurrence of functional sequelae. The prognosis of upper limb ischemia is associated with prompt and proper treatment and can also be predicted by initial serum LDH levels. PMID:26290835

  7. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  8. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  9. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA), which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score) were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%). Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18) and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4). The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28%) and externalizing (26%) disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA) at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement) in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2), with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission. Conclusions Acute

  10. Editorial: The search for core symptoms - will this help clinical decision-making?

    PubMed

    Frazier Norbury, Courtenay

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis is an important component of our clinical roles, and should also lead to particular treatment pathways. The diagnostic process may be challenged by co-occurring deficits that are neither specific nor universal to the diagnosis under consideration and may well be evident across a range of other clinical conditions. How important is it to refine our instruments so that they measure unique symptoms? Will this alter or improve intervention choices? This Editorial focuses on the extent to which fine tuning diagnostic instruments improves our decisions about treatment, in the context of articles published in this issue of JCPP. PMID:27445109

  11. Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction: Answers to Clinical Questions*

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Alió, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    Cardioembolic cerebral infarction (CI) is the most severe subtype of ischaemic stroke but some clinical aspects of this condition are still unclear. This article provides the reader with an overview and up-date of relevant aspects related to clinical features, specific cardiac disorders and prognosis of CI. CI accounts for 14−30% of ischemic strokes; patients with CI are prone to early and long-term stroke recurrence, although recurrences may be preventable by appropriate treatment during the acute phase and strict control at follow-up. Certain clinical features are suggestive of CI, including sudden onset to maximal deficit, decreased level of consciousness at onset, Wernicke’s aphasia or global aphasia without hemiparesis, a Valsalva manoeuvre at the time of stroke onset, and co-occurrence of cerebral and systemic emboli. Lacunar clinical presentations, a lacunar infarct and especially multiple lacunar infarcts, make cardioembolic origin unlikely. The most common disorders associated with a high risk of cardioembolism include atrial fibrillation, recent myocardial infarction, mechanical prosthetic valve, dilated myocardiopathy and mitral rheumatic stenosis. Patent foramen ovale and complex atheromatosis of the aortic arch are potentially emerging sources of cardioembolic infarction. Mitral annular calcification can be a marker of complex aortic atheroma in stroke patients of unkown etiology. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiogram can disclose structural heart diseases. Paroxysmal atrial dysrhyhtmia can be detected by Holter monitoring. Magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, and electrophysiological studies are useful to document the source of cardioembolism. In-hospital mortality in cardioembolic stroke (27.3%, in our series) is the highest as compared with other subtypes of cerebral infarction. Secondary prevention with anticoagulants should be started immediately if possible in patients at high risk for recurrent cardioembolic stroke in

  12. Israeli acute paralysis virus associated paralysis symptoms, viral tissue distribution and Dicer-2 induction in bumblebee workers (Bombus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Although it is known that Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) can cause bee mortality, the symptoms of paralysis and the distribution of the virus in different body tissues and their potential to respond with an increase of the siRNA antiviral immune system have not been studied. In this project we worked with Bombus terrestris, which is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe and an important pollinator for wild flowers and many crops in agriculture. Besides the classic symptoms of paralysis and trembling prior to death, we report a new IAPV-related symptom, crippled/immobilized forelegs. Reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that IAPV accumulates in different body tissues (midgut, fat body, brain and ovary). The highest levels of IAPV were observed in the fat body. With fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we detected IAPV in the Kenyon cells of mushroom bodies and neuropils from both antennal and optic lobes of the brain in IAPV-infected workers. Finally, we observed an induction of Dicer-2, a core gene of the RNAi antiviral immune response, in the IAPV-infected tissues of B. terrestris workers. According to our results, tissue tropism and the induction strength of Dicer-2 could not be correlated with virus-related paralysis symptoms. PMID:27230225

  13. Correlation of quality of life with clinical symptoms and signs at the time of glaucoma diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, R P

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the relationship between clinical measures of visual function and patient-reported measures of symptoms and health status in a large cohort of glaucoma patients at the time of diagnosis. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The 607 patients in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CIGTS) received standardized examinations of visual acuity and visual field at enrollment. In addition, they completed a health-related quality-of-life instrument, which included the Visual Activities Questionnaire (VAQ), Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), a symptom and a comorbidity chart, a question about their degree of worry about becoming blind, and many other items. RESULTS: The SIP total and dimension scores correlated only weakly, and not significantly, with visual acuity and visual field measures. The VAQ total and subscale scores, particularly the peripheral vision subscale, correlated weakly and significantly with visual acuity and visual field scores, especially those from the better eye. Worry about blindness and symptoms attributed to glaucoma correlated weakly but significantly to visual field scores from the worse eye. Attempts to improve correlations by scoring the visual fields differently, including only paracentral and pericentral test locations in the scores, and simulating binocular visual field scores were largely unsuccessful. CONCLUSIONS: At diagnosis, most patients were relatively free of glaucoma-induced impairments, so clinical measures were poor predictors of a patient's perception of health-related quality of life. The vision-specific VAQ and glaucoma-related symptom score correlated better than the generic SIP with clinical measures at the time of enrollment into CIGTS. PMID:10360308

  14. The clinical relevance of the effect of ospemifene on symptoms of vulvar and vaginal atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Panay, N.; Bruyniks, N.; Castelo-Branco, C.; De Villiers, T. J.; Simon, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore clinically relevant differences in severity of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) in postmenopausal women treated with ospemifene compared with placebo. Methods Analysis of two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, 12-week phase-III studies in postmenopausal women (40–80 years, with VVA, treated with ospemifene 60 mg/day or placebo (Study 310 and Study 821)). Severity of vaginal dryness and dyspareunia were evaluated using a four-point scoring system and clinically relevant differences between ospemifene and placebo were analyzed and are presented as improvement (reduction in ≥ 1 unit on four-point scoring system), substantial improvement (reduction in 2–3 units on four-point scoring system) and relief (severity score of mild/none after 12 weeks). Results In Study 310, significantly more women with a most bothersome symptom of dyspareunia had improvement (68.3% vs. 54.1%; p = 0.0255) or relief (57.5% vs. 41.8%; p = 0.0205) in the severity of dyspareunia from baseline to week 12 with ospemifene compared with placebo. For those with a most bothersome symptom of vaginal dryness, significantly more experienced improvement (74.6% vs. 57.7%; p = 0.0101), substantial improvement (42.4% vs. 26.9%; p = 0.0172) and relief (66.1% vs. 49.0%; p = 0.0140) of vaginal dryness from baseline to week 12 with ospemifene compared with placebo. Proportions of women with improvement/substantial improvement/relief of symptoms of vaginal dryness or dyspareunia were similar in Study 821. Clinically relevant differences were noticeable by week 4. Conclusions Treatment with ospemifene was consistently associated with greater improvement, substantial improvement or relief in the severity of the most bothersome symptoms of vaginal dryness or dyspareunia compared with placebo. PMID:25335119

  15. Acute Hepatic Phenotype of Wilson Disease: Clinical Features of Acute Episodes and Chronic Lesions Remaining in Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisao; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Yahata, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Hiroki; Momose, Kenji; Isaji, Ryohei; Sasaki, Youji; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Wakusawa, Shinya; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism, and an international group for the study of WD (IGSW) has proposed three phenotypes for its initial presentation: acute hepatic, chronic hepatic, and neurologic phenotypes. Characterization of the acute hepatic phenotype may improve our understanding of the disease. Methods: Clinical features of 10 WD patients with the acute hepatic phenotype and characteristics of chronic lesions remaining in survivors were assessed by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) guidelines. Results: All six patients younger than 30 years had survived an acute episode of hemolytic anemia with residual liver disease of cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. The acute episode was self-limiting in two of the four patients over the age of 30 years and progressed to acute liver failure in the other two patients. One of the two survivors had residual liver disease of chronic hepatitis, while the other had chronic hepatitis and neurologic disease. Neurologic disease remained in a patient who successfully received a liver transplantation. During acute episodes, serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) changed rapidly along with anemia. Liver-specific ALT levels were age-dependently correlated with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Enzyme reduction was milder for AST than ALT, which resulted in a high AST/ALT ratio in the anemic stage. The anemic stage in two patients transformed to acute liver failure. Conclusions: All survivors of an acute episode of the acute hepatic phenotype had residual liver disease or both liver and neurologic diseases. The rapid changes in liver enzymes during the acute episode and the liver and neurologic diseases remaining in survivors may provide a better understanding of WD. PMID:26807378

  16. Intensive care management of patients with acute intermittent porphyria: Clinical report of four cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Madhur; Rath, Girija P.; Padhy, Uma P.; Marda, Manish; Mahajan, Charu; Dash, Hari H.

    2010-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common and the most severe form of acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant condition. It results from lower-than-normal levels (less than 50%) of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Patients may present commonly with gastrointestinal complaints and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Diagnosis may be confirmed with the presence of intermediary metabolites of haem synthesis, amino levulinic acid (ALA) and PBG in urine or with specific enzyme assays. Abdominal pain is the most common symptom (90%). Peripheral polyneuropathy, primarily motor with flaccid paresis of proximal musculature, with or without autonomic involvement, is characteristic. Respiratory failure necessitates ventilator and intensive care support. Avoidance of precipitating factors and the use of haem preparations and intravenous dextrose form the basis of management. Gabapentin and propofol, rather than the conventional antiepileptics appear to be the appropriate choice for seizure control. Here, we present intensive care management of four cases of AIP with varying clinical presentation. PMID:20859493

  17. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with early acute severe pancreatitis: Experience from a medical center in China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hou-Quan; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Zou, Shou-Chun

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical characteristics and management of patients with early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). METHODS: Data of 297 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to our hospital within 72 h after onset of symptoms from January 1991 to June 2003 were reviewed for the occurrence and development of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms. Sixty-nine patients had ESAP, 228 patients without organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms had SAP. The clinical characteristics, incidence of organ dysfunction during hospitalization and prognosis between ESAP and SAP were compared. RESULTS: Impairment degree of pancreas (Balthazar CT class) in ESAP was more serious than that in SAP (5.31 ± 0.68 vs 3.68 ± 0.29, P < 0.01). ESAP had a higher mortality than SAP (43.4% vs 2.6%, P < 0.01), and a higher incidence of hypoxemia (85.5% vs 25%, P < 0.01), pancreas infection (15.9% vs 7.5%, P < 0.05), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) (78.3% vs 23.2%, P < 0.01) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)(78.3% vs 10.1%, P < 0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the main predisposing factors to ESAP were higher APACHE II score, Balthazar CT class, MODS and hypoxemia. CONCLUSION: ESAP is characterised by MODS, severe pathological changes of pancreas, early hypoxemia and abdominal compartment syndrome. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units with special measures such as close supervision, fluid resuscitation, improvement of hypoxemia, reduction of pancreatic secretion, elimination of inflammatory mediators, prevention and treatment of pancreatic infections. PMID:15040047

  18. Impact of a soy drink on climacteric symptoms: an open-label, crossover, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Tranche, Salvador; Brotons, Carlos; Pascual de la Pisa, Beatriz; Macías, Ramón; Hevia, Eduardo; Marzo-Castillejo, Mercè

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of a soy drink with a high concentration of isoflavones (ViveSoy®) on climacteric symptoms. Methods: An open-label, controlled, crossover clinical trial was conducted in 147 peri- and postmenopausal women. Eligible women were recruited from 13 Spanish health centers and randomly assigned to one of the two sequence groups (control or ViveSoy®, 500 mL per day, 15 g of protein and 50 mg of isoflavones). Each intervention phase lasted for 12 weeks with a 6-week washout period. Changes on the Menopause Rating Scale and quality of life questionnaires, as well as lipid profile, cardiovascular risk and carbohydrate and bone metabolism were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed-effects model. Results: A sample of 147 female volunteers was recruited of which 90 were evaluable. In both sequence groups, adherence to the intervention was high. Regular consumption of ViveSoy® reduced climacteric symptoms by 20.4% (p = 0.001) and symptoms in the urogenital domain by 21.3% (p < 0.05). It also improved health-related quality life by 18.1%, as per the MRS questionnaire (p <0.05). Conclusion: Regular consumption of ViveSoy® improves both the somatic and urogenital domain symptoms of menopause, as well as health-related quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women. PMID:26806546

  19. Is This Symptom Even a Food Allergy?: Clinical Types of Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an under-recognized non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. The diagnosis of FPIES is based on clinical history, sequential symptoms and the timing, after excluding other possible causes. It is definitively diagnosed by an oral food challenge test. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of FPIES is frequently delayed because of non-specific symptoms and insufficient definitive diagnostic biomarkers. FPIES is not well recognized by clinicians; the affected infants are often mismanaged as having viral gastroenteritis, food poisoning, sepsis, or a surgical disease. Familiarity with the clinical features of FPIES and awareness of the indexes of suspicion for FPIES are important to diagnose FPIES. Understanding the recently defined clinical terms and types of FPIES is mandatory to suspect and correctly diagnose FPIES. The aim of this review is to provide a case-driven presentation as a guide of how to recognize the clinical features of FPIES to improve diagnosis and management of patients with FPIES. PMID:25061581

  20. Is This Symptom Even a Food Allergy?: Clinical Types of Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin-Bok

    2014-06-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is an under-recognized non-IgE-mediated gastrointestinal food allergy. The diagnosis of FPIES is based on clinical history, sequential symptoms and the timing, after excluding other possible causes. It is definitively diagnosed by an oral food challenge test. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of FPIES is frequently delayed because of non-specific symptoms and insufficient definitive diagnostic biomarkers. FPIES is not well recognized by clinicians; the affected infants are often mismanaged as having viral gastroenteritis, food poisoning, sepsis, or a surgical disease. Familiarity with the clinical features of FPIES and awareness of the indexes of suspicion for FPIES are important to diagnose FPIES. Understanding the recently defined clinical terms and types of FPIES is mandatory to suspect and correctly diagnose FPIES. The aim of this review is to provide a case-driven presentation as a guide of how to recognize the clinical features of FPIES to improve diagnosis and management of patients with FPIES. PMID:25061581

  1. Clinical Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury Following Snake Bite Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Dharod, Mrudul V; Patil, Tushar B; Deshpande, Archana S; Gulhane, Ragini V; Patil, Mangesh B; Bansod, Yogendra V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Snake bite envenomation is a major public health concern in developing countries. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is as important cause of mortality in patients with vasculotoxic snake bite. Aims: This study was to evaluate the clinical profile of snake bite patients and to determine the predictors of developing AKI following snake bite. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and eighty-one patients with snake envenomation were included. Eighty-seven patients developed AKI (Group A) and 194 (Group B) did not. History, examination findings and investigations results were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results: In group A, 61 (70.11%) patients were male and in group B, 117 (60.30%) patients were male. Out of 281 patients, 232 had cellulitis, 113 had bleeding tendencies, 87 had oliguria, 76 had neuroparalysis, and 23 had hypotension at presentation. After multivariate analysis, bite to hospital time (P = 0.016), hypotension (P = 0.000), albuminuria (P = 0.000), bleeding time (P = 0.000), prothrombin time (P = 0.000), hemoglobin (P = 0.000) and total bilirubin (P = 0.010) were significant independent predictors of AKI. Conclusions: AKI developed in 30.96% of patients with snake bite, leading to mortality in 39.08% patients. Factors associated with AKI are bite to hospital time, hypotension, albuminuria, prolonged bleeding time, prolonged prothrombin time, low hemoglobin and a high total bilirubin. PMID:24350071

  2. [Clinical picture and pathomorphology of acute coenuriasis in sheep].

    PubMed

    Angelov, A K; Belchev, L

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and morphological investigations were carried out in the case of two enzootics of coenurosis in weaned lambs. The disease was established in two flocks of 180 and 160 animals, respectively. Outbreaks were recorded two weeks after they were put on premises where dogs untreated for worms had been kept. Instable gait and incoordinated movements of the head and limbs were observed along with circling movements of the body, loss of herd instinct, and lay ill for a long time. Morphologically, hyperemia was seen in the meninges, hemispheres, cerebellum, and the basal portions of the brain, with swelling of the tissue, numerous oncospheres, and purulent and necrotic foci. Histopathologically, there were in the acute stages great numbers of parasite passages with detritus mass, hemorrhages, purulent-and-necrotic meningoencephalitis, and higher counts of neutrophile and eosinophile granulocytes. Besides, in the subacute cases there were histiocytes and lymphoid and gigantic alien cells. Differential diagnosis should take into consideration listeriosis, cerebrocortical necrosis, estrosis monesiosis, and enterotoxemia. PMID:3765379

  3. Clinical decision rules for acute bacterial meningitis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Alain; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Zeni, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) requires rapid diagnosis so that suitable treatment can be instituted within 60 minutes of admitting the patient. The cornerstone of diagnostic examination is lumbar puncture, which enables microbiological analysis and determination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical characteristics. However, microbiological testing is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out this diagnosis. With regard to the analysis of standard CSF cytochemical characteristics (polymorphonuclear count, CSF glucose and protein concentration, and CSF:serum glucose), this is often misleading. Indeed, the relatively imprecise nature of the cutoff values for these BM diagnosis markers can make their interpretation difficult. However, there are two markers that appear to be more efficient than the standard ones: CSF lactate and serum procalcitonin levels. Scores and predictive models are also available; however, they only define a clinical probability, and in addition, their use calls for prior validation on the population in which they are used. In this article, we review current methods of BM diagnosis. PMID:27307768

  4. Clinical, histopathologic & immunologic features of cutaneous lesions in acute meningococcaemia.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Mukherjee, A; Chandra, M; Sehgal, S K; Saxena, U; Jain, A K; Wadhwa, A

    1990-01-01

    Fifty children with culture proven acute meningococcaemia were studied during the winter outbreak of the disease in 1986-87. Purpuric lesions were seen in 60 per cent, erythematous papules in 32 per cent, faint pink macules in 28 per cent, conjunctival petechiae in 10 per cent and herpes labialis in 20 per cent. Histopathology of skin lesions showed that the primary damage was to the dermal vessels, the extent of damage depending on the type of skin involvement. Diplococci in Gram's stained sections were seen frequently in purpuric as compared to the other skin lesions. They were located in degenerating neutrophils, endothelial cells, fibrin clots or freely in the vascular lumen. Electron microscopic study showed vascular changes accompanied by a perivascular phagocytic response. Both light and electronmicroscopy indicated the involvement of the coagulative mechanism in the pathogenesis of meningococcaemia. However, clinical parameters of clotting were often within normal limits. In the case of a child (who died eventually), a low platelet count and prolonged coagulation indices were observed. Sera from some of the children were tested for the presence of antibodies against meningococci by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies were detected in the sera and they may have a role in regulating the severity and course of the illness. The significance of immunoglobulin deposits in the skin lesions is not clear. PMID:2111800

  5. Racial and ethnic differences in the physiology and clinical symptoms of menopause.

    PubMed

    Richard-Davis, Gloria; Wellons, Melissa

    2013-09-01

    More than 4 million menopausal women are from ethnic minority groups. Over the past 25 years, recognition of the importance of social, emotional, and physical changes of midlife to women's long-term health and well-being has emerged. Multiple factors influence how a woman perceives menopausal changes and what she addresses as associated symptoms. Factors such as educational level to socioeconomic status, health-related factors, stress, and marital status influence these choices. Increasingly, researchers are reporting on the impact of race and ethnicity on menopausal symptoms. Understanding similarities and differences among women's perceptions, attitudes, and expectations surrounding menopause improves delivery of culturally appropriate care and promotes lifestyles that may decrease symptoms and increase quality of life. Historically, the majority of the research in this area has been conducted in Western countries with clinical samples of women predominantly from European backgrounds. Thus, this population has shaped the emerging clinical picture of the midlife menopausal transition. Recently, studies of non-European women, both in the United States and internationally, indicate significant variations in their experiences during this transition, but these cultural differences have not broadened the understanding of the meaning of this universal experience. To date, there are still large knowledge gaps in race, ethnic, and cultural differences in menopausal health. The content of this review summarizes the current body of knowledge on racial differences in the menopause experience. PMID:23934699

  6. Clinical Characteristics and Factors Influencing the Occurrence of Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia in Korean Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) is an uncommon inflammatory lung disease, and limited data exist concerning the clinical characteristics and factors that influence its occurrence. We retrospectively reviewed the records of AEP patients treated at Korean military hospitals between January 2007 and December 2013. In total, 333 patients were identified; their median age was 22 years, and all were men. All patients presented with acute respiratory symptoms (cough, sputum, dyspnea, or fever) and had elevated levels of inflammatory markers including median values of 13,185/µL for white blood cell count and 9.51 mg/dL for C-reactive protein. All patients showed diffuse ground glass opacity/consolidation, and most had pleural effusion (n = 265; 80%) or interlobular septal thickening (n = 265; 85%) on chest computed tomography. Most patients had normal body mass index (n = 255; 77%), and only 30 (9%) patients had underlying diseases including rhinitis, asthma, or atopic dermatitis. Most patients had recently changed smoking habits (n = 288; 87%) and were Army personnel (n = 297; 89%).The AEP incidence was higher in the Army group compared to the Navy or Air Force group for every year (P = 0.002). Both the number of patients and patients with high illness severity (oxygen requirement, intensive care unit admission, and pneumonia severity score class ≥ III) tended to increase as seasonal temperatures rose. We describe the clinical characteristics of AEP and demonstrate that AEP patients have recently changed smoking habits and work for the Army. There is an increasing tendency in the numbers of patients and those with higher AEP severity with rising seasonal temperatures. PMID:26839479

  7. Acute Hepatitis C Virus in an HIV Clinic: A Screening Strategy, Risk Factors, and Perception of Risk

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, A.K.; Maynard, M.A.; Chapman, S.; Gholam, P.; Blackard, J.T.; Rich, J.; Mayer, K.H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is being acquired undetected among HIV-infected individuals. A practical way to regularly screen HIV-infected patients for acute HCV irrespective of perceived risk or symptoms is needed. We piloted implementation of an acute HCV screening strategy using routine HIV clinical care schedules and the least costly blood tests, in a Rhode Island HIV care center. Study participants had ongoing HCV risk, completed questionnaires encompassing risk behaviors and perception of risk, and were screened with quarterly alanine aminotransferase (ALT). ALT rise triggered HCV RNA testing, with pooled rather than individual specimen HCV RNA testing for underinsured participants. Participants were primarily older, college-educated men who have sex with men (MSM) with history of sexually transmitted infection other than HIV. One of 58 participants developed acute HCV in 50 person–years of observation for an annual incidence of 2.0% per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05–11.1%). The majority (54%) of MSM did not perceive that traumatic sexual and drug practices they were engaging in put them at risk for HCV. Unprotected sex often occurred under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Self-reported HCV risk and participation in several risk behaviors declined during the study. It was possible to collect frequent ALTs in a busy HIV clinic with 71% of total projected ALTs obtained and 88% of participants having at least one ALT during the 9-month follow-up period. All instances of ALT rise led to reflexive HCV RNA testing. Tracking quarterly ALT for elevation to systematically prompt HCV RNA testing before seroconversion is a promising approach to screen for acute HCV in a real-world HIV clinical setting. PMID:21859307

  8. Epidemiological and clinical features of dengue versus other acute febrile illnesses amongst patients seen at government polyclinics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, B; Hani, A W Asmah; Chem, Y K; Mariam, M; Khairul, A H; Abdul Rasid, K; Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    Classical dengue fever is characterized by the clinical features of fever, headache, severe myalgia and occasionally rash, which can also be caused by a number of other viral and bacterial infections. Five hundred and fifty eight patients who fulfilled the criteria of clinical diagnosis of acute dengue from 4 government outpatient polyclinics were recruited in this prospective field study. Of the 558 patients, 190 patients were categorized as acute dengue fever, 86 as recent dengue and 282 as non-dengue febrile illnesses based on the results of a number of laboratory tests. Epidemiological features of febrile patients showed that the mean age of patients in the dengue fever group was significantly younger in comparison with patients in the non-dengue group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to gender but there was significant ethnic difference with foreign workers representing a higher proportion in the dengue fever group. Patients with acute dengue fever were more likely to have patient-reported rash and a history of dengue in family or neighbourhood but less likely to have respiratory symptoms, sore-throat and jaundice in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. As with patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have history of patient-reported rash and a history of dengue contact and less likely to have respiratory symptoms in comparison to patients with non-dengue febrile illnesses. In contrast to patients with dengue fever, patients in the recent dengue group were more likely to have abdominal pain and jaundice in comparison to non-dengue febrile patients. The finding strongly suggests that a proportion of patients in the recent dengue group may actually represent a subset of patients with acute dengue fever at the late stage of illness. PMID:21901948

  9. Automatic symptom name normalization in clinical records of traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, Data Mining technology has been applied more than ever before in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to discover regularities from the experience accumulated in the past thousands of years in China. Electronic medical records (or clinical records) of TCM, containing larger amount of information than well-structured data of prescriptions extracted manually from TCM literature such as information related to medical treatment process, could be an important source for discovering valuable regularities of TCM. However, they are collected by TCM doctors on a day to day basis without the support of authoritative editorial board, and owing to different experience and background of TCM doctors, the same concept might be described in several different terms. Therefore, clinical records of TCM cannot be used directly to Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery. This paper focuses its attention on the phenomena of "one symptom with different names" and investigates a series of metrics for automatically normalizing symptom names in clinical records of TCM. Results A series of extensive experiments were performed to validate the metrics proposed, and they have shown that the hybrid similarity metrics integrating literal similarity and remedy-based similarity are more accurate than the others which are based on literal similarity or remedy-based similarity alone, and the highest F-Measure (65.62%) of all the metrics is achieved by hybrid similarity metric VSM+TFIDF+SWD. Conclusions Automatic symptom name normalization is an essential task for discovering knowledge from clinical data of TCM. The problem is introduced for the first time by this paper. The results have verified that the investigated metrics are reasonable and accurate, and the hybrid similarity metrics are much better than the metrics based on literal similarity or remedy-based similarity alone. PMID:20089162

  10. Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and hoarding symptoms: a distinctive clinical subtype?

    PubMed

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Soares, Isabela D; Versiani, Márcio

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and hoarding symptoms can be differentiated from their counterparts with other types of obsessions and compulsions in terms of sociodemographic and clinical features. Ninety-seven patients with OCD were assessed with a sociodemographic and clinical questionnaire, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I), the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Fifteen patients who reported hoarding symptoms in the Y-BOCS checklist (15.6% of the total sample) were compared and contrasted with 82 patients without those symptoms using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and the Pearson's goodness-of-fit chi-square test for categorical ones; Fisher's exact test was employed when indicated. Hoarders were characterized by (1) higher educational levels (chi(2) = 7.49; df = 2; P =.02); (2) earlier age at onset (Z = -2.99; P =.003); (3) higher rates of symmetry obsessions (chi(2) = 7.03; df = 1; P =.01); (4) greater frequency of ordering (chi(2) = 10.08; df = 1; P =.004); (5) rituals repetition (chi(2) = 4.42; df = 1; P =.03); (6) counting compulsions (chi(2) = 5.92; df = 1; P =.02); and (7) significantly higher rates of comorbidity with bipolar II disorder (chi(2) = 10.62; df = 1; P =.02) and (8) with eating disorders (chi(2) = 7.42; df = 1; P =.02). In conclusion, patients with OCD exhibiting hoarding feature a distinctive sociodemographic and clinical profile. It remains to be investigated whether these phenotypical characteristics are underlined by specific neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:15332201

  11. [Clinical pathway management of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on state machine].

    PubMed

    Tan, Jian; Hao, Liwei; Cheng, Yuanxiong; Xu, Tongliang; Song, Yingnuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a clinical pathway of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) based on state machine. Clinical event-driven response was utilized to control workflow execution of the AECOPD clinical pathway. By comparison with the traditional clinical pathway management, clinical numerical results showed that the proposed method was better in hospitalization days, average hospitalization expense and aberration rate, and better handled the variability in the AECOPD clinical pathway execution. PMID:24752111

  12. Ecological Momentary Assessment of Acute Alcohol Use Disorder Symptoms: Associations With Mood, Motives, and Use on Planned Drinking Days

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Robert D.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Day, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Several theories posit that alcohol is consumed both in relation to one’s mood and in relation to different motives for drinking. However, there are mixed findings regarding the role of mood and motives in predicting drinking. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods provide an opportunity to evaluate near real-time changes in mood and motives within individuals to predict alcohol use. In addition, endorsement of criteria of an alcohol use disorder (AUD) may also be sensitive to changes within subjects. The current study used EMA with 74 moderate drinkers who responded to fixed and random mood, motive, alcohol use, and AUD criteria prompts over a 21-day assessment period. A temporal pattern of daytime mood, evening drinking motivation, and nighttime alcohol use and acute AUD symptoms on planned drinking days was modeled to examine how these associations unfold throughout the day. The results suggest considerable heterogeneity in drinking motivation across drinking days. Additionally, an affect regulation model of drinking to cope with negative mood was observed. Specifically, on planned drinking days, the temporal association between daytime negative mood and the experience of acute AUD symptoms was mediated via coping motives and alcohol use. The current study found that motives are dynamic, and that changes in motives may predict differential drinking patterns across days. Further, the study provides evidence that emotion-regulation-driven alcohol involvement may need to be examined at the event level to fully capture the ebb and flow of negative affect motivated drinking. PMID:24932896

  13. Ecological momentary assessment of acute alcohol use disorder symptoms: associations with mood, motives, and use on planned drinking days.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Robert D; Pearson, Matthew R; Day, Anne M

    2014-08-01

    Several theories posit that alcohol is consumed both in relation to one's mood and in relation to different motives for drinking. However, there are mixed findings regarding the role of mood and motives in predicting drinking. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods provide an opportunity to evaluate near real-time changes in mood and motives within individuals to predict alcohol use. In addition, endorsement of criteria of an alcohol use disorder (AUD) may also be sensitive to changes within subjects. The current study used EMA with 74 moderate drinkers who responded to fixed and random mood, motive, alcohol use, and AUD criteria prompts over a 21-day assessment period. A temporal pattern of daytime mood, evening drinking motivation, and nighttime alcohol use and acute AUD symptoms on planned drinking days was modeled to examine how these associations unfold throughout the day. The results suggest considerable heterogeneity in drinking motivation across drinking days. Additionally, an affect regulation model of drinking to cope with negative mood was observed. Specifically, on planned drinking days, the temporal association between daytime negative mood and the experience of acute AUD symptoms was mediated via coping motives and alcohol use. The current study found that motives are dynamic, and that changes in motives may predict differential drinking patterns across days. Further, the study provides evidence that emotion-regulation-driven alcohol involvement may need to be examined at the event level to fully capture the ebb and flow of negative affect motivated drinking. PMID:24932896

  14. Clinical Symptoms of Human Rotavirus Infection Observed in Children in Sokoto, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alkali, B. R.; Daneji, A. I.; Magaji, A. A.; Bilbis, L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus has been identified among the most important causes of infantile diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. The present study was undertaken to determine the occurrence and clinical symptoms of human rotavirus disease among children presenting with varying degree of diarrhoea in selected urban hospitals in Sokoto metropolis, Nigeria. Diarrhoea samples were collected from 200 diarrheic children younger than 5 years of age and tested using a commercially available DAKO Rotavirus ELISA kit which detects the presence of human group A rotaviruses. A questionnaire, based on WHO generic protocol, was completed for each child to generate the primary data. Of the total number of samples collected, 51 were found to be positive for human group A rotavirus indicating 25.5% prevalence of the disease in Sokoto state. The symptoms associated with the disease were analyzed and discussed. PMID:26692016

  15. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This document provides healthcare practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in guidelines development, and do not address the particulars of the Canadian healthcare environment. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections, and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused. Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability rather than

  16. Factors associated with self-reported symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning among farmers in northwestern Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Ngqabutho M.; Fogo, Christopher; Bessler, Patricia; Jolly, Curtis M.; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2011-01-01

    Pesticide poisoning is a major public health concern in developing countries. We conducted a population survey among farmers in three parishes of northwestern Jamaica to determine the occurrence of acute pesticide poisoning and to identify factors associated with pesticide poisoning. Approximately 16% of 359 farmers who participated in the study reported one or more incidents of acute pesticide poisoning within the last two years. Only 25% of the farmers reported ever receiving training in pesticide handling or safety. The majority (68%) of farmers who reported pesticide poisoning never sought medical attention for poisoning. The factors found to be associated with pesticide poisoning in this study indicate that implementation of specific intervention strategies and education of farmers is needed in order to improve safe handling, use and disposal of pesticides and reduce incidents of acute pesticide poisoning. PMID:24484363

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Clinical Dimensions of Schizophrenia: Polygenic Effect on Disorganized Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Ayman H.; Zhou, Baiyu; Aggen, Steven H.; Bergen, Sarah E.; Amdur, Richard L.; Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R.; Shi, Jianxin; Mowry, Bryan J.; Olincy, Ann; Amin, Farooq; Cloninger, C. Robert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Black, Donald W.; Freedman, Robert; Dudbridge, Frank; Holmans, Peter A.; Ripke, Stephan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Multiple sources of evidence suggest that genetic factors influence variation in clinical features of schizophrenia. The authors present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dimensional symptom scores among individuals with schizophrenia. Method Based on the Lifetime Dimensions of Psychosis Scale ratings of 2,454 case subjects of European ancestry from the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS) sample, three symptom factors (positive, negative/disorganized, and mood) were identified with exploratory factor analysis. Quantitative scores for each factor from a confirmatory factor analysis were analyzed for association with 696,491 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using linear regression, with correction for age, sex, clinical site, and ancestry. Polygenic score analysis was carried out to determine whether case and comparison subjects in 16 Psychiatric GWAS Consortium (PGC) schizophrenia samples (excluding MGS samples) differed in scores computed by weighting their genotypes by MGS association test results for each symptom factor. Results No genome-wide significant associations were observed between SNPs and factor scores. Most of the SNPs producing the strongest evidence for association were in or near genes involved in neurodevelopment, neuroprotection, or neurotransmission, including genes playing a role in Mendelian CNS diseases, but no statistically significant effect was observed for any defined gene pathway. Finally, polygenic scores based on MGS GWAS results for the negative/disorganized factor were significantly different between case and comparison subjects in the PGC data set; for MGS subjects, negative/ disorganized factor scores were correlated with polygenic scores generated using case-control GWAS results from the other PGC samples. Conclusions The polygenic signal that has been observed in cross-sample analyses of schizophrenia GWAS data sets could be in part related to genetic effects on negative and disorganized

  18. Purified high-dose anthocyanoside oligomer administration improves nocturnal vision and clinical symptoms in myopia subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghyun; Lee, Hyung K; Kim, Chan Y; Hong, Young J; Choe, Chul M; You, Tae W; Seong, Gong J

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of purified high-dose anthocyanoside oligomer administration on nocturnal visual function and clinical symptoms in low-to-moderate myopia subjects. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and involved sixty subjects with asthenopia and refractive errors between -1.00 and -8.00 diopters in both eyes. Thirty subjects were administered a purified high-dose anthocyanoside oligomer (100 mg tablet comprising 85 % anthocyanoside oligomer), and thirty were given a placebo in tablet form twice daily for 4 weeks. Prior to the treatment, the placebo and anthocyanoside groups were similar in terms of age and contrast sensitivity. Before and after treatment, subjects completed a questionnaire to determine their clinical symptoms and were also assessed for nocturnal visual function using contrast sensitivity testing. Questionnaire data analysis showed that, following treatment, twenty-two (73.3 %) anthocyanoside subjects showed improved symptoms, whereas only one placebo subject showed an improvement (Fisher's exact test, P<0.0001). Contrast sensitivity levels according to each cycle per degree significantly improved in the anthocyanoside group and remained stable in the placebo group. The mean contrast sensitivity change in the anthocyanoside group was 2.41 (SD) 1.91, compared with -0.66 (SD) 2.66 dB for the placebo group (unpaired Student's t test, P<0.0001). At all cycle per degree levels, contrast sensitivity changes in the anthocyanoside group were better than in the placebo group (unpaired Student's t test, P<0.05). The present data show that the administration of anthocyanoside oligomer appears to improve subjective symptoms and objective contrast sensitivity in myopia subjects with asthenopia. PMID:16022759

  19. More clinical observations on migraine associated with monocular visual symptoms in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Jogi, Vishal; Mehta, Sahil; Gupta, Amod; Singh, Paramjeet; Lal, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retinal migraine (RM) is considered as one of the rare causes of transient monocular visual loss (TMVL) and has not been studied in Indian population. Objectives: The study aims to analyze the clinical and investigational profile of patients with RM. Materials and Methods: This is an observational prospective analysis of 12 cases of TMVL fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2nd edition (ICHD-II) criteria of RM examined in Neurology and Ophthalmology Outpatient Department (OPD) of Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh from July 2011 to October 2012. Results: Most patients presented in 3rd and 4th decade with equal sex distribution. Seventy-five percent had antecedent migraine without aura (MoA) and 25% had migraine with Aura (MA). Headache was ipsilateral to visual symptoms in 67% and bilateral in 33%. TMVL preceded headache onset in 58% and occurred during headache episode in 42%. Visual symptoms were predominantly negative except in one patient who had positive followed by negative symptoms. Duration of visual symptoms was variable ranging from 30 s to 45 min. None of the patient had permanent monocular vision loss. Three patients had episodes of TMVL without headache in addition to the symptom constellation defining RM. Most of the tests done to rule out alternative causes were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain showed nonspecific white matter changes in one patient. Visual-evoked potential (VEP) showed prolonged P100 latencies in two cases. Patent foramen ovale was detected in one patient. Conclusions: RM is a definite subtype of migraine and should remain in the ICHD classification. It should be kept as one of the differential diagnosis of transient monocular vision loss. We propose existence of “acephalgic RM” which may respond to migraine prophylaxis. PMID:27011631

  20. Management of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, and Importance of Clinical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Kaihan; Hastings, Erin; Butson, Christopher R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Zeilman, Pam; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS) battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. Background Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator). Methods A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002–2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY). Results The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson’s disease was 7.2 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 3.82), for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 8.53), for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 4.85), and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 4.35). There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r = −.59, p<.001), as well as total power and battery life (r = −.64, p<.001). The UF estimator (r = .67, p<.001) and the Medtronic helpline (r = .74, p<.001) predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r = .65 and r = .70, respectively, both p<.001). Conclusions Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain. PMID:23536810

  1. Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years

    PubMed Central

    Alsaggaf, Mohammed A.; Wali, Siraj O.; Merdad, Roah A.; Merdad, Leena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations with academic performance and psychological stress. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, medical students (n=320) were randomly selected from a list of all enrolled clinical-year students in a Saudi medical school from 2011-2012. Students filled a questionnaire including demographic and lifestyle factors, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Results: Students acquired on average, 5.8 hours of sleep each night, with an average bedtime at 01:53. Approximately 8% reported acquiring sleep during the day, and not during nighttime. Poor sleep quality was present in 30%, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in 40%, and insomnia symptoms in 33% of students. Multivariable regression models revealed significant associations between stress, poor sleep quality, and EDS. Poorer academic performance and stress were associated with symptoms of insomnia. Conclusion: Sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, and EDS are common among clinical years medical students. High levels of stress and the pressure of maintaining grade point averages may be influencing their quality of sleep. PMID:26837401

  2. Clinical Symptoms as a Function of Client Personality in College Students: Incorporating the Five-Factor Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Marie S.; Lockman, Jennifer D.; Temple, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between personality characteristics and presenting clinical symptoms of individuals at a college counseling center was examined. Analysis of assessments of personality (Costa & McCrae, 1992) and mental health symptoms (Farrell & McCullough, 1989) suggests that the personality characteristics of individuals…

  3. Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia in Clinical Settings: Recommendations from a Multidisciplinary Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Kales, Helen C.; Gitlin, Laura N.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Non-cognitive neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of dementia include aggression, agitation, depression, anxiety, delusions, hallucinations, apathy, and disinhibition. These affect dementia patients nearly universally across dementia stages and etiologies. NPS are associated with poor patient and caregiver outcomes including excess morbidity and mortality, increased health care utilization, and earlier nursing home placement, as well as caregiver stress, depression and reduced employment. While there is no FDA-approved pharmacotherapy for NPS, psychotropic medications are frequently used to manage these symptoms. However, in the few cases of proven pharmacologic efficacy, benefit may be off set by significant risk of adverse effects. Non-pharmacologic treatments, typically considered first-line, also show evidence for efficacy as well as a limited potential for adverse effects. However, their uptake as preferred treatments remains inadequate in real-world clinical settings. Thus, the field currently finds itself between a “rock and a hard place” in terms of management of these difficult symptoms. It was in this context that the University of Michigan Program for Positive Aging, working in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and Center for Innovative Care in Aging sponsored and convened a multidisciplinary expert panel in Detroit Michigan in Fall 2011 with three objectives, to: 1) define key elements of care for NPS in dementia; 2) construct an approach describing the sequential and iterative steps of managing NPS in real-world clinical settings that can be used as a basis for integrating non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches; 3) discuss how the approach generated could be implemented in research and clinical care. PMID:24635665

  4. Prophylaxis of symptoms of hyperhistaminemia after the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia with all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Y; Suga, K; Yamaguchi, M; Kuriyama, K; Tomonaga, M

    1994-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is described in whom some leukemic promyelocytes contained granules similar to those of basophils, and hyperhistaminemia developed after treatment with all-trans retinoic acid. The symptoms of hyperhistaminemia, mediated via H2 receptors, were prevented by the administration of an H2-blocker, famotidine, but wheezing due to bronchospasms, mediated via H1 receptors, developed and was improved by administration of chlorpheniramine. In APL, it is generally thought that the maturation of neutrophilic leukocytes is arrested at the level of abnormal promyelocytes. However, heterogeneity of leukemic promyelocytes has been described and in a few patients some leukemic promyelocytes have been known to show basophilic features. Marked basophilia and severe symptoms due to hyperhistaminemia have recently been reported after the treatment of APL with all-trans retinoic acid. Our case presented similar basophilic features, but indicated that the symptoms of hyperhistaminemia after administration of retinoic acid can be prevented with antihistaminic drugs and suggested that both H1- and H2-blockers should be administered to such APL patients with basophilia. PMID:7817703

  5. Acute Effects of Asian Dust Events on Respiratory Symptoms and Peak Expiratory Flow in Children with Mild Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young; Choung, Ji Tae; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Do Kyun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible adverse effects of Asian dust events on respiratory health in asthmatic children. Fifty-two children with mild asthma were studied for eight consecutive weeks in the spring of 2004 (March 8 to May 2). During the study period, five Asian dust days were identified; we included a lag period of two days following each of the events. Subjects recorded their respiratory symptom diaries and peak expiratory flow (PEF) twice daily during the study period; and they underwent methacholine bronchial challenge tests. The subjects reported a significantly higher frequency of respiratory symptoms during the Asian dust days than during the control days. They showed significantly more reduced morning and evening PEF values, and more increased PEF variability (10.1%±3.5% vs. 5.5%±2.2%) during the Asian dust days than during the control days. Methacholine PC20 was not significantly different between before and after the study period (geometric mean: 2.82 mg/mL vs. 3.16 mg/mL). These results suggest that the short-term Asian dust events might be associated with increased acute respiratory symptoms and changes in PEF outcomes. However, there might be little long-term influence on airway hyperresponsiveness in children with mild asthma. PMID:18303201

  6. Sleep Apnea Symptoms as a Predictor of Fatigue in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Umesh; Baker, Jason V; Wang, Qi; Khalil, Wajahat; Kunisaki, Ken M

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is common among persons living with HIV (PLWH), and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) such as older age and obesity are increasingly prevalent. Studies of OSA among PLWH are lacking, so we aimed to characterize OSA symptoms and associated clinical consequences (e.g., fatigue) among a contemporary population of PLWH. Self-administered surveys containing 23 items that included self-reported snoring, witnessed apneas, estimated sleep duration, the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), and the FACIT-Fatigue score were mailed to PLWH receiving care at an urban HIV clinic. Clinical/demographic data were collected from the medical record. Multivariable linear regression models were created to study relationships between fatigue, clinical variables, and OSA symptoms. Of 535 surveys, 203 (38%) responded. Eight patients (3.9%) had known OSA. Among those without known OSA, mean respondent characteristics included: age 47 years; 80% male, 41% African American, 48% Caucasian, BMI 26.4 kg/m(2), duration of HIV diagnosis 12 years, 93% on antiretroviral therapy, and 81% with <50 HIV RNA copies/mL. 27% reported snoring, 24% reported witnessed apneas, and 38% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Witnessed apnea was the strongest independent predictor of fatigue (lower FACIT-Fatigue score; β = -6.49; p < 0.001); this difference of 6.49 points exceeds the accepted minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 points. Other predictors included opioid use (β = -5.53; p < 0.001), depression (β = -4.18; p = 0.02), antidepressant use (β = -4.25; p = 0.02), and sleep duration < 6 h (β = -3.42; p = 0.02). Our data strongly support the need for increased efforts directed at OSA screening and treatment in PLWH. PMID:26376124

  7. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia: Clinical features, Classification, and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-12-01

    Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE.Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging.Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing.AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  8. The Role of the Emergency Department in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Trials – Enriching Patient Identification and Enrollment

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean P.; Levy, Phillip D.; Pang, Peter S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 800,000 of the one million patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (AHF) every year are initially treated by emergency physicians. Signs and symptoms are typically most severe at initial presentation but, with timely diagnostic and therapeutic management, rapid improvement can be achieved. As a direct result, emergency physicians set the tone for initial AHF management. They dictate early treatment decisions, determine whether patients are admitted or discharged, and if admitted, what the appropriate initial level of care should be (i.e. observation, telemetry, ICU status). Despite this key role, the ED phase of management is often overlooked in AHF research and clinical trials. Consequently, present understanding of AHF patients early in their course is poor and phenotypic characterization has been limited. As a result, the proportion of AHF patients eligible for a given therapeutic intervention is not well known. Moreover, because the traditional approach to AHF clinical trials has relied on cardiology-based research teams to identify patients up to 24 hours after ED presentation, patients admitted to non-cardiology services are often missed and those that are captured tend to be enrolled long after initial therapy has improved acute symptoms. This has resulted in low enrollment HF clinical trials, which has been approximated at 0.41 patients/site/month. We describe the landscape of initial ED management, explain how this may confound clinical trial results, and provide a multi-dimensional template for successful ED/cardiology collaboration aimed at improving patient enrollment and the conduct of AHF clinical trials in the United States. PMID:23708160

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  10. Clinical effectiveness of KSS formula, a traditional folk remedy for alcohol hangover symptoms.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuho; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Sadamoto, Kiyomi

    2010-10-01

    A formula (KSS formula) containing the pith of Citrus tangerine Hort. et Tanaka (Kitsuraku), the rhizome of Zingiber officinale (Shokyo), and brown sugar has been traditionally used in China for the treatment of discomfort and cold sensation in the abdomen after ingestion of large amounts of alcohol. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness of this formula on signs and symptoms of alcohol hangover (AH). Of the twenty-two symptoms listed, significant decreases in severity scores were shown in nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea when the formula was administered in scheduled prophylactic doses. The score in overall well-being, ranging from 0 to 100 (worst possible condition), was 68.9 +/- 16.5 (mean +/- SD) in the control group and it decreased to 46.9 +/- 27.3 and to 44.4 +/- 26.4 in the two groups that included a dosing point prior to alcohol ingestion. Regardless of dosing schedules, KSS formula did not alter the time required for complete recovery from AH symptoms. These findings suggest the possibility that KSS formula may become a candidate for AH remedy when administered prophylactically. PMID:20559749

  11. The Natural Substance MS-10 Improves and Prevents Menopausal Symptoms, Including Colpoxerosis, in Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Noh, Yoo-Hun; Kim, Do-Hee; Lee, Seung-Ah; Yin, Xing Fu; Park, Jiae; Lee, Moo Yeol; Lee, Won Bok; Lee, Sang Hyung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Kim, Sung-Su; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Myung, Soon-Chul; Kim, Tae Jin; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Many natural substances were screened to develop nutraceuticals that reduce menopausal symptoms. A complex of Cirsium japonicum var. maackii and Thymus vulgaris extracts, named MS-10, had significant positive effects. Under a low concentration of estrogen, which represents postmenopausal physiological conditions, MS-10 had beneficial effects on estrogen receptor-expressing MCF-7 cells by reversibly enhancing estrogen activity. In addition, in the ovariectomized rat model, changes in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin, as well as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly decreased by MS-10. These results show that MS-10 protected bone health and reduced metabolic disturbances. Furthermore, in a clinical study, all menopausal symptoms, including hot flushes, parenthesis, insomnia, nervousness, melancholia, vertigo, fatigue, rheumatic pain, palpitations, formication, and headache, as well as colpoxerosis, were significantly improved by taking MS-10 for 90 days. Therefore, the evidence supports that MS-10 is an effective natural substance that can safely improve menopausal symptoms, including colpoxerosis. PMID:26848802

  12. Acute posttraumatic stress symptoms but not generalized anxiety symptoms are associated with severity of exposure to war trauma: A study of civilians under fire.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Liat; Besser, Avi; Neria, Yuval

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and generalized anxiety symptoms (GAS) may ensue following trauma. While they are now thought to represent different psychopathological entities, it is not clear whether both GAS and PTSS show a dose-response to trauma exposure. The current study aimed to address this gap in knowledge and to investigate the moderating role of subjects' demographics in the exposure-outcome associations. The sample included 249 civilian adults, assessed during the 2014 Israel-Gaza military conflict. The survey probed demographic information, trauma exposure, and symptoms. PTSS but not GAS was associated with exposure severity. Women were at higher risk for both PTSS and GAS than men. In addition, several demographic variables were only associated with PTSS levels. PTSS dose-response effect was moderated by education. These findings are in line with emerging neurobiological and cognitive research, suggesting that although PTSS and GAS have shared risk factors they represent two different psychopathological entities. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:26343559

  13. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  14. Hypermetabolism and symptom burden in advanced cancer patients evaluated in a cachexia clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Rony; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary; Delgado-Guay, Marvin; Dalal, Shalini; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated resting energy expenditure (REE) may contribute to weight loss and symptom burden in cancer patients. Aims The aim of this study was to compare the velocity of weight loss, symptom burden (fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and anorexia—combined score as measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Score), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and survival among cancer patients referred to a cachexia clinic with hypermetabolism, elevated REE > 110% of predicted, with normal REE. Methods A retrospective analysis of 60 advanced cancer patients evaluated in a cachexia clinic for either >5% weight loss or anorexia who underwent indirect calorimetry to measure REE. Patients were dichotomized to either elevated or normal REE. Descriptive statistics were generated, and a two-sample Student's t-tests were used to compare the outcomes between the groups. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression methodology were used to examine the survival times between groups. Results Thirty-seven patients (62%) were men, 41 (68%) were White, 59 (98%) solid tumours, predominantly 23 gastrointestinal cancers (38%), with a median age of 60 (95% confidence interval 57.0–62.9). Thirty-five patients (58%) were hypermetabolic. Non-Caucasian patients were more likely to have high REE [odds ratio = 6.17 (1.56, 24.8), P = 0.01]. No statistical difference regarding age, cancer type, gender, active treatment with chemotherapy, and/or radiation between hypermetabolic and normal REE was noted. The velocity of weight loss over a 3 month period (−8.5 kg vs. −7.2 kg, P = 0.68), C-reactive protein (37.3 vs. 55.6 mg/L, P = 0.70), symptom burden (4.2 vs. 4.5, P = 0.54), and survival (288 vs. 276 days, P = 0.68) was not significantly different between high vs. normal REE, respectively. Conclusion Hypermetabolism is common in cancer patients with weight loss and noted to be more frequent in non-Caucasian patients. No association among velocity of weight loss

  15. Event-level associations between affect, alcohol intoxication, and acute dependence symptoms: Effects of urgency, self-control, and drinking experience

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey S.; Dvorak, Robert D.; Batien, Bryan D.; Wray, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    This study used experience sampling to examine within-person associations between positive affect, anxiety, sadness, and hostility and two outcomes: alcohol intoxication and acute dependence symptoms. We examined the role of urgency, premeditation, and perseverance in predicting the alcohol outcomes and tested whether the affective associations varied as a function of urgency. Participants completed baseline assessments and 21 days of experience sampling on PDAs. Hypotheses were partially confirmed. Positive affect was positively, and sadness inversely, associated with intoxication. Hostility was associated with intoxication for men but not women. Negative urgency moderated the association between anxiety and intoxication, making it stronger. However, positive urgency did not moderate the effect of positive affect. Heavier drinkers exhibited the greatest number of symptoms, yet the association between intoxication and acute signs of alcohol disorder were attenuated among these individuals. Results support the use of experience sampling to study acute signs and symptoms of high risk drinking and dependence. PMID:20685044

  16. A Clinical Study of ADHD Symptoms with Relation to Symptoms of Learning Disorders in Schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talero-Gutierrez, Claudia; Van Meerbeke, Alberto Velez; Reyes, Rodrigo Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible relationships between symptoms of ADHD and of learning disorder (LD) in a population geographically, culturally, and linguistically distinct from previous studies. Method: The authors evaluated a cross section of 834 Colombian schoolchildren for childhood neurological pathologies on the basis of a medical…

  17. Clinical outcome assessment in malignant glioma trials: measuring signs, symptoms, and functional limitations.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Coons, Stephen Joel; Corboy, John R; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Mendoza, Tito R; Wefel, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    The shared goal of all parties developing therapeutics against malignant gliomas is to positively impact the lives of people affected by these cancers. Clinical outcome assessment (COA) tools, including measures of patient-reported outcome, performance outcome, clinician-reported outcome, and observer-reported outcome, allow patient-focused assessments to complement traditional efficacy measures such as overall survival and radiographic endpoints. This review examines the properties of various COA measures used in malignant glioma clinical trials to date and cross references their content to the priority signs, symptoms, and functional limitations defined through a community survey conducted by the National Brain Tumor Society. The overarching goal of this initiative is to identify COA measures that are feasible and have appropriate psychometric properties for use in this patient population as well as highlight where further development is needed. PMID:26989128

  18. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  19. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. PMID:25917334

  20. Clinically Significant Depressive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for HIV Infection Among Black MSM in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Skeer, Margie; Bright, Donna; Cranston, Kevin; Isenberg, Deborah; Bland, Sean; Barker, Thomas A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    High rates of depression have been observed among men who have sex with men (MSM) relative to the general adult male population; however, a dearth of research has explored depression among Black MSM. Black MSM (n = 197) recruited via modified respondent-driven sampling between January and July 2008 completed an interviewer-administered quantitative assessment and voluntary HIV counseling and testing. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined the associations of demographics, behavioral HIV risk factors, and psychosocial variables with depressive symptoms by severity, using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Adjusting for demographic and behavioral variables, significant factors associated with (1) clinically significant depressive symptoms (33%; CES-D score ≥ 16): being publicly insured by Medicaid, having serodiscordant anal sex with a casual male partner, and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (2) moderate depressive symptoms (19%; CES-D score 16–26): having serodiscordant unprotected anal sex with a casual male partner and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (3) severe depressive symptoms (14%; CES-D score 27+): being publicly insured by Medicaid and reporting difficulty accessing healthcare in the past 12 months. Moderately depressed Black MSM may be more likely to engage in behaviors that place them at increased risk for HIV and other STDs. HIV prevention interventions for Black MSM may benefit from incorporating screening and/or treatment for depression, allowing MSM who are depressed to respond more effectively to behavioral change approaches. PMID:19462228

  1. Treatment of Acute Cough Due to the Common Cold: Multi-component, Multi-symptom Therapy is Preferable to Single-Component, Single-Symptom Therapy--A Pro/Con Debate.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Ronald; Turner, Ronald B; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V

    2016-02-01

    Acute viral upper respiratory tract infection, or, the common cold, affects essentially every human being, and cough is reported as its most frequent associated symptom. Billions of dollars are spent worldwide annually by individuals seeking relief from this multi-symptom syndrome. Thousands of non-prescription, over-the-counter products are available worldwide, aimed at relieving the various bothersome symptoms induced by the common cold. Differences of opinion exist as to whether optimal therapy for cough associated with the common cold consists of multi-component, multi-symptom cough/cold preparations, or, whether single-component medications, aimed at relief of specific symptoms, represent the optimal therapeutic approach. The 5th American Cough Conference, held in Washington, D.C. in June, 2015, provided an ideal forum for discussion and debate of this issue between two internationally recognized experts in the field of the common cold and its treatment. PMID:26420163

  2. [Subtype distribution of Blastocystis isolates and evaluation of clinical symptoms detected in Aydin province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ertuğ, Sema; Malatyalı, Erdoğan; Ertabaklar, Hatice; Özlem Çalışkan, Serçin; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic potential and genetic diversity of Blastocystis are poorly understood despite being one of the most frequent intestinal parasites in routine fecal examination all around the world as well as Turkey. There are numerous defined subtypes (ST) of Blastocystis which infect animals and nine of them were isolated from human fecal samples. Blastocystis is an anaerobic parasite and generally recognized as nonpathogenic microorganism that colonizes the colon. However recent studies have indicated that the genotypes may be related with the pathogenicity and clinical symptoms of the infection. The aims of this study were to investigate the subtypes of Blastocystis isolates obtained from stool samples submitted to the parasitology laboratory of Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, and to evaluate the clinical symptoms of infected cases. A total of 61 cases (40 male, 21 female; age range: 5-69 years, mean age: 35 ± 19.1 years) were included in the study. Stool samples that were positive for Blastocystis cysts in direct microscopic examination, were inoculated in Jones medium and incubated at 37°C for 72 hours for the growth of parasite. Genomic DNAs were isolated from Jones medium directly or frozen samples with a commercial kit (DNAzol, Invitrogen, USA). The subtypes of Blastocystis were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using ST-specific primers and the symptoms of patients were evaluated retrospectively. Forty-four (72.1%) out of 61 isolates were subtyped by PCR, while 17 (27.9%) could not be typed. The distribution of Blastocystis subtypes were found as follows; ST3 in 17 (38.6%), ST2 in 13 (29.5%), ST1 in 9 (20.5%), ST1 + ST3 in 4 (9.1%), and ST1 + ST2 in one (2.3%) of the samples. The most common symptoms among Blastocystis infected cases were abdominal pain (n= 24, 39.4%), pruritus (n= 22, 36.1%), diarrhea (n= 4, 6.6%) and constipation (n= 2, 3.3%), respectively. This is the first study investigating the genotypes of Blastocystis in

  3. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  4. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18-25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25-30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician's attention. PMID:26392780

  5. Protective measures against acute respiratory symptoms in French pilgrims participating in the Hajj of 2009.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Vu Hai, Vinh; Sani, Seydou; Doutchi, Mahamadou; Parola, Philippe; Brouqui, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Among a cohort of 274 French pilgrims participating in the 2009 Hajj, 77.4% used hand disinfectant, 89.8% used disposable handkerchiefs, and 79.6% used face masks; 97.4% were vaccinated against seasonal flu, 5.8% against H1N1, and 31.4% against pneumococcus. Influenza vaccine and face mask use did not significantly reduce respiratory symptoms. PMID:21199143

  6. The Shear Wave Velocity on Elastography Correlates with the Clinical Symptoms and Histopathological Features of Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Satoko; Yoshikawa, Katsuhiro; Katayama, Yasuhiro; Enoshiri, Tatsuki; Naitoh, Motoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Keloids present as red, painful lesions causing serious functional and cosmetic problems; however, there is no consensus regarding tools for objectively evaluating keloids. To demonstrate the utility of shear wave elastography in keloids, we investigated the correlations between clinical symptoms, ultrasound shear wave velocity, and histopathological findings. Methods: Three patients with keloids containing both red hypertrophic and mature areas were evaluated using the shear wave velocity and histopathological findings. Results: The results indicate that the shear wave velocity is high in active hypertrophic areas and low in mature areas. The areas with high elastography values exhibited numerous fibrillar collagenous matrices forming a whorled pattern with hyalinized tissue on hematoxylin-eosin staining corresponding with metachromasia on toluidine blue staining. In the mature area, the collagen fibers were oriented parallel to each other without metachromasia. Conclusions: Shear wave elastography provides quantitative estimates of tissue stiffness that correlate with the clinical symptoms and histopathological findings of the keloid lesions and can be used to assess the activity of keloids. PMID:26301153

  7. Self-image and eating disorder symptoms in normal and clinical adolescents.

    PubMed

    Forsén Mantilla, Emma; Bergsten, Katja; Birgegård, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders (ED) are psychiatric disorders of multifactorial origin, predominantly appearing in adolescence. Negative self-image is identified as risk factor, but the association between self-image and ED in adolescents or sex differences regarding such associations remains unclear. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between specific self-image aspects and ED symptoms in normal and clinical adolescents, including sex differences. Participants included 855 ED patients (girls=813, boys=42) and 482 normal adolescents (girls=238, boys=244), 13-15 years. Stepwise regression demonstrated strong associations between self-image and ED in normal adolescents (girls: R(2)=.31, boys: R(2)=.08), and stronger associations in patients (girls: R(2)=.64, boys: R(2)=.69). Qualitative sex differences were observed in patients. Connections between specific self-image aspects and ED have implications for clinical management of ED. The strong link between self-image variables and ED symptoms in normal girls, but not boys, is discussed in terms of the continuity-discontinuity hypothesis. PMID:24411765

  8. PTSD symptoms as a consequence of breast cancer diagnosis: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Arnaboldi, Paola; Lucchiari, Claudio; Santoro, Luigi; Sangalli, Claudia; Luini, Alberto; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    It is a well-established multidisciplinary practice at the European Institute of Oncology, that nurses and physicians often report their difficulties to clinical psychologists regarding adherence to hospital scheduling and procedures, when faced with women who, having been diagnosed with cancer, may be too overwhelmed to understand medical advice. We thus undertook an observational-prospective-cohort study, to investigate the prevalence and variation of PTSD symptomatology in women awaiting a mastectomy at a mean of 30 days after diagnosis and up to 2 years after discharge from hospital. The presence of any correlations between PTSD symptoms and medical and psycho-social variables was also investigated. Between March 2011 and June 2012, 150 women entered the study and were evaluated at four points in time: pre-hospital admission, admission for surgery, hospital discharge and two years later. The prevalence of distress at pre-hospital admission was 20% for intrusion symptoms, 19.1% for avoidance symptoms and 70.7% for state anxiety. Intrusion was negatively correlated with time from diagnosis independently of tumor dimensions, i.e. independently of the perceived seriousness of the illness. Even though at two-year follow up the prevalence of intrusion and avoidance is similar to that in the general population, patients with high levels of intrusion and avoidance at pre-hospital admission will maintain these levels, showing difficulties in adjusting to illness even two years later. As for psycho-social factors, the presence of a positive cancer family and relational history is associated with high levels of distress, in particular with intrusive thinking. Proper interventions aimed at the management of these issues and at their implications in clinical practice is clearly warranted. PMID:25105089

  9. Acute flaccid myelitis: A clinical review of US cases 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Messacar, Kevin; Schreiner, Teri L; Van Haren, Keith; Yang, Michele; Glaser, Carol A; Tyler, Kenneth L; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2016-09-01

    This review highlights clinical features of the increasing cases of acute flaccid paralysis associated with anterior myelitis noted in the United States from 2012 to 2015. Acute flaccid myelitis refers to acute flaccid limb weakness with spinal cord gray matter lesions on imaging or evidence of spinal cord motor neuron injury on electrodiagnostic testing. Although some individuals demonstrated improvement in motor weakness and functional deficits, most have residual weakness a year or more after onset. Epidemiological evidence and biological plausibility support an association between enterovirus D68 and the recent increase in acute flaccid myelitis cases in the United States. Ann Neurol 2016;80:326-338. PMID:27422805

  10. Prospective Study on the Clinical Course and Outcomes in Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Roubinian, Nareg; Gajic, Ognjen; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C.; Wu, Ping; Grimes, Barbara; Norris, Philip J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gandhi, Manish J.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Hirschler, Nora V.; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Matthay, Michael A.; Toy, Pearl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. Design Prospective case study with controls. Setting University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Patients We prospectively enrolled 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 164 transfused controls, and 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, and prolonged hypoxemia compared with controls. Of the patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 29 of 37 patients (78%) required initiation of mechanical ventilation and 13 of 53 (25%) required initiation of vasopressors. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury had an increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased days in the ICU and hospital compared with controls. There were 15 of 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury (17%) who died, whereas 61 of 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (42%) died and 7 of 164 of controls (4%) died. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had evidence of more systemic inflammation with increases in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in platelets compared with controls. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury also had a statistically significant increase in plasma interleukin-8, interleukin-10, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist posttransfusion compared with controls. Conclusions In conclusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition

  11. Clinical and neural effects of six-week administration of oxytocin on core symptoms of autism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Kuroda, Miho; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yuta; Iwashiro, Norichika; Tatsunobu, Natsubori; Takao, Hidemasa; Nippashi, Yasumasa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kunimatsu, Akira; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder with no established pharmacological treatment for its core symptoms. Although previous literature has shown that single-dose administration of oxytocin temporally mitigates autistic social behaviours in experimental settings, it remains in dispute whether such potentially beneficial responses in laboratories can result in clinically positive effects in daily life situations, which are measurable only in long-term observations of individuals with the developmental disorder undergoing continual oxytocin administration. Here, to address this issue, we performed an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial including 20 high-functional adult males with autism spectrum disorder. Data obtained from 18 participants who completed the trial showed that 6-week intranasal administration of oxytocin significantly reduced autism core symptoms specific to social reciprocity, which was clinically evaluated by Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale (P = 0.034, PFDR < 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.78). Critically, the improvement of this clinical score was accompanied by oxytocin-induced enhancement of task-independent resting-state functional connectivity between anterior cingulate cortex and dorso-medial prefrontal cortex (rho = -0.60, P = 0.011), which was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, using the same social-judgement task as used in our previous single-dose oxytocin trial, we confirmed that the current continual administration also significantly mitigated behavioural and neural responses during the task, both of which were originally impaired in autistic individuals (judgement tendency: P = 0.019, d = 0.62; eye-gaze effect: P = 0.03, d = 0.56; anterior cingulate activity: P = 0.00069, d = 0.97; dorso-medial prefrontal activity: P = 0.0014, d = 0.92; all, PFDR < 0.05). Furthermore, despite its longer administration, these effect sizes of the 6-week intervention

  12. AB077. Clinical symptoms, molecular genetics, genotype and phenotype correlations of children with congenital hyperinsulinism

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Dang Anh; Dung, Vu Chi; Dat, Nguyen Phu; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Thao, Bui Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Dien, Tran Minh

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) causes severe hypoglycemia in neonates and infants. Molecular genetic results is very important which help clinicians will have suitable treatment. The study aims to describe clinical symptoms, signs of HI patients and to identify mutations in the ABCC8 and KCNJ11, HNF4A and GLUD genes, genotype and phenotype correlations of children with HI. Methods A prospective study was conducted on 68 cases with congenital HI diagnosed and treated in National Hospital of Pediatric from January 2007 to April 2015. Patients were selected by using inclusion criteria of Hussain K [2008]. During the work-up clinical, biochemal was collected. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes using standard procedures. Single exon of KCNJ11; 39 exons of ABCC8; were amplified & sequenced. Sequencing reactions were analyzed on an ABI 3730 capillary sequencer & were compared to published sequences using Mutation Surveyor version 3.24. Results Major clinical symptoms, signs of HI patients when hypoglycemia are: lethargy (69.12%), poor feeding (66.2%), cyanosis (57.4%), ear hair (52.9%), seizure (42.6%), grunting (42.7%), apnea (23.5%), hypotonia (27.9%), diaphoresis (19.12%), unconsciousness (11.7%), hypothermia (2.9%). Glucose level on admission 0.99±0.94 mmol/L, insulin level and C-peptid when hypoglycemia are 214.2±190.6 pmol/L and 1.78±1.5 nmol/L. Gene mutations were detected in 64.29% of cases including mutation of genes ABCC8 (88.89%), KCNJ11 (8.33%), HNF4A (2.78%). Mutation of ABCC8 included homozygous mutations (25%), compound heterozygous mutation (31.25%), one dominant mutation from father (40.63%), one dominant mutation from mother (3.13%). All cases with homozygous mutations, 83.3% of cases with compound heterozygous mutation and 83.3% of cases with one dominant mutation of ABCC8 gene from father did not respond to diazoxide treatment and required 95% pancreatectomy. Other cases with non-mutation usual respond to

  13. ACG Clinical Guideline: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Acute Diarrheal Infections in Adults.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Mark S; DuPont, Herbert L; Connor, Bradley A

    2016-05-01

    Acute diarrheal infections are a common health problem globally and among both individuals in the United States and traveling to developing world countries. Multiple modalities including antibiotic and non-antibiotic therapies have been used to address these common infections. Information on treatment, prevention, diagnostics, and the consequences of acute diarrhea infection has emerged and helps to inform clinical management. In this ACG Clinical Guideline, the authors present an evidence-based approach to diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of acute diarrhea infection in both US-based and travel settings. PMID:27068718

  14. The Clinical Features and Pathophysiology of Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Patients Receiving Tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Maeng, Lee So; Oh, Se Jeong; Lee, An Hi; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Han, Chi Wha

    2009-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy (RT) including tomotherapy has been widely used to treat primary tumors, as well as to alleviate the symptoms of metastatic cancers. Objective The primary purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with acute radiation dermatitis in cancer patients that received tomotherapy, and compare the results to patients treated by conventional radiation therapy. Methods The study population consisted of 11 patients that were referred to the dermatology department because of radiation dermatitis after receiving tomotherapy; all patients were evaluated for clinical severity. The patients were assessed and identified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria version (CTC) 3.0. We performed biopsies of the skin lesions that were examined for apoptosis using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay and stained immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies to CD8, CD4 and TGF-β. As a positive control, patients with radiation dermatitis treated with conventional radiation therapy were also studied. Results The results of the clinical features of the skin of tomotherapy patients were the following: grade 1 (36%), grade 2 (55%) and other changes (9%). Among the population that had skin lesions due to acute radiation dermatitis, the mean number of positive cells per high power field (HPF) was the following: there were 30.50±7.50 TUNEL-positive cells, 34.60±12.50 CD8+ T cells, 5.19±3.17 CD4+ T cells and 9.95±1.33 TGF-β positive cells measured per HPF. The mean number of positive cells per HPF for the patients that received conventional radiation therapy was: TUNLEL-positive cells in 7.5±1.64, CD8-, CD4- and TGF-β-positive cells in 12.50±3.73, 3.16±1.47, 6.50±1.97. Conclusion We found that the number of TUNEL-positive cells and CD8+ T cells were higher in the lesions of

  15. Frequency and pattern of childhood symptom onset reported by first episode schizophrenia and clinical high risk youth

    PubMed Central

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Serur, Rachael A.; Hallinan, Sean B.; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Wojcik, Joanne D.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Frazier, Jean A.; Goldstein, Jill M.; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.; Seidman, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychosis prevention and early intervention efforts in schizophrenia have focused increasingly on sub-threshold psychotic symptoms in adolescents and young adults. Although many youth report symptom onset prior to adolescence, the childhood incidence of prodromal-level symptoms in those with schizophrenia or related psychoses is largely unknown. Methods This study reports on the retrospective recall of prodromal-level symptoms from 40 participants in a first-episode of schizophrenia (FES) and 40 participants at “clinical high risk” (CHR) for psychosis. Onset of positive and non-specific symptoms was captured using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Frequencies are reported according to onset during childhood (prior to age 13), adolescence (13–17), or adulthood (18 +). Results Childhood-onset of attenuated psychotic symptoms was not rare. At least 11% of FES and 23% of CHR reported specific recall of childhood-onset of unusual or delusional ideas, suspiciousness, or perceptual abnormalities. Most recalled experiencing non-specific symptoms prior to positive symptoms. CHR and FES did not differ significantly in the timing of positive and non-specific symptom onset. Other than being younger at assessment, those with childhood onset did not differ demographically from those with later onset. Conclusion Childhood-onset of initial psychotic-like symptoms may be more common than previous research has suggested. Improved characterization of these symptoms and a focus on their predictive value for subsequent schizophrenia and other major psychoses are needed to facilitate screening of children presenting with attenuated psychotic symptoms. Accurate detection of prodromal symptoms in children might facilitate even earlier intervention and the potential to alter pre-illness trajectories. PMID:24924404

  16. Systematic review of clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of ivy leaf (hedera helix) for acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (n = 360) investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation. PMID:20976077

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in immune system genes and their association with clinical symptoms persistence in dengue-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Dettogni, Raquel Spinassé; Tristão-Sá, Ricardo; Dos Santos, Marcelo; da Silva, Franciane Figueiredo; Louro, Iúri Drumond

    2015-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dengue clinical symptom persistence during 60days of disease follow up, in patients of Espírito Santo state (ES)-Brazil and to evaluate the relation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FcγRIIa, CD209, VDR, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ genes with symptom persistence. During 2012-2013, 96 blood samples from individuals diagnosed with symptomatic dengue were collected. Clinical symptom persistence in 60days of follow-up was assessed by a clinical and epidemiological questionnaire filled in 4 interviews. SNP genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). In two months of monitoring the dengue infection, we observed that symptoms persisted in 38.5% (37/96) of dengue patients at the end of the first month (D30) and in 11.5% (11/96) of dengue patients at the end of the second month (D60). Our results show an association between FcγRIIa, TNF-α and IL-6 gene SNPs and symptom persistence and an association trend with CD209, IL-4 and IFN-γ gene SNPs. Our findings may increase the knowledge on the pathophysiological mechanisms of persistent symptoms of infection with the dengue virus (DENV) and thus help the clinical management of patients. PMID:26429310

  18. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: a study in a large clinical sample of patients using a novel automated method

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Jayatilleke, Nishamali; Broadbent, Matthew; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Foskett, Nadia; Gorrell, Genevieve; Hayes, Richard D; Jackson, Richard; Johnston, Caroline; Shetty, Hitesh; Roberts, Angus; McGuire, Philip; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify negative symptoms in the clinical records of a large sample of patients with schizophrenia using natural language processing and assess their relationship with clinical outcomes. Design Observational study using an anonymised electronic health record case register. Setting South London and Maudsley NHS Trust (SLaM), a large provider of inpatient and community mental healthcare in the UK. Participants 7678 patients with schizophrenia receiving care during 2011. Main outcome measures Hospital admission, readmission and duration of admission. Results 10 different negative symptoms were ascertained with precision statistics above 0.80. 41% of patients had 2 or more negative symptoms. Negative symptoms were associated with younger age, male gender and single marital status, and with increased likelihood of hospital admission (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.39), longer duration of admission (β-coefficient 20.5 days, 7.6–33.5), and increased likelihood of readmission following discharge (OR 1.58, 1.28 to 1.95). Conclusions Negative symptoms were common and associated with adverse clinical outcomes, consistent with evidence that these symptoms account for much of the disability associated with schizophrenia. Natural language processing provides a means of conducting research in large representative samples of patients, using data recorded during routine clinical practice. PMID:26346872

  19. Clinical Significance of Auditory Target P300 Subcomponents in Psychosis: Differential Diagnosis, Symptom Profiles, and Course

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Greg; Foti, Dan; Jackson, Felicia; Kotov, Roman; Constantino, Eduardo; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced auditory target P300 amplitude is a leading biomarker for psychotic disorders, although its relevance for differential diagnosis and link to specific clinical features (symptom profiles, functional impairment, and course) is unclear. This study aims to clarify the clinical significance of auditory target P300 using concurrent and retrospective clinical data from a longitudinal cohort with psychosis. Methods 92 cases from an epidemiological study of first-admission psychosis were assessed using an auditory oddball paradigm at 15-year follow-up along with 44 never-psychotic adults. Subcomponents of auditory target P300 amplitude (i.e., a central positive P3a, a parietal positive P3b, and a frontal negative slow wave) were isolated using temporal-spatial principal components analysis. Results P3a amplitude was blunted across psychotic disorders relative to non-psychotic adults. P3b amplitude was reduced in schizophrenia specifically, including cases initially misclassified at baseline. The frontal negative slow wave did not distinguish among groups. P3b amplitude reduction was associated with several clinical features at the concurrent assessment, as well as previous time points, including recovery from psychosis even 5 years earlier and functioning even 15 years earlier. Conclusions Auditory target P300 amplitude yields both a schizophrenia-specific component (i.e., P3b) and a transdiagnostic psychosis component (i.e., P3a). The P3b component may also shed light on prognosis, real-world functioning, and course, as well as help to reduce misdiagnosis of psychotic disorders. Prospective studies are needed to test whether P3b tracks or predicts clinical status. PMID:25934167

  20. Probabilistic assessment of acute health symptoms related to pesticide use under intensified Nepalese agriculture.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Kishor

    2008-06-01

    Agriculture intensification has pushed farmers to use pesticides for maintaining agricultural productivity and to increase income. However, pesticide use has a significant negative impact on farmers' health. In Nepal, uses of pesticides have been already documented in agriculturally intensified areas, however, little is known on health impacts. Weekly interviews were conducted during 2005 to assess the emerging pesticide problems, estimate the magnitude of pesticide-related acute illness, and identify associated risk factors. The study showed that very few farmers have adopted safety gear during pesticide spraying. The safety measures regression shows that warm temperature and drinking habits significantly reduced adoption of safety gear, whereas, integrated pest management (IPM) training and farm experience increased its adoption. The dose-response analyses showed that use of insecticides or fungicides, spray duration and mixing pesticides significantly affect farmer's health, which could be reduced either by educating farmers, increasing the use of safety gear, or reducing mixtures applications. PMID:18569147

  1. Effect of Levothyroxine Treatment on Clinical Symptoms in Hypothyroid Patients with Chronic Urticaria and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hun; Sung, Nam Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid autoimmunity has been increasingly reported to be associated with chronic urticaria (CU), and the possible clinical benefit of thyroid hormone or anti-thyroid drugs in some CU patients with autoimmune thyroid disease has been studied. However, the effect of thyroid hormone or anti-thyroid drugs on clinical symptoms of CU remains unclear. Objective We investigated the clinical response of urticaria to the treatment of thyroid dysfunction. Methods Medical records of patients with CU evaluated for thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid function were collected and reviewed. Results Of 184 patients with CU, 43 patients (23.4%) had thyroid autoantibodies and 26 patients (14.1%) had thyroid dysfunction. While none of the five patients with Graves' disease showed any improvement of urticaria after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs, two of the 10 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis showed improved urticaria after being treated with levothyroxine. Conclusion Although levothyroxine treatment was effective in a minority of patients with CU, there may be a causal relationship between CU and thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:27081267

  2. Comparison of clinical symptoms scored according to the National Institutes of Health chronic prostatitis symptoms index and assessment of antimicrobial treatment in patients with chronic prostatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skerk, Visnja; Roglić, S; Cajić, V; Markotić, A; Radonić, A; Skerk, Vedrana; Granić, J; Zidovec-Lepej, S; Parazajder, J; Begovac, J

    2009-04-01

    We examined a total of 194 patients over 18 years of age with chronic prostatitis syndrome and no evidence of structural or functional lower genitourinary tract abnormalities. The following data were obtained for each patient: clinical history--the severity of chronic prostatitis symptoms scored by a Croatian translation of the NiH CPSI questionnaire, clinical status including digitorectal examination, urethral swab specimens, and selective samples of urine and expressed prostatic secretion, according to the 4-glass localization test (meares and Stamey localization technique). Patients were treated orally with antimicrobial agents in doses and duration according to clinical practice in Croatia. An infectious etiology was determined in 169 (87%) patients. Chlamydia trachomatis was the causative pathogen in 38 (20%), Trichomonas vaginalis in 35 (18%), Enterococcus in 36 (19%) and Escherichia coli in 35 (18%) patients. In the remaining 25 patients the following causative pathogens were found: Ureaplasma urealyticum, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Comparison of symptoms scores and effect on quality of life has shown that the most severe clinical presentation of disease was recorded in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis caused by E. coli and Enterococcus (p<0.001). Clinical success was paralleled by bacteriological eradication in chronic bacterial prostatitis caused by C. trachomatis, Enterococcus and E. coli (kappa >0.2<0.5), but not in inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome caused by T. vaginalis. PMID:19423471

  3. Acute Minocycline Treatment Mitigates the Symptoms of Mild Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Kamnaksh, Alaa; Wingo, Daniel; Ahmed, Farid; Grunberg, Neil E.; Long, Joseph B.; Kasper, Christine E.; Agoston, Denes V.

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a significant challenge for the civilian and military health care systems due to its high prevalence and overall complexity. Our earlier works showed evidence of neuroinflammation, a late onset of neurobehavioral changes, and lasting memory impairment in a rat model of mild blast-induced TBI (mbTBI). The aim of our present study was to determine whether acute treatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug minocycline (Minocin®) can mitigate the neurobehavioral abnormalities associated with mbTBI, Furthermore, we aimed to assess the effects of the treatment on select inflammatory, vascular, neuronal, and glial markers in sera and in brain regions associated with anxiety and memory (amygdala, prefrontal cortex, ventral, and dorsal hippocampus) following the termination (51 days post-injury) of the experiment. Four hours after a single exposure to mild blast overpressure or sham conditions, we treated animals with a daily dose of minocycline (50 mg/kg) or physiological saline (vehicle) for four consecutive days. At 8 and 45 days post-injury, we tested animals for locomotion, anxiety, and spatial memory. Injured animals exhibited significantly impaired memory and increased anxiety especially at the later testing time point. Conversely, injured and minocycline treated rats’ performance was practically identical to control (sham) animals in the open field, elevated plus maze, and Barnes maze. Protein analyses of sera and brain regions showed significantly elevated levels of all of the measured biomarkers (except VEGF) in injured and untreated rats. Importantly, minocycline treatment normalized serum and tissue levels of the majority of the selected inflammatory, vascular, neuronal, and glial markers. In summary, acute minocycline treatment appears to prevent the development of neurobehavioral abnormalities likely through mitigating the molecular pathologies of the injury in an experimental model of mb

  4. The present mercury contents of scalp hair and clinical symptoms in inhabitants of the Minamata area.

    PubMed

    Harada, M; Nakanishi, J; Konuma, S; Ohno, K; Kimura, T; Yamaguchi, H; Tsuruta, K; Kizaki, T; Ookawara, T; Ohno, H

    1998-05-01

    A total of 191 fishermen and their family (32-82 years) living in some mercury-polluted areas along the Shiranui Sea volunteered for the present study. They made a living by fishery and had formerly eaten the methyl mercury-contaminated fish and shellfish caught there. The questionnaire on subjective symptoms, fish eating habits, and past living history was conducted on the subjects. In addition, they were clinically examined in detail by several neurologists and scalp hair was collected. With six exceptions, all the 185 subjects showed a normal total mercury level in hair (<10 ppm). The ratio of methyl mercury to total mercury was 79-94% on the average for each group examined, suggesting indirect contamination (perhaps through the food chain). Despite their low mercury level in scalp hair, however, the subjects showed various neurological symptoms, particularly, sensory disturbance (such as the glove and stocking type), at a very high rate. Thus, it seems fair to state that, in addition to officially recognized Minamata disease patients, there still exist many people with atypical, slight Minamata disease on the coast of the Shiranui Sea. The current hair mercury level is not necessarily useful as a criterion for diagnosing chronic Minamata disease because of the long lapse of time. PMID:9600809

  5. Sativex: clinical efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael Philip

    2006-04-01

    Sativex is one of the first cannabis-based medicines to undergo conventional clinical development and to be approved as a prescription medicine. It is an oromucosal spray that allows flexible, individualised dosing. Patients self titrate their overall dose and pattern of dosing according to their response to and tolerance of the medicine. This usually results in the administration of approximately 8-12 sprays/day. Each spray delivers tetrahydrocannabinol 2.7 mg and cannabidiol 2.5 mg, giving an approximate average dose of tetrahydrocannabinol 22-32 mg/day and cannabidiol 20-30 mg/day. Development has concentrated on the treatment of symptoms of multiple sclerosis, notably spasticity and neuropathic pain, as well as the treatment of neuropathic pain of other aetiologies. Positive results in placebo-controlled trials of the use of Sativex as an add-on therapy in these indications demonstrate that Sativex is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of these symptoms. Sativex has been approved for use in neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis in Canada. If ongoing studies replicate the results already observed, further approvals for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis and for neuropathic pain are likely. PMID:16553576

  6. Citing conduct, individualizing symptoms: Accomplishing autism diagnosis in clinical case conferences.

    PubMed

    Turowetz, Jason

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, I examine how clinicians at a clinic for developmental disabilities in the United States determine whether children being evaluated for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) showed symptoms of that condition. Drawing on a convenience sample of 61 audio and video recorded case conferences from two time periods (1985 and 2011-15), and combining Conversation Analysis with insights from Actor Network Theory, I find that clinicians describe (via a representational practice called "citation") children's conduct in ways that advance diagnostic claims. More specifically, they portray key actants in the assessment process in patterned ways: the test instrument is represented as a neutral tool of measurement, the clinician as administrator and instructor; and the child as the focal figure whose conduct is made to appear independent of the other participants and suggestive of diagnostic symptoms. These tacit representational conventions conform to and reproduce the assumptions of standardized testing, according to which clinicians and tests are to be neutral arbiters of the child's abilities, and thereby provide for objective, warrantable findings. At the same time, however, by designing representations around the child's symptomatic conduct in this way, clinicians may minimize or elide their own contributions, and those of the test instrument, to the child's performance, and thereby make the child alone appear responsible for what are, in fact, interactionally-occasioned behaviors. PMID:26318210

  7. A Clinical Skills Instruction Program: The Acute Abdomen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laube, Douglas W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An effective evaluation of the acutely ill female implies a thorough examination that integrates skills representing three learning domains. This process should include: a thorough medical history, a physical examination, good patient-physician rapport, and development of an efficacious management plan. A University of Iowa simulation approach is…

  8. Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype-1: A Review of Disease Distribution, Clinical Symptoms, and Laboratory Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Nichole L.; Miller, Cathy L.

    2012-01-01

    Avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) is capable of infecting a wide range of avian species leading to a broad range of clinical symptoms. Ease of transmission has allowed the virus to spread worldwide with varying degrees of virulence depending on the virus strain and host species. Classification systems have been designed to group isolates based on their genetic composition. The genetic composition of the fusion gene cleavage site plays an important role in virulence. Presence of multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site allows enzymatic cleavage of the fusion protein enabling virulent viruses to spread systemically. Diagnostic tests, including virus isolation, real-time reverse-transcription PCR, and sequencing, are used to characterize the virus and identify virulent strains. Genetic diversity within APMV-1 demonstrates the need for continual monitoring for changes that may arise requiring modifications to the molecular assays to maintain their usefulness for diagnostic testing. PMID:22577610

  9. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  10. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  11. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Creating Mandalas for the Management of Acute Pain Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinley, Nora E.; Norris, Deborah O.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial explored the feasibility of implementing a fast-acting mandala intervention to reduce physical pain and psychological anxiety experienced during needle sticks. Forty pediatric patients participated in this two-group study: 20 participants created a mandala on an iPad (Treatment Group) and 20 participants…

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Acute Kidney Injury: Parenchymal Acute Kidney Injury-Tubulo-Interstitial Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is the most common type of acute kidney injury (AKI) related to parenchymal damage (90% of cases). It may be due to a direct kidney injury, such as sepsis, drugs, toxins, contrast media, hemoglobinuria and myoglobinuria, or it may be the consequence of a prolonged systemic ischemic injury. Conventional ultrasound (US) shows enlarged kidneys with hypoechoic pyramids. Increased volume is largely sustained by the increase of anteroposterior diameter, while longitudinal axis usually maintains its normal length. Despite the role of color Doppler in AKI still being debated, many studies demonstrate that renal resistive indexes (RIs) vary on the basis of primary disease. Moreover, several studies assessed that higher RI values are predictive of persistent AKI. Nevertheless, due to the marked heterogeneity among the studies, further investigations focused on timing of RI measurement and test performances are needed. Acute interstitial nephritis is also a frequent cause of AKI, mainly due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics administration. The development of acute interstitial nephritis is due to an immunological reaction against nephritogenic exogenous antigens, processed by tubular cells. In acute interstitial nephritis, as well as in ATN, conventional US does not allow a definitive diagnosis. Kidneys appear enlarged and widely hyperechoic due to interstitial edema and inflammatory infiltration. Also, in this condition, hemodynamic changes are closely correlated to the severity and the progression of the anatomical damage. PMID:27169885

  14. Prevalence and clinical significance of subsyndromal manic symptoms, including irritability and psychomotor agitation, during bipolar major depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Akiskal, Hagop; Coryell, William; Fawcett, Jan; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that subsyndromal manic symptoms occur frequently during bipolar major depressive episodes (MDEs) and may be a subtle form of ‘depressive mixed state.’ This paper examines the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDEs with subsyndromal manic symptoms. The specific effects of overt irritability and psychomotor agitation are examined. Methods Bipolar (type I or II) patients with an MDE at intake (N=142) were compared based on the presence or absence of concurrent subsyndromal manic symptoms. The groups were further subdivided by the presence of symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation. Results Subsyndromal manic symptoms during bipolar MDEs were highly prevalent (76.1%), and were associated with significantly increased severity of depression/dysphoria in the intake episode, longer episode duration, and more suicidal ideation and behavior (past, current, and during long-term follow-up). Overt irritability and psychomotor agitation were the most prevalent subsyndromal manic symptoms (co-occurring in 57% and 39% of MDEs, respectively), and accounted for most of the negative effects associated with subsyndromal manic symptoms. Limitations The findings need to be confirmed in larger samples, which also examine the relationship to adequate antidepressant and/or mood stabilizing treatment. Conclusions The presence of one or more subsyndromal manic symptoms appears to be the modal presentation of bipolar MDEs and a marker for a subtle form of bipolar mixed depressive state. In particular, patients with symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation should be monitored closely to avoid serious clinical outcomes such as longer affective episodes, exacerbation of manic symptoms syndromal mania, and heightened suicidality. PMID:22314261

  15. The therapeutic effect of adding dextromethorphan to clonidine for reducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Malek, Ayyoub; Amiri, Shahrokh; Habibi Asl, Bohlool

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dextromethorphan is a noncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonist that is clinically feasible for relieving the opioid withdrawal symptoms. This study compares the efficacy of a combination therapy with dextromethorphan and clonidine to treatment with clonidine alone. Methods and Materials. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, patients were selected from inpatients of detox and rehabilitation ward of Razi Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. They were randomly allocated to two groups receiving either clonidine (0.4-1.2 mg/day) or clonidine and dextromethorphan (300 mg/day). Withdrawal symptoms were evaluated in the first day of admission and again 24, 48, and 72 hours later. Results. Thirty male patients completed the trial in each group. Withdrawal symptoms began to decrease in the second day in patients receiving dextromethorphan and clonidine while patients receiving clonidine experienced the more severe symptoms in 72 hours. Analysis of variance of the symptom severity score revealed a significant group × time interaction (F = 14.25; P < 0.001), so that patients receiving dextromethorphan plus clonidine had milder symptoms during three days in all of the measurements compared to clonidine group. Conclusion. Combination therapy of dextromethorphan and clonidine would result in milder opioid withdrawal symptoms compared to clonidine alone with a reduction beginning at the second day. PMID:23864983

  16. Clinical Significance of the Number of Depressive Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the CRESCEND Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to establish the relationship between the number of depressive symptoms and the clinical characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). This would enable us to predict the clinical significance of the number of depressive symptoms in MDD patients. Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in Korea, 853 patients with DSM-IV MDD were recruited. The baseline and clinical characteristics of groups with different numbers of depressive symptoms were compared using the χ2 test for discrete variables and covariance (ANCOVA) for continuous variables. In addition, the scores of these groups on the measurement tools were compared by ANCOVA after adjusting the potential effects of confounding variables. After adjusting the effects of monthly income and history of depression, a larger number of depressive symptoms indicated higher overall severity of depression (F [4, 756] = 21.458, P < 0.001) and higher levels of depressive symptoms (F [4, 767] = 19.145, P < 0.001), anxiety symptoms (F [4, 765] = 12.890, P < 0.001) and suicidal ideation (F [4, 653] = 6.970, P < 0.001). It also indicated lower levels of social function (F [4, 760] = 13.343, P < 0.001), and quality of life (F [4, 656] = 11.975, P < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in alcohol consumption (F [4, 656] = 11.975, P < 0.001). The number of depressive symptoms can be used as an index of greater illness burden in clinical psychiatry. PMID:27051248

  17. Clinical Significance of the Number of Depressive Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the CRESCEND Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Sakong, Jeongkyu; Koo, Bon Hoon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-04-01

    Our study aimed to establish the relationship between the number of depressive symptoms and the clinical characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). This would enable us to predict the clinical significance of the number of depressive symptoms in MDD patients. Using data from the Clinical Research Center for Depression (CRESCEND) study in Korea, 853 patients with DSM-IV MDD were recruited. The baseline and clinical characteristics of groups with different numbers of depressive symptoms were compared using the χ(2) test for discrete variables and covariance (ANCOVA) for continuous variables. In addition, the scores of these groups on the measurement tools were compared by ANCOVA after adjusting the potential effects of confounding variables. After adjusting the effects of monthly income and history of depression, a larger number of depressive symptoms indicated higher overall severity of depression (F [4, 756] = 21.458, P < 0.001) and higher levels of depressive symptoms (F [4, 767] = 19.145, P < 0.001), anxiety symptoms (F [4, 765] = 12.890, P < 0.001) and suicidal ideation (F [4, 653] = 6.970, P < 0.001). It also indicated lower levels of social function (F [4, 760] = 13.343, P < 0.001), and quality of life (F [4, 656] = 11.975, P < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in alcohol consumption (F [4, 656] = 11.975, P < 0.001). The number of depressive symptoms can be used as an index of greater illness burden in clinical psychiatry. PMID:27051248

  18. Postpartum Acute Pulmonary Oedema with Sub clinical Rheumatic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    R, Padmaja; Gande, Sri Krishna Padma Challa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Acute dyspnea with pulmonary oedema in postpartum is uncommon but life-threatening event. Contributing factors for pulmonary oedema include, administration of tocolytics, underlying cardiac disease, iatrogenic fluid overload and preeclampsia acounting 0.08% of pregnancies. Pulmonary embolism, amniotic fluid embolism, pneumonia, aspiration and pulmonary oedema are some of the potentially devastating conditions that should be considered by the attending physician. Here, we report a case of postpartum acute pulmonary oedema referred to causality after an emergency caesarean section in a private hospital. No matter what the underlying pathology, prompt administration and appropriate resuscitation is always the first priority. Only after the patient has been stabilized attention must be turned to diagnosis and specific treatment. A diagnosis of severe Mitral Stenosis, probably of rheumatic origin was made after stabilizing the patient. PMID:25859501

  19. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  20. Antimicrobial therapy of acute diarrhoea: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhoea is one of the most commonly occurring diseases. This article presents a review of the current state of the treatment of acute infectious diarrhoea, as well as of the most important pathogens. The general principles of the therapy of diarrhoea are exemplified, followed by a description of the targeted antimicrobial therapy of the most important bacterial gastrointestinal infections, including salmonellosis, shigellosis and Campylobacter infections, as well as infections with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, yersiniosis and cholera. Diarrhoea caused by toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains has increased in incidence and in severity. These infections will therefore be described in detail, including important new aspects of treatment. Symptomatic therapy is still the most important component of the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. However, empirical antibiotic therapy should be considered for severely ill patients with a high frequency of stools, fever, bloody diarrhoea, underlying immune deficiency, advanced age or significant comorbidities. Increasing resistance, in particular against fluoroquinolones, must be taken into consideration. Therapy with motility inhibitors is not recommended for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and severe colitis. The macrocyclic antibiotic fidaxomicin can reduce the rate of recurrent disease in CDI. Furthermore, evidence for the benefits of faecal microbiota transplantation as a treatment option for multiple recurrences of CDI is increasing. In conclusion, the treatment of acute diarrhoea is still primarily supportive. General empirical antibiotic therapy for acute diarrhoea is not evidence-based. PMID:26641310

  1. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively. PMID:27144227

  2. Clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of paraphenylene-diamine induced acute kidney injury following hair dye poisoning: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shigidi, Mazin; Mohammed, Osama; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Taha, Elshafie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Africa and Asia hair dye is applied together with henna to decorate the hands and feet. Paraphenylene-diamine (PPD), a highly toxic constituent of hair dye can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods A cohort study was conducted during the period from April 2012 to March 2013 in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, Sudan. It targeted adults presenting acutely with an evident history and clinical features of hair dye poisoning, together with AKI as per the RIFLE criteria. Analysis of data was done using SPSS. Results 30 adults were included, their mean age was 25.6 ± 4.2 years, 93.3% were females. Exposure to PPD was suicidal in 86.7%. The mean duration to onset of renal symptoms was 34.8 ± 7.6 hours, maximum median serum creatinine was 8.6 ± 2.3 mg/dl, 86.7% had loss of kidney function as per the RIFLE classification and required dialysis. Initial renal recovery was seen after a mean duration of 9.8 ± 2.2 days. One patient died, 3.3%; all others, 96.7%, recovered normal kidney function. The amount of ingested PPD correlated significantly to the severity of symptoms, number of dialysis sessions required and time for renal recovery with P values < 0.05. Conclusion Hair dye poisoning was associated with prolonged hospital stay, requirement of dialysis and increased morbidity. The severity of symptoms directly correlates to the dose of PPD ingested, with the kidney damage being reversible in almost all survivors. PMID:25810799

  3. Olanzapine use in acute porphyria.

    PubMed

    Horgan, Patrick; Jones, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the use of olanzapine in the treatment of a patient with hereditary coproporphyria. This patient suffered from paranoid delusions, poor self-care and anxiety symptoms. The patient was commenced on olanzapine with a good clinical response, and without significant adverse effects. This suggests that olanzapine is a safe and effective treatment of psychotic symptoms in acute porphyrias. PMID:24937245

  4. Cognitive changes preceding clinical symptom onset of mild cognitive impairment and relationship to ApoE genotype

    PubMed Central

    Albert, M; Soldan, A; Gottesman, R; McKhann, G; Sacktor, N; Farrington, L; Grega, M; Turner, RS; Lu, Y; Li, S; Wang, M-C; Selnes, O

    2014-01-01

    Background This study had two goals (1) to evaluate changes in neuropsychological performance among cognitively normal individuals that might precede the onset of clinical symptoms, and (2) to examine the impact of Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype on these changes. Methods Longitudinal neuropsychological, clinical assessments and consensus diagnoses were completed prospectively in 268 cognitively normal individuals. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.2 years (+/− 3.3). 208 participants remained normal and 60 developed cognitive decline, consistent with a diagnosis of MCI or dementia. Cox regression analyses were completed, for both baseline scores and rate of change in scores, in relation to time to onset of clinical symptoms. Analyses were completed both with and without ApoE-4 status included. Interactions with ApoE-4 status were also examined. Results Lower baseline test scores, as well as greater rate of change in test scores, were associated with time to onset of clinical symptoms (p<0.001). The mean time from baseline to onset of clinical symptoms was 6.15 (+/− 3.4) years. The presence of an ApoE-4 allele doubled the risk of progression. The rate of change in two of the test scores was significantly different in ApoE-4 carriers vs. non-carriers. Conclusions Cognitive performance declines prior to the onset of clinical symptoms that are a harbinger of a diagnosis of MCI. Cognitive changes in normal individuals who will subsequently decline may be observed at least 6.5 years prior to symptom onset. In addition, the risk of decline is doubled among individuals with an ApoE-4 allele. PMID:25212916

  5. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM) is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498. PMID:20958995

  6. Acute effects of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinzadeh, Khadijeh; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Baghdasar, Parvin Javad; Alizadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation and pain induced by delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) as a result of eccentric exercise (EE) or unaccustomed activity cause some difficulties in exercise for athletes. The purpose of this study was to survey the effect of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptom of delayed onset muscle soreness. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, 36 healthy female subjects, who were recruited by intra dormitory calls, randomly divided into 3 groups, including: ginger intake 1 hour before exercise (GIBE), ginger intake immediately after exercise (GIAE) and placebo group (PL). Subjects consumed capsules contain 60 mg of ginger extract (equivalent of 2 g dried ginger powder) or placebo before and after exercise. The exercise protocol consisted of a 20 minute step test using a 46cm step at a rate of 15 steps per minute. The blood samples were taken before, 1, 24 and 48 hour after exercise to assay creatine kinase (CK) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Muscle pain scores, isometric strength and circumference of thigh muscle, and hip range of motion were recorded at mentioned times. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure was used to determine the differences between groups. Results: The results showed a significant reduction of pain in GIBE compared to GIAE after 24 and 48h of EE and GIAE compared to PL (p<0.05). IL-6 changed significantly in GIBE compared to PL (p<0.05) after 1, 24, and 48h after EE. The other factors didn’t change meaningfully. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that 2 grams of ginger may have anti-inflammation and analgesic effect on DOMS. PMID:26793652

  7. Intrinsic functional connectivity of insular cortex and symptoms of sickness during acute experimental inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lekander, Mats; Karshikoff, Bianka; Johansson, Emilia; Soop, Anne; Fransson, Peter; Lundström, Johan N; Andreasson, Anna; Ingvar, Martin; Petrovic, Predrag; Axelsson, John; Nilsonne, Gustav

    2016-08-01

    Task-based fMRI has been used to study the effects of experimental inflammation on the human brain, but it remains unknown whether intrinsic connectivity in the brain at rest changes during a sickness response. Here, we investigated the effect of experimental inflammation on connectivity between areas relevant for monitoring of bodily states, motivation, and subjective symptoms of sickness. In a double-blind randomized controlled experiment, 52 healthy volunteers were injected with 0.6ng/kg LPS (lipopolysaccharide) or placebo, and participated in a resting state fMRI experiment after approximately 2h 45min. Resting state fMRI data were available from 48 participants, of which 28 received LPS and 20 received placebo. Bilateral anterior and bilateral posterior insula sections were used as seed regions and connectivity with bilateral orbitofrontal and cingulate (anterior and middle) cortices was investigated. Back pain, headache and global sickness increased significantly after as compared to before LPS, while a non-significant trend was shown for increased nausea. Compared to placebo, LPS was followed by increased connectivity between left anterior insula and left midcingulate cortex. This connectivity was significantly correlated to increase in back pain after LPS and tended to be related to increased global sickness, but was not related to increased headache or nausea. LPS did not affect the connectivity from other insular seeds. In conclusion, the finding of increased functional connectivity between left anterior insula and middle cingulate cortex suggests a potential neurophysiological mechanism that can be further tested to understand the subjective feeling of malaise and discomfort during a sickness response. PMID:26732827

  8. Unusual Acute Sequelae of α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: A Myriad of Symptoms With One Common Cure.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Alessandro N; McCarthy, Cormac; Carroll, Tomas P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-11-01

    Panniculitis associated with α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is well documented but rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of successful induction of clinical remission of AATD-related panniculitis following a single 120-mg/kg dose administration of plasma-purified α1-antitrypsin (AAT). A 23-year-old man with known PiZZ AATD presented to the hospital with a diffusely swollen and tender right upper limb. This was associated with subcutaneous induration, and a discrepancy of 5 cm in upper limb circumference at the mid arm was noted. There was no convincing precipitant for cellulitis or an infectious cause, and inflammatory markers were raised, with a C-reactive protein (CRP) level of 93.9 mg/L and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 71 mm/h. Doppler ultrasonography ruled out DVT. No antimicrobials or antiinflammatory medications were administered during or prior to admission. Biopsy specimens of the right upper limb revealed extensive panniculitis with neutrophils, foamy macrophages, and fat necrosis. A diagnosis of AATD-associated panniculitis was made. Following this, a single IV dose of 120 mg/kg of plasma-purified AAT was administered. By day 7 post AAT infusion, CRP level had normalized to 4.6 mg/L and ESR had dropped to 22 mm/h. Limb circumference discrepancy on day 7 was 1 cm. There was no tenderness to palpation or induration, and a clinical remission of panniculitis was observed. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of clinical remission following a single treatment with IV AAT at a dose of 120 mg/kg. This opens avenues to more timely and effective treatment of the more severe presentations of AAT-associated panniculitis. PMID:26527439

  9. Clinical Research in Acute Fatal Illness: Lessons From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Clinical research to evaluate the effectiveness of life support systems in acute fatal illness has unique problems of logistics, ethics, and consent. There have been 10 prospective comparative trials of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in acute fatal respiratory failure, utilizing different study designs. The trial designs were prospective controlled randomized, prospective adaptive randomized, sequential, and matched pairs. The trials were reviewed with regard to logistics, ethics, consent, statistical methods, economics, and impact. The matched pairs method is the best study design for evaluation of life support systems in acute fatal illness. PMID:25223826

  10. Differences in Clinical Manifestations of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infection between HIV-1 Subtypes in African Women

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Richard R.; Morrison, Charles S.; Kwok, Cynthia; Chipato, Tsungai; Musoke, Robert; Arts, Eric J.; Nankya, Immaculate; Salata, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in clinical manifestations between women with various HIV-1 subtypes during acute (AI) and early (EI) HIV infection. In a longitudinal cohort study, clinical signs and symptoms among Uganda and Zimbabwe women with AI and EI were compared with HIV-negative controls; symptoms were assessed quarterly for 15 to 24 months. Early HIV infection was defined as the first visit during which a woman tested HIV antibody positive. Women who were HIV negative serologically but DNA polymerase chain reaction positive were considered AI. In all, 26 women were classified AI and 192 EI, with 654 HIV-negative controls. Primary HIV infection (AI and EI) was associated with unexplained fever (P <.01), weight loss (P <.01), fatigue (P <.01), inguinal adenopathy (P <.01), and cervical friability (P =.01). More women with subtype C infection had unexplained fever, fatigue, and abnormal vaginal discharge compared to subtype A or D infection. Inguinal adenopathy occurred less often in women with subtype A infection than those with subtype C or D infection. PMID:24106054

  11. Validation of the Chinese version of the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS): a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Shi, Chuan; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Ho, Karen K. Y.; Hung, Karen S. Y.; Lam, Joanna W. S.; Wang, Ya; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). We recruited 68 patients with schizophrenia from the Chinese setting. The findings showed a generally consistent two-factor structure with the original version, namely “expression” and “motivation–pleasure.” There is a minor cultural variation in perceiving these items in the Chinese culture. However, the present study demonstrated that the Chinese version of the CAINS appears to be a valid and reliable clinical tool for the assessment of negative symptoms in the Chinese setting. PMID:25698985

  12. Clinical Correlates of Co-occurring Psychiatric and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Symptom-Induced Impairment in Children with ASD.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Perlman, Greg; Ramdhany, Lianne; de Ruiter, Janneke

    2016-01-01

    Although psychiatric symptom severity and impairment are overlapping but nevertheless distinct illness parameters, little research has examined whether variables found to be associated with the severity are also correlated with symptom-induced impairment. Parents and teachers completed ratings of symptom-induced impairment for DSM-IV-referenced syndromes, and parents completed a background questionnaire for a consecutively referred sample of primarily male (81%) 6-to-12 year olds with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (N = 221). Some clinical correlates (e.g., IQ < 70, maternal level of education, pregnancy complications, current use of psychotropic medication, season of birth) were associated with impairment for several disorders, whereas others were correlated with only a few syndromes (e.g., gender, co-morbid medical conditions) or were not related to impairment in any disorder (e.g., family psychopathology). There was little convergence in findings for parents' versus teachers' ratings. Some clinical correlates (e.g., season of birth, current psychotropic medication, maternal education) were unique predictors of three or more disorders. Pregnancy complications were uniquely associated with social anxiety and schizoid personality symptom-induced impairment. IQ was a unique predictor of schizophrenia, ASD, oppositional defiant disorder symptom-induced impairment. Children whose mothers had relatively fewer years of education had greater odds for symptom-induced impairment in social anxiety, depression, aggression, and mania and greater number of impairing conditions. Season of birth was the most robust correlate of symptom-induced impairment as rated by teachers but not by parents. Children born in fall evidenced higher rates of co-occurring psychiatric and ASD symptom-induced impairment and total number of impairing conditions. Many variables previously linked with symptom severity are also correlated with impairment. PMID:25640910

  13. No Significant Acute and Subacute Differences between Blast and Blunt Concussions across Multiple Neurocognitive Measures and Symptoms in Deployed Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Kelly, Mark P; Coldren, Rodney L; Parish, Robert V; Russell, Michael L

    2015-08-15

    Seventy-one deployed U.S. Army soldiers who presented for concussion care due to either blast or blunt mechanisms within 72 h of injury were assessed using the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM), traditional neuropsychological tests, and health status questionnaires. Follow-up ANAM testing was performed 10 d after initial testing (±5 d). Twenty-one soldiers were excluded: two for poor effort and 19 who had combined blast/blunt injuries. Of the remaining 50 male participants, 34 had blast injuries and 16 had blunt injuries. There were no statistically significant differences between blast injury and blunt injury participants in demographic, physical, or psychological health factors, concussive symptoms, or automated and traditional neurocognitive testing scores within 72 h post-injury. In addition, follow-up ANAM scores up to 15 d post-injury were not significantly different (available on 21 blast-injured and 13 blunt-injured subjects). Pre-injury baseline ANAM scores were compared where available, and revealed no statistically significant differences between 22 blast injury and eight blunt injury participants. These findings suggest there are no significant differences between mechanisms of injury during both the acute and subacute periods in neurobehavioral concussion sequelae while deployed in a combat environment. The current study supports the use of sports/mechanical concussion models for early concussion management in the deployed setting and exploration of variability in potential long-term outcomes. PMID:25367048

  14. Prevalence, codetection and seasonal distribution of upper airway viruses and bacteria in children with acute respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, K F; Grimwood, K; Sloots, T P; Whiley, D M; Acworth, J P; Phillips, N; Goyal, V; Chang, A B

    2016-06-01

    Most studies exploring the role of upper airway viruses and bacteria in paediatric acute respiratory infections (ARI) focus on specific clinical diagnoses and/or do not account for virus-bacteria interactions. We aimed to describe the frequency and predictors of virus and bacteria codetection in children with ARI and cough, irrespective of clinical diagnosis. Bilateral nasal swabs, demographic, clinical and risk factor data were collected at enrollment in children aged <15 years presenting to an emergency department with an ARI and where cough was a symptom. Swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction for 17 respiratory viruses and seven respiratory bacteria. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between child characteristics and codetection of the organisms of interest. Between December 2011 and August 2014, swabs were collected from 817 (93.3%) of 876 enrolled children, median age 27.7 months (interquartile range 13.9-60.3 months). Overall, 740 (90.6%) of 817 specimens were positive for any organism. Both viruses and bacteria were detected in 423 specimens (51.8%). Factors associated with codetection were age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for age <12 months = 4.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.0, 7.9; age 12 to <24 months = 6.0, 95% CI 3.7, 9.8; age 24 to <60 months = 2.4, 95% CI 1.5, 3.9), male gender (aOR 1.46; 95% CI 1.1, 2.0), child care attendance (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4, 2.8) and winter enrollment (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3, 3.0). Haemophilus influenzae dominated the virus-bacteria pairs. Virus-H. influenzae interactions in ARI should be investigated further, especially as the contribution of nontypeable H. influenzae to acute and chronic respiratory diseases is being increasingly recognized. PMID:26916343

  15. Reliability of the McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey among Black and White Women

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Jean C.; Cleves, Mario A.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Rojo, Martha O.; Armbya, Narain; Moser, Debra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates are higher among women, particularly Black, than men. Women’s mortality rates may reflect difficulty in recognizing CHD prodromal symptoms (PS) but reliable screening instruments for women are scarce. The McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey (MAPMISS) has been shown to capture women’s PS presentation, but has limited testing among Black women. Aim To assess the test-retest reliability of the MAPMISS PS section for Black and White women. Methods The sample was recruited from women enrolled in a longitudinal study examining the predictive validity of the MAPMISS. The MAPMISS was re-administered to 42 women (22 White, 20 Black) 3–5 days after baseline assessment. Results Women endorsed an average of 7.5 PS (SD =4.8; range: 0–20) initially and 7.6 (SD = 4.7; range: 0–20) at re-test. Over half of the women (54.8%) of both races endorsed the same number of PS at test and retest; for 69%, the number endorsed at both testings differed by no more than 1. Percent agreement and Kappa statistics on the number of PS endorsed were excellent overall and by race. PS test and retest scores, reflecting PS intensity and frequency, were highly correlated overall (r=0.92, p<0.001) and separately for White (r=0.93, p<0.001) and Black women (r=0.91, p<0.001). Racial differences were insignificant. Conclusions Findings indicate a) the MAPMISS PS score has excellent test-retest reliability (r=0.92) when administered to women without a history of CHD, and b) test-retest reliability is as strong for Black (r=0.91) as for White women (r=0.93). PMID:23045304

  16. Acute Mountain Sickness Symptom Severity at the South Pole: The Influence of Self-Selected Prophylaxis with Acetazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jacob B.; Richert, Maile; Miller, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, remains the only FDA approved pharmaceutical prophylaxis for acute mountain sickness (AMS) though its effectiveness after rapid transport in real world conditions is less clear. Methods Over 2 years, 248 healthy adults traveled by airplane from sea level (SL) to the South Pole (ALT, ~3200m) and 226 participants provided Lake Louise Symptom Scores (LLSS) on a daily basis for 1 week; vital signs, blood samples, and urine samples were collected at SL and at ALT. Acetazolamide was available to any participant desiring prophylaxis. Comparisons were made between the acetazolamide with AMS (ACZ/AMS) (n = 42), acetazolamide without AMS (ACZ/No AMS)(n = 49), no acetazolamide with AMS (No ACZ/AMS) (n = 56), and the no acetazolamide without AMS (No ACZ/No AMS) (n = 79) groups. Statistical analysis included Chi-squared and one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests. Significance was p≤0.05. Results No significant differences were found for between-group characteristics or incidence of AMS between ACZ and No ACZ groups. ACZ/AMS reported greater LLSS, BMI, and red cell distribution width. ACZ/No AMS had the highest oxygen saturation (O2Sat) at ALT. No significant differences were found in serum electrolyte concentrations or PFT results. Discussion Acetazolamide during rapid ascent provided no apparent protection from AMS based on LLSS. However, it is unclear if this lack of effect was directly associated with the drug or if perhaps there was some selection bias with individuals taking ACZ more likely to have symptoms or if there may have been more of perceptual phenomenon related to a constellation of side effects. PMID:26848757

  17. Soft, Brown Rupture: Clinical Signs and Symptoms Associated with Ruptured PIP Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Robert T.; Feig, Christine; Reintals, Michelle; Hill, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative signs and symptoms of patients with Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) implants could be predictive of device failure. Based on clinical observation and intraoperative findings 4 hypotheses were raised: (1) Preoperative clinical signs including acquired asymmetry, breast enlargement, fullness of the lower pole, decreased mound projection, and change in breast consistency could be indicative of implant rupture. (2) Device failure correlates with a low preoperative Baker grade of capsule. (3) Brown-stained implants are more prone to implant failure. (4) The brown gel could be indicative of iodine ingression through a substandard elastomer shell. Methods: Preoperative clinical signs were compared with intraoperative findings for 27 patients undergoing PIP implant explantation. Results: Acquired asymmetry (P = 0.0003), breast enlargement (P = 0.0002), fuller lower pole (P < 0.0001), and loss of lateral projection (P < 0.0001) were all significantly predictive of device failure. Capsule Baker grade was lower preoperatively for ruptured implants. The lack of palpable and visible preoperative capsular contracture could be secondary to the elastic nature of the capsular tissue found. Brown implants failed significantly more often than white implants. Analysis of brown gel revealed the presence of iodine, suggesting povidone iodine ingression at implantation. Conclusions: Preoperative signs can be predictive of PIP implant failure. Brown-stained implants are more prone to rupture. The presence of iodine in the gel suggests unacceptable permeability of the shell early in the implant’s life span. A noninvasive screening test to detect brown implants in situ could help identify implants at risk of failure in those who elect to keep their implants. PMID:25506532

  18. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  19. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings. PMID:26683233

  20. Clinical Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Are Better Associated to Lipid Peroxidation Levels in Blood Mononuclear Cells Rather than in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco J.; De Miguel, Manuel; Carrión, Angel M.; Navas, Plácido; Sánchez Alcázar, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined lipid peroxidation (LPO) in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and plasma, as a marker of oxidative damage, and its association to clinical symptoms in Fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Methods We conducted a case–control and correlational study comparing 65 patients and 45 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring LPO in BMCs and plasma. Results We found increased LPO levels in BMCs and plasma from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). A significant correlation between LPO in BMCs and clinical parameters was observed (r = 0.584, P<0.001 for VAS; r = 0.823, P<0.001 for FIQ total score; and r = 0.875, P<0.01 for depression in the BDI). We also found a positive correlation between LPO in plasma and clinical symptoms (r = 0.452, P<0.001 for VAS; r = 0.578, P<0.001 for FIQ total score; and r = 0.579, P<0.001 for depression in the BDI). Partial correlation analysis controlling for age and BMI, and sex, showed that both LPO in cells and plasma were independently associated to clinical symptoms. However, LPO in cells, but not LPO in plasma, was independently associated to clinical symptoms when controlling for depression (BDI scores). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia and that LPO in BMCs rather than LPO in plasma is better associated to clinical symptoms in FM. PMID:22046409

  1. Response to ecallantide treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema based on time to intervention: results from the EDEMA clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Banta, Erin; Horn, Patrick; Craig, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) is a rare, debilitating, genetic disorder characterized by acute attacks of edema without urticaria. Ecallantide, a direct plasma kallikrein inhibitor, is approved for treatment of acute HAE attacks. This article addresses the efficacy of ecallantide in the treatment of moderate-to-severe attacks of HAE based on time to treatment. A post hoc integrated analysis of the EDEMA4 and EDEMA3-DB clinical trials was performed based on the time to patient's treatment, defined as the time from initial recognition of moderate-to-severe symptoms to dosing (cohort, 0-2, >2-4, >4-6, >6-8, and >8 hours). Mean symptom complex severity (MSCS) score and treatment outcome score (TOS) were analyzed. Complete or near-complete resolution of symptoms was assessed at 4 and 24 hours. In this analysis, 70 patients received 30 mg of subcutaneous (s.c.) ecallantide and 73 patients received placebo. Change from baseline in MSCS score and TOS at 4 hours revealed significantly better response to ecallantide versus placebo for patients treated >2-4 (n = 46; p = 0.002; p = 0.003) or >4-6 (n = 47; p = 0.044; p = 0.043) hours after symptom onset. Fewer patients were treated within 2 hours of symptom onset; for these patients (n = 10; p = 0.752; p = 0.422) treatment did not achieve statistical significance. For overall response, complete or near-complete resolution was greatest within the 0- to 2-hour cohort (71.4%). As with other therapies for HAE early ecallantide therapy is optimal. Treatment with ecallantide within 6 hours of symptom onset leads to more rapid and sustained improvement of symptoms. PMID:21781409

  2. Acute renal failure in children. An ultrasonographic-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Vergesslich, K A; Sommer, G; Wittich, G R; Balzar, E; Weninger, M; Ponhold, W

    1987-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) may be due to obstructive uropathy or renal parenchymal disease. Twenty-five children with acute renal failure secondary to renal parenchymal disease underwent ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys. Changes of renal size and cortical echogenicity were correlated with renal function. All patients presented with bilaterally enlarged kidneys with the exception of those in the neonatal age group (12%). Improvement in renal function resulted in normalization of renal size. With regard to cortical echogenicity two groups were formed. Group A comprised 11 patients whose kidneys had the same echogenicity as the liver, while in group B the kidneys were more echogenic (14 patients). Cortical echogenicity was always increased. Determination of creatinine levels showed a statistically significant difference between group A (3.32 mg% +/- 1.40 S.D.) and group B (5.95 mg% +/- 1.96 S.D.), p less than 0.001. Changes in renal function were paralleled by rapid changes in renal size and cortical echogenicity. PMID:3319623

  3. Are Improvements in Cognitive Content and Depressive Symptoms Correlates or Mediators during Acute-Phase Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive model of depression posits that cognitive therapy’s (CT) effect on depressive symptoms is mediated by changes in cognitive content (e.g., automatic negative thoughts dysfunctional attitudes, failure attributions). We tested improvement and normalization of cognitive content among outpatients (N = 523) with recurrent major depressive disorder treated with acute-phase CT (Jarrett & Thase, 2010; Jarrett et al., 2013). We also tested whether improvement in cognitive content accounted for subsequent changes in depressive symptoms and vice versa. Five measures of content improved substantively from pre- to post-CT (median d = 0.96), and the proportions of patients scoring in “healthy” ranges increased (median 45% to 82%). Evidence for cognitive mediation of symptom reduction was limited (median r = .06), as was evidence for symptom mediation of cognitive content improvement (median r = .07). We discuss measurement and design issues relevant to detection of mediators and consider alternative theories of change. PMID:26401194

  4. Poor symptom and performance validity in regularly referred Hospital outpatients: Link with standard clinical measures, and role of incentives.

    PubMed

    Dandachi-FitzGerald, Brechje; van Twillert, Björn; van de Sande, Peter; van Os, Yindee; Ponds, Rudolf W H M

    2016-05-30

    We investigated the frequency of symptom validity test (SVT) failure and its clinical correlates in a large, heterogeneous sample of hospital outpatients referred for psychological assessment for clinical purposes. We studied patients (N=469), who were regularly referred for assessment to the psychology departments of five hospitals. Background characteristics, including information about incentives, were obtained with a checklist completed by the clinician. As a measure of over-reporting, the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS) was administered to all patients. The Amsterdam Short-Term Memory test (ASTM), a cognitive underperformance measure, was only administered to patients who were referred for a neuropsychological assessment. Symptom over-reporting occurred in a minority of patients, ranging from 12% to 19% in the main diagnostic patient groups. Patients with morbid obesity had a low rate of over-reporting (1%). The SIMS was positively associated with levels of self-reported psychological symptoms. Cognitive underperformance occurred in 29.3% of the neuropsychological assessments. The ASTM was negatively associated with memory test performance. We found no association between SVT failure and financial incentives. Our results support the recommendation to routinely evaluate symptom validity in clinical assessments of hospital patients. The dynamics behind invalid symptom reporting need to be further elucidated. PMID:27137961

  5. Pupillary responses during a joint attention task are associated with nonverbal cognitive abilities and sub-clinical symptoms of autism

    PubMed Central

    Erstenyuk, Valentyna; Swanson, Meghan R.; Siller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Measures of pupillary dilation provide a temporally sensitive, quantitative indicator of cognitive resource allocation. The current study included 39 typically developing children between 3 and 9 years of age. Children completed a free-viewing task designed to elicit gaze following, a core deficit of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Results revealed a negative association between children's pupil dilation and a standardized measure of nonverbal intelligence, suggesting that children with lower intelligence allocated more cognitive resources than children with higher intelligence. In addition, the results revealed a negative association between pupil dilation and a parent-report measure of sub-clinical symptoms of ASD, suggesting that children with fewer ASD-related symptoms allocated more cognitive resources than children who showed more sub-clinical symptoms of ASD. Both associations were independent of each other and could not be explained by variation in chronological age. These findings extend previous research demonstrating associations between basic aspects of visual processing and intelligence. In addition, these findings comport with recent theories of ASD that emphasize reduced sensitivity to the reward value of social situations. When confronted with social ambiguity, children with more ASD-related symptoms allocated fewer cognitive resources to resolving this ambiguity than children who showed fewer sub-clinical symptoms of ASD. PMID:25821516

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Social Skills Training for Schizophrenia: Improvement in Functioning and Experiential Negative Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Granholm, Eric; Holden, Jason; Link, Peter C.; McQuaid, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identifying treatments to improve functioning and reduce negative symptoms in consumers with schizophrenia is of high public health significance. Method In this randomized clinical trial, participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N=149) were randomly assigned to cognitive behavioral social skills training (CBSST) or an active goal-focused supportive contact (GFSC) control condition. CBSST combined cognitive behavior therapy with social skills training and problem solving training to improve functioning and negative symptoms. GFSC was weekly supportive group therapy focused on setting and achieving functioning goals. Blind raters assessed functioning (primary outcome: Independent Living Skills Survey (ILSS)), CBSST skill knowledge, positive and negative symptoms, depression, and defeatist performance attitudes. Results In mixed-effects regression models in intent-to-treat analyses, CBSST skill knowledge, functioning, amotivation/asociality negative symptoms and defeatist performance attitudes improved significantly more in CBSST relative to GFSC. In both treatment groups, comparable improvements were also found for positive symptoms and a performance-based measure of social competence. Conclusions The results suggest CBSST is an effective treatment to improve functioning and experiential negative symptoms in consumers with schizophrenia, and both CBSST and supportive group therapy that is actively focused on setting and achieving functioning goals can improve social competence and reduce positive symptoms. PMID:24911420

  7. Drugs under preclinical and clinical study for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Joe Antony; Salmani, Jumah Masoud Mohammad; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy has modernized the treatment of both chronic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies and combinational drugs has increased the survival rate of patients. Preclinical studies with various agents have resulted in positive outputs with Phase III trial drugs and monoclonal antibodies entering clinical trials. Most of the monoclonal antibodies target the CD20 and CD22 receptors. This has led to the approval of a few of these drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on the drugs under preclinical and clinical study in the ongoing efforts for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27382259

  8. Transcriptional Profile of Muscle following Acute Induction of Symptoms in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Halievski, Katherine; Mo, Kaiguo; Westwood, J. Timothy; Monks, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kennedy’s disease/Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) is a degenerative neuromuscular disease affecting males. This disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion mutations of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Although KD/SBMA has been traditionally considered a motor neuron disease, emerging evidence points to a central etiological role of muscle. We previously reported a microarray study of genes differentially expressed in muscle of three genetically unique mouse models of KD/SBMA but were unable to detect those which are androgen-dependent or are associated with onset of symptoms. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study we examined the time course and androgen-dependence of transcriptional changes in the HSA-AR transgenic (Tg) mouse model, in which females have a severe phenotype after acute testosterone treatment. Using microarray analysis we identified differentially expressed genes at the onset and peak of muscle weakness in testosterone-treated Tg females. We found both transient and persistent groups of differentially expressed genes and analysis of gene function indicated functional groups such as mitochondrion, ion and nucleotide binding, muscle development, and sarcomere maintenance. Conclusions/Significance By comparing the current results with those from the three previously reported models we were able to identify KD/SBMA candidate genes that are androgen dependent, and occur early in the disease process, properties which are promising for targeted therapeutics. PMID:25719894

  9. Eruptive cherry angiomas and irritant symptoms after one acute exposure to the glycol ether solvent 2-butoxyethanol.

    PubMed

    Raymond, L W; Williford, L S; Burke, W A

    1998-12-01

    Seven clerical workers were evaluated in 1993, 8 months after exposure to vaporized 2-butoxyethanol (2-BE; also called butyl cellosolve or ethylene glycol monobutyl ether [EGMBE or EGBE]), which had been applied overnight to strip the floor of their file room. At the time of exposure, they had noted intense eye and respiratory irritation, marked dyspnea, nausea, and faintness, suggesting a concentration of 2-BE in the air of 200-300 parts per million (ppm). All seven workers later experienced recurrent eye and respiratory irritation, dry cough, and headache. Four months after the exposure, cherry angiomas began to appear on the arms, trunk, and thighs of six workers, who voiced concerns about the possibility of cancer. Our evaluation found no evidence of hematologic, liver, lung, or renal toxicity, but elevations in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and blood pressure of each subject were found. Workplace air sampling found no detectable 2-BE, but traces (0.1-0.2 ppm) of formaldehyde were identified. Irritant symptoms abated after the group was moved to a room with better ventilation, and the mild hypertension gradually cleared, but new cherry angiomas have continued to appear 5 years after the acute exposure, as the initial ones persisted. These angiomas occur in healthy persons as they age but in this instance appear to have resulted from a single overexposure to 2-BE. We felt confident in reassuring the workers that they would suffer no serious consequences from this exposure. PMID:9871882

  10. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge. The following case is presented as an example of such an occurrence. A 67-year-old woman presented to the emergency department for lethargy, nausea and syncope. The head CT did not demonstrate any bleeding or mass effect, but lab results were significant for elevated lactic acid. The patient recently underwent left total hip replacement surgery, which was complicated by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. She received 6 weeks of oral linezolid therapy. And upon learning that key part of her history, the linezolid was discontinued. Her lactic acid rapidly normalized and she was discharged home. Several publications demonstrate that linezolid induces lactic acidosis by disrupting crucial mitochondrial functions. It is essential that clinicians are aware that linezolid can cause lactic acidosis. And, the important reminder is that adverse drug reactions can often mimic common diseases. If it is not recognized early, ominous clinical consequences may occur. In conclusion, linezolid should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis if lactic acidosis exists with an uncommon clinical picture.

  11. Effectiveness of alcohol-based hand disinfectants in a public administration: Impact on health and work performance related to acute respiratory symptoms and diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The economical impact of absenteeism and reduced productivity due to acute infectious respiratory and gastrointestinal disease is normally not in the focus of surveillance systems and may therefore be underestimated. However, large community studies in Europe and USA have shown that communicable diseases have a great impact on morbidity and lead to millions of lost days at work, school and university each year. Hand disinfection is acknowledged as key element for infection control, but its effect in open, work place settings is unclear. Methods Our study involved a prospective, controlled, intervention-control group design to assess the epidemiological and economical impact of alcohol-based hand disinfectants use at work place. Volunteers in public administrations in the municipality of the city of Greifswald were randomized in two groups. Participants in the intervention group were provided with alcoholic hand disinfection, the control group was unchanged. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and days of work were recorded based on a monthly questionnaire over one year. On the whole, 1230 person months were evaluated. Results Hand disinfection reduced the number of episodes of illness for the majority of the registered symptoms. This effect became statistically significant for common cold (OR = 0.35 [0.17 - 0.71], p = 0.003), fever (OR = 0.38 [0.14-0.99], p = 0.035) and coughing (OR = 0.45 [0.22 - 0.91], p = 0.02). Participants in the intervention group reported less days ill for most symptoms assessed, e.g. colds (2.07 vs. 2.78%, p = 0.008), fever (0.25 vs. 0.31%, p = 0.037) and cough (1.85 vs. 2.00%, p = 0.024). For diarrhoea, the odds ratio for being absent became statistically significant too (0.11 (CI 0.01 - 0.93). Conclusion Hand disinfection can easily be introduced and maintained outside clinical settings as part of the daily hand hygiene. Therefore it appears as an interesting, cost-efficient method within the scope of company health

  12. The correlation between anti phospholipase A2 specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers

    PubMed Central

    Matysiak, Joanna; Bręborowicz, Anna; Dereziński, Paweł; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Beekeepers are a group of people with high exposure to honeybee stings and with a very high risk of allergy to bee venom. Therefore, they are a proper population to study the correlations between clinical symptoms and results of diagnostic tests. Aim The primary aim of our study was to assess the correlations between total IgE, venom- and phospholipase A2-specific IgE and clinical symptoms after a bee sting in beekeepers. The secondary aim was to compare the results of diagnostic tests in beekeepers and in individuals with standard exposure to bees. Material and methods Fifty-four individuals were divided into two groups: beekeepers and control group. The levels of total IgE (tIgE), venom-specific IgE (venom sIgE), and phospholipase A2-specific IgE (phospholipase A2 sIgE) were analyzed. Results Our study showed no statistically significant correlation between the clinical symptoms after a sting and tIgE in the entire analyzed group. There was also no correlation between venom sIgE level and clinical symptoms either in beekeepers or in the group with standard exposure to bees. We observed a statistically significant correlation between phospholipase A2 sIgE level and clinical signs after a sting in the group of beekeepers, whereas no such correlation was detected in the control group. Significantly higher venom-specific IgE levels in the beekeepers, as compared to control individuals were shown. Conclusions In beekeepers, the severity of clinical symptoms after a bee sting correlated better with phospholipase A2 sIgE than with venom sIgE levels. PMID:27512356

  13. Clinical application of kampo medicine (rikkunshito) for common and/or intractable symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenterological reflux disease and functional dyspepsia are usually treatable using Western medical practices. Nonetheless, some cases present with intractable symptoms that are not amenable to these therapies. Treatment with kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, recently has been proposed as an alternative therapy for use in combination with the Western practices. In general, traditional Japanese medicines have been used empirically for intractable symptoms correctively designated as "general malaises." Accumulating lines of evidence, including basic and clinical researches, have demonstrate detailed mechanisms where traditional Japanese medicines exert pharmacological action to improve symptoms. Therefore, traditional Japanese medicines have been gaining use by various medical doctors as the specific modes of pharmacological action are recognized. This review covers both the pharmacological functions and the clinical efficacies of rikkunshito for use in treating disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25688209

  14. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    PubMed

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications. PMID:24667111

  15. Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy: A clinical checkmate

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Rashid, Mahjabeen; Balek, Mark; Park, Chong

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in pregnancy is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Management of these patients can be challenging as little is known about the optimal management strategy. Medications routinely used may have harmful effects on the pregnancy outcome. In addition, AMI could occur in the absence of atherosclerotic disease. We describe optimal management strategy by eliciting the management of a 45-year-old female with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. We recommend early use of coronary angiography to define the pathology in such cases. Radial artery assess should be preferred. Pregnant patients with AMI due to atherosclerotic disease should be given a 325 mg of aspirin and 600 mg of clopidogrel and either balloon angioplasty or bare metal stent should be used for revascularization. Percutaneous coronary intervention with heparin is preferred over bivalirudin and later should be reserved for patients with severe heparin allergy. PMID:23993012

  16. Relaxin for the Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Pharmacology, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tien M H; Goland, Sorel; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity, and its treatment requires an increasing investment of the health care system. Whereas success in treating chronic heart failure has been achieved over the last decades, several pharmacological approaches for acute heart failure have been introduced but have failed to demonstrate any clinical benefit. Serelaxin is a recombinant human relaxin-2 vasoactive peptide that causes systemic and renal vasodilation. Data suggest that the clinical benefits may be attributable to a potential combination of multiple actions of serelaxin, including improving systemic, cardiac, and renal hemodynamics, and protecting cells and organs from damage via neurohormonal, anti-inflammatory, antiremodeling, antifibrotic, anti-ischemic, and proangiogenic effects. Recently, a number of clinical trials have demonstrated that serelaxin infusion over 48 hours improved dyspnea with more rapid relief of congestion during the first days after admission for heart failure. In addition, administration of serelaxin diminished cardiac, renal, and hepatic damage, which were associated with improved long-term mortality. Available data support substantial clinical benefits and significant promise for serelaxin as a treatment option for patients with acute heart failure. This review focuses on the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of serelaxin and provides a detailed discussion of the clinical evidence for this novel therapy in acute heart failure. PMID:26331289

  17. Metabolic correction in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy: improving clinical results beyond symptom control.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Massari, J R; Gonzalez, M J; Jimenez, F J; Allende-Vigo, M Z; Duconge, J

    2011-11-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metformin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk of

  18. Maternal deprivation of rat pups increases clinical symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis at adult age.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Marc A T; Heijnen, Cobi J; Sluyter, Frans; Bakker, Joost M; Van Dam, Anne-Marie M W; Hof, Maleen; Cools, Alexander R; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2002-12-01

    Maternal deprivation of neonatal animals has been shown to induce long-lasting changes in the reactivity of the neuroendocrine system. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal deprivation also affects susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in adult life. To this end, 9-day-old rat pups were subjected to a short-lasting maternal deprivation for a period of 24 h. At the age of 8 weeks, we induced EAE in these rats by immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant. Our data demonstrate that short-lasting maternal deprivation induces a marked increase in the severity of EAE in the animals in later life. The histopathological evaluation of spinal cord and cerebellum corresponded with the observed differences in clinical symptoms of EAE. Moreover, neonatal maternal deprivation affects macrophage functioning at adult age. In contrast, no differences were observed in in vitro mitogen- and MBP-induced cytokine production by splenocytes. LPS-induced corticosterone release did not differ either between maternally deprived and control animals. We conclude that short-lasting neonatal maternal deprivation of rat pups has long-lasting consequences for macrophage activity and for susceptibility to the inflammatory autoimmune disease EAE. PMID:12446005

  19. Low internal radiation alters innate immune status in children with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Reza; Kuznetsova, L V; Bojenko, V B

    2010-09-01

    Adverse health effect of low radiation is clear. The aim of this study was to determine effect of internal low radiation on innate immune status in Ukrainian children with spastic colitis as a result of Chernobyl disaster. The test population consisted of 95 participants: 75 rural participants with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome, aged 4 to 18, who lived in a contaminated area exposed to radio nucleotide due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant (categorized in three groups) and 20 healthy urban participants from Kiev, aged 5 to 15, as the control group. Internal radiation activity has been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed for CD16(+) subset, serum concentration of circulation immune complex was measured by the polyethylene glycol method. Phagocytic activity function was assessed by using latex article and phagocytic index were calculated. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Percent of CD16(+) cell in groups II and III increased significantly in comparison to control group (p < 0.05). Concentration of circulating immune complexes increased significantly in all study groups compared to control group (p < 0.001). Phagocytes activity and phagocyte index decreased significantly in all study groups in comparison to control group (p < 0.001). The innate immune status of study groups has changed. Our data have demonstrated that this change may be related to radioactivity from technogenic pollution due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant. PMID:20538707

  20. The General Public’s Awareness of Early Symptoms of and Emergency Responses to Acute Myocardial Infarction and Related Factors in South Korea: A National Public Telephone Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Lee, HeyJean; Kim, KeonYeop; Park, Hyeung-Keun; Park, Ki-Soo; Kang, Gil Won; Shin, Hee-Young; Kim, Rock Bum; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Seo, Jae Hee; Lee, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt treatment affects prognosis and survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) onset. This study evaluated the awareness of early symptoms of AMI and knowledge of appropriate responses on symptom occurrence, along with related factors. Methods Participants’ knowledge of the early symptoms of and responses to AMI onset were investigated using a random digit dialing survey. We included 9600 residents of 16 metropolitan cities and provinces in Korea. Results The proportions of respondents who were aware of early symptoms of AMI ranged from 32.9% (arm or shoulder pain) to 79.1% (chest pain and discomfort). Of the respondents, 67.0% would call an ambulance if someone showed signs of AMI, 88.7% knew ≥1 symptom, 10.9% knew all five symptoms, and 3.1% had excellent knowledge (correct identification of all five AMI symptoms, not answering “Yes” to the trap question, and correctly identifying calling an ambulance as the appropriate response when someone is exhibiting AMI symptoms). The odds ratio (OR) for having excellent knowledge was significantly higher for those who graduated college or higher (OR 3.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–10.76) than for those with less than a primary school education, as well as for subjects with AMI advertisement exposure (OR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.10–2.02) and with knowledge of AMI (OR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.16–2.27). The 60- to 79-year-old group had significantly lower OR for excellent knowledge than the 20- to 39-year-old group (OR 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28–0.99). Conclusions Awareness of AMI symptoms and the appropriate action to take after symptom onset in South Korea was poor. Therefore, educational and promotional strategies to increase the overall awareness in the general public, especially in the elderly and those with low education levels, are needed. PMID:26853101

  1. Optical diagnosis of acute scrotum in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Stothers, Lynn; Nigro, Mark; Afshar, Kourosh; Kajbafzadeh, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Acute scrotum is a urologic condition defined by scrotal pain, swelling, and redness of acute onset. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are necessary to preserve testicular viability. The history and clinical symptoms reported are key to diagnosis and proper treatment, but are not always readily obtained in children, in whom common causes of acute scrotum include testicular torsion, torsion of the appendix testis, and epididymitis. These acute conditions have different causal pathology that mandate specific treatment, hence the importance of early and accurate diagnosis.

  2. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Silk Patch in Acute Tympanic Membrane Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Joong Seob; Kim, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The silk patch is a thin transparent patch that is produced from silk fibroin. In this study, we investigated the treatment effects of the silk patch in patients with traumatic tympanic membrane perforation (TTMP). Methods The closure rate, otorrhea rate, and closure time in all patients and the closure time in successful patients were compared between the paper patch and silk patch groups. Results Demographic data (gender, site, age, traumatic duration, preoperative air-bone gap, and perforation size and location) were not significantly different between the two groups. The closure rate and otorrhea rate were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the closure time was different between the two groups (closure time of all patients, P=0.031; closure time of successful patients, P=0.037). Conclusion The silk patch which has transparent, elastic, adhesive, and hyper-keratinizing properties results in a more efficient closure time than the paper patch in the treatment of TTMP patients. We therefore believe that the silk patch should be recommended for the treatment of acute tympanic membrane perforation. PMID:26045909

  4. Clinical features and symptom recovery on a gluten-free diet in Canadian adults with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Olga; Zarkadas, Marion; Dubois, Sheila; MacIsaac, Krista; Cantin, Isabelle; La Vieille, Sébastien; Godefroy, Samuel; Rashid, Mohsin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease can present with mild or nongastrointestinal symptoms, and may escape timely recognition. The treatment of celiac disease involves a gluten-free diet, which is complex and challenging. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical features and symptom recovery on a gluten-free diet in a Canadian adult celiac population. METHODS: All adult members (n=10,693) of the two national celiac support organizations, the Canadian Celiac Association and Fondation québécoise de la maladie coeliaque, were surveyed using a questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 5912 individuals (≥18 years of age) with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease and/or dermatitis herpetiformis completed the survey. The female to male ratio was 3:1, and mean (± SD) age at diagnosis was 45.2±16.4 years. Mean time to diagnosis after onset of symptoms was 12.0±14.4 years. Abdominal pain and bloating (84.9%), extreme weakness/tiredness (74.2%), diarrhea (71.7%) and anemia (67.8%) were the most commonly reported symptoms at the time of diagnosis. Many respondents continued to experience symptoms after being on a gluten-free diet for >5 years. Sex differences were reported in clinical features before diagnosis, recovery after being on gluten-free diet and perceived quality of life, with women experiencing more difficulties than men. CONCLUSIONS: Delays in diagnosis of celiac disease in Canada remain unacceptably long despite wider availability of serological screening tests. Many patients report continuing symptoms despite adhering to a gluten-free diet for >5 years, with women experiencing more symptoms and a lower recovery rate than men. Awareness of celiac disease needs improvement, and follow-up with a physician and a dietitian is essential for all patients with celiac disease. PMID:23936873

  5. Clinical presentation, etiology, and survival in adult acute encephalitis syndrome in rural Central India

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajnish; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Joshi, Deepti; Santhosh, SR; Parida, M.M.; Desikan, Prabha; Gangane, Nitin; Kalantri, S.P.; Reingold, Arthur; Colford, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a constellation of symptoms that includes fever and altered mental status. Most cases are attributed to viral encephalitis (VE), occurring either in outbreaks or sporadically. We conducted hospital-based surveillance for sporadic adult-AES in rural Central India in order to describe its incidence, spatial and temporal distribution, clinical profile, etiology and predictors of mortality. Methods All consecutive hospital admissions during the study period were screened to identify adult-AES cases and were followed until 30-days of hospitalization. We estimated incidence by administrative sub-division of residence and described the temporal distribution of cases. We performed viral diagnostic studies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to determine the etiology of AES. The diagnostic tests included RT-PCR (for enteroviruses, HSV 1 and 2), conventional PCR (for flaviviruses), CSF IgM capture ELISA (for Japanese encephalitis virus, dengue, West Nile virus, Varicella zoster virus, measles, and mumps). We compared demographic and clinical variables across etiologic subtypes and estimated predictors of 30-day mortality. Results A total of 183 AES cases were identified between January and October 2007, representing 2.38% of all admissions. The incidence of adult AES in the administrative subdivisions closest to the hospital was 16 per 100,000. Of the 183 cases, a non-viral etiology was confirmed in 31 (16.9%) and the remaining 152 were considered as VE suspects. Of the VE suspects, we could confirm a viral etiology in 31 cases: 17 (11.2%) enterovirus; 8 (5.2%) flavivirus; 3 (1.9%) Varicella zoster; 1 (0.6%) herpesvirus; and 2 (1.3%) mixed etiology); the etiology remained unknown in remaining 121 (79.6%) cases. 53 (36%) of the AES patients died; the case fatality proportion was similar in patients with a confirmed and unknown viral etiology (45.1 and 33.6% respectively). A requirement for assisted ventilation significantly

  6. EEG in ischaemic stroke: quantitative EEG can uniquely inform (sub-)acute prognoses and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Finnigan, Simon; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of (sub-)acute ischaemic stroke (IS) employing quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) methods, in concert with other assessments, are reviewed. Numerous outcomes from hundreds of patients collectively indicate that (sub-)acute QEEG indices from standard systems can uniquely inform clinical management, particularly prognostication of outcomes from IS. Two classes of QEEG indices have proven particularly informative. The first quantifies the power of abnormal, slow activity relative to that of faster activity and the second, interhemispheric voltage asymmetry (broadband). Both have been identified as statistically significant predictors of outcomes assessed (via routine clinical scales) in the weeks and months following IS. Furthermore both have demonstrated higher predictive value than concomitant neurological assessments and scales, and to improve upon outcome prediction afforded by neuroimaging alone. These indices also may continuously provide unique, real-time insights into the efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, prior to clinical changes. Two key applications of QEEG which should prove valuable for future clinical management of IS are: (1) continuous, acute monitoring to inform about the efficacy of thrombolysis and decisions about potential additional interventions, and; (2) brief, subacute recording to inform outcome prognostication and clinical decisions about, for example, rehabilitation strategies. Ongoing research and technological developments will continue to facilitate clinical translation of QEEG investigations reviewed herein. PMID:22858178

  7. Gaining entry-level clinical competence outside of the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne; Taper, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, an emphasis has been placed on dietetic interns' attainment of entry-level clinical competence in acute care facilities. The perceived risks and benefits of acquiring entry-level clinical competence within long-term and acute care clinical environments were examined. The study included a purposive sample of recent graduates and dietitians (n=14) involved in an integrated internship program. Study subjects participated in in-depth individual interviews. Data were thematically analyzed with the support of data management software QSR N6. Perceived risks and benefits were associated with receiving clinical training exclusively in either environment; risks in one area surfaced as benefits in the other. Themes that emerged included philosophy of care, approach to practice, working environment, depth and breadth of experience, relationships (both client and professional), practice outcomes, employment opportunities, and attitude. Entry-level clinical competence is achievable in both acute and long-term care environments; however, attention must be paid to identified risks. Interns who consider gaining clinical competence exclusively in one area can reduce risks and better position themselves for employment in either practice area by incorporating an affiliation in the other area into their internship program. PMID:18334052

  8. Clinical efficacy of farcosolvin syrup (ambroxol–theophylline–guaiphenesin mixture) in the treatment of acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Salem, Amel; Omar, Abdel-Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) are defined as recurrent attacks of worsening bronchial inflammation that are marked by an increase in the volume of daily sputum produced, a change in color of the expectorated sputum, and worsening dyspnea. Farcosolvin® (Pharco Pharmaceuticals, Alexandria, Egypt) is a mixture of ambroxol (15 mg); theophylline (50 mg); and guaiphenesin (30 mg), per 5 mL syrup. Objective: To test the clinical efficacy of Farcosolvin in the treatment of AECB in a randomized, single-blinded, controlled study design. Patients and methods: One hundred patients with AECB were randomized to either Farcosolvin or guaiphenesin treatment groups, in addition to the standard medical treatment for their cases. Baseline clinical symptomatolgy of breathlessness, cough, and sputum severity scoring were compared before and after 3 and 7 days of treatment in both groups and the differences compared between groups. Changes in perceived improvement were also compared between groups using the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement or Change Scale (CGIC). Results: There were statistically significant improvements in breathlessness and cough scores in both groups (pretreatment versus posttreatment at day 3 and at day 7; P < 0.05). There were highly statistically significant differences between groups in improvement in breathlessness and cough scores, after 3 and 7 days treatment, in favor of the Farcosolvin treatment group (P < 0.001). Out of 50 patients, 48 (96%) in the Farcosolvin-treated group rated their improvement on the CGIC scale as “much” and “very much” improved, while only 41 patients (82%) reported such a degree of improvement in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: We concluded from our study that Farcosolvin syrup might be safe and effective in improving symptoms in cases of acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. PMID:20714379

  9. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Cori, Anne; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements. PMID:27367230

  10. Reduced white matter integrity and its correlation with clinical symptom in first-episode, treatment-naive generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qian, Shaowen; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Li, Min; Xin, Kuolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore white matter microstructural alterations in the patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique, and to assess neural associations with the symptom severity. Twenty-eight first-episode, treatment-naive GAD patients without co-morbidities and 28 matched healthy controls underwent DTI acquisition and clinical symptom assessments. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to analyze white matter microstructural abnormalities in patients with GAD, as well as their associations with clinical symptom scores in a voxel-wise manner. Compared to controls, patients showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in 7 clusters of white matter in bilateral uncinate fasciculus, body of corpus callosum, left middle cingulum (cingulate gyrus), bilateral anterior thalamic radiation and corona radiate, right anterior limb of internal capsule, bilateral inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity in widespread white matter regions. Reduced FA values in right uncinate fasciculus, left cingulum bundle showed significantly negative correlations with clinical symptom severity for Hamilton anxiety Rating Scale scores. Our findings suggest microstructural abnormalities in uncinate fasciculus and cingulum bundle play key roles in the underlying neural basis of GAD. PMID:27515289

  11. Assessment of knowledge among patients of surgical wards regarding clinical symptoms and diagnostics of the most common malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim of this work was to evaluate the knowledge of symptoms and prophylaxis among hospitalized patients. Material and methods The research was carried in the Provincial Hospital in Bydgoszcz (i.e. general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, urology, breast surgery and thoracic surgery). 250 hospitalized patients took part in the tests, as well as 50 healthy people. The scientific method used was a specially designed questionnaire. The Bioethics Committee of Collegium Medicum of Mikołaj Kopernik University in Bydgoszcz approved these tests. Results Patients from the Breast Diseases Ward had better knowledge about cancers than the control group. Symptoms of lung cancer were known to both groups to the same extent. Patients from the Clinical Ward of Thoracic Surgery were very knowledgeable about lung cancer, but they did not know anything about other malignant types of cancer. Patients from Gynecology and Obstetrics wards are better than the control group only at knowledge about symptoms and screening of cervix cancer. Patients from the Urology Ward have the best knowledge about screening of prostate cancer and colon cancer. Those hospitalized at the Surgery Ward do not know symptoms of colon cancer, but they have knowledge about its screening. Conclusions Patients from the Clinical Ward of Thoracic and Cancer Surgery and the Clinical Surgery Ward had the least knowledge about malignant tumors.Patients from Urology, Gynecology and Obstetrics wards have better knowledge about malignant tumors treated there. PMID:23788944

  12. Aspartame Attenuates 2, 4-Dinitrofluorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Clinical Symptoms in NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Cho, Jeong-Je; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common multifactorial chronic skin disease that has a multiple and complex pathogenesis. AD is gradually increasing in prevalence globally. In NC/Nga mice, repetitive applications of 2, 4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) evoke AD-like clinical symptoms similar to human AD. Aspartame (N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester) is a methyl ester of a dipeptide, which is used as an artificial non-nutritive sweetener. Aspartame has analgesic and anti-inflammatory functions that are similar to the function of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. We investigated whether aspartame can relieve AD-like clinical symptoms induced by DNFB treatment in NC/Nga mice. Sucrose did not relieve AD-like symptoms, whereas aspartame at doses of 0.5 μg kg(-1) and 0.5 mg kg(-1) inhibited ear swelling and relieved AD-like clinical symptoms. Aspartame inhibited infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, mast cells, and CD4(+) T cells, and suppressed the expression of cytokines including IL-4 and IFN-γ, and total serum IgE levels. Aspartame may have therapeutic value in the treatment of AD. PMID:26099025

  13. Streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease and clinical effects of minocycline on the disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, F; Oyama, N; Nishibu, A

    1997-12-01

    Although the precise pathoetiology of Behçet's disease (BD) remains obscure, patients with BD have a high incidence of chronic infectious foci, indicating an enhanced susceptibility to chronic tonsillitis, and dental caries. Sometimes, clinical symptoms appear after treatment of these foci in BD patients. It is believed that BD might be related to an allergic reaction to a bacterial infection in view of the many clinical symptoms, especially the presence of aphthous and genital ulcerations. An attempt to obtain cutaneous responses to bacterial antigens has been carried out using various vaccines developed from bacteria isolated from the ulcerative lesions and oral cavities of BD patients. BD patients often show intense hypersensitivity to various strains of streptococci, not only by their cutaneous reactions but also by in vitro testing. In this report, we describe our previous studies on the correlation between streptococcal antigens and the pathogenesis of BD and also discuss the recent reports of other authors. The intense hypersensitivity to streptococcal antigens acquired after streptococcal infection is thought to play an important role in the appearance of symptoms in BD patients since the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was enhanced when stimulated with streptococcal antigen in a culture system. Minocycline, an antibiotic to which certain strains of streptococci are sensitive, reduced the frequency of clinical symptoms in BD patients as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by BD-PBMC stimulated with streptococcal antigen. PMID:9509915

  14. Relationship between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of women.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Bilgic, Özlem; Çolak, Rukiye Sivri; Altınyazar, Hilmi Cevdet

    2016-04-01

    Acne vulgaris has recently been reported to be associated with elevated rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in epidemiological studies. This report examines childhood and current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of female adults. Ninety-one women with acne vulgaris and 53 controls were included in this study. The aforementioned symptoms were measured in participants. No significant differences were found between patients and controls in any of the measurements. Contrary to the findings of epidemiological studies, this study did not uncover a link between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. PMID:27192533

  15. Relationship between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of women*

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Ayhan; Bilgic, Özlem; Çolak, Rukiye Sivri; Altınyazar, Hilmi Cevdet

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris has recently been reported to be associated with elevated rates of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in epidemiological studies. This report examines childhood and current attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms in a clinical sample of female adults. Ninety-one women with acne vulgaris and 53 controls were included in this study. The aforementioned symptoms were measured in participants. No significant differences were found between patients and controls in any of the measurements. Contrary to the findings of epidemiological studies, this study did not uncover a link between acne vulgaris and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder PMID:27192533

  16. Association of Depressive Symptoms and Disease Activity in Children with Asthma: Methodological and Clinical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxmonsky, James; Wood, Beatrice L.; Stern, Trudy; Ballow, Mark; Lillis, Kathleen; Cramer-Benjamin, Darci; Mador, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in children with asthma and the association between depression and asthma activity. Method: Children ages 7 to 17 (n = 129) were recruited from a hospital emergency department after presenting for asthma symptoms. The majority of subjects were from disadvantaged,…

  17. Real world COPD: association of morning symptoms with clinical and patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Nicolas; Small, Mark; Broomfield, Sarah; Higgins, Victoria; Pollard, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    This research examined the prevalence of morning symptoms and their relationship with health status, exacerbations and daily activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data on 1489 patients were analysed from a European and USA sample. Results were tested for significance (p < 0.05) using Mann-Whitney and regression modelling accounting for age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, symptom severity, smoking status and medication adherence. Morning symptoms were experienced by 39.8% of patients. Controlling for potential confounders, morning symptoms were significantly associated with higher COPD assessment test scores (p < 0.001) and exacerbation frequency (p < 0.001), more frequent worsening of symptoms without consulting a Health Care Professional (p = 0.008), and increased impact on normal daily activities (p = 0.007); and in the working population, a significantly greater impact on getting up and ready for the day (p < 0.001) and significantly more days off work per year (p < 0.001). Our research concluded that in patients with COPD, morning symptoms are associated with poorer health status, impaired daily activities and increased risk of exacerbation in affected patients compared with those patients without morning symptoms. Improved control of patients' morning symptoms may lead to substantial reduction in COPD impact and frequency of exacerbations, and enable patients to increase daily activities, particularly early morning activities. This could, in turn, enable working patients with COPD to be more productive in the workplace. PMID:24127914

  18. Relation of Symptom-Induced Impairment with Other Illness Parameters in Clinic-Referred Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Kaat, Aaron J.; Lecavalier, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relation of caregiver ratings of psychiatric symptom-induced impairment with number and severity of symptoms and informant agreement in consecutive child psychiatry outpatient referrals. Methods: Parents and teachers completed a broadband "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale with disorder-specific impairment for 636…

  19. Heart Failure in Post-Acute and Long-Term Care: Evidence and Strategies to Improve Transitions, Clinical Care, and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Arif; Smucker, William D

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is highly prevalent among older patients in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). HF outcomes for SNF patients suffer because of many factors, including staff training, lack of physician availability, and failure to implement evidence-based care. AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine has recently updated the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Heart Failure Management in SNFs. This review supplements the Guidelines with a robust focus on best practices for transitional care, symptom management, treatment and monitoring, and palliative care in patients with HF. PMID:26089116

  20. [Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in patients with clinical symptoms of pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Mysiak, A; Salomon, P; Halawa, B

    1999-09-01

    The accurate detection of pulmonary embolism is possible by means of non-invasive but very expensive ventilation-perfusion lung scanning or invasive and with high rate of complications pulmonary angiography. Thus monitoring of many clinical and biochemical parameters has been recently attempted to increase the probability of correct diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient is a more sensitive indicator of disturbance in oxygenation than occurrence of hypoxia in gasometry. The aim of our study was to examined the changes of the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient in patients with pulmonary embolism. The survey was made in 35 patients aged from 41 to 75 with acute pulmonary embolism, of these 17 were men and 18 were women. We excluded patients with coexisting serious heart or lung disease. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed on the grounds of presence of commonly known risk factors, sudden onset, findings on the chest radiography, hypoxia resistant to oxygen therapy, electrocardiography, echocardiography and catheterization of pulmonary artery using a Swan-Ganz catheter. The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was measured in arterial blood samples obtained 15 minutes after 100% oxygen ventilation, using standard formulae. All patients were administered heparin, oxygen and warfarine therapy. The control group consisted of 20 patients, 11 women and 9 men aged from 37 to 74, with deep venous thrombosis without coexisting heart or lung disease. In our study we showed that the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient is a very useful parameter helping with diagnosis and monitoring efficacy of treatment in patients with pulmonary embolism without coexisting heart or lung diseases. PMID:10598485

  1. Adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome; a follow-up study displays concurrent improvement of circulatory abnormalities and clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in adolescents is unknown, and the clinical course and prognosis is still questioned. Recent research indicates that abnormalities of autonomic cardiovascular control may play an important role. The aim of this research project was to perform a follow-up study of adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, focusing on clinical symptoms and autonomic cardiovascular control. Methods 47 adolescents (12-18 years old) with CFS were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital. In a primary visit and a follow-up visit (3-17 months later), we evaluated: a) a wide range of complaints and symptoms and b) cardiovascular variables at baseline and during a 20° head-up tilt-test (HUT). Results At the second visit, patients reported significant improvement regarding functional impairments, fatigue severity, muscular pain, concentration problems, post-exertional malaise and the problem of non-relieving rest. Also, at the second visit, baseline heart rate (HR), blood pressure, total peripheral resistance index (TPRI) and LF/HF (low-frequency:high-frequency heart rate variability ratio, an index of sinus node sympathovagal balance derived from spectral analyses of heart rate) were significant lower, and the increases in HR, mean blood pressure (MBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and TPRI during tilt were significantly less pronounced as compared to the first visit. There was a significant correlation between changes in autonomic symptom score, fatigue severity score and functional impairment score from the first to the second visit. Conclusions The majority of adolescents with CFS experienced an improvement over time in functional impairment, self-reported fatigue and additional symptoms, and a concurrent improvement of autonomic cardiovascular control. A possible connection between clinical symptoms and abnormal autonomic control in CFS might represent a focus for

  2. Using Clinical Trial Simulators to Analyse the Sources of Variance in Clinical Trials of Novel Therapies for Acute Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Weverling, Gerrit-Jan; de Wolf, Frank; Anderson, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background About 90% of drugs fail in clinical development. The question is whether trials fail because of insufficient efficacy of the new treatment, or rather because of poor trial design that is unable to detect the true efficacy. The variance of the measured endpoints is a major, largely underestimated source of uncertainty in clinical trial design, particularly in acute viral infections. We use a clinical trial simulator to demonstrate how a thorough consideration of the variability inherent in clinical trials of novel therapies for acute viral infections can improve trial design. Methods and Findings We developed a clinical trial simulator to analyse the impact of three different types of variation on the outcome of a challenge study of influenza treatments for infected patients, including individual patient variability in the response to the drug, the variance of the measurement procedure, and the variance of the lower limit of quantification of endpoint measurements. In addition, we investigated the impact of protocol variation on clinical trial outcome. We found that the greatest source of variance was inter-individual variability in the natural course of infection. Running a larger phase II study can save up to $38 million, if an unlikely to succeed phase III trial is avoided. In addition, low-sensitivity viral load assays can lead to falsely negative trial outcomes. Conclusions Due to high inter-individual variability in natural infection, the most important variable in clinical trial design for challenge studies of potential novel influenza treatments is the number of participants. 100 participants are preferable over 50. Using more sensitive viral load assays increases the probability of a positive trial outcome, but may in some circumstances lead to false positive outcomes. Clinical trial simulations are powerful tools to identify the most important sources of variance in clinical trials and thereby help improve trial design. PMID:27332704

  3. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor.

  4. Clinical review: Stem cell therapies for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - hope or hype?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has led to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for this devastating disease. Mesenchymal stem cells appear closest to clinical translation, given the evidence that they may favourably modulate the immune response to reduce lung injury, while maintaining host immune-competence and also facilitating lung regeneration and repair. The demonstration that human mesenchymal stem cells exert benefit in the endotoxin-injured human lung is particularly persuasive. Endothelial progenitor cells also demonstrate promise in reducing endothelial damage, which is a key pathophysiological feature of ALI. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are at an earlier stage in the translational process, but offer the hope of directly replacing injured lung tissue. The lung itself also contains endogenous stem cells, which may ultimately offer the greatest hope for lung diseases, given their physiologic role in replacing and regenerating native lung tissues. However, significant deficits remain in our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action of stem cells, their efficacy in relevant pre-clinical models, and their safety, particularly in critically ill patients. These gaps need to be addressed before the enormous therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALI/ARDS can be realised. PMID:22424108

  5. Acute respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects living near a coal-fired plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pershagen, G.

    1984-01-01

    Daily symptom rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in other subjects with presumed high sensitivity to air pollution who lived near a coal-fired power plant were compared with 24 h ambient air concentrations of NO/SUB/2, SO/SUB/2, soot and suspended particles, as well as with emissions from the plant. The mean concentrations of each of the pollutants during the 4-month study period were below 30GAMMA/m/SUP/3, and no single 24h concentration exceeded 100GAMMA/m/SUP/3. There were no consistent associations between plant emissions and pollutant levels, or between these two variables and daily symptom rates. The results indicate that the coal-fired plant was not of major importance for the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms in the surrounding population.

  6. Clinical, Electroencephalographic, and Neuroradiological Outcome Predictors in Acute Nonhypoxic Encephalopathy: A Nine-Year Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Marked impairment of consciousness, brain lesion on neuroimaging, and nonreactive electroencephalographic (EEG) background activity are established outcome predictors in patients with hypoxic encephalopathy. In this observational cohort study, we aimed to assess the predictive value of clinical, neuroimaging and EEG characteristics for outcome in different types of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathic patients. All adult intensive care unit patients from a tertiary academic medical care center with clinical and EEG evidence of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathy were included from 2004 to 2012. Clinical data, neuroimaging studies, EEG characteristics, and outcome were assessed. In-hospital death was the main outcome. Median age of 262 patients was 65 years (range 18-98 years). Mortality was 12.6%. In Poisson regression analyses, older age (P=.02), intracranial hemorrhage (P=.008), coma (P=.012), and nonreactive EEG background activity (P<.0001) were independently associated with death with nonreactive EEG being the strongest predictor (relative risk 3.74; 95% confidence interval 2.02-6.91). Subgroup analysis revealed no significant effect modification for the predictive value of nonreactive EEG by the presence or absence of coma and different types of acute brain lesions. In conclusion, this study identifies and quantifies the independent predictive value of older age, intracranial hemorrhage, coma, and nonreactive EEG for death, in patients with different types of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathy. These results add further credence to the limited body of evidence that EEG provides important prognostic information in different types of acute encephalopathy not related to hypoxic brain injury. Further studies are warranted to analyze the robustness of this predictor in larger subpopulations with specific etiologies of acute nonhypoxic encephalopathies. PMID:25828484

  7. Antidepressant Controlled Trial For Negative Symptoms In Schizophrenia (ACTIONS): a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Thomas Re; Leeson, Verity C; Paton, Carol; Costelloe, Céire; Simon, Judit; Kiss, Noemi; Osborn, David; Killaspy, Helen; Craig, Tom Kj; Lewis, Shôn; Keown, Patrick; Ismail, Shajahan; Crawford, Mike; Baldwin, David; Lewis, Glyn; Geddes, John; Kumar, Manoj; Pathak, Rudresh; Taylor, Simon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent deficiencies in emotional responsiveness, motivation, socialisation, speech and movement. When persistent, they are held to account for much of the poor functional outcomes associated with schizophrenia. There are currently no approved pharmacological treatments. While the available evidence suggests that a combination of antipsychotic and antidepressant medication may be effective in treating negative symptoms, it is too limited to allow any firm conclusions. OBJECTIVE To establish the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of augmentation of antipsychotic medication with the antidepressant citalopram for the management of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. DESIGN A multicentre, double-blind, individually randomised, placebo-controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. SETTING Adult psychiatric services, treating people with schizophrenia. PARTICIPANTS Inpatients or outpatients with schizophrenia, on continuing, stable antipsychotic medication, with persistent negative symptoms at a criterion level of severity. INTERVENTIONS Eligible participants were randomised 1 : 1 to treatment with either placebo (one capsule) or 20 mg of citalopram per day for 48 weeks, with the clinical option at 4 weeks to increase the daily dosage to 40 mg of citalopram or two placebo capsules for the remainder of the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcomes were quality of life measured at 12 and 48 weeks assessed using the Heinrich's Quality of Life Scale, and negative symptoms at 12 weeks measured on the negative symptom subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. RESULTS No therapeutic benefit in terms of improvement in quality of life or negative symptoms was detected for citalopram over 12 weeks or at 48 weeks, but secondary analysis suggested modest improvement in the negative symptom domain, avolition/amotivation, at 12 weeks (mean difference -1.3, 95% confidence interval -2.5 to -0.09). There

  8. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  9. Somatic awareness in the clinical care of patients with body distress symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Donald; Coll, Patrick; Schaefer, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide primary care physicians and medical specialists with an experiential psychosomatic framework for understanding patients with body distress symptoms. The framework relies on somatic awareness, a normal part of consciousness, to resolve the dualism inherent in conventional multidisciplinary approaches. Somatic awareness represents a guiding healing heuristic which acknowledges the validity of the patient's physical symptoms and uses body sensations to identify the psychological, physiological, and social factors needed for symptom self-regulation. The experiential approach is based on psychobiologic concepts which include bodily distress disorder, central sensitization, dysfunctional breathing, and contextual nature of mood. PMID:18291028

  10. Diversity and Evolutionary Histories of Human Coronaviruses NL63 and 229E Associated with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Khannaq, Maryam Nabiel; Ng, Kim Tien; Oong, Xiang Yong; Pang, Yong Kek; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-05-01

    The human alphacoronaviruses HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E are commonly associated with upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Information on their molecular epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics in the tropical region of southeast Asia however is limited. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic, temporal distribution, population history, and clinical manifestations among patients infected with HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 2,060 consenting adults presented with acute URTI symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 2012 and 2013. The presence of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The spike glycoprotein, nucleocapsid, and 1a genes were sequenced for phylogenetic reconstruction and Bayesian coalescent inference. A total of 68/2,060 (3.3%) subjects were positive for human alphacoronavirus; HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E were detected in 45 (2.2%) and 23 (1.1%) patients, respectively. A peak in the number of HCoV-NL63 infections was recorded between June and October 2012. Phylogenetic inference revealed that 62.8% of HCoV-NL63 infections belonged to genotype B, 37.2% was genotype C, while all HCoV-229E sequences were clustered within group 4. Molecular dating analysis indicated that the origin of HCoV-NL63 was dated to 1921, before it diverged into genotype A (1975), genotype B (1996), and genotype C (2003). The root of the HCoV-229E tree was dated to 1955, before it diverged into groups 1-4 between the 1970s and 1990s. The study described the seasonality, molecular diversity, and evolutionary dynamics of human alphacoronavirus infections in a tropical region. PMID:26928836

  11. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  12. Applying the results of large clinical trials in the management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, J P; Schwartz, G G

    1996-01-01

    Mortality from acute myocardial infarction has declined in recent years, largely due to the widespread application of new pharmacologic and mechanical interventions that have been tested in large, prospective, randomized clinical trials. For practicing generalists, we review the key data from such trials that have shaped the current management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We discuss the roles of thrombolytic therapy, coronary angioplasty, nitrates, beta- and calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, magnesium, and antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic agents. In addition, we highlight critical unanswered questions in the management of this disorder. PMID:8775936

  13. Cross-cultural confirmation of bi-factor models of a symptom distress measure: Symptom Checklist-90-Revised in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Róbert; Arrindell, Willem A; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Unoka, Zsolt; Timman, Reinier

    2016-05-30

    Four decades have elapsed since the introduction for clinical and research purposes of the Symptom Checklist-90(-R). Yet, its underlying dimensional structure has not been clearly delineated. A shift has been observed in the methods utilized-from predominantly exploratory factor analytic in nature in the first two decades or so to different confirmatory methods in recent years. A need remains to search for a structure that remains invariant across samples and nations. In that context, the present study attempted to replicate and extend recent findings yielded in a Hungarian general population sample (N=2,874) with two psychiatric patient samples from Hungary (N=972) and The Netherlands (N=1,902). In doing so, four models were contrasted: the one-factor model, Derogatis' nine factor model, a second-ordered factor model, and a bi-factor model. The bi-factor model was shown to yield the closest fit to the data in both countries. Further studies are needed to determine the stable number and kind of subscale scores that reflect the specific (primary) symptoms best, that is, those subscales with minimal shared variance with the overall general psychological distress dimension. PMID:27039011

  14. Application values of clinical nursing pathway in patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIHUA; GAO, JIANMEI; WEI, SHUFANG; WANG, DONGHAI

    2016-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage accounts for approximately 25% of strokes for elderly patients. Consequently, treatments to improve prognosis should be identified. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical values of the application of clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage. Between January 2013 and January 2015, 92 patients diagnosed with acute intracerebral hemorrhage were enrolled in the study based on the guidelines recommended for providing appropriate surgical or conservative treatment and the sequence of admission. The 92 patients were randomly divided into the control and observation groups. Patients in the control group underwent routine nursing mode prior to and after admission, and underwent clinical nursing path model (hierarchical partitioning prior to admission to hospital plus general professional program of nursing in hospital) was applied to the observation group. Barthel index scores for the observation group were significantly higher than that of the control group. The length of hospital stay for patients in the observation group was significantly lower while the average score for patients' satisfaction on nursing care while in hospital was significantly higher than that of the control group, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The incidence of complications such as fever, infection, bedsore, gastrointestinal function, electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition, in the observation group was significantly lower, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). The functional independence measure (FIM) and Fugl-Meyer scores after 6 months for the observation group were significantly higher, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05). In conclusion, application of the clinical nursing pathway for patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage significantly improved the clinical effects and nursing satisfaction, reduced adverse reactions, and had a greater clinical application value. PMID

  15. Acute Q fever in Portugal. Epidemiological and clinical features of 32 hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Carolina; Badura, Robert; Valadas, Emília

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. The main characteristic of acute Q fever is its clinical polymorphism, usually presenting as a febrile illness with varying degrees of hepatitis and/or pneumonia. Q fever is endemic in Portugal, and it is an obligatory notifiable disease since 1999. However, its epidemiological and clinical characteristics are still incompletely described. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 32 cases admitted in the Infectious Diseases Department, Santa Maria’s University Hospital, from January 2001 to December 2010, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetii antigens associated with a compatible clinical syndrome. Results Out of the 32 cases recorded, 29 (91%) were male, with a male:female ratio of 9.7:1. Individuals at productive age were mainly affected (88%, n=28, with ages between 25 and 64 years). Clinically, the most common manifestation of acute Q fever was hepatic involvement (84%, n=27), which occurred isolated in 53% (n=17) of the cases. Hepatitis was more severe, presenting with higher values of liver function tests, in patients presenting both pulmonary and hepatic involvement. Additionally, we report one case of myocarditis and another one with neurological involvement. Empiric but appropriate antibiotic therapy was given in 66% (n=21) of the cases. There was a complete recovery in 94% (n=30) of the patients, and one death. We confirmed the sub-notification of this disease in Portugal, with only 47% (n=15) of the cases notified. Conclusion In Portugal further studies are needed to confirm our results. From the 32 cases studied, acute Q fever presented more frequently as a febrile disease with hepatic involvement affecting mainly young male individuals. Furthermore, acute Q fever is clearly underdiagnosed and underreported in Portugal, which suggests that an increased awareness of the disease is needed, together with a broader use

  16. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  17. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  18. Finding Cervical Cancer Symptoms in Swedish Clinical Text using a Machine Learning Approach and NegEx

    PubMed Central

    Weegar, Rebecka; Kvist, Maria; Sundström, Karin; Brunak, Søren; Dalianis, Hercules

    2015-01-01

    Detection of early symptoms in cervical cancer is crucial for early treatment and survival. To find symptoms of cervical cancer in clinical text, Named Entity Recognition is needed. In this paper the Clinical Entity Finder, a machine-learning tool trained on annotated clinical text from a Swedish internal medicine emergency unit, is evaluated on cervical cancer records. The Clinical Entity Finder identifies entities of the types body part, finding and disorder and is extended with negation detection using the rule-based tool NegEx, to distinguish between negated and non-negated entities. To measure the performance of the tools on this new domain, two physicians annotated a set of clinical notes from the health records of cervical cancer patients. The inter-annotator agreement for finding, disorder and body part obtained an average F-score of 0.677 and the Clinical Entity Finder extended with NegEx had an average F-score of 0.667. PMID:26958270

  19. A Novel Religious/Spiritual Group Psychotherapy Reduces Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chida, Yoichi; Schrempft, Stephanie; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to examine the effect of the Happy Science doctrine-based group psychotherapy on depressive symptoms in 118 Japanese mental disorder outpatients. The treatment group (n = 58) took part in five 90-min sessions at one-week intervals, while the control group (n = 60) received standard care including medication. Depressive symptoms were assessed before the intervention, 5 weeks after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the control group, the treatment group showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms both at post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, this group psychotherapy might be of benefit in treating depressive symptoms. PMID:26320001

  20. SEX DIFFERENCES IN ASTHMA SYMPTOM 1 PROFILES AND CONTROL IN THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION ASTHMA CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTERS

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Jennifer W.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Wei, Christine Y.; Parsons, Jonathan P.; Benninger, Cathy G.; Dixon, Anne E.; Gerald, Lynn B.; Mastronarde, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Important differences between men and women with asthma have been demonstrated, with women describing more symptoms and worse asthma-related quality of life (QOL) despite having similar or better pulmonary function. While current guidelines focus heavily on assessing asthma control, they lack information about whether sex-specific approaches to asthma assessment should be considered. We sought to determine if sex differences in asthma control or symptom profiles exist in the well-characterized population of participants in the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers (ALA-ACRC) trials. Methods We reviewed baseline data from four trials published by the ALA-ACRC to evaluate individual item responses to three standardized asthma questionnaires: the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), the multi-attribute Asthma Symptom Utility Index (ASUI), and Juniper Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mini-AQLQ). Results In the poorly-controlled population, women reported similar overall asthma control (mean ACQ 1.9 vs. 1.8; p=0.54), but were more likely to report specific symptoms such as nocturnal awakenings, activity limitations, and shortness of breath on individual item responses. Women reported worse asthma-related QOL on the mini-AQLQ (mean 4.5 vs. 4.9; p<0.001) and more asthma-related symptoms with a lower mean score on the ASUI (0.73 vs. 0.77; p=<0.0001) and were more likely to report feeling bothered by particular symptoms such as coughing, or environmental triggers. Conclusions In participants with poorly-controlled asthma, women had outwardly similar asthma control, but had unique symptom profiles on detailed item analyses which were evident on evaluation of three standardized asthma questionnaires. PMID:23972381

  1. Mood regulation in youth: research findings and clinical approaches to irritability and short-lived episodes of mania like symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Eleanor; Smith, Patrick; Milavic, Gordana; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Mood regulation problems, such as severe chronic irritability or short episodes of mania like symptoms are common, impairing and a topic of intense recent interest to clinicians, researchers and the DSM-5 process. Here we review the most recent findings about these two presentations and discuss approaches to their treatment. Recent findings Longitudinal and genetic findings suggest that chronic irritability should be regarded as a mood problem that is distinct from bipolar disorder. A proportion of children with short (less than 4 days) episodes of mania like symptoms seem to progress to classical (Type I or II) bipolar disorder over time in US clinic samples. In a UK sample, such episodes were independently associated with psychosocial impairment. The evidence base for the treatment of either irritability or short-lived episodes to mania-like symptoms is still small. Clinicians should be cautious with extrapolating treatments from classical bipolar disorder to these mood regulation problems. CBT-based approaches targeting general mood regulation processes may be effective for cases with severe irritability or short episodes of mania like symptoms. Summary There is increasing research evidence for the importance of mood regulation problems in the form of either irritability or short episodes of mania like symptoms in youth. The evidence base for their drug treatment has yet to be developed. CBT-based interventions to modify processes of mood regulation may be a useful and safe intervention for patients with these presentations. PMID:22569307

  2. The Therapeutic Effectiveness of Risperidone on Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia in Comparison with Haloperidol: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mirabzadeh, Arash; Kimiaghalam, Pooneh; Fadai, Farbod; Samiei, Mercedeh; Daneshmand, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A number of research studies have shown that the new generation of neuroleptic medications can more effectively contribute to treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia compared with the first generation by influence cognitive functioning. The present study examined the therapeutic effectiveness of manufactured Risperidone and Haloperidol in Iran on treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Methods This randomized clinical trial (RCT) study examined 100 hospitalized patients who met DSM-IV. TR criteria for schizophrenia were sampled at Razi psychiatric hospital in Tehran, Iran. After two weeks of stopping neuroleptic medications, the patients were randomly assigned into two groups, Risperidone and Haloperidol group. During 8 weeks of the study, baseline and weekly assessments were performed by completing brief psychiatric report scale (BPRS). Results Both Risperidone and Haloperidol were effective in treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia and improvements in both groups were initiated in the second week of treatment. The most prominent response rate was the second week in Haloperidol group and the eighth week in Risperidone group but this difference was not statistically significant. Discussion Prescribing Risperidone or Haloperidol for treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia can be influenced by other criteria including side effects, previous treatment histories of patients and their families and a patient’s or physician’ preference in prescribing a medication. Studies in other countries show that Haloperidol has better therapeutic effects in treating the negative symptoms of schizophrenia in comparison with Risperidone. Further studies on the therapeutic effectiveness of Risperidone and Haloperidol are suggested. PMID:25337382

  3. The clinical inadequacy of the DSM-5 classification of somatic symptom and related disorders: an alternative trans-diagnostic model.

    PubMed

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Fava, Giovanni A

    2016-08-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) somatic symptom and related disorders chapter has a limited clinical utility. In addition to the problems that the single diagnostic rubrics and the deletion of the diagnosis of hypochondriasis entail, there are 2 major ambiguities: (1) the use of the term "somatic symptoms" reflects an ill-defined concept of somatization and (2) abnormal illness behavior is included in all diagnostic rubrics, but it is never conceptually defined. In the present review of the literature, we will attempt to approach the clinical issue from a different angle, by introducing the trans-diagnostic viewpoint of illness behavior and propose an alternative clinimetric classification system, based on the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research. PMID:26707822

  4. Perspectives on Creating Clinically Relevant Blast Models for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Lisa A.; Bahraini, Nazanin; Hernández, Theresa D.

    2012-01-01

    Military personnel are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and reporting non-specific physical (somatic), behavioral, psychological, and cognitive symptoms. Many of these symptoms are frequently associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and/or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite significant attention and advances in assessment and intervention for these two conditions, challenges persist. To address this, clinically relevant blast models are essential in the full characterization of this type of injury, as well as in the testing and identification of potential treatment strategies. In this publication, existing diagnostic challenges and current treatment practices for mTBI and/or PTSD will be summarized, along with suggestions regarding how what has been learned from existing models of PTSD and traditional mechanism (e.g., non-blast) traumatic brain injury can be used to facilitate the development of clinically relevant blast models. PMID:22408635

  5. Effect of clinical symptoms on the indication for selective neck dissection for N0 carcinomas of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yoshida, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mariko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishio, Naoki; Shimono, Mariko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-07-01

    Lymph node metastasis is a major prognostic factor in parotid carcinoma, however, the pre-operative diagnosis of occult nodal metastasis is difficult in clinical N0 (cN0) parotid cancer patients. In addition, the indication of neck dissection in T1-3 cN0 patients is controversial. The current study investigated 17 patients with clinical T1-3 cN0 parotid cancer, and analyzed the correlation between patient symptoms/findings and pathological N status/tumor histological grade. In the statistical analysis, pain was found to significantly correlate with neck metastasis. Furthermore, cN0-staged patients without pain exhibited no neck metastasis. However, no significant correlation was identified between patient symptoms or findings and histological grade. These results indicate the possibility that selective neck dissection can be omitted for T1-3 cN0-staged patients without pain. PMID:24959272

  6. CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancers: Are patients with pulmonary emphysema also candidates for SBRT for lung cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki . E-mail: tkkimura@med.kawawa-u.ac.jp; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Ito, Katsuhide; Okawa, Motoomi

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and evaluate the difference by the presence of pulmonary emphysema (PE) for small lung cancers. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 45 patients with 52 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SBRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We also evaluated the relationship between CT appearance, clinical symptoms, and PE. Results: CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows: (1) diffuse consolidation, 38.5%; (2) patchy consolidation and ground-glass opacities (GGO), 15.4%; (3) diffuse GGO, 11.5%; (4) patchy GGO, 2.0%; (5) no evidence of increasing density, 32.6%. CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows: (1) modified conventional pattern, 61.5%; (2) mass-like pattern, 17.3%; (3) scar-like pattern, 21.2%. Patients who were diagnosed with more than Grade 2 pneumonitis showed significantly less no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern than any other pattern (p = 0.0314, 0.0297, respectively). Significantly, most of these patients with no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern had PE (p = 0.00038, 0.00044, respectively). Conclusion: Computed tomographic appearance after SBRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and three patterns of radiation fibrosis. Our results suggest that SBRT can be also safely performed even in patients with PE.

  7. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia. PMID:26876264

  8. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  9. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  10. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  11. [Should a lumbar puncture be performed in any child with acute peripheral facial palsy and clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis?].

    PubMed

    Blin-Rochemaure, N; Quinet, B

    2012-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis should be considered in any child affected with acute peripheral facial palsy without obvious cause in endemic areas, especially if it happens from May to November, with a history of erythema migrans, tick bite, or possible exposure during the previous weeks. The clinical appearance of Lyme borreliosis differs between adults and children and according to the geographical origin of the infection: therefore it is difficult to interpret and follow the recommendations for the management and treatment of this disease. Neuroborreliosis is more frequent in Europe than in the United States, and meningitis associated to facial palsy occurs earlier and is more frequent among the European pediatric population, too. When peripheral facial palsy occurs and there is suspicion of Lyme borreliosis, it seems necessary to perform a lumbar puncture in order to support the diagnosis with detection of intrathecal synthesis of specific antibodies, sometimes more abundant than in the serum, and thus to adapt the antibiotic therapy modalities. Parenteral antibiotherapy is recommended if any involvement is detected in the cerebrospinal fluid, while oral antibiotherapy should be prescribed for isolated facial palsies. Follow-up should be made according to clinical symptoms with a close collaboration between pediatricians, infection disease specialists, and ENT specialists. PMID:23116983

  12. Seasonal variation in affective and other clinical symptoms among high-risk families for bipolar disorders in an Arctic population

    PubMed Central

    Pirkola, Sami; Eriksen, Heidi A.; Partonen, Timo; Kieseppä, Tuula; Veijola, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Mylläri-Figuerola, Eeva-Maija; Salo, Paula M.; Paunio, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Background In bipolar disorder (BD), seasonality of symptoms is common and disturbances in circadian rhythms have been reported. Objectives We identified high-penetrance families in a geographically restricted area in Northern Fennoscandia and studied the seasonal variation of clinical symptoms among BD subjects and their healthy relatives. Design We explored the clinical characteristics of subjects living in Northern Fennoscandia, with extreme annual variation in daylight. Among known indigenous high-risk families for BD, we compared the affected ones (N=16) with their healthy relatives (N=15), and also included 18 healthy non-related controls from the same geographical area. Seasonal fluctuation in clinical measures was followed up at the 4 most demarcated photoperiodic time points of the annual cycle: around the summer solstice and autumn equinox in 2013, the winter solstice in 2013/2014, and the spring equinox in 2014. In the baseline, lifetime manic symptoms [Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ)] and morningness–eveningness questionnaire type (MEQ) were registered, whereas in the follow-up, depressive [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)] and distress [General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12)] symptoms and alcohol consumption and sleep were recorded. Results Possibly indicative or statistically significant differences in symptoms between the affected subjects and their healthy relatives were the BDI winter (13.3 vs. 2.6, t=−2.51, p=0.022) and spring scores (12.6 vs. 3.2, t=−1.97, p=0.063) and GHQ winter (4.2 vs. 0.82, t=−2.08, p=0.052) and spring scores (3.8 vs. 0.82, t=−1.97, p=0.063). Scores were higher among the affected subjects, exceeding a possibly diagnostic threshold (10 and 3) at all the time points, and without the notable seasonality which was observed among the healthy relatives. In the overall population, MDQ and MEQ scores had an inverse correlation (−0.384, significant at 0.016), indicating increased lifetime manic behaviour among “the night

  13. Oral coenzyme Q10 supplementation improves clinical symptoms and recovers pathologic alterations in blood mononuclear cells in a fibromyalgia patient.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; Cotán, David; del-Pozo-Martín, Yaiza; Carrión, Angel M; de Miguel, Manuel; Bullón, Pedro; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant. Low CoQ10 levels have been detected in patients with FM, and a significant decrease of clinical symptoms has been reported after oral CoQ10 supplementation. In this report, we show the effect of CoQ10 treatment on clinical symptoms, blood mononuclear cells, and mitochondrial and oxidative stress markers from a woman with FM. After CoQ10 treatment, the patient reported a significant improvement of clinical symptoms. At the cellular level, CoQ10 treatment restored mitochondrial dysfunction and the mtDNA copy number, decreased oxidative stress, and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results suggest that CoQ10 could be an alternative therapeutic approach for FM. PMID:22898267

  14. Transcranial magnetic stimulation at 1 Hertz improves clinical symptoms in children with Tourette syndrome for at least 6 months.

    PubMed

    Le, Kai; Liu, Ling; Sun, Manli; Hu, Ling; Xiao, Nong

    2013-02-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the supplemental motor area (SMA) can reduce tic severity. Here, we investigated whether 1 Hz rTMS targeted to the SMA could improve symptoms in children with TS. Twenty-five children with TS (aged under 16 years) received 20 daily sessions of rTMS to the SMA at a frequency of 1 Hz, 110% of resting motor threshold (RMT). Clinical assessment and physiological measures of the left and right RMT were conducted at different times during treatment and follow-up. After four weeks of treatment we observed statistically significant reductions on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale, Clinical Global Impression Scale, Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Rating Scale, version IV for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Children's Depression Inventory, Spence Children's Anxiety Scale and a novel Attention Test. In addition, symptom improvement correlated with an increase of both right and left RMT and was stable at six months follow-up. Therefore, we found that 1 Hz rTMS to the SMA can improve clinical symptoms in children with TS for at least six months. PMID:23238046

  15. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in acute coronary syndromes: clinical evidence, tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent (DES) is routine treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, permanent metallic caging of the vessel has several shortcomings, such as side branch jailing and impossibility of late lumen enlargement. Moreover, DES PCI is affected by vasomotion impairment. In ACS a high thrombus burden and vasospasm lead to a higher risk of acute and late acquired stent malapposition than in stable patients. This increases the risk of acute, late and very late stent thrombosis. In this challenging clinical setting, the implantation of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) could represent an appealing therapeutic option. Temporary vessel scaffolding has proved to have several advantages over metallic stent delivery, such as framework reabsorption, late lumen enlargement, side branch patency, and recovery of physiological reactivity to vasoactive stimuli. In the thrombotic environment of ACS, BVS implantation has the benefit of capping the thrombus and the vulnerable plaque. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds also seems to reduce the incidence of angina during follow-up. Acute coronary syndromes patients may therefore benefit more from temporary polymeric caging than from permanent stent platform implantation. The aim of this review is to update the available knowledge concerning the use of BVS in ACS patients, by analyzing the potential pitfalls in this challenging clinical setting and presenting tricks to overcome these limitations. PMID:26677353

  16. Bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in acute coronary syndromes: clinical evidence, tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Giacchi, Giuseppe; Ortega-Paz, Luis; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Ishida, Kohki; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent (DES) is routine treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, permanent metallic caging of the vessel has several shortcomings, such as side branch jailing and impossibility of late lumen enlargement. Moreover, DES PCI is affected by vasomotion impairment. In ACS a high thrombus burden and vasospasm lead to a higher risk of acute and late acquired stent malapposition than in stable patients. This increases the risk of acute, late and very late stent thrombosis. In this challenging clinical setting, the implantation of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) could represent an appealing therapeutic option. Temporary vessel scaffolding has proved to have several advantages over metallic stent delivery, such as framework reabsorption, late lumen enlargement, side branch patency, and recovery of physiological reactivity to vasoactive stimuli. In the thrombotic environment of ACS, BVS implantation has the benefit of capping the thrombus and the vulnerable plaque. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds also seems to reduce the incidence of angina during follow-up. Acute coronary syndromes patients may therefore benefit more from temporary polymeric caging than from permanent stent platform implantation. The aim of this review is to update the available knowledge concerning the use of BVS in ACS patients, by analyzing the potential pitfalls in this challenging clinical setting and presenting tricks to overcome these limitations. PMID:26677353

  17. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  18. National data elements for the clinical management of acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chew, Derek P B; Allan, Roger M; Aroney, Constantine N; Sheerin, Noella J

    2005-05-01

    Patients with acute coronary syndromes represent a clinically diverse group and their care remains heterogeneous. These patients account for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality in Australia. Optimal patient outcomes depend on rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification and the effective implementation of proven therapies, as advocated by clinical guidelines. The challenge is in effectively applying evidence in clinical practice. Objectivity and standardised quantification of clinical practice are essential in understanding the evidence-practice gap. Observational registries are key to understanding the link between evidence-based medicine, clinical practice and patient outcome. Data elements for monitoring clinical management of patients with acute coronary syndromes have been adapted from internationally accepted definitions and incorporated into the National Health Data Dictionary, the national standard for health data definitions in Australia. Widespread use of these data elements will assist in the local development of "quality-of-care" initiatives and performance indicators, facilitate collaboration in cardiovascular outcomes research, and aid in the development of electronic data collection methods. PMID:15865580

  19. Efficacy of Synbiotics to Reduce Acute Radiation Proctitis Symptoms and Improve Quality of Life: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Mariana; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Caporossi, Cervantes; Castro-Barcellos, Heloisa Michelon; Motta, Rodrigo Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the daily intake of synbiotics interferes in radiation-induced acute proctitis symptoms and in quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer were randomized to intake either a synbiotic powder containing Lactobacillus reuteri 10{sup 8} colony-forming units and 4.3 g of soluble fiber (Nestlé) or placebo. The questionnaire EORTC QLQ-PRT23 was applied before the beginning of radiation therapy and in every week for the first 4 weeks of treatment. The sum of both the complete (proctitis symptoms plus quality of life) and partial (proctitis symptoms) scores of the EORTC QLQ-PRT23 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Module for Proctitis–23 items) questionnaire were the main endpoints. Results: This pilot study showed that the complete questionnaire score (median [range]) was higher in the second (23 [21-30] vs 26.5 [22-34], P<.05) and third (23 [21-32] vs 27.5 [24-33], P<.01) weeks in the placebo group. Proctitis symptoms were highest scored in the placebo group in both the second (19.5 [16-25]) and third (19 [17-24]) weeks than in the synbiotic group (week 2: 16.5 [15-20], P<.05; week 3: 17 [15-23], P<.01). In both scores the placebo group had a significantly higher result (P<.01) than the synbiotic group (repeated-measures analysis of variance). Conclusions: Synbiotics reduce proctitis symptoms and improve quality of life in radiation-induced acute proctitis during radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

  20. Validation of the Korean-Version of the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia (CAINS)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) was developed to overcome the limitations of existing instruments and reflect the current view of negative symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (K-CAINS). Inpatients (n = 49) and outpatients (n = 70) with schizophrenia were recruited from three institutions. The confirmative factor analysis, test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity were assessed. The study group consisted of 71 males (59.7%) and 48 females (40.3%). Their mean age was 42.15 years (SD = 12.2). The K-CAINS was confirmed to be divided into two subscales of 9 items related to "motivation/pleasure" and 4 items related to "expression" in concordance with the original version of the CAINS. The results showed that the K-CAINS had a good inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.84-0.94), test-retest reliability (r = 0.90, P < 0.001). Convergent validity was proven by demonstrating a significant correlation with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) negative subscale, and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). Discriminant validity was proven by the lack of a significant correlation with the PANSS positive subscale, the Korean version of the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Korean version of the Calgary depression scale for schizophrenia (K-CDSS), and the Modified Simpson Angus scale (MSAS). The K-CAINS could be a reliable and valid tool to assess the negative symptoms of Korean schizophrenia patients. PMID:27366011

  1. ru2hot?: A public health education campaign for men who have sex with men to increase awareness of symptoms of acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Stekler, Joanne D; Baldwin, Heather D; Louella, Michael W; Katz, David A; Golden, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Teach HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) symptoms of acute HIV infection (AHI) and direct them to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) though Public Health—Seattle & King County (PHSKC). Design Cross-sectional surveys, retrospective database analysis and chart review. Methods Beginning in June 2009, the ru2hot? campaign described AHI symptoms and NAAT. Two preintervention and two postintervention surveys assessed campaign visibility, symptom knowledge, and healthcare-seeking behaviour. Regression analyses evaluated secular trends in case-finding. Results 366 MSM completed surveys. In survey 4, 23% of 100 men reported seeing the campaign, and 25% knew ‘ru2hot?’ referred to AHI. From survey 1 to survey 4, the proportion of subjects who knew ≥2 symptoms or that AHI was a ‘flu-like’ illness was unchanged (61% vs 57%, p=0.6). However, in survey 4, 13 (72%) of 18 subjects who saw the campaign named fever as a symptom of AHI compared with 19 (35%) of 55 subjects who had not seen the campaign (p=0.005). From 9/2003 to 12/2010, 622 (2.2%) of 27 661 MSM tested HIV-positive, and 111 (18%) were identified by the Public Health—Seattle & King County NAAT programme. In terms of the impact of the campaign on case-finding, diagnosis of EIA-negative/NAAT-positive and OraQuick-negative/EIA-positive cases increased from six in 2004 to 20 in 2010 (p=0.01), but postcampaign numbers were unchanged. 23 (51%) of 45 cases identified before and 8 (44%) of 18 cases identified after the campaign reported symptoms at initial testing (p=0.6). Conclusions Although a quarter of MSM surveyed saw the campaign and knowledge of fever (the symptom of emphasis) was high, case-finding was unchanged. Increasing campaign visibility could have had greater impact. PMID:23349338

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy in pediatric acute ischemic stroke: Clinical outcomes and literature review.

    PubMed

    Madaelil, Thomas P; Kansagra, Akash P; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2016-08-01

    There are limited data on outcomes of mechanical thrombectomy for pediatric stroke using modern devices. In this study, we report two cases of pediatric acute ischemic stroke treated with mechanical thrombectomy, both with good angiographic result (TICI 3) and clinical outcome (no neurological deficits at 90 days). In addition, we conducted a literature review of all previously reported cases describing the use of modern thrombectomy devices. Including our two cases, the aggregate rate of partial or complete vessel recanalization was 100% (22/22), and the aggregate rate of favorable clinical outcome was 91% (20/22). This preliminary evidence suggests that mechanical thrombectomy with modern devices may be a safe and effective treatment option in pediatric patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26945589

  3. Insomnia treatment in the third trimester of pregnancy reduces postpartum depression symptoms: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul; Knight, David C; Emamian, Farnoosh; Tahmasian, Masoud

    2013-12-30

    Mental health is an important medical issue in perinatal care, and there is increasing evidence that insomnia during pregnancy is associated with postpartum depression (PPD). Therefore, the present study evaluated the effect of insomnia treatment during the third trimester of pregnancy on PPD symptoms. Fifty-four pregnant women with insomnia were randomly assigned to trazodone, diphenhydramine, or placebo treatment. Sleep quality was measured by actigraphy at baseline, and after 2 and 6 weeks of treatment. In addition, depression was assessed 2 and 6 weeks after delivery. Trazodone and diphenhydramine improved sleep profile compared to placebo after 6 weeks of treatment. Further, depressive symptoms were reduced 2 and 6 weeks after delivery in trazodone and diphenhydramine groups compared to placebo. No differences in depressive symptoms were observed between the trazodone and diphenhydramine groups. These findings indicate that insomnia treatment with trazodone or diphenhydramine during the third trimester of pregnancy may prevent PPD. PMID:23993464

  4. Acute tubular necrosis as a part of vancomycin induced drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome with coincident postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min; Sung, Kyoung; Yang, Hea Koung; Kim, Seong Heon; Kim, Hye Young; Ban, Gil Ho; Park, Su Eun; Lee, Hyoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal condition characterized by skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiorgan involvement. Various drugs may be associated with this syndrome including carbamazepine, allopurinol, and sulfasalazine. Renal involvement in DRESS syndrome most commonly presents as acute kidney injury due to interstitial nephritis. An 11-year-old boy was referred to the Children's Hospital of Pusan National University because of persistent fever, rash, abdominal distension, generalized edema, lymphadenopathy, and eosinophilia. He previously received vancomycin and ceftriaxone for 10 days at another hospital. He developed acute kidney injury with nephrotic range proteinuria and hypocomplementemia. A subsequent renal biopsy indicated the presence of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and late exudative phase of postinfectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN). Systemic symptoms and renal function improved with corticosteroid therapy after the discontinuation of vancomycin. Here, we describe a biopsy-proven case of severe ATN that manifested as a part of vancomycin-induced DRESS syndrome with coincident PIGN. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this syndrome due to its severity and potentially fatal nature. PMID:27186222

  5. Measuring respiratory symptoms in clinical trials of COPD: reliability and validity of a daily diary

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, N K; Sexton, C C; Jones, P W; Notte, S M; Monz, B U; Nelsen, L; Goldman, M; Murray, L T; Sethi, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Although respiratory symptoms are characteristic features of COPD, there is no standardised method for quantifying their severity in stable disease. Objective To evaluate the EXACT-Respiratory Symptom (E-RS) measure, a daily diary comprising 11 of the 14 items in the Exacerbations of Chronic Pulmonary Disease Tool (EXACT). Methods Qualitative: patient focus group and interviews to address content validity. Quantitative: secondary data analyses to test reliability and validity. Results Qualitative: n=84; mean (SD) age 65 (10) years, FEV1 1.2(0.4) L; 44% male. Subject descriptions of their respiratory symptoms were consistent with E-RS content and structure. Quantitative: n=188; mean (SD) age 66 (10) years, FEV1 1.2(0.5) L; 50% male. Factor analysis (FA) showed 3 subscales: RS-Breathlessness, RS-Cough & Sputum, and RS-Chest Symptoms; second-order FA supported a general factor and total score. Reliability (total and subscales): 0.88, 0.86, 0.73, 0.81; 2-day test-retest ICC: 0.90, 0.86, 0.87, 0.82, respectively. Validity: Total scores correlated significantly (p < 0.0001) with SGRQ Total (r=0.75), Symptoms (r=0.66), Activity (r=0.57), Impact (r=0.70) scores; subscale correlations were also significant (r=0.26, p < 0.05 (RS-Chest Symptoms with Activity) to r=0.69, p < 0.0001 (RS-Cough & Sputum with Symptoms). RS-Breathlessness correlated with rescue medication use (r=0.32, p < 0.0001), clinician-reported mMRC (r=0.33, p < 0.0001), and FEV1% predicted (r=-0.17, p < 0.05). E-RS scores differentiated groups based on chronic bronchitis diagnosis (p < 0.01–0.001), smoking status (p < 0.05–0.001), and rescue medication use (p < 0.05–0.0001). Conclusions Results suggest the RS-Total is a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating respiratory symptom severity in stable COPD. Further study of sensitivity to change is warranted. PMID:24595666

  6. How potentially serious symptom changes are talked about and managed in COPD clinical review consultations: a micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatwin, John; Kennedy, Anne; Firth, Adam; Povey, Andrew; Rogers, Anne; Sanders, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    People with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are at heightened risk of developing lung cancer. Recent research has suggested that in people who have the disease, the time between symptom onset and consultation can be long enough to significantly affect prognosis. The regular and routine clinical encounters that people with COPD engage in provide an opportunity for them to highlight new symptoms of concern, and for clinicians to be watchful for new symptomatic indicators. We present a micro-analysis of naturalistic data from a corpus of such encounters with the aim of exploring the interactional factors within these routine consultations which influence when and how new symptoms of concern are raised. Our hypothesis is that although the underlying aim of the review consultation is the same in both settings, the different consultation structures oriented to by nurses and GPs have a tangible effect on how new and concerning symptomatic information is introduced. Conversation analysis (CA) was used to examine 39 naturalistic review consultation recordings in two clinical settings; GP led (n = 16), and practice nurse led (n = 23). We describe three interactional formats by which patients chose to present new symptomatic concerns; 'direct', 'embedded', and 'oblique'. Both settings provided interactional 'slots' for patients to offer new and concerning symptomatic information. However, the structure of nurse led encounters tended to limit opportunities for patients to develop extended symptom narratives which in turn facilitated 'oblique' formats. We suggest that the attenuation of the 'oblique' format in this particular clinical setting has implications relating to the psycho-social idiosyncrasies of lung cancer and the maintenance of interactional conditions that encourage patients to disclose new symptomatic concerns. PMID:24861413

  7. A Study to Determine if Addition of Palatal Petechiae to Centor Criteria Adds More Significance to Clinical Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Nibhanipudi, Kumara V

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A study to determine if addition of palatal petechiae to Centor criteria adds more value for clinical diagnosis of acute strep pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis. In children, Centor Criteria does not cover all the symptoms and signs of acute strep pharyngitis. We hypothesize that addition of palatal petechiae to Centor Criteria will increase the possibility of clinical diagnosis of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children. Methods. One hundred patients with a complaint of sore throat were enrolled in the study. All the patients were examined clinically using the Centor Criteria. They were also examined for other signs and symptoms like petechial lesions over the palate, abdominal pain, and skin rash. All the patients were given rapid strep tests, and throat cultures were sent. No antibiotics were given until culture results were obtained. Results. The sample size was 100 patients. All 100 had fever, sore throat, and erythema of tonsils. Twenty of the 100 patients had tonsillar exudates, 85/100 had tender anterior cervical lymph nodes, and 86/100 had no cough. In total, 9 out of the 100 patients had positive throat cultures. We observed that petechiae over the palate, a very significant sign, is not included in the Centor Criteria. Palatal petechiae were present in 8 out of the 100 patients. Six out of these 8 with palatal petechiae had positive throat culture for strep (75%). Only 7 out of 20 with exudates had positive strep culture. Sixteen out of the 100 patients had rapid strep test positive. Those 84/100 who had negative rapid strep also had negative throat culture. Statistics. We used Fisher's exact test, comparing throat culture positive and negative versus presence of exudates and palatal hemorrhages with positive and negative throat cultures and the resultant P value <.0001. Conclusion. Our study concludes that addition of petechiae over the palate to Centor Criteria will increase the possibility of diagnosing acute group A streptococcal

  8. A Study to Determine if Addition of Palatal Petechiae to Centor Criteria Adds More Significance to Clinical Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nibhanipudi, Kumara V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. A study to determine if addition of palatal petechiae to Centor criteria adds more value for clinical diagnosis of acute strep pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis. In children, Centor Criteria does not cover all the symptoms and signs of acute strep pharyngitis. We hypothesize that addition of palatal petechiae to Centor Criteria will increase the possibility of clinical diagnosis of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children. Methods. One hundred patients with a complaint of sore throat were enrolled in the study. All the patients were examined clinically using the Centor Criteria. They were also examined for other signs and symptoms like petechial lesions over the palate, abdominal pain, and skin rash. All the patients were given rapid strep tests, and throat cultures were sent. No antibiotics were given until culture results were obtained. Results. The sample size was 100 patients. All 100 had fever, sore throat, and erythema of tonsils. Twenty of the 100 patients had tonsillar exudates, 85/100 had tender anterior cervical lymph nodes, and 86/100 had no cough. In total, 9 out of the 100 patients had positive throat cultures. We observed that petechiae over the palate, a very significant sign, is not included in the Centor Criteria. Palatal petechiae were present in 8 out of the 100 patients. Six out of these 8 with palatal petechiae had positive throat culture for strep (75%). Only 7 out of 20 with exudates had positive strep culture. Sixteen out of the 100 patients had rapid strep test positive. Those 84/100 who had negative rapid strep also had negative throat culture. Statistics. We used Fisher’s exact test, comparing throat culture positive and negative versus presence of exudates and palatal hemorrhages with positive and negative throat cultures and the resultant P value <.0001. Conclusion. Our study concludes that addition of petechiae over the palate to Centor Criteria will increase the possibility of diagnosing acute group A streptococcal

  9. Menopausal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Janice; Morris, Edward P

    2000-01-01

    Definition Menopause begins one year after the last menstrual period. Symptoms often begin in the perimenopausal years. Incidence/prevalence In the United Kingdom the mean age for the menopause is 50 years 9 months. The median onset of the perimenopause is between 45.5 and 47.5 years. One Scottish survey (of 6096 women aged 45 to 54 years) found that 84% had experienced at least one of the classic menopausal symptoms, with 45% finding one or more symptoms a problem.1 InterventionsBeneficial:OestrogensTiboloneLikely to be beneficial:ProgestogensClonidineUnknown effectiveness:Phyto-oestrogensTestosteroneAntidepressants Aetiology/risk factors Urogenital symptoms of menopause are caused by decreased oestrogen concentrations, but the cause of vasomotor symptoms and psychological effects is complex and remains unclear. Prognosis Menopause is a physiological event. Its timing may be genetically determined. Although endocrine changes are permanent, menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, which are experienced by about 70% of women, usually resolve with time.2 However, some symptoms, such as genital atrophy, may remain the same or worsen. Aims To reduce or prevent menopausal symptoms, and to improve quality of life with minimum adverse effects. Outcomes Frequency and severity of vasomotor, urogenital, and psychological symptoms; quality of life. Methods Clinical Evidence search and appraisal December 1999. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews that met Clinical Evidence quality criteria. PMID:11118182

  10. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  11. Efficacy of enrofloxacin in the treatment of naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis.

    PubMed

    Suojala, L; Simojoki, H; Mustonen, K; Kaartinen, L; Pyörälä, S

    2010-05-01

    The efficacy of the combination of systemic enrofloxacin (5mg/kg twice with a 24-h interval, first dose i.v., second dose s.c.) and the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent ketoprofen (3mg/kg i.m. or 4 mg/kg per os daily for 1 to 3 d) treatment was compared with antiinflammatory treatment only in dairy cows with naturally occurring acute clinical Escherichia coli mastitis. A total of 132 cows with acute clinical mastitis and with confirmed growth of E. coli in a pretreatment milk sample were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Response to treatment was evaluated clinically and by bacteriological culturing and determination of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase) activity on d 2 and 21 posttreatment. Enrofloxacin treatment did not increase bacteriological (90.5% of treated vs. 86.8% of nontreated cured) or clinical cure (46.7% of treated vs. 57.1% of nontreated cured), cow survival (95.3% of treated vs. 92.7% of nontreated), or quarter milk production assessed 21 d posttreatment (21.8 vs. 29.3% return to preinfection level for nontreated cows), nor did it decrease mammary gland tissue damage estimated using determination of milk NAGase activity (24.0+/-0.3 vs. 18.3+/-1.3 pmol of 4-methylumbelliferone per min per microL for nontreated cows). Treatment did not influence the number of study cows remaining in the herd after 6 mo (71.9% of treated vs. 80.6% of nontreated). The only significant effects of enrofloxacin were enhancing the bacteriological cure (odds ratio=3.32 for treated cows) and decreasing the clinical cure (odds ratio=0.05 for treated cows) on d 2 posttreatment. Our results did not support the use of enrofloxacin to treat acute clinical E. coli mastitis. PMID:20412909

  12. Duration of Untreated Psychosis Is Associated with More Negative Schizophrenia Symptoms after Acute Treatment for First-Episode Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grano, Niklas; Lindsberg, Jenni; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Gronroos, Peter; Blomberg, Ari-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Evidence of association between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is inconsistent in the recent literature. In the present study, DUP, schizophrenia symptoms, duration of medication, and diagnosis were obtained from hospital archives in a sample of FEP patients.…

  13. Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Stability and Change in Clinical Diagnosis and Symptom Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Whitney; Swineford, Lauren B.; Nottke, Charly; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be stable in children as young as age three, few studies have explored stability of a diagnosis in younger children. Predictive value of diagnostic tools for toddlers and patterns of symptom change are important considerations for clinicians making early diagnoses. Most…

  14. Mindfulness Meditation Alleviates Fibromyalgia Symptoms in Women: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Elizabeth; Salmon, Paul; Weissbecker, Inka; Rebholz, Whitney N.; Bayley-Veloso, Rene; Zimmaro, Lauren; Floyd, Andrea; Dedert, Eric; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the efficacy of a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention on psychological and physiological functioning in patients with fibromyalgia. Purpose We conducted a randomized prospective trial of MBSR among female fibromyalgia patients. Methods Effects on perceived stress, pain, sleep quality, fatigue, symptom severity, and salivary cortisol were tested in treatment (n=51) versus wait-list control participants (n=40) using data at baseline, post-program, and two-month follow-up. Results Analyses revealed MBSR significantly reduced perceived stress, sleep disturbance, and symptom severity, with gains maintained at follow-up. Greater home practice at follow-up was associated with reduced symptom severity. MBSR did not significantly alter pain, physical functioning, or cortisol profiles. Conclusion MBSR ameliorated some of the major symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduced subjective illness burden. Further exploration of MBSR effects on physiological stress responses is warranted. These results support use of MBSR as a complementary treatment for women with fibromyalgia. (ISRCTN: 34628811) PMID:25425224

  15. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Symptoms and Associated Clinical Features among Australian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartsch, Dianna

    2007-01-01

    The current study addressed the frequency of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms among university students and investigated the predictors of dysmorphic concern. Six hundred and nineteen Australian university students completed measures assessing BDD, dysmorphic concern, self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, self-oriented and socially…

  16. Black cohosh for the management of menopausal symptoms : a systematic review of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Carlos; Masri, Ghania; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2009-01-01

    Alternative medicine preparations represent a significant industry worldwide. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), a buttercup plant grown in North America, is one such popular preparation for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Because the proportion of women experiencing climacteric symptoms is high, black cohosh merits further study as to its efficacy and safety. Convincing evidence for its efficacy in this setting remains to be demonstrated. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the current literature on the benefits of black cohosh for women experiencing climacteric symptoms. To this end, a PubMed search was conducted on 1 November 2007 using the search terms 'black cohosh' AND 'menopause'. The search was limited to randomized controlled trials in the English language involving adults. Several additional reviews dealing with alternative therapies for menopause were included to capture additional older and non-English language literature. Ultimately, 16 studies eligible for review were identified. Many of the studies had conflicting results. Methodological flaws included lack of uniformity of the drug preparation used, variable outcome measures and lack of a placebo group. The benefits of black cohosh in the management of climacteric symptoms remain to be proven. Case studies suggest an additional unexplored area of adverse events that also needs to be addressed. PMID:19102512

  17. Relationship of Exposure to Clinically Irrelevant Emotion Cues and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Laura B.; Barlow, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Research has highlighted the role of emotion regulation as a common factor underlying emotional disorders. The current study examined the relationship of emotion regulation skills to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms. Seven participants with a principal diagnosis of OCD in a multiple-baseline across subjects design were taught the skill…

  18. Clinical indicators of ineffective airway clearance in children with acute respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Livia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Herdman, T Heather; Lira, Ana Luisa Brandão de Carvalho; Teixeira, Iane Ximenes; Costa, Alice Gabrielle de Sousa

    2016-09-01

    The identification of clinical indicators with good predictive ability allows the nurse to minimize the existing variability in clinical situations presented by the patient and to accurately identify the nursing diagnosis, which represents the true clinical condition. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accuracy of NANDA-I clinical indicators of the nursing diagnosis ineffective airway clearance (IAC) in children with acute respiratory infection. This was a prospective cohort study conducted with a group of 136 children and followed for a period of time ranging from 6 to 10 consecutive days. For data analysis, the measures of accuracy were calculated for clinical indicators, which presented statistical significance in a generalized estimated equation model. IAC was present in 91.9% of children in the first assessment. Adventitious breath sounds presented the best measure of accuracy. Ineffective cough presented a high value of sensitivity. Changes in respiratory rate, wide-eyed, diminished breath sounds, and difficulty vocalizing presented high positive predictive values. In conclusion, adventitious breath sounds showed the best predictive ability to diagnose IAC in children with respiratory acute infection. PMID:26311487

  19. Low testosterone and sexual symptoms in men with acute coronary syndrome can be used to predict major adverse cardiovascular events during long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, A; Mizia-Stec, K; Wierzbicka-Chmiel, J; Rychlik, S; Muras, A; Mizia, M; Bienkowski, J

    2015-11-01

    Low total testosterone (TT) and sexual symptoms are common among men with coronary artery disease, however its impact on major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) is still debatable. We investigated whether low TT and coexisting sexual symptoms