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Sample records for acute cmv infection

  1. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePlus

    CMV mononucleosis; Cytomegalovirus; CMV; Human cytomegalovirus; HCMV ... infection is spread by: Blood transfusions Organ transplants ... viruses remain in your body for the rest of your life. If your ...

  2. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of antiviral drugs. Antiviral drugs slow the virus reproduction, but can't cure it. Researchers are studying ... saliva. Practice safe sex. Wear a condom during sexual contact to prevent spreading the CMV virus through ...

  3. Acute Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection Associated with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in an Immunocompetent Host Meeting All Eight HLH 2004 Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Willeford, Wesley G; Lichstein, Peter; Ohar, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare and often deadly syndrome characterized by severe inflammation and cytokine dysregulation. The disease is defined by the HLH-2004 criteria, requiring five of eight findings, and is further differentiated into either primary or secondary causes. Primary HLH tends to be of genetic etiology, while secondary HLH results from other insults such as infection. Secondary HLH is most commonly associated with viral infections in immunocompromised patients. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) associated HLH in the immunocompetent host is exceedingly rare and only documented in four case reports to date. We describe the fifth documented case of CMV-associated HLH in an immunocompetent patient, and furthermore, we demonstrate that this patient is the first published case of its type to satisfy all eight of HLH-2004 criteria.

  4. Gallium scintigraphic pattern in lung CMV infections

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, W.I.; Cohen, D.; Mallin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Due to extensive use of prophylactic therapy for Pneumonitis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP), Cytomegalic Viral (CMV) infection may now be the most common lung infection in AIDS patients. This study was performed to determine Gallium-67 patterns in AIDS patients with CMV. Pathology reports were reviewed in AIDS patients who had a dose of 5 to 10 mCi of Gallium-67 citrate. Analysis of images were obtained 48-72 hours later of the entire body was performed. Gallium-67 scans in 14 AIDS patients with biopsy proven CMV, were evaluated for eye, colon, adrenal, lung and renal uptake. These were compared to 40 AIDS patients without CMV. These controls had infections including PCP, Mycobacterial infections, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis. 100% of CMV patients had bowel uptake greater than or equal to liver. Similar bowel activity was seen in 50% of AIDS patients without CMV. 71% had intense eye uptake which was seen in only 10% of patients without CMV. 50% of CMV patients had renal uptake compared to 5% of non-CMV cases. Adrenal uptake was suggested in 50%, however, SPECT imaging is needed for confirmation. 85% had low grade lung uptake. The low grade lung had perihilar prominence. The remaining 15% had high grade lung uptake (greater than sternum) due to superimposed PCP infection. Colon uptake is very sensitive indicator for CMV infection. However, observing eye, renal, and or adrenal uptake improved the diagnostic specificity. SPECT imaging is needed to confirm renal or adrenal abnormalities due to intense bowel activity present in 100% of cases. When high grade lung uptake is seen superimposed PCP is suggested.

  5. The Immunology of Posttransplant CMV Infection: Potential Effect of CMV Immunoglobulins on Distinct Components of the Immune Response to CMV.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Javier

    2016-03-01

    The immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is highly complex, including humoral, cellular, innate, and adaptive immune responses. Detection of CMV by the innate immune system triggers production of type I IFNs and inflammatory cytokines which initiate cellular and humoral responses that are critical during the early viremic phase of CMV infection. Sustained control of CMV infection is largely accounted for by cellular immunity, involving various T-cell and B-cell subsets. In solid organ transplant patients, global suppression of innate and adaptive immunities by immunosuppressive agents limits immunological defense, including inhibition of natural killer cell activity with ongoing lowering of Ig levels and CMV-specific antibody titers. This is coupled with a short-term suppression of CMV-specific T cells, the extent and duration of which can predict risk of progression to CMV viremia. CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) preparations have the potential to exert immunomodulatory effects as well as providing passive immunization. Specific CMVIG antibodies and virus neutralization might be enhanced by modulation of dendritic cell activity and by a decrease in T-cell activation, effects which are of importance during the initial phase of infection. In summary, the role of CMVIG in reconstituting specific anti-CMV antibodies may be enhanced by some degree of modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses, which could help to control some of the direct and indirect effects of CMV infection.

  6. CMV Immunoglobulins for the Treatment of CMV Infections in Thoracic Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Uwe; Solidoro, Paolo; Müller, Veronika; Szabo, Attila; Gottlieb, Jens; Wilkens, Heinrike; Enseleit, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous ganciclovir and, increasingly, oral valganciclovir are now considered the mainstay of treatment for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or CMV disease. Under certain circumstances, CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) may be an appropriate addition or, indeed, alternative. Data on monotherapy with CMVIG are limited, but encouraging, for example in cases of ganciclovir intolerance. In cases of recurrent CMV in thoracic transplant patients after a disease- and drug-free period, adjunctive CMVIG can be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. Antiviral-resistant CMV, which is more common among thoracic organ recipients than in other types of transplant, can be an indication for introduction of CMVIG, particularly in view of the toxicity associated with other options, such as foscarnet. Due to a lack of controlled trials, decision-making is based on clinical experience. In the absence of a robust evidence base, it seems reasonable to consider the use of CMVIG to treat CMV in adult or pediatric thoracic transplant patients with ganciclovir-resistant infection, or in serious or complicated cases. The latter can potentially include (i) treatment of severe clinical manifestations, such as pneumonitis or eye complications; (ii) patients with a positive biopsy in end organs, such as the lung or stomach; (iii) symptomatic cases with rising polymerase chain reaction values (for example, higher than 5.0 log10) despite antiviral treatment; (iv) CMV disease or CMV infection or risk factors, such as CMV-IgG-negative serostatus; (vi) ganciclovir intolerance; (vii) patients with hypogammaglobulinemia.

  7. Treatment of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Cidofovir and CMV Immune Globulin in a Lung Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Heinrike; Sester, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after lung transplantation is associated with increased risk for pneumonitis and bronchiolitis obliterans as well as allograft rejection and opportunistic infections. Ganciclovir is the mainstay of prophylaxis and treatment but CMV infections can be unresponsive. Apart from direct antiviral drugs, CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) preparations may be considered but are only licensed for prophylaxis. A CMV-seronegative 42-year-old man with cystic fibrosis received a lung from a CMV-seropositive donor. Intravenous ganciclovir prophylaxis was delayed until day 12 due to acute postoperative renal failure and was accompanied by five doses of CMVIG (10 g). By day 16, CMV-DNA was detectable and rising; CMV-specific T-cells were undetectable. Switch from ganciclovir to foscarnet prompted a transient decrease in CMV viral load, but after increasing again to reach 3600 copies/mL foscarnet was changed to intravenous cidofovir and CMVIG was restarted. CMV load continued to fluctuate and declined slowly, whereas CMV-specific T-cells were detected five months later and increased thereafter. At last follow-up, the patient was in very good clinical condition with no evidence of bronchiolitis obliterans. No side effects of this treatment were observed. In this hard-to-treat case, the combination of cidofovir with off-label use of CMVIG contributed to a successful outcome.

  8. CMV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antibody, IgG and IgM; Cytomegalovirus by PCR; Cytomegalovirus Culture Related tests: Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies , Herpes Testing , ... and/or confirm active infections in others. Viral culture is the traditional method of virus detection. Presence ...

  9. [Widespread gastrointestinal CMV infection as the presenting manifestation of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Dayan, K; Neufeld, D M; Lang, R; Novis, B; Bernheim, J; Freund, U

    1993-02-01

    A 53-year-old man is reported who developed a widespread gastrointestinal infection due to cytomegalic (CMV) virus and was found to be suffering from AIDS. He died of overwhelming pulmonary infection. There is need for awareness of the rapid increase of AIDS in our local population, particularly in groups not regarded as at high risk. It is imperative to keep this diagnosis in mind when dealing with patients with gastroenterocolitis not responding to standard treatments. CMV has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, from carrier state to life-threatening infection. In the gastrointestinal system it causes inflammation and ulcers in the mucosa that may bleed or perforate. There are increasing numbers of reports of CMV ileocolitis in homosexuals with AIDS. The rate of sero-positive CMV in healthy homosexual populations is 94-100% and in 14% there is active infection. CMV is the main infective agent in patients suffering from AIDS; 90% will develop an infection with this virus and in most cases it will be fatal.

  10. Repeated CMV Infection in a Heart Transplantation Patient

    PubMed Central

    Melero-Ferrer, Josep; Sanchez-Lazaro, Ignacio J.; Navea-Tejerina, Amparo; Almenar-Bonet, Luis; Blanes-Julia, Marino; Martinez-Dolz, Luis; Salvador-Sanz, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in heart transplantation (HTx). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common viral infection during the first year after HTx, but it is more unusual after this time. We present the case of a patient who underwent an HTx due to a severe ischemic heart disease. Although the patient did not have a high risk for CMV, infection, he suffered a reactivation during the first year and then up to six more episodes, especially in his eyes. The patient received different treatments against CMV and the immunosuppression was changed several times. Finally, everolimus was introduced instead of cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil was withdrawn. The presented case provides an example of how the immunosupresion plays a key role in some infections in spite of being a suitable antiviral treatment. PMID:23213610

  11. How long should someone wait after CMV infection to start pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Moienafshari, R.; Bar-Oz, B.; Ford-Jones, L.; Koren, G.

    1998-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my patients contracted a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. What is the recommended waiting time between primary CMV infection and conception, and which tests are valid for determining whether infectivity is over? ANSWER: Although no data on the proper waiting period between primary CMV infection and conception are available, we suggest waiting until CMV-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies are present (at least 6 months). PMID:9839051

  12. Seroprevalence of CMV, HSV-2 and HBV among HIV-Infected Malawian Children: A Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chris Buck, W.; Kazembe, Peter N.; Phiri, Sam; Andrianarimanana, Diavolana; Weigel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about viral co-infections in African human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children. We examined the prevalence of seromarkers for cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections among HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve children in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods: Ninety-one serum samples were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies to CMV, and IgG antibodies to HSV-2 and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Baseline demographic, clinical and laboratory data were abstracted from electronic records. Results: CMV IgG was the most common positive result in all age groups (in 73% of children <1 year, and 100% in all other groups). Three patients were CMV IgM positive (3.3%), suggesting acute infection. HSV-2 IgG was positive in four patients (4.4%), and HBsAg in two (2.2%). Conclusions: CMV infection occurred early in life, and few children had specific signs of CMV infection at the time of ART initiation. Unrecognized HBV infection represents opportunities for testing and treatment of HIV/HBV co-infected children. PMID:26884443

  13. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families after Stem Cell Transplant What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ... weakened by medicines that you must take after stem cell transplant and by the transplant itself. Your body ...

  14. Replication of CMV in the gut of HIV-infected individuals and epithelial barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Somsouk, Ma; Hunt, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Although invasive cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is uncommon in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART), asymptomatic CMV coinfection is nearly ubiquitous in HIV infected individuals. While microbial translocation and gut epithelial barrier dysfunction may promote persistent immune activation in treated HIV infection, potentially contributing to morbidity and mortality, it has been unclear whether CMV replication in individuals with no symptoms of CMV disease might play a role in this process. We hypothesized that persistent CMV replication in the intestinal epithelium of HIV/CMV-coinfected individuals impairs gut epithelial barrier function. Using a combination of state-of-the-art in situ hybridization technology (RNAscope) and immunohistochemistry, we detected CMV DNA and proteins and evidence of intestinal damage in rectosigmoid samples from CMV-positive individuals with both untreated and ART-suppressed HIV infection. Two different model systems, primary human intestinal cells differentiated in vitro to form polarized monolayers and a humanized mouse model of human gut, together demonstrated that intestinal epithelial cells are fully permissive to CMV replication. Independent of HIV, CMV disrupted tight junctions of polarized intestinal cells, significantly reducing transepithelial electrical resistance, a measure of monolayer integrity, and enhancing transepithelial permeability. The effect of CMV infection on the intestinal epithelium is mediated, at least in part, by the CMV-induced proinflammatory cytokine IL-6. Furthermore, letermovir, a novel anti-CMV drug, dampened the effects of CMV on the epithelium. Together, our data strongly suggest that CMV can disrupt epithelial junctions, leading to bacterial translocation and chronic inflammation in the gut and that CMV could serve as a target for therapeutic intervention to prevent or treat gut epithelial barrier dysfunction during HIV infection. PMID:28241080

  15. Diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Gabrielli, Liliana; Guerra, Brunella; Cervi, Francesca; Piccirilli, Giulia; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Bellini, Francesca; Landini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading non-genetic cause of sensori-neural hearing loss and neurodevelopmental sequelae. Despite these alarming facts, the general public healthcare system is often not aware of CMV and not enough is done to prevent congenital CMV infection.We describe the clinical and laboratory monitoring of a case with primary CMV infection occurring before the first trimester of gestation. Specific literature review is included in order to point out major goals achieved in the diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection and the many questions still unanswered. Serological diagnosis of primary CMV infection was performed based on serum-CMV specific-IgM antibodies, combined with low avidity anti-CMV IgG antibodies. The maternal infection was asymptomatic, as it is for most infections in immunocompetent patients. Therefore, disclosing primary infection depended on specific serological tests during the initial period of pregnancy (before weeks 12-16 of gestation). The invasive (amniocentesis) and non-invasive (ultrasonographic examination) prenatal tests, carried out at 21 weeks gestation, revealed a severe CMV infection in a fetus small for gestational age with ventriculomegaly. The presence of overt ultrasound abnormalities combined with high viral load in the amniotic fluid sampled at the appropriate times was highly suggestive of an unfavourable prognosis. The autopsy performed on the fetus confirmed severe disseminated CMV infection with histological brain damage.

  16. Evaluation of a standardised real-time PCR based DNA-detection method (Realstar®) in whole blood for the diagnosis of primary human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Berth, M; Benoy, I; Christensen, N

    2016-02-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA detection in blood could, as a supplementary test to serology, improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis of an acute CMV infection. In this study we evaluated the performance of a commercially available and standardised CMV PCR assay in whole blood for the diagnosis of a primary infection in immunocompetent adults. Moreover, the kinetics of viral DNA was evaluated in order to provide a time frame in which viral DNA could be detected during an acute primary infection. Whole blood samples were collected from 66 patients with an acute CMV infection, 65 patients with an acute Epstein-Barr virus infection, 27 patients with various other acute infections (parvovirus B19, HIV, Toxoplasma gondii), 20 patients with past CMV infections (>1 year) and 20 apparently healthy persons. For CMV DNA detection and quantification a commercially available real-time PCR was applied (RealStar®, altona Diagnostics). The clinical sensitivity of CMV PCR in whole blood for the diagnosis of a recent primary CMV infection was 93.9 % and the diagnostic specificity 99.2 %. In the majority of the patients CMV DNA was not detectable anymore approximately within 4 weeks after the first blood sample was taken. From these data we concluded that, together with a suggestive serological profile, a positive CMV PCR result in whole blood can be regarded as a diagnostic confirmation of a recent CMV infection on a single blood sample in an immunocompetent patient. However, a negative CMV PCR result does not exclude a recent CMV infection.

  17. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  18. Mandibular osteomyelitis and tooth exfoliation following zoster-CMV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Meer, Shabnum; Coleman, Hedley; Altini, Mario; Alexander, Terence

    2006-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a common viral infection, the oral soft tissue manifestations of which are widely known and recognized. Reports of spontaneous tooth exfoliation and jaw osteonecrosis following herpes zoster infection in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve are extremely infrequent and sporadic, with only 39 cases being reported in the literature. We report an additional case of mandibular osteomyelitis and spontaneous tooth exfoliation following herpes zoster infection, which occurred in the left mandible of a 70-year-old diabetic man; however, our case also showed CMV co-infection. The role of CMV in the pathogenesis of the osteonecrosis remains uncertain. Awareness of the possibility of CMV co-infection in various oral diseases including oral ulcers, Kaposi's sarcoma, and herpes zoster infections especially in immunocompromised patients is important, since spread of the CMV can easily occur to other sites with potentially fatal consequences. Early diagnosis can lead to effective treatment and prevention of complications.

  19. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Colitis - cytomegalovirus; Gastroenteritis - cytomegalovirus; Gastrointestinal CMV disease ... or after bone marrow or organ transplant Ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease Rarely, serious CMV infection involving ...

  20. Transfer of minimally manipulated CMV-specific T cells from stem cell or third-party donors to treat CMV infection after allo-HSCT.

    PubMed

    Neuenhahn, M; Albrecht, J; Odendahl, M; Schlott, F; Dössinger, G; Schiemann, M; Lakshmipathi, S; Martin, K; Bunjes, D; Harsdorf, S; Weissinger, E M; Menzel, H; Verbeek, M; Uharek, L; Kröger, N; Wagner, E; Kobbe, G; Schroeder, T; Schmitt, M; Held, G; Herr, W; Germeroth, L; Bonig, H; Tonn, T; Einsele, H; Busch, D H; Grigoleit, G U

    2017-02-17

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common, potentially life-threatening complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We assessed prospectively the safety and efficacy of stem cell-donor- or third-party-donor-derived CMV-specific T cells for the treatment of persistent CMV infections after allo-HSCT in a phase I/IIa trial. Allo-HSCT patients with drug-refractory CMV infection and lacking virus-specific T cells were treated with a single dose of ex vivo major histocompatibility complex-Streptamer-isolated CMV epitope-specific donor T cells. Forty-four allo-HSCT patients receiving a T-cell-replete (D(+) repl; n=28) or T-cell-depleted (D(+) depl; n=16) graft from a CMV-seropositive donor were screened for CMV-specific T-cell immunity. Eight D(+) depl recipients received adoptive T-cell therapy from their stem cell donor. CMV epitope-specific T cells were well supported and became detectable in all treated patients. Complete and partial virological response rates were 62.5% and 25%, respectively. Owing to longsome third-party donor (TPD) identification, only 8 of the 57 CMV patients transplanted from CMV-seronegative donors (D(-)) received antigen-specific T cells from partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched TPDs. In all but one, TPD-derived CMV-specific T cells remained undetectable. In summary, adoptive transfer correlated with functional virus-specific T-cell reconstitution in D(+) depl patients. Suboptimal HLA match may counteract expansion of TPD-derived virus-specific T cells in D(-) patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 17 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.16.

  1. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) IE1- and pp65-specific CD8+ T cell responses broaden over time after primary CMV infection in infants.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Laura; Dooley, Sheryl; Trzmielina, Sonia; Somasundaran, Mohan; Fisher, Donna; Revello, Maria Grazia; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2007-06-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in young children. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cell responses to CMV pp65 or IE1 protein were readily detectable in children with congenital or postnatal CMV infection. Here, we have further characterized the evolution of the peptide specificity of these responses in 7 infants<6 months of age at the start of the study. Thirteen pp65 and 15 IE1 peptides (median, 5 peptides/infant) were targeted, and most (61%) represented sequences not previously reported. Peptide specificity remained stable or broadened over time despite the clearance of CMV viremia. Loss of peptide recognition was not observed. Responses with the highest functional peptide avidity were not necessarily detected earliest. These data provide additional evidence that young infants can generate diverse CMV-specific CD8+ T cell responses but show that early responses may exhibit relatively focused peptide specificity and lower peptide avidity.

  2. Differential CMV-Specific CD8+ Effector T Cell Responses in the Lung Allograft Predominate over the Blood during Human Primary Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Pipeling, Matthew R.; West, Erin E.; Osborne, Christine M.; Whitlock, Amanda B.; Dropulic, Lesia K.; Willett, Matthew H.; Forman, Michael; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Orens, Jonathan B.; Moller, David R.; Lechtzin, Noah; Migueles, Stephen A.; Connors, Mark; McDyer, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition of T cell responses during primary CMV infection in lung transplant recipients (LTRs) appear critical for host defense and allograft durability, with increased mortality in donor+/recipient− (D+R−) individuals. In 15 D+R− LTRs studied, acute primary CMV infection was characterized by viremia in the presence or absence of pneumonitis, with viral loads higher in the lung airways/allograft compared with the blood. A striking influx of CD8+ T cells into the lung airways/allograft was observed, with inversion of the CD4+:CD8+ T cell ratio. De novo CMV-specific CD8+ effector frequencies in response to pooled peptides of pp65 were strikingly higher in lung mononuclear cells compared with the PBMC and predominated over IE1-specific responses and CD4+ effector responses in both compartments. The frequencies of pp65-specific cytokine responses were significantly higher in lung mononuclear cells compared with PBMC and demonstrated marked contraction with long-term persistence of effector memory CD8+ T cells in the lung airways following primary infection. CMV-tetramer+CD8+ T cells from PBMC were CD45RA− during viremia and transitioned to CD45RA+ following resolution. In contrast, CMV-specific CD8+ effectors in the lung airways/allograft maintained a CD45RA− phenotype during transition from acute into chronic infection. Together, these data reveal differential CMV-specific CD8+ effector frequencies, immunodominance, and polyfunctional cytokine responses predominating in the lung airways/allograft compared with the blood during acute primary infection. Moreover, we show intercompartmental phenotypic differences in CMV-specific memory responses during the transition to chronic infection. PMID:18566421

  3. Partners in Crime: The Role of CMV in Immune Dysregulation and Clinical Outcome During HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Lederman, Michael M; Gianella, Sara

    2016-02-01

    In the current era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are living longer and healthier lives. Nevertheless, HIV-infected persons are at greater risk for age-related disorders, which have been linked to residual immune dysfunction and inflammation. HIV-infected individuals are almost universally co-infected with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and both viruses are associated with inflammation-related morbidities. Therefore, a detailed investigation of the relationship between CMV and aging-related morbidities emerging during chronic HIV infection is warranted. Here, we review the literature on how CMV co-infection affects HIV infection and host immunity and we discuss the gaps in our knowledge that need elucidation.

  4. Multi-antigen CMV-MVA Triplex Vaccine in Reducing CMV Complications in Patients Previously Infected With CMV and Undergoing Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Cytomegaloviral Infection; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. Universal newborn screening for congenital CMV infection: what is the evidence of potential benefit?†

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Michael J.; Griffiths, Paul D.; Aston, Van; Rawlinson, William D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of childhood disability. Many children born with congenital CMV infection are asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms and therefore are typically not diagnosed. A strategy of newborn CMV screening could allow for early detection and intervention to improve clinical outcomes. Interventions might include antiviral drugs or nonpharmaceutical therapies such as speech-language therapy or cochlear implants. Using published data from developed countries, we analyzed existing evidence of potential benefit that could result from newborn CMV screening. We first estimated the numbers of children with the most important CMV-related disabilities (i.e. hearing loss, cognitive deficit, and vision impairment), including the age at which the disabilities occur. Then, for each of the disabilities, we examined the existing evidence for the effectiveness of various interventions. We concluded that there is good evidence of potential benefit from nonpharmaceutical interventions for children with delayed hearing loss that occurs by 9 months of age. Similarly, we concluded that there is fair evidence of potential benefit from antiviral therapy for children with hearing loss at birth and from nonpharmaceutical interventions for children with delayed hearing loss occurring between 9 and 24 months of age and for children with CMV-related cognitive deficits. We found poor evidence of potential benefit for children with delayed hearing loss occurring after 24 months of age and for children with vision impairment. Overall, we estimated that in the United States, several thousand children with congenital CMV could benefit each year from newborn CMV screening, early detection, and interventions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24760655

  6. Universal newborn screening for congenital CMV infection: what is the evidence of potential benefit?

    PubMed

    Cannon, Michael J; Griffiths, Paul D; Aston, Van; Rawlinson, William D

    2014-09-01

    Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of childhood disability. Many children born with congenital CMV infection are asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms and therefore are typically not diagnosed. A strategy of newborn CMV screening could allow for early detection and intervention to improve clinical outcomes. Interventions might include antiviral drugs or nonpharmaceutical therapies such as speech-language therapy or cochlear implants. Using published data from developed countries, we analyzed existing evidence of potential benefit that could result from newborn CMV screening. We first estimated the numbers of children with the most important CMV-related disabilities (i.e. hearing loss, cognitive deficit, and vision impairment), including the age at which the disabilities occur. Then, for each of the disabilities, we examined the existing evidence for the effectiveness of various interventions. We concluded that there is good evidence of potential benefit from nonpharmaceutical interventions for children with delayed hearing loss that occurs by 9 months of age. Similarly, we concluded that there is fair evidence of potential benefit from antiviral therapy for children with hearing loss at birth and from nonpharmaceutical interventions for children with delayed hearing loss occurring between 9 and 24 months of age and for children with CMV-related cognitive deficits. We found poor evidence of potential benefit for children with delayed hearing loss occurring after 24 months of age and for children with vision impairment. Overall, we estimated that in the United States, several thousand children with congenital CMV could benefit each year from newborn CMV screening, early detection, and interventions.

  7. Combination of immunoglobulins and natural killer cells in the context of CMV and EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, K; Lehmann, J; Krüger, D H; Martin-Parras, L; Uharek, L; Hofmann, J

    2014-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific hyperimmunoglobulin (CMV-HIG) is used to treat and prevent CMV infection in immunocompromised patients, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody is successfully used in the treatment for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Two immunological approaches have been suggested to further improve the control of viral reproduction in patients with active disease: first, the use of monoclonal antibodies with specificity against viral epitopes and second, coadministration of cells with the capacity to promote antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we have evaluated the effectiveness of these strategies in vitro (alone and in combination) with neutralization and cytotoxicity assays. Our results indicate that monoclonal antibodies (in particular SM5-1) can be as effective as CMV-HIG in neutralizing-cell-free CMV. Moreover, our data indicate that antibody-mediated elimination (either by moAb or by HIG) of EBV-infected cells can be significantly enhanced by NK cells. Using human NK cells that have been purified, cultured and expanded under GMP conditions, we were able to demonstrate that the combination of NK cells and antibodies could represent a feasible and highly effective clinical approach to achieve control of EBV infections. Especially in leukopenic patients with low numbers of ADCC-promoting cells, the combination of adoptively transferred NK cells and antiviral antibodies offers a promising strategy that should be tested in clinical trials.

  8. Evaluation of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cell immunity for the assessment of the risk of active CMV infection in non-immunosuppressed surgical and trauma intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Clari, María A; Aguilar, Gerardo; Benet, Isabel; Belda, Javier; Giménez, Estela; Bravo, Dayana; Carbonell, José A; Henao, Liliana; Navarro, David

    2013-10-01

    The current study was designed to assess the predictive value of the evaluation of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cell immunity early following admission to the intensive care unit for inferring the risk of active CMV infection in non-immunosuppressed surgical and trauma patients. A total of 31 CMV-seropositive patients were included. Patients were screened for the presence of CMV DNA in plasma and in tracheal aspirates by real-time PCR. Enumeration of CMV pp65 and IE-1-specific IFN-γ CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells was performed by flow cytometry for intracellular cytokine staining. Virological and immunological monitoring was conducted once or twice a week. Active CMV infection occurred in 17 out of 31 patients. Undetectable levels of pp65 and IE-1-specific IFN-γ CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell subsets cells were observed in 10 patients who developed active CMV infection and in one who did not (at a median of 2 days following ICU admission). Peak CMV DNA loads in both tracheal aspirates and plasma were substantially higher (P = 0.018 and P = 0.091, respectively) in patients with undetectable IFN-γ T-cell responses than in patients with detectable responses. The expansion of both CMV-specific T-cell subsets following detection of active CMV infection was demonstrated in 9 out of 14 patients with active CMV infection. In conclusion, the evaluation of CMV pp65 and IE-1-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells early following ICU admission may allow the identification of patients most at risk of either having or developing an episode of active CMV infection, particularly those associated with high-level virus replication.

  9. An overview of the infection of CMV, HSV 1/2 and EBV in Mexican patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Vega, Sergio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela; Hernández-Santos, Hector; Salinas-Lara, Citlatepetl; Palma, Icela; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Gelista-Herrera, Noemí; Rembao-Bojorquez, Daniel; Ochoa, Sara A; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Uribe-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Arellano-Galindo, José

    2017-03-01

    Several risk factors are involved in glioblastoma, including cytomegalovirus (CMV). This research was carried out to determine the rate of CMV infection, as well as HSV 1/2 and EBV in brain tissue, in patients with glioblastomamultiforme (GBM). The tissues were tested using immunohistochemistry, PCR, in situ hybridization and real-time PCR. At least, one HHV was detected in 21/29 (72%) patients as follows: single infections with HSV-1/2 in 4/21 (19%), EBV in 6/21 (28.6%) and CMV in 1/21 (4.8%). Mixed viral infection, HSV-1/2 and EBV were detected in 4/21 patients (19%), CMV and EBV in 5/21 (23.8%), and HSV-1/2, EBV, and CMV in 1/21. The CMV viral load ranged from 3×10(2) to 4.33×10(5) genome/100ng of tissue. Genotype based on CMV gB was 3/7 where 2/3 was gB1 and 1/3 gB4. HSV, EBV and CMV were frequently found in brain tissues, more in mix in a population reported as highly seropositive.

  10. Prevalence of CMV infection among staff in a metropolitan children’s hospital – occupational health screening findings

    PubMed Central

    Stranzinger, Johanna; Kindel, Jutta; Henning, Melanie; Wendeler, Dana; Nienhaus, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Staff in children’s hospitals may run an increased risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) contact infection leading to a congenital CMV fetopathy during pregnancy. The main risk factor is close contact with inapparent carriers of CMV among infants (<3 years). We therefore examined CMV seroprevalence (SP) and possible risk factors for CMV infection among staff at a children’s hospital. Method: In 2014, staff at a metropolitan children’s hospital were offered a CMV antibody test in the context of occupational health screening. Besides of anti-CMV immunoglobulin G (anti-CMV IgG) gender, age, profession, number of children and migration background were assessed and used as independent variables in multiple logistic regression. Women without a migration background (MIG) were considered as a separate group. Results: The study included 219 employees. Women showed a significant higher risk than men of being CMV-positive (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.0; 95% CI 1.1–7.8). The risk among age groups of 30 and over was double that of the under-30s (aOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.0–3.9); among those aged 40-plus it was aOR 2.3 (95% CI 1.1–4.7). Staff with an MIG tested more often positive than those without an MIG (95.5% versus 45.7%). CMV SP was 47.7% among women without an MIG. In this subgroup the probability of CMV infection increased with age (p=0.08) as well. Conclusion: In the staff group as a whole there was a significant correlation between CMV SP, country of origin and age. We found no significant differences between occupational groups; perhaps our random sample was too small. Given the low CMV SP particularly in those without MIG, women who want to have children in particular must be protected from CMV infection. Follow-up studies should be undertaken to test whether good workplace hygiene offers sufficient protection for pregnant women and could be an alternative to prohibiting certain activities. PMID:27730028

  11. First Report of CD4 Lymphopenia and Defective Neutrophil Functions in a Patient with Amebiasis Associated with CMV Reactivation and Severe Bacterial and Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghrenassia, Etienne; Guihot, Amélie; Dong, Yuan; Robinet, Pauline; Fontaine, Thierry; Lacombe, Karine; Lescot, Thomas; Meyohas, Marie-Caroline; Elbim, Carole

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with acute necrotizing colitis due to invasive amebiasis associated with CD4 lymphopenia and impaired neutrophil responses. The course of the disease was characterized by CMV reactivation and severe and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, which might be related to the decreased CD4 T cell count and the impaired functional capacities of neutrophils, respectively. The clinical outcome was positive with normalization of both CD4 cell count and neutrophil functions. PMID:28243230

  12. Adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific effector CD4+ T cells provides antiviral protection from murine CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Jeitziner, Sanja Mandaric; Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the human population and establishes a life-long persistence. CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but the virus carries pathogenic potential and causes severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. T-cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role in control of CMV infection and adoptive transfer of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells restores viral immunity in immunosuppressed patients but a role for CD4(+) T cells remains elusive. Here, we analyzed in adoptive transfer studies the features and antiviral functions of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells during primary murine CMV (MCMV) infection. MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells expanded upon MCMV infection and displayed an effector phenotype and function. Adoptive transfer of in vivo activated MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells to immune-compromised mice was protective during pathogenic MCMV infection and IFN-γ was a crucial mediator of this protective capacity. Moreover, co-transfer of low doses of both MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells synergized in control of lytic viral replication in immune-compromised mice. Our data reveal a pivotal antiviral role for virus-specific CD4(+) T cells in protection from pathogenic CMV infection and provide evidence for their antiviral therapeutic potential.

  13. KIR and HLA interactions are associated with control of primary CMV infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    van Duin, D; Avery, R K; Hemachandra, S; Yen-Lieberman, B; Zhang, A; Jain, A; Butler, R S; Barnard, J; Schold, J D; Fung, J; Askar, M

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors(KIR) are genetically polymorphic natural killer(NK) cell receptors important in antiviral responses. A retrospective, single-center cohort study was performed to study the interaction of KIR genotype and primary control of CMV infection after transplantation.Time to first CMV viremia was determined for a cohort of 531 CMV serology donor positive/recipient negative solid organ transplant recipients. Of the KIR genes,KIR2DL3 and KIR2DS2 were most strongly associated with time to CMV viremia in random survival forest analysis. As KIR2DL3 and KIR2DS2 both interact with HLA-C1, these interactions were evaluated. Seventy six recipients were found to be positive for both KIR2DL3 and KIR2DS2 and expressed only HLA-C1 antigens in both recipient and donor. These patients had a substantially reduced hazard of CMV viremia in the first year after solid organ transplantation (hazard ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.27–0.72, p=0.0012). In KIR2DL3+/KIR2DS2+/HLA-C1/1 recipients who received an organ from a non-C1/1 donor, this protective effect was not observed. These results improve our understanding of human NK cell function in primary CMV infection after transplant.

  14. CMV Infection Attenuates the Disease Course in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pirko, Istvan; Cardin, Rhonda; Chen, Yi; Lohrey, Anne K.; Lindquist, Diana M.; Dunn, R. Scott; Zivadinov, Robert; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests that active CMV infection may result in more benign clinical disease. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether underlying murine CMV (MCMV) infection affects the course of the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV) induced murine model of MS. A group of eight TMEV-infected mice were co-infected with MCMV at 2 weeks prior to TMEV infection while a second group of TMEV-infected mice received MCMV two weeks post TMEV. We also used 2 control groups, where at the above time points MCMV was replaced with PBS. Outcome measures included (1) monthly monitoring of disability via rotarod for 8 months; (2) in vivo MRI for brain atrophy studies and (3) FACS analysis of brain infiltrating lymphocytes at 8 months post TMEV infection. Co-infection with MCMV influenced the disease course in mice infected prior to TMEV infection. In this group, rotarod detectable motor performance was significantly improved starting 3 months post-infection and beyond (p≤0.024). In addition, their brain atrophy was close to 30% reduced at 8 months, but this was only present as a trend due to low power (p = 0.19). A significant reduction in the proportion of brain infiltrating CD3+ cells was detected in this group (p = 0.026), while the proportion of CD45+ Mac1+ cells significantly increased (p = 0.003). There was also a strong trend for a reduced proportion of CD4+ cells (p = 0.17) while CD8 and B220+ cell proportion did not change. These findings support an immunomodulatory effect of MCMV infection in this MS model. Future studies in this co-infection model will provide insight into mechanisms which modulate the development of demyelination and may be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22393447

  15. The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on acute rejection in kidney transplanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzamani, Boshra; Hami, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Vajihe; Torkamani, Mahtab; Ghorban Sabagh, Mahin; Ahmadi Simab, Saiideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is known that cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a common problem among kidney transplant patients. This infection can be increased morbidity and decreased graft survival. This problem has been associated with acute rejection too. Patients and Methods: One hundred and thirty renal transplant patients were included in a prospective, case-control study. The renal transplant patients were divided into two groups; patients group with CMV infection and control group without CMV infection. Serum CMV-IgG in all patients was positive (donor and recipients). None of patients had received anti-thymocyte-globulin and thymoglobulin. CMV infection was diagnosed by quantitative CMV-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test (more than 500 copies/μg). Rejection episode was defined by kidney isotope scan or biopsy. Results: In the group of 66 CMV infection patients (41 male [62.1%] and 25 female [37.9%]) the incidence of graft rejection was 36%, however in the group of 64 control patients the incidence of graft rejection was 9.4 % (P < 0.005). Conclusion: CMV infection is important predisposing factor for acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The results of this study suggests that the control of CMV infection could decrease episodes of acute kidney rejection. PMID:27471740

  16. Developing a Vaccine against Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: What Have We Learned from Animal Models? Where Should We Go Next?

    PubMed

    Schleiss, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can lead to long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, including mental retardation and sensorineural hearing loss. Unfortunately, CMVs are highly adapted to their specific species, precluding the evaluation of HCMV vaccines in animal models prior to clinical trials. Several species-specific CMVs have been characterized and developed in models of pathogenesis and vaccine-mediated protection against disease. These include the murine CMV (MCMV), the porcine CMV (PCMV), the rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV), the rat CMV (RCMV), and the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV). Because of the propensity of the GPCMV to cross the placenta, infecting the fetus in utero, it has emerged as a model of particular interest in studying vaccine-mediated protection of the fetus. In this paper, a review of these various models, with particular emphasis on the value of the model in the testing and evaluation of vaccines against congenital CMV, is provided. Recent exciting developments and advances in these various models are summarized, and recommendations offered for high-priority areas for future study.

  17. Developing a Vaccine against Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: What Have We Learned from Animal Models? Where Should We Go Next?

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can lead to long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae, including mental retardation and sensorineural hearing loss. Unfortunately, CMVs are highly adapted to their specific species, precluding the evaluation of HCMV vaccines in animal models prior to clinical trials. Several species-specific CMVs have been characterized and developed in models of pathogenesis and vaccine-mediated protection against disease. These include the murine CMV (MCMV), the porcine CMV (PCMV), the rhesus macaque CMV (RhCMV), the rat CMV (RCMV), and the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV). Because of the propensity of the GPCMV to cross the placenta, infecting the fetus in utero, it has emerged as a model of particular interest in studying vaccine-mediated protection of the fetus. In this paper, a review of these various models, with particular emphasis on the value of the model in the testing and evaluation of vaccines against congenital CMV, is provided. Recent exciting developments and advances in these various models are summarized, and recommendations offered for high-priority areas for future study. PMID:24523827

  18. Priorities for CMV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Philip R; Bialek, Stephanie R; Boppana, Suresh B; Griffiths, Paul D; Laughlin, Catherine A; Ljungman, Per; Mocarski, Edward S; Pass, Robert F; Read, Jennifer S; Schleiss, Mark R; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2013-12-17

    A multidisciplinary meeting addressed priorities related to development of vaccines against cytomegalovirus (CMV), the cause of congenital CMV (cCMV) disease and of serious disease in the immunocompromised. Participants discussed optimal uses of a CMV vaccine, aspects of clinical study design, and the value of additional research. A universal childhood CMV vaccine could potentially rapidly reduce cCMV disease, as infected children are sources of viral transmission to seronegative and seropositive mothers. A vaccine administered to adolescents or adult women could also reduce cCMV disease by making them immune prior to pregnancy. Clinical trials of CMV vaccines in women should evaluate protection against cCMV infection, an essential precursor of cCMV disease, which is a more practical and acceptable endpoint for assessing vaccine effects on maternal-fetal transmission. Clinical trials of vaccines to evaluate prevention of CMV disease in stem cell transplant recipients could use CMV viremia at a level triggering pre-emptive antiviral therapy as an endpoint, because widespread use of pre-emptive and prophylactic antivirals has rendered CMV-induced disease too rare to be a practical endpoint for clinical trials. In solid organ transplant patients, CMV-associated disease is sufficiently common for use as a primary endpoint. Additional research to advance CMV vaccine development should include identifying factors that predict fetal loss due to CMV, determining age-specific incidence and transmission rates, defining the mechanism and relative contributions of maternal reactivation and re-infection to cCMV disease, developing assays that can distinguish between reactivation and re-infection in seropositive vaccinees, further defining predictors of sequelae from cCMV infection, and identifying clinically relevant immune response parameters to CMV (including developing validated assays that could assess CMV antibody avidity) that could lead to the establishment of immune

  19. Priorities for CMV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Philip R.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Boppana, Suresh B.; Griffiths, Paul D.; Laughlin, Catherine A.; Ljungman, Per; Mocarski, Edward S.; Pass, Robert F.; Read, Jennifer S.; Schleiss, Mark R.; Plotkin, Stanley A.

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary meeting addressed priorities related to development of vaccines against cytomegalovirus (CMV), the cause of congenital CMV (cCMV) disease and of serious disease in the immunocompromised. Participants discussed optimal uses of a CMV vaccine, aspects of clinical study design, and the value of additional research. A universal childhood CMV vaccine could potentially rapidly reduce cCMV disease, as infected children are sources of viral transmission to seronegative and seropositive mothers. A vaccine administered to adolescents or adult women could also reduce cCMV disease by making them immune prior to pregnancy. Clinical trials of CMV vaccines in women should evaluate protection against cCMV infection, an essential precursor of cCMV disease, which is a more practical and acceptable endpoint for assessing vaccine effects on maternal-fetal transmission. Clinical trials of vaccines to evaluate prevention of CMV disease in stem cell transplant recipients could use CMV viremia at a level triggering preemptive antiviral therapy as an endpoint, because widespread use of preemptive and prophylactic antivirals has rendered CMV-induced disease too rare to be a practical endpoint for clinical trials. In solid organ transplant patients, CMV-associated disease is sufficiently common for use as a primary endpoint. Additional research to advance CMV vaccine development should include identifying factors that predict fetal loss due to CMV, determining age-specific incidence and transmission rates, defining the mechanism and relative contributions of maternal reactivation and re-infection to cCMV disease, developing assays that can distinguish between reactivation and re-infection in seropositive vaccinees, further defining predictors of sequelae from cCMV infection, and identifying clinically relevant immune response parameters to CMV (including developing validated assays that could assess CMV antibody avidity) that could lead to the establishment of immune

  20. Detection of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Wheezing Infants by Urine DNA and Serum IgG Testing

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhao-cheng; Chang, Qing; Sun, Zhi-wei; Song, Ming-mei; Jin, Xin-ling; Jiang, Shu-ya; Yang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of CMV infection in wheezing infants and the association between CMV-DNA and immunoglobulins (Igs). Material/Methods A total of 243 wheezing infants and 3,000 parturients were enrolled in this study. The infants were randomly grouped to receive blood HCMV-DNA tests (n=46) or urine HCMV-DNA tests (n=197). Furthermore, all participants had serum CMV-specific IgM and IgG testing. Afterwards, 10 HCMV-IgG positive infants were randomly selected for simultaneous blood and urine HCMV-DNA tests, and 25 HCMV-IgG positive puerperants were randomly selected for urine HCMV-DNA tests. Results The detection rate of urine HCMV-DNA was significantly higher than that of blood HCMV-DNA (67.5% vs. 13.0%, p<0.001). Fifteen (6.2%) and 190 (80.0%) infants showed positive CMV-specific IgM and IgG results (p<0.001), respectively. Among the 10 HCMV-IgG positive infants tested further, only two infants had positive HCMV-DNA blood tests, while all of the 10 infants had positive HCMV-DNA urine tests. However, HCMV-DNA was not detected in the urine of the 25 randomly selected parturients positive for HCMV-IgG. Conclusions CMV infection may be one of the causes of wheezing in infants; CMV infection can be detected by urine-HCMV-DNA and serum HCMV-IgG testing. Infants were more susceptible to CMV infection than parturients. PMID:28283676

  1. Persistent CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a CMV-seronegative donor-to-positive recipient constellation: Development of multidrug resistance in the absence of anti-viral cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Herling, Marco; Schröder, L; Awerkiew, Sabine; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Holtick, Udo; Kaiser, Rolf; Pfister, Herbert; Scheid, Christof; Di Cristanziano, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with discordant and high-risk (D-/R+) constellation of CMV serostatus. Despite the use of different and innovative antiviral strategies, viral replication could not be suppressed successfully promoting a protracted CMV colitis associated with severe gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GI GVHD). We illustrate that the development of multidrug viral resistance, the failure to mount a CMV-specific cellular immune response, as confirmed by QuantiFERON(®)-CMV (Qiagen) assay, and the refractory GVHD requiring prolonged immunosuppression were the main factors contributing to persistent viral replication and the fulminant unfavorable course.

  2. Effect of CMV infection and high temperatures on the enzymes involved in raffinose family oligosaccharide biosynthesis in melon plants.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lidor; Ben-Ari, Julius; Turgeon, Robert; Wolf, Shmuel

    2012-07-01

    Ultrastructural and molecular studies have provided experimental evidence for the classification of cucurbits as symplastic loaders, mainly translocating the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) raffinose and stachyose. Earlier studies established that cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) infection causes a significant increase in the sucrose-to-RFO ratio in the phloem sap of melon plants. The alteration in phloem sap sugar composition was associated with upregulation of CmSUT1 transcript within the vascular bundles. The current research aimed to explore the effect of CMV infection on the enzymes involved in symplastic phloem loading and RFO biosynthesis. Viral infection did not affect the activity of either raffinose or stachyose synthases in source leaves, but caused upregulation of the respective transcripts. Interestingly, activity of galactinol synthase was higher in CMV-infected leaves, associated with upregulation of CmGAS2. A significant increase in CmGAS2 expression in source leaves of melon plants exposed to high temperatures indicated that this response is common for both biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the effect of CMV or heat stress on phloem sap sugar composition is not due to alteration in RFO biosynthesis.

  3. The Unmet Need in the Elderly: How immunosenescence, CMV infection, co-morbidities and frailty are a challenge for the development of more effective influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McElhaney, Janet E.; Zhou, Xin; Talbot, H. Keipp; Soethout, Ernst; Bleackley, R. Chris; Granville, David; Pawelec, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Influenza remains the single most important cause of excess disability and mortality during the winter months. In spite of widespread influenza vaccination programs leading to demonstrated cost-savings in the over 65 population, hospitalization and death rates for acute respiratory illnesses continue to rise. As a person ages, increased serum levels of inflammatory cytokines are commonly recorded (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6). Termed “inflammaging”, this has been linked to persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and immune senescence, while increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) are possibly associated with more healthy aging. Paradoxically, a shift with aging toward an anti-inflammatory (IL-10) response and decline in the IFN-γ:IL-10 ratio in influenza-challenged peripheral blood mononuclear cells is associated with a decline in the cytolytic capacity of CD8+ T cells responsible for clearing influenza virus from infected lung tissue. Thus, it is seemingly counter intuitive that the immune phenotype of healthy aging predicts a poor cell-mediated immune response and more serious outcomes of influenza. Herein we postulate a mechanistic link between the accumulation of late-stage, potentially terminally-differentiated T cells, many or most of which result from CMV infection, and the immunopathogenesis of influenza infection, mediated by granzyme B in older adults. Further, adjuvanted influenza vaccines that stimulate inflammatory cytokines and suppress the IL-10 response to influenza challenge, would be expected to enhance protection in the 65+ population. PMID:22289511

  4. CMV+ Serostatus Associates Negatively with CD4:CD8 Ratio Normalization in Controlled HIV-Infected Patients on cART

    PubMed Central

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Allavena, Clotilde; Duvivier, Claudine; Cano, Carla Eliana; Guillouet de Salvador, Francine; Rey, David; Dellamonica, Pierre; Cuzin, Lise; Cheret, Antoine; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common among HIV-infected patients but its repercussion on the course of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after cART initiation remains elusive. The French Dat'AIDS cohort enrolled 5,688 patients on first-line cART, from which we selected patients who achieved HIV suppression for at least 12 months without modification of cART, and for whom CMV serostatus was available. Five hundred and three patients fulfilled the selection criteria (74% male, median age 43 yrs, 15.5% CDC stage C), of whom 444 (88.3%) were seropositive for CMV (CMV+). Multivariate analyses using mixed-linear models adjusted for the time from HIV suppression, sex, age, transmission risk group, duration of HIV follow-up, the interaction between time from HIV suppression and CMV+ serology, and the nadir CD4 count revealed a negative correlation between CMV+ and CD4:CD8 ratio (coeff. = -0.16; p = 0.001). This correlation was also observed among patients displaying optimal CD4 recovery (≥500 cells/mm3 at M12; coeff. = -0.24; p = 0.002). Hence, CMV+ serostatus antagonizes normalization of the CD4:CD8 ratio, although further analyses of the impact of co-morbidities that associate with CMV serostatus, like HCV infection, are needed to elucidate this antagonism formally. However, this might reflect a premature T cell senescence, thus advocating for a close monitoring of T cells in CMV co-infected patients. In addition, our results raise the question of the benefit of treatment for asymptomatic CMV co-infection in HIV-infected patients. PMID:27824907

  5. Breakage of resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus by co-infection with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: enhancement of CMV accumulation independent of symptom expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Lee, K C; Gaba, V; Wong, S M; Palukaitis, P; Gal-On, A

    2004-02-01

    Resistance to the cucumovirus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in cucumber cv. Delila was manifested as a very low level of accumulation of viral RNA and capsid protein, and an absence of CMV-induced symptoms. In addition, resistance was observed at the single cell level, with a reduction in accumulation of CMV RNAs, compared to accumulation in cells of the susceptible cucumber cv. Bet Alpha. Resistance to CMV in cv. Delila was broken by co-infection with the potyvirus Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Resistance breakage in cv. Delila plants was manifested by an increase in the accumulation of (+) and (-) CMV RNA as well as CMV capsid protein, with no increase in the level of accumulation of ZYMV. Resistance breakage in the resistant cultivar by ZYMV also occurred at the single cell level. Thus, synergistic interactions known to occur between a potyvirus and a cucumovirus led to resistance breakage during a double infection. However, resistance breakage was not accompanied by an increase in disease symptoms beyond those induced by ZYMV itself. On co-inoculation with an asymptomatic variant of ZYMV-AG an enhancement of CMV infection occurred without disease manifestation. Consequently, intensification of viral RNA and capsid protein accumulation can occur without a corresponding increase in disease development, suggesting that different host genes regulate viral accumulation and disease development in the CMV-resistant cucumber plants.

  6. An atypical case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    De Fino, Chiara; Nociti, Viviana; Modoni, Anna; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man admitted to our hospital for persistent headache associated with fever, retrorbitary pain and vomiting, who rapidly developed encephalopathy with drowsiness, paraplegia, hypoesthesia with a D6 sensory level and urinary retention. Brain and spinal cord MRI revealed findings compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and microbiological tests documented a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV infection is extraordinarily associated with ADEM, but must be included in microbiological tests, because early diagnosis and treatment ameliorate the neurological outcome.

  7. Expansions of Cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T Cells Drive Excess Cardiovascular Mortality in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Chronic Inflammatory Conditions and Are Triggered by CMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Broadley, Iain; Pera, Alejandra; Morrow, George; Davies, Kevin A.; Kern, Florian

    2017-01-01

    A large proportion of cardiovascular (CV) pathology results from immune-mediated damage, including systemic inflammation and cellular proliferation, which cause a narrowing of the blood vessels. Expansions of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells characterized by loss of CD28 (“CD4+CD28− T cells” or “CD4+CD28null cells”) are closely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), in particular coronary artery damage. Direct involvement of these cells in damaging the vasculature has been demonstrated repeatedly. Moreover, CD4+CD28− T cells are significantly increased in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. It is striking that expansions of this subset beyond 1–2% occur exclusively in CMV-infected people. CMV infection itself is known to increase the severity of autoimmune diseases, in particular RA and has also been linked to increased vascular pathology. A review of the recent literature on immunological changes in CVD, RA, and CMV infection provides strong evidence that expansions of cytotoxic CD4+CD28− T cells in RA and other chronic inflammatory conditions are limited to CMV-infected patients and driven by CMV infection. They are likely to be responsible for the excess CV mortality observed in these situations. The CD4+CD28− phenotype convincingly links CMV infection to CV mortality based on a direct cellular-pathological mechanism rather than epidemiological association. PMID:28303136

  8. Association between individual and combined SNPs in genes related to innate immunity and incidence of CMV infection in seropositive kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, M; Corrales, I; Arias, M; Campistol, J M; Giménez, E; Crespo, J; López-Oliva, M O; Beneyto, I; Martín-Moreno, P L; Llamas-Fuente, F; Gutiérrez, A; García-Álvarez, T; Guerra-Rodríguez, R; Calvo, N; Fernández-Rodríguez, A; Tabernero-Romo, J M; Navarro, M D; Ramos-Verde, A; Aguado, J M; Navarro, D

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we assessed the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven candidate genes involved in orchestrating the immune response against cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the 12-month incidence of CMV infection in 315 CMV-seropositive kidney transplant (KT) recipients. Patients were managed either by antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy. CMV infection occurred in 140 patients (44.4%), including 13 episodes of disease. After adjusting for various clinical covariates, patients harboring T-allele genotypes of interleukin-28B (IL28B) (rs12979860) SNP had lower incidence of CMV infection (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.46-0.96; p-value = 0.029). In the analysis restricted to patients not receiving prophylaxis, carriers of the TT genotype of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) (rs5743836) SNP had lower incidence of infection (aHR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.38-0.96; p-value = 0.035), whereas the GG genotype of dendritic cell-specific ICAM 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) (rs735240) SNP exerted the opposite effect (aHR: 1.86; 95% CI: 1.18-2.94; p-value = 0.008). An independent association was found between the number of unfavorable SNP genotypes carried by the patient and the incidence of CMV infection. In conclusion, specific SNPs in IL28B, TLR9 and DC-SIGN genes may play a role in modulating the susceptibility to CMV infection in CMV-seropositive KT recipients.

  9. CMV - pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone marrow transplant Breathing difficulty Chemotherapy CMV retinitis HIV/AIDS Immune response Mononucleosis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) WBC count Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 12/10/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant ...

  10. Are female daycare workers at greater risk of cytomegalovirus infection? A secondary data analysis of CMV seroprevalence between 2010 and 2013 in Hamburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stranzinger, Johanna; Kozak, Agnessa; Schilgen, Benjamin; Paris, Diana; Nießen, Thomas; Schmidt, Lutz; Wille, Andreas; Wagner, Norbert L.; Nienhaus, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Close contact with asymptomatic children younger than three years is a risk factor for a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. In pregnant women, such primary infection increases the risk of CMV-induced feto- or embryopathy. Daycare providers have therefore implemented working restrictions for pregnant daycare workers (DCWs) in accordance with legislation and guidelines for maternity protection. However, little is known about the infection risk for DCWs. We therefore compared the prevalence of CMV antibodies of pregnant DCWs to that of female blood donors (BDs). Method: In a secondary data analysis, the prevalence of anti-CMV IgG among pregnant DCWs (N=509) in daycare centers (DCCs) was compared to the prevalence of female first-time BDs (N=14,358) from the greater region of Hamburg, Germany. Data collection took place between 2010 and 2013. The influence of other risk factors such as age, pregnancies and place of residence was evaluated using logistic regression models. Results: The prevalence of CMV antibodies in pregnant DCWs was higher than in female BDs (54.6 vs 41.5%; OR 1.6; 95%CI 1.3–1.9). The subgroup of BDs who had given birth to at least one child and who lived in the city of Hamburg (N=2,591) had a prevalence of CMV antibodies similar to the prevalence in pregnant DCWs (53.9 vs 54.6%; OR 0.9; 95%CI 0.8–1.2). Age, pregnancy history and living in the center of Hamburg were risk factors for CMV infections. Conclusion: The comparison of pregnant DCWs to the best-matching subgroup of female first-time BDs with past pregnancies and living in the city of Hamburg does not indicate an elevated risk of CMV infection among DCWs. However, as two secondary data sets from convenience samples were used, a more detailed investigation of the risk factors other than place of residence, age and maternity was not possible. Therefore, the CMV infection risk in DCWs should be further studied by taking into consideration the potential preventive effect of

  11. Cytomegalovirus Hyper Immunoglobulin for CMV Prophylaxis in Thoracic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Federico; Potena, Luciano; Yonan, Nizar; Wagner, Florian; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection negatively influences both short- and long-term outcomes after cardiothoracic transplantation. In heart transplantation, registry analyses have shown that CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) with or without virostatic prophylaxis is associated with a significant reduction in mortality and graft loss versus no prophylaxis, particularly in high-risk donor (D)+/recipient (R)- transplants. Randomized comparative trials are lacking but retrospective data suggest that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis may reduce rates of CMV-related events after heart transplantation, including the incidence of acute rejection or chronic allograft vasculopathy. However, available data consistently indicate that when CMVIG is used, it should be administered with concomitant antiviral therapy, and that evidence concerning preemptive management with CMVIG is limited, but promising. In lung transplantation, CMVIG should again only be used with concomitant antiviral therapy. Retrospective studies have shown convincing evidence that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis lowers CMV endpoints and mortality. The current balance of evidence suggests that CMVIG prophylaxis reduces the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, but a controlled trial is awaited. Overall, the relatively limited current data set suggests that prophylaxis with CMVIG in combination with antiviral therapy appears effective in D+/R- heart transplant patients, whereas in lung transplantation, addition of CMVIG in recipients of a CMV-positive graft may offer an advantage in terms of CMV infection and disease.

  12. Immunostimulation by cytomegalovirus (CMV): helper T cell-dependent activation of immunoglobulin production in vitro by lymphocytes from CMV-immune donors

    SciTech Connect

    Yachie, A.; Tosato, G.; Straus, S.E.; Blaese, R.M.

    1985-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the cause of a number of different diseases ranging from self-limited benign infections in healthy adults to life threatening illnesses among immunocompromised hosts and newborns. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity is often found in cases of acute CMV infection, and in addition, the virus may also be a potent stimulant of lymphoid cells in vivo. The authors studied cellular proliferation and immunoglobulin (Ig) production induced by CMV to determine its effect on human lymphocytes in vitro. The CMV that was added to cultures of lymphocytes from CMV-seronegative donors failed to induce either significant cellular proliferation or Ig production. By contrast, CMV-stimulated cultures from CMV-seropositive donors induced both prominent cellular proliferation and Ig production. B cell differentiation into Ig-secreting cells required the presence of T cells, and this T cell help was sensitive to irradiation with 2000 rad and to treatment with cyclosporin A. When T cells were depleted of OKT4+ cells with monoclonal antibody and complement, the co-cultured B cells failed to produce Ig, whereas the depletion of OKT8+ cells had no effect on the Ig-secreting cell response. Inactivation of CMV before culture did not result in a reduction of either cellular proliferation or Ig production. Thus, infection of target cells is not required for in vitro lymphocyte activation by CMV. These results demonstrate that CMV is a potent activator of B cells inducing Ig production in vitro, and that this process requires the presence of virus-specific memory T cells.

  13. Routine CMV screening during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Collinet, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Kacet, N; Dewilde, A; Puech, F

    2004-05-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) screening during pregnancy has been widely discussed for several years, but still no consensus has been agreed. With a number of live births of 750,000 per year in France, we would expect 7500 infected infants at birth per year (rate of congenital infection of 1%). Among infected infants at birth, the number of severely infected foetuses would be approximately 75, the number of infants with severe sequelae would be 480, 675 approximately would present with hearing loss and the number of asymptomatic infants would be 6270. Five different preventive methods for congenital CMV infection are possible: (1) Routine CMV screening at the beginning of pregnancy for primary prevention. (2) Secondary prevention by antenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection complications. (3) Tertiary prevention by serological testing during pregnancy. (4) Tertiary prevention by serological screening at birth. (5) Tertiary prevention: Hearing loss screening at birth. The aims of this review are to define the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods of CMV screening during pregnancy and to determine if the current available information would make systematic testing acceptable.

  14. In utero cytomegalovirus infection and development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Stephen Starko; Wallace, Amelia D; Wendt, George A; Li, Linlin; Liu, Fenyong; Riley, Lee W; Kogan, Scott; Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Dahl, Gary V; Ma, Xiaomei; Delwart, Eric; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2017-03-23

    It is widely suspected, yet controversial, that infection plays an etiologic role in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer and a disease with a confirmed prenatal origin in most cases. We investigated infections at diagnosis and then assessed the timing of infection at birth in children with ALL and age, gender, and ethnicity matched controls to identify potential causal initiating infections. Comprehensive untargeted virome and bacterial analyses of pretreatment bone marrow specimens (n = 127 ALL in comparison with 38 acute myeloid leukemia cases in a comparison group) revealed prevalent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection at diagnosis in childhood ALL, demonstrating active viral transcription in leukemia blasts as well as intact virions in serum. Screening of newborn blood samples revealed a significantly higher prevalence of in utero CMV infection in ALL cases (n = 268) than healthy controls (n = 270) (odds ratio [OR], 3.71, confidence interval [CI], 1.56-7.92, P = .0016). Risk was more pronounced in Hispanics (OR=5.90, CI=1.89-25.96) than in non-Hispanic whites (OR=2.10 CI= 0.69-7.13). This is the first study to suggest that congenital CMV infection is a risk factor for childhood ALL and is more prominent in Hispanic children. Further investigation of CMV as an etiologic agent for ALL is warranted.

  15. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient With Hodgkin lymphoma and Concurrent EBV, CMV, and Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa Ali, Moaath; Ruano Mendez, Ana Lucia; Carraway, Hetty E.

    2017-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a syndrome characterized by immune activation and subsequent widespread organ damage. Patients affected by HLH commonly develop fever, cytopenias, liver damage, neurologic manifestations, and hypercytokinemia. In this case, we describe a 60-year-old male who presented with HLH and concurrent Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and Candida infections and was subsequently diagnosed with a Hodgkin lymphoma. This case highlights the importance of considering a cancer diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with HLH. PMID:28210636

  16. Unusually difficult clinical presentation of an infant suffering from congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection combined with alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Potočnjak, Ines; Tešović, Goran; Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Štefanović, Mario; Žaja, Orjena

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency are separately well described entities, but their simultaneous occurrence can pose a special challenge to a clinician, especially dealing with optimal diagnostic as well as therapeutic approach. Congenital CMV infection is the most common vertically transmitted infection in developed countries. In 85–95% of newborns it runs asymptomatic, while in others it is presented with jaundice, petechias, hepatosplenomegaly and central nervous system damage. A1AT deficiency is on the other hand, the most common genetic liver disease in children, and the clinical spectrum varies from the accidentally detected increased levels of transaminases through to the severe infant cholestasis that can progress to cirrhosis. The following case report describes a two-month old male with severe clinical presentation of congenital CMV infection probably exacerbated due to A1AT deficiency comorbidity. The clinical manifestations and unusually difficult clinical signs this infant presented lead to assumption that the additional liver damage exists. Extensive laboratory analyses were performed, including PCR for CMV DNA, A1AT serum concentration, A1AT genotyping, followed and confirmed with phenotyping. Patient was treated parenteral with ganciclovir, what continued with oral valganciclovir and supportive therapy. Intensive and thorough supportive treatment of the infant resulted in satisfactory progress and excellent outcome. Patient was followed-up till the age of 18 months. The presented case provides excellent example about successful overcoming obstacles in differential diagnosis of A1AT in neonates and infants. Medical charts analysis was the methodology used in making this report. PMID:25351359

  17. Severe Thrombocytopenia and Acute Cytomegalovirus Colitis during Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Furuhata, Masanori; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Nishiki, Shingo; Sasaki, Shugo; Suganuma, Akihiko; Imamura, Akifumi; Ajisawa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 25-year-old man who was referred to our hospital due to acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis. The initial blood tests showed that the patient had concurrent primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and severe thrombocytopenia. Raltegravir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was initiated without the use of ganciclovir or corticosteroids and resulted in a rapid clinical improvement. Platelet transfusions were only necessary for a short period, and subsequent colonoscopy revealed a completely healed ulcer. This case implies that ART alone could be effective for treating severe thrombocytopenia during primary HIV and CMV coinfection. PMID:27980271

  18. The risk of polyomavirus BK-associated hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT is associated with myeloablative conditioning, CMV viremia and severe acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Uhm, J; Hamad, N; Michelis, F V; Shanavas, M; Kuruvilla, J; Gupta, V; Lipton, J H; Messner, H A; Seftel, M; Kim, D D

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common complication after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). Several risk factors have been suggested including BU-containing myeloablative conditioning, unrelated donors and GVHD, but these have not been consistently reported. We conducted a retrospective study including 339 allo-HSCT recipients between 2009 and 2012. Of 339 patients, 79 (23.3%) developed HC with 2-year cumulative incidence of 24.0% (95% confidence interval, 19.4-28.9). The median onset time was 45 days (range, 16-430) after allo-HSCT. Sixty-two patients (84%) out of 74 evaluated for urine BK virus PCR testing showed a positive result (mean 2.0 × 10(10) copies of DNA per mL). In univariate analysis, myeloablative conditioning, HLA-mismatched donor, CMV viremia and acute GVHD (aGVHD) grade 3-4 were significantly associated with the risk of HC. Multivariate analysis confirmed all associating factors identified in univariate analysis except for HLA-mismatched donor: myeloablative conditioning (hazard ratio (HR) 2.63, P=0.003), CMV viremia (HR 1.88, P=0.014) and aGVHD grade 3-4 (HR 1.71, P=0.029). HC did not affect OS or non-relapse mortality. Symptomatic HC is a frequent complication following allo-HSCT, with a 2-year cumulative incidence of 24.0%. Three clinical factors associated with HC were identified including myeloablative conditioning, CMV viremia and severe aGVHD.

  19. Case report: persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using in vivo alemtuzumab: emergence of resistant CMV due to mutations in the UL97 and UL54 genes.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kumi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kako, Shinichi; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Watanabe, Takuro; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-10-01

    Addition of in vivo alemtuzumab to the conditioning regimen enabled 2- or 3-locus-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with an acceptable incidence of graft-versus-host-disease. However, the procedure was associated with a high incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. Although preemptive therapy with ganciclovir prevented successfully severe CMV diseases and CMV-related mortality, a patient developed persistent positive CMV antigenemia for more than 1 year after transplantation and CMV disease, despite the use of ganciclovir and foscarnet. The in vitro susceptibility assay showed that the clinical isolate was resistant to foscarnet, moderately resistant to ganciclovir, but sensitive to cidofovir. Therefore, cidofovir was administered. CMV antigenemia became negative within 2 weeks and never developed again. Nucleotide sequence of the UL54 and UL97 of the clinical isolate showed 4 amino acid substitutions (V11L, Q578H, S655L, and G874R) in UL54 and 2 mutations (A140V and A594V) in UL97 compared with the Towne and AD169 strains. Ganciclovir resistance was suspected to be caused by both A594V of UL97 and Q578H of UL54, whereas foscarnet resistance was due mainly to Q578H of UL54. In conclusion, the in vitro susceptibility assay as well as nucleotide sequence of clinical isolate is important to choose appropriate antiviral agents for patients who have persistent CMV reactivation after stem cell transplantation.

  20. Difference of physiological characters in dark green islands and yellow leaf tissue of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected Nicotiana tabacum leaves.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Xi, De-Hui; Yuan, Shu; Xu, Fei; Xu, Mo-Yun; Qi, Hai-Long; Wang, Shao-Dong; Huang, Qing-Rong; Wen, Lin; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Dark green islands (DGIs) are a common symptom of plants systemically infected with the mosaic virus. DGIs are clusters of green leaf cells that are free of virus but surrounded by yellow leaf tissue that is full of virus particles. In Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected Nicotiana tabacum leaves, the respiration and photosynthesis capabilities of DGIs and yellow leaf tissues were measured. The results showed that the cyanide-resistant respiration was enhanced in yellow leaf tissue and the photosynthesis was declined, while in DGIs they were less affected. The activities of the oxygen-scavenging enzymes catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in infected leaves were significantly higher than those in the healthy leaves, and the enzyme activities in DGIs were always lower than in the yellow leaf tissues. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) staining showed that the hydrogen peroxide content in yellow leaf tissues was apparently higher than that in DGIs, while the superoxide content was on the contrary. Formation of DGIs may be a strategy of the host plants resistance to the CMV infection.

  1. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  2. Transient antiphospholipid syndrome associated with primary cytomegalovirus infection: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Irino, Kensuke; Kimoto, Yasutaka; Arinobu, Yojiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Takahiko; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Viral infection is known to induce transient autoimmunity in humans. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is implicated in occasional thrombosis formation. We here, for the first time, report a 19-year-old female who had an acute CMV infection, leading to a deep venous thrombosis and a pulmonary embolism along with transient appearance of lupus anticoagulant. The pathological role of antiphospholipid antibodies in CMV-mediated thrombosis is discussed.

  3. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  4. Analysis of leukocyte activation during acute rejection of pulmonary allografts in noninfected and cytomegalovirus-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmüller, C; Steinhoff, G; Bauer, D; You, X M; Denzin, H; Franke-Ullmann, G; Hausen, B; Bruggemann, C; Wagner, T O; Lohmann-Matthes, M L; Emmendörffer, A

    1997-01-01

    After human lung transplantation acute rejection and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections may occur, probably contributing to the development of chronic rejection. We established a model of subacute allograft rejection in rats to analyze leukocyte activation and effects of a CMV infection. Histoincompatible lung transplants (BN/LEW) without immunosuppression (group A) and lungs of initially immunosuppressed animals (group B) were analyzed. The production of inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxides) and the expression of MHC class II antigens by alveolar and lung tissue macrophages were significantly enhanced during the alloresponse. In recipients without immunosuppression (group A) allograft necrosis was detected by day 6, whereas group B allografts were fully rejected by day 25. In allografts of immunosuppressed, CMV-infected animals (group C) the CMV infection was clearly aggravated and the number of activated lung tissue macrophages was increased when compared with noninfected allografts or isografts. The subacute model provides the advantage of allowing us to study mechanisms of acute rejection without the effects of reperfusion injury. Furthermore these findings underline the role of inflammatory mediators produced by macrophages during rejection.

  5. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  6. Severe acute malnutrition and infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-12-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice.

  7. MISR CMV New Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-31

    ... daily (D), monthly (M), quarterly (Q), and yearly (Y) time scales and regional maps associated with field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The CMV product provides conveniently organized, high quality ...

  8. Immune reconstitution complicated by CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent haploidentical CD34+-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Boaro, Maria Paola; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Cermakova, Ivete; Perruccio, Katia; Mengoli, Carlo; Messina, Chiara

    2008-09-01

    We describe two episodes of CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent a CD34+ selected graft from his haploidentical father. Both recipient and donor were cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositive. Both episodes occurred late post-grafting during a phase of complete immunological recovery with sufficient numbers of circulating CMV-specific clones. Antiviral treatment with foscarnet and ganciclovir was successful but prolonged treatment was required to prevent relapses. We hypothesize that this complication was more related to an immune reconstitution process than to an immune-deficient state post-grafting. We conclude that CMV retinitis is a late complication of HSCT that can occur despite satisfactory immune reconstitution. Usually, it is responsive to antiviral therapy. Dilated fundoscopic examination is essential both for examining patients with reduced visual acuity and for screening asymptomatic patients.

  9. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  10. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  11. Cytomegalovirus infection after allogeneic transplantation: comparison of cord blood with peripheral blood and marrow graft sources.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; van Burik, Jo-Anne H; De For, Todd E; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2007-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is an important complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), but the natural history in the cord blood setting has not been well studied. We assessed CMV infection episodes in 753 consecutive allogeneic HSCT recipients at the University of Minnesota between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2003. The 6-month cumulative incidence of viremia/antigenemia was 22% by day +182: 21% (95% confidence interval 16%-26%) in cord blood recipients (UCB), 24% (20%-28%) in marrow (BM), and 22% (16%-28%) using peripheral blood grafts (PBSC). CMV disease incidence was 6% (2%-10%) in UCB, 8% (5%-11%) in BM, and 9% (6%-12%) in PBSC. In multivariate analysis, CMV infection (viremia/antigenemia and disease) was significantly more likely in patients who were seropositive to CMV, in those with acute graft versus host disease, and in those receiving T cell-depleted grafts. Graft source did not independently contribute to the risk of CMV infection and did not impact survival after CMV infection. These data confirm that recipient CMV serostatus remains the dominant risk factor for CMV infection. Recipients of UCB have similar risks of CMV infection, responses to antiviral therapy, and survival following CMV infection as recipients of either marrow or PBSC.

  12. Infection Prophylaxis and Management in Treating Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Aplastic Anemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma

  13. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  14. Clinical evaluation of the Roche Elecsys CMV IgG Avidity assay.

    PubMed

    Vauloup-Fellous, C; Lazzarotto, T; Revello, M G; Grangeot-Keros, L

    2014-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has potentially severe consequences in newborns. The testing of pregnant women for CMV-specific antibodies may be useful for the identification of women at risk of transmitting the infection to the fetus. The determination of CMV IgG avidity helps to establish the timing of infection as IgG avidity matures during the course of infection. This study examines the performance of the Elecsys CMV IgG Avidity assay using preselected samples from patients at different phases of CMV infection. The Elecsys CMV IgG Avidity assay was tested at three sites using sequential samples from patients with recent primary CMV infection, as well as single samples from patients with recent primary or past CMV infection. The Elecsys assay discriminated well between early (low avidity) and late (high avidity) phases of infection in sequential serum samples. Overall, 98.8% of low-avidity samples corresponded to infection onset <180 days before sampling and 77.8% of all high-avidity results corresponded to infection onset >90 days before sampling. The assay's sensitivity was 90-97%, with specificity ranging from 89 to 100%, depending on the consideration of gray-zone avidity values. Single samples from recent primary or past infection showed similar distributions of avidity results. The Elecsys CMV IgG Avidity assay results are in agreement with preselected samples from patients with primary or past CMV infection, showing that the test is an adequate predictor of the phase of infection.

  15. Acute exercise preferentially redeploys NK-cells with a highly-differentiated phenotype and augments cytotoxicity against lymphoma and multiple myeloma target cells. Part II: impact of latent cytomegalovirus infection and catecholamine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Austin B; Rezvani, Katayoun; Pistillo, Mira; Reed, Justin; Agha, Nadia; Kunz, Hawley; O'Connor, Daniel P; Sekine, Takuya; Bollard, Catherine M; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    We showed previously that acute exercise is associated with a preferential redeployment of highly-differentiated NK-cells and increased cytotoxicity against HLA-expressing tumor cell lines during exercise recovery. In this part II study, we retrospectively analyzed these findings in the context of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and performed additional experiments to explore potential mechanisms underpinning the marked reduction in NK-cell redeployment with exercise in CMV-seropositive individuals. We show here that latent CMV infection impairs NK-cell mobilization with exercise, only when the intensity of the exercise bout exceeds the individual blood lactate threshold (BLT). This impaired mobilization is associated with increased proportions of poorly exercise-responsive NK-cell subsets (NKG2C+/KIR-, NKG2C+/NKG2A-, and NKG2C+/CD57+) and decreased NK-cell β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR) expression in those with CMV. As a result, NK-cell production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to in vitro isoproterenol (synthetic β-agonist) stimulation was drastically lower in those with CMV (6.0 vs. 20.3pmol/mL, p<0.001) and correlated highly with the proportion of NKG2C+/CD57+ NK-cells (R(2)=0.97). Moreover, NK-cell cytotoxic activity (NKCA) against the K562 (36.6% vs. 22.7%, p<0.05), U266 (23.6% vs. 15.9%, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (41.3% vs. 13.3%, p<0.001) cell lines was increased at baseline in those infected with CMV; however, latent CMV infection abated the post-exercise increase in NKCA as a result of decreased NK-cell mobilization. Additionally, NKCA per cell against the U266 (0.24 vs. 0.12, p<0.01), RPMI-8226 (0.17 vs. 0.11, p<0.05), and 221.AEH (0.18 vs. 0.11, p<0.05) cell lines was increased 1h post-exercise (relative to baseline) in CMV-seronegative subjects, but not in those infected with CMV. Collectively, these data indicate that latent CMV infection may compromise NK-cell mediated immunosurveillance after acute exercise due to an increased proportion of

  16. Relationship between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation, CMV-driven immunity, overall immune recovery and graft-versus-leukaemia effect in children.

    PubMed

    Jeljeli, Mohamed; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Porcher, Raphael; Fahd, Mony; Leveillé, Sandrine; Yakouben, Karima; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; LeGoff, Jerome; Cordeiro, Debora Jorge; Pédron, Beatrice; Baruchel, Andre; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Sterkers, Ghislaine

    2014-07-01

    The interplay between immune recovery, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation, CMV-driven immunity and graft-versus-leukaemia effect (GVL) was analysed in 108 children (median age: 8 years) who underwent haematopoietic-stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukaemia. Follow-up was 2 years unless death or relapse occurred. CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was programmed weekly until month +3 post-HSCT. Immunomonitoring consisted of sequential lymphocyte subset enumerations and analyses of T-cell proliferative and γ-interferon responses to CMV and to adenovirus. In the 108 recipients, the 2-year relapse rate (RR) was 25% (median time to onset 4·5 months; range: 24 d-17 months). CMV reactivation occurrence was 31% (median time to onset 26 d). Donor/recipient CMV serostatus did not influence RR. Among the 89 recipients disease-free after day +120, i) early CMV-reactivation before day +30 was more frequent (P = 0·01) in the relapse recipient group opposed to the non-relapse group. ii) CD8(+) /CD28(-) and CD4(+) CD45RA(-) T-cell expansions induced by CMV did not influence RR, iii) Recovery of anti-CMV and also anti-adenovirus immunity and of naïve CD4(+) T-cells was faster in the non-relapse group (P = 0·008; 0·009 and 0·002 respectively). In contrast to adult acute myeloid leukaemia, CMV reactivation was associated with increased RR in this paediatric series. Accelerated overall immune recovery rather than CMV-driven immunity had a favourable impact on RR.

  17. Late-onset cytomegalovirus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome in a kidney transplant recipient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shaban, E; Gohh, R; Knoll, B M

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a common infection after solid-organ transplantation. In the general population CMV disease is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an autoimmune disease leading to an acute peripheral neuropathy, in 1 of 1000 cases. Interestingly, GBS is a rarely observed complication in solid-organ transplant recipients, possibly related to maintenance immunosuppression. We describe a case of CMV infection complicated by GBS in a kidney transplant recipient and review the literature.

  18. Stress and acute respiratory infection

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, N.M.; Douglas, R.M.; Ryan, P.

    1986-09-01

    To examine the relationship between stress and upper respiratory tract infection, 235 adults aged 14-57 years, from 94 families affiliated with three suburban family physicians in Adelaide, South Australia, participated in a six-month prospective study. High and low stress groups were identified by median splits of data collected from the Life Events Inventory, the Daily Hassles Scale, and the General Health Questionnaire, which were administered both before and during the six months of respiratory diary data collection. Using intra-study stress data, the high stress group experienced significantly more episodes (mean of 2.71 vs. 1.56, p less than 0.0005) and symptom days (mean of 29.43 vs. 15.42, p = 0.005) of respiratory illness. The two groups were almost identical with respect to age, sex, occupational status, smoking, passive smoking, exposure to air pollution, family size, and proneness to acute respiratory infection in childhood. In a multivariate model with total respiratory episodes as the dependent variable, 21% of the variance was explained, and two stress variables accounted for 9% of the explained variance. Significant, but less strong relationships were also identified between intra-study stress variables and clinically definite episodes and symptom days in both clinically definite and total respiratory episodes. Pre-study measures of stress emphasized chronic stresses and were less strongly related to measures of respiratory illness than those collected during the study. However, significantly more episodes (mean of 2.50 vs. 1.75, p less than 0.02) and symptom days (mean of 28.00 vs. 17.06, p less than 0.03) were experienced in the high stress group. In the multivariate analyses, pre-study stress remained significantly associated with total respiratory episodes nd symptom days in total and ''definite'' respiratory episodes.

  19. Current Therapy in Acute Mouth Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, George; Burnstein, Irwin L.

    1970-01-01

    Until a dental department is added to a college health service, a physician or nurse can give treatment for acute oral infections. Treatment excludes the use of caustic, escharotic chemicals in favor of more benign agents. (Author)

  20. Severe steroid-resistant thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent adult.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Takashi; Kubota, Yasushi; Wakayama, Kazuo; Kimura, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia secondary to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is rare in immunocompetent hosts. We describe a case of severe thrombocytopenia secondary to CMV infection in an immunocompetent 30-year-old man who presented with pyrexia and bleeding tendency. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) was made following hematological and serological testing, and bone marrow aspiration. Acute CMV infection was confirmed by serological testing, antigenemia, and detection of CMV-DNA. Corticosteroid therapy was ineffective and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was therefore administered. This resulted in immediate recovery of the platelet count and cessation of nasal bleeding. Early IVIG administration should be considered in steroid-resistant cases.

  1. Acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis may be associated with Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Abou, Magali; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompetent hosts is generally asymptomatic or may present as a mononucleosic syndrome. Its association with acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis has rarely been reported. A 24-year-old woman presented with pelvic pain, vulvodynia, abnormal vaginal discharge, burning with urination, fatigue, fever, vomiting and diarrhoea. The vulva and cervix were red with vesicular lesions on the cervix. Genital herpes simplex infection (HSV) was suspected and valacyclovir was given orally. However, serial viral cultures performed 7 weeks apart did not isolate HSV as suspected, but CMV was confirmed by immunofluorescence and early antigen research. Blood tests confirmed an acute CMV infection. Typical inclusions were found at histology. Symptoms resolved slowly with persistence of cervical lesions at 7 weeks from diagnosis. The frequency of CMV genital infection is probably underestimated. The infection is not always asymptomatic and might be confused with genital HSV infection. The clinical course is longer. PMID:23606387

  2. Acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis may be associated with Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Abou, Magali; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-04-19

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompetent hosts is generally asymptomatic or may present as a mononucleosic syndrome. Its association with acute cervicitis and vulvovaginitis has rarely been reported. A 24-year-old woman presented with pelvic pain, vulvodynia, abnormal vaginal discharge, burning with urination, fatigue, fever, vomiting and diarrhoea. The vulva and cervix were red with vesicular lesions on the cervix. Genital herpes simplex infection (HSV) was suspected and valacyclovir was given orally. However, serial viral cultures performed 7 weeks apart did not isolate HSV as suspected, but CMV was confirmed by immunofluorescence and early antigen research. Blood tests confirmed an acute CMV infection. Typical inclusions were found at histology. Symptoms resolved slowly with persistence of cervical lesions at 7 weeks from diagnosis. The frequency of CMV genital infection is probably underestimated. The infection is not always asymptomatic and might be confused with genital HSV infection. The clinical course is longer.

  3. Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection in Seronegative Kidney Transplant Patients Is Associated with Protracted Cold Ischemic Time of Seropositive Donor Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Matevossian, Edouard; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Hösel, Volker; Busch, Dirk H.; Renders, Lutz; Neuenhahn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) can lead to primary infection or reactivation in CMV-seronegative or -seropositive kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Complications comprise severe end-organ diseases and acute or chronic transplant rejection. Risk for CMV manifestation is stratified according to the CMV-IgG-serostatus, with donor+/recipient- (D+/R-) patients carrying the highest risk for CMV-replication. However, risk factors predisposing for primary infection in CMV-seronegative recipients are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we monitored D+/R- high-risk patients undergoing kidney transplantation in combination with antiviral prophylaxis for the incidence of CMV-viremia for a median follow-up time of 784 days (156–1155 days). In this period, we analyzed the functional CMV-specific T cell response by intracellular cytokine staining and CMV-serology by ELISA. Only four of eight D+/R- patients developed clinically relevant CMV-viremia followed by seroconversion. Viremia triggered expansion of functional CMV-specific T cells correlating with protection against secondary CMV-reactivations. In contrast, all other patients remained permanently aviremic and showed no immunological correlate of infection after discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis for up to three years. Comparing cold ischemic times (CIT) of viremic (median = 1020 min; 720–1080 min) and aviremic patients (median = 335 min; 120–660 min) revealed significantly (p = 0.0286) protracted CIT in patients with primary CMV-infection. Taken together, primary CMV-infection affects only a subgroup of D+/R- patients correlating with length of CIT. Therefore, patients with extended CIT should be thoroughly monitored for CMV-replication well beyond discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis. In contrast, patients with short CIT remained permanently uninfected and might benefit from shorter prophylactic treatment. PMID:28129395

  4. Cytomegalovirus infections following umbilical cord blood transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning regimens for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Tomoko; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kami, Masahiro; Yuji, Koichiro; Kusumi, Eiji; Hori, Akiko; Murashige, Naoko; Tanaka, Yuji; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Wake, Atsushi; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2007-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT); however, we have little information on the clinical features of CMV reactivation after cord blood transplantation using reduced-intensity regimens (RI-CBT) for adults. We reviewed medical records of 140 patients who underwent RI-CBT at Toranomon Hospital between January 2002 and March 2005. All the patients were monitored for CMV-antigenemia weekly, and, if turned positive, received preemptive foscarnet or ganciclovir. Seventy-seven patients developed positive antigenemia at a median onset of day 35 (range, 4-92) after transplant. Median of the maximal number of CMV pp65-positive cells per 50,000 cells was 22 (range, 1-1806). CMV disease developed in 22 patients on a median of day 35 (range, 15-106); 21 had enterocolitis and 1 had adrenalitis. CMV antigenemia had not been detected in 2 patients, when CMV disease was diagnosed. CMV disease was successfully treated using ganciclovir or foscarnet in 14 patients. The other 8 patients died without improvement of CMV disease. In multivariate analysis, grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was a risk factor of CMV disease (relative risk 3.48, 95% confidential interval 1.47-8.23). CMV reactivation and disease develop early after RI-CBT. CMV enterocolitis may be a common complication after RI-CBT.

  5. Acute transverse myelitis complicating breakthrough varicella infection.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Asli; Kurugol, Zafer; Gokben, Sarenur

    2014-11-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl who presented with acute transverse myelitis after breakthrough varicella infection. The diagnosis was based on the development of motor weakness, paraparesis and bladder dysfunction, spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings and detection of anti-varicella zoster virus IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid. This case report highlights that breakthrough varicella can result in serious complications such as acute transverse myelitis.

  6. Acute renal failure in Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Neri, S; Pulvirenti, D; Patamia, I; Zoccolo, A; Castellino, P

    2008-04-01

    We report an unusual case of transfusion-transmitted malaria which remained undiagnosed for several months in an Italian woman splenectomised and polytransfused for thalassaemia major. The infecting species was Plasmodium malariae, and the patient developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, and hepatic failure. Treatment with chlorochine was followed by a slow, but complete recovery of renal function.

  7. Pre-transplant assessment of CMV-specific immune response by Elispot assay in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rittà, Massimo; Costa, Cristina; Sidoti, Francesca; Ballocco, Cinzia; Ranghino, Andrea; Messina, Maria; Biancone, Luigi; Cavallo, Rossana

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) primary infection or re-activation in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, with patients with IgG-CMV D+/R- sero-matching at greater risk. The impact of pre-transplant CMV-specific host cellular immunity on the long-term risk of CMV replication in kidney transplants (KT) was prospectively evaluated in eighty patients by CMV-EliSpot assay. The study population included 54 male and 26 female recipients, with CMV-IgG distribution: 60 D+/R+, 11 D-/R+, 7 D+/R-, 2 D-/R-. At pre-transplantation, 49 KT (61.3%) were CMV-responders by EliSpot. At 3-month follow up, 16 (32.7%) out of 49 CMV-responders showed CMV blood infection, compared to 8 (25.8%) out of 31 non-responders. No further episode of CMV viraemia was reported in the responder group, in comparison to 15 out 31 non-responders (48.4%) showing at least one episode of CMV-DNAemia at 12-month follow-up. Baseline CMV-IgG serology showed a strong correlation with EliSpot determinations; KT recipients exhibiting at least one episode of CMV viraemia at 12-month follow-up showed lower baseline CMV-EliSpot values than those without signs of CMV replication. The study suggests that monitoring CMV-specific T-cell responses at pre-transplantation by EliSpot assay may be useful for predicting the post-transplantation risk of CMV infection and reactivation.

  8. [Comparison of the CMV antigenemia test and CMV-DNA PCR results in solid organ transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Özkarata, Emre; Özkarataş, Emre; Özbek, Ö Alpay; Avkan Oğuz, Vildan; Sayıner, A Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is among the most common important viral infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Diagnostic tests for detecting CMV replication are widely used for this group of patients, however there is no clear agreement on the cut-off levels for interpretation of clinical decisions especially when the low level of viral load is detected. In this study, CMV pp65 antigenemia test results were compared with plasma CMV-DNA levels detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in samples of kidney and liver transplant recipients in the Central Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul University Hospital between 2011 and 2013, and the correlation between these two tests and viral load equivalent to antigenemia positivity were determined. In the study, pp65 antigenemia and CMV-DNA qPCR results were evaluated retrospectively. The samples from the same patients were included if the time between antigenemia and CMV-DNA qPCR tests were less than 48 hours. SPSS v15.0 was used for correlation, regression and ROC curve analysis. The results of the 217 samples collected from 100 patients (59 male, 41 female; age range: 16-71, mean age: 46 ± 13 years), 36 liver and 64 kidney recipients were evaluated in the study. Of the patients 80% were CMV IgM negative, IgG positive; 1% was CMV IgG and IgM positive; 2% were CMV IgM and IgG negative, while for 17 patients serological results could not be reached. CMV pp65 antigenemia and CMV-DNA were both negative in 102 (47%) samples, while both were positive in 37 (17%) samples. The single sample from a case with CMV IgM and IgG positivity yielded negative results for both antigenemia and CMV-DNA tests. In 78 samples antigenemia were negative and CMV-DNA qPCR were positive, while there were no samples with antigenemia positive and qPCR negative. Mean values of antigenemia and qPCR tests were 23 positive cells/200.000 leukocytes (range: 1 to 230 positive cells) and 12.595 copies/ml (range: 180 to 106

  9. Acute neck infections in children.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, A Bülent; Kara, Ateş; Kanra, Güler; Seçmeer, Gülten; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Ozen, Metehan

    2004-01-01

    A retrospective review was conducted on 132 patients aged between two and 15 years with cervical lymphadenitis and/or with abscess formation to determine the epidemiologic and clinical presentation of these infections. The most common locations were the upper anterior cervical space (43.2%) and the submandibular space (27.3%). The duration of symptoms ranged from 12 hours to 20 days. Results of the pus cultures were available in 31 patients (23.5%). Of these, 16 cultures (51.6%) were positive. The isolated organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (50%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.3%), group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (12.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6.3%) and Escherichia coli (6.3%). One of the specimens yielded mixed organisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Penicillin resistance was documented in six (37.5%) of the 16 gram-positive bacteria isolated from the pus culture. Both throat and blood cultures were available in all 132 patients. Seven throat cultures (5.3%) were positive for group A beta hemolytic streptococci, whereas five blood cultures (3.8%) were reported to have bacterial growth. Sixty-seven patients (50.8%) were treated with ampicillin-sulbactam, 53 patients (40.1%) with ampicillin-sulbactam and ornidazole and 12 patients (9.1%) with ceftriaxone parenterally. The mean duration of hospital stay related to the infection was 7.30 +/- 3.89 days (range, 2-28 days). The mean period for downsizing of the cervical mass by half was 4.05 +/- 2.05 days, and the recovery period (total antibiotic usage period) was 13.72 +/- 5.33 days. All of the patients had an uneventful recovery without complications. Results of both throat and blood cultures were not predictive for etiologic agents in our study group. Since ultrasonographic evaluation of each patient has limited additional benefits in clinical management, it must be reserved for selected cases to document abscess formation.

  10. CMV in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de la Cámara, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on the outcome of stem cell transplant (SCT) and solid organ transplant patients (SOT) CMV has been called “the troll of transplantation”. One of the greatest advances in the management of SCT has been the introduction of the preemptive strategy. Since its introduction, the incidence of the viremia, as expected, remains unchanged but there has been a marked decline in the incidence of early CMV disease. However, in spite of the advances in prevention of CMV disease, CMV is still today an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Late CMV disease is still occurring in a significant proportion of patients and the so-called indirect effects of CMV are causing significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately there have been several advances in the development of new antivirals, adoptive immunotherapy and DNA-CMV vaccines that might transform the management of CMV in the near future. PMID:27413524

  11. Combined CMV- and HSV-1 brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2014-04-15

    We report a very rare case of a combined CMV- and HSV-1 isolated brainstem encephalitis restricted to medulla oblongata in a patient with advanced HIV disease. Neither limbic nor general ventricular involvement was detected on neuroimaging. The case highlights the importance of testing for HSV-1 and CMV in HIV-infected patients presenting with an isolated brainstem syndrome.

  12. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after pertussis infection.

    PubMed

    Budan, B; Ekici, B; Tatli, B; Somer, A

    2011-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which is usually precipitated by a viral infection or vaccination. A 3-month-old boy is reported who developed ADEM a week after full recovery from pertussis. MRI detected a high-intensity lesion extending from the pons to the mesencephalon, compatible with ADEM. Following the administration of intravenous immunoglobulins, the patient's clinical symptoms improved. This case report demonstrates that pertussis is capable of inducing an immune-mediated demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system.

  13. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  14. Comparison between valganciclovir and aciclovir/valaciclovir for CMV prophylaxis in pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fila, M; Dechartes, A; Maisin, A; Dossier, C; Zhao, W; Deschênes, G; Baudouin, V

    2015-01-01

    Prophylaxis has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after renal transplantation. Optimal regimens of treatment remain controversial, especially in pediatric recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of valganciclovir (VGC) versus aciclovir/valaciclovir (ACV) in a pediatric renal transplant population. Data from 101 renal transplantations were retrospectively analyzed. Except those with R-/Dstatus, all patients received prophylaxis either with ACV, n = 39 or VGC, n = 38. Incidences of positive CMV antigenemia and disease, as well as the delay in relation to the prophylaxis, were collected during at least 12 months after the end of treatment. Positive CMV antigenemia was reported in 34 patients (ACV: 16, VGC: 16, no prophylaxis: 2). CMV disease occurred in 15 patients (ACV: 5; VGC: 8) (ns). For the majority of patients under VGC, positive CMV antigenemia occurred within the year following the withdrawal of prophylaxis (VGC: 14; ACV: 5, P <0.05), whereas it occurred during prophylaxis in 11 patients under ACV versus two under VGC (P <0.05). The over-all incidence of positive CMV antigenemia was similar between ACV and VGC prophylaxis. However, VGC was more efficient to prevent early CMV infection while patients treated with ACV had less CMV infection or disease after the end of the prophylaxis.

  15. Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shany; Eytan, Ori

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis associated with acute cytomegalovirus infection has been reported many times in the literature since the mid 1980s – mainly in case reports and in small case series, but also in four controlled studies. Still, many physicians are unaware of this association although acute cytomegalovirus infection diagnosis in a thrombosis patient may warrant antiviral therapy and may affect anticoagulation therapy duration. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics of patients with thrombosis and acute cytomegalovirus infection are reviewed, and the current knowledge concerning this unique association is presented herein. We believe it is time to add acute cytomegalovirus infection to the list of thrombosis triggers. PMID:25624857

  16. Infective substructures of measles virus from acutely and persistently infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblatt, S; Koch, T; Pinhasi, O; Bratosin, S

    1979-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein from cells acutely or persistently infected with measles virus were shown to be infectious by the calcium phosphate technique. Very little or no infectivity was obtained when calcium phosphate precipitation was omitted. Electron microscopy showed that the majority of ribonucleoprotein structures isolated from acutely infected cells were folded, whereas those from persistently infected cells were linear in appearance. Images PMID:120450

  17. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  18. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  19. Increased resistance to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Lilium transformed with a defective CMV replicase gene.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Pejman; Otang, Ntui Valentaine; Supaporn, Hasthanasombut; Khan, Raham Sher; Chin, Dong Poh; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Lilium cv Acapulco was transformed with a defective cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) replicase gene (CMV2-GDD) construct using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Four lines were analyzed for gene expression and resistance to CMV-O strain. Expression of the CMV2-GDD gene in the transgenic plants was confirmed by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). When these four lines were mechanically inoculated with CMV-O, no signal of coat protein (CP) messages using RT-PCR was detected in newly produced leaves of two transgenic lines. Dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) of CP was performed to examine the presence of the CMV in the newly produced leaves of challenged plants. Results, similar to those obtained with RT-PCR of the CP messages, were observed in DIBA. Therefore, our results imply that the two lines show increased levels of resistance to CMV, and CMV-GDD replicase gene is an effective construct that has protection against CMV in Lilium.

  20. Selective impairment of T lymphocyte activation through the T cell receptor/CD3 complex after cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Timón, M; Arnaiz-Villena, A; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Ramos-Amador, J T; Pacheco, A; Regueiro, J R

    1993-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is reported to cause transient immunosuppression in man. In this study we have analysed the effect of CMV on T lymphocyte function in 29 children diagnosed for acute CMV infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the patients showed a significant specific impairment in their proliferative response to enterotoxins A and C1, to concanavalin A and to the anti-CD3 MoAb OKT3. The impaired responses were corrected with exogenous IL-2. In contrast, stimulation using phytohaemagglutinin, as well as activation signals delivered through the surface molecules CD26 or CD28, elicited normal proliferative responses in CMV PBMC. The results indicate that the T cell anergy associated with CMV infection is restricted to the T cell receptor/CD3 activation pathway. PMID:8403514

  1. Hypogammaglobulinemia after heart transplantation: use of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy in relapsing CMV disease.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, E; Fernàndez-Yáñez, J; Muñoz, P; Palomo, J; Rodríguez-Molina, J J; Bermejo, J; Catalan, P; Bouza, E; Fernández-Cruz, E; Carbone, J

    2005-01-01

    Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia after heart transplantation may follow immunosuppressive therapy with the resultant increased risk of infections, including cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease. There is limited information on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IVIG) in heart-transplanted patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and CMV disease. We present data on five consecutive heart-transplanted patients with relapsing CMV disease, four of whom developed gastrointestinal disease. The immunosuppressive regimen included prednisone, cyclosporine A, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and antithymocyte globulin (ATG). Evaluation revealed CMV antigenemia. All the patients had been treated with intravenous ganciclovir. In addition, hyperimmune CMV immunoglobulin was administered in three patients. Significantly reduced levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) were observed in the patients as compared with 15 heart-transplanted individuals without CMV disease [mean IgG levels: 323+/-18 and 639+/-63 mg/dl, respectively (p=0.003)]. IVIG [FLEBOGAMMA], 200-400 mg/kg every 21 days with the goal of maintaining normal serum IgG levels, was added for the treatment of CMV disease. Selected batches with the highest anti-CMV titers were set apart for the treatment of the patients. IVIG treatment, in combination with antiviral therapy, proved able to control CMV disease. There was a favorable clinical response and the patients became free of gastrointestinal symptoms. Detection of CMV antigens was negative after treatment. During IVIG therapy no immediate or delayed adverse effects were observed. Even if our survey was limited to five cases, the results suggest that addition of IVIG to antiviral chemotherapy might improve outcome in heart-transplanted patients with hypogammaglobulinemia and CMV disease.

  2. Acute pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and acute renal failure favourably resolved in two renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Mihai; Ionescu, Camelia; Ismail, Gener; Mandache, Eugen; Hortopan, Monica; Constantinescu, Ileana; Iliescu, Olguta

    2003-03-01

    Renal transplantation is often associated with severe complications. Except for acute rejection, infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive treatment are the most frequent problems observed after transplantation. Infections with hepatic viruses (HBV, HDV, HCV, HGV) and cytomegalic virus (CMV) are the main infectious complications after renal transplantation. Cyclosporine toxicity is not unusual for a patient with renal transplantation and is even more frequent for patients with hepatic impairment due to viral infections. The subjects of this report are two renal transplant recipients with acute pancreatitis, severe hepatitis and acute renal failure on graft, receiving immunosuppressive therapy for maintaining renal graft function

  3. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) inactivation in breast milk: reassessment of pasteurization and freeze-thawing.

    PubMed

    Hamprecht, Klaus; Maschmann, Jens; Müller, Denise; Dietz, Klaus; Besenthal, Ingo; Goelz, Rangmar; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Speer, Christian P; Jahn, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    Breast-feeding mothers frequently transmit cytomegalovirus (CMV) to preterm infants of very low birth weight. Current recommendations for prevention of virus transmission are based on data published 20 y ago in the context of human milk banking. Two recent clinical trials examined storage of breast milk at -20 degrees Celsius to reduce virus transmission. However, in both studies, CMV transmission occurred. Using sensitive tools like quantitative PCR, CMV pp67 late mRNA assay, and a high-speed, centrifugation-based microculture assay for quantification of CMV infectivity, we reassessed the virological and biochemical characteristics of freeze-storing breast milk at -20 degrees Celsius, compared it with traditional Holder pasteurization (30 min at 62.5 degrees Celsius), and a new short-term pasteurization (5 s at 72 degrees Celsius) based on the generation of a milk film. Both heat treatment procedures were able to destroy viral infectivity and pp67 RNA completely. Preliminary results showed short-term heat inactivation below 72 degrees Celsius was less harmful in reducing the activity of marker enzymes than Holder pasteurization. Freezing breast milk preserved the biochemical and immunologic quality of the milk; however, late viral RNA and viral infectivity was also preserved. Compared with viral DNA, CMV-RNA more directly reflects infectious CMV in human milk samples. Further studies are necessary to evaluate short-term heat treatment below 72 degrees Celsius as an effective tool for prevention of CMV transmission.

  4. The immune reconstitution after an allogeneic stem cell transplant correlates with the risk of graft-versus-host disease and cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Iori, Anna P; De Propris, Maria S; Capobianchi, Angela; Barberi, Walter; Valle, Veronica; Iannella, Emilia; Natalino, Fiammetta; Mercanti, Caterina; Perrone, Salvatore; Gentile, Giuseppe; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2011-08-01

    Aim of the study was to correlate the clinical outcome of eighteen patients who have undergone an allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) with the concentration in the peripheral blood (PB) of lymphocyte subpopulations evaluated at 1 year from transplant. The occurrence of acute GVHD and CMV infection correlated with the concentration of Tregs in the PB; CMV infection also correlated with the content of NK cells. The obtained results document that the concentration of Tregs in the PB after an allogeneic SCT may protect from GVHD and from CMV infection; the potential anti-viral role of NK cells is confirmed.

  5. Neuralgic amyotrophy complicating acute hepatitis E infection: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Theochari, Evangelia; Vincent-Smith, Lisa; Ellis, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus infection (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that is under-recognised in developed countries. Preceding infection manifested by acute transaminitis has been associated with neurological manifestations, predominately involving the peripheral nervous system, even in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of a 65-year-old previously fit and well Caucasian man with bilateral neuralgic amyotrophy (NA) and acute transaminitis. Serology testing for immunoglobulin (Ig) M and G established the diagnosis of acute HEV infection. The patient received immunomodulatory treatment with an excellent long-term outcome. The temporal association of the clinical presentation of bilateral NA and acute transaminitis from HEV infection suggested the causal association of HEV to NA. We propose screening for HEV in patients presenting with NA and acute hepatitis. PMID:25739795

  6. A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults: Parasitic infection-related acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Küpeli, Aydın Hakan; Özdemir, Murat; Topuz, Sezgin; Sözütek, Alper; Paksoy, Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common parasitic disease all over the world, especially in less developed countries. Acute appendicitis related to parasitic infection is a rare condition. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients who are admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen, especially in endemic areas.

  7. PCR detection of cytomegalovirus DNA in serum as a diagnostic test for congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C T; Istas, A S; Wilkerson, M K; Demmler, G J

    1995-01-01

    PCR detected cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in the serum of 18 of 18 infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection, 1 of 2 infants with asymptomatic congenital CMV infection, and 0 of 32 controls. Serum CMV PCR provided a rapid, sensitive, and specific method for diagnosis of congenital CMV infection in infants who were symptomatic at birth. PMID:8586726

  8. [PROGNOSTICATION OF LIMITED ACCUMULATIONS LIQUID INFECTION BY SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Sheiko, V D; Oganezyan, A G

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 53 patients on limited accumulations of liquid (LAL) for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) were analysed. In 62.5% of patients on acute aseptic LAL celebrated parapancreatyc liquid accumulation were determinened. Most (94.6%) patients infected by LAL revealed heterogeneity of their structure according ultrasonography, in 81.1%--secvestral mass in their cavity. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) observed both aseptic and infected LAL. Prognostically important criteria LAL infection in patients on SAP is the heterogeneity of echostructure in absence of a downward trend. Diagnostic puncture under ultrasound control and microbiological studies are safe methods of diagnosis by infected LAL in SAP.

  9. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. Aim The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Results Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly

  10. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  11. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria infection, a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Sangappa, Jainapur Ravi; Choudhary, Prakash Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male presented with 6 days history of intermittent fever with chills, 2 days history of upper abdomen pain, distension of abdomen, and decreased urine output. He was diagnosed to have Plasmodium vivax malaria, acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure. These constellations of complications in P. vivax infection have never been reported in the past. The patient responded to intravenous chloroquine and supportive treatment. For renal failure, he required hemodialysis. Acute pancreatitis, ascites, and acute renal failure form an unusual combination in P. vivax infection. PMID:26629455

  12. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. High-resolution linkage map in the proximity of the host resistance locus Cmv1

    SciTech Connect

    Depatie, C.; Muise, E.; Gros, P.

    1997-01-15

    The mouse chromosome 6 locus Cmv1 controls replication of mouse Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in the spleen of the infected host. In our effort to clone Cmv1, we have constructed a high-resolution genetic linkage map in the proximity of the gene. For this, a total of 45 DNA markers corresponding to either cloned genes or microsatellites were mapped within a 7.9-cM interval overlapping the Cmv1 region. We have followed the cosegregation of these markers with respect to Cmv1 in a total of 2248 backcross mice from a preexisting interspecific backcross panel of 281 (Mus spretus X C57BL/6J)F1 X C57BL/6J and 2 novel panels of 989 (A/J X C57BL6)F1 X A/J and 978 (BALB/c X C57BL/6J)F1 X BALB/c segregating Cmv1. Combined pedigree analysis allowed us to determine the following gene order and intergene distances (in cM) on the distal region of mouse chromosome 6: D6Mit216-(1.9)-D6Mit336-(2.2)-D6Mit218-(1.0)-D6Mit52-(0.5)-D6Mit194-(0.2)-Nkrp1/D6Mit61/135/257/289/338-(0.4)-Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370-(0.3)-Prp/Kap/D6Mit13/111/219-(0.3)-Tel/D6Mit374/290/220/196/195/110-(1.1)-D6Mit25. Therefore, the minimal genetic interval for Cmv1 of 0.7 cM is defined by 13 tightly linked markers including 2 markers, Ly49A and D6Mit370, that did not show recombination with Cmv1 in 1967 meioses analyzed; the proximal limit of the Cmv1 domain was defined by 8 crossovers between Nkrp1/D6Mit61/135/257/289/338 and Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370, and the distal limit was defined by 5 crossovers between Cmv1/Ly49A/D6Mit370 and Prp/Kap/D6Mit13/111/219. This work demonstrates tight linkage between Cmv1 and genes from the natural killer complex (NKC), such as Nkrp1 and Ly49A suggesting that Cmv1 may represent an NK cell recognition structure encoded in the NKC region. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    PubMed

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  15. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children. PMID:27088268

  16. CD8 epitope escape and reversion in acute HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Timm, Joerg; Lauer, Georg M; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Sheridan, Isabelle; Kim, Arthur Y; Lucas, Michaela; Pillay, Thillagavathie; Ouchi, Kei; Reyor, Laura L; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Chung, Raymond T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2004-12-20

    In the setting of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, robust HCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are associated with initial control of viremia. Despite these responses, 70-80% of individuals develop persistent infection. Although viral escape from CD8 responses has been illustrated in the chimpanzee model of HCV infection, the effect of CD8 selection pressure on viral evolution and containment in acute HCV infection in humans remains unclear. Here, we examined viral evolution in an immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B8-restricted NS3 epitope in subjects with acute HCV infection. Development of mutations within the epitope coincided with loss of strong ex vivo tetramer and interferon gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses, and endogenous expression of variant NS3 sequences suggested that the selected mutations altered processing and presentation of the variant epitope. Analysis of NS3 sequences from 30 additional chronic HCV-infected subjects revealed a strong association between sequence variation within this region and expression of HLA-B8, supporting reproducible allele-specific selection pressures at the population level. Interestingly, transmission of an HLA-B8-associated escape mutation to an HLA-B8 negative subject resulted in rapid reversion of the mutation. Together, these data indicate that viral escape from CD8+ T cell responses occurs during human HCV infection and that acute immune selection pressure is of sufficient magnitude to influence HCV evolution.

  17. Dasatinib-Induced CMV Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Rare Complication of a Common Drug.

    PubMed

    Davalos, Fidencio; Chaucer, Benjamin; Zafar, Wahib; Salman, Shamim; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-06-01

    Dasatinib is a common anticancer drug used in the treatment of leukemia. Several side effects have been reported, the most common being myelosuppression, diarrhea, edema, and nausea. Three papers have been published reporting hepatic side effects of dasatinib treatment. A rare side effect of dasatinib treatment is reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Never before has dasatinib therapy shown to be the cause of CMV hepatitis in an immunocompetent patient. We present a case of an immunocompetent patient who was treated with the standard dose of dasatinib therapy and subsequently developed CMV hepatitis. Well-known side effects of dasatinib therapy are understood and documented; unknown adverse drug reactions can occur and should be monitored for. This is a significant finding given the high rate of CMV seropositivity in the general population.

  18. Kinetics of CMV seroconversion in a Swiss pregnant women population.

    PubMed

    Maine, Gregory T; Stricker, René; Stricker, Reto

    2012-07-01

    Retrospective evaluation of the kinetics of cytomegalovirus (CMV) seroconversion with CMV IgM, IgG, and IgG avidity assays, in a Swiss pregnant women population, has shown that the current published CMV serologic diagnostic algorithms were valid and fit for use. In 19% of the cases analyzed, CMV-specific IgM was detected before IgG.

  19. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  20. Imaging in acute renal infection in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Starshak, R.J.; Schroeder, B.A.

    1987-03-01

    Infection is the most common disease of the urinary tract in children, and various imaging techniques have been used to verify its presence and location. On retrospective analysis, 50 consecutive children with documented upper urinary tract infection had abnormal findings on renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. The infection involved the renal poles only in 38 and the poles plus other renal cortical areas in eight. Four had abnormalities that spared the poles. Renal sonograms were abnormal in 32 of 50 children. Excretory urograms were abnormal in six of 23 children in whom they were obtained. Vesicoureteral reflux was found in 34 of 40 children in whom voiding cystourethrography was performed. These data show the high sensitivity of renal cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc-glucoheptonate in documenting upper urinary tract infection. The location of the abnormalities detected suggests that renal infections spread via an ascending mode and implies that intrarenal reflux is a major contributing factor.

  1. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    PubMed Central

    Flieger, Robert Rainer; Mankertz, Annette; Yilmaz, Kadir; Roepke, Torsten Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade. PMID:27818687

  2. Rapid diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection by in-situ hybridisation in liver grafts.

    PubMed

    Naoumov, N V; Alexander, G J; O'Grady, J G; Sutherland, S; Aldis, P; Portmann, B C; Williams, R

    1988-06-18

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a major cause of hepatic dysfunction after liver transplantation, but proof of infection and distinguishing CMV hepatitis from other causes of impaired liver function can be difficult. In-situ hybridisation for CMV-DNA in liver biopsy specimens was assessed in 25 liver graft recipients in whom CMV was suspected on clinical grounds. CMV-DNA was detected in all 10 patients with primary CMV infection, in whom a close correlation was found between the number of CMV-DNA-positive cells and both the number of cells containing viral inclusions identified by light microscopy and the clinical severity of disease. In contrast, CMV-DNA was not detected in patients with secondary CMV infection, or in those without evidence of CMV infection. In-situ hybridisation for CMV-DNA provides an accurate and rapid diagnosis of CMV infection, and allows specific antiviral therapy to be used earlier.

  3. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  4. Massive Hemolysis Causing Renal Failure in Acute Hepatitis E Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pragya; Malik, Sarthak; Mallick, Bipadabhanjan; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute viral hepatitis is usually a self-limiting illness. However, it can lead to complications that can be life-threatening, such as acute liver failure. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the setting of acute viral hepatitis can lead to a massive hemolysis, manifesting as acute kidney injury and markedly raised bilirubin levels; although cases are rare. Here, we report such a case. The patient had a viral hepatitis E infection and presented with kidney injury requiring dialysis. Examination showed very high mixed hyperbilirubinemia due to massive intravascular hemolysis. The patient experienced a long, protracted course of illness, requiring renal replacement therapy with other supportive management, which led to improvement over a period of four weeks. This case highlights the importance of recognizing associated hemolysis in a patient with viral hepatitis who presents with very high bilirubin levels or associated kidney injury. Such patients will require aggressive supportive care with prompt fluid and electrolyte management. PMID:28097104

  5. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burke, Thomas W; Henao, Ricardo; Soderblom, Erik; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Thompson, J Will; McClain, Micah T; Nichols, Marshall; Nicholson, Bradly P; Veldman, Timothy; Lucas, Joseph E; Moseley, M Arthur; Turner, Ronald B; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Hero, Alfred O; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2017-02-21

    Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR). With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bathen-Noethen, A; Stein, V M; Puff, C; Baumgaertner, W; Tipold, A

    2008-09-01

    Demyelination is the prominent histopathological hallmark in the acute stage of canine distemper virus infection. Magnetic resonance imaging is an important diagnostic tool in human beings to determine demyelination in the brain, for example in multiple sclerosis. Five young dogs with clinically suspected canine distemper virus infection were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Hyperintense lesions and loss of contrast between grey and white matter were detected in T2-weighted images in the cerebellum and/or in the brainstem of three dogs, which correlated with demyelination demonstrated in histopathological examination. Furthermore, increased signal intensities in T2-weighted images were seen in the temporal lobe of four dogs with no evidence of demyelination. Magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a sensitive tool for the visualisation of in vivo myelination defects in dogs with acute canine distemper virus infection. Postictal oedema and accumulation of antigen positive cells have to be considered an important differential diagnosis.

  7. cGAS-STING Signaling Regulates Initial Innate Control of Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bryan; Takahashi, Mariko; Dhanwani, Rekha; Sharma, Nikita; Huang, Jenny; Pham, Elise; Benedict, Chris A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several innate sensing pathways contribute to the control of early cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leading to a multiphasic type I interferon (IFN-I) response that limits viral replication and promotes host defenses. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent pathways induce IFN-I production in CMV-infected plasmacytoid dendritic cells; however, the initial burst of IFN-I that occurs within the first few hours in vivo is TLR independent and emanates from stromal cells. Here we show that primary human endothelial cells mount robust IFN-I responses to human CMV that are dependent upon cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), STING, and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signaling. Disruption of STING expression in endothelial cells by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 revealed that it is essential for the induction of IFN-I and restriction of CMV replication. Consistently, STING was necessary to mount the first phase of IFN-I production and curb CMV replication in infected mice. Thus, DNA sensing through STING is critical for primary detection of both human and mouse CMV in nonhematopoietic cells and drives the initial wave of IFN-I that is key for controlling early viral replication in vivo. IMPORTANCE Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most common viral pathogens, with the majority of people contracting the virus in their lifetime. Although acute infection is mostly asymptomatic in healthy persons, significant pathology is observed in immunocompromised individuals, and chronic CMV infection may exacerbate a myriad of inflammatory conditions. Here we show that primary human endothelial cells mount robust IFN-I responses against CMV via a cGAS/STING/IRF3 pathway. Disruption of STING expression by CRISPRs revealed an essential role in eliciting IFN-I responses and restricting CMV replication. Consistently, in mice, STING is necessary for the first phase of IFN-I production that limits early CMV replication. Our results demonstrate a

  8. Pre-emptive therapy against cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease guided by CMV antigenemia assay after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a single-center experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Y; Mineishi, S; Saito, T; Seo, S; Saito, A; Suenaga, K; Ohnishi, M; Niiya, H; Nakai, K; Takeuchi, T; Kawahigashi, N; Shoji, N; Ogasawara, T; Tanosaki, R; Kobayashi, Y; Tobinai, K; Kami, M; Mori, S; Suzuki, R; Kunitoh, H; Takaue, Y

    2001-02-01

    From April 1998 to March 2000, a cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigenemia-guided pre-emptive approach for CMV disease was evaluated in 77 adult patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the National Cancer Center Hospital. A CMV antigenemia assay was performed at least once a week after engraftment. High-level antigenemia was defined as a positive result with 10 or more positive cells per 50 000 cells and low-level antigenemia was defined as less than 10 positive cells. Among the 74 patients with initial engraftment, 51 developed positive antigenemia. Transplantation from alternative donors and the development of grade II-IV GVHD were independent risk factors for positive antigenemia. Ganciclovir was administered as pre-emptive therapy in 39 patients in a risk-adapted manner. None of the nine low-risk patients with low-level antigenemia as their initial positive result developed high-level antigenemia even though ganciclovir was withheld. Only one patient developed early CMV disease (hepatitis) during the study period. CMV antigenemia resolved in all but two cases, in whom ganciclovir was replaced with foscarnet. In eight patients, however, the neutrophil count decreased to 0.5 x 10(9)/l or less after starting ganciclovir, including three with documented infections and two with subsequent secondary graft failure. The total amount of ganciclovir and possibly the duration of high-dose ganciclovir might affect the incidence of neutropenia. We concluded that antigenemia-guided pre-emptive therapy with a decreased dose of ganciclovir and response-oriented dose adjustment might be appropriate to decrease the toxicity of ganciclovir without increasing the risk of CMV disease.

  9. Relevance of maintenance triple-drug immunosuppression to bridle the amplification of rat cytomegalovirus infection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lehle, K; von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Diez, C; Michl, M; Geissler, E K; Wottge, H U; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W

    2012-12-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy required to treat rejection after lung transplantation (LTx) contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and disease. In a weak allogeneic left LTx model in the rat (Fisher 344 [F344] to Wistar Kyoto [WKY] rats) we analyzed the influence of acute CMV infection on postoperative day (POD) 3, with application of standard triple-drug immunosuppression (TD-IS) (cyclosporin A, azathioprine, prednisolone) on late outcome after LTx. Native right lungs and syngeneic grafts (WKY to WKY) served as controls. Rats were sacrificed on POD 15, 30, 60, and 100. TD-IS completely prevented acute and chronic rejection in non-infected rats. Allografts of CMV-infected rats treated with TD-IS showed only mild perivascular infiltrations in 6/10 rats (POD 15 and 30), which persisted up to POD 100 in 4/10 rats. In the long-term course, mild isolated interstitial and alveolar changes were found in 40% of these animals. In conclusion, rat CMV infection partially neutralized the immunosuppressive effect of TD-IS. However, an amplification of CMV infection under TD-IS can be controlled and does not result in fatal outcome.

  10. Ongoing burden of disease and mortality from HIV/CMV coinfection in Africa in the antiretroviral therapy era

    PubMed Central

    Adland, Emily; Klenerman, Paul; Goulder, Philip; Matthews, Philippa C.

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a well-recognized pathogen in the context of HIV infection, but since the roll out of ART, clinical and scientific interest in the problem of HIV/CMV coinfection has diminished. However, CMV remains a significant cofactor in HIV disease, with an influence on HIV acquisition, disease progression, morbidity, and mortality. Disease manifestations may be a result of direct interplay between the two viruses, or may arise as a secondary consequence of immune dysregulation and systemic inflammation. The problem is most relevant when the rates of coinfection are high, most notably in sub-Saharan Africa, and in children at risk of acquiring both infections early in life. Understanding the interplay between these viruses and developing strategies to diagnose, treat and prevent CMV should be a priority. PMID:26441939

  11. Minireview: Invasive fungal infection complicating acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Schneider, Markward; Just-Nuebling, Gudrun; Groll, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic infection in people, affecting 5-10% of the world's population with more than two million deaths a year. Whereas invasive bacterial infections are not uncommon during severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, only a few cases of opportunistic fungal infections have been reported. Here, we present a fatal case of disseminated hyalohyphomycosis associated with acute P. falciparum malaria in a non-immune traveller, review the cases reported in the literature and discuss the theoretical foundations for the increased susceptibility of non-immune individuals with severe P. falciparum malaria to opportunistic fungal infections. Apart from the availability of free iron as sequelae of massive haemolysis, tissue damage, acidosis and measures of advanced life support, patients with complicated P. falciparum malaria also are profoundly immunosuppressed by the organism's interaction with innate and adaptive host immune mechanisms.

  12. Role of Infections in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to developing bacterial infections. Moreover, bacterial infection is the most common identifiable trigger of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), which is characterized by organ failures and a high risk of death. There is evidence of an excessive immune response of the host as a major mechanism leading to the development of organ failures in patients with cirrhosis. However, a role for direct tissue damage caused by bacterial toxins and virulence factors cannot be excluded. Failed tolerance mechanisms may also contribute to organ failures, although the involved mechanisms are unclear. A proportion of patients with infection-related ACLF have a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. These patients have immune suppression, increased risk of superinfection and poor outcome. Immune suppression might be a consequence of the first infection episode that has led patients to be admitted to hospital.

  13. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  14. Multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with atypical rubella virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Koji; Asahara, Hideaki; Uehara, Taira; Miyoshi, Katsue; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of an occurrence of multiphasic acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with atypical rubella virus infection with no rash and long-term increased titers of serum anti-rubella IgM in a 17-year-old male who had no history of rubella vaccination. He suffered from at least six clinical exacerbations with disseminated hyperintense lesions on FLAIR MR images during the course of 18 months. Repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy resolved the exacerbations. In patients with multiphasic ADEM of unknown etiology, clinicians should also consider the possibility of preceding infection with rubella virus.

  15. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings.

  16. Cost of acute hepatitis B infection in Swedish adults.

    PubMed

    Struve, J; Giesecke, J

    1993-01-01

    In order to register data on costs for episodes of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in adults, the medical records from 70 adults with acute HBV infection seen at Roslagstull's Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, were reviewed. All cost-consuming events due to medical treatment, absence from work, and secondary prophylaxis were registered. The average cost was 1,230 pounds for medical treatment, 570 pounds for work loss and 290 pounds for secondary cases and prophylaxis, a total of 2,090 pounds in 1992 prices. This figure is considerably lower than that reported in 3 previous European studies. Accurate estimates of the costs for a case of HBV, as well as those of different vaccination strategies, are essential when economic aspects of HBV vaccination programmes are discussed.

  17. Augmented plasma microparticles during acute Plasmodium vivax infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last few years, the study of microparticles (MPs) - submicron vesicles released from cells upon activation or apoptosis - has gained growing interest in the field of inflammation and in infectious diseases. Their role in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax remains unexplored. Because acute vivax malaria has been related to pro-inflammatory responses, the main hypothesis investigated in this study was that Plasmodium vivax infection is associated with elevated levels of circulating MPs, which may play a role during acute disease in non-immune patients. Methods Plasma MPs were analysed among thirty-seven uncomplicated P. vivax infections from an area of unstable malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon. The MP phenotype was analysed by flow cytometry using the classical MP marker, annexin, and fluorochrome-labeled monoclonal antibodies against specific cell surface markers. The frequencies of plasma MPs in P. vivax patients (n = 37) were further compared to malaria-unexposed controls (n = 15) and ovarian carcinoma patients (n = 12), a known MPs-inducing disease non-related to malaria. Results The frequencies of plasma circulating MPs were markedly increased in P. vivax patients, as compared to healthy age-matched malaria-unexposed controls. Although platelets, erythrocytes and leukocytes were the main cellular sources of MPs during vivax malaria, platelet derived-MPs (PMPs) increased in a linear fashion with the presence of fever at the time of blood collection (β = 0.06, p < 0.0001) and length of acute symptoms (β = 0.36, p < 0.0001). Finally, the results suggest that plasma levels of PMPs diminish as patient experience more episodes of clinical malaria (β = 0.07, p < 0.003). Conclusions Abundant circulating MPs are present during acute P. vivax infection, and platelet derived-MPs may play a role on the acute inflammatory symptoms of malaria vivax. PMID:21080932

  18. Results of a phase I/II British Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation study on PCR-based pre-emptive therapy with valganciclovir or ganciclovir for active CMV infection following alemtuzumab-based reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Z Y; Cook, G; Johnson, P R; Parker, Anne; Zuckerman, M; Marks, D; Wiltshire, H; Mufti, G J; Pagliuca, A

    2009-02-01

    This multi-centre randomized study assessed the bioavailability of ganciclovir in patients undergoing alemtuzumab-based reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after oral administration of valganciclovir. Patients were randomized to 2 groups receiving either oral valganciclovir (900 mg twice daily) or intravenous ganciclovir (5mg/kg twice daily) for 14 days. Twenty-seven patients were recruited and 18 patients (67%) completed allocated treatment resulting in clearance of cytomegolovirus (CMV) DNA load at a median of 14 days. The bioavailability of ganciclovir from valganciclovir was 73% (95% CI: 34-112%). The average exposure in the valganciclovir group (36.9+/-14.9 microg h/ml) was higher than the ganciclovir cohort (27.9+/-7.5 microg h/ml). When compared with intravenous ganciclovir, oral valganciclovir had high bioavailability in patients undergoing alemtuzumab-based RIC HSCT.

  19. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  20. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bruner, Katherine M; Murray, Alexandra J; Pollack, Ross A; Soliman, Mary G; Laskey, Sarah B; Capoferri, Adam A; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Siliciano, Janet D; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) persists in CD4(+) T cells in a latent form that is not targeted by the immune system or by ART. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to curing individuals of HIV-1 infection. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and the persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. By using an unbiased method to amplify near-full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1-infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early initiation of ART limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly affect the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals who were treated early versus late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size, as determined by the number of genetically intact proviruses. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies.

  1. Construction and Quality Analysis of Transgenic Rehmannia glutinosa Containing TMV and CMV Coat Protein.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhongqiu; Shen, Ye; Li, Jing; Lin, Zhongping; Chen, Min; Wang, Min; Li, Man; Dong, Hongran; Huang, Luqi

    2016-08-27

    Plant viruses, especially tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) are serious threats to Rehmannia glutinosa which is a "top grade" herb in China. In the present study, TMV- and CMV-resistant Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch. plants were constructed by transforming the protein (CP) genes of TMV and CMV into Rehmannia glutinosa via a modified procedure of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Integration and expression of TMV CP and CMV CP transgenes in 2 lines, LBA-1 and LBA-2, were confirmed by PCR, Southern blot and RT-PCR. Both LBA-1 and LBA-2 were resistant to infection of homologous TMV and CMV strains. The quality of transgenic Rehmanniae Radix was evaluated based on fingerprint analysis and components quantitative analysis comparing with control root tubes. These results showed that chemical composition of transgenic Rehmanniae Radix were similar to non-transgenic ones, which demonstrated that the medical quality and biosafety of transgenic Rehmanniae Radix were equivalent to non-transgenic material when consumed as traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM).

  2. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) is one of the commonest bone infection in childhood. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest organism causing AHO. With use of advanced diagnostic methods, fastidious Kingella kingae is increasingly becoming an important organism in etiology of osteoarticular infections in children under the age of 3 y. The diagnosis of AHO is primarily clinical. The main clinical symptom and sign in AHO is pain and tenderness over the affected bone especially in the metaphyseal region. However, in a neonate the clinical presentation may be subtle and misleading. Laboratory and radiological investigations supplement the clinical findings. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are frequently elevated. Ultrasonography and MRI are key imaging modalities for early detection of AHO. Determination of infecting organism in AHO is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management and therefore, organism isolation using blood cultures and site aspiration should be attempted. Several effective antibiotics regimes are available for managing AHO in children. The choice of antibiotic and its duration and mode of delivery requires individualization depending upon severity of infection, causative organism, regional sensitivity patterns, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and child's presentation and the clinical and laboratory response to the treatment. If pus has been evidenced in the soft tissues or bone region, surgical decompression of abscess is mandatory.

  3. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corinne J; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8(+) T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8(+) T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  4. The Prevalence and Incidence of Epiretinal Membranes in Eyes With Inactive Extramacular CMV Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Vaidya, Vijay; Van Natta, Mark L.; Pak, Jeong W.; May, K. Patrick; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the prevalence and incidence of epiretinal membranes (ERM) in eyes with inactive extramacular cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods. A case–control report from a longitudinal multicenter observational study by the Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (SOCA) Research Group. A total of 357 eyes of 270 patients with inactive CMV retinitis and 1084 eyes of 552 patients with no ocular opportunistic infection (OOI) were studied. Stereoscopic views of the posterior pole from fundus photographs were assessed at baseline and year 5 visits for the presence of macular ERM. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence and 5-year incidence of ERM in eyes with and without CMV retinitis at enrollment. Crude and adjusted logistic regression was performed adjusting for possible confounders. Main outcome measures included the prevalence, incidence, estimated prevalence, and incidence odds ratios. Results. The prevalence of ERM at enrollment was 14.8% (53/357) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 1.8% (19/1084) in eyes with no OOI. The incidence of ERM at 5 years was 18.6% (16/86) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 2.4% (6/253) in eyes with no OOI. The crude odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval, CI) for prevalence was 9.8 (5.5–17.5) (P < 0.01). The crude OR (95% CI) for incidence was 9.4 (3.2–27.9) (P < 0.01). Conclusions. A history of extramacular CMV retinitis is associated with increased prevalence and incidence of ERM formation compared to what is seen in eyes without ocular opportunistic infections in AIDS patients. PMID:24925880

  5. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  6. Atypical presentations of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Ansuya; Paruk, Hoosain; Bhagwan, Bhupendra; Moodley, Anand

    2017-02-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a monophasic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system associated with various viral infections including HIV infection. We present the findings of seven HIV-infected patients with mild to moderate immunosuppression presenting with atypical features. Four patients had a multiphasic course; three patients had tumefactive lesions, and two patients had corpus callosum lesions. Two patients with the multiphasic course also had tumefactive lesions. Their clinical and radiological findings are presented. Despite the few cases, we propose that the dysimmune process lying between marked immunosuppression (CD4 < 200 cells/μL) and normal CD4 counts (CD4 > 500 cells/μL) might be responsible for these atypical presentations.

  7. Defective proviruses rapidly accumulate during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Katherine M.; Murray, Alexandra J.; Pollack, Ross A.; Soliman, Mary G.; Laskey, Sarah B.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Lai, Jun; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Hoh, Rebecca; Ho, Ya-Chi; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication to clinically undetectable levels, HIV-1 persists in CD4+ T cells in a latent form not targeted by the immune system or ART1–5. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to cure. Many individuals initiate ART during chronic infection, and in this setting, most proviruses are defective6. However, the dynamics of the accumulation and persistence of defective proviruses during acute HIV-1 infection are largely unknown. Here we show that defective proviruses accumulate rapidly within the first few weeks of infection to make up over 93% of all proviruses, regardless of how early ART is initiated. Using an unbiased method to amplify near full-length proviral genomes from HIV-1 infected adults treated at different stages of infection, we demonstrate that early ART initiation limits the size of the reservoir but does not profoundly impact the proviral landscape. This analysis allows us to revise our understanding of the composition of proviral populations and estimate the true reservoir size in individuals treated early vs. late in infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that common assays for measuring the reservoir do not correlate with reservoir size. These findings reveal hurdles that must be overcome to successfully analyze future HIV-1 cure strategies. PMID:27500724

  8. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    PubMed

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  9. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  10. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  13. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  14. [Analytical performances of real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 for the detection of cytomegalovirus in urine].

    PubMed

    De Monte, Anne; Cannavo, Isabelle; Caramella, Anne; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading cause of sensoneurinal disability due to infectious congenital disease. The diagnosis of congenital CMV infection is based on the search of CMV in the urine within the first two weeks of life. Viral culture of urine is the gold standard. However, the PCR is highly sensitive and faster. It is becoming an alternative choice. The objective of this study is the validation of real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 for the detection of cytomegalovirus in urine. Repeatability, reproducibility, detection limit and inter-sample contamination were evaluated. Urine samples from patients (n=141) were collected and analyzed simultaneously in culture and PCR in order to assess the correlation of these two methods. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR were also calculated. The Abbott RealTime CMV PCR in urine is an automated and sensitive method (detection limit 200 UI/mL). Fidelity is very good (standard deviation of repeatability: 0.08 to 0.15 LogUI/mL and reproducibility 0.18 LogUI/mL). We can note a good correlation between culture and Abbott RealTime CMV PCR (kappa 96%). When considering rapid culture as reference, real-time PCR was highly sensitive (100%) and specific (98.2%). The real-time PCR by Abbott RealTime CMV with m2000 is optimal for CMV detection in urine.

  15. Significant infections after hand transplantation in a Polish population.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, D; Kościelska-Kasprzak, K; Myszka, M; Banasik, M; Chełmoński, A; Boratyńska, M; Jabłecki, J; Klinger, M

    2014-10-01

    The study was conducted to assess serious infectious complications in five hand allograft recipients (four males, one female, age 40 ± 10 years), transplanted between 2006 and 2010. All donors and recipients were positive but one for cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunoglobulin G. All recipients received immunosuppressive therapy basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and methylprednisolone. Until May 2013, there were four cases of severe infections requiring hospitalization. One patient developed CMV infection on the 28th postoperative day. Despite therapy with ganciclovir and prophylaxis with valganciclovir, reinfection episodes occurred both 4 weeks and 7 months later. The female recipient developed CMV infection 8 months after hand transplantation. After 3 weeks of ganciclovir treatment, the polymerase chain reaction results remained negative. We found that the CD4/CD8 T lymphocytes ratio differs in those two patients who had developed CMV disease in the past in comparison to the three remaining hand transplant recipients (mean 0.46 versus 1.7, respectively). Moreover, the ratio of patients who were CD4-8 negative to total T lymphocytes in CMV recovered patients was two-fold higher compared to the remaining recipients (10.0 versus 4.4, respectively). The female recipient was also hospitalized because of acute tonsillitis 25 months after hand transplantation, and successfully treated with amoxicillin clavulanate. The third recipient was hospitalized because of severe acute pain involving right lower limb, especially foot, 74 months after hand transplantation. After 48 hours, a painful vesicular rash occurred on the plantar as well as dorsal surface of right foot and herpes zoster was diagnosed. Immunosuppressive therapy after hand transplantation may be complicated by serious infections. CMV disease was associated with persistent alterations in T lymphocyte subsets.

  16. Microbial transformation from normal oral microbiota to acute endodontic infections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endodontic infections are a leading cause of oro-facial pain and tooth loss in western countries, and may lead to severe life-threatening infections. These infections are polymicrobial with high bacterial diversity. Understanding the spatial transition of microbiota from normal oral cavities through the infected root canal to the acute periapical abscess can improve our knowledge of the pathogenesis of endodontic infections and lead to more effective treatment. We obtained samples from the oral cavity, infected root canal and periapical abscess of 8 patients (5 with localized and 3 with systemic infections). Microbial populations in these samples were analyzed using next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. Bioinformatics tools and statistical tests with rigorous criteria were used to elucidate the spatial transition of the microbiota from normal to diseased sites. Results On average, 10,000 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from each sample. All sequences fell into 11 different bacterial phyla. The microbial diversity in root canal and abscess samples was significantly lower than in the oral samples. Streptococcus was the most abundant genus in oral cavities while Prevotella and Fusobacterium were most abundant in diseased samples. The microbiota community structures of root canal and abscess samples were, however, more similar to each other than to the oral cavity microbiota. Using rigorous criteria and novel bioinformatics tools, we found that Granulicatella adiacens, Eubacterium yurii, Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella salivae, Streptococcus mitis, and Atopobium rimae were over-represented in diseased samples. Conclusions We used a novel approach and high-throughput methodologies to characterize the microbiota associated normal and diseased oral sites in the same individuals. PMID:22839737

  17. Recent Toxoplasmosis Infection With Acute Myopericarditis and Persistent Troponin Elevation in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Roubille, François; Roubille, Camille; Lattuca, Benoît; Gervasoni, Richard; Vernhet-Kovacsik, Hélène; Leclercq, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Although often considered as "begnin", acute infections in young healthy adults can lead to heart inflammation, including acute myocarditis. We report a rare case of myopericarditis in a young immunocompetent adult, in the context of recent toxoplasmosis infection. Clinical presentation was common acute pericarditis, but with risk biomarkers: high troponin I levels and multiple inflammation-compatible images on MR-scan. Diagnosis of myopericarditis was established. In spite of spontaneous favourable clinical evolution, troponin remained elevated. MR-scan is shown; acute myocarditis in the context of an acute toxoplasmosis infection is discussed.

  18. Preparing for the next round: convalescent care after acute infection.

    PubMed

    Rohde, J E

    1978-12-01

    Infections pose a nutritional stress on the growing child. No therapeutic goal is as important as the rapid recovery of preillness weight after acute infections. Successful convalescence, with supernormal growth rates, can be achieved with relatively brief periods of intensive refeeding, offsetting any tendency toward reduced immune defenses or other nutritionally determined susceptibilities to further infection. Since the mother is the only person who can effectively manage convalescent care, she must be given specific tasks with measurable targets in order to reliably oversee the child's rehabilitation. Not generally considered in the realm of preventive medicine, effective home-based convalencent care is the first crucial step in preventing the next round of illness. An approach to the widespread mobilization of mothers to monitor and sustain their children's growth is proposed in this paper. Rather than a passive recipient of health services, the mother becomes the basic health worker, providing diagnostic and therapeutic primary care for her child. Only the mother can break the malnutrition-infection cycle.

  19. Early Detection of Autism (ASD) by a Non-invasive Quick Measurement of Markedly Reduced Acetylcholine & DHEA and Increased β-Amyloid (1-42), Asbestos (Chrysotile), Titanium Dioxide, Al, Hg & often Coexisting Virus Infections (CMV, HPV 16 and 18), Bacterial Infections etc. in the Brain and Corresponding Safe Individualized Effective Treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Ahdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    A brief historical background on Autism & some of the important symptoms associated with Autism are summarized. Using strong Electro Magnetic Field Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical molecules with identical weight (which received U.S. Patent) non-invasively & rapidly we can detect various molecules including neurotransmitters, bacteria, virus, fungus, metals & abnormal molecules. Simple non- invasive measurement of various molecules through pupils & head of diagnosed or suspected Autism patients indicated that in Autism patients following changes were often found: 1) Acetylcholine is markedly reduced; 2) Alzheimer's disease markers (i.e. β-Amyloid (1-42), Tau Protein, Apolipoprotein (Apo E4)) are markedly increased; 3) Chrysotile Asbestos is increased; 4) Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is moderately increased; 5) Al is moderately increased; 6) Hg is moderately increased; 7) Dopamine, Serotonin & GABA are significantly reduced (up to about 1/10 of normal); 8) Often viral infections (such as CMV, HHV-6, HPV-16, HPV-18, etc.), and Bacterial infections (such as Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium TB, Borrelia Burgdorferi, etc.) coexist. Research by others on Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows that it is a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders, with about 70% of ASD patients also suffering from gastro-intestinal problems. While Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by formation of 1) Amyloid plaques, 2) Neurofibrillary tangles inside of neurons, and 3) Loss of connections between neurons. More than 90% of AD develops in people over the age of 65. These 3 characteristics often progressively worsen over time. Although Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alzheimer's disease are completely different diseases they have some similar biochemical changes. Eight examples of such measurement & analysis are shown for comparison. Most of Autism patients improved significantly by removing the source or preventing intake of Asbestos, TiO2, Al & Hg or enhancing urinary output

  20. [Epidemiology and bacteriological diagnosis of paediatric acute osteoarticular infections].

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A

    2007-10-01

    Acute paediatric osteo-articular infections require a fast and sensitive diagnosis allowing a treatment directed to the causative pathogen. Many micro-organisms can be incriminated, but Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae markedly prevail. K. kingae became the first bacterial species responsible for septic arthritis in children < 3 years. More rarely, (2)haemolytic Streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae are found. The incidence of community acquired S. aureus resistant to oxacillin in osteo-articular infections is still low in France. The microbiological diagnosis of septic arthritis relies upon analysis of articular fluid, which requires systematic inoculation of a blood culture vial to increase the recovery rate of K. kingae. If the culture is negative, it is recommended to carry out a universal PCR or a PCR targeted to the main germs responsible for septic arthritis. Indeed, PCR represents an undeniable benefice for the diagnosis of paediatric septic arthritis, particularly for the DNA detection of K. kingae. The diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis relies primarily upon blood cultures, since the bone puncture is not a systematic procedure in this setting. Their efficiency is low, and there is still a need to look for other arguments of diagnosis such as search of possible portals of entry or specific serologies.

  1. Acute renal damage in infants after first urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Salvatore; Chertin, Boris; Yoneda, Akihiro; Rolle, Udo; Kelleher, Jeremiah; Puri, Prem

    2002-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common causes of unexplained fever in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of urinary tract anomalies and acute renal damage in neonates who presented with first urinary tract infection in the first 8 weeks of life. We reviewed the records of 95 infants, who were hospitalised with UTI during a 6-year period (1994-1999). Patients with antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis and incomplete radiological investigations were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 57 patients, 42 were boys and 15 girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 32 days (range 5-60 days). All patients underwent renal ultrasonography (US), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Urinary tract abnormalities were detected in 20 (35%) patients. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was found in 19 (33%) neonates, 7 girls and 12 boys. Acute cortical defects on DMSA scan were present in 19 kidneys of patients with VUR and in 25 of those without reflux. Only one-third of neonates after first symptomatic UTI had VUR. We recommend that US, VCUG, and DMSA scan should be routinely performed after the first UTI in infants younger than 8 weeks.

  2. Incidence of acute otitis media and sinusitis complicating upper respiratory tract infection: the effect of age.

    PubMed

    Revai, Krystal; Dobbs, Laura A; Nair, Sangeeta; Patel, Janak A; Grady, James J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2007-06-01

    Infants and young children are prone to developing upper respiratory tract infections, which often result in bacterial complications such as acute otitis media and sinusitis. We evaluated 623 upper respiratory tract infection episodes in 112 children (6-35 months of age) to determine the proportion of upper respiratory tract infection episodes that result in acute otitis media or sinusitis. Of all upper respiratory tract infections, 30% were complicated by acute otitis media and 8% were complicated by sinusitis. The rate of acute otitis media after upper respiratory tract infection declined with increasing age, whereas the rate of sinusitis after upper respiratory tract infection peaked in the second year of life. Risk for acute otitis media may be reduced substantially by avoiding frequent exposure to respiratory viruses (eg, avoidance of day care attendance) in the first year of life.

  3. New agents approved for treatment of acute staphylococcal skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, Jan; Staniszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been a predominant treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections for decades. However, growing reservations about its efficacy led to an urgent need for new antibiotics effective against MRSA and other drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. This review covers three new anti-MRSA antibiotics that have been recently approved by the FDA: dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid. The mechanism of action, indications, antibacterial activity profile, microbial resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, interactions as well as available formulations and administration of each of these new antibiotics are described. Dalbavancin is a once-a-week, two-dose, long-acting intravenous bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. Oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity, was developed as a single-dose intravenous treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI), which offers simplifying treatment of infections. Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone-class bacteriostatic once-daily agent, available for intravenous as well as oral use. Increased ability to overcome bacterial resistance is the main therapeutic advantage of the novel agents over existing antibiotics. PMID:27904526

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus can be experimentally transmitted via milk during acute maternal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, R K; Jordan, H L; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in neonates nursed by acutely infected mothers and infection resulting from oral inoculation of kittens with FIV were evaluated. Ten of 16 kittens nursed by four queens with FIV infection established immediately postpartum developed FIV infection. Five of 11 neonates orally administered cell-free FIV culture supernatant developed FIV infection. Kittens that developed FIV infection had greater proportions of CD4+ and Pan-T+ lymphocytes at birth than negative kittens. Infectious virus was recovered from the milk of acutely infected mothers. We conclude that FIV may be experimentally transmitted via milk from queens with acute infections and that oral administration of FIV to neonatal kittens results in infection. Images PMID:8151797

  5. CMV2b-AGO Interaction Is Required for the Suppression of RDR-Dependent Antiviral Silencing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Liu, Shang-Wu; Wang, Sheng; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Using a transient plant system, it was previously found that the suppression of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b protein relies on its double-strand (ds) RNA binding capacity, but it is independent of its interaction with ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins. Thus, the biological meaning of the 2b-AGO interaction in the context of virus infection remains elusive. In this study, we created infectious clones of CMV mutants that expressed the 2b functional domains of dsRNA or AGO binding and tested the effect of these CMV mutants on viral pathogenicity. We found that the mutant CMV2b(1–76) expressing the 2b dsRNA-binding domain exhibited the same virulence as wild-type CMV in infection with either wild-type Arabidopsis or rdr1/6 plants with RDR1- and RDR6-deficient mutations. However, remarkably reduced viral RNA levels and increased virus (v)siRNAs were detected in CMV2b(1–76)-infected Arabidopsis in comparison to CMV infection, which demonstrated that the 2b(1–76) deleted AGO-binding domain failed to suppress the RDR1/RDR6-dependent degradation of viral RNAs. The mutant CMV2b(8–111) expressing mutant 2b, in which the N-terminal 7 amino acid (aa) was deleted, exhibited slightly reduced virulence, but not viral RNA levels, in both wild-type and rdr1/6 plants, which indicated that 2b retained the AGO-binding activity acquired the counter-RDRs degradation of viral RNAs. The deletion of the N-terminal 7 aa of 2b affected virulence due to the reduced affinity for long dsRNA. The mutant CMV2b(18–111) expressing mutant 2b lacked the N-terminal 17 aa but retained its AGO-binding activity greatly reduced virulence and viral RNA level. Together with the instability of both 2b(18–111)-EGFP and RFP-AGO4 proteins when co-expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, our data demonstrates that the effect of 2b-AGO interaction on counter-RDRs antiviral defense required the presence of 2b dsRNA-binding activity. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the dsRNA-binding activity of

  6. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... the development of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin...

  7. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:22516379

  8. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  9. Microbiologically documented infections and infection-related mortality in children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Lange, Beverly J; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Feusner, James

    2007-11-15

    The primary objective was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of microbiologically defined infections and infection-related mortality (IRM) in 492 children with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled on CCG 2961. Secondary objectives were to determine the relationship between demographic, disease-related, and therapeutic variables, and infections and IRM. Institutions documented infections prospectively. Age, ethnicity, body mass index, leukemia karyotype, treatment, and institutional size were examined for association with infection outcomes. More than 60% of children experienced such infections in each of 3 phases of chemotherapy. There were 58 infectious deaths; cumulative incidence of IRM was 11% plus or minus 2%. Thirty-one percent of infectious deaths were associated with Aspergillus, 25.9% with Candida, and 15.5% with alpha hemolytic streptococci. Age older than 16 years (hazard ratio [HR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87-5.89; P < .001), nonwhite ethnicity (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.09; P = .02), and underweight status (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.51-6.22; P = .002) were associated with IRM, while size of the treating institution was not. Thus, age, ethnicity, and BMI were important contributors to IRM. Fungi and Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms associated with IRM and, in particular, Aspergillus species was the largest contributor to infectious deaths.

  10. Primary Cytomegalovirus-Related Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a Three-year-old Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reesi, Mohammed Al; Al-Maani, Amal; Paul, George; Al-Arimi, Sumaiah

    2014-01-01

    A diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is rare in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We report a case of EP in association with a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in a three-year-old Omani child with ALL. The patient presented with fever while undergoing maintenance chemotherapy. He was admitted to the Child Health Department of Royal Hospital, in Muscat, Oman, in November 2011. He was initially thought to have sepsis but failed to respond to antibiotics. Chest computed tomography showed diffuse ground glass lung opacification. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cytology was consistent with the diagnosis of EP. Polymerase chain reaction tests for CMV were performed on the BAL and blood samples and were both markedly elevated. The patient made a full recovery after treatment with prednisolone and ganciclovir. The association between CMV infection and EP as well as the management of this combination in immunocompromised patients has never been reported in the English literature. PMID:25364562

  11. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  12. Acute and Chronic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Infection in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Ersdal, C; Jørgensen, H J; Lie, K-I

    2015-07-01

    Polyarthritis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a relatively common infection in lambs characterized by low mortality and high morbidity. E. rhusiopathiae is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterium that is both a commensal and a pathogen of vertebrates. The disease was studied during an outbreak in a Norwegian Spæl sheep flock. In the acute phase, 48 of 230 (20%) lambs developed clinical signs and 4 died (1.7%). One acute case was necropsied and E. rhusiopathiae was cultured from all major organs investigated and from joints. There was a fibrinous polyarthritis, increased presence of monocytes in vessels, and necrosis of Purkinje cells. Sixteen of the diseased animals (33%) developed a chronic polyarthritis. Eight of these lambs were necropsied; all had lesions in major limb joints, and 3 of 8 also had lesions in the atlanto-occipital joint. At this stage, E. rhusiopathiae was cultured only from the joints in 7 of 8 (87.5%) lambs, but by real-time polymerase chain reaction, we showed persistence of the bacterium in several organs. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of the bacterial isolates indicated that the same strain caused the acute and chronic disease. Five of 6 (83%) chronically affected animals had amyloidosis of the spleen, and 6 of 8 (75%) had amyloidosis of the liver. All chronically affected animals had a glomerulonephritis, and 6 of 8 (75%) had sparse degeneration in the brain. Ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin were significantly increased in the chronically diseased lambs. These results show that chronic ovine erysipelas is not restricted to joints but is a multisystemic disease.

  13. Acute hepatitis C: changing epidemiology and association with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brejt, Nick; Gilleece, Yvonne; Fisher, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Over the past 6 to 7 years an increasing incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (AHCV) has been fuelled by two different changing epidemics: (1) a new resurgence of AHCV amongst intravenous drug users (IVDU); and (2) presumed sexually transmitted AHCV amongst predominantly HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Increasing incidence amongst IVDUs is likely to be a consequence of changing injecting behaviour, possibly related to changes in perception of HIV as well as HCV risk and consequences. Increasing incidence amongst MSM is likely to be a consequence of changing sexual practices, for example number of sexual partners and type of sexual behaviour, as well as increasing availability of recreational drugs associated with sexual risk-taking, and wider availability of casual sexual partners via the internet or sex-on-premises venues. It remains unclear whether the current outbreaks in MSM, predominantly seen in HIV-positive individuals, reflect a predisposition to AHCV secondary to HIV status per se, or whether this reflects differences in behaviour amongst HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM, or potentially increased screening (either routine or secondary to abnormal liver function tests) in HIV-positive MSM. The majority of individuals with AHCV are asymptomatic and therefore routine screening of individuals in at-risk groups with abnormal liver function tests should be considered. Previous historical studies suggest that individuals with concomitant HIV infection are far less likely than those without to spontaneously clear HCV. It is currently recommended that such individuals acutely infected with HCV should undergo monitoring of HCV viral load levels to determine whether spontaneous clearance is likely or whether the opportunity for early treatment should be considered.

  14. Fully automated quantification of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in whole blood with the new sensitive Abbott RealTime CMV assay in the era of the CMV international standard.

    PubMed

    Schnepf, Nathalie; Scieux, Catherine; Resche-Riggon, Matthieu; Feghoul, Linda; Xhaard, Alienor; Gallien, Sébastien; Molina, Jean-Michel; Socié, Gérard; Viglietti, Denis; Simon, François; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Legoff, Jérôme

    2013-07-01

    Fully standardized reproducible and sensitive quantification assays for cytomegalovirus (CMV) are needed to better define thresholds for antiviral therapy initiation and interruption. We evaluated the newly released Abbott RealTime CMV assay for CMV quantification in whole blood (WB) that includes automated extraction and amplification (m2000 RealTime system). Sensitivity, accuracy, linearity, and intra- and interassay variability were validated in a WB matrix using Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) panels and the WHO international standard (IS). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.37% and 2.09% at 5 log10 copies/ml and 2.41% and 3.80% at 3 log10 copies/ml, respectively. According to expected values for the QCMD and Abbott RealTime CMV methods, the lower limits of quantification were 104 and <50 copies/ml, respectively. The conversion factor between international units and copies (2.18), determined from serial dilutions of the WHO IS in WB, was significantly different from the factor provided by the manufacturer (1.56) (P = 0.001). Results from 302 clinical samples were compared with those from the Qiagen artus CMV assay on the same m2000 RealTime system. The two assays provided highly concordant results (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.92), but the Abbott RealTime CMV assay detected and quantified, respectively, 20.6% and 47.8% more samples than the Qiagen/artus CMV assay. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the results, along with the automation, fulfilled the quality requirements for implementation of the Abbott RealTime CMV assay in clinical settings. Our results highlight the need for careful validation of conversion factors provided by the manufacturers for the WHO IS in WB to allow future comparison of results obtained with different assays.

  15. Fully Automated Quantification of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in Whole Blood with the New Sensitive Abbott RealTime CMV Assay in the Era of the CMV International Standard

    PubMed Central

    Schnepf, Nathalie; Scieux, Catherine; Resche-Riggon, Matthieu; Feghoul, Linda; Xhaard, Alienor; Gallien, Sébastien; Molina, Jean-Michel; Socié, Gérard; Viglietti, Denis; Simon, François; Mazeron, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Fully standardized reproducible and sensitive quantification assays for cytomegalovirus (CMV) are needed to better define thresholds for antiviral therapy initiation and interruption. We evaluated the newly released Abbott RealTime CMV assay for CMV quantification in whole blood (WB) that includes automated extraction and amplification (m2000 RealTime system). Sensitivity, accuracy, linearity, and intra- and interassay variability were validated in a WB matrix using Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) panels and the WHO international standard (IS). The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 1.37% and 2.09% at 5 log10 copies/ml and 2.41% and 3.80% at 3 log10 copies/ml, respectively. According to expected values for the QCMD and Abbott RealTime CMV methods, the lower limits of quantification were 104 and <50 copies/ml, respectively. The conversion factor between international units and copies (2.18), determined from serial dilutions of the WHO IS in WB, was significantly different from the factor provided by the manufacturer (1.56) (P = 0.001). Results from 302 clinical samples were compared with those from the Qiagen artus CMV assay on the same m2000 RealTime system. The two assays provided highly concordant results (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.92), but the Abbott RealTime CMV assay detected and quantified, respectively, 20.6% and 47.8% more samples than the Qiagen/artus CMV assay. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the results, along with the automation, fulfilled the quality requirements for implementation of the Abbott RealTime CMV assay in clinical settings. Our results highlight the need for careful validation of conversion factors provided by the manufacturers for the WHO IS in WB to allow future comparison of results obtained with different assays. PMID:23616450

  16. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Korman, R M; Cerón, J J; Knowles, T G; Barker, E N; Eckersall, P D; Tasker, S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7-14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16-44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49-77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species.

  17. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  18. Bacterial translocation: a potential source for infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, L; Munda, R; Alexander, J W; Tchervenkov, J I; Babcock, G F

    1993-09-01

    Infections from enteric bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during acute pancreatitis (AP), but the pathways by which these organisms reach distant organs remains speculative. Experiments were conducted to determine if bacterial translocation could be a mechanism for infection during this disease. AP was induced in Lewis rats by i.v. infusion of caerulein (experiment I) or ligation of the head of the pancreas (experiment II). In a third experiment, rats were gavaged with 1 x 10(8) 14C-radiolabeled Escherichia coli and pancreatitis was induced with caerulein. Results in all three experiments showed that AP increased the number of viable bacteria recovered in peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, lungs, and pancreas. Radionuclide counting indicated that AP enhanced the gut permeability to 14C E. coli. To estimate the impact of AP on the magnitude of translocation and on the ability of the host to clear bacteria, the nuclide and colony-forming units (CFU) ratios were calculated between animals with and without AP. Blood, peritoneal fluid, and MLN had the highest nuclide ratio. During AP, these tissues may be the principal routes for bacterial spreading from the gut lumen. Peritoneal fluid, pancreas, and lung were the tissues with the highest CFU ratio. Bacterial killing ability of these tissues is likely impaired during AP.

  19. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made. PMID:25709166

  20. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made.

  1. Acute kidney injury associated with Plasmodium malariae infection.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Diongue, Khadim; Diallo, Seydou; Ndongo, Aliou A; Diedhiou, Cyrille K; Deme, Awa B; Ma, Diallo; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Seck, Mame C; Dieng, Therese; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndiaye, Daouda

    2014-06-07

    According to current estimates, Plasmodium malariae is not very common in Senegal, as more than 98% of malaria cases are suspected to be due to Plasmodium falciparum. However, it is possible that other malarial species are being under-reported or misdiagnosed. This is a report of a case of P. malariae in a 30-year-old man previously hospitalized with acute kidney injury after treatment with quinine and re-hospitalized three months later. He was diagnosed with renal cortical necrosis post malaria treatment. Plasmodium malariae was identified with light microscope and confirmed using species-specific small-subunit rRNA (ssrRNA) amplification.The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for seven days, followed by three days of oral treatment; the bacterial infection was treated using ceftriaxone during the first hospitalization and ciprofloxacin associated with ceftriaxone the second time. He also had four rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered the renal function. Given the complications that can be caused by P. malariae infection, it should be systematically looked for, even if the predominant species is P. falciparum in Senegal.

  2. Control of murine cytomegalovirus infection by γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Sabrina; Dietz, Monika; Schneider, Andrea; Holtappels, Rafaela; Mach, Michael; Winkler, Thomas H

    2015-02-01

    Infections with cytomegalovirus (CMV) can cause severe disease in immunosuppressed patients and infected newborns. Innate as well as cellular and humoral adaptive immune effector functions contribute to the control of CMV in immunocompetent individuals. None of the innate or adaptive immune functions are essential for virus control, however. Expansion of γδ T cells has been observed during human CMV (HCMV) infection in the fetus and in transplant patients with HCMV reactivation but the protective function of γδ T cells under these conditions remains unclear. Here we show for murine CMV (MCMV) infections that mice that lack CD8 and CD4 αβ-T cells as well as B lymphocytes can control a MCMV infection that is lethal in RAG-1(-/-) mice lacking any T- and B-cells. γδ T cells, isolated from infected mice can kill MCMV infected target cells in vitro and, importantly, provide long-term protection in infected RAG-1(-/-) mice after adoptive transfer. γδ T cells in MCMV infected hosts undergo a prominent and long-lasting phenotypic change most compatible with the view that the majority of the γδ T cell population persists in an effector/memory state even after resolution of the acute phase of the infection. A clonotypically focused Vγ1 and Vγ2 repertoire was observed at later stages of the infection in the organs where MCMV persists. These findings add γδ T cells as yet another protective component to the anti-CMV immune response. Our data provide clear evidence that γδ T cells can provide an effective control mechanism of acute CMV infections, particularly when conventional adaptive immune mechanisms are insufficient or absent, like in transplant patient or in the developing immune system in utero. The findings have implications in the stem cell transplant setting, as antigen recognition by γδ T cells is not MHC-restricted and dual reactivity against CMV and tumors has been described.

  3. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  4. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  5. Enterovirus D68 Infection in Children with Acute Flaccid Myelitis, Colorado, USA, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Messacar, Kevin; Pastula, Daniel M.; Robinson, Christine C.; Leshem, Eyal; Sejvar, James J.; Nix, W. Allan; Oberste, M. Steven; Feikin, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    During August 8, 2014–October 14, 2014, a total of 11 children with acute flaccid myelitis and distinctive neuroimaging changes were identified near Denver, Colorado, USA. A respiratory prodrome was experienced by 10, and nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) for 4. To determine whether an association exists between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis, we conducted a retrospective case–control study comparing these patients with 2 groups of outpatient control children (1 group tested for acute respiratory illness and 1 for Bordetella pertussis infection). Adjusted analyses indicated that, for children with acute flaccid myelitis, the odds of having EV-D68 infection were 10.3 times greater than for those tested for acute respiratory infection and 4.5 times greater than for those tested for B. pertussis infection. No statistical association was seen between acute flaccid myelitis and non–EV-D68 enterovirus or rhinovirus infection. These findings support an association between EV-D68 infection and acute flaccid myelitis. PMID:27434186

  6. Phylogenetic reconstruction of transmission events from individuals with acute HIV infection: toward more-rigorous epidemiological definitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alison E; Gifford, Robert J; Clewley, Jonathan P; Kucherer, Claudia; Masquelier, Bernard; Porter, Kholoud; Balotta, Claudia; Back, Nicole K T; Jorgensen, Louise Bruun; de Mendoza, Carmen; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Gill, O Noel; Johnson, Anne M; Pillay, Deenan

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenetic reconstructions of transmission events from individuals with acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are conducted to illustrate this group's heightened infectivity. Varied definitions of acute infection and assumptions about observed phylogenetic clusters may produce misleading results. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of HIV pol sequences from 165 European patients with estimated infection dates and calculated the difference between dates within clusters. Nine phylogenetic clusters were observed. Comparison of dates within clusters revealed that only 2 could have been generated during acute infection. Previous analyses may have incorrectly assigned transmission events to the acutely HIV infected when they were more likely to have occurred during chronic infection.

  7. Functional screening for anti-CMV biologics identifies a broadly neutralizing epitope of an essential envelope protein

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Thomas J.; Stein, Kathryn R.; Duty, J. Andrew; Schwarz, Toni M.; Noriega, Vanessa M.; Kraus, Thomas; Moran, Thomas M.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The prototypic β-herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) establishes life-long persistence within its human host. The CMV envelope consists of various protein complexes that enable wide viral tropism. More specifically, the glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gO (gH-trimer) is required for infection of all cell types, while the gH/gL/UL128/130/131a (gH-pentamer) complex imparts specificity in infecting epithelial, endothelial and myeloid cells. Here we utilize state-of-the-art robotics and a high-throughput neutralization assay to screen and identify monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting the gH glycoproteins that display broad-spectrum properties to inhibit virus infection and dissemination. Subsequent biochemical characterization reveals that the mAbs bind to gH-trimer and gH-pentamer complexes and identify the antibodies' epitope as an ‘antigenic hot spot' critical for virus entry. The mAbs inhibit CMV infection at a post-attachment step by interacting with a highly conserved central alpha helix-rich domain. The platform described here provides the framework for development of effective CMV biologics and vaccine design strategies. PMID:27966523

  8. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    PubMed

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  9. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Hana; Dallas, Ronald; Zhou, Yinmei; Pei, Dequing; Cheng, Cheng; Flynn, Patricia M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the incidence, clinical course and impact of respiratory viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. Methods A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed ALL on Total Therapy XVI protocol at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital between 2007 and 2011 was evaluated. Results Of 223 children, 95 (43%) developed 133 episodes of viral acute respiratory illness (ARI) (incidence = 1.1/1,000 patient-days). ARI without viral etiology was identified in 65 (29%) patients and no ARI in 63 (28%). There were no significant associations between race, gender, age, or ALL risk group and development of ARI. Children receiving induction chemotherapy were at the highest risk for viral ARI (incidence, 2.3 per 1,000 patient-days). Influenza virus was the most common virus (38%) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (33%). Of 133 episodes of viral ARI, 61% of patients were hospitalized, 26% suffered a complicated course, 80% had their chemotherapy delayed, and 0.7% died. Twenty-four (18%) patients developed viral lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI); of which 5 (21%) had complications. Patients with viral LRTI had significantly lower nadir absolute lymphocyte count, were sicker at presentation, and were more likely to have RSV, to be hospitalized, and to have their chemotherapy delayed for longer time compared to those with viral URTI. Conclusion Despite the low incidence of viral ARI in children with ALL, the associated morbidity, mortality, and delay in chemotherapy remain clinically significant. Viral LRTI was particularly associated with high morbidity requiring intensive care level support. PMID:26700662

  10. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. Liver Fibrosis during an Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Men: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Daniel S.; Uriel, Alison J.; Carriero, Damaris C.; Klepper, Arielle; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Mullen, Michael P.; Thung, Swan N.; Fiel, M. Isabel; Branch, Andrea D.

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are occurring in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. We evaluated risk factors and liver histopathology in 11 consecutively enrolled men with newly acquired HCV infection that was diagnosed on the basis of antibody seroconversion, new elevations in alanine aminotransferase level, and wide fluctuations in HCV RNA level. Ten patients reported unprotected anal intercourse, and 7 reported “club-drug” use, including methamphetamine. Liver biopsy showed moderately advanced fibrosis (Scheuer stage 2) in 9 patients (82%). No cause of liver damage other than acute HCV infection was identified. The specific pathways leading to periportal fibrosis in HIV-infected men with newly acquired HCV infection require investigation. PMID:18627270

  12. Acute cholecystitis associated with infection of Enterobacteriaceae from gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yan, Q; Luo, F; Shang, D; Wu, D; Zhang, H; Shang, X; Kang, X; Abdo, M; Liu, B; Ma, Y; Xin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute cholecystitis (AC) is one of the most common surgical diseases. Bacterial infection accounts for 50% to 85% of the disease's onset. Since there is a close relationship between the biliary system and the gut, the aims of this study were to characterize and determine the influence of gut microbiota on AC, to detect the pathogenic microorganism in the biliary system, and to explore the relationship between the gut and bile microbiota of patients with AC. A total of 185 713 high-quality sequence reads were generated from the faecal samples of 15 patients and 13 healthy controls by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Patients' samples were significantly enriched in Akkermansia, Enterobacter and Escherichia/Shigella group. The healthy controls, however, showed significant enrichment of Clostridiales, Coprococcus, Coprobacillaceae, Paraprevotella, Turicibacter and TM7-3 in their faecal samples. Escherichia coli was the main biliary pathogenic microorganism, among others such as Klebsiella spp., Clostridium perfringens, Citrobacter freundii and Enterobacter cloacae in the bile of the patients. Additionally, the amount of bile endotoxin significantly correlated with the number of Enterobacteriaceae, especially E. coli. Our data indicate that Enterobacteriaceae might play essential role in the pathogenesis and/or progress of AC. This was verified in an in vivo model using a pathogenic E. coli isolated from one of the patients in guinea pigs and observed marked gallbladder inflammation and morphologic changes. This study thus provides insight which could be useful for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AC and related diseases by controlling the growth of Enterobacteriaceae to alleviate the infection.

  13. [Rhinoviruses. Frequency in nonhospitalized children with acute respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Marcone, Débora N; Ricarte, Carmen; Videla, Cristina; Ekstrom, Jorge; Carballal, Guadalupe; Vidaurreta, Santiago; Echavarría, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Molecular methods for human rhinoviruses (HRV) have increased the sensitivity in their diagnosis. HRV may cause acute respiratory infections (ARI) of the upper and lower respiratory tract. HRV infection during childhood is a predictor of asthma development. In this study, the HRV frequency in outpatient children with ARI was determined, and their clinical features and previous conditions were evaluated. A total of 186 respiratory samples of children under 6 year old attending the CEMIC pediatric emergency room from June 1, 2008 to May 31, 2010, were studied. Classical respiratory viruses were detected by immunofluorescence. A real time RT-PCR that amplifies part of the 5' non coding genomic region was used for HRV detection. Viral detection was obtained in 61% of children. The frequency was: 27% for HRV, 16% for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 9% for influenza, 8% for parainfluenza, 7% for metapneumovirus and 0.5% for adenovirus. Dual coinfection was detected in 8 children and HRV were the most frequent, detected in 4 of them. HRV circulated during the two year period of the study, with peaks during winter and spring. No clinical difference was observed between patients with or without HRV, except an increase percent of children with HRV without fever. HRV were the most frequent viruses detected in this population, mainly in children under 2 year old, the second cause of bronchiolitis after RSV and more frequently detected in children exposed to passive smoking (OR = 2.91; p = 0.012), and were detected as the sole etiologic agent in 28% of bronchiolitis.

  14. Recovery from an acute infection in C. elegans requires the GATA transcription factor ELT-2.

    PubMed

    Head, Brian; Aballay, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in the recognition of microbial pathogens and activation of the immune system have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in the recovery phase of an infection are incompletely characterized at both the cellular and physiological levels. Here, we establish a Caenorhabditis elegans-Salmonella enterica model of acute infection and antibiotic treatment for studying biological changes during the resolution phase of an infection. Using whole genome expression profiles of acutely infected animals, we found that genes that are markers of innate immunity are down-regulated upon recovery, while genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification, redox regulation, and cellular homeostasis are up-regulated. In silico analyses demonstrated that genes altered during recovery from infection were transcriptionally regulated by conserved transcription factors, including GATA/ELT-2, FOXO/DAF-16, and Nrf/SKN-1. Finally, we found that recovery from an acute bacterial infection is dependent on ELT-2 activity.

  15. [Mortality from acute respiratory infections and influenza (1976-1980)].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sanz Aliaga, S A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1992-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) and influenza (flu) are extremely common illnesses, which make up the main causes of medical consultation and absence from work. OBJECTIVE. To discover the level of mortality because of ARI and flu in the Health Areas within the Community of Valencia; to analyse their possible relationship with socio-economic factors and also to identify higher-risk groups according to age and sex. DESIGN. Retrospective study. SITE. The Community of Valencia. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS. Mortality data across the Community were obtained from the mortality statistics published by the Generalitat (Government) of Valencia during the five-year period of 1976 to 1980. MAIN MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS. The results establish that Health Areas 4, 6, 7, 9-12 and 18 present less mortality because of ARI and flu. These are the better areas, socio-economically speaking, although the data are without statistical significance. A spectacular increase in mortality in the age-group of those over 70 was observed, with no great differences found between the sexes. CONCLUSIONS. Given that the main interventions to prevent these diseases are based on vaccination, it would be useful to carry out vaccination programmes with greater thoroughness in those areas identified as of high risk.

  16. Acute HIV infection among pregnant women in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gay, Cynthia L; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M; Kwiek, Jesse J; Fiscus, Susan A; Meshnick, Steven R; Cohen, Myron S

    2010-04-01

    There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Among 3,825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative, and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2,666 seronegative specimens, 2,327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery.

  17. Acute HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia L.; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Methods Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Results Among 3825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2666 seronegative specimens, 2327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% CI: 0.03, 0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Discussion Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery. PMID:20226326

  18. Neurobehavioral Disturbances During Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Doyle, Katie L.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Morgan, Erin E.; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan J.; Grant, Igor; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Acute and early human immunodeficiency virus infection (AEH) is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes as well as impairment in neurocognitive and everyday functions, but little is known about the frequency and clinical correlates of the neurobehavioral disturbances during this period. We compared pre-seroconversion with current levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction; we also examined everyday function and HIV disease correlates of neuropsychiatric impairment in individuals with AEH. Methods In this study, 34 individuals with AEH and 39 HIV-seronegative participants completed neuromedical and neuropsychological assessments, a structured psychiatric interview, and the apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction subscales of the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale. Results Independent of any substance use and mood disorders, the AEH group had significantly higher levels of current apathy and executive dysfunction than the controls, but not greater disinhibition. Retrospective ratings of pre-seroconversion levels of apathy, disinhibition, and executive dysfunction were all higher in the AEH group than the controls. After seroconversion, the AEH cohort had increases in current apathy and executive dysfunction, but not disinhibition. In the AEH cohort, higher current global neurobehavioral dysfunction was significantly associated with lower nadir CD4 counts, slowed information processing speed, and more everyday function problems. Conclusions These data suggest that individuals who have recently acquired HIV experienced higher-than-normal premorbid levels of neurobehavioral disturbance. Apathy and executive dysfunction are exacerbated during AEH, particularly in association with lower CD4 counts. PMID:27008244

  19. Requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute burn and chronic surgical wound infection.

    PubMed

    Turner, Keith H; Everett, Jake; Trivedi, Urvish; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-07-01

    Opportunistic infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be acute or chronic. While acute infections often spread rapidly and can cause tissue damage and sepsis with high mortality rates, chronic infections can persist for weeks, months, or years in the face of intensive clinical intervention. Remarkably, this diverse infectious capability is not accompanied by extensive variation in genomic content, suggesting that the genetic capacity to be an acute or a chronic pathogen is present in most P. aeruginosa strains. To investigate the genetic requirements for acute and chronic pathogenesis in P. aeruginosa infections, we combined high-throughput sequencing-mediated transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) and genome-wide insertion mutant fitness profiling (Tn-seq) to characterize gene expression and fitness determinants in murine models of burn and non-diabetic chronic wound infection. Generally we discovered that expression of a gene in vivo is not correlated with its importance for fitness, with the exception of metabolic genes. By combining metabolic models generated from in vivo gene expression data with mutant fitness profiles, we determined the nutritional requirements for colonization and persistence in these infections. Specifically, we found that long-chain fatty acids represent a major carbon source in both chronic and acute wounds, and P. aeruginosa must biosynthesize purines, several amino acids, and most cofactors during infection. In addition, we determined that P. aeruginosa requires chemotactic flagellar motility for fitness and virulence in acute burn wound infections, but not in non-diabetic chronic wound infections. Our results provide novel insight into the genetic requirements for acute and chronic P. aeruginosa wound infections and demonstrate the power of using both gene expression and fitness profiling for probing bacterial virulence.

  20. Genetic mapping of Cmv1 in the region of mouse chromosome 6 encoding the NK gene complex-associated loci Ly49 and musNKR-P1

    SciTech Connect

    Scalzo, A.A.; Lyons, P.A.; Fitzgerald, N.A.

    1995-06-10

    The Cmv1 resistance gene controls splenic replication of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and confers natural killer (NK) cell-mediated resistance to otherwise lethal infection. The Cmv1 phenotypes of 13 inbred mouse strains have been assessed, and it was found that the Cmv1{sup r} resistance phenotype was restricted to the C57BL/6J and Ma/MyJ strains. We have further analyzed the linkage of Cmv1 to the NK gene complex (NKC) mapping to distal mouse chromosome 6 in 99 (BALB/c x C57BL/6J)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross mice using cloned gene probes and microsatellite markers from this region. No recombinants were observed between Cmv1 and the NKC-associated Ly49 and musNKR-P1 multigene families, nor the Kap locus, nor with 7 microsatellite markers, indicating that Cmv1 is closely linked (<1 cM) to all of these markers. Analysis of the genotype of the MCMV-susceptible BXD8 RI strain around the NKC region revealed that it had C57BL/6J alleles at microsatellite markers immediately proximal and distal to Cmv1. This suggests that the Cmv1{sup s} phenotype of this strain is due to a germ-line mutation. Thus, the close linkage of Cmv1 to the Ly49 and musNK-R-P1 multigene families suggests that it may represent an NK cell recognition structure encoded in the NKC region. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Immune recovery and the risk of CMV/ EBV reactivation in children post allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Janeczko, Małgorzata; Mielcarek, Monika; Rybka, Blanka; Ryczan-Krawczyk, Renata; Noworolska-Sauren, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution was studied prospectively in 86 children who underwent allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We analysed the risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation in correlation with the kinetics of immune recovery and in relation to other potential risk factors that may influence the reactivation of these viruses including: diagnosis, type of HSCT, source of stem cells, type of conditioning, or the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The absolute number of lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood was evaluated in seven timepoints following HSCT. Significantly lower values of both CD3+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes on day +14 and significantly higher values of both these subsets on day +168 post-transplant in patients with CMV reactivation were observed. Significantly lower values of CD3+CD4+ subpopulation were noted in patients with CMV reactivation on day +28 post allo-HSCT. Significantly lower lymphocyte values in the group with EBV reactivation comparing with the group without EBV reactivation were confirmed only in the case of pan-B lymphocytes (CD19+) subpopulation on day +21, +28, and +84 post allo-HSCT. We identified the impact of CMV reactivation on occurrence of the intestinal acute GvHD, which occurred more frequently in the group with CMV reactivation compared with patients without reactivation. Higher incidence of chronic GvHD was also observed in patients with CMV reactivation compared to the group without reactivation. EBV reactivation occurred more frequently in patients receiving transplants from matched unrelated donors, in particular after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and while implementing antithymocyte globulin as GvHD prophylaxis. PMID:27833447

  2. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  3. Serologically proven acute rubella infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of dengue.

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, J.; Hamdan, A.; Loroño, M. A.; Montero, M. T.; Gómez, B.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with a clinical diagnosis of dengue but negative by serological testing were studied for rubella infection. Paired sera were obtained from 69 patients during an outbreak in Yucatán, México. The presence of specific anti-viral IgM in the acute sera was considered as diagnostic for rubella infection. The immunoglobulin was determined by measuring the difference in the inhibition of hemagglutination between the non-reduced and the reduced fractionated sera. Immunoglobulins were separated by sucrose density centrifugation. Acute rubella infection was found in 7 (10.1%) of the patients. These results demonstrate active rubella infection in patients clinically diagnosed as dengue. PMID:2323361

  4. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient's serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness. PMID:27980872

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  6. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Hope; Havens, Deborah; Manda, Geoffrey; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities. Methods Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms. Results From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis. Discussion A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults. Registration number CRD42015028042. PMID:27907205

  7. Bacillus cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gurler, N; Oksuz, L; Muftuoglu, M; Sargin, Fd; Besisik, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related bloodstream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B. cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts. Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblast c leukemia (ALL) in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.

  8. Effect of CMV and Aging on the Differential Expression of CD300a, CD161, T-bet, and Eomes on NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sejas, Nelson; Campos, Carmen; Hassouneh, Fakhri; Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Tarazona, Raquel; Pera, Alejandra; Solana, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells involved in the defense against virus-infected cells and tumor cells. NK cell phenotype and function is affected with age and cytomegalovirus (CMV) latent infection. Aging affects the frequency and phenotype of NK cells, and CMV infection also contributes to these alterations. Thus, a reduction of CD56(bright) NK cell subpopulation associated with age and an expansion of memory-like NK cells CD56(dim)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) probably related to CMV seropositivity have been described. NK cells express T-bet and Eomes transcription factors that are necessary for the development of NK cells. Here, we analyze the effect of age and CMV seropositivity on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, and T-bet and Eomes transcription factors in NK cell subsets defined by the expression of CD56 and CD57. CD300a is expressed by the majority of NK cells. CD56(bright) NK cells express higher levels of CD300a than CD56(dim) NK cells. An increase in the expression of CD300a was associated with age, whereas a decreased expression of CD161 in CD56(dim) NK cells was associated with CMV seropositivity. In CD56(dim) NK cells, an increased percentage of CD57(+)CD300a(+) and a reduction in the percentage of CD161(+)CD300a(+) cells were found to be associated with CMV seropositivity. Regarding T-bet and Eomes transcription factors, CMV seropositivity was associated with a decrease of T-bet(hi) in CD56(dim)CD57(+) NK cells from young individuals, whereas Eomes expression was increased with CMV seropositivity in both CD56(bright) and CD56(dim)CD57(+/-) (from middle age and young individuals, respectively) and was decreased with aging in all NK subsets from the three group of age. In conclusion, CMV infection and age induce significant changes in the expression of CD300a and CD161 in NK cell subsets defined by the expression of CD56 and CD57. T-bet and Eomes are differentially expressed on NK cell subsets, and their expression is

  9. Systemic viral infections and their retinal and choroidal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Yoser, S L; Forster, D J; Rao, N A

    1993-01-01

    Viruses are one of the most common causes of infections involving the posterior segment of the eye. Such infections can occur either on a congenital or an acquired basis, and may affect primarily the retina or the choroid. Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) and rubella infections may result in retinitis. CMV retinitis is also the most common cause of acquired viral retinitis, primarily because of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Other types of viral retinitis, such as those caused by herpes simplex or herpes zoster, can occur in immunocompromised or immunocompetent individuals. Retinitis or choroiditis caused by viruses such as measles, influenza, Epstein-Barr virus, and Rift Valley fever virus, typically occurs subsequent to an acute viral systemic illness. The systemic and ocular manifestations, as well as the histopathology, laboratory tests, differential diagnoses, and treatment regimens for each of the individual viruses are discussed in detail.

  10. Active cytomegalovirus infection in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Shereen F; Shehata, Iman H; Abdel Aziz, Ghada A; Kamal, Mahmoud M

    2005-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex immunologic skin disorder that is expressed when genetically predisposed individuals are exposed to certain environmental stimuli. Inspite of the high prevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and its potent immunomodulatory activities, the relation of CMV to AD is still poorly understood and is still to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of active CMV infection in patients with AD and its possible etiologic role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Also, we tried to find if a relation between active CMV infection and disease severity exists. The present study was carried on 31 patients with AD with various degrees of disease severity. Ten apparently healthy subjects were enrolled in the study as a control group. Anti CMV IgG antibodies were estimated by quantitative enzyme immunoassay to discriminate between recent CMV infection and CMV reactivation. Active CMV infection was diagnosed by using nested PCR to detect CMV DNA in the sera of the studied subjects. The detection rate of CMV genome was higher in patients with AD in comparison to the control group. Cytomegalovirus genome was detected in the sera of 52% (16/31) of patients with AD (87.5% of them were seropositive for anti-CMV IgG antibodies). On the other hand no CMV DNA was detected in any of the serum samples of the control subjects. The difference was statistically significant. No significant relation was found between active CMV infection and disease severity. Also, no significant statistical difference was found between the two studied groups as regards the prevalence of latent CMV infection. In addition, no significant difference was detected between anti-CMV IgG antibody levels in all seropositive subjects. Our results denote that active subclinical CMV infection is more frequent in patients with AD and may have possible immunomodulatory role in the etiopathogenesis of AD but it is not related to disease severity.

  11. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  12. SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN THE BRAIN AND LUNG LEADS TO DIFFERENTIAL TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING DURING ACUTE INFECTION*

    PubMed Central

    Alammar, Luna; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2011-01-01

    Using an accelerated and consistent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pigtailed macaque model of HIV associated neurological disorders, we have demonstrated that virus enters the brain during acute infection. However, neurological symptoms do not manifest until late stages of infection, suggesting that immunological mechanisms exist within the central nervous system (CNS) that control viral replication and associated inflammation. We have shown that interferon beta, a type I interferon central to viral innate immunity, is a major cytokine present in the brain during acute infection and is responsible for limiting virus infection and inflammatory cytokine expression. However, the induction and role of interferon alpha in the CNS during acute SIV infection has never been examined in this model. In the classical model of interferon signaling, interferon beta signals through the interferon α/β receptor, leading to expression of interferon alpha. Surprisingly, although interferon beta is up regulated during acute SIV infection, we found that interferon alpha is down regulated. We demonstrate that this down regulation is coupled with a suppression of signaling molecules downstream of the interferon receptor, namely tyk2, STAT1 and IRF7, as indicated by either lack of protein phosphorylation, lack of nuclear accumulation, or transcriptional and/or translational repression. In contrast to brain, interferon alpha is up regulated in lung and accompanied by activation of tyk2 and STAT1. These data provide a novel observation that during acute SIV infection in the brain there is differential signaling through the interferon α/β receptor that fails to activate expression of interferon alpha in the brain. PMID:21368232

  13. Development of Chronic and Acute Golden Syrian Hamster Infection Models with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The golden Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is frequently used as a model to study virulence for several species of Leptospira. Onset of an acute, lethal infection following infection with several pathogenic Leptospira species has been widely adopted for vaccine testing. An important exceptio...

  14. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis in 7 dogs from Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Kjaergaard, Astrid B.; Carr, Anthony P.; Gaunt, M. Casey

    2016-01-01

    Seven dogs diagnosed with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection in association with acute gastroenteritis are described. Disease severity ranged from mild in adults to fatal disease in young dogs. Enteropathogenic E. coli infection should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in dogs with diarrhea. PMID:27587889

  15. Anomaly Detection in Host Signaling Pathways for the Early Prognosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ogle, Serenity; Forero, Adriana; Morrison, Juliet; Slayden, Richard; Katze, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of acute infectious diseases during the early stages of infection is critical to administering the appropriate treatment to improve the disease outcome. We present a data driven analysis of the human cellular response to respiratory viruses including influenza, respiratory syncytia virus, and human rhinovirus, and compared this with the response to the bacterial endotoxin, Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Using an anomaly detection framework we identified pathways that clearly distinguish between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients infected with the four different respiratory viruses and that accurately diagnosed patients exposed to a bacterial infection. Connectivity pathway analysis comparing the viral and bacterial diagnostic signatures identified host cellular pathways that were unique to patients exposed to LPS endotoxin indicating this type of analysis could be used to identify host biomarkers that can differentiate clinical etiologies of acute infection. We applied the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) on two human influenza (H1N1 and H3N2) gene expression data sets to define host networks perturbed in the asymptomatic phase of infection. Our analysis identified pathways in the respiratory virus diagnostic signature as prognostic biomarkers that triggered prior to clinical presentation of acute symptoms. These early warning pathways correctly predicted that almost half of the subjects would become symptomatic in less than forty hours post-infection and that three of the 18 subjects would become symptomatic after only 8 hours. These results provide a proof-of-concept for utility of anomaly detection algorithms to classify host pathway signatures that can identify presymptomatic signatures of acute diseases and differentiate between etiologies of infection. On a global scale, acute respiratory infections cause a significant proportion of human co-morbidities and account for 4.25 million deaths annually. The development of clinical

  16. Prevalence, Characteristics, and One-Year Follow-Up of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Isfahan City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid; Nasr Azadani, Hossein; Mohammadizadeh, Majid; Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Adibi, Atosa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Need of neonatal screening for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is under debate, in part because of limited data on importance of the disease regarding the prevalence of congenital CMV (cCMV) infection and associated morbidity and mortality. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and prognosis of cCMV infection in Iran, where there is high maternal seroprevalence of CMV. Methodology. This prospective study was conducted in Isfahan city, Iran, from 2014 to 2016. CMV was investigated in urine specimens by using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. CMV-infected infants were examined for clinical and laboratory findings attributed to CMV infection and followed up for one year. Results. Among 1617 studied neonates, eight (0.49%) were positive for CMV infection. CMV-infected neonates were more likely to be preterm than noninfected ones (25% versus 4.5%, p = 0.0508), and they had lower birth weight. Three out of the eight CMV-infected neonates had transient symptoms at birth. At follow-up, one case had mild hearing loss. Most patients had impaired growth during the one-year follow-up. Conclusions. The primary object of this study was determination of prevalence of cCMV infection in Iran as a developing country, which was at the lower range compared with other such countries. cCMV infection may result in short-term impairment in growth. PMID:28070187

  17. Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Acute Ischemic Stroke from Septic Embolus: Successful Solitaire FR Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jackson J; Bishu, Kalkidan G; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2012-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is often complicated by systemic embolization. Acute stroke due to septic emboli is a particularly dreaded complication. Optimal treatment for acute stroke in IE has not been well outlined. Fibrinolytic therapy may be associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke in the setting of IE. We present a case of IE complicated by acute stroke which was successfully treated with mechanical thrombectomy. This case illustrates a role of mechanical thrombectomy devices in this patient population.

  18. Impact of early cART in the gut during acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deleage, Claire; Schuetz, Alexandra; Alvord, W. Gregory; Johnston, Leslie; Hao, Xing-Pei; Morcock, David R.; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Fletcher, James L.K.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Dewar, Robin; McCune, Joseph M.; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Hunt, Peter; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Early after HIV infection there is substantial depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract lamina propria (LP), with associated epithelial barrier damage, leading to microbial translocation and systemic inflammation and immune activation. In this study, we analyzed these early events in the GI tract in a cohort of Thai acute HIV-infected patients and determined the effect of early combination antiretroviral treatment (cART). HIV-uninfected and chronically and acutely HIV-infected patients at different Fiebig stages (I–V) underwent colonic biopsies and then received cART. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis were performed on cross-sectional and longitudinal colon biopsy specimens (day 0 to week 96) to measure GI tract damage (infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells), inflammation (Mx1, TNF-α), immune activation (Ki-67), and the CD4+ T cell population in the LP. The magnitude of GI tract damage, immune activation, and inflammation was significantly increased, with significantly depleted CD4+ T cells in the LP in all acutely infected groups prior to cART compared with HIV-uninfected control participants. While most patients treated during acute infection resolved GI tract inflammation and immune activation back to baseline levels after 24 weeks of cART, most acutely infected participants did not restore their CD4+ T cells after 96 weeks of cART. PMID:27446990

  19. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications.

  20. Routine Laboratory Screening for Acute and Recent HIV Infection in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jesse L.; Segura, Eddy R.; Montano, Silvia M.; Leon, Segundo R.; Kochel, Tadeusz; Salvatierra, Hector J.; Alcantara, Jorge; Cáceres, Carlos F.; Coates, Thomas J.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior to implementing screening programs for acute HIV infection in developing countries, key issues including cost, feasibility, and public health impact must be determined. We compared fourth-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with pooled HIV-1 RNA assays for the detection of acute and early HIV infection in counseling and testing populations in Lima, Peru. Methods Adults presenting for HIV testing at designated clinics in Lima-Callao, Peru were offered additional screening for acute HIV infection. All serum samples were tested with fourth-generation Ag/Ab EIA and confirmed by line immunoassay (LIA). Negative specimens were combined into 50-sample pools for HIV-1 RNA screening by PCR analysis in standard pooling algorithms. RNA-positive samples were re-tested with a third-generation EIA to evaluate the relative sensitivity of standard testing procedures. Results Between 2007 and 2008 we recruited 1,191 participants. The prevalence of HIV infection was 3.2% (38/1191; 2.2-4.2%) overall and 10.6% (25/237; CI=6.6-14.5%) among men who reported sex with men (MSM). The prevalence of acute or recent HIV infection was 0.2% (CI=0-0.4%) overall and 0.8% (CI=0-2.0%) among MSM. Compared with third generation EIA testing, both fourth generation EIA and RNA PCR increased the rate of HIV case identification by 5.6% overall and by 8.0% within the subpopulation of MSM. Conclusions Screening for acute HIV infection within Peru's resource-limited public health system was acceptable and detected a high prevalence of acute and recent HIV infection among MSM. Additional efforts are needed to screen for and prevent transmission of HIV among MSM in Peru during the acute seroconversion stage. PMID:21113069

  1. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called “superinfection exclusion” to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism. PMID:26549784

  2. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-11-09

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called "superinfection exclusion" to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism.

  3. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  4. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-03-08

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans.

  5. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  6. A Systematic Meta-analysis of Immune Signatures in Patients With Acute Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Terk-Shin; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Lee, Bernett; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Wimal, Abeyewickreme; Ng, Lee-Ching; Ng, Lisa F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Individuals infected with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) normally exhibit a variety of clinical manifestations during the acute phase of infection. However, studies in different patient cohorts have revealed that disease manifestations vary in frequency. Methods. Disease profiles between patients with acute CHIKV-infection and febrile patients without CHIKV were compared and examined to determine whether any clinical presentations were associated with the clinical outcome of CHIKV infection. Circulatory immune mediators profiles were then characterized and compared with data from 14 independent patient cohort studies. The particular immune mediator signature that defines acute CHIKV infection was determined. Results. Our findings revealed a specific pattern of clinical presentations of joint-specific arthralgia from this CHIKV cohort. More importantly, we identified an immune mediator signature dominated by proinflammatory cytokines, which include interferon α and γ and interleukin 2, 2R, 6, 7, 12, 15, 17, and 18, across different patient cohorts of CHIKV load associated with arthralgia. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study that associated levels of CHIKV load with arthralgia as an indicator of acute CHIKV infection. Importantly, our findings also revealed specific immune mediator signatures that can be used to better define CHIKV infection. PMID:25635123

  7. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  8. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  9. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  10. Brincidofovir Use after Foscarnet Crystal Nephropathy in a Kidney Transplant Recipient with Multiresistant Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Romain; Zandotti, Christine; Alain, Sophie; Decourt, Alexandre; Purgus, Raj; Bornet, Charleric; Daniel, Laurent; Moal, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) antiviral drug resistance constitutes an increasing challenge in transplantation. Foscarnet is usually proposed when resistance for ganciclovir is suspected, but its use is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Case Presentation. We report a case of multiresistant CMV disease in a kidney transplant recipient. Foscarnet was prescribed after ganciclovir treatment failure in a patient with two mutations in the UL97 viral gene. Foscarnet induced biopsy-proven kidney crystal precipitation that resulted in severe acute transplant failure and nephrotic syndrome. Despite a large decrease in immunosuppression, CMV disease was not controlled and a salvage therapy with Brincidofovir (BCV), which is an oral lipid conjugate of cidofovir with limited nephrotoxicity, was attempted. Clinical and virological remission was observed after a 21-day course of BCV, despite mild and reversible liver toxicity. However, a new relapse could not be effectively cured by BCV due to a new mutation in the UL54 gene, which is known to confer resistance to cidofovir. A new course of foscarnet finally resulted in prolonged CMV remission. Herein, we present a review of foscarnet nephropathy cases in solid-organ transplanted patients. Conclusions. This unique case highlights the potential benefit of BCV use during resistant CMV infection, although mutations in the UL54 gene may limit its therapeutic efficacy. These findings need to be confirmed in clinical trials. PMID:28348914

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  12. Sudden psychotic episode probably due to meningoencephalitis and Chlamydia pneumoniae acute infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Since 9% to 20% of all cases of acute psychosis presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) are due to a general medical condition, cautious medical workup should be mandatory in such patients. Differential diagnosis must consider conditions as diverse as renal failure or CNS infection. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection usually causes a self-limited respiratory syndrome. Rarely, acute neurological complications occur, with acute meningoencephalitis most frequently reported. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and is difficult to confirm. Case report We describe a 22 year-old female Caucasian who, three days after a mild pharingitis, developed an acute psychosis with exuberant symptoms interspersed with periods of lucidity, in a background of normal consciousness and orientation. Initial medical and imagiological workup were inconclusive. After 20 days of unsuccessful treatment with antipsychotics she developed a high fever and was re-evaluated medically. Lumbar puncture revealed an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed irregular thickening and nodularity of the lateral ventricles' lining. An anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM antibody titter of 85 IU/ml was detected. All symptoms cleared after treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of acute CP-associated meningoencephalitis manifesting as an acute psychotic episode. It illustrates the principle that non-organic psychiatric syndromes must remain a diagnosis of exclusion in first-time acute psychosis. PMID:16164756

  13. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  14. Toward an HIV Cure Based on Targeted Killing of Infected Cells: Different Approaches Against Acute Versus Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Barna; Berger, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Current regimens of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) offer effective control of HIV infection, with maintenance of immune health and near-normal life expectancy. What will it take to progress beyond the status quo, whereby infectious virus can be eradicated (a “sterilizing cure”) or fully controlled without the need for ongoing cART (a “functional cure”)? Recent findings Based on therapeutic advances in the cancer field, we propose that targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill HIV-infected cells represents a logical complement to cART for achieving an HIV cure. This concept is based on the fact that cART effectively blocks replication of the virus, but does not eliminate cells that are already infected; targeted cytotoxic therapy would contribute precisely this missing component. We suggest that different modalities are suited for curing primary acute versus established chronic infection. For acute infection, relatively short-acting potent agents such as recombinant immunotoxins might prove sufficient for HIV eradication whereas for chronic infection, a long-lasting (lifelong?) modality is required to maintain full virus control, as might be achieved with genetically modified autologous T cells. Summary We present perspectives for complementing cART with targeted cytotoxic therapy whereby HIV infection is either eradicated or fully controlled, thereby eliminating the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:25710815

  15. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Co-Infections from Mono-Infections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-01-26

    The frequency of HAV and HEV infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of co-infections was found. Significant overexpression of IL-4, IL-12, IL-13 and IFN-gamma during HAV mono-infections and limited secretion of cytokines in HEV infections were observed.

  16. Epidemiology of acute infections among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Lorien S; Go, Alan S

    2008-09-01

    The objectives of this review were (1) to review recent literature on the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infections in patients who had chronic kidney disease (CKD) and did or did not require renal replacement therapy; (2) to review literature on the efficacy and use of selected vaccines for patients with CKD; and (3) to outline a research framework for examining key issues regarding infections in patients with CKD. Infection-related hospitalizations contribute substantially to excess morbidity and mortality in patients with ESRD, and infection is the second leading cause of death in this population. Patients who have CKD and do not require renal replacement therapy seem to be at higher risk for infection compared with patients without CKD; however, data about patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis therapy are very limited. Numerous factors potentially predispose patients with CKD to infection: advanced age, presence of coexisting illnesses, vaccine hyporesponsiveness, immunosuppressive therapy, uremia, dialysis access, and the dialysis procedure. Targeted vaccination seems to have variable efficacy in the setting of CKD and is generally underused in this population. In conclusion, infection is a primary issue when caring for patients who receive maintenance dialysis. Very limited data exist about the rates, risk factors, and outcomes of infection in patients who have CKD and do not require dialysis. Future research is needed to delineate accurately the epidemiology of infections in these populations and to develop effective preventive strategies across the spectrum of CKD severity.

  17. Pathology of Acute Henipavirus Infection in Humans and Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K. T.; Ong, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Zoonoses as causes of human infections have been increasingly reported, and many of these are viruses that cause central nervous system infections. This paper focuses on the henipaviruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus henipavirus) that have recently emerged to cause severe encephalitis and systemic infection in humans and animals in the Asia-Pacific region. The pathological features in the human infections comprise vasculopathy (vasculitis, endothelial multinucleated syncytia, thrombosis, etc.) and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system, lung, kidney, and other major organs. Most animals naturally or experimentally infected show more or less similar features confirming the dual pathogenetic mechanism of vasculopathy-associated microinfarction and direct extravascular parenchymal cell infection as causes of tissue injury. The most promising animal models include the hamster, ferret, squirrel monkey, and African green monkey. With increasing evidence of infection in the natural hosts, the pteropid bats and, hence, probable future outbreaks in many more countries, a greater awareness of henipavirus infection in both humans and animals is imperative. PMID:21961078

  18. Pathology of acute henipavirus infection in humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Wong, K T; Ong, K C

    2011-01-01

    Zoonoses as causes of human infections have been increasingly reported, and many of these are viruses that cause central nervous system infections. This paper focuses on the henipaviruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus henipavirus) that have recently emerged to cause severe encephalitis and systemic infection in humans and animals in the Asia-Pacific region. The pathological features in the human infections comprise vasculopathy (vasculitis, endothelial multinucleated syncytia, thrombosis, etc.) and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system, lung, kidney, and other major organs. Most animals naturally or experimentally infected show more or less similar features confirming the dual pathogenetic mechanism of vasculopathy-associated microinfarction and direct extravascular parenchymal cell infection as causes of tissue injury. The most promising animal models include the hamster, ferret, squirrel monkey, and African green monkey. With increasing evidence of infection in the natural hosts, the pteropid bats and, hence, probable future outbreaks in many more countries, a greater awareness of henipavirus infection in both humans and animals is imperative.

  19. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection.

  20. Optic neuritis and acute anterior uveitis associated with influenza A infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hayate; Noma, Hidetaka; Kotake, Osamu; Motohashi, Ryosuke; Yasuda, Kanako; Shimura, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Background A few reports have described ocular complications of influenza A infection, such as impaired ocular movement, parasympathetic ocular nerve, keratitis, macular lesion, and frosted branch angiitis. We encountered a rare case of acute anterior uveitis and optic neuritis associated with influenza A infection. Case presentation A 70-year-old man presented with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. A rapid diagnostic test showed a positive result for influenza A. At the same time, he developed ocular symptoms including blurred vision with optic disk edema and hemorrhage in the left eye, and bilateral red eyes. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed on aqueous humor sample detected no viral infection. Visual field testing with a Goldmann perimeter showed central and paracentral scotomas in the left eye. In addition to antiviral agent (oseltamivir phosphate 75 mg), the patient was prescribed topical prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension eye drops every 5 hours and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone 1,000 mg daily for 3 days. Two months later, his best-corrected visual acuity improved to 20/50 with regression of visual field defects in his left eye. Conclusion We report a case of bilateral acute anterior uveitis and unilateral optic neuritis concomitant with influenza A infection. Topical and systemic corticosteroids were effective to resolve acute anterior uveitis and neuritis. Analysis of aqueous humor sample suggested that acute anterior uveitis and optic neuritis in this case were not caused by influenza A virus infection per se but by autoimmune mechanism. PMID:28115874

  1. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands1

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Elmer; Delsing, Corine E.; Sprong, Tom; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower respiratory tract symptoms, or fever and hepatitis, but had negative serologic results for Q fever. Patients with acute Q fever were younger and had higher C-reactive protein levels but lower leukocyte counts. However, a large overlap was found. In patients with an indication for prophylaxis, chronic Q fever did not develop after patients received prophylaxis but did develop in 50% of patients who did not receive prophylaxis. Differentiating acute Q fever from other respiratory infections, fever, or hepatitis is not possible without serologic testing or PCR. If risk factors for chronic Q fever are present, prophylactic treatment is advised. PMID:26196955

  2. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S.; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab–infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  3. Infection after Acute Ischemic Stroke: Risk Factors, Biomarkers, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wartenberg, Katja E.; Stoll, Anett; Funk, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; Schmidt, J. Michael; Berrouschot, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Background. The activation of inflammatory cascades triggered by ischemic stroke may play a key role in the development of infections. Methods. Patients admitted with ischemic stroke within 24 hours were prospectively enrolled. Biomarkers of infection were measured on days 1, 3, and 5. The patients were continuously monitored for predefined infections. Results. Patients with infection were older (OR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.01–1.11) and had a higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale Score (NIHSS, OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10–1.34), localization in the insula, and higher stroke volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging. The maximum temperature on days 1 and 3, leukocytes, interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein on days 1, 3, and 5, C-reactive protein on days 3 and 5, and procalcitonin on day 5 were higher and HLA-DR-expression on monocytes on days 1, 3, and 5 lower in patients with infection. Age and NIHSS predicted the development of infections. Infection was an independent predictor of poor functional outcome. Conclusions. Severe stroke and increasing age were shown to be early predictors for infections after stroke. PMID:21789273

  4. Acute post-infection glomerulonephritis caused by new 'thongs'. A case report.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, D; Markowitz, S

    1986-04-26

    Acute glomerulonephritis complicated secondary infection in a patient suffering from traumatic blisters caused by new footwear. This unlikely setting for acute glomerulonephritis was made more interesting by its occurrence in an adult in contrast with its more frequent recognition in a child. The age of the patient and the severity of the local symptoms masked the significance of the initial finding of haematuria until deteriorating renal function indicated the diagnosis of concomitant glomerular disease.

  5. Persistent and acute chlamydial infections induce different structural changes in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiling; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Pu; Chen, Mukai; Huang, Zengwei; Li, Kunpeng; Li, Yinyin; He, Jian; Han, Jiande; Zhang, Qinfen

    2014-07-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a wide range of diseases that have a significant impact on public health. Acute chlamydial infections can cause fragmentation of the Golgi compartment ensuring the lipid transportation from the host cell. However, the changes that occur in the host cell Golgi apparatus after persistent infections are unclear. Here, we examined Golgi-associated gene (golga5) transcription and expression along with the structure of the Golgi apparatus in cells persistently infected with Chlamydia trachomatis. The results showed that persistent infections caused little fragmentation of the Golgi. The results also revealed that Golgi fragmentation might be associated with the suppression of transcription of the gene golga5.

  6. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    all stages of HIV infection. Fifty-six percent of the cases of ocular toxoplasmosis had simultaneous toxoplasmic cerebritis. Ocular toxoplasmosis responded to standard anti-microbial therapy. Varicella zoster virus retinitis, when manifested by the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome, responded to intravenous acyclovir therapy. Conversely, in a limited number of patients with the progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome, the disease responded poorly to intravenous acyclovir therapy, but appeared to respond to combination foscarnet and acyclovir therapy. Neuro-ophthalmic lesions were present in 6% of the patients with AIDS. The most common cause of a neuro-ophthalmic lesion was cryptococcal meningitis, and 25% of the patients with cryptococcal meningitis developed a neuro-ophthalmic complication. CONCLUSIONS: Ocular manifestations are common in patients with AIDS. CMV retinitis represented a major vision-threatening problem in these patients. While available therapy was successful in initially controlling the retinitis, the phenomenon of relapse resulted in some degree of long-term visual loss. Preservation of the patient's visual acuity in at least one eye was generally successful. Other opportunistic ocular infections were substantially less common than CMV retinitis but require aggressive therapy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719695

  7. Multiple T-cell responses are associated with better control of acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Yanchun; Han, Zhen; Liu, Guihai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Sai; Sun, Huanhuan; Wu, Hao; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses play pivotal roles in controlling the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but the correlation between CTL responses and the progression of HIV-1 infection are controversial on account of HIV immune escape mutations driven by CTL pressure were reported. The acute HIV-1-infected patients from Beijing were incorporated into our study to investigate the effects of CTL response on the progression of HIV-1 infection. A longitudinal study was performed on acute HIV-1-infected patients to clarify the kinetic of T-cell responses, the dynamic of escape mutations, as well as the correlation between effective T-cell response and the progression of HIV infection. Seven human leukocyte antigen-B51+ (HLA-B51+) individuals were screened from 105 acute HIV-1 infectors. The detailed kinetic of HLA-B51-restricted CTL responses was described through blood sampling time points including seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection in the 7 HLA-B51+ individuals, by using 16 known HLA-B51 restricted epitopes. Pol743–751 (LPPVVAKEI, LI9), Pol283–289 (TAFTIPSI, TI8), and Gag327–3459 (NANPDCKTI, NI9) were identified as 3 dominant epitopes, and ranked as starting with LI9, followed by TI8 and NI9 in the ability to induce T-cell responses. The dynamics of escape mutations in the 3 epitopes were also found with the same order as T-cell response, by using sequencing for viral clones on blood sampling at seroconversion, 3 and 6 months after HIV-1 infection. We use solid evidence to demonstrate the correlation between T-cell response and HIV-1 mutation, and postulate that multiple T-cell responses might benefit the control of HIV-1 infection, especially in acute infection phase. PMID:27472741

  8. A case of acute acalculous cholecystitis complicated by primary Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichi; Shono, Miki; Goji, Aya; Matsuura, Sato; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM). An immunocompetent 6-year-old Japanese girl complained of epigastralgia during the course of IM. Ultrasonography (US) revealed a markedly thickened and sonolucent gallbladder wall. No gallstones were apparent. Antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) confirmed primary EBV infection. Cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M showed a false-positive result in the acute phase, probably due to cross-reaction to EBV nuclear antigen. We diagnosed her as AAC related with primary EBV infection. She recovered completely by conservative treatment. US should be performed in consideration of the possibility of AAC when a patient with IM complains of epigastralgia.

  9. A case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Eun; Lee, Jun-Bum; Cho, Yu Na; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2012-07-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a monophasic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which typically follows acute viral or bacterial infection or vaccination. We report a case of ADEM associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-HCV antibody. After steroid treatment, neurologic symptoms were improved. Virus triggers autoimmunity or direct viral invasion plays a part in the genesis of ADEM. This is the first reported case of ADEM with anti-HCV antibody in the CSF.

  10. Multi-Agent Simulations of the Immune Response to Hiv during the Acute Stage of Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walshe, R.; Ruskin, H. J.; Callaghan, A.

    Results of multi-agent based simulations of the immune response to HIV during the acute phase of infection are presented here. The model successfully recreates the viral dynamics associated with the acute phase of infection, i.e., a rapid rise in viral load followed by a sharp decline to what is often referred to as a "set point", a result of T-cell response and emergence of HIV neutralizing antibodies. The results indicate that sufficient T Killer cell response is the key factor in controlling viral growth during this phase with antibody levels of critical importance only in the absence of a sufficient T Killer response.

  11. Heterophile antibody positive, acute cytomegaloviral infection in an immunocompetent pre-teen: an atypical presentation of an atypical infection.

    PubMed

    Raja, Junaid; de Quesada, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Mononucleosis and mononucleosis-like illnesses comprise a significant proportion of pediatric and adolescent infectious illnesses. By far, the most common cause of these illnesses is Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mononucleosis, and a distant second is cytomegalovirus, which is the most common cause of mononucleosis-like illnesses. This case provides an interesting juxtaposition of laboratory findings of an adolescent who was heterophile antibody positive but acute Epstein-Barr virus antigen-antibody negative. A subsequent immunologic assay resulted in a final diagnosis of an acute cytomegaloviral infection. This is, to our knowledge, the first such report in the literature.

  12. Alveolar Macrophages Are a Prominent but Nonessential Target for Murine Cytomegalovirus Infecting the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Oliveira, Martha T.; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) infect the lungs and cause pathological damage there in immunocompromised hosts. How lung infection starts is unknown. Inhaled murine CMV (MCMV) directly infected alveolar macrophages (AMs) and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) but not type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC1s). In contrast, herpes simplex virus 1 infected AEC1s and murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infected AEC1s via AMs. MCMV-infected AMs prominently expressed viral reporter genes from a human CMV IE1 promoter; but most IE1-positive cells were AEC2s, and CD11c-cre mice, which express cre in AMs, switched the fluorochrome expression of <5% of floxed MCMV in the lungs. In contrast, CD11C-cre mice exhibited fluorochrome switching in >90% of floxed MuHV-4 in the lungs and 50% of floxed MCMV in the blood. AM depletion increased MCMV titers in the lung during the acute phase of infection. Thus, the influence of AMs was more restrictive than permissive. Circulating monocytes entered infected lungs in large numbers and became infected, but not directly; infection occurred mainly via AEC2s. Mice infected with an MCMV mutant lacking its m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which promotes macrophage infection, showed levels of lung infection equivalent to those of wild-type MCMV-infected mice. The level of lung infiltration by Gr-1-positive cells infected with the MCMV m131/m129-null mutant was modestly different from that for wild-type MCMV-infected lungs. These results are consistent with myeloid cells mainly disseminating MCMV from the lungs, whereas AEC2s provide local amplification. IMPORTANCE Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) chronically and systemically infect most mammals. Human CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but causes lung disease in people with poor immune function. As human infection is hard to analyze, studies with related animal viruses provide important insights. We show that murine CMV has two targets in the lungs: macrophages and surfactant-secreting epithelial cells

  13. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology.

  14. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  15. Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Steven; Whitley, Richard J.; Kong, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are an important cause of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Numerous viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A (H1N1) virus, have been implicated in the progression of pneumonia to ARDS; yet the incidence of progression is unknown. Despite acute and chronic morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections, particularly in “at risk” populations, treatment options are limited. Thus, with few exceptions, care is symptomatic. In addition, mortality rates for viral-related ARDS have yet to be determined. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology, and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden will be outlined. We focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1) viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options. PMID:27933286

  16. Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nye, Steven; Whitley, Richard J; Kong, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are an important cause of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Numerous viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A (H1N1) virus, have been implicated in the progression of pneumonia to ARDS; yet the incidence of progression is unknown. Despite acute and chronic morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections, particularly in "at risk" populations, treatment options are limited. Thus, with few exceptions, care is symptomatic. In addition, mortality rates for viral-related ARDS have yet to be determined. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology, and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden will be outlined. We focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1) viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options.

  17. Acute respiratory infection with mouse adenovirus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jason B.; Stempfle, Gregory S.; Wilkinson, John E.; Younger, John G.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of adenovirus respiratory disease are limited by the strict species-specificity of the adenoviruses. Following intranasal inoculation of adult C57BL/6 mice with mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), we detected MAV-1 early region 3 (E3) and hexon gene expression in the lungs at 7 days post-infection (dpi). We detected MAV-1 E3 protein in the respiratory epithelium 7 dpi. We did not detect viral mRNA or protein at 14 dpi, but MAV-1 DNA was detected by PCR at 21 dpi. Chemokine transcript levels increased between 7 and 14 dpi in the lungs of infected mice. MAV-1 infection induced a patchy cellular infiltrate in lungs at 7 and 14 dpi. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of MAV-1 in the respiratory epithelium of infected mice and describing chemokine responses in the lung induced by MAV-1 respiratory infection. MAV-1 infection of mice has the potential to serve as a model for inflammatory changes seen in human adenovirus respiratory disease. PMID:16054189

  18. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity.

  19. Parvovirus b19 infection associated with acute hepatitis, arthralgias, and rash.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J M; Wolfe, J T; Frattali, A L; Werth, V P; Naides, S J; Spiers, E M

    1996-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes, including erythema infectiosum, or fifth disease, polyarthritis, aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, and chronic anemia in immunocompromised persons. Liver enzyme abnormalities are an infrequently reported association of parvovirus B19 infection in adults. We present a case of an acute transient hepatitis in the setting of parvovirus B19 infection, associated with arthralgias and an erythematous, edematous rash on the hands and leg.

  20. The infant and young child during periods of acute infection

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Passive immunity, which is conferred on infants through maternal antibodies and breast milk, helps to protect them against infection during the first months of life. Later, as this immunity decreases and contact with the environment increases, the incidence of infections rises rapidly and persists at a high level during the second and third years of life. Infections and inadequate diet may be of little consequence for the well-nourished child; in underweight children, however, each episode of infection is frequently more protracted and has a considerably greater impact on health. Besides the reduced food intake and absorption, the demand for nutrients is higher during periods of infectious diseases. Infants who are exclusively breast-fed are at much lower risk from diarrhoeal diseases. In contrast, bottle-fed infants and children receiving foods other than milk, particularly in an unsanitary environment, are at much greater risk of infection from contaminated food and utensils. The period of convalescence from diarrhoeal and other disease is characterized by the return of a normal appetite and increased nutritional requirements to permit catch-up growth and the replenishment of nutritional reserves. A primary requirement is that children receive sufficient dietary energy and nutrients to enable them to achieve their growth potential. PMID:20604473

  1. Acute lymphoid changes and ongoing immune activation in SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Popov, J; McGraw, T; Hofmann, B; Vowels, B; Shum, A; Nishanian, P; Fahey, J L

    1992-01-01

    Two features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection are emphasized: a transitory decrease in CD4 T cells in the first 2 weeks of infection followed by CD8 T-cell rise, and immune cell activation occurring by 4 weeks and persisting throughout the illness. The short-term changes included a fall in CD4 T cells by 2 weeks with partial recovery by 4 weeks and a CD8 rise that starts at 2 weeks. Subsequent characterization of CD4 T cells showed reduced expression of HLA-DR and CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) antigens later in SIV infection. Immune cell activation is evident in increased serum levels of neopterin and soluble CD8 antigen. Serum beta 2-microglobulin changes are less marked. Activation of CD8 T cells is reflected by increased percentages of cells expressing HLA-DR antigen. The B-cell numbers increased late in the course of SIV infection. Increased expression of the CD78 (Leu 21) activation phenotype was also seen in some monkeys. The immune activation changes (serum neopterin levels) induced by SIV infection in rhesus macaques appear to be associated with duration of illness, although the number of monkeys observed until death were too few for conclusive data. Thus, immune activation as well as T-cell deficiency may reflect significant immunopathogenic processes in SIV-induced disease.

  2. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  3. Immune complexed (IC) hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronically and acutely HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Riva, E; Maggi, F; Abbruzzese, F; Bellomi, F; Giannelli, G; Picardi, A; Scagnolari, C; Folgori, A; Spada, E; Piccolella, E; Dianzani, F; Antonelli, G

    2009-02-01

    In infected individuals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists in various forms of circulating particles which role in virus persistence and in HCV resistance to IFN therapy is still debated. Here, the proportion of HCV bound to immunoglobulin was determined in plasma of 107 chronically infected patients harbouring different HCV genotypes and, for comparison, of six patients with acute HCV infection. The results showed that, in spite of wide individual variability, chronically HCV-infected patients exhibited an extremely high proportion of immune complexed (IC) virus regardless of plasma HCV load and infecting genotype. Moreover, no significant association was found between baseline proportion of IC HCV and response to IFN treatment. Plasma samples collected within 2 weeks of treatment from 20 patients revealed a significant decline of mean IC HCV values relative to baseline that clearly paralleled the decay of total HCV load. In acutely infected patients, circulating HCV was not IC or IC at very low levels only in patients developing chronic HCV infection. Collectively, these findings strengthen the possibility that IC virus could play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  4. Risk Factors for the Development of Intra-Abdominal Fungal Infections in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Brian J.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-abdominal fungal infections (AFI) complicating acute pancreatitis arise in the context of pancreatic necrosis. Our goal was to determine which risk factors contribute to AFI in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods Records were reviewed from 479 non-transfer patients admitted to our medical center with acute pancreatitis from 1985–2009. Using multivariable regression models, risk factors for AFI were identified. Results Out of 479 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis, 17 patients were subsequently found to have an AFI and 3 of these patients expired. The mean length of stay for patients with an AFI was 24 days and 76% were admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients with AFI were more likely to have received prophylactic antibiotics on admission (OR 1.7, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.3), TPN within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7) or to have necrosis on CT scan within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7). Multivariable regression models identified admission antibiotic use (OR 1.6, 95% C.I. 1.4–1.8) as the strongest predictor of AFI. Conclusion Admission antibiotics are the biggest risk factor for the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections in acute pancreatitis. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent infected necrosis should therefore be discouraged. PMID:25872170

  5. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function.

  6. Incidence of respiratory viruses in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Verne, Eduardo; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J; Pumarola, Tomás

    2015-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are responsible for high morbi-mortality in Peruvian children. However, the etiological agents are poorly identified. This study, conducted during the pandemic outbreak of H1N1 influenza in 2009, aims to determine the main etiological agents responsible for acute respiratory infections in children from Lima, Peru. Nasopharyngeal swabs collected from 717 children with acute respiratory infections between January 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed by multiplex RT-PCR for 13 respiratory viruses: influenza A, B, and C virus; parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4; and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A and B, among others. Samples were also tested with direct fluorescent-antibodies (DFA) for six respiratory viruses. RT-PCR and DFA detected respiratory viruses in 240 (33.5%) and 85 (11.9%) cases, respectively. The most common etiological agents were RSV-A (15.3%), followed by influenza A (4.6%), PIV-1 (3.6%), and PIV-2 (1.8%). The viruses identified by DFA corresponded to RSV (5.9%) and influenza A (1.8%). Therefore, respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) were found to be the most common etiology of acute respiratory infections. The authors suggest that active surveillance be conducted to identify the causative agents and improve clinical management, especially in the context of possible circulation of pandemic viruses.

  7. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  8. Development of Hamster Models for Acute and Chronic Infections with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Golden Syrian hamster is frequently used as a small animal model to study acute leptospirosis. However, use of this small animal model to study Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo infections has not been well documented. Cattle are the normal maintenance hosts of L. borgpetersenii serovar...

  9. Disseminated Infection Caused by Scedosporium prolificans in a Patient with Acute Multilineal Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Batlle, J.; Motjé, M.; Balanzà, R.; Guardia, R.; Ortiz, R.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of disseminated infection caused by Scedosporium prolificans (S. inflatum) in a patient affected by chemotherapy-induced acute multilineal leukemia and neutropenia. For the fungus isolated in four blood cultures, high MICs of currently available antifungal agents were found. Postmortem examination revealed multiorgan involvement. PMID:10747173

  10. Schistosoma mansoni: a diagnostic approach to detect acute schistosomiasis infection in a murine model by PCR.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Nidia; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Lopez Aban, Julio; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Gárate, Teresa; Muro, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Schistosomiasis represents an increasing problem in non-endemic areas, due to the growing number of immigrants and to tourists contracting this disease in "off-the-beaten-track" tourism. Acute schistosomiasis is not diagnosed early due to the lack of diagnostic tools that are sufficiently sensitive enough to detect the parasite during the first weeks of infection. We have developed a diagnostic approach based on the detection of parasite DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in urine, comparing the performance of this new approach with the two currently used schistosomiasis diagnostic tools (Kato-Katz and ELISA) and the PCR in stool samples. This comparison was done in a Schistosoma mansoni murine experimental model, which permits follow up of the parasite from the acute to the chronic stage of infection. Our results suggest that this new PCR-based approach could be useful for the detection of acute schistosomiasis in easy-to-handle clinical samples such the urine.

  11. Capgras-like syndrome in a patient with an acute urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Massimo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Macrì, Francesco; Fojanesi, Marta; Minichino, Amedeo; Gallo, Mariana; De Michele, Francesco; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of delusional phenomena in which patients misidentify familiar persons, objects, or themselves, believing that they have been replaced or transformed. In 25%–40% of cases, misidentification syndromes have been reported in association with organic illness. We report an acute episode of Capgras-like delusion lasting 8 days, focused on the idea that people were robots with human bodies, in association with an acute urinary infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report associating urinary tract infection with Capgras-like syndrome. Awareness of the prevalence of delusional misidentification syndromes associated with acute medical illness should promote diligence on the part of clinicians in recognizing this disorder. PMID:23355784

  12. [Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in human influenza A H1N1 mediated infection].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Ornelas-Arroyo, Sofía; Pérez-Bustos, Estela; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Jesús; Uribe-Esquivel, Misael

    2009-01-01

    Rabdomiolysis and acute renal failure secondary to influenza infection are rare. Up to now, few cases have been reported and most of them are primarily among children. Myositis associated to influenza infection is caused by the toxic effect of the virus in the muscular fiber, dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines and a cross reaction between the muscle fiber and the viral particles. We present the case of a 57 year old male with a diagnosis of H1N1 influenza who developed polyuria, oligoanuria, elevation of lactic dehydrogenase, myoglobin, creatinin phosphokinase and an electromyography with a myopathic pattern. The diagnosis of rabdomyolisis and acute renal failure were made, hemodyalisis was started and the patient improved satisfactorily. This is the first report of a patient with radmoyolisis and acute renal failure secondary to A H1N1 influenza treated during the Mexico epidemic.

  13. Electrophoretic analysis of polypeptides immune precipitated from cytomegalovirus-infected cell extracts by human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, L; Hoffman, M; Cremer, N

    1982-01-01

    Serodiagnosis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection by complement fixation tests depends on showing a fourfold rise in antibody titer from acute- to convalescent-phase sera. Freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted, infected cell culture antigens used for these tests give markedly different titers in reactions with the same sera. In this study, we characterized the CMV-infected cell polypeptides contained in freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted antigens and identified the proteins precipitated by 23 pairs of human acute and convalescent sera. Our results were as follows. First, freeze-thaw and glycine-extracted antigens prepared from infected cells radiolabeled with [35S]methionine and subjected to electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels yielded similar patterns, and the bulk of the label was contained in late structural proteins and glycoproteins. Glycine-extracted preparations contained a greater proportion of soluble 66,000- and 50,000-molecular-weight proteins than did freeze-thaw antigens. Second, convalescent sera precipitated proteins migrating with apparent molecular weights of 150,000, 130,000, 110,000, 96,000, 74,000, 66,000, 50,000, 34,000, 32,000, and 25,000. Of these the 130,000-, 110,000-, 96,000-, 66,000-, 50,000-, and 25,000-molecular-weight proteins comigrated with glucosamine-labeled polypeptides. Both immunoglobulin G and M antibodies in human sera precipitated these proteins from CMV-infected cell preparations. Implications of the results for serodiagnosis of CMV infections are discussed. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 10 PMID:6284646

  14. Sofosbuvir and ribavirin in acute hepatitis C–infected patient with decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Tong; Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection has been revolutionized by the advent of direct-acting antiviral agents. However, evidence of its effects on patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) virus infection is limited. Case summary: We report the case of a patient with decompensated cirrhosis induced by autoimmune liver disease, whose condition rapidly deteriorated following AHC virus infection. The patient received sofosbuvir and ribavirin combination treatment for 12 weeks. Serum hepatitis C virus RNA remained undetectable 36 weeks after discontinuing sofosbuvir and ribavirin. Conclusion: Our findings support the use of sofosbuvir and ribavirin as a treatment in AHC patients with decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:27930559

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  16. Acute gastritis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Mok; Song, Chun Woo; Song, Kyu Sang

    2016-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) inducing a self-limiting clinical syndrome characterized by fever, sore throat, hepatosplenomegaly, and generalized lymphadenopathy. Gastrointestinal symptoms of EBV infection are nonspecific and occur rarely. EBV inducing acute gastrointestinal pathology is poorly recognized without suspicion. Careful consideration is needed to diagnose gastric involvement of EBV infection including gastric lymphoma, gastric cancer, and gastritis. A few recent cases of gastritis associated with EBV infection have been reported in adolescents and adults. However, there is no report of EBV-associated gastritis in early childhood. We experienced a rare case of 4-year-old girl with EBV gastritis confirmed by in situ hybridization. PMID:28018450

  17. Summary of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of CMV Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter A; Emery, Vincent C; Newstead, Chas

    2011-12-15

    The third edition of the British Transplantation Society Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of CMV Disease after Solid Organ Transplantation was published in March 2011. This article summarizes the important changes and advances in management in this rapidly evolving field. The pros and cons of universal, or targeted anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis, and pre-emptive anti-CMV therapy are discussed, especially with respect to advances in CMV polymerase chain reaction monitoring. The evidence for oral anti-CMV prophylaxis using valganciclovir is presented, together with a summary of the treatment of CMV disease and emerging fields such as CMV vaccination, CMV genotyping, and drug resistance.

  18. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation Induced Acute Hepatitis and Gastric Erosions in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis under Treatment with an Anti-IL-6 Receptor Antibody, Tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Ohta, Hajime; Nakai, Ryotaro; Seishima, Jun; Yamato, Masatoshi; Miyazawa, Masaki; Kaji, Kiichiro; Marukawa, Yohei; Kagaya, Takashi; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Tocilizumab, an anti-human interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) monoclonal antibody, is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is expected to exhibit clinical efficacy when used to treat other autoimmune diseases. However, a risk of opportunistic infection is occasionally recognized. A 54-year-old woman had received an oral corticosteroid and methotrexate to treat RA. Despite receiving these treatments, she received additional treatment with tocilizumab due to poor control of the disease activity. She presented at our hospital with a high fever and epigastralgia 19 days after receiving this treatment. A laboratory evaluation revealed liver injury and cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed hepatosplenomegaly, but no ascites. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastric erosions induced by CMV, which were confirmed immunohistochemically. Hence, we diagnosed the patient with CMV reactivation-induced acute hepatitis and gastric erosions under tocilizumab treatment. She received an anti-cytomegalovirus drug, ganciclovir, for 14 days due to her viremia and impaired general condition, which was suggestive of a severe infection. Her general condition subsequently improved, the liver function test results normalized, and the gastric erosions disappeared. In conclusion, although tocilizumab is very useful for treating certain autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and will be prescribed more widely in the future, associated CMV infections must be closely monitored, as these can be lethal.

  19. Change in Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy after Treatment during Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, William; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chalermchai, Thep; DeGruttola, Victor; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Pothisri, Mantana; Busovaca, Edgar; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Jagodzinski, Linda; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome H.; Valcour, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Objective Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to monitor changes in brain inflammation and neuronal integrity associated with HIV infection and its treatments. We used MRS to measure brain changes during the first weeks following HIV infection and in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Brain metabolite levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCHO), creatine (CR), myoinositol (MI), and glutamate and glutamine (GLX) were measured in acute HIV subjects (n = 31) and compared to chronic HIV+individuals (n = 26) and HIV negative control subjects (n = 10) from Bangkok, Thailand. Metabolites were measured in frontal gray matter (FGM), frontal white matter (FWM), occipital gray matter (OGM), and basal ganglia (BG). Repeat measures were obtained in 17 acute subjects 1, 3 and 6 months following initiation of ART. Results After adjustment for age we identified elevated BG tCHO/CR in acute HIV cases at baseline (median 14 days after HIV infection) compared to control (p = 0.0014), as well as chronic subjects (p = 0.0023). A similar tCHO/CR elevation was noted in OGM; no other metabolite abnormalities were seen between acute and control subjects. Mixed longitudinal models revealed resolution of BG tCHO/CR elevation after ART (p = 0.022) with tCHO/CR similar to control subjects at 6 months. Interpretation We detected cellular inflammation in the absence of measurable neuronal injury within the first month of HIV infection, and normalization of this inflammation following acutely administered ART. Our findings suggest that early ART may be neuroprotective in HIV infection by mitigating processes leading to CNS injury. PMID:23229129

  20. Association of Interleukin-8 and Neutrophils with Nasal Symptom Severity During Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Kelsey M.; Hayney, Mary S.; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Using a large data set (n = 811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (rs = 0.082, P = 0.022; rs = 0.080, P = 0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r = 0.13, P = <0.00001; r = 0.18, P = <0.003), plugged nose (r = 0.045, P = 0.003; r = 0.14, P = 0.058), and sneezing (r = −0.02, P = <0.0001; r = −0.0055, P = 0.31). Neutrophils correlate with some quality of life measures such as sleeping well (r = 0.15, P = 0.026). Thus, the study demonstrates that IL-8 and neutrophils are correlated with severity of nasal symptoms during acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. PMID:25132248

  1. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  2. Placental thrombosis in acute phase abortions during experimental Toxoplasma gondii infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    After oral administration of ewes during mid gestation with 2000 freshly prepared sporulated oocysts of T. gondii isolate M4, abortions occurred between days 7 and 11 in 91.6% of pregnant and infected ewes. Afterwards, a further infection was carried out at late gestation in another group of sheep with 500 sporulated oocysts. Abortions happened again between days 9 and 11 post infection (pi) in 58.3% of the infected ewes. Classically, abortions in natural and experimental ovine toxoplasmosis usually occur one month after infection. Few experimental studies have reported the so-called acute phase abortions as early as 7 to 14 days after oral inoculation of oocysts, and pyrexia was proposed to be responsible for abortion, although the underline mechanism was not elucidated. In the present study, all placentas analysed from ewes suffering acute phase abortions showed infarcts and thrombosis in the caruncullar villi of the placentomes and ischemic lesions (periventricular leukomalacia) in the brain of some foetuses. The parasite was identified by PCR in samples from some placentomes of only one sheep, and no antigen was detected by immunohistochemical labelling. These findings suggest that the vascular lesions found in the placenta, and the consequent hypoxic damage to the foetus, could be associated to the occurrence of acute phase abortions. Although the pathogenesis of these lesions remains to be determined, the infectious dose or virulence of the isolate may play a role in their development. PMID:24475786

  3. Patient Experiences following Acute HIV Infection Diagnosis and Counseling in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wolpaw, Benjamin J.; Mathews, Catherine; Mtshizana, Yolisa; Chopra, Mickey; Hardie, Diana; Lurie, Mark N.; De Azevedo, Virginia; Jennings, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the acute stage of HIV infection (AHI) have an elevated potential to transmit HIV and play a critical role in the growth of the epidemic. Routine identification and counseling of individuals during AHI could decrease transmission behavior during this key period. However, diagnosis of AHI may present challenges distinct from those experienced through diagnosis of established HIV infection. A study was conducted in a public youth clinic outside of Cape Town, South Africa, to identify and counsel individuals with acute stage HIV infection. In-depth interviews were conducted with patients following diagnosis. After counseling, patients were accepting of the testing regimen used to diagnose AHI. They used the knowledge of having been recently infected to identify the source of their infection, but did not retain or place importance on information regarding the increased ability to transmit HIV during the acute stage. Future interventions directed at the reduction of HIV transmission following diagnosis with AHI will need to find ways of making this information more salient, possibly through more culturally meaningful educational approaches. PMID:25153674

  4. Fatal systemic adenoviral infection superimposed on pulmonary mucormycosis in a child with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu Mi; Hwang-Bo, Seok; Kim, Seong koo; Han, Seung Beom; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. Case summary: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection. He had received reinduction chemotherapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia under continuing antifungal therapy for previously diagnosed fungal pneumonia. He complained of fever and right shoulder pain 4 days after completing the reinduction chemotherapy. In spite of appropriate antibiotic and antifungal therapy, pneumonia was aggravated and gross hematuria was accompanied. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction test for respiratory viruses was positive for ADV in a blood sample, and a urine culture was positive for ADV. He received oral ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous cidofovir therapy; however, he eventually died. Relapsed leukemia, concurrent fungal pneumonia, and delayed cidofovir administration were considered the cause of the grave outcome in this patient. Conclusion: ADV may cause severe infections not only in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, but also in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia. The risk factors for severe ADV infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy should be determined in the future studies, and early antiviral therapy should be administered to immune compromised patients with systemic ADV infection. PMID:27749571

  5. Knowledge and Awareness of Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Among Mobile App-Using Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Missed Public Health Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Aaron J.; Sanchez, Travis; Sineath, R. Craig; Grey, Jeremy; Kahle, Erin; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    In a national online survey, we assessed awareness and knowledge of acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection manifestation among 1748 men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 39% of respondents were aware that acute HIV infection may be accompanied by symptoms. Education and increased access to acute HIV testing may facilitate MSM to appropriately seek acute HIV testing. PMID:26034766

  6. Immunochemical evaluation of two Toxoplasma gondii GRA8 sequences to detect acute toxoplasmosis infection.

    PubMed

    Costa, Juan Gabriel; Duré, Andrea Belén

    2016-11-01

    In this work, two Toxoplasma gondii GRA8 protein sequences were tested by indirect ELISA and measurement of avidity to differentiate between acute and chronic toxoplasmosis infection. Using the antigen called GRA8B, 79.7% sensitivity and 84.1% specificity was achieved detecting IgG concentrations and a 71.2% sensitivity and a 68.3% specificity detecting IgA concentrations. This study is the first to report IgA detection with GRA8 by ELISA to differentiate stages of infection. Unfortunately the indirect ELISA to detect IgM was not effective in distinguishing stages. Also, this work is the first to report that the GRA8 protein can aid the differentiation between acute and chronic phase infection by measuring IgG antibody avidity, a technique in which we obtained 85.71% and 100% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Finally, in silico tools were used to explain the differences in our immunochemistry results.

  7. Similar pattern of chemokines after acute viral and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-27

    Read with great interest the article by Cavalcanti et al (1). Which describes the levels of chemokine such as MCP-1, RANETS, MIG and IP-10 in children with sepsis community acquired pneumonia and skin abscess. Author has found increased levels of RANETS in all infections mentioned above. Interestingly IP-10 was significantly increased in sepsis groups with low levels of MCP1. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. THE ETIOLOGY OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION (COMMON COLD).

    PubMed

    Long, P H; Doull, J A; Bourn, J M; McComb, E

    1931-03-31

    Experimental upper respiratory infections similar to "common colds" were transmitted singly and in series through two and four passages in nine out of fifteen persons, by intransal inoculations with bacteria-free filtrates of nasopharyngeal washings obtained from individuals ill with natural "colds." These observations conform with those reported by previous workers and lend further support to the view that the incitant of the "common cold" is a filtrable virus.

  9. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  10. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections--A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M; Atmar, Robert L; Quarles, John M; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L; Wells, Janet M; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E; Shaw, Chad A; Belmont, John W; Couch, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates.

  11. Predictive value of inflammatory markers for irrigation and debridement of acute TKA infection.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Abdel, Matthew P; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2013-06-01

    The roles of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are well established in the diagnosis of total joint infection. However, it is not entirely clear what value preoperative CRP and ESR have in predicting outcomes following irrigation and debridement with insert exchange for acute hematogenous total knee arthroplasty infection. The total joint registry at the authors' institution was reviewed to identify all patients who underwent irrigation and debridement with insert exchange for a diagnosis of acute hematogenous infection of a primary total knee arthroplasty. Patient medical records were then reviewed for preoperative white blood cell count and CRP and ESR levels; interval from symptom onset to surgery; infecting organism; and any additional surgery for infection. Average patient age was 72 years (range, 51-91 years). Forty-four patients were men and 26 were women. Mean follow-up was 54 months (range, 12-176 months). Seventy-two procedures (69 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 20 (28%) additional procedures for infection were performed and were classified as treatment failures. Average CRP was 173.7 mg/L in the successful group and 159.0 mg/L in the failed group (P=.31). Mean ESR at the time of irrigation and debridement with insert exchange was 61.3 mm/hr in both groups (P=.49). Although CRP and ESR are well established in the diagnosis of infection, no role currently exists for them in predicting the outcomes of irrigation and debridement with insert exchange for the treatment of acute hematogenous total knee arthroplasty infection.

  12. HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection predict disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Soghoian, Damien Z.; Jessen, Heiko; Flanders, Michael; Sierra-Davidson, Kailan; Cutler, Sam; Pertel, Thomas; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lindqvist, Madelene; Davis, Isaiah; Lane, Kimberly; Rychert, Jenna; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Brass, Abraham L.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Streeck, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Early immunological events during acute HIV infection are thought to fundamentally influence long-term disease outcome. Whereas the contribution of HIV-specific CD8 T cell responses to early viral control is well established, the role of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses in the control of viral replication following acute infection is unknown. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4 T cells - besides their helper function - have the capacity to directly recognize and kill virally infected cells. In a longitudinal study of a cohort of individuals acutely infected with HIV, we observed that subjects able to spontaneously control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy showed a significant expansion of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses—but not CD8 T cell responses–compared to subjects who progressed to a high viral set point (p=0.038). Strikingly, this expansion occurred prior to differences in viral load or CD4 T cell count and was characterized by robust cytolytic activity and expression of a distinct profile of perforin and granzymes at the earliest time point. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the emergence of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses at baseline was highly predictive of slower disease progression and clinical outcome (average days to CD4 T cell count <350/μl was 575 versus 306, p=0.001). These data demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses can be used during the earliest phase of HIV infection as an immunological predictor of subsequent viral set point and disease outcome. Moreover, these data suggest that expansion of Granzyme A+ HIV-specific cytolytic CD4 T cell responses early during acute HIV infection contributes substantially to the control of viral replication. PMID:22378925

  13. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  14. Acute enterocolitis in a human being infected with the protozoan Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Nime, F A; Burek, J D; Page, D L; Holscher, M A; Yardley, J H

    1976-04-01

    A 3-year-old child with severe acute self-limited enterocolitis was found on rectal biopsy to be infected with the protozoal parasite Cryptosporidium. This organism is known to infect a variety of vertebrates, but this is the first report of infection by Cryptosporidium in a human being. Both light and electron microscopic findings in the rectal biopsy are reported. It is suggested, on the basis of the severity of the clinical symptoms, and on the pathological changes in the rectum, that the organism in this case is likely to have been the cause of the enterocolitis and thus to have been a pathogen rather than a commensal. The source of the infection in this child could not be established. The value of signoidoscopy and biopsies is noted in this condition and as a general method for determining the etiology of a gastrointestinal infection in cases where other studies are negative.

  15. Estimating the impact of vaccination in acute SHIV-SIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy

    2008-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infects approxmately 0.5% of the world population, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A vaccine for HIV is urgently required, and a variety of vaccine modalities have been tested in animal models of infection. A number of these studies have shown protection in monkey models of infection, although the ability of the vaccine to protect appears to vary with the viral strain and animal model used. The recent failure of a large vaccine study in humans suggests that further understanding of the basic dynamics of infection and impact of vaccination are required, in order to understand the variable efficacy of vaccination in different infections. The dynamics of HIV infection have been studied in humans and in a variety of animal models. The standard model of infection has been used to estimate the basic reproductive ratio (R{sub 0}) of the virus, calculated from the growth rate of virus in acute infection. This method has not been useful in studying the effects of vaccination, since, in the vaccines developed so far, early growth rates of virus do not differ between control and vaccinated animals. Here, we use the standard model of viral dynamics to derive the reproductive ratio from the peak viral load and nadir of target cell numbers in acute infection. We apply this method to data from studies of vaccination in Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection and demonstrate that vaccination can reduce the reproductive ratio by 2.3 and 2 fold respectively. This method allows the comparison of vaccination efficacy amongst different viral strains and animal models in vivo.

  16. Can Giardia lamblia infection lower the risk of acute diarrhea among preschool children?

    PubMed

    Muhsen, Khitam; Cohen, Dani; Levine, Myron M

    2014-04-01

    There are inconsistent findings concerning the role of Giardia lamblia in pediatric diarrhea. A prospective cohort study of the incidence of acute diarrhea among Israeli Arab preschool children offered the opportunity to examine the association between G. lamblia infection (at baseline) and subsequent diarrhea. Following baseline screening by light microscopy for the presence of Giardia in their stools, a cohort was assembled of 142 children who were followed between October 2003 and August 2004 for the incidence of diarrhea. Surveillance was performed through maternal interviews. At baseline, 21 children tested Giardia-positive. During the prospective surveillance, acute diarrhea occurred less often among Giardia-positive children (9.5%) than among children who were not infected with Giardia (26.5%). G. lamblia infection was associated with lower risk of acute diarrhea; adjusted odds ratio of 0.18 (95% confidence interval 0.04-0.93) (p = 0.041). This prospective study provides additional evidence that Giardia may lower the risk of subsequent acute diarrhea among preschool children.

  17. Parasitic infection of the appendix as a cause of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Danielle Fernandes; da Silva, Reinaldo José; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; Sartorelli, Alesso Cervantes; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2007-12-01

    The association between parasitic infection of the appendix and acute appendicitis has been widely investigated. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the prevalence of parasitic infection of the appendix in a tropical area at southeast Brazil and to assess its possible relation to acute appendicitis in surgically removed appendices. Of the 1,600 appendectomies performed during a 10-year period, 24 (1.5%) were found to have helminths within the appendix. Enterobius vermicularis was observed in 23 of the 24 specimens (95.8%), and Taenia sp. was detected in only one case. Sixteen patients (66.7%) were less than 10 years old; 15 patients were male and nine female; 21 patients were white, and three were nonwhites. Pathologic analysis disclosed acute neutrophilic inflammation in the appendix wall in 12 of the 24 specimens and lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 of the 24 appendices. Gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed in three cases, and peritonitis was found in 11 of the 24 infected appendices. The results of the present study indicate that E. vermicularis is the commonest worm found in the appendix and that its presence can cause pathologic changes ranging from lymphoid hyperplasia to acute phlegmonous inflammation with life-threatening complications like gangrene and peritonitis.

  18. Electrodiagnostic features of acute paralytic poliomyelitis associated with West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Al-Shekhlee, Amer; Katirji, Bashar

    2004-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection is a potentially fatal disease, with meningoencephalitis being its most common neurological manifestation. Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has also been described, but acute paralytic poliomyelitis has only recently been recognized. We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings of five patients with WNV infection, who presented with acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Three patients manifested focal asymmetrical weakness, and two had rapid ascending quadriplegia mimicking GBS. Electrodiagnostic studies during the acute illness showed normal sensory nerve action potentials, compound motor action potentials of normal or reduced amplitude, and no slowing of nerve conduction velocities. Depending on the timing of the examination, fibrillation potentials were widespread, including in those with focal weakness. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging in one patient showed abnormal T2-weighted signals in the spinal cord gray matter. On follow-up, signs of clinical improvement were seen in one patient, whereas two remained quadriplegic and ventilator-dependent 5 months after the onset. This report highlights the value of the electrodiagnostic studies in the diagnosis and prognosis of focal or generalized weakness due to acute paralytic poliomyelitis associated with WNV infection.

  19. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  20. Acute transverse myelitis and subacute thyroiditis associated with dengue viral infection: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Zhiming; Dong, Yaxian; Chen, Xiaolian; Yao, Huiyan; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is a rare manifestation of dengue infection. To the best of our knowledge, only 6 cases of acute transverse myelitis as a manifestation of dengue infection have been reported thus far. The present study described a case of acute transverse myelitis complicated with subacute thyroiditis 6 days after the onset of dengue viral infection. In addition, the available literature was searched to identify similar previous cases. Treatment with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone immunoglobulin plasmapheresis and physiotherapy resulted in partial recovery at 3 months post-infection. In conclusion, the involvement of dengue infection should be considered in patients who develop central nervous system manifestations during or after the recovery period of dengue infection. Furthermore, since methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin are effective during the active phase of the infection, prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment are crucial. PMID:27703498

  1. Pre-irradiation with low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly enhances the efficacy of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy in human non-small lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Wenjian; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Guangming; Xie, Yi; Hao, Jifang; Min, Fengling; Zhou, Qingming; Duan, Xin

    2007-04-01

    The combination of ionizing radiation and gene therapy has been investigated. However, there are very few reports about the combination of heavy-ion irradiation and gene therapy. To determine if the pre-exposure to low-dose heavy ion beam enhances the suppression of AdCMV-p53 on non-small lung cancer (NSLC), the cells pre-irradiated or non-irradiated were infected with 20, 40 MOI of AdCMV-p53. Survival fraction and the relative biology effect (RBE) were determined by clonogenic assay. The results showed that the proportions of p53 positive cells in 12C6+ beam induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells were more than 90%, which were significantly more than those in γ-ray induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells. The pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly prevented the G0/G1 arrest and activated G2/M checkpoints. The pre-exposure to 12C6+ beam significantly improved cell to apoptosis. RBEs for the 12C6+ + AdCMV-p53 infection groups were 30% 60%, 20% 130% and 30% 70% more than those for the 12C6+-irradiated only, AdCMV-p53 infected only, and γ-irradiation induced AdCMVp53 infected groups, respectively. The data suggested that the pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly promotes exogenous p53 expression in NSLC, and the suppression of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy on NSLC.

  2. Associations between EBV and CMV Seropositivity, Early Exposures, and Gut Microbiota in a Prospective Birth Cohort: A 10-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Queiroz, Claudia; Johansson, Maria A.; Persson, Jan-Olov; Jörtsö, Evelina; Kjerstadius, Torbjörn; Nilsson, Caroline; Saghafian-Hedengren, Shanie; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Early-life infections with persistent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are delayed in affluent countries, probably due to alterations in early environmental exposures, such as maternal age, siblings, and day-care attendance. We have previously reported that the timing of EBV and CMV contraction is related both to allergic sensitization and changes in functional competence of immune cells, while the presence/absence of lactobacilli [Lactobacillus (L.) casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus] or Staphylococcus (S.) aureus in feces is related to the risk for allergy. Here, we used the same prospective longitudinal birth cohort of children to investigate early-life environmental exposures and their influence on EBV and CMV contraction over time. Since gut microbes also belong to this category of early exposures, we investigated their association with herpesvirus contraction. Our results show that these two viruses are acquired with different kinetics and that EBV and CMV seroprevalence at 10 years of age was 47 and 57%, respectively. We also observed that a delayed EBV or CMV infection was associated with older maternal age [time ratio (TR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.21, Padj < 0.001 and TR 1.09, CI 1.03–1.16, Padj = 0.008, respectively]. Further, we present the novel finding that S. aureus colonization reduced the time to CMV acquisition (TR 0.21, CI 0.06–0.78, Padj = 0.02). Together, these findings suggest that there is a relationship between timing of herpesvirus acquisition and early-life immune modulating exposures, which interestingly also includes the early infant gut microbiota. PMID:27630978

  3. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  4. Neonatal experience interacts with adult social stress to alter acute and chronic Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R R; Maldonado Bouchard, S; Prentice, T W; Bridegam, P; Rassu, F; Young, C R; Steelman, A J; Welsh, T H; Welsh, C J; Meagher, M W

    2014-08-01

    Previous research has shown that neonatal handling has prolonged protective effects associated with stress resilience and aging, yet little is known about its effect on stress-induced modulation of infectious disease. We have previously demonstrated that social disruption stress exacerbates the acute and chronic phases of the disease when applied prior to Theiler's virus infection (PRE-SDR) whereas it attenuates disease severity when applied concurrently with infection (CON-SDR). Here, we asked whether neonatal handling would protect adult mice from the detrimental effects of PRE-SDR and attenuate the protective effects of CON-SDR on Theiler's virus infection. As expected, handling alone decreased IL-6 and corticosterone levels, protected the non-stressed adult mice from motor impairment throughout infection and reduced antibodies to myelin components (PLP, MBP) during the autoimmune phase of disease. In contrast, neonatal handling X PRE/CON-SDR elevated IL-6 and reduced corticosterone as well as increased motor impairment during the acute phase of the infection. Neonatal handling X PRE/CON-SDR continued to exacerbate motor impairment during the chronic phase, whereas only neonatal handling X PRE-SDR increased in antibodies to PLP, MOG, MBP and TMEV. Together, these results imply that while handling reduced the severity of later Theiler's virus infection in non-stressed mice, brief handling may not be protective when paired with later social stress.

  5. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  6. Interstitial nephritis, acute renal failure in a patient with non-fulminant hepatitis A infection.

    PubMed

    Vaboe, A L; Leh, S; Forslund, T

    2002-02-01

    This is the first report from Norway of a patient with interstitial nephritis and renal failure due to non-fulminant hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. HAV infection was confirmed by positive anti-HAV IgM serology. All tests for other virus infections were negative. At admittance serum creatinine (s-Creat) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration were 539 microlmol/l and 32.6 mmol/l increasing the following days to 890 micromol/l and 39.9 mmol/l, respectively. Nine courses of hemodialysis had to be given. Kidney biopsy specimen showed interstitial edema, lymphocytic cell infiltration and acute tubular injury with normal glomeruli. Examination with immunohistochemistry was negative. In contrast to the findings associated with HBV and HCV infection in which glomerular disease is predominantly found, the HAV infection in our patient was associated with interstitial nephritis and acute tubular necrosis. The prognosis of the renal failure due to HAV infection was good although the recovery was substantially delayed.

  7. Microorganisms Causing Community-Acquired Acute Bronchitis: The Role of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Park, Sunghoon; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lee, Myung Goo; Park, Yong Bum; Oh, Kil Chan; Lee, Jae-Myung; Kim, Do Il; Seo, Ki-Hyun; Shin, Kyeong-Cheol; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ko, Yongchun; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Although acute bronchitis is quite common, there is relatively limited information regarding the microorganisms that are involved in this illness. Methods We performed a prospective study of acute bronchitis at 31 hospitals and clinics in Korea from July 2011 to June 2012. Sputum specimens were collected for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture of microorganisms. Results Of the 811 enrolled patients, 291 had acceptable sputum specimens that were included for analysis of the etiologic distribution. With multiplex PCR testing, viruses were identified in 36.1% (105/291), most commonly rhinovirus (25.8%) and coronavirus (3.8%). Typical bacteria were isolated in 126/291 (43.3%) patients. Among these patients Haemophilus influenzae (n = 39) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 30) were isolated most commonly; atypical bacteria were identified in 44 (15.1%) patients. Bacteria-only, virus-only, and mixed infections (bacteria plus virus) accounted for 36.7% (98/291), 17.2% (50/291), and 18.9% (55/291) of infections, respectively. In particular, 52.4% of patients with viral infection had a concurrent bacterial infection, and rhinovirus was the most common virus in mixed infections (40/55). Additionally, infections with typical bacteria were more common in patients with chronic lung disease (p = 0.029), and typical bacterial infections showed a trend towards a higher prevalence with older age (p = 0.001). Conclusions Bacteria were associated with almost half of community-acquired acute bronchitis cases. Additional studies are required to further illuminate the role of bacteria and to identify patient groups most likely to benefit from antibiotic treatment. PMID:27788254

  8. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    SciTech Connect

    Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

    1985-10-01

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

  9. [Parasitic infection of the appendix and its possible relationship to acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielle Fernandes da; Silva, Reinaldo José da; Silva, Márcia Guimarães da; Sartorelli, Alesso Cervantes; Takegawa, Bonifácio Katsunori; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2008-01-01

    From 1,600 surgically removed appendices, 24 (1.5%) were found to have helminths. Enterobius vermicularis was observed in 23 of the 24 specimens (95.8%) and Taenia sp was detected in only 1 (4.2%) case. Sixteen patients (66.7%) were less than 10 year-old; 15 patients were male and 9 female. Pathologic analysis disclosed acute neutrophilic inflammation in 12 cases and lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 of the 24 appendices. Gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed in 3 cases and peritonitis was found in 11 of the 24 infested appendices. Parasitic infection of the appendix is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis in children and adolescents.

  10. A Pediatric Case of Acute Generalized Pustular Eruption without Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Nobuko; Yoshizawa, Hideka

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular lesions characterized by acute onset with fever occur in pustulosis acuta generalisata, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and generalized pustular psoriasis. In the present report, we describe a pediatric case of generalized pustular eruption that was not completely consistent with clinical features. Our patient had no evidence of a post-streptococcal infection. We observed scattered symmetric eruption of discrete pustules with an inflammatory halo on normal skin. The eruption was absent on her palms and soles of the feet. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports in the English literature of cases with clinical features similar to those of our patient. PMID:27462226

  11. Acute peg in hole docking in the management of infected non-union of long bones

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Mohammed Ramzan; Ahmed, Molvi Sajjad; Afzal, Suhail; Butt, Mohammed Farooq; Badoo, A. R.; Dar, Irshad Tabasum; Hussain, Anwar

    2007-01-01

    The Ilizarov method has been studied extensively in the management of non-union of long bones. In most cases this involves filling of defects present primarily or after débridement by bone transport. Acute docking over gaps longer than 2 cm has not been adequately studied, however. The purpose of this paper is to report the efficacy of acute peg in hole docking as a bone graft-sparing modality in the management of infected non-union of long bones. PMID:17387474

  12. HIV-1-Specific CD8 T Cells Exhibit Limited Cross-Reactivity during Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Du, Victor Y; Bansal, Anju; Carlson, Jonathan; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Salazar, Maria G; Ladell, Kristin; Gras, Stephanie; Josephs, Tracy M; Heath, Sonya L; Price, David A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Hunter, Eric; Goepfert, Paul A

    2016-04-15

    Prior work has demonstrated that HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells can cross-recognize variant epitopes. However, most of these studies were performed in the context of chronic infection, where the presence of viral quasispecies makes it difficult to ascertain the true nature of the original antigenic stimulus. To overcome this limitation, we evaluated the extent of CD8 T cell cross-reactivity in patients with acute HIV-1 clade B infection. In each case, we determined the transmitted founder virus sequence to identify the autologous epitopes restricted by individual HLA class I molecules. Our data show that cross-reactive CD8 T cells are infrequent during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, in the uncommon instances where cross-reactive responses were detected, the variant epitopes were poorly recognized in cytotoxicity assays. Molecular analysis revealed that similar antigenic structures could be cross-recognized by identical CD8 T cell clonotypes mobilized in vivo, yet even subtle differences in a single TCR-accessible peptide residue were sufficient to disrupt variant-specific reactivity. These findings demonstrate that CD8 T cells are highly specific for autologous epitopes during acute HIV-1 infection. Polyvalent vaccines may therefore be required to provide optimal immune cover against this genetically labile pathogen.

  13. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  14. Distinct surveillance pathway for immunopathology during acute infection via autophagy and SR-BI

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Khandagale, Avinash B.; Magenau, Astrid; Nichols, Maryana; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Rinninger, Franz; Ziegler, Tilman; Seveau, Stephanie; Schubert, Sören; Zahler, Stefan; Verschoor, Admar; Latz, Eicke; Massberg, Steffen; Gaus, Katharina; Engelmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting from immunopathology during acute bacterial infections are incompletely known. We found that in response to apoptotic immune cells and live or dead Listeria monocytogenes scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), an anti-atherogenic lipid exchange mediator, activated internalization mechanisms with characteristics of macropinocytosis and, assisted by Golgi fragmentation, initiated autophagic responses. This was supported by scavenger receptor-induced local increases in membrane cholesterol concentrations which generated lipid domains particularly in cell extensions and the Golgi. SR-BI was a key driver of beclin-1-dependent autophagy during acute bacterial infection of the liver and spleen. Autophagy regulated tissue infiltration of neutrophils, suppressed accumulation of Ly6C+ (inflammatory) macrophages, and prevented hepatocyte necrosis in the core of infectious foci. Perifocal levels of Ly6C+ macrophages and Ly6C− macrophages were unaffected, indicating predominant regulation of the focus core. SR-BI-triggered autophagy promoted co-elimination of apoptotic immune cells and dead bacteria but barely influenced bacterial sequestration and survival or inflammasome activation, thus exclusively counteracting damage inflicted by immune responses. Hence, SR-BI- and autophagy promote a surveillance pathway that partially responds to products of antimicrobial defenses and selectively prevents immunity-induced damage during acute infection. Our findings suggest that control of infection-associated immunopathology can be based on a unified defense operation. PMID:27694929

  15. Guillain-Barré syndrome and cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Julien; Germi, Raphaële; Jean, Dominique; Baccard-Longère, Monique; Casez, Olivier; Besson, Gérard; Rougé, Alain; Boutonnat, Jean; Schwebel, Carole; Hoffmann, Pascale; Morand, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder which can be triggered by cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. GBS following CMV primary infection is a rare event during pregnancy, which raises the question of maternal and fetal management. We describe an unusual case of GBS after CMV primary infection in a pregnant woman. The mother was successfully treated with standard immunoglobulins but in utero fetal death caused by CMV congenital infection unfortunately occurred. Similar cases have rarely been reported in the literature.

  16. Acute bronchial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dorca, J

    1995-10-01

    Bacterial bronchial infection is a frequent cause of COPD exacerbation but not its only aetiology. Increased purulent expectorant appears to be its best indicator rather than fever, non-productive cough or dyspnoea. The clinician must try to recognize this condition rather than systematically prescribe empirical antibiotics. Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the major pathogens. Although atypical bacteria are not frequent, Chlamydia pneumoniae could play significant role. During the last years, new antibiotics, much more expensive than other regimens, are widely prescribed, often without a rational approach. In patients not already on antibiotics, sputum Gram stain is useful for deciding which patient should be treated and what would be the best anti-biotic. When it is not available, the chosen antibiotic must be at least active against three major pathogens according to the local susceptibility patterns. In patients not responding to the initial treatment, the consideration of its potential spectrum holes is then more useful than sputum examination.

  17. Immunoglobulin M for Acute Infection: True or False?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin M (IgM) tests have clear clinical utility but also suffer disproportionately from false-positive results, which in turn can lead to misdiagnoses, inappropriate therapy, and premature closure of a diagnostic workup. Despite numerous reports in the literature, many clinicians and laboratorians remain unaware of this issue. In this brief review, a series of virology case examples is presented. However, a false-positive IgM can occur with any pathogen. Thus, when an accurate diagnosis is essential for therapy, prognosis, infection control, or public health, when the patient is sick enough to be hospitalized, or when the clinical or epidemiologic findings do not fit, IgM detection should not be accepted as a stand-alone test. Rather, whenever possible, the diagnosis should be confirmed by other means, including testing of serial samples and the application of additional test methods. PMID:27193039

  18. In vivo administration of a JAK3 inhibitor during acute SIV infection leads to significant increases in viral load during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Albrecht, Christina; Brameier, Markus; Walter, Lutz; Mayne, Ann E; Dunbar, Paul; Russo, Robert; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Tara; Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A

    2014-03-01

    The studies reported herein are the first to document the effect of the in vivo administration of a JAK3 inhibitor for defining the potential role of NK cells during acute SIV infection of a group of 15 rhesus macaques (RM). An additional group of 16 MHC/KIR typed RM was included as controls. The previously optimized in vivo dose regimen (20 mg/kg daily for 35 days) led to a marked depletion of each of the major NK cell subsets both in the blood and gastro-intestinal tissues (GIT) during acute infection. While such depletion had no detectable effects on plasma viral loads during acute infection, there was a significant sustained increase in plasma viral loads during chronic infection. While the potential mechanisms that lead to such increased plasma viral loads during chronic infection remain unclear, several correlates were documented. Thus, during acute infection, the administration of the JAK3 inhibitor besides depleting all NK cell subsets also decreased some CD8⁺ T cells and inhibited the mobilization of the plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the blood and their localization to the GIT. Of interest is the finding that the administration of the JAK3 inhibitor during acute infection also resulted in the sustained maintenance during chronic infection of a high number of naïve and central memory CD4⁺ T cells, increases in B cells in the blood, but decreases in the frequencies and function of NKG2a⁺ NK cells within the GIT and blood, respectively. These data identify a unique role for JAK3 inhibitor sensitive cells, that includes NK cells during acute infection that in concert lead to high viral loads in SIV infected RM during chronic infection without affecting detectable changes in antiviral humoral/cellular responses. Identifying the precise mechanisms by which JAK3 sensitive cells exert their influence is critical with important implications for vaccine design against lentiviruses.

  19. Radionuclide imaging of inflammation and infection in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Love, Charito; Palestro, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Although infection may be suggested by signs and symptoms such as fever, pain, general malaise, and abnormal laboratory results, imaging tests often are used to confirm its presence. Morphologic imaging tests identify structural alterations of tissues or organs that result from a combination of microbial invasion and the inflammatory response of the host. Functional imaging studies use minute quantities of radioactive material, which are taken up directly by cells, tissues, and organs, or are attached to substances that subsequently migrate to the region of interest. Bone scintigraphy is extremely sensitive and can be positive within 2 days after the onset of symptoms. With an accuracy of more than 90%, 3-phase bone scintigraphy is the radionuclide procedure of choice for diagnosing osteomyelitis in unviolated bone. In patients with acute renal failure, gallium imaging facilitates the differentiation of acute interstitial nephritis from acute tubular necrosis. Gallium imaging also is useful in the evaluation of pulmonary infections and inflammation. Many opportunistic infections affect the lungs, and a normal gallium scan of the chest excludes infection with a high degree of certainty, especially when the chest x-ray is negative. In the human immunodeficiency virus positive patient, lymph node uptake usually is associated with mycobacterial disease or lymphoma. Focal pulmonary parenchymal uptake suggests bacterial pneumonia. Diffuse pulmonary uptake suggests an opportunistic pneumonia. Gallium imaging provides useful information about other acute respiratory conditions, including radiation pneumonitis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. In vitro labeled leukocyte imaging with indium-111 and technetium-99m labeled leukocytes is useful in various acute care situations. The test facilitates the differentiation of normal postoperative changes from infection and is useful for diagnosing prosthetic vascular graft infection. In inflammatory bowel disease, labeled leukocyte

  20. Modeling the Potential Impact of Vaccination on the Epidemiology of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lanzieri, Tatiana M.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R.; Gambhir, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the potential for vaccination to change cytomegalovirus (CMV) epidemiology is important for developing CMV vaccines and designing clinical trials. Methods We constructed a deterministic, age-specific and time-dependent mathematical model of pathogen transmission, parameterized using CMV seroprevalence from the United States and Brazil, to predict the impact of vaccination on congenital CMV infection. Findings Concurrent vaccination of young children and adolescents would result in the greatest reductions in congenital CMV infections in populations with moderate and high baseline maternal seroprevalence. Such a vaccination strategy, assuming 70% vaccine efficacy, 90% coverage and 5-year duration of protection, could ultimately prevent 30%-50% of congenital CMV infections. At equilibrium, this strategy could result in a 30% reduction in congenital CMV infections due to primary maternal infection in the United States but a 3% increase in Brazil. The potential for an increase in congenital CMV infections due to primary maternal infections in Brazil was not predicted with use of a vaccine that confers protection for greater than 5 years. Interpretation Modeling suggests that vaccination strategies that include young children will result in greater declines in congenital CMV infection than those restricted to adolescents or women of reproductive age. Our study highlights the critical need for better understanding of the relative contribution of type of maternal infection to congenital CMV infection and disease, the main focus of vaccine prevention. PMID:24837782

  1. Phase I study of H5.020CMV.PDGF-beta to treat venous leg ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David J; Morris, Lee M; Papadopoulos, Maryte; Weinberg, Linda; Filip, Jennifer C; Lang, Stephanie A; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2009-10-01

    Venous leg ulcers are a prevalent nonhealing wound of the lower extremity. Although topically applied growth factors successfully improve wound repair in animal studies, similar studies on humans with venous leg ulcers have not been successful. This study was designed to evaluate the acute safety and biologic feasibility of peri-ulcer injection of a replication-incompetent adenoviral construct expressing platelet-derived growth factor-beta (PDGF-beta). In this phase I study, we demonstrate the initial safety, feasibility, and biologic plausibility of using H5.020CMV.PDGF-beta to treat venous leg ulcer disease.

  2. Phase I Study of H5.020CMV.PDGF-β to Treat Venous Leg Ulcer Disease.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David J; Morris, Lee M; Papadopoulos, Maryte; Weinberg, Linda; Filip, Jennifer C; Lang, Stephanie A; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2009-10-01

    Venous leg ulcers are a prevalent nonhealing wound of the lower extremity. Although topically applied growth factors successfully improve wound repair in animal studies, similar studies on humans with venous leg ulcers have not been successful. This study was designed to evaluate the acute safety and biologic feasibility of peri-ulcer injection of a replication-incompetent adenoviral construct expressing platelet-derived growth factor-β (PDGF-β). In this phase I study, we demonstrate the initial safety, feasibility, and biologic plausibility of using H5.020CMV.PDGF-β to treat venous leg ulcer disease.

  3. Phase I Study of H5.020CMV.PDGF-β to Treat Venous Leg Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, David J; Morris, Lee M; Papadopoulos, Maryte; Weinberg, Linda; Filip, Jennifer C; Lang, Stephanie A; Vaikunth, Sachin S; Crombleholme, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are a prevalent nonhealing wound of the lower extremity. Although topically applied growth factors successfully improve wound repair in animal studies, similar studies on humans with venous leg ulcers have not been successful. This study was designed to evaluate the acute safety and biologic feasibility of peri-ulcer injection of a replication-incompetent adenoviral construct expressing platelet-derived growth factor-β (PDGF-β). In this phase I study, we demonstrate the initial safety, feasibility, and biologic plausibility of using H5.020CMV.PDGF-β to treat venous leg ulcer disease. PMID:19638959

  4. Genotyping of human rhinovirus in adult patients with acute respiratory infections identified predominant infections of genotype A21

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Yang, Donghong; Ren, Xianwen; Li, Mingkun; Mu, Xinlin; Wang, Qi; Cao, Jie; Hu, Ke; Yan, Chunliang; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Xiangxin; Chen, Yusheng; Wang, Ruiqin; An, Fucheng; An, Shuchang; Luo, Ming; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yan; Xiang, Zichun; Xiao, Yan; Li, Li; Huang, Fang; Jin, Qi; Gao, Zhancheng; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is an important causative agent of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). The roles of specific HRV genotypes in patients suffering from ARTIs have not been well established. We recruited 147 adult inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 291 adult outpatients with upper ARTIs (URTIs). Respiratory pathogens were screened via PCR assays. HRV was detected in 42 patients, with 35 species A, five B and two C. Seventeen genotypes were identified, and HRV-A21 ranked the highest (9/42, 21.4%). The HRV-A21-positive infections were detected in four patients with CAP and in five with URTIs, all without co-infections. The HRV-A21 genome sequenced in this study contained 12 novel coding polymorphisms in viral protein (VP) 1, VP2 EF loop, VP3 knob and 3D regions. The infections of HRV-A21 virus obtained in this study could not be neutralized by antiserum of HRV-A21 prototype strain (VR-1131), indicating remarkable antigenic variation. Metagenomic analysis showed the HRV-A21 reads were dominant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the three HRV-A21-positive patients with severe CAP, in which two dead. Our results highlight an unexpected infection of genotype HRV-A21 in the clinic, indicating the necessity of precise genotyping and surveillance of HRVs to improve the clinical management of ARTIs. PMID:28128353

  5. Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection Induces Consistent Changes in Circulating MicroRNAs That Are Associated with Nonlytic Hepatocyte Release

    PubMed Central

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Bailey, Justin R.; Page, Kimberly; Ray, Stuart C.; Cox, Andrea L.; Thomas, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) change in abundance in response to disease and have been associated with liver fibrosis severity in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the early dynamics of miRNA release during acute HCV infection are poorly understood. In addition, circulating miRNA signatures have been difficult to reproduce among separate populations. We studied plasma miRNA abundance during acute HCV infection to identify an miRNA signature of early infection. We measured 754 plasma miRNAs by quantitative PCR array in a discovery cohort of 22 individuals before and during acute HCV infection and after spontaneous resolution (n = 11) or persistence (n = 11) to identify a plasma miRNA signature. The discovery cohort derived from the Baltimore Before and After Acute Study of Hepatitis. During acute HCV infection, increases in miR-122 (P < 0.01) and miR-885-5p (Pcorrected < 0.05) and a decrease in miR-494 (Pcorrected < 0.05) were observed at the earliest time points after virus detection. Changes in miR-122 and miR-885-5p were sustained in persistent (P < 0.001) but not resolved HCV infection. The circulating miRNA signature of acute HCV infection was confirmed in a separate validation cohort that was derived from the San Francisco-based You Find Out (UFO) Study (n = 28). As further confirmation, cellular changes of signature miRNAs were examined in a tissue culture model of HCV in hepatoma cells: HCV infection induced extracellular release of miR-122 and miR-885-5p despite unperturbed intracellular levels. In contrast, miR-494 accumulated intracellularly (P < 0.05). Collectively, these data are inconsistent with necrolytic release of hepatocyte miRNAs into the plasma during acute HCV infection of humans. IMPORTANCE MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that emerging research shows can transmit regulatory signals between cells in health and disease. HCV infects 2% of humans worldwide, and chronic HCV infection is a major cause of severe

  6. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with dengue infection: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Meena; Nayak, Rajeev; Khwaja, Geeta A; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-12-15

    Dengue is the commonest arboviral illness caused by four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1 through DEN-4). The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from asymptomatic or mild infection to catastrophic dengue shock syndrome (DSS). In last few years, neurological manifestations of dengue infection have been increasingly observed and reported mainly with serotypes DEN-2 and DEN-3. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. Encephalopathy and encephalitis are the most frequently reported neurological manifestations followed by meningitis, myositis, hypokalemic periodic paralysis, stroke, Guillain-Barré syndrome and transverse myelitis. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with dengue infection is rarely reported. We herein report a case of ADEM associated with classic dengue fever. Favourable clinical outcome occurred after a five-day course of intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  7. Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dix, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bowes, Lynette; Cellot, Sonia; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Feusner, Jim; Gillmeister, Biljana; Johnston, Donna L; Lewis, Victor; Michon, Bruno; Mitchell, David; Portwine, Carol; Price, Victoria; Silva, Mariana; Stobart, Kent; Yanofsky, Rochelle; Zelcer, Shayna; Beyene, Joseph; Sung, Lillian

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML.

  8. Anemia and mechanism of erythrocyte destruction in ducks with acute Leucocytozoon infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1968-01-01

    In the anemia which accompanies infection by Leucocytozoon simondi in Pekin ducks there was a far greater loss of erythrocytes than could be accounted for as a result of direct physical rupture by the parasite. Erythrocyte loss began at the same time the 1st parasites appeared in the blood and was severest just prior to maximum parasitemia. Blood replacement and parasite loss occurred simultaneously. Examination of the spleen and bone marrow revealed that erythrophagocytosis was not the cause of anemia as reported for infections of Plasmodium, Babesia and Anaplasma. An anti-erythrocyte (A-E) factor was found in the serum of acutely infected ducks which agglutinated and hemolyzed normal untreated duck erythrocytes as well as infected cells. This A-E factor appeared when the 1st red cell loss was detected and reached its maximum titer just prior to the greatest red cell loss. Titers of the A-E factor were determined using normal uninfected erythrocytes at temperatures between 4 and 42 C. Cells agglutinated below 25 C and hemolyzed at 37 and 42 C. These results indicated that the A-E factor could be responsible for loss of cells other than those which were infected and could thus produce an excess loss of red cells. Attempts to implicate the A-E factor as an autoantibody were all negative. The A-E factor was present in the gamma fraction of acute serum but no anamnestic response could be detected when recovered ducks were reinfected. Anemia was never as severe in reinfections as in primary infections. The A-E factor also never reached as high a titer and was removed from the circulation very rapidly in reinfected ducks. It is concluded that red cell loss in ducks with acute Leucocytozoon disease results from intravascular hemolysis rather than erythrophagocytosis. The A-E factor responsible for hemolysis is more likely a parasite product rather than autoantibody.

  9. The concurrent occurrence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood acute leukemia in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Gisele Moledo; Azevedo-Silva, Fernanda; dos Santos Thuler, Luiz Claudio; Pina, Eugênia Terra Granado; Souza, Celeste S.F.; Calabrese, Katia; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the co-existence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood leukemia in patients naïve to treatment; this has serious clinical and epidemiological implications. Methods The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies prior to any treatment was investigated in children with clinical features of acute leukemia. Serological tests were performed in 470 samples drawn from under 14-year-old children from different regions of Brazil with clinical suspicion of acute leukemia. Acute leukemia subtypes were characterized by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Morphological analyses of bone marrow aspirates were systematically performed to visualize blast cells and/or the formation of L. chagasi amastigotes. Data analysis used a standard univariate procedure and the Pearson's chi-square test. Results The plasma of 437 children (93%) displayed antibodies against L. chagasi by indirect immunofluorescence assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. Of the 437 patients diagnosed from 2002 to 2006, 254 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 92 had acute myeloid leukemia, and 91 did not have acute leukemia. The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies according to the indirect immunofluorescence assay test (22.5%) was similar in children with or without acute leukemia (p-value = 0.76). The co-existence of visceral leishmanasis and acute leukemia was confirmed in 24 children. The overall survival of these children was poor with a high death rate during the first year of leukemia treatment. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of childhood leukemia, visceral leishmanasis should be considered as a potential concurrent disease in regions where L. chagasi is endemic. PMID:25305169

  10. Acute post-infectious cerebellar ataxia due to co-infection of human herpesvirus-6 and adenovirus mimicking myositis.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Aldo; Pala, Giovanna; Cresta, Federico; Finetti, Martina; Biancheri, Roberta; Renna, Salvatore

    2014-11-26

    Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA) is a relatively common neurological disease in children. Most common types of ACA are acute post-infectious (APCA) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Less common but important causes include opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) and acute cerebellitis. Cerebellar neoplasms and acute hydrocephalus are additional causes of paediatric ataxia. APCA is the most common cause of ACA in children, comprising about 30-50% of total cases. This is a report about an immunocompetent 4-yrs-old male affected by APCA, due to co-infection by human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and adenovirus, with symptoms mimicking myositis.

  11. Saving the limb in diabetic patients with ischemic foot lesions complicated by acute infection.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Giacomo; Faglia, Ezio

    2014-12-01

    Ischemia and infection are the most important factors affecting the prognosis of foot ulcerations in diabetic patients. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to aggressively treat 2 important pathologies--namely, occlusive arterial disease affecting the tibial and femoral arteries and infection of the ischemic diabetic foot. Each of these 2 conditions may lead to major limb amputation, and the presence of both critical limb ischemia (CLI) and acute deep infection is a major risk factor for lower-extremity amputation. Thus, the management of diabetic foot ulcers requires specific therapeutic approaches that vary significantly depending on whether foot lesions are complicated by infection and/or ischemia. A multidisciplinary team approach is the key to successful treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: ischemic diabetic foot ulcers complicated by acute deep infection pose serious treatment challenges because high levels of skill, organization, accuracy, and timing of intervention are required to maximize the chances of limb salvage: these complex issues are better managed by a multidisciplinary clinical group.

  12. [Dipodascus capitatus (Geotrichum capitatum): fatal systemic infection on patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Thereza Christina Sampaio; Oliveira, Loiva Therezinha Otonelli; Landell, Melissa; Valente, Patrícia; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Pereira, Waldir Veiga

    2011-10-01

    The infections caused by Dipodascus capitatus are rare, and the treatment is difficult. We reported a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. The fungus was first isolated from hemocultures, and the phenotypic identification was based on mycological methods. The genotyping was carried out by sequencing the region D1/D2 from 26 rDNA. The susceptibility tests were assayed by Etest® and by the microdilution technique. None of the antifungal treatments employed were effective. The patient died on day 17 after the mycological diagnosis. The authors discussed the emergence of such infections as well as the difficulty regarding the diagnosis and treatment.

  13. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic.

  14. Acute hepatitis C infection in HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    McFaul, K; Maghlaoui, A; Nzuruba, M; Farnworth, S; Foxton, M; Anderson, M; Nelson, M; Devitt, E

    2015-06-01

    Acute hepatitis C infection is recognized in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), but the risk in HIV-negative MSM remains unclear. We evaluated a population of MSM with acute hepatitis C. From January 2010 to May 2014, all cases of HCV antibody positive HIV-negative MSM were identified. European AIDS Network criteria were applied to determine acute infection, and 44 individuals fulfilled the criteria for acute hepatitis C. Ten were RNA negative at baseline and classed as prior spontaneous clearance. 15 (34.1%) had a previously negative HCV antibody within 1 year. 11 (25.0%) had significant elevation in ALT levels, and 18 (40.9%) were clinically diagnosed from risk exposure and history. Median age was 37 years (range 24-75). 41 (93.2%) individuals reported unprotected anal sex, 36 with (87.8%) both insertive and receptive intercourse, 4 (9.8%) with receptive intercourse, 1 (2.4%) with insertive intercourse, and no data were recorded for 3 (7.3%) patients. Individuals had an average of 7.3 reported (median 2, range 1-100) partners. 12 (27.3%) engaged in group sex, 11 (25.0%) practised fisting, 11 (25.0%) admitted using drugs during sexual activity, 16 (36.4%) reported nasal, and 9 (20.5%) reported injection drug use. 14 (31.8)% had unprotected sex whilst under the influence of recreational drugs. 29 individuals were aware of a partner's status. 2 (4.5%) individuals had sexual contact with a known HCV monoinfected partner, 13 (29.5%) with a HIV monoinfected partner and 6 (13.6%) with a HCV/HIV coinfected partner. 9 (20.5%) reported a partner/partners with no known infection. No data were available in 14 (31.8%) individuals. 13 (29.5%) individuals had a coexisting STI at the time of acute HCV diagnosis. 8 (18.2%) received HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) within the 6 months prior to the HCV diagnosis (2 were participants in a HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis trial). 15 (34.1%) individuals achieved spontaneous clearance of HCV, and 11 patients received HCV

  15. A case of severe thrombocytopaenia associated with acute HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ami; Moro, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Asakawa, Katsuaki; Miura, Satoru; Moriyama, Masato; Tanabe, Yoshinari; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-03-01

    A 23-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe thrombocytopaenia. He had unprotected sexual contact 6 weeks earlier. He was diagnosed with acute HIV infection by means of HIV RNA viral load testing and HIV-associated thrombocytopaenia. Although his thrombocytopaenia improved immediately with short-term dexamethasone therapy, this effect was not sustained after cessation of therapy. Antiretroviral therapy including raltegravir was initiated, and the patient recovered from severe thrombocytopaenia within several days. The findings from this case suggest that acute HIV infection should be suspected with unexplained thrombocytopaenia, and that antiretroviral therapy is the treatment of choice for severe HIV-associated thrombocytopaenia, even when in the early period following acquisition of the virus.

  16. Influenza Virus-Associated Fatal Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: Role of Nonpermissive Viral Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mungaomklang, Anek; Chomcheoy, Jiraruj; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Joyjinda, Yutthana; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Rodpan, Apaporn; Ghai, Siriporn; Saraya, Abhinbhen; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, two unusual peaks of H1N1 influenza outbreak occurred in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, in Thailand. Among 2,406 cases, one of the 22 deaths in the province included a 6-year-old boy, who initially presented with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. On the other hand, his sibling was mildly affected by the same influenza virus strain, confirmed by whole-genome sequencing, with one silent mutation. Absence of acute necrotizing encephalopathy and other neurological illnesses in the family and the whole province, with near identical whole viral genomic sequences from the two siblings, and an absence of concomitant severe lung infection (cytokine storm) at onset suggest nonpermissive infection as an alternative pathogenetic mechanism of influenza virus. PMID:27812294

  17. Acute Abdomen Due to Penicillium marneffei: An Indicator of HIV Infection in Manipur State.

    PubMed

    Ghalige, Hemanth Sureshwara; Sahoo, Biswajeet; Sharma, Sanjeeb; Devi, Khuraijam Ranjana; Singh Th, Sudhir Chandra

    2014-09-01

    Opportunistic infection in HIV disease often present to clinicians in an atypical manner testing clinical acumen. Here, we report a case of Penicilliosis marneffei (PM) infection presenting to surgical emergency as acute abdomen with undiagnosed HIV status in advanced AIDS, chief complaints being prolonged fever and diffuse abdominal pain. Radiologic imaging showed non-specific mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the lymph node was done and subjected to direct microscopy, gram staining and culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar (SDA) which showed Penicillium marneffei. He was then treated with intravenous amphotericin. This case is reported for its rarity and unusual presentation to sensitise clinicians and microbiologists to consider PM as an aetiology in acute abdomen in high risk individuals, more so, in patients from north-east India.

  18. Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Abdullahel

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured. PMID:12764514

  19. [Atypical case of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Krzyźewska-Niedzialek, Aldona; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Borkowski, Piotr K; Ulińska, Magdalena; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a rare manifestation of viral chorioretinitis, accompanied by occlusive vasculitis, which is associated with poor visual prognosis. The main causal factors include varicella-zoster virus in older patients and herpes simplex in younger ones. The disease typically manifests as a reactivation of latent infections. We present a case of a 57-year-old female with atypical clinical manifestation of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary viral infection with herpes simplex. The serology panel of vitreous tap and blood sample confirmed viral aetiology (H. simplex). The initial clinical signs included optic disc edema with retinitis presenting as self-limiting, slowly progressing, peripheral lesions, later followed by uveitis. The antiviral therapy resolved the symptoms of uveitis and enabled healing of retinal lesions, however the natural course of disease was later complicated with retinal detachment. It was successfully treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Despite aggressive treatment, the final visual outcome was unfavourable, due to optic nerve atrophy.

  20. Acute Cerebellar Syndrome in Infectious Mononucleosis: Documentation of Two Cases With Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, David S.; Smitnik, Loretta M.; John, Kuruvilla; Drake, Miles E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia has been described occasionally with infectious mononucleosis. Two additional cases are reported with serologic identification of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. As with previously described cases, the outcome was benign, and examination and laboratory studies did not indicate diffuse neurologic involvement. Visual and brainstem auditory-evoked responses were normal. Electroencephalograms (EEG) demonstrated 14 and 6 per second positive spikes in both patients. This pattern is considered a normal variant and has been recorded from depth electrodes and reported with deep midline lesions. These cases support the prognosis of benign cerebellar involvement in infectious mononucleosis and suggest that evidence of EBV infection be sought in patients with acute ataxia. The significance of 14/sec and 6/sec positive EEG spikes is uncertain. PMID:2987517

  1. Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Infections among Young Febrile Adults Evaluated for Acute HIV-1 Infection in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngoi, Carolyne N.; Price, Matt A.; Fields, Barry; Bonventure, Juma; Ochieng, Caroline; Mwashigadi, Grace; Hassan, Amin S.; Thiong’o, Alexander N.; Micheni, Murugi; Mugo, Peter; Graham, Susan; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is common among patients seeking care in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA), but causes other than malaria are rarely diagnosed. We assessed dengue and chikungunya virus infections among young febrile adults evaluated for acute HIV infection (AHI) and malaria in coastal Kenya. Methods We tested plasma samples obtained in a cross-sectional study from febrile adult patients aged 18–35 years evaluated for AHI and malaria at urgent care seeking at seven health facilities in coastal Kenya in 2014–2015. Dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) were amplified using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. We conducted logistic regression analyses to determine independent predictors of dengue virus infection. Results 489 samples that were negative for both AHI and malaria were tested, of which 43 (8.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.4–11.7) were positive for DENV infection. No participant was positive for CHIKV infection. DENV infections were associated with clinic visits in the rainy season (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.3–6.5) and evaluation at a private health facility (AOR 5.2, 95% CI: 2.0–13.1) or research health facility (AOR = 25.6, 95% CI: 8.9–73.2) instead of a public health facility. Conclusion A high prevalence of DENV infections was found in febrile young adult patients evaluated for AHI. Our data suggests that DENV, along with AHI and malaria, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the adult patient seeking care for fever in coastal Kenya. PMID:27942016

  2. Allergenicity assessment of genetically modified cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistant tomato (Solanum lycopersicon).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Sheu, Fuu; Lin, Hsin-Tang; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2010-02-24

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been identified as the causal agent of several disease epidemics in most countries of the world. Insect-mediated virus diseases, such as those caused by CMV, caused remarkable loss of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) production in Taiwan. With expression of the CMV coat protein gene (Cmvcp) in a local popular tomato cultivar L4783, transgenic tomato line R8 has showed consistent CMV resistance through T(0) to T(8). In this report, the allergenicity of the CMV coat protein (CMV cp) expressed in transgenic tomato R8 was assessed by investigation of the expression of the transgene source of protein, sequence similarity with known allergens, and resistance to pepsin hydrolysis. There is no known account for either the CMV or its coat protein being an allergen. The result of a bioinformatic search also showed no significant homology between CMV cp and any known allergen. The pepsin-susceptible property of recombinant CMV cp was revealed by a simulated gastric fluid (SGF) assay. Following the most recent FAO/WHO decision tree, all results have indicated that CMV cp was a protein with low possibility to be an allergen and the transgenic tomato R8 should be considered as safe as its host.

  3. ["Barking" micturition noise as sign of acute hip-TEP-late infection].

    PubMed

    Weisenstein, D B; Popescu, I-A

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the case of a patient with an acute late infection of the hip prosthesis. At first, complaints in the hip region were in the foreground. Shortly after the revision operation the patient noticed a barking noise during micturition, as sign of a pneumaturia. The following diagnostics showed a perforated sigmoid diverticulitis with a sigmoid-urinary bladder-fistula.

  4. Surveillance for Respiratory Infections, Including Severe Acute Respiratory, Syndrome (SARS), in Cobra Gold 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-10

    to be causal. Respiratory illnesses caused by viruses in the family Coronaviridae have long been recognized.2-13 Two species known to cause human ...tested positive for influenza A, 2 (13%) for coronavirus OC43, 2 (13%) for respiratory syncytial virus , 1 (6%) rhinovirus, 9 and 4 (25%) were...NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SURVEILLANCE FOR RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS , INCLUDING SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (SARS), IN COBRA

  5. Symptomatic Acute Hepatitis C Infection Following a Single Episode of Unprotected Sexual Intercourse

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Bhaskar; Potts, Jonathan; Emmanuel, Julian

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 23-year-old MSM presented with jaundice, systemic upset, and rash 2 months after a single episode of unprotected sexual intercourse. Liver biochemistry was grossly deranged, with markedly elevated transaminases and hyperbilirubinaemia. Serology was positive for genotype 1a hepatitis C virus (HCV) and in the absence of other causes, acute HCV infection was suspected. He was subsequently successfully treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 weeks and made a full clinical and biochemical recovery. PMID:27957361

  6. [Regression of acute Chagas cardiopathy in an infant with a suspected transfusion infection].

    PubMed

    Gónzalez-Zambrano, H; Amador Mena, J E; Delgadillo Jaime, C B

    1999-01-01

    Chagas disease was described in Mexico by Mazzotti in 1940. Post-transfusional cases have not been described. We report proved case of acute chagasic cardiopathy in a nine months old infant with suspected transfusional infection during neonatal period. She was treated with nifurtimox with disappearance of parasites and regression of cardiopathy. She is asymptomatic nine years afterwards with normal growth and negative parasitology and serology.

  7. Brief Report: Autistic Disorder in Three Children with Cytomegalovirus Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeten, Thayne L.; Posey, David J.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research has identified a relationship between autistic disorder (autism) and specific congenital infections. Three cases of congenital or perinatal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring in association with autism are described. Hypothetical mechanisms relating congenital infection, such as CMV, to the development of autism are…

  8. HEV infection as an aetiologic factor for acute hepatitis: experience from a tertiary hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Rahman, Salimur; Khan, Mobin; Karim, Fazal

    2009-02-01

    Acute hepatitis is seen sporadically round the year in Bangladesh. The incidence of acute viral hepatitis E increases after floods as this allows sewerage contamination of piped and groundwater. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the burden of hepatitis E virus (HEV infection) in Bangladesh. Patients attending the Hepatology Unit III of the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, during June 2004-December 2006, were included in the study. All viral markers were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study population was divided in four groups. Group 1 included 144 patients with acute viral hepatitis. The inclusion criteria were: nausea and/or vomiting, loss of appetite, serum bilirubin >200 micromol/L, raised serum transaminases, and prothrombin time >3 seconds prolonged beyond control value. In Group 2, there were 31 pregnant women with acute viral hepatitis. All the patients had prodrome, icterus, raised serum bilirubin and raised serum transaminase levels. Group 3 included 23 patients presenting with fulminant hepatic failure. In Group 4, 69 patients with cirrhosis of liver were included. They presented with features of decompensation for the first time. The inclusion criteria were: patients with established cirrhosis with jaundice and/or ascites and/or hepatic encephalopathy. In Group 1, 58.33% of the 144 patients had acute viral hepatitis E. In Group 2, 45.16% of the pregnant women also had acute viral hepatitis E. HEV was responsible for 56.52% cases of fulminant hepatic failure in Group 3. In 21.7% cases in Group 4, decompensation of cirrhosis was due to HEV. Acute viral hepatitis E in the third trimester of pregnancy and HEV-induced fulminant hepatic failure were associated with 80% of mortality despite the best possible care. In this clinical context, acute viral hepatitis E is the leading cause of wide spectrum of liver disease ranging from severe acute viral hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, to decompensation of liver in

  9. [Morphological changes of the intestine in experimental acute intestinal infection in the treatment of colloidal silver].

    PubMed

    Polov'ian, E S; Chemich, N D; Moskalenko, R A; Romaniuk, A N

    2012-06-01

    At the present stage of infectionist practice in the treatment of acute intestinal infections caused by opportunistic microorganisms, colloidal silver is used with a particle size of 25 nm as an alternative to conventional causal therapy. In 32 rats, distributed in 4 groups of 8 animals each (intact; healthy, got colloidal silver; with a modeled acute intestinal infection in the basic treatment and with the addition of colloidal silver), histological examination was performed of small and large intestine of rats. Oral administration of colloidal silver at a dose of 0.02 mg/day to intact rats did not lead to changes in morphometric parameters compared to the norm, and during early convalescence in rats with acute intestinal infections were observed destructive and compensatory changes in the intestine, which depended on the treatment regimen. With the introduction of colloidal silver decreased activity of the inflammatory process and the severity of morphological changes in tissues of small and large intestine, indicating that the positive effect of study drug compared with baseline therapy.

  10. Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J.; Glockmann, Anja; Fischer, Michael; Riley, David S.; Baars, Erik; Kiene, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Objective Anthroposophic medications (AMED) are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections. Methods A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged ≥1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED. Results Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1) swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2) sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron® 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327) of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715) of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443) of applications. Conclusion In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated. PMID:21901075

  11. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  12. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  13. Expansion of CMV-specific CD8+CD45RA+CD27- T cells in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mackus, Wendelina J M; Frakking, Florine N J; Grummels, Annette; Gamadia, Laila E; De Bree, Godelieve J; Hamann, Dorte; Van Lier, Rene A W; Van Oers, Marinus H J

    2003-08-01

    In patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), the absolute number of T cells is increased. Although it has been suggested that these T cells might be tumor specific, concrete evidence for this hypothesis is lacking. We performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of the T-cell compartment in the peripheral blood of 28 patients with B-CLL (Rai 0, n = 12; Rai I-II, n = 10; Rai III-IV, n = 6) and 12 healthy age-matched controls and measured the ability of these patients to mount specific immune responses. In all Rai stages a significant increase in the absolute numbers of CD3+ cells was observed. Whereas the number of CD4+ cells was not different from controls, patients with B-CLL showed significantly increased relative and absolute numbers of CD8+ cells, which exhibited a CD45RA+CD27- cytotoxic phenotype. Analysis of specific immune responses with tetrameric cytomegalovirus (CMV)-peptide complexes showed that patients with B-CLL had significantly increased numbers of tetramer-binding CMV-specific CD8+ T cells. The rise in the total number of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was evident only in CMV-seropositive B-CLL patients. Thus, our data suggest that in patients with B-CLL the composition of T cells is shifted toward a CD8+ cytotoxic cell type in an effort to control infections with persistent viruses such as CMV. Moreover, they offer an explanation for the high incidence of CMV reactivation in CLL patients treated with T cell-depleting agents, such as the monoclonal antibody (mAb) alemtuzumab (Campath; alpha-CD52 mAb). Furthermore, because in CMV-seronegative patients no increase in cytotoxic CD8+ T cells is found, our studies do not support the hypothesis that tumor-specific T cells account for T-cell expansion in B-CLL.

  14. No strong correlations between serum cytokine levels, CMV serostatus and hand-grip strength in older subjects in the Berlin BASE-II cohort.

    PubMed

    Goldeck, David; Pawelec, Graham; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Oettinger, Lilly; Haehnel, Karin; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    Hand-grip strength is strongly correlated with measures of muscle mass and can be taken to predict morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hand-grip strength and other markers associated with immune ageing, such as Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in the elderly. We have assessed grip strength with the Smedley Dynamometer in younger (22-37 years) and older (60-85 years) men and women in a sample of people living in Berlin (the BASE-II study). Serum cytokine levels were determined by flow-cytometry, CMV serostatus via ELISA and leukocyte telomere length by quantitative PCR. IL-1β levels tended to be negatively associated with grip strength, but we did not find a significant association with IL-6 levels. CMV-seropositivity was not associated with higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, nor with weaker grip strength in men or women at any age. A putative general measure of organismal ageing, overall leukocyte telomere length, was also found not to be associated with lower grip strength in the elderly. Hand-grip strength remains an important biomarker independent of CMV infection or shorter telomere lengths, and poorly reflected in peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, all of which have been associated in some studies with frailty and mortality.

  15. Survey of CMV management in pediatric allogeneic HSCT programs, on behalf of the inborn errors, infectious diseases and pediatric diseases working parties of EBMT.

    PubMed

    Bontant, T; Sedlaçek, P; Balduzzi, A; Gaspar, B; Cesaro, S; Einsele, H; Peters, C; Dalle, J-H

    2014-02-01

    Human CMV infection is a frequent complication after HSC in children with remarkable morbidity and mortality. Antiviral drugs are relatively efficient but have numerous side effects. They are used as prophylactic, pre-emptive or therapeutic medicines. It is still a matter of debate which option is the best strategy. No uniform procedure has emerged regarding these three options, and new immunologic tools have raised more questions for physicians. To assess the current practice in the management of CMV infection, we sent a questionnaire to the EBMT centers performing hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in children. Fifty-six out of 196 responded to the questionnaire (28.5%). Quantitative PCR was the most common monitoring tool (44/56). Only 4/56 centers use the pp65 antigenemia alone. All centers used pre-emptive strategy (56/56). 21/56 centers also used prophylactic measures, 13/21 after analysis of donor/receptor serologic status. Ganciclovir was the most common first-line agent for CMV disease (55/56). The most common dose and duration for induction treatment were 5 mg/kg bid (47/55) for 14 days (20/55). There is no uniform procedure for researching resistance strain, antiviral second-line therapy or cell therapy. A harmonization process should enable sound prospective trials to improve prevention, control and cure of CMV disease in children and adolescents.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis as the Cause of Infectious Infertility: Acute, Repetitive or Persistent Long-Term Infection?

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Larissa; Rupp, Jan

    2016-07-02

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most frequently detected agent of sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Infection of the lower female genital tract (FGT) can cause cervicitis and if ascending to the upper FGT may result in serious sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), salpingitis and tubal factor infertility (TFI). The factors leading to this complication are still not completely understood. We elaborate four different models for host-pathogen interactions in C. trachomatis infections that may promote disease development: (1) acute infection, (2) repeated infections, (3) chronic/persistent infections and (4) non-inflammatory colonization. Whereas experimental data exist for all of these models in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo, we were interested in seeing what clinical evidence we have supporting one or the other model. We particularly focused on data that favour the one or the other model for TFI development in C. trachomatis infection and speculate on future studies that could integrate in vitro findings for a better characterization of the situation in vivo.

  17. Induction of Alternatively Activated Macrophages Enhances Pathogenesis during Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J.; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1−/− mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6−/− double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  18. Induction of alternatively activated macrophages enhances pathogenesis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J; Hennighausen, Lothar; Frieman, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1(-/-) mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6(-/-) double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  19. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi), and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun) to 35% (ileum) at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum) or IgM (duodenum) plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses to other pathogens and

  20. Effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production on pancreatic infection in experimental acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Maria M.; Sampietre, Sandra; Patzina, Rosely; Jukemura, Jose; Cunha, Jose Eduardo M.; Machado, Marcel C.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Acute pancreatitis is one the important causes of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). SIRS results in gut barrier dysfunction that allows bacterial translocation and pancreatic infection to occur. Indomethacin has been used to reduce inflammatory process and bacterial translocation in experimental models. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production on pancreatic infection. Materials and methods. An experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) was utilized. The animals were divided into three groups: sham (surgical procedure without AP induction); pancreatitis (AP induction); and indomethacin (AP induction plus administration of 3 mg/kg of indomethacin). Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, PGE2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured 2 h after the induction of AP. We analyzed the occurrence of pancreatic infection with bacterial cultures performed 24 h after the induction of AP. The occurrence of pancreatic infection (considered positive when the CFU/g was >105), pancreatic histologic analysis, and mortality rate were studied. Results. In spite of the reduction of IL-6, IL-10, and PGE2 levels in the indomethacin group, TNF-α level, bacterial translocation, and pancreatic infection were not influenced by administration of indomethacin. The inhibition of PGE2 production did not reduce pancreatic infection, histologic score, or mortality rate. Conclusion. The inhibition of PGE2 production was not able to reduce the occurrence of pancreatic infection and does not have any beneficial effect in this experimental model. Further investigations will be necessary to discover a specific inhibitor that would make it possible to develop an anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:18345325

  1. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  2. Virological Characteristics of Acute Hepatitis B in Eastern India: Critical Differences with Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Neelakshi; Pal, Ananya; Das, Dipanwita; Saha, Debraj; Biswas, Avik; Bandopadhayay, Bhaswati; Chakraborti, Mandira; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Chakravarty, Runu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) manifests high genetic variability and is classifiable into ten genotypes (A-J). HBV infection can lead to variable clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting acute hepatitis to active chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study characterizes HBV strains circulating among patients with acute (AHB) and chronic HBV infection (CHB). Among a total of 653 HBsAg positive cases, 40 manifested acute infection. After sequencing the surface(S), basal core promoter/pre-core(BCP/PC) and the X gene regions, phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA4 by neighbor-joining method. Statistical robustness was established with bootstrap analysis. Nucleotide diversity was determined by Shannon entropy per site using the Entropy program of the Los Alamos National Laboratories. Analyses of acute patients revealed that HBV/D2 is the major circulating sub-genotype and commonly associated with sexual promiscuity and the age group between15-30 years. Comparison of AHB and CHB patients revealed that HBeAg positivity, ALT levels and genotype D were significantly high in AHB, whereas CHB patients were predominantly male, had a high viral load, and were commonly associated with genotype C. The frequencies of mutations in the S, BCP/PC, and X gene were low in AHB as compared to CHB. Drug resistant mutations were not detectable in the polymerase gene of AHB. Average nucleotide diversity in AHB was considerably low as compared to CHB. Further, the highest average ΔH (average difference in entropy between chronic and acute infection) was observed in the BCP/PC region implying that this region was most vulnerable to mutations upon HBV persistence, especially in case of genotype C. Additionally, among all substitutions, the A1762T and G1764A BCP mutations were the strongest indicators of chronicity. In conclusion, the study exhibits a general portrait of HBV strains circulating among acute hepatitis B patients in Eastern India and their

  3. Plasma pentraxin-3 and coagulation and fibrinolysis variables during acute Puumala hantavirus infection and associated thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Laine, Outi K; Koskela, Sirpa M; Outinen, Tuula K; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Huhtala, Heini; Vaheri, Antti; Hurme, Mikko A; Jylhävä, Juulia; Mäkelä, Satu M; Mustonen, Jukka T

    2014-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia and altered coagulation characterize all hantavirus infections. To further assess the newly discovered predictive biomarkers of disease severity during acute Puumala virus (PUUV) infection, we studied the associations between them and the variables reflecting coagulation, fibrinolysis and endothelial activation. Nineteen hospital-treated patients with serologically confirmed acute PUUV infection were included. Acutely, plasma levels of pentraxin-3 (PTX3), cell-free DNA (cf-DNA), complement components SC5b-9 and C3 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were recorded as well as platelet ligands and markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis. High values of plasma PTX3 associated with thrombin formation (prothrombin fragments F1+2; r = 0.46, P = 0.05), consumption of platelet ligand fibrinogen (r = -0.70, P < 0.001) and natural anticoagulants antithrombin (AT) (r = -0.74, P < 0.001), protein C (r = -0.77, P < 0.001) and protein S free antigen (r = -0.81, P < 0.001) and a decreased endothelial marker ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 domain 13) (r = -0.48, P = 0.04). Plasma level of AT associated with C3 (r = 0.76, P < 0.001), IL-6 (r = -0.56, P = 0.01) and cf-DNA (r = -0.47, P = 0.04). High cf-DNA coincided with increased prothrombin fragments F1+2 (r = 0.47, P = 0.04). Low C3 levels reflecting the activation of complement system through the alternative route predicted loss of all natural anticoagulants (for protein C r = 0.53, P = 0.03 and for protein S free antigen r = 0.64, P = 0.004). Variables depicting altered coagulation follow the new predictive biomarkers of disease severity, especially PTX3, in acute PUUV infection. The findings are consistent with the previous observations of these biomarkers also being predictive for low platelet count and underline the cross-talk of inflammation and coagulation systems in acute PUUV infection.

  4. Genomic and functional analysis of the host response to acute simian varicella infection in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nicole; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Rais, Maham; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Although it is well established that VZV is transmitted via the respiratory route, the host-pathogen interactions during acute VZV infection in the lungs remain poorly understood due to limited access to clinical samples. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we leveraged a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection where rhesus macaques are intrabronchially challenged with the closely related Simian Varicella Virus (SVV). Acute infection is characterized by immune infiltration of the lung airways, a significant up-regulation of genes involved in antiviral-immunity, and a down-regulation of genes involved in lung development. This is followed by a decrease in viral loads and increased expression of genes associated with cell cycle and tissue repair. These data provide the first characterization of the host response required to control varicella virus replication in the lung and provide insight into mechanisms by which VZV infection can cause lung injury in an immune competent host. PMID:27677639

  5. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  6. microRNA function is limited to cytokine control in the acute response to virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Lauren C.; Schmid, Sonja; Sachs, David; Shim, Jaehee V.; Lim, Jean K.; tenOever, Benjamin R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY With the capacity to fine-tune protein expression via sequence-specific interactions, microRNAs (miRNAs) help regulate cell maintenance and differentiation. While some studies have also implicated miRNAs as regulators of the antiviral response, others have found that the RISC complex that facilitates miRNA-mediated silencing is rendered non-functional during cellular stress, including virus infection. To determine the global role of miRNAs in the cellular response to virus infection, we generated a vector that rapidly eliminates total cellular miRNA populations in terminally differentiated primary cultures. Loss of miRNAs has a negligible impact on both innate sensing of and immediate response to acute viral infection. In contrast, miRNA depletion specifically enhances cytokine expression, providing a post-translational mechanism for immune cell activation during cellular stress. This work highlights the physiological role of miRNAs during the antiviral response and suggests their contribution is limited to chronic infections and the acute activation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:26651947

  7. Diet regulates liver autophagy differentially in murine acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Lizardo, Kezia; Almonte, Vanessa; Law, Calvin; Aiyyappan, Janeesh Plakkal; Cui, Min-Hui; Nagajyothi, Jyothi F

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which affects about ten million people in its endemic regions of Latin America. After the initial acute stage of infection, 60-80% of infected individuals remain asymptomatic for several years to a lifetime; however, the rest develop the debilitating symptomatic stage, which affects the nervous system, digestive system, and heart. The challenges of Chagas disease have become global due to immigration. Despite well-documented dietary changes accompanying immigration, as well as a transition to a western style diet in the Chagas endemic regions, the role of host metabolism in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remains underexplored. We have previously used a mouse model to show that host diet is a key factor regulating cardiomyopathy in Chagas disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of a high-fat diet on liver morphology and physiology, lipid metabolism, immune signaling, energy homeostasis, and stress responses in the murine model of acute T. cruzi infection. Our results indicate that in T. cruzi-infected mice, diet differentially regulates several liver processes, including autophagy, a stress response mechanism, with corresponding implications for human Chagas disease patients.

  8. Acute and Chronic Airway Disease After Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus).

    PubMed

    Grieves, Jessica L; Yin, Zhiwei; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-08-01

    Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) generally presents as a mild, upper airway disease in human patients but may cause severe lower airway disease in the very young and very old. Progress toward understanding the mechanisms of RSV pathogenesis has been hampered by a lack of relevant rodent models. Mice, the species most commonly used in RSV research, are resistant to upper respiratory infection and do not recapitulate the pattern of virus spread in the human host. To address the need for better rodent models of RSV infection, we have characterized the acute and chronic pathology of RSV infection of a relatively permissive host, cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). We demonstrate that virus delivered to the upper airway results in widespread RSV replication in the ciliated respiratory epithelial cells of the nasal cavity and, to a lesser extent, of the lung. Although acute inflammation is relatively mild and rapidly eliminated after viral clearance, chronic, eosinophilic lung pathology persists. These data support the use of cotton rats as a robust rodent model of human RSV disease, including the association between RSV pneumonia and subsequent development of allergic asthma.

  9. Acute and Chronic Airway Disease After Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Cotton Rats (Sigmodon hispidus)

    PubMed Central

    Grieves, Jessica L; Yin, Zhiwei; Durbin, Russell K; Durbin, Joan E

    2015-01-01

    Infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) generally presents as a mild, upper airway disease in human patients but may cause severe lower airway disease in the very young and very old. Progress toward understanding the mechanisms of RSV pathogenesis has been hampered by a lack of relevant rodent models. Mice, the species most commonly used in RSV research, are resistant to upper respiratory infection and do not recapitulate the pattern of virus spread in the human host. To address the need for better rodent models of RSV infection, we have characterized the acute and chronic pathology of RSV infection of a relatively permissive host, cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus). We demonstrate that virus delivered to the upper airway results in widespread RSV replication in the ciliated respiratory epithelial cells of the nasal cavity and, to a lesser extent, of the lung. Although acute inflammation is relatively mild and rapidly eliminated after viral clearance, chronic, eosinophilic lung pathology persists. These data support the use of cotton rats as a robust rodent model of human RSV disease, including the association between RSV pneumonia and subsequent development of allergic asthma. PMID:26310461

  10. A compendium of strategies to prevent healthcare-associated infections in acute care hospitals: 2014 updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  11. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates.

    PubMed

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Anderson, Deverick J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Calfee, David P; Dubberke, Erik R; Ellingson, Katherine D; Gerding, Dale N; Haas, Janet P; Kaye, Keith S; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Salgado, Cassandra D; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M; Fishman, Neil O; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2014-08-01

    Since the publication of "A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals" in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS).

  12. [Interaction of the Siberian and Far Eastern subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus in mammals with mixed infection. Competition of the subtypes in acute and inapparent infection].

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, S G; Pogodina, V V; Koliasnikova, N M; Karan', L S; Malenko, G V; Levina, L S

    2011-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of natural tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) populations could reveal the change of TBEV subtypes, the displacement of the Far Eastern (FE) subtype, and its substitution for the Siberian (Sib) subtype. Acute and inapparent mixed infections were studied in Syrian hamsters to understand this phenomenon. The animals were inoculated with the Sib subtype and then with the FE one of TBEV (JQ845440-YaroslavI-Aver-08 and Fj214132-Kemerovo-Phateev-1954 strains). The inapparent form developed more frequently in mixed infection. Viral progeny was genotyped by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and hybridization fluorescence detection using genotype-specific probes. Independent reproduction of strains in the brain gave way to competition. The FE subtype dominated in hamster youngsters with acute infection. The Sib subtype had selective benefits in asymptomatic infection (adult hamsters infected intracerebrally and subcutaneously and youngsters infected subcutaneously). The competition of the subtypes was imperfect.

  13. Coexisting cytomegalovirus infection in immunocompetent patients with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Khee-Siang; Lee, Wen-Ying; Yu, Wen-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, and malignancy receiving chemotherapy or ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive agents. However, CMV colitis is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent hosts. Notably, CMV colitis coexisting with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in apparently healthy individuals has been published in recent years, which could result in high morbidity and mortality. CMV colitis is a rare but possible differential diagnosis in immunocompetent patients with abdominal pain, watery, or especially bloody diarrhea, which could be refractory to standard treatment for CDI. As a characteristic of CDI, however, pseudomembranous colitis may be only caused by CMV infection. Real-time CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for blood and stool samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic strategy to identify CMV infection when treatment of CDI eventually fails to show significant benefits. Quantitative CMV-PCR in mucosal biopsies may increase the diagnostic yield of traditional histopathology. CMV colitis is potentially life-threatening if severe complications occur, such as sepsis secondary to colitis, massive colorectal bleeding, toxic megacolon, and colonic perforation, so that may necessitate pre-emptive antiviral treatment for those who are positive for CMV-PCR in blood and/or stool samples while pending histological diagnosis.

  14. In vivo infection of IgG-containing cells by Jembrana disease virus during acute infection

    SciTech Connect

    Desport, Moira; Tenaya, I.W. Masa; McLachlan, Alexander; McNab, Tegan J.; Rachmat, Judhi; Hartaningsih, Nining; Wilcox, Graham E.

    2009-10-25

    Jembrana disease virus (JDV) is an unusual bovine lentivirus which causes a non-follicular proliferation of lymphocytes, a transient immunosuppression and a delayed humoral response in infected Bali cattle in Indonesia. A double-immunofluorescent labeling method was developed to identify the subset of mononuclear cells in which the viral capsid protein could be detected. Viral antigen was present in pleomorphic centroblast-like cells which were identified as IgG-containing cells, including plasma cells, in lymphoid tissues. There was no evidence of infection of CD3{sup +} T-cells or MAC387{sup +} monocytes in tissues but large vacuolated cells with a macrophage-like morphology in the lung were found to contain viral antigen although they could not be shown conclusively to be infected. The tropism of JDV for mature IgG-containing cells may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of Jembrana disease, the delayed antibody responses and the genetic composition of this atypical lentivirus.

  15. Genetic mechanism associated with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and analysis of effects of the infection on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Zhang, H F; Zhang, X Q; Huang, G L; Huang, H Z; Yu, W W

    2015-10-27

    We aimed to compare the diagnostic value of various detection methods for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, to investigate the genetic mechanism associated with CMV infection in pregnant women, and to analyze the risk of sequelae development in fetuses with CMV infection. A total of 300 participants who had the same immunosuppressive regimen and received preemptive therapy for CMV infection were prospectively enrolled in this study; they included 289 vaccine trial participants. The gB-absorbed CMV IgG assay was performed for each vaccine trial participant. The healthy women were divided into 2 groups, and amniotic fluids were collected from them at 15-18 weeks of gestation to test for CMV seropositivity before conception by using IgM specific antibodies, CMV-DNA, and IgG analysis. In 104 cases, cord blood sera and urine specimens were also collected from the infants and examined. The sensitivity and specificity of immediate-early messenger RNA and pp67 (late) messenger RNA detection by the nucleic acid sequence-based amplification technique was comparable to those of virus isolation and PCR. Furthermore, an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the TLR-2 gene and congenital CMV infection was observed and confirmed. Moreover, CMV infection during early pregnancy has been shown to have a much more severe effect on the pregnancy outcome compared to infection during later stages of pregnancy.

  16. Modeling the Early Events of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yu-Ting; Liao, Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical picture of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and respiratory failure, resembling that of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the events that lead to the recruitment of leukocytes are poorly understood. To study the cellular response in the acute phase of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-host cell interaction, we investigated the induction of chemokines, adhesion molecules, and DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin) by SARS-CoV. Immunohistochemistry revealed neutrophil, macrophage, and CD8 T-cell infiltration in the lung autopsy of a SARS patient who died during the acute phase of illness. Additionally, pneumocytes and macrophages in the patient's lung expressed P-selectin and DC-SIGN. In in vitro study, we showed that the A549 and THP-1 cell lines were susceptible to SARS-CoV. A549 cells produced CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) after interaction with SARS-CoV and expressed P-selectin and VCAM-1. Moreover, SARS-CoV induced THP-1 cells to express CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL8/IL-8, CCL3/MIP-1α, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL4/MIP-1β, and CCL5/RANTES, which attracted neutrophils, monocytes, and activated T cells in a chemotaxis assay. We also demonstrated that DC-SIGN was inducible in THP-1 as well as A549 cells after SARS-CoV infection. Our in vitro experiments modeling infection in humans together with the study of a lung biopsy of a patient who died during the early phase of infection demonstrated that SARS-CoV, through a dynamic interaction with lung epithelial cells and monocytic cells, creates an environment conducive for immune cell migration and accumulation that eventually leads to lung injury. PMID:16501078

  17. Acute parvovirus B19 infection in identical twins unmasking previously unidentified hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Forde, Donall G; Cope, Alison; Stone, Ben

    2014-07-29

    Identical Caucasian male twins, previously fit, presented 1 week apart with short histories of fever and lethargy. The twins were febrile at presentation with profound pancytopaenia and evidence of haemolysis. There was no rash or arthralgia. Both required multiple red cell transfusions. The twins had positive IgM serology for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and parvovirus B19. EBV viral capsid antigen and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen IgGs were also positive however, suggesting past EBV exposure. Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected from peripheral blood PCR; CMV and EBV DNA PCRs were negative. Convalescent serology demonstrated no evolution of the CMV serological response, that is no IgG to CMV developed which implies an initial non-specific polyclonal IgM response. The twins recovered fully over 7 days, the first with a course of prednisolone and the second spontaneously. They were diagnosed with hereditary spherocytosis on convalescent blood films. On further questioning, a family history of hereditary spherocytosis was eventually revealed. The twins' maternal grandmother was known to have the condition asymptomatically. Their mother had prior to this never been tested, but later bloods would reveal a compatible biochemical picture.

  18. Analysis of Serum Th1/Th2 Cytokine Levels in Patients with Acute Mumps Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malaiyan, Jeevan; Ramanan, Padmasani Venkat; Subramaniam, Dinesh; Menon, Thangam

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mumps virus is frequently the causative agent of parotitis. There has been no study on serum cytokine levels of acute mumps parotitis except for a few which document cytokine levels in cerebrospinal fluid of mumps meningitis. It is with this notion, our study aimed to find Th1/Th2 cytokine levels from patients with acute mumps parotitis. Materials and Methods: Concentrations of mumps-specific IgM, mumps, measles, rubella-specific IgG antibody, and Th1/Th2 cytokines, namely interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, and IL-10 were measured simultaneously in serum from 74 patients (42 pediatric and 32 adult cases), 40 healthy subjects (20 pediatric and 20 adults) and in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with mumps virus genotype C which served as the positive control. Statistical significance was analyzed between each group by means of Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test. Results: IgM positivity confirmed acute infection in all 74 patients and of these 67 were vaccinated cases; however, very few of them (10/67) were positive for mumps IgG. We found that IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10 showed a statistically significant increase in both pediatric and adult patients with acute mumps infection when compared to healthy controls and values were comparable to the positive control. Conclusion: The Th1 cells play important roles during the acute phase of mumps parotitis. PMID:27293364

  19. In vivo imaging of bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an acute murine airway infection model.

    PubMed

    Munder, Antje; Wölbeling, Florian; Klockgether, Jens; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging allows the analysis of infectious diseases in small animal models. In this study, an acute airway infection of C3H/HeN mice with luxCDABE transformed Pseudomonas aeruginosa TBCF10839 and an isogenic transposon mutant was followed by optical imaging in vivo. Using the disease-causing dose of 2.0 × 10(6) CFU of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839, subtle luminescence of the lungs was inconsistently visible for the first hour after infection. Conversely, using a 100-fold higher dose of the strongly virulence-attenuated transposon mutant, the robust signal of bioluminescent bacteria increased over 24 h. To monitor murine airway infections with P. aeruginosa in vivo by bioluminescence, one should select an attenuated mutant of a virulent strain or a wild type strain that naturally lacks virulence determinants and/or that has acquired a low virulence persister phenotype by patho-adaptive mutations.

  20. Contribution of viruses, Chlamydia spp. and Mycoplasma pneumoniae to acute respiratory infections in Iranian children.

    PubMed

    Naghipour, Mohammadreza; Cuevas, Luis E; Bakhshinejad, Tahereh; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Noursalehi, Smaeil; Alavy, Ali; Dove, Winifred; Hart, Charles Anthony

    2007-06-01

    The study reports the frequency and clinical presentation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza (Inf V), parainfluenza, adenovirus (Adv), Chlamydia spp. and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Rasht, Iran. Nasopharyngeal aspirates and swabs were collected from 261 children in 2003 and 2004. Pathogens were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), confirmed with sequence analysis. Ninety-three pathogens were detected in 83 children. RSV was present in 39 (15%), Adv in 37 (14%), Inf A in 11 (4%), C. trachomatis in 4 (2%) and M. pneumoniae, in 2 (1%) children. Neither parainfluenza nor metapneumovirus were detected. RSV, Inf A and C. trachomatis were more frequent in children with lower respiratory infections. Adv presented more frequently as upper respiratory infection. All pathogens, except M. pneumoniae, were detected in children with severe pneumonia. Viruses play a significant role in Iranian children with community-acquired ARI.

  1. Cross reactivity of commercial anti-dengue immunoassays in patients with acute Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Felix, Alvina Clara; Souza, Nathalia C Santiago; Figueiredo, Walter M; Costa, Angela A; Inenami, Marta; da Silva, Rosangela M G; Levi, José Eduardo; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Romano, Camila Malta

    2017-02-23

    Several countries have local transmission of multiple arboviruses, in particular, dengue and Zika viruses, which have recently spread through many American countries. Cross reactivity among Flaviviruses is high and present a challenge for accurate identification of the infecting agent. Thus, we evaluated the level of cross reactivity of anti-dengue IgM/G Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) from three manufacturers against 122 serum samples obtained at two time-points from 61 patients with non-dengue confirmed Zika virus infection. All anti-dengue ELISAs cross reacted with serum from patients with acute Zika infection at some level and a worrisome number of seroconversion for dengue IgG and IgM was observed. These findings may impact the interpretation of currently standard criteria for dengue diagnosis in endemic regions.

  2. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  3. Poor Predictive Value of Cytomegalovirus (CMV)–Specific T Cell Assays for the Development of CMV Retinitis in Patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark A.; Tan, Qi Xuan; Girling, Valerie; Poon, C.; Van Natta, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A.; Inokuma, Margaret; Maecker, Holden T.; Bredt, Barry; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined the potential clinical utility of using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)–specific T cell immunoassay to determine the risk of developing new-onset CMV retinitis (CMVR) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods CMV-specific T cell assays were performed by multiparameter flow cytometry using stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells that had been obtained in an observational study 2–6 months before new-onset CMVR was diagnosed in case patients (at a study visit during which a dilated ophthalmologic examination revealed no evidence of CMVR) and at the same study visit in control subjects (matched by absolute CD4+ T cell count at entry) who did not subsequently develop retinitis during 1–6 years of study follow-up. Results There were no significant differences in CMV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cell interferon-γ or interleukin-2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from case patients and control subjects. Although there were trends toward lower percentages and absolute numbers of CMV-specific, cytokine-expressing CD8+ T cells with a “late memory” phenotype (CD27−CD28−) as well as with an “early memory” phenotype (CD27+CD28+CD45RA+) in case patients than in control subjects, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Many studies have reported that CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses distinguish patients with active CMVR (i.e., who lack CMV-protective immunity) from those with inactive CMVR after immune restoration by antiretroviral treatment (i.e., who have CMV-protective immunity). However, the multiple CMV-specific immune responses we measured do not appear to have clinical utility for predicting the risk for patients with AIDS of developing new-onset CMVR with sufficient accuracy to be used in guiding therapeutic management. PMID:18173357

  4. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  5. The Ly49E Receptor Inhibits the Immune Control of Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Filtjens, Jessica; Coltel, Nicolas; Cencig, Sabrina; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Ammel, Els; Van Acker, Aline; Kerre, Tessa; Matthys, Patrick; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi circulates in the blood upon infection and invades various cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK) and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is induced early upon T. cruzi infection and remains elevated until day 20 post-infection. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT) to Ly49E knockout (KO) mice for their control of experimental T. cruzi infection. Our results show that young, i.e., 4- and 6-week-old, Ly49E KO mice control the infection better than WT mice, indicated by a lower parasite load and less cachexia. The beneficial effect of Ly49E depletion is more obvious in 4-week-old male than in female mice and weakens in 8-week-old mice. In young mice, the lower T. cruzi parasitemia in Ly49E KO mice is paralleled by higher IFN-γ production compared to their WT controls. Our data indicate that Ly49E receptor expression inhibits the immune control of T. cruzi infection. This is the first demonstration that the inhibitory Ly49E receptor can interfere with the immune response to a pathogen in vivo. PMID:27891126

  6. Surveillance of Acute Respiratory Infections Using Community-Submitted Symptoms and Specimens for Molecular Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Jennifer; Rowe, Aaron; Brownstein, John S.; Chunara, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    Participatory systems for surveillance of acute respiratory infection give real-time information about infections circulating in the community, yet to-date are limited to self-reported syndromic information only and lacking methods of linking symptom reports to infection types. We developed the GoViral platform to evaluate whether a cohort of lay volunteers could, and would find it useful to, contribute self-reported symptoms online and to compare specimen types for self-collected diagnostic information of sufficient quality for respiratory infection surveillance. Volunteers were recruited, given a kit (collection materials and customized instructions), instructed to report their symptoms weekly, and when sick with cold or flu-like symptoms, requested to collect specimens (saliva and nasal swab). We compared specimen types for respiratory virus detection sensitivity (via polymerase-chain-reaction) and ease of collection. Participants were surveyed to determine receptivity to participating when sick, to receiving information on the type of pathogen causing their infection and types circulating near them. Between December 1 2013 and March 1 2014, 295 participants enrolled in the study and received a kit. Of those who reported symptoms, half (71) collected and sent specimens for analysis. Participants submitted kits on average 2.30 days (95 CI: 1.65 to 2.96) after symptoms began. We found good concordance between nasal and saliva specimens for multiple pathogens, with few discrepancies. Individuals report that saliva collection is easiest and report that receiving information about what pathogen they, and those near them, have is valued and can shape public health behaviors. Community-submitted specimens can be used for the detection of acute respiratory infection with individuals showing receptivity for participating and interest in a real-time picture of respiratory pathogens near them. PMID:26075141

  7. Surveillance of Acute Respiratory Infections Using Community-Submitted Symptoms and Specimens for Molecular Diagnostic Testing.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jennifer; Rowe, Aaron; Brownstein, John S; Chunara, Rumi

    2015-05-27

    Participatory systems for surveillance of acute respiratory infection give real-time information about infections circulating in the community, yet to-date are limited to self-reported syndromic information only and lacking methods of linking symptom reports to infection types. We developed the GoViral platform to evaluate whether a cohort of lay volunteers could, and would find it useful to, contribute self-reported symptoms online and to compare specimen types for self-collected diagnostic information of sufficient quality for respiratory infection surveillance. Volunteers were recruited, given a kit (collection materials and customized instructions), instructed to report their symptoms weekly, and when sick with cold or flu-like symptoms, requested to collect specimens (saliva and nasal swab). We compared specimen types for respiratory virus detection sensitivity (via polymerase-chain-reaction) and ease of collection. Participants were surveyed to determine receptivity to participating when sick, to receiving information on the type of pathogen causing their infection and types circulating near them. Between December 1 2013 and March 1 2014, 295 participants enrolled in the study and received a kit. Of those who reported symptoms, half (71) collected and sent specimens for analysis. Participants submitted kits on average 2.30 days (95 CI: 1.65 to 2.96) after symptoms began. We found good concordance between nasal and saliva specimens for multiple pathogens, with few discrepancies. Individuals report that saliva collection is easiest and report that receiving information about what pathogen they, and those near them, have is valued and can shape public health behaviors. Community-submitted specimens can be used for the detection of acute respiratory infection with individuals showing receptivity for participating and interest in a real-time picture of respiratory pathogens near them.

  8. Acute Infections and Environmental Exposure to Organochlorines in Inuit Infants from Nunavik

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Dewailly, Éric; Muckle, Gina; Vézina, Carole; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Ayotte, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p < 0.05). No association was found when postnatal exposure was considered. These results show a possible association between prenatal exposure to OCs and acute infections early in life in this Inuit population. PMID:15471725

  9. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  10. Ligand Induction of Retinoic Acid Receptors Alters an Acute Infection by Murine Cytomegalovirus†

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Ana; Chandraratna, Roshantha A. S.; LeBlanc, James F.; Ghazal, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Here we report that administration of retinoids can alter the outcome of an acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. We show that a crucial viral control element, the major immediate-early enhancer, can be activated by retinoic acid (RA) via multiple RA-responsive elements (DR2) that bind retinoid X receptor-retinoic acid receptor (RAR) heterodimers with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 15 to 33 nM. Viral growth is dramatically increased upon RA treatment of infected tissue culture cells. Using synthetic retinoid receptor-specific agonists and antagonists, we provide evidence that RAR activation in cells is required for mediating the response of MCMV to RA. Oral administration of RA to infected immunocompetent mice selectively exacerbates an infection by MCMV, while cotreatment with an RAR antagonist protects against the adverse effects of RA on MCMV infection. In conclusion, these chemical genetic experiments provide evidence that an RAR-mediated pathway can modulate in vitro and in vivo infections by MCMV. PMID:9573222

  11. Progress in Treatment of Viral Infections in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moschovi, Maria; Adamaki, Maria; Vlahopoulos, Spiros A.

    2016-01-01

    In children, the most commonly encountered type of leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). An important source of morbidity and mortality in ALL are viral infections. Even though allogeneic transplantations, which are often applied also in ALL, carry a recognized risk for viral infections, there are multiple factors that make ALL patients susceptible to viral infections. The presence of those factors has an influence in the type and severity of infections. Currently available treatment options do not guarantee a positive outcome for every case of viral infection in ALL, without significant side effects. Side effects can have very serious consequences for the ALL patients, which include nephrotoxicity. For this reason a number of strategies for personalized intervention have been already clinically tested, and experimental approaches are being developed. Adoptive immunotherapy, which entails administration of ex vivo grown immune cells to a patient, is a promising approach in general, and for transplant recipients in particular. The ex vivo grown cells are aimed to strengthen the immune response to the virus that has been identified in the patients’ blood and tissue samples. Even though many patients with weakened immune system can benefit from progress in novel approaches, a viral infection still poses a very significant risk for many patients. Therefore, preventive measures and supportive care are very important for ALL patients. PMID:27471584

  12. Tim-3 directly enhances CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jacob V.; Starbeck-Miller, Gabriel; Pham, Nhat-Long L.; Traver, Geri L.; Rothman, Paul B.; Harty, John T.; Colgan, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Tim-3 is a surface molecule expressed throughout the immune system that can mediate both stimulatory and inhibitory effects. Previous studies have provided evidence that Tim-3 functions to enforce CD8 T cell exhaustion, a dysfunctional state associated with chronic stimulation. In contrast, the role of Tim-3 in the regulation of CD8 T cell responses to acute and transient stimulation remains undefined. To address this knowledge gap, we examined how Tim-3 affects CD8 T cell responses to acute Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. Analysis of wild-type (WT) mice infected with LM revealed that Tim-3 was transiently expressed by activated CD8 T cells and was associated primarily with acquisition of an effector phenotype. Comparison of responses to LM by WT and Tim-3 KO mice showed that the absence of Tim-3 significantly reduced the magnitudes of both primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses, which correlated with decreased IFN-γ production and degranulation by Tim-3 KO cells stimulated with peptide antigen ex vivo. To address the T cell-intrinsic role of Tim-3, we analyzed responses to LM infection by WT and Tim-3 KO TCR-transgenic CD8 T cells following adoptive transfer into a shared WT host. In this setting, the accumulation of CD8 T cells and the generation of cytokine-producing cells were significantly reduced by the lack of Tim-3, demonstrating that this molecule has a direct effect on CD8 T cell function. Combined, our results suggest that Tim-3 can mediate a stimulatory effect on CD8 T cell responses to an acute infection. PMID:24567532

  13. [Possible role of cytomegalovirus infection in the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Yonemitsu, Y; Komori, K; Sueishi, K; Sugimachi, K

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the pathogenic role of human cytomegalovirus(CMV) infection in human vascular disease, we first examined the role of CMV immediate early gene (CMV-IE) expression in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. The in vitro IE gene transfer stimulated VSMC proliferation. The in vivo IE gene transfer showed neointimal thickening while the control arteries did not. In the wall of "so-called" inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA), CMV infected cells were more frequently encountered than in that of AA and control cases. CMV infected cells were largely identified as macrophages or fibroblasts, and these cells frequently expressed CMV-IE gene. These findings thus suggest that the persistent expression of CMV-IE gene in the vessel wall may play a role in the vascular cellular responses, including progression of atherosclerosis or vasculitis, in vivo.

  14. Retrospective Multicenter Study on Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections after Appendectomy for Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Giesen, Louis J.X.; van den Boom, Anne Loes; van Rossem, Charles C.; den Hoed, P.T.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) are seen in up to 5% of patients after appendectomy for acute appendicitis. SSI are associated with prolonged hospital stay and increased costs. The aim of this multicenter study was to identify factors associated with SSI after appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Methods Patients who underwent appendectomy for acute appendicitis between June 2014 and January 2015 in 6 teaching hospitals in the southwest of the Netherlands were included. Patient, diagnostic, intra-operative and disease-related factors were collected from the patients' charts. Primary outcome was surgical site infection. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent risk factors for SSI. Results Some 637 patients were included. Forty-two patients developed a SSI. In univariable analysis body temperature >38°C, CRP>65 and complex appendicitis were associated with SSI. After multivariable logistic regression with stepwise backwards elimination, complex appendicitis was significantly associated with SSI (OR 4.09; 95% CI 2.04-8.20). Appendiceal stump closure with a stapler device was inversely correlated with SSI (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.97) Conclusions Complex appendicitis is a risk factor for SSI and warrants close monitoring postoperatively. The use of a stapler device for appendiceal stump closure is associated with a reduced risk of SSI. PMID:27631081

  15. Antibody-dependent infection of human macrophages by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Public health risks associated to infection by human coronaviruses remain considerable and vaccination is a key option for preventing the resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We have previously reported that antibodies elicited by a SARS-CoV vaccine candidate based on recombinant, full-length SARS-CoV Spike-protein trimers, trigger infection of immune cell lines. These observations prompted us to investigate the molecular mechanisms and responses to antibody-mediated infection in human macrophages. Methods We have used primary human immune cells to evaluate their susceptibility to infection by SARS-CoV in the presence of anti-Spike antibodies. Fluorescence microscopy and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were utilized to assess occurrence and consequences of infection. To gain insight into the underlying molecular mechanism, we performed mutational analysis with a series of truncated and chimeric constructs of fragment crystallizable γ receptors (FcγR), which bind antibody-coated pathogens. Results We show here that anti-Spike immune serum increased infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages by replication-competent SARS-CoV as well as Spike-pseudotyped lentiviral particles (SARS-CoVpp). Macrophages infected with SARS-CoV, however, did not support productive replication of the virus. Purified anti-viral IgGs, but not other soluble factor(s) from heat-inactivated mouse immune serum, were sufficient to enhance infection. Antibody-mediated infection was dependent on signaling-competent members of the human FcγRII family, which were shown to confer susceptibility to otherwise naïve ST486 cells, as binding of immune complexes to cell surface FcγRII was necessary but not sufficient to trigger antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. Furthermore, only FcγRII with intact cytoplasmic signaling domains were competent to sustain ADE of SARS-CoVpp infection, thus

  16. Suppression of Swine NK Cell Function During Acute Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infects cloven-hoofed animals and causes an economically devastating disease. This highly acute infection has multiple negative effects on the innate response, presumably contributing to the rapid spread of virus within the host. Understanding the regulation of in...

  17. Proof-of-concept study: profile of circulating micro RNAs in bovine serum harvested during acute and persistent FMDV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expression of 144 distinct bovine microRNAs (miRNAs) was quantified in bovine serum harvested during different phases of infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). There were marked differences in miRNA expression between acute, persistent, and convalescent phases of infection. During acu...

  18. Cytomegalovirus IgG Level and Avidity in Breastfeeding Infants of HIV-Infected Mothers in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Wiener, Jeffrey; Chang, Tiffany S; Dollard, Sheila C; Amin, Minal M; Ellington, Sascha; Kayira, Dumbani; van der Horst, Charles; Jamieson, Denise J

    2015-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is common among infants of HIV-infected mothers in resource-limited settings. We examined the prevalence and timing of infant CMV infection during the first year of life using IgG antibody and avidity among HIV-exposed infants in Malawi and correlated the results with the presence of detectable CMV DNA in the blood. The Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study randomized 2,369 mothers and their infants to maternal antiretrovirals, infant nevirapine, or neither for 28 weeks of breastfeeding, followed by weaning. Stored plasma specimens were tested for CMV IgG and antibody avidity from a random subset of infants who had been previously tested with blood CMV PCR and had available specimens at birth and at 24 and 48 weeks of age. Ninety-four of 127 infants (74.0%) tested at 24 weeks of age had CMV IgG of low or intermediate avidity, signifying primary CMV infections. An additional 22 infants (17.3%) had IgG of high avidity; 19 of them had CMV DNA detected in their blood, indicating infant infections. Taken together, these results show that the estimated prevalence of CMV infection at 24 weeks was 88.9%. By 48 weeks of age, 81.3% of infants had anti-CMV IgG; most of them (70.9%) had IgG of high avidity. The CMV serology and avidity testing, combined with the PCR results, confirmed a high rate of primary CMV infection by 6 months of life among breastfeeding infants of HIV-infected mothers. The CMV PCR in blood detected most, but not all, infant CMV infections.

  19. Signs and Symptoms that Differentiate Acute Sinusitis from Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H.; Colborn, D. Kathleen; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Jeong, Jong H.; Haralam, Mary Ann; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Wald, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Differentiating acute bacterial sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is challenging; 20% to 40% of children diagnosed with acute sinusitis based on clinical criteria likely have an uncomplicated URI. The objective of this study was to determine which signs and symptoms could be used to identify the subgroup of children who meet current clinical criteria for sinusitis but who nevertheless have a viral URI. Methods We obtained sinus radiographs in consecutive children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. We considered the subgroup of children with completely normal sinus radiographs to have an uncomplicated URI despite meeting the clinical diagnostic criteria for sinusitis. We examined the utility of signs and symptoms in identifying children with URI. Results Of 258 children enrolled, 54 (20.9%) children had completely normal radiographs. The absence of green nasal discharge, the absence of disturbed sleep, and mild symptoms were associated with a diagnosis of URI. No physical exam findings were particularly helpful in distinguishing between children with normal vs. abnormal radiographs. Conclusions Among children meeting current criteria for the diagnosis of acute sinusitis, those with mild symptoms are significantly more likely to have a URI than those with severe symptoms. In addition to assessing overall severity of symptoms, practitioners should ask about sleep disturbance and green nasal discharge when assessing children with suspected sinusitis; their absence favors a diagnosis of URI. PMID:23694838

  20. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization.

  1. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  2. A host-based RT-PCR gene expression signature to identify acute respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zaas, Aimee K; Burke, Thomas; Chen, Minhua; McClain, Micah; Nicholson, Bradly; Veldman, Timothy; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Fowler, Vance; Rivers, Emanuel P; Otero, Ronny; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Voora, Deepak; Lucas, Joseph; Hero, Alfred O; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2013-09-18

    Improved ways to diagnose acute respiratory viral infections could decrease inappropriate antibacterial use and serve as a vital triage mechanism in the event of a potential viral pandemic. Measurement of the host response to infection is an alternative to pathogen-based diagnostic testing and may improve diagnostic accuracy. We have developed a host-based assay with a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) platform for classifying respiratory viral infection. We developed the assay using two cohorts experimentally infected with influenza A H3N2/Wisconsin or influenza A H1N1/Brisbane, and validated the assay in a sample of adults presenting to the emergency department with fever (n = 102) and in healthy volunteers (n = 41). Peripheral blood RNA samples were obtained from individuals who underwent experimental viral challenge or who presented to the emergency department and had microbiologically proven viral respiratory infection or systemic bacterial infection. The selected gene set on the RT-PCR TLDA assay classified participants with experimentally induced influenza H3N2 and H1N1 infection with 100 and 87% accuracy, respectively. We validated this host gene expression signature in a cohort of 102 individuals arriving at the emergency department. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR test was 89% [95% confidence interval (CI), 72 to 98%], and the specificity was 94% (95% CI, 86 to 99%). These results show that RT-PCR-based detection of a host gene expression signature can classify individuals with respiratory viral infection and sets the stage for prospective evaluation of this diagnostic approach in a clinical setting.

  3. Measuring T-cell responses against LCV and CMV in cynomolgus macaques using ELISPOT: potential application to non-clinical testing of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kamperschroer, Cris; O'Donnell, Lynn M; Schneider, Patricia A; Li, Dingzhou; Roy, Marc; Coskran, Timothy M; Kawabata, Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    A number of immunomodulatory therapeutics increase the risk of disease associated with latent herpesviruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the lymphocryptovirus (LCV) family that infects humans. The diseases associated with loss of immunity to these viruses can have major impacts on patients as well as on the commercial viability of the immunomodulatory therapeutics. In an effort to develop non-clinical methods for measuring effects on anti-viral immunity, we have developed an interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay to quantify the number of CMV or LCV-reactive T-cells in peripheral blood of cynomolgus macaques. After optimization of various parameters, the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay was characterized for specificity, intra-assay, monkey-to-monkey, and longitudinal variability and sensitivity to immunosuppression. The results show that nearly all animals have detectable responses against both CMV and LCV and responses were derived from T-cells specific to the virus of interest. Analyses of variability show assay reproducibility (≤23% CV), and that variability over time in anti-viral responses in individual animals (larger for LCV than for CMV) was ∼2-fold in most animals over a 3-month time period, which is predicted to allow for detection of drug-induced changes when using group sizes typical of non-clinical studies. In addition, the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay was capable of detecting decreases in the numbers of CMV and LCV reactive T-cells induced by immunosuppressive drugs in vitro. This assay may allow for non-clinical assessment of the effects of immunomodulatory therapeutics on anti-viral T-cell immunity in monkeys, and may help determine if therapeutics increase the risk of reactivating latent viral infections.

  4. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases.

  5. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-01-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases. PMID:27335150

  6. Serum Galectin-9 and Galectin-3-Binding Protein in Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Yao-Hua; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Yen, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-05-27

    Dengue fever is a serious threat for public health and induces various inflammatory cytokines and mediators, including galectins and glycoproteins. Diverse immune responses and immunological pathways are induced in different phases of dengue fever progression. However, the status of serum galectins and glycoproteins is not fully determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum concentration and potential interaction of soluble galectin-1, galectin-3, galectin-9, galectin-3 binding protein (galectin-3BP), glycoprotein 130 (gp130), and E-, L-, and P-selectin in patients with dengue fever in acute febrile phase. In this study, 317 febrile patients (187 dengue patients, 150 non-dengue patients that included 48 patients with bacterial infection and 102 patients with other febrile illness) who presented to the emergency department and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. Our results showed the levels of galectin-9 and galectin-3BP were significantly higher in dengue patients than those in healthy controls. Lower serum levels of galectin-1, galectin-3, and E-, L-, and P-selectin in dengue patients were detected compared to bacteria-infected patients, but not to healthy controls. In addition, strong correlation between galectin-9 and galectin-3BP was observed in dengue patients. In summary, our study suggested galectin-9 and galectin-3BP might be critical inflammatory mediators in acute dengue virus infection.

  7. The Frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis Infections in Patients Diagnosed With Acute Appendicitis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Bilal, Muhammad; Anis, Khurram; Khan, Ali Mahmood; Fatima, Kaneez; Ahmed, Iqbal; Khatri, Ali Mohammad; Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main aim of this study was to determine the frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis infections and other unique histopathological findings in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Materials: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan over a time period of 9 years from 2005 to 2013. The recorded demographic and histopathological data for the 2956 appendectomies performed during this time frame were extracted using a structured template form. Negative and incidental appendectomies were excluded from the study. Results: Out of the 2956 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 84 (2.8%) patients had Enterobius Vermicularis infections. Malignancy (n=2, 0.1%) and infection with Ascaris (n=1, 0.1%) was found very rarely among the patients. Eggs in lumen (n=22, 0.7%), mucinous cystadenoma (n=28, 1.0%), mucocele (n=11, 0.4%), lymphoma (n=9, 0.3%), obstruction in lumen (n=17, 0.6%) and purulent exudate (n=37, 1.3%) were also seldom seen in the histopathological reports. Conclusion: Enterobius Vermicularis manifestation is a rare overall but a leading parasitic cause of appendicitis. Steps such as early diagnosis and regular de worming may help eradicate the need for surgeries. PMID:26156929

  8. [Bocavirus in infants under 5 years with acute respiratory infection. Chaco Province, Argentina, 2014].

    PubMed

    Deluca, Gerardo D; Urquijo, María Cecilia; Passarella, Carolina; Picón, César; Picón, Dimas; Acosta, María; Rovira, Carina; Marín, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent pathology along human life, being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bocavirus (BoV) in infants under 5 years with symptoms of ARI from north Argentina (Chaco province). The study was performed on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 488 patients, in the period of January-December 2014. The samples were tested by real time PCR and 36 positive BoV cases (7.4%) were detected. The period with the highest detection rate was June-September with 28 cases (77.8%), of which 26 (72.2%) were infants between 6-18 moths of life. In half of BoV positive cases this virus was detected as single infection of the upper respiratory tract, and in the remaining 50%, as concomitant infection with other microorganisms. To our knowledge, this would be the first study on molecular epidemiology of BoV in northern Argentina. We emphasize the importance of investigating these new viruses capable of generating acute respiratory disease and also to disseminate awareness on their circulation within the community.

  9. Roseola infantum and other syndromes associated with acute HHV6 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Irving, W L; Chang, J; Raymond, D R; Dunstan, R; Grattan-Smith, P; Cunningham, A L

    1990-01-01

    Eight cases of acute human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV6) infection in infants were diagnosed serologically by the demonstration of IgM anti-HHV6 (8/8) and a significant change in total anti-HHV6 antibody titre (6/8). Four infants were sufficiently ill to require admission to hospital and further investigations: one with encephalitis and three with gross hepatosplenomegaly, two of whom had evidence of simultaneous infection with another herpes-virus. The remaining four infants had an illness compatible with roseola infantum, although this diagnosis had not been made clinically. Sera from two of those infants with rash had been sent for analysis to exclude rubella because the infants' mothers were pregnant. The other two had received antibiotics when febrile, and the subsequent appearance of the roseola rash had raised the possibility of antibiotic allergy. The data suggest that there are clinical syndromes in addition to roseola infantum associated with the presence of IgM anti-HHV6, in which serological screening for evidence of acute HHV6 infection may be useful. PMID:2176778

  10. First case report of an acute genotype 3 hepatitis E infected pregnant woman living in South-Eastern France.

    PubMed

    Anty, R; Ollier, L; Péron, J M; Nicand, E; Cannavo, I; Bongain, A; Giordanengo, V; Tran, A

    2012-05-01

    In European countries, epidemiology of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is not well known. Although, seroprevalence of HEV Immunoglobulin G reached a few percent in European women, no acute hepatitis E during pregnancy has been described so far. Here, we report a case of an autochthonous HEV genotype 3 infection in a 41-years-old pregnant woman living in a non-endemic country. The acute hepatitis had a spontaneous good outcome for the mother and the child. In non-endemic areas where Hepatitis E infections are emerging, unexplained cytolysis, whatever its level, in a pregnant woman could be investigated for HEV, using biological molecular and serology tools.

  11. Benign acute childhood myositis complicating influenza B infection in a boy with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Przychodzień, Joanna; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benign acute childhood myositis (BACM) is an acute complication of an infection characterized by calf pain, limitation of lower limb mobility, an increase in serum creatine kinase, and a self-limiting course. No reports of BACM in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) can be found in the literature. Case report A 5-year-old boy with steroid-sensitive INS presented with fever, leg pain, and problems with walking. Physical examination showed pharyngeal erythema, preserved movements in all joints, and weakness of leg muscles. Laboratory tests showed white blood cell count 3900/µl, albumin 2.3 g/dl, urea 25 mg/dl, creatinine 0.3 mg/dl, increased transaminases (AspAT 440 U/l, AlAT 100 U/l) and creatine kinase (10 817 U/l), and proteinuria 3500 mg/dl. The boy was diagnosed with an INS bout and BACM. Testing for infective causes of myositis showed evidence of an influenza B virus infection. Treatment included prednisone and oseltamivir. A rapid improvement of motor function was observed, with normalization of serum creatine kinase and transaminases, and resolution of proteinuria. Conclusions 1. As influenza virus infection in a child with INS is a risk factor for complications and a disease bout, these patients should be vaccinated against influenza. 2. Differential diagnosis of leg pain and mobility limitation in a child with INS should include lower limb deep venous thrombosis, arthritis, post-infectious neurological complications (including Guillain-Barré syndrome), and BACM. 3. Serum creatine kinase level should be measured in all cases of motor disturbances in a child with symptoms of respiratory tract infection. PMID:27833453

  12. Kinetics of acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii and histopathological changes in the duodenum of rats.

    PubMed

    Trevizan, Aline Rosa; Vicentino-Vieira, Suellen Laís; da Silva Watanabe, Paulo; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; de Melo, Gessilda de Alcântara Nogueira; Garcia, João Luiz; José de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo; Sant'Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii crosses the intestinal barrier to spread into the body. We investigate the intestinal wall and epithelial cells of the duodenum of rats infected with T. gondii during different time points of acute infection. Male Wistar rats, 60 days of age, were assigned into groups that were orally inoculated with 5000 sporulated oocysts T. gondii for 6 h (G6), 12 h (G12), 24 h (G24), 48 h (G48), 72 h (G72), 7 days (G7d), and 10 days (G10d). The control group (CG) received saline. The rats were killed and the duodenum was processed to obtain histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Periodic Acid Schiff, and Alcian blue (pH 2.5 and 1.0). Morphometry was performed on the layers of the intestinal wall and enterocytes, and the number of goblet cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes was counted. The data were compared by ANOVA considering 5% as level of significance. The infection provoked an increase in the width of villi and crypts; decrease in enterocyte height; increase in the smaller-diameter and reduction in the larger-diameter of the enterocytes nuclei, increased number of goblet cells secreting neutral (G6, G12 and G7d) and acidic (G7d and G10d) mucus, and increase in the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (G48). The infected groups showed atrophy of the submucosa and muscular layers and the total wall. Acute infection with T. gondii caused morphological changes in the intestinal wall and epithelial cells of the duodenum in rats.

  13. Prospective Follow-Up of Patients with Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Ximenez, Lia L.; Lauer, Georg M.; zur Wiesch, Julian Schulze; de Sousa, Paulo Sergio Fonseca; Ginuino, Cleber F.; Paranhos-Baccalá, Gláucia; Ulmer, Hanno; Pfeiffer, Karl P.; Goebel, Georg; Pereira, João Luiz; de Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes; Yoshida, Clara Fumiko Tachibana; Lampe, Elisabeth; Velloso, Carlos Eduardo; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Coelho, Henrique Sergio; Almeida, Adilson José; Fernandes, Carlos Augusto; Kim, Arthur Y.; Strasak, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The natural outcome of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies substantially among individuals. However, little is known about host and viral factors associated with a self-limiting or chronic evolution of HCV infection. Methods From 1 January 2001 through 31 December 2008, a consecutive series of 65 patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a well-documented diagnosis of acute HCV infection, acquired via various routes, were enrolled in this study. Patients were prospectively followed up for a median of 40 months after the estimated date of HCV infection with serial measurements of serum alanine aminotransferase, HCV RNA, and anti-HCV antibodies. Spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) was defined as undetectable levels of HCV RNA in serum, in the absence of treatment, for 3 consecutive HCV polymerase chain reaction tests within the first 6 months of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify host and viral predictors of SVC. Results The cumulative rate of SVC was 44.6% (95% confidence interval, 32.3%–57.5%). Compared with chronic HCV evolution, patients with self-limiting disease had significantly lower peak levels of anti-HCV antibodies (median, 109.0 vs 86.7 optical density–to–cutoff ratio [od/co]; P < .02), experienced disease symptoms more frequently (69.4% vs 100%; P < .001), and had lower viral load at first clinical presentation (median, 4.3 vs 0.0 log copies; P =.01). In multivariate analyses, low peak anti-HCV level (<93.5 od/co) was the only independent predictor for SVC; the hazard ratio compared with high anti-HCV levels (≥93.5 od/co) was 2.62 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–6.19; P =.03). Conclusion Our data suggest that low levels of anti-HCV antibodies during the acute phase of HCV infection are independently related to spontaneous viral clearance. PMID:20235831

  14. Acute small fiber neuropathy following Mycoplasma infection: a rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makonahalli, Rohitha; Seneviratne, Janaka; Seneviratne, Udaya

    2014-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a well-described condition involving the peripheral nervous system. The most well-known form of this disease is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Among the different variants of GBS described in the literature, the sensory variant is scantily recognized. There has been a recent attempt to classify the sensory variants of the GBS and bring more objectivity to this diagnostic paradigm. We report a rare sensory variant of GBS presenting with isolated small nerve fiber involvement peripherally in the limbs and associated facial nerve palsy in a patient who had clinical and serological evidence of a preceding Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The symptoms resolved gradually with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This case adds to the growing literature of the rare form of acute small fiber neuropathy and GBS variants.

  15. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  16. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  17. Acute viral respiratory infections among children in MERS-endemic Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F; Garbati, Musa A; Hasan, Rami; AlShahrani, Dayel; Al-Shehri, Mohamed; AlFawaz, Tariq; Hakawi, Ahmed; Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Skakni, Leila

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in Saudi Arabia has intensified focus on Acute Respiratory Infections [ARIs]. This study sought to identify respiratory viruses (RVs) associated with ARIs in children presenting at a tertiary hospital. Children (aged ≤13) presenting with ARI between January 2012 and December 2013 tested for 15 RVs using the Seeplex(R) RV15 kit were retrospectively included. Epidemiological data was retrieved from patient records. Of the 2235 children tested, 61.5% were ≤1 year with a male: female ratio of 3:2. Viruses were detected in 1364 (61.02%) children, 233 (10.4%) having dual infections: these viruses include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (24%), human rhinovirus (hRV) (19.7%), adenovirus (5.7%), influenza virus (5.3%), and parainfluenzavirus-3 (4.6%). Children, aged 9-11 months, were most infected (60.9%). Lower respiratory tract infections (55.4%) were significantly more than upper respiratory tract infection (45.3%) (P < 0.001). Seasonal variation of RV was directly and inversely proportional to relative humidity and temperature, respectively, for non MERS coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, and OC43). The study confirms community-acquired RV associated with ARI in children and suggests modulating roles for abiotic factors in RV epidemiology. However, community-based studies are needed to elucidate how these factors locally influence RV epidemiology. J. Med. Virol. 89:195-201, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, Vanessa; Wong, K. Thong; Looi, R.Y.; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Barrot, Laura; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2009-05-10

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  19. Neutralizing antibody responses in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C infection.

    PubMed

    Gray, E S; Moore, P L; Choge, I A; Decker, J M; Bibollet-Ruche, F; Li, H; Leseka, N; Treurnicht, F; Mlisana, K; Shaw, G M; Karim, S S Abdool; Williamson, C; Morris, L

    2007-06-01

    The study of the evolution and specificities of neutralizing antibodies during the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may be important in the discovery of possible targets for vaccine design. In this study, we assessed the autologous and heterologous neutralization responses of 14 HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals, using envelope clones obtained within the first 2 months postinfection. Our data show that potent but relatively strain-specific neutralizing antibodies develop within 3 to 12 months of HIV-1 infection. The magnitude of this response was associated with shorter V1-to-V5 envelope lengths and fewer glycosylation sites, particularly in the V1-V2 region. Anti-MPER antibodies were detected in 4 of 14 individuals within a year of infection, while antibodies to CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes developed to high titers in 12 participants, in most cases before the development of autologous neutralizing antibodies. However, neither anti-MPER nor anti-CD4i antibody specificity conferred neutralization breadth. These data provide insights into the kinetics, potency, breadth, and epitope specificity of neutralizing antibody responses in acute HIV-1 subtype C infection.

  20. Cross-Sectional Detection of Acute HIV Infection: Timing of Transmission, Inflammation and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia; Dibben, Oliver; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Stacey, Andrea; Mayo, Ashley J.; Norris, Philip J.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Li, Hui; Keele, Brandon F.; Hicks, Charles; Margolis, David; Ferrari, Guido; Haynes, Barton; Swanstrom, Ronald; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Eron, Joseph J.; Borrow, Persephone; Cohen, Myron S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute HIV infection (AHI) is a critical phase of infection when irreparable damage to the immune system occurs and subjects are very infectious. We studied subjects with AHI prospectively to develop better treatment and public health interventions. Methods Cross-sectional screening was employed to detect HIV RNA positive, antibody negative subjects. Date of HIV acquisition was estimated from clinical history and correlated with sequence diversity assessed by single genome amplification (SGA). Twenty-two cytokines/chemokines were measured from enrollment through week 24. Results Thirty-seven AHI subjects were studied. In 7 participants with limited exposure windows, the median exposure to HIV occurred 14 days before symptom onset. Lack of viral sequence diversification confirmed the short duration of infection. Transmission dates estimated by SGA/sequencing using molecular clock models correlated with transmission dates estimated by symptom onset in individuals infected with single HIV variants (mean of 28 versus 33 days). Only 10 of 22 cytokines/chemokines were significantly elevated among AHI participants at enrollment compared to uninfected controls, and only 4 participants remained seronegative at enrollment. Discussion The results emphasize the difficulty in recruiting subjects early in AHI. Viral sequence diversity proved accurate in estimating time of infection. Regardless of aggressive screening, peak viremia and inflammation occurred before enrollment and potential intervention. Given the personal and public health importance, improved AHI detection is urgently needed. PMID:21573003

  1. Acute Q fever infection in Thuringia, Germany, after burial of roe deer fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus): a case report

    PubMed Central

    Schleenvoigt, B.T.; Sprague, L.D.; Mertens, K.; Moog, U.; Schmoock, G.; Wolf, G.; Neumann, M.; Pletz, M.W.; Neubauer, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute Q fever infection after burying two fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus). Recent outbreaks of Q fever in Europe have been traced back to intensive goat breeding units, sheep flocks in the proximity of highly populated urban areas or to farmed deer. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing Q fever infection in a human linked to roe deer as a source of infection. PMID:26566445

  2. Infection with hepatitis A, B, C, and delta viruses among patients with acute hepatitis in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Takahashi, Masaharu; Endo, Kazunori; Buyankhuu, Osorjin; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    One hundred ten consecutive patients (60 males and 50 females; age, mean +/- standard deviation [SD], 22.6 +/- 6.4 years; range 16-48 years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis between December 2004 and January 2005 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus were detected in 18 patients (16.4%), IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc IgM) in 38 patients (34.5%) including two patients with concurrent hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection, and hepatitis C virus RNA in nine patients (8.2%). There were 30 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HDV but were negative for anti-HBc IgM, suggesting that they acquired type D acute hepatitis due to superinfection of HDV on a background of chronic HBV infection. None had IgM antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Consequently, 16.4, 32.7, 6.4, 1.8, and 27.3% of the patients were diagnosed as having acute hepatitis of type A, B, C, type B + D (HBV/HDV coinfection), and type D (superinfection of HDV), respectively. The cause of hepatitis was not known in the remaining 17 patients (15.5%). All 18 HAV isolates were genotyped as IA, all 9 HCV isolates were genotyped as 1b, and all 32 HDV isolates were classified into genotype I. The distribution of HBV genotypes among the 67 HBV isolates was A (1.5%, n = 1) and D (98.5%, n = 66). The present study indicates that de novo infections of HAV, HBV, HCV, and HDV are prevalent among young adults in Mongolia.

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Morphotypes Show a Synchronized Metabolic Pattern after Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Ivo; Lalk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a water and soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. A characteristic feature of this bacterium is the formation of different colony morphologies which can be isolated from environmental samples as well as from clinical samples, but can also be induced in vitro. Previous studies indicate that morphotypes can differ in a number of characteristics such as resistance to oxidative stress, cellular adhesion and intracellular replication. Yet the metabolic features of B. pseudomallei and its different morphotypes have not been examined in detail so far. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the exometabolome of B. pseudomallei morphotypes and the impact of acute infection on their metabolic characteristics. Methods and Principal Findings We applied nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) in a metabolic footprint approach to compare nutrition uptake and metabolite secretion of starvation induced morphotypes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and E8. We observed gluconate production and uptake in all morphotype cultures. Our study also revealed that among all morphotypes amino acids could be classified with regard to their fast and slow consumption. In addition to these shared metabolic features, the morphotypes varied highly in amino acid uptake profiles, secretion of branched chain amino acid metabolites and carbon utilization. After intracellular passage in vitro or murine acute infection in vivo, we observed a switch of the various morphotypes towards a single morphotype and a synchronization of nutrient uptake and metabolite secretion. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides first insights into the basic metabolism of B. pseudomallei and its colony morphotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest, that acute infection leads to the synchronization of B. pseudomallei colony morphology and metabolism through yet unknown host signals and bacterial mechanisms. PMID:26943908

  4. Evaluation of the United States Public Health Service guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after immune recovery in patients with CMV retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Colvin, Ryan; Van Natta, Mark L.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Bardsley, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate US Public Health Service (USPHS) guidelines for discontinuing anti-CMV therapy in patients with AIDS who have immune recovery and quiescent retinitis after initiating highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Design Cohort study of patients with CMV retinitis (Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS). Methods Participants had CMV retinitis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 50 cells/uL or fewer enrolled from 1998 to 2009 who demonstrated sustained immune recovery (two consecutive CD4+ T-cell counts of 100 cells/uL or more at least 6 months apart) and inactive retinitis. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to anti-CMV treatment after immune recover: (1) continued anti-CMV therapy and (2) discontinued therapy. We evaluated survival, visual acuity, and CMV retinitis activity; we employed propensity scores to adjust for confounding factors for these analyses. Results Of 152 participants reviewed, 71 demonstrated immune recovery; 37 of whom discontinued therapy and 34 who continued therapy. At immune recovery, participants continuing therapy tended to be older (44 vs 40 years, P=0.09), have bilateral retinitis (53% vs 32%, P=0.10), and have lower CD4+ T-cell counts (148 vs 207 cells/μL, P<0.001). There were no statistical differences in any of the clinical outcomes (death, retinitis progress, visual acuity or incidence of bilateral retinitis). Both groups lost visual acuity during follow-up, on average 1.2 letters per year (P<0.01). Conclusion Discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after immune recovery did not increase the risk of poor outcomes. These results support the current guidelines for discontinuation of anti-CMV therapy after achievement of sustained immune recovery. PMID:21742304

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  6. Cytomegalovirus-associated acute hydramnios treated by amniocentesis and maternal indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Hattori, Yukio; Kaneko, Saori; Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2009-12-01

    A 22-year-old pregnant woman noticed a rapid increase of abdominal growth, uterine tenderness and irregular contraction, for which she hospitalized at 25 weeks of gestation. An ultrasound examination demonstrated a single fetus with normal anatomy and massive hydramnios. Serial therapeutic amniocentesis was performed for relief of maternal symptoms and indomethacin compress was initiated. Both the maternal and amniotic fluid IgM were positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Maternal compress indomethacin was discontinued at 32 weeks. Cesarean section was performed due to fetal distress at 34 weeks of gestation. A female infant was delivered and the neonatal examination was within normal limits with urine culture positive for CMV. At 1 year of age the child was developing normally with normal hearing and no clinical sequelae of intrauterine CMV infection. We postulate that serial and large volume reduction of amniotic fluid by amniocentesis and compress indomethacin in our case interrupted the natural course and provided sufficient time for the fetus to recover from the acute phase of viral infection.

  7. Acute cervico-facial infection in Scotland 2010: patterns of presentation, patient demographics and recording of systemic involvement.

    PubMed

    Byers, J; Lowe, T; Goodall, C A

    2012-10-01

    Acute bacterial cervicofacial infection is a common problem that is most often secondary to dental infection. Most cases present as localised abscesses but some may be associated with serious morbidity including scarring, embarrassment of the airway, SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), and sepsis syndrome. Fourteen oral surgery or maxillofacial surgery units in Scotland took part in a clinical audit of acute infection during two four-week cycles (August and November) in 2010. Information regarding the patients, signs and symptoms, and management was recorded. Training material was distributed between cycles with information on SIRS, sepsis, and the prescription of antibiotics. Overall, 140 patients presented with acute infection. There was an equal sex distribution and ages ranged from 5 to 87 years. There was an association with deprivation and 36% of patients were from the lowest socioeconomic quintile. Most infections were dental (n=120, 86%), and patients presented with pain and swelling (n=120, 86% and n=134, 96%, respectively) Twenty-three patients (16%) met the criteria for SIRS. A further 23 (16%) had at least one positive SIRS marker with incomplete recording of the remaining markers. Twenty-six patients (19%) had no recorded SIRS markers. Cervicofacial infection can be associated with serious morbidity and mortality, which may be better managed if the systemic signs and symptoms of sepsis are recognised and recorded at presentation. This study showed that the recording of signs of sepsis was variable even with training. Further training of junior staff to recognise severe acute bacterial infection may improve management.

  8. Screening for seemingly healthy newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus infection by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using newborn urine: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Oh-ishi, Tsutomu; Arai, Takashi; Sakata, Hideaki; Adachi, Nodoka; Asanuma, Satoshi; Oguma, Eiji; Kimoto, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Jiro; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Uesato, Tadashi; Fujita, Jutaro; Shirato, Ken; Ohno, Hideki; Kizaki, Takako

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 8–10% of newborns with asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection develop sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). However, the relationship between CMV load, SNHL and central nervous system (CNS) damage in cCMV infection remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the relationship between urinary CMV load, SNHL and CNS damage in newborns with cCMV infection. Study design The study included 23 368 newborns from two maternity hospitals in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. Urine screening for cCMV infection (quantitative real-time PCR) and newborn hearing screening (automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) testing) were conducted within 5 days of birth to examine the incidence of cCMV infection and SNHL, respectively. CNS damage was assessed by MRI of cCMV-infected newborns. Results The incidence of cCMV infection was 60/23 368 (0.257%; 95% CI 0.192% to 0.322%). The geometric mean urinary CMV DNA copy number in newborns with cCMV was 1.79×106 copies/mL (95% CI 7.97×105 to 4.02×106). AABR testing revealed abnormalities in 171 of the 22 229 (0.769%) newborns whose parents approved hearing screening. Of these 171 newborns, 22 had SNHL (12.9%), and 5 of these 22 were infected with cCMV (22.7%). Newborns with both cCMV and SNHL had a higher urinary CMV DNA copy number than newborns with cCMV without SNHL (p=0.036). MRI revealed CNS damage, including white matter abnormalities, in 83.0% of newborns with cCMV. Moreover, newborns with CNS damage had a significantly greater urinary CMV load than newborns without CNS damage (p=0.013). Conclusions We determined the incidence of cCMV infection and urinary CMV DNA copy number in seemingly healthy newborns from two hospitals in Saitama Prefecture. SNHL and CNS damage were associated with urinary CMV DNA copy number. Quantification of urinary CMV load may effectively predict the incidence of late-onset SNHL and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:28110288

  9. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Methawasin, Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment. PMID:27403101

  10. Dynamics of the Cytotoxic T Cell Response to a Model of Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, William S.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Lindau, Paul; Vignali, Marissa; Snyder, Thomas M.; Desmarais, Cindy; Sanders, Catherine; Utsugi, Heidi; Warren, Edus H.; McElrath, Juliana; Makar, Karen W.; Wald, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A detailed characterization of the dynamics and breadth of the immune response to an acute viral infection, as well as the determinants of recruitment to immunological memory, can greatly contribute to our basic understanding of the mechanics of the human immune system and can ultimately guide the design of effective vaccines. In addition to neutralizing antibodies, T cells have been shown to be critical for the effective resolution of acute viral infections. We report the first in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the CD8+ T cell repertoire at the level of individual T cell clonal lineages upon vaccination of human volunteers with a single dose of YF-17D. This live attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine yields sterile, long-term immunity and has been previously used as a model to understand the immune response to a controlled acute viral infection. We identified and enumerated unique CD8+ T cell clones specifically induced by this vaccine through a combined experimental and statistical approach that included high-throughput sequencing of the CDR3 variable region of the T cell receptor β-chain and an algorithm that detected significantly expanded T cell clones. This allowed us to establish that (i) on average, ∼2,000 CD8+ T cell clones were induced by YF-17D, (ii) 5 to 6% of the responding clones were recruited to long-term memory 3 months postvaccination, (iii) the most highly expanded effector clones were preferentially recruited to the memory compartment, and (iv) a fraction of the YF-17D-induced clones could be identified from peripheral blood lymphocytes solely by measuring clonal expansion. IMPORTANCE The exhaustive investigation of pathogen-induced effector T cells is essential to accurately quantify the dynamics of the human immune response. The yellow fever vaccine (YFV) has been broadly used as a model to understand how a controlled, self-resolving acute viral infection induces an effective and long-term protective immune response. Here, we

  11. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H.; Bouyer, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11–12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14–19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  12. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role.

  13. Adjuvant and salvage therapy with leflunomide for recalcitrant cytomegalovirus infections in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: A case series.

    PubMed

    El Chaer, Firas; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Shah, Dimpy; Oliver, Nora; Wang, Emily; Jan, Anna; Doan, Vi; Tverdek, Frank; Tayar, Jean; Ariza-Heredia, Ella; Chemaly, Roy F

    2016-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation is a clinically significant complication in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Alternative therapy for multidrug-resistant CMV is limited and often fails. Leflunomide has been used to treat resistant CMV infections, however, data on efficacy, safety, and guidance for therapeutic drug level monitoring are lacking. In this report, we describe 3 HCT recipients with multi-drug resistant CMV infections who received leflunomide as adjuvant and salvage therapy. The therapeutic effect of leflunomide as an anti-CMV agent based on virologic responses and therapeutic drug monitoring were evaluated.

  14. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and thrombocytopenia following Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Dabbagh, Omar; Al-Muhaizae, Muhammad; Dhalaan, Hesham; Chedrawi, Aziza

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes a broad spectrum of disease in humans with several clinical syndromes and is ubiquitous, infecting more than 95% of the world's population. Central Nervous System (CNS) disease alone associated with Epstein-Barr virus rarely occurs in previously healthy individuals. Systemic viral illness in children and complications are rare, but may occur. In few cases, it is associated with a variety of CNS and hematological complications like acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, transverse myelitis, neuropsychiatric syndrome, GBS, autoimmune thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia and they usually respond to immunotherapy. We report previously healthy boy, who presented with left sided weakness, headache and thrombocytopenia following EBV infection. The thrombocytopenia was resistant to intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone but responded well to Rituximab.

  16. Value of serological tests in the diagnosis of viral acute respiratory infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Căruntu, F; Dogaru, D; Stefan, D; Căruntu, V; Angelescu, C; Streinu-Cercel, A; Colţan, G; Petrescu, A L; Tarţă, D; Bârnaure, F

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the antibody response to influenza viruses A (H1N1), A (H3N2) and B, to parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, 3, to adenoviruses and respiratory syncytial virus was studied in paired serum samples collected from 110 patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and in 40 patients suffering from other diseases. Rises in serum antibody titers to 1--5 of the above mentioned antigens were detected in many of the patients of both groups. The fact is most likely due to the presence of some epidemiologically and clinically uncharacteristic viral ARI (influenza included); simultaneous or successive infections with influenza virus and different other viruses were very frequent. A greater efficiency of the etiological diagnosis of viral ARI can be achieved only by the association of epidemiological and clinical criteria with serological data, the visualization of viral antigens and virus isolation.

  17. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  18. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  19. Metagenomic analysis of bloodstream infections in patients with acute leukemia and therapy-induced neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmati, P.; Kjellander, C.; Aust, C.; Song, Y.; Öhrmalm, L.; Giske, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic patients are often immunocompromised due to underlying conditions, comorbidities and the effects of chemotherapy, and thus at risk for developing systemic infections. Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a severe complication in neutropenic patients, and is associated with increased mortality. BSI is routinely diagnosed with blood culture, which only detects culturable pathogens. We analyzed 27 blood samples from 9 patients with acute leukemia and suspected BSI at different time points of their antimicrobial treatment using shotgun metagenomics sequencing in order to detect unculturable and non-bacterial pathogens. Our findings confirm the presence of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens alongside antimicrobial resistance genes. Decreased white blood cell (WBC) counts were associated with the presence of microbial DNA, and was inversely proportional to the number of sequencing reads. This study could indicate the use of high-throughput sequencing for personalized antimicrobial treatments in BSIs. PMID:26996149

  20. Infection of cultured intestinal epithelial cells with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, J; Hoever, G; Morgenstern, B; Preiser, W; Vogel, J-U; Hofmann, W-K; Bauer, G; Michaelis, M; Rabenau, H F; Doerr, H W

    2004-08-01

    To identify a model for the study of intestinal pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) we tested the sensitivity of six human intestinal epithelial cell lines to infection with SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In permissive cell lines, effects of SARS-CoV on cellular gene expression were analysed using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Caco-2 and CL-14 cell lines were found to be highly permissive to SARS-CoV, due to the presence of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 as a functional receptor. In both cell lines, SARS-CoV infection deregulated expression of cellular genes which may be important for the intestinal pathogenesis of SARS.

  1. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Antonella C.; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection. PMID:28253319

  2. CT of acute perianal abscesses and infected fistulae: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Khati, Nadia J; Sondel Lewis, Nicole; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Obias, Vincent; Zeman, Robert K; Hill, Michael C

    2015-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an effective, readily available diagnostic imaging tool for evaluation of the emergency room (ER) patients with the clinical suspicion of perianal abscess and/or infected fistulous tract (anorectal sepsis). These patients usually present with perineal pain, fever, and leukocytosis. The diagnosis can be easy if the fistulous tract or abscess is visible on inspection of the perianal skin. If the tract or abscess is deep, then the clinical diagnosis can be difficult. Also, the presence of complex tracts or supralevator extension of the infection cannot be judged by external examination alone. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging test to accurately detect fistulous tracts, especially when they are complex (Omally et al. in AJR 199:W43-W53, 2012). However, in the acute setting in the ER, this imaging modality is not always immediately available. Endorectal ultrasound has also been used to identify perianal abscesses, but this modality requires hands-on expertise and can have difficulty localizing the offending fistulous tract. It may also require the use of a rectal probe, which the patient may not be able to tolerate. Contrast-enhanced CT is a very useful tool to diagnose anorectal sepsis; however, this has not received much attention in the recent literature (Yousem et al. in Radiology 167(2):331-334, 1988) aside from a paper describing CT imaging following fistulography (Liang et al. in Clin Imaging 37(6):1069-1076, 2013). An infected fistula is indicated by a fluid-/air-filled soft tissue tract surrounded by inflammation. A well-defined round to oval-shaped fluid/air collection is indicative of an abscess. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the usefulness of contrast-enhanced CT in the diagnosis of acute anorectal sepsis in the ER setting. We will discuss the CT appearance of infected fistulous tracts and abscesses and how CT imaging can guide the ER physician in the clinical management of these patients.

  3. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases. PMID:27433800

  4. Analysis of the Molecular Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Symptomatic Acute Infections in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María Belén; Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; González López Ledesma, María Mora; Perez, Paula Soledad; Bouzas, María Belén; Galdame, Omar; Marciano, Sebastián; Fainboim, Hugo; Flichman, Diego Martín; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a globally distributed human pathogen that leads to both self-limited and chronic infections. At least eight genotypes (A-H) with distinct geographical allocations and phylodynamic behaviors have been described. They differ substantially in many virological and probably some clinical parameters. The aim of this study was to analyze full-length HBV genome sequences from individuals with symptomatic acute HBV infections using phylogenetic and coalescent methods. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in the following subgenotype distribution: F1b (52.7%), A2 (18.2%), F4 (18.2%) and A1, B2, D3 and F2a 1.8% each. These results contrast with those previously reported from chronic infections, where subgenotypes F1b, F4, A2 and genotype D were evenly distributed. This differential distribution might be related to recent internal migrations and/or intrinsic biological features of each viral genotype that could impact on the probability of transmission. The coalescence analysis showed that after a diversification process started in the 80s, the current sequences of subgenotype F1b were grouped in at least four highly supported lineages, whereas subgenotype F4 revealed a more limited diversification pattern with most lineages without offspring in the present. In addition, the genetic characterization of the studied sequences showed that only two of them presented mutations of clinical relevance at S codifyng region and none at the polymerase catalytic domains. Finally, since the acute infections could be an expression of the genotypes currently being transmitted to new hosts, the predominance of subgenotype F1b might have epidemiological, as well as, clinical relevance due to its potential adverse disease outcome among the chronic cases.

  5. An evaluation of the sensitivity of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background World Health Organization (WHO) targets for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, including the notification of a minimum rate of AFP among children, are used to assess the adequacy of AFP surveillance for the detection of poliovirus infection. Sensitive surveillance for poliovirus infection in both developed and developing countries is essential to support global disease eradication efforts. We applied recently developed methods for the quantitative evaluation of disease surveillance systems to evaluate the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia. Methods A scenario tree model which accounted for administrative region, age, population immunity, the likelihood of AFP, and the probability of notification and stool sampling was used to assess the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for wild poliovirus infection among children aged less than 15 years in Australia. The analysis was based on historical surveillance data collected between 2000 and 2005. We used a surveillance time period of one month, and evaluated the ability of the surveillance system to detect poliovirus infection at a prevalence of 1 case per 100 000 persons and 1 case per million persons. Results There was considerable variation in the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection among Australian States and Territories. The estimated median sensitivity of AFP surveillance in Australia among children aged less than 15 years was 8.2% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 population, and 0.9% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per million population. The probability that Australia is free from poliovirus infection given negative surveillance findings following 5 years of continuous surveillance was 96.9% at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 persons and 56.5% at a prevalence of 1 case per million persons. Conclusion Given the ongoing risk of poliovirus importation prior to global eradication, long term surveillance is required to provide

  6. Bench-to-bedside review: Rare and common viral infections in the intensive care unit – linking pathophysiology to clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Harper, Richart W; Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Viral infections are common causes of respiratory tract disease in the outpatient setting but much less common in the intensive care unit. However, a finite number of viral agents cause respiratory tract disease in the intensive care unit. Some viruses, such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are relatively common. Others, such as adenovirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus, Hantavirus, and the viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs), are rare but have an immense public health impact. Recognizing these viral etiologies becomes paramount in treatment, infection control, and public health measures. Therefore, a basic understanding of the pathogenesis of viral entry, replication, and host response is important for clinical diagnosis and initiating therapeutic options. This review discusses the basic pathophysiology leading to clinical presentations in a few common and rare, but important, viruses found in the intensive care unit: influenza, RSV, SARS, VZV, adenovirus, CMV, VHF, and Hantavirus. PMID:18671826

  7. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Relapse in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Survived to Day 100 after Transplantation: The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Transplantation-related Complication Working Group.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Katsuto; Nishida, Tetsuya; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Oshima, Kumi; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Kanamori, Heiwa; Miyamura, Koichi; Kato, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Naoki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Morishima, Yasuo; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2015-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major infectious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recently, it was reported that CMV reactivation is associated with a decreased risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of early CMV reactivation on the incidence of disease relapse after allo-HSCT in a large cohort of patients. The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation's Transplantation-Related Complication Working Group retrospectively surveyed the database of the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program at the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Patients with AML (n = 1836), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 911), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 223), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n = 569) who underwent their first allo-HSCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors between 2000 and 2009 and who survived without disease relapse until day 100 after transplantation were analyzed. Patients who received umbilical cord blood transplantation were not included. Patients underwent surveillance by pp65 antigenemia from the time of engraftment, and the beginning of preemptive therapy was defined as CMV reactivation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the risk factors of relapse, nonrelapse, and overall mortality. CMV reactivation and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were evaluated as time-dependent covariates. CMV reactivation was associated with a decreased incidence of relapse in patients with AML (20.3% versus 26.4%, P = .027), but not in patients with ALL, CML, or MDS. Among 1836 patients with AML, CMV reactivation occurred in 795 patients (43.3%) at a median of 42 days, and 436 patients (23.7%) relapsed at a median of 221 days after allo-HSCT. Acute GVHD grades II to IV developed in 630 patients (34.3%). By multivariate analysis considering competing risk factors, 3

  8. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  9. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic military conscripts during a non-epidemic period.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, R; Bloigu, A; Paldanius, M; Peitso, A; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, S; Harju, T; Leinonen, M; Saikku, P

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory tract infections were studied in 512 male military conscripts (123 asthmatic and 389 non-asthmatic) taking part in 180-day service between July 2004 and July 2005 in Kajaani, Finland. Respiratory tract infections requiring a medical consultation were analysed prospectively. At baseline, at end of service, and during each episode of respiratory infection, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C. pneumoniae antibodies. Data concerning the clinical features of each infection episode were collected. Serological evidence of acute C. pneumoniae infection was found in 34 of the 512 conscripts with antibody data available, including 9.8% of the asthmatic subjects and 5.7% of the non-asthmatic subjects (p 0.111). A serological diagnosis could be made for 25 clinical episodes in 24 conscripts. The spectrum of respiratory tract infections included 13 episodes of mild upper respiratory tract infection and seven episodes of sinusitis, with five episodes involving asthma exacerbation. Two of three pneumonias were primary infections. Primary infections were diagnosed in five subjects, and re-infection/reactivation in 19 subjects, with the latter comprising 12 non-asthmatic subjects and seven asthmatic subjects (p 0.180). Prolonged infections were present in six asthmatic subjects and one non-asthmatic subject (p 0.001). A wide variety of respiratory tract infections, ranging from common cold to pneumonia, were associated with serologically confirmed C. pneumoniae infections. Infections were often mild, with common cold and sinusitis being the most common manifestations. Acute, rapidly resolved C. pneumoniae infections were equally common among asthmatic subjects and non-asthmatic subjects, whereas prolonged infections were more common among subjects with asthma.

  10. Cervical shedding of cytomegalovirus in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected women.

    PubMed

    Mostad, S B; Kreiss, J K; Ryncarz, A J; Overbaugh, J; Mandaliya, K; Chohan, B; Ndinya-Achola, J; Bwayo, J J; Corey, L

    1999-12-01

    Cervical shedding of cytomegalovirus (CMV) is important in transmission of CMV to exposed sexual partners and neonates. We evaluated prevalence and correlates of CMV DNA shedding in cervical secretions from a large cohort of HIV-1-seropositive women. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, CMV DNA was detected in 183 (59%) cervical swab samples from 311 women. Cervical shedding of CMV DNA was significantly associated with shedding of HIV-1 DNA (odds ratio 1.8; 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.8). CMV shedding was also more frequent in women with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis infections, but these associations were not statistically significant. Cervical shedding of CMV in HIV-1-infected women is very frequent and may reflect higher risk of transmission to sexual partners and neonates than previously appreciated.

  11. The role of chemokines in acute and chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Stephen; Dempsey, Eugene; Long, Aideen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C imposes a significant burden on global healthcare. Chronic infection is associated with progressive inflammation of the liver which typically manifests in cirrhosis, organ failure and cancer. By virtue of elaborate evasion strategies, hepatitis C virus (HCV) succeeds as a persistent human virus. It has an extraordinary capacity to subvert the immune response enabling it to establish chronic infections and associated liver disease. Chemokines are low molecular weight chemotactic peptides that mediate the recruitment of inflammatory cells into tissues and back into the lymphatics and peripheral blood. Thus, they are central to the temporal and spatial distribution of effector and regulatory immune cells. The interactions between chemokines and their cognate receptors help shape the immune response and therefore, have a major influence on the outcome of infection. However, chemokines represent a target for modulation by viruses including the HCV. HCV is known to modulate chemokine expression in vitro and may therefore enable its survival by subverting the immune response in vivo through altered leukocyte chemotaxis resulting in impaired viral clearance and the establishment of chronic low-grade inflammation. In this review, the roles of chemokines in acute and chronic HCV infection are described with a particular emphasis placed on chemokine modulation as a means of immune subversion. We provide an in depth discussion of the part played by chemokines in mediating hepatic fibrosis while addressing the potential applications for these chemoattractants in prognostic medicine.

  12. Nosocomial infections in acute leukemia: comparison between younger and elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Leoni, Franco; Longo, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    The progressive decline in immune functions render elderly individuals more susceptible to infections than younger patients. To evaluate potential age-related differences in nosocomial infections between younger (<60 yr) and elderly (> or =60 yr) patients with acute leukemia, we retrospectively reviewed 161 consecutive febrile episodes. All neutropenic patients with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) less than 500/microl were examined during the different phases of intensive chemotherapy and hospitalized until fever and neutropenia resolved. Fever was recorded in 66% of younger and in 64% of elderly patients and occurred respectively in 45% and in 51% during induction, in 32% and in 36% during consolidation, in 23% and in 13% during relapse/refractory treatment (P=0.01). A central venous catheter (CVC) was present in 68% and in 42% of patients (P=0.001). Febrile episodes during severe neutropenia with ANC <100/microl were recorded in 47% and in 22% respectively, during neutropenia with ANC >100/microl in 53% and in 78% respectively (P=0.002). No significant difference was documented in the overall incidence of infections, type of febrile episodes, nosocomial pattern, defervescence-time, median duration of antimicrobic therapy and in overall outcome. Elderly patients do not seem to be more susceptible to infections than younger ones, although the lower frequency of some risk factors must be taken into account.

  13. Acute-phase protein behavior in dairy cattle herd naturally infected with Trypanosoma vivax.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Paulo Henrique; Fidelis Junior, Otavio Luiz; Marques, Luiz Carlos; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Barnabé, Patrícia de Athayde; André, Marcos Rogério; Balbuena, Tiago Santana; Cadioli, Fabiano Antonio

    2015-07-30

    Trypanosoma vivax is a hemoprotozoon that causes disease in cattle and is difficult to diagnose. The host-parasite relationship in cattle that are infected by T. vivax has only been poorly studied. In the present study, a total of 429 serum proteinograms were produced from naturally infected animals (NIF) and were compared with 50 samples from control animals (C). The total protein, IgA band, complement C3 β chain band, albumin band, antitrypsin band, IgG band, haptoglobin band, complement C3c α chain band and protein HP-20 band presented higher levels in the serum proteinograms of the NIF group. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, α2-macroglobulin, complement C6, ceruloplasmin, transferrin band and apolipoprotein A1 band presented lower levels in this group. There was no significant difference (p<0.05) in acid glycoprotein serum concentration between the NIF and C groups. Acute phase proteins may be useful for understanding the host-parasite relationship, since the antitrypsin band was only present in the NIF group. This can be used as an indicator for infection in cattle that are naturally infected by T. vivax.

  14. Role of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Varma-Basil, Mandira; Dwivedi, Shailendra K D; Kumar, Krishna; Pathak, Rakesh; Rastogi, Ritika; Thukral, S S; Shariff, Malini; Vijayan, V K; Chhabra, Sunil K; Chaudhary, Rama

    2009-03-01

    Eighty per cent of the cases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) have an infective aetiology, atypical bacteria including Mycoplasma pneumoniae accounting for 5-10 % of these. However, the importance of association of M. pneumoniae with episodes of AECOPD still remains doubtful. The present study was therefore undertaken to delineate the extent of involvement of M. pneumoniae in patients with AECOPD at a referral hospital in Delhi, India. Sputum samples and throat swabs from a total of 100 AECOPD patients attending the Clinical Research Center of Vallabhbhai Patel Chest Institute, Delhi, were collected during a 2-year period (January 2004-June 2006). The samples were investigated for the presence of aerobic bacterial pathogens and M. pneumoniae. Diagnosis of infection with M. pneumoniae was based on culture, serology, direct detection of M. pneumoniae specific antigen and PCR. Bacterial aetiology could be established in 16 of the 100 samples studied. Pseudomonas spp. were recovered from eight cases, Streptococcus pneumoniae from four and Klebsiella spp. from two cases. Acinetobacter sp. and Moraxella catarrhalis were isolated from one case each. Serological evidence of M. pneumoniae infection and/or detection of M. pneumoniae specific antigen were seen in 16 % of the cases. One case with definite evidence of M. pneumoniae infection also had coinfection with Pseudomonas spp. However, no direct evidence of M. pneumoniae infection was found in our study population as defined by culture isolation or PCR. In conclusion, although the serological prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection in our study population was significantly higher than in the control group, there was no direct evidence of it playing a role in AECOPD.