Science.gov

Sample records for acute community-acquired bacterial

  1. [Case report: Löffler's syndrome due to Ascaris lumbricoides mimicking acute bacterial community--acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Acar, Ali; Oncül, Oral; Cavuşlu, Saban; Okutan, Oğuzhan; Kartaloğlu, Zafer

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a patient with Loeffler's syndrome caused by Ascaris lumbricoides who presented with the clinical findings of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Our patient, who was twenty-five years old, and who had had symptoms such as coughing, expectorating, dyspnea and fever for approximately ten days, was hospitalized. We auscultated polyphonic rhonchuses at the both hemithoraxes. A chest X-ray revealed bilateral lower zone patch consolidation. Acute bacterial community acquired pneumonia (CAP) was diagnosed due to these findings and empirical antibiotic treatment was begun. Repeated sputum Gram stains were negative, and both sputum and blood cultures were sterile. A sputum smear was negative for acid-fast bacilli. The patient's fever and respiratory complaint did not respond to the empirical antibiotics therapy. During the course of advanced investigations, we measured peripheric eosinophilia, and high levels of total Eo and total IgE, and observed Ascaris lumbricoides eggs during stool examination. The patient was given a diagnosis of Loeffler's syndrome. Thereupon the patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazol 400 mg. In conclusion, we suggest that Loeffler's syndrome must be considered early in the differential diagnosis for CAP when peripheric eosinophilia is seen in patients if they live in an endemic area for parasitic disease. PMID:19851973

  2. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  3. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  4. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  5. Ceftaroline fosamil as first-line versus second-line treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP).

    PubMed

    Guervil, David J; Kaye, Keith S; Hassoun, Ali; Cole, Phillip; Huang, Xing-Yue; Friedland, H David

    2016-06-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter registry study of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data for this analysis were collected between August 2011 and February 2013 at US study centres by randomly ordered chart review. Clinical success rates among ABSSSI patients were >81% when ceftaroline fosamil was used as first- or second-line therapy, including monotherapy and concurrent therapy. Among CABP patients, clinical success rates were >77% among first-line and second-line patients and patients who received first-line concurrent therapy or second line monotherapy or concurrent therapy. For CABP patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil as first-line monotherapy, the clinical success rate was 70%. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for patients with ABSSSI or CABP with similar clinical success rates when used as first-line or second-line treatment. PMID:25817579

  6. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  7. Acute community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia in a presumed immunocompetent host

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Varun; Rajagopalan, Natarajan; C, Shivaprasad; Patil, Mahantesh; Varghese, Jaicob

    2012-01-01

    Infection from Aspergillus results in a wide range of diseases from simple Aspergillus pneumonia to fatal invasive Aspergillosis. Though the fungus is known to predominantly affect the immunocompromised host, it has also been known to cause acute pneumonia in immunocompetent hosts which is invariably fatal. It presents as an acute pneumonia with bilateral chest infiltrates on radiograph. Early clinical suspicion and microbiological identification by measures such as broncho alveolar lavage and initiation of therapy with voricanozole significantly increase the chances of survival. In this article the authors discuss a case of acute community acquired Aspergillus pneumonia in an immunocompetent host who survived due to early identification and prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal medication. PMID:22605848

  8. [Indication of neuro-imaging for the initial management and the follow-up of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Béquet, D; de Broucker, T

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar puncture is the best way to prove bacterial meningitis. It should be performed without any delay if the diagnosis is suspected. Herniation is a rare complication of LP. CT is normal in most cases of purulent meningitis, including those complicated by a subsequent herniation; normal CT results does not mean that performing a LP is safe. Three main clinical features can help determine which patient is at risk of herniation and should have a CT before LP. This risk has to be determined rapidly in the emergency ward while assessing anamnestic data, localization signs or symptoms, and level of consciousness. Cranial imaging (mainly MRI) is useful in the course of bacterial meningitis. Patients who do not respond well to treatment or with atypical presentation, persistence of fever, or new neurological signs should undergo brain imaging; MRI and CT may identify subdural effusions, brain abscesses, empyemas, hydrocephaly, or brain parenchymal changes (cerebritis, infarction, hemorrhage). CT and MRI are useful to screen for an ENT cause of bacterial meningitis, and mandatory in case of pneumococcal meningitis. Numerous MRI sequences are useful to identify bacterial meningitis complications: SE T1 without and with gadolinium injection, SE T2, FLAIR, gradient-echo T2, diffusion weighted imaging, MR angiography. PMID:19398288

  9. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Julian J; Martin, Stanley I

    2012-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin β-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent. PMID:22547933

  10. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001). Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  11. Aetiology of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in hospitalised adults: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Andreas; Stark, Klaus; Kunkel, Jan; Schreier, Eckart; Ignatius, Ralf; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Werber, Dirk; Göbel, Ulf B; Zeitz, Martin; Schneider, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background The aetiology of severe gastroenteritis leading to hospitalisation in adults frequently remains unclear. Our objective was to study the causes and characteristics of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in adult hospitalized patients to support the clinical management of these patients. Methods From August 2005 to August 2007, we conducted a prospective cohort study among patients ≥18 y hospitalized with community-acquired gastroenteritis in a university hospital in Berlin, Germany. Stool specimens were examined for 26 gastrointestinal pathogens, supplemented by serologic tests for antibodies to Campylobacter spp., Yersinia spp., and Entamoeba histolytica. Patient data on demographics and clinical presentation were recorded and analyzed. Coexisting medical conditions were assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results Of 132 patients presenting with acute community-acquired gastroenteritis, 104 were included in the study. A non-infectious aetiology was diagnosed in 8 patients (8%). In 79 (82%) of the remaining 96 patients at least one microorganism was identified. Campylobacter spp. (35%) was detected most frequently, followed by norovirus (23%), Salmonella spp. (20%), and rotavirus (15%). In 46% of the patients with Campylobacter spp. infection, the diagnosis was made solely by serology. More than one pathogen was found in seventeen (22%) patients. Simultaneous infection was significantly more likely in patients with rotavirus and salmonella infections (RR 3.6; 95% CI: 1.8–7.4; RR 2.5; 95%CI: 1.2–5.5). Length of hospital stay (median: 5.5 days) was independent of the pathogen, but was associated with coexisting medical conditions (OR 4,8; 95%CI:2,0–11,6). Conclusion Known enteric pathogens were detected in 82% of adult patients who were hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis. We found that currently used culture-based methods may miss a substantial proportion of Campylobacter infections, and additional serological testing for

  12. Changing etiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a nationwide multicenter study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, S-Y; Chung, D R; Kim, S-W; Chang, H H; Lee, H; Jung, D S; Kim, Y-S; Jung, S I; Ryu, S Y; Heo, S T; Moon, C; Ki, H K; Son, J S; Kwon, K T; Shin, S Y; Lee, J S; Lee, S S; Rhee, J-Y; Lee, J-A; Joung, M K; Cheong, H S; Peck, K R; Song, J-H

    2010-07-01

    Epidemiologic data on the etiologic organisms is important for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis. We identified the etiologies of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in Korean adults and the associated epidemiological factors. A retrospective, multicenter nationwide study was carried out. Patients 18 years of age or older with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a confirmed pathogen were enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected. One hundred and ninety-five cases were collected. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen (50.8%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (10.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.7%), Listeria monocytogenes (6.7%), and group B Streptococcus (3.1%). The penicillin resistance rate of the S. pneumoniae was 60.3%; 40.0% of the organisms were not susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins. The combination of third-generation cephalosporin with vancomycin was used in 76.3% of cases. Steroids were given before or with the first dose of antibiotics in 37.4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 20.5% and neurological sequelae developed in 15.6% of cases. S. pneumoniae was the most common organism identified in community-acquired bacterial meningitis among Korean adults. S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, L. monocytogenes, and group B Streptococcus were also common. S. pneumoniae had high rates of resistance to penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins. PMID:20432052

  13. Serum protein electrophoresis: an interesting diagnosis tool to distinguish viral from bacterial community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Davido, B; Badr, C; Lagrange, A; Makhloufi, S; De Truchis, P; Perronne, C; Salomon, J; Dinh, A

    2016-06-01

    29-69 % of pneumonias are microbiologically documented because it can be considered as an invasive procedure with variable test sensitivity. However, it drastically impacts therapeutic strategy in particular the use of antibiotics. Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) is a routine and non-invasive test commonly used to identify serum protein disorders. As virus and bacteria may induce different globulins production, we hypothesize that SPEP can be used as an etiological diagnosis test. Retrospective study conducted from 1/1/13 until 5/1/15 among patient hospitalized for an acute community-acquired pneumonia based on fever, crackles and radiological abnormalities. α/β, α/γ, β/γ globulins and albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio were calculated from SPEP. Data were analyzed in 3 groups: documented viral (DVP) or bacterial pneumonia (DBP) and supposedly bacterial pneumonia (SBP). We used ANOVA statistic test with multiple comparisons using CI95 and ROC curve to compare them. 109 patients included divided into DBP (n = 16), DVP (n = 26) and SBP (n = 67). Mean age was 62 ± 18 year-old with a sex ratio M/F of 1.3. Underlying conditions (e.g. COPD, diabetes) were comparable between groups in multivariate analysis. Means of A/G ratio were 0.80 [0.76-0.84], 0.96 [0.91-1.01], 1.08 [0.99-1.16] respectively for DBP, SBP and DVP (p = 0.0002). A/G ratio cut-off value of 0.845 has a sensitivity of 87.5 % and a specificity of 73.1 %. A/G ratio seems to be an easy diagnostic tool to differentiate bacterial from viral pneumonia. A/G ratio cut-off value below 0.845 seems to be predictable of a bacterial origin and support the use of antibiotics. PMID:26936614

  14. Inflammatory response in mixed viral-bacterial community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of mixed pneumonia (virus + bacteria) in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been described in recent years. However, it is not known whether the systemic inflammatory profile is different compared to monomicrobial CAP. We wanted to investigate this profile of mixed viral-bacterial infection and to compare it to monomicrobial bacterial or viral CAP. Methods We measured baseline serum procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) count in 171 patients with CAP with definite etiology admitted to a tertiary hospital: 59 (34.5%) bacterial, 66 (39.%) viral and 46 (27%) mixed (viral-bacterial). Results Serum PCT levels were higher in mixed and bacterial CAP compared to viral CAP. CRP levels were higher in mixed CAP compared to the other groups. CRP was independently associated with mixed CAP. CRP levels below 26 mg/dL were indicative of an etiology other than mixed in 83% of cases, but the positive predictive value was 45%. PCT levels over 2.10 ng/mL had a positive predictive value for bacterial-involved CAP versus viral CAP of 78%, but the negative predictive value was 48%. Conclusions Mixed CAP has a different inflammatory pattern compared to bacterial or viral CAP. High CRP levels may be useful for clinicians to suspect mixed CAP. PMID:25073709

  15. Value of rapid aetiological diagnosis in optimization of antimicrobial treatment in bacterial community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mareković, Ivana; Plecko, Vanda; Boras, Zagorka; Pavlović, Ladislav; Budimir, Ana; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Puretić, Hrvoje; Zele-Starcević, Lidija; Kalenić, Smilja

    2012-06-01

    In 80 adult patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) conventional microbiological methods, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were performed and the appropriateness of the empirical antimicrobial treatment was evaluated according to bacterial pathogen detected. The aetiology was determined in 42 (52.5%) patients, with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the most common pathogen. PCR applied to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided 2 and PCR on sputum samples 1 additional aetiological diagnosis of CAP The mean CRP values in the S. pneumoniae group were not significantly higher than in the group with other aetiological diagnoses (166.89 mg/L vs. 160.11 mg/L, p = 0.457). In 23.8% (10/42) of patients with determined aetiology, the empirical antimicrobial treatment was inappropriate. PCR tests need further investigation, particularly those for the atypical pathogens, as they are predominant in inappropriately treated patients. Our results do not support the use of CRP as a rapid test to guide the antimicrobial treatment in patients with CAP. PMID:22856222

  16. Systematic review of probiotics for the treatment of community-acquired acute diarrhea in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral rehydration salts (ORS), zinc, and continued feeding are the recommended treatments for community-acquired acute diarrhea among young children. However, probiotics are becoming increasingly popular treatments for diarrhea in some countries. We sought to estimate the effect of probiotics on diarrhea morbidity and mortality in children < 5 years of age. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to estimate the effect of probiotic microorganisms for the treatment of community-acquired acute diarrhea in children. Data were abstracted into a standardized table and study quality was assessed using the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) adaption of the GRADE technique. We measured the relative effect of probiotic treatment in addition to recommended rehydration on hospitalizations, duration and severity. We then calculated the average percent difference for all continuous outcomes and performed a meta-analysis for discrete outcomes. Results We identified 8 studies for inclusion in the final database. No studies reported diarrhea mortality and overall the evidence was low to moderate quality. Probiotics reduced diarrhea duration by 14.0% (95% CI: 3.8-24.2%) and stool frequency on the second day of treatment by 13.1% (95% CI: 0.8 – 25.3%). There was no effect on the risk of diarrhea hospitalizations. Conclusion Probiotics may be efficacious in reducing diarrhea duration and stool frequency during a diarrhea episode. However, only few studies have been conducted in low-income countries and none used zinc (the current recommendation) thus additional research is needed to understand the effect of probiotics as adjunct therapy for diarrhea among children in developing countries. PMID:24564646

  17. Epidemiology, aetiology and management of childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia in developing countries--a review.

    PubMed

    Falade, A G; Ayede, A I

    2011-12-01

    Childhood acute community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In children who have not received prior antibiotic therapy, the main bacterial causes of clinical pneumonia in developing countries are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and the main viral cause is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), but estimates of their relative importance vary in different settings. The only vaccines for the prevention of bacterial pneumonia (excluding vaccines for pertussis and measles) are Hib and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). In children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, bacterial infection remains a major cause of pneumonia mortality; however, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are important causes of pneumonia in them. Studies of bacterial aetiology of acute pneumonia in severely malnourished children have implicated Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, S. pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and H. influenzae, with very few data on the role of respiratory viruses and tuberculosis. Studies of neonatal sepsis suggest that Gram-negative enteric organisms, particularly Klebsiella spp., and Gram-positive organisms, mainly pneumococcus, group b Streptococcus and S. aureus are causes of neonatal pneumonia. Many of the developing countries that ranked high in pneumonia mortality are preparing to introduce new pneumonia vaccines with support from Global Alliance for Vaccine and Immunization (GAVI Alliance), plan for the expansion of community-based case management and have ambitious plans for strengthening health systems. Assurance that these plans are implemented will require funding and continued public attention to pneumonia, which will help contribute to a substantial decline in childhood pneumonia deaths. PMID:22783679

  18. [Critical evaluation and predictive value of clinical presentation in out-patients with acute community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Mayaud, C; Fartoukh, M; Prigent, H; Parrot, A; Cadranel, J

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic probability of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends on data related to age and clinical and radiological findings. The critical evaluation of data in the literature leads to the following conclusions: 1) the prevalence of CAP in a given population with acute respiratory disease is 5% in outpatients and 10% in an emergency care unit. This could be as low as 2% in young people and even higher than 40% in hospitalized elderly patients; 2) the collection of clinical data is linked to the way the patient is examined and to the expertise of the clinician. The absolute lack of "vital signs" has a good negative predictive value in CAP; presence of unilateral crackles has a good positive predictive value; 3) there is a wide range of X-ray abnormalities: localized alveolar opacities; interstitial opacities, limited of diffused. The greatest radiological difficulties are encountered in old people with disorders including chronic respiratory or cardiac opacities and as a consequence of the high prevalence of bronchopneumonia episodes at this age; 4) among patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT) infections, the blood levels of leukocytes, CRP and procalcitonine are higher in CAP patients, mainly when their disease has a bacterial origin. Since you have not a threshold value reliably demonstrated in large populations with LRT infections or acute respiratory disease, presence or absence of these parameters could only be taken as a slight hint for a CAP diagnosis. PMID:17084571

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0%) had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%). Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing), preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5%) and pleural effusions alone (4.5%) and normal parenchyma (4.5%). Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28%) received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0%) patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p = 0.04) and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate, are more

  20. Lipid metabolites as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for acute community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Lee, Kim-Chung; Wong, Samson S Y; Sze, Kong-Hung; Ke, Yi-Hong; Lui, Yin-Ming; Tang, Bone S F; Li, Iris W S; Lau, Susanna K P; Hung, Ivan F N; Law, Chun-Yiu; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is important in patient triage and treatment decisions. To identify biomarkers that distinguish patients with CAP from non-CAP controls, we conducted an untargeted global metabolome analysis for plasma samples from 142 patients with CAP (CAP cases) and 97 without CAP (non-CAP controls). Thirteen lipid metabolites could discriminate between CAP cases and non-CAP controls with area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic curve of >0.8 (P ≤ 10(-9)). The levels of glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines and L-palmitoylcarnitine were higher, while the levels of lysophosphatidylethanolamines were lower in the CAP cases than those in non-CAP controls. All 13 metabolites could distinguish CAP cases from the non-infection, extrapulmonary infection and non-CAP respiratory tract infection subgroups. The levels of trihexosylceramide (d18:1/16:0) were higher, while the levels of lysophosphatidylethanolamines were lower, in the fatal than those of non-fatal CAP cases. Our findings suggest that lipid metabolites are potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for CAP. PMID:27105773

  1. Community-acquired acute kidney injury: A challenge and opportunity for primary care in kidney health.

    PubMed

    Mesropian, Paul Der; Othersen, Jennifer; Mason, Darius; Wang, Jeffrey; Asif, Arif; Mathew, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been found to be a common event in the population. Current incidence estimates are not available, but evaluations of severe elevations in serum creatinine indicate that incidence can be as high as 989 cases per million population in those older than 80 years. Data on risk factors are limited, but older age and higher comorbid illness burden, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease, seem to be more common in patients who suffer CA-AKI. In addition to being more common than hospital-acquired AKI, the long-term sequelae of CA-AKI seem to be just as severe, including renal disease progression and mortality. Efforts to better understand the aetiology of CA-AKI and how ultimately to prevent the development of this condition will need to be taken. In the meantime, a concerted effort by general internists and nephrologists will be needed to prevent CA-AKI in the highest risk patients and thus limit the poor outcomes associated with this entity. PMID:26890822

  2. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort. This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission. AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI. Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  3. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Whong, Christine Y; Echevarria, Kelly; Nambiar, Anoop M; Anzueto, Antonio; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2012-01-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline) was recently approved for the treatment of community- acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2), ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP. PMID:22355258

  4. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  5. Investigation of the Selection and Timing of Pharmacological Therapy in Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Sheley, Jared; Willman, Dave; Downen, Julie; Bergman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacterial meningitis is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but early appropriate therapy is expected to improve outcomes. National treatment guidelines were published in 2004, but no assessment of their utilization in the U.S. has been reported. Objectives: To measure adherence to meningitis treatment guidelines and describe patient outcomes in relation to recommended antibiotic and dexamethasone use. Methods: Retrospective chart reviews were performed on patients with bacterial meningitis who presented to emergency departments at two community teaching hospitals. Timing and appropriateness of antibiotic and dexamethasone use were assessed according to national guidelines. Patient outcomes of mortality, length of hospitalization, and neurological complications were analyzed based on therapies received. Results: A total of 161 cases were identified; 38 met inclusion criteria. Recommended antibiotic regimens were administered to 52.6% of patients, while 26.3% received that regimen within eight hours. Dexamethasone was used in 44.7% of patients, but was administered prior to antibiotics in only 10.5% of cases. Mortality was numerically lower with recommended antibiotic therapy but did not reach statistical significance (5.0% versus 16.7%; P = 0.33). Median length of stay was eight days for patients who received recommended antibiotics and 11 days for those who did not (P = 0.69). One patient who received dexamethasone had a neurological complication at discharge compared with four patients not receiving dexamethasone (5.9% versus 19.0%, P = 0.35). Conclusion: Current treatment guidelines provide clinicians with direction on optimal care for patients with bacterial meningitis, and an opportunity exists to improve implementation of these recommendations, which could improve patient outcomes. PMID:27408520

  6. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. PMID:25096655

  7. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  8. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Cross, Kristen E; Benitez, Alvaro J; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children. PMID:27191004

  9. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maureen H.; Cross, Kristen E.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Hicks, Lauri A.; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M.; Chappell, James D.; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children. PMID:27191004

  10. Activity of JNJ-Q2, a new fluoroquinolone, tested against contemporary pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Biedenbach, Douglas J; Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Liverman, Lisa C; McIntyre, Gail; Jones, Ronald N

    2012-04-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens and is currently in clinical development for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections. This study determined the activity of JNJ-Q2 against a worldwide year 2010 collection (89 centres in 27 countries) of three common respiratory pathogens (3757 isolates) from patients with CABP. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were tested by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution method, and susceptibility rates for comparators were assessed using CLSI and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoint criteria. JNJ-Q2 had activity against all three species, with 96.9% of strains inhibited at ≤0.015 mg/L. JNJ-Q2 [minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% and 90% of the organisms, respectively (MIC(50/90))=0.008/0.015 mg/L] demonstrated a 16-fold greater potency compared with moxifloxacin (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25 mg/L) and at least 128-fold greater activity compared with levofloxacin (MIC(50/90)=1/ 1 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC(50/90)=1/2 mg/L) against S. pneumoniae. Haemophilus influenzae isolates were 21.9-23.3% resistant to ampicillin, but JNJ-Q2 (MIC(50/90)≤0.004/0.015 mg/L) was at least two-fold more active than moxifloxacin (MIC(50/90)=0.015/0.03 mg/L) as well as being potent against M. catarrhalis (MIC(90)=0.015/0.015 mg/L). In conclusion, JNJ-Q2 demonstrated increased potency compared with other marketed fluoroquinolones that have been used to treat CABP pathogens, thus favouring further clinical development. PMID:22306239

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05). Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01). Conclusion CAP may be an independent risk factor for higher inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  12. Adult community-acquired bacterial meningitis requiring ICU admission: epidemiological data, prognosis factors and adherence to IDSA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Georges, H; Chiche, A; Alfandari, S; Devos, P; Boussekey, N; Leroy, O

    2009-11-01

    Numerous guidelines are available to guide empirical antimicrobial therapy (EAT) in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) patients. We analysed prognosis factors and compliance to the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines in ABM patients requiring stay in an intensive care unit (ICU). A 10-year retrospective study, using prospectively collected data, in 82 ABM patients admitted to a 16-bed university-affiliated French ICU was undertaken. Seventeen patients (20.7%) died during ICU stay. Multivariate analysis isolated four factors associated with in-ICU death: alcoholism (P = 0.007), acute kidney injury (P = 0.006), age >60 years (P = 0.006) and ICU admission for neurological failure (P = 0.01). Causative pathogens were isolated for 62 (75.6%) patients, including 29 pneumococci, 14/28 of which were non-susceptible to penicillin. No characteristics, particularly recent hospitalisation and/or antibiotic delivery, was associated with penicillin susceptibility. Compliance to IDSA guidelines was 65%. Non-compliance concerned to be essentially the non-delivery or low dosage of vancomycin. Treatment compatible with IDSA guidelines was associated with a decreased ICU mortality in univariate (61.5% survival vs. 35.3%, P = 0.05) but not in multivariate analysis. In-ICU mortality associated with ABM remains high. Prognosis factors are related to the severity of disease or underlying conditions. Penicillin non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae can occur without any of the usual predisposing factors. PMID:19727871

  13. Incidence, Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Community-Acquired and Hospital-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Ning; Lee, Chien-Te; Su, Chien-Hao; Wang, Yu-Ching Lily; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Tain, You-Lin

    2016-05-01

    The disease burden and outcomes of community-acquired (CA-) and hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) are not well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of AKI in a large Taiwanese adult cohort.This retrospective cohort study examined 734,340 hospital admissions from a group of hospitals within an organization in Taiwan between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2014. Patients with AKI at discharge were classified as either CA- or HA-AKI based on the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end stage of kidney disease) classification criteria. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality, dialysis, recovery of renal function, and length of stay. Risks of developing AKI were determined using multivariate logistic regression based on demographic and baseline clinical characteristics and nephrotoxin use before admission.AKI occurred in 1.68% to 2% hospital discharges among adults without and with preexisting chronic kidney disease (CKD), respectively. The incidence of CA-AKI was 17.25 and HA-AKI was 8.14 per 1000 admissions. The annual rate of CA-AKI increased from 12.43 to 19.96 per 1000 people, but the change in HA-AKI was insignificant. Comparing to CA-AKI, those with HA-AKI had higher levels of in-hospital mortality (26.07% vs 51.58%), mean length of stay (21.25 ± 22.35 vs 35.84 ± 34.62 days), and dialysis during hospitalization (1.45% vs 2.06%). Preexisting systemic diseases, including CKD were associated with increased risks of CA-AKI, and nephrotoxic polypharmacy increased risk of both CA- and HA-AKI.Patients with HA-AKI had more severe outcomes than patients with CA-AKI, and demonstrated different spectrum of risk factors. Although patients with CA-AKI with better outcomes, the incidence increased over time. It is also clear that optimal preventive and management strategies of HA- and CA-AKI are urgently needed to limit the risks in susceptible individuals. PMID:27175701

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  15. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  16. Integrated DNA and RNA extraction and purification on an automated microfluidic cassette from bacterial and viral pathogens causing community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Spang, Peter; Schwind, Carmen; Drese, Klaus S; Ritzi-Lehnert, Marion; Nieto, Benjamin; Camps, Marta; Landgraf, Bryan; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; Samitier, Josep; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Roeser, Tina

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of an automated sample preparation procedure for etiological agents of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTI). The consecutive assay steps, including sample re-suspension, pre-treatment, lysis, nucleic acid purification, and concentration, were integrated into a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LOC) cassette that is operated hands-free by a demonstrator setup, providing fluidic and valve actuation. The performance of the assay was evaluated on viral and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial broth cultures previously sampled using a nasopharyngeal swab. Sample preparation on the microfluidic cassette resulted in higher or similar concentrations of pure bacterial DNA or viral RNA compared to manual benchtop experiments. The miniaturization and integration of the complete sample preparation procedure, to extract purified nucleic acids from real samples of CA-LRTI pathogens to, and above, lab quality and efficiency, represent important steps towards its application in a point-of-care test (POCT) for rapid diagnosis of CA-LRTI. PMID:24615272

  17. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy. PMID:26926407

  18. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens responsible for community-acquired urinary tract infections in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, E; Suchocka, U; Bosacka, K; Hryniewicz, W

    2016-08-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are some of the most common infections in both community and hospital settings infections. With their high rate of incidence, recurrence, complications, diverse etiologic agents, as well as growing antibiotic resistance, UTIs have proven to be a serious challenge for medical professionals. The aim of this study was to obtain data on the susceptibility patterns of pathogens responsible for UTIs in Poland to currently used antibiotics. A total of 396 bacterial isolates were collected between March and May 2013 from 41 centers in all regions of Poland. The majority of isolates were from adult patients (96.2 %); 144 (37.8 %) patients were diagnosed with uncomplicated UTI, while the remaining 237 (62.2 %) had a complicated infection. The most prevalent pathogen was Escherichia coli (71.4 %), followed by Klebsiella spp. (10.8 %) and the Proteae group (7.6 %). Escherichia coli was responsible for 80.6 % of cases of uncomplicated and 65.8 % of complicated infections. Only 65.8 % of E. coli isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin (uncomplicated 75.9 %, complicated 58.3 %), 64.0 % to nitrofurantoin (67.2 %, 62.8 %), 65.1 % to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (68.1 %, 62.8 %), and 66.4 % to fosfomycin (77.6 %, 62.2 %). Among E. coli isolates from all UTIs, only 43.4 % were susceptible to ampicillin, with 47.4 % from uncomplicated compared with 40.4 % from complicated infections; 88.2 % to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (91.4 % vs. 85.9 % complicated); 90.1 % to cefuroxime (93.1 %, 87.8 %); and 94.1 % to cefotaxime (98.2 %, 91.0 %). Thirty-five strains (10.4 %) were capable of producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). This study demonstrates an increase in multidrug-resistant strains, especially among the leading pathogens associated with UTIs, including E. coli, Klebsiella spp., and Proteus spp. PMID:27189078

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  20. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country. PMID:16163422

  1. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    Ellison RT, Donowitz GR. Acute pneumonia. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  2. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  3. [Community-acquired Pseudomonas stutzeri meningitis in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Sünbül, Mustafa; Zivalioğlu, Muammer; Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri which is an aerobic, non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus frequently found in soil, water and hospital environment, rarely leads to serious community-acquired infections. In this report a case of community-acquired meningitis due to P. stutzeri was presented. A 73-years-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of nausea, vomiting, headache, dizziness, difficulties in walking and speaking and loss of consciousness. There was no history of an underlying disease or immunosuppression. Physical examination revealed nuchal rigidity, however, Kernig and Brudzinski signs were negative. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 0.4 mg/dl glucose (simultaneous blood glucose 145 mg/dl), and 618 mg/dl protein and 640 leucocyte/mm3 (90% PMNL). No bacteria were detected in Gram stained and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained CSF smears. Upon the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis, treatment with ceftriaxone and ampicillin was initiated, however, the patient died after 16 hours of hospitalization. CSF culture yielded the growth of gram-negative oxidase-positive bacteria and the isolate was identified as P. stutzeri by Vitek-2 Compact system (bioMerieux, France). The isolate was found to be sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam, amikacin, gentamycin, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. Since the patient was lost due to acute respiratory and cardiac failure, it was not possible to change the therapy to agent specific therapy. In conclusion, it should always be kept in mind that uncommon agents could lead to community-acquired meningitis in elderly patients and empirical treatment protocols might fail in such cases resulting in high morbidity and mortality. PMID:19334394

  4. Ketolides in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lipsky, Martin S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The increasing prevalence of resistance to established antibiotics among key respiratory bacterial pathogens highlights a need for new antibacterial agents for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Ketolides are a new class of antibiotics specifically developed for the treatment of RTIs. Objective: The aim of this review was to present the current status of treatment of RTIs with ketolides, focusing on telithromycin—the first ketolide to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use. Methods: To gather evidence on the current status of ketolides, a literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (years: 1990–2005; key terms: ketolides, telithromycin, and HMR3647). Results: Telithromycin shows strong in vitro activity against the major respiratorypathogens, including strains resistant to other antibiotics, as well as the atypical respiratory pathogens. The pharmacokinetic properties of telithromycin are compatible with once-daily dosing. Clinical trials have demonstrated that telithromycin 800 mg QD for 5 to 10 days is effective in the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis, acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and mild to moderate community-acquired pneumonia. Overall, telithromycin is well tolerated by patients. Drug-drug interactions are similar to those reported for macrolides. Conclusion: Evidence to date indicates that telithromycin is an effective andwell-tolerated empiric treatment for community-acquired RTIs. PMID:24672119

  5. Does the adoption of EUCAST susceptibility breakpoints affect the selection of antimicrobials to treat acute community-acquired respiratory tract infections?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In several European Countries, by the end of 2012, CLSI guidelines will be replaced by EUCAST. We compared antimicrobial susceptibility results of a large number of respiratory pathogens using both EUCAST and previously adopted CLSI criteria to evaluate the impact on susceptibility patterns and the possible consequences that could occur in clinical practice due to this replacement. For S. pyogenes and S. aureus, the interpretation of susceptibility data using the EUCAST criteria did not produce relevant changes in comparison to CLSI. Against S. pneumoniae, more restrictive EUCAST breakpoints could lead to increased benzylpenicillin and/or amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance rates, which in turn could translate in increased dosages of these antibiotics or usage of alternative agents for respiratory tract infections. Against S. pneumoniae, M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae, cefuroxime-axetil and cefaclor produced the most divergent results depending on the breakpoints adopted and these striking differences could lead to the revision of those guidelines suggesting these two cephalosporins as alternatives in the management of upper respiratory tract infections. Discussion Many differences exist between CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints. However, only in a few cases do these differences translate in major interpretive category discrepancies. In countries adopting more restrictive EUCAST breakpoints, clinicians should be aware of these discrepancies and that they could be faced with antibiotic-resistant respiratory pathogens more frequently than before. Summary The interpretive discrepancies between EUCAST and CLSI suggest that the discussion on the management of community-acquired respiratory tract infections is still open and further studies are desirable to better define the role of some antibiotics. PMID:22866984

  6. [Features of morbidity community-acquired pneumonia among young recruits].

    PubMed

    Serdukov, D U; Gordienko, A V; Kozlov, M S; Mikhailov, A A; Davydov, P A

    2015-10-01

    Were examined 3338 military personnel of the combined training center. 183 of them diagnosed community-acquired pneumonia, in 3155 focal and infiltrative changes in lung tissue were not identified. The analisys of prevalence been made among young recruits of the acute respiratory illness before arriving in part and at the assembly point, foci of chronic infection, smoking, low body weight. 511 military personnel arrived at the training center in the disease state with symptoms of acute respiratory illness. Examined the relationship these risk factor to the development of community-acquired pneumonia in this category of servicemen. PMID:26827502

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to evaluate ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimens for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Canut, A; Isla, A; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the probability of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment (PTA) of ceftaroline against clinical isolates causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI) in Europe was evaluated. Three dosing regimens were assessed: 600 mg every 12 h (q12 h) as a 1-h infusion (standard dose) or 600 mg every 8 h (q8 h) as a 2-h infusion in virtual patients with normal renal function; and 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pharmacokinetic and microbiological data were obtained from the literature. The PTA and the cumulative fraction of response (CFR) were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In patients with normal renal function, the ceftaroline standard dose (600 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion) can be sufficient to treat CABP due to ceftazidime-susceptible (CAZ-S) Escherichia coli, CAZ-S Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (CFR>90%). However, against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the CFR was 72%. In cSSSI, the CFR was also <80% for MRSA. Administration of ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion or 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal insufficiency provided a high probability of treatment success (CFR ca. 100%) for most micro-organisms causing CABP and cSSSI, including MRSA and penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae. These results suggest that in patients with normal renal function, ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion may be a better option than the standard dose, especially if the MRSA rate is high. PMID:25700566

  8. Relevant Cytokines in the Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Adrian; Rendon-Ramirez, Erick J; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2016-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of infectious death in the world. Immune dysregulation during acute lung infection plays a role in lung injury and the systemic inflammatory response. Cytokines seem to be major players in severe lung infection cases. Here, we present a review of published papers in the last 3 years regarding this topic. The cytokine response during pneumonia is different in bacterial vs viral infections; some of these cytokines correlate with clinical severity scales such as CURB65 or SOFA. Treatment focused in the cytokine environment is an interesting area that could impact the prognosis of CAP. Some of the agents that have been studied as co-adjuvant therapy are corticosteroids, macrolides, and linezolid, but anyone of those have shown a clear or proven efficacy or have been recommended as a part of the standard of care for CAP. More studies designed to define the role of immunomodulatory agents, such as co-adjuvant therapy in pneumonia, are needed. PMID:26874956

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. PMID:24387877

  10. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25850806

  11. Epicutaneous model of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus skin infections.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Ranjani; Foreman, Oded; De Pascalis, Roberto; Lee, Gloria M; Plaut, Roger D; Kim, Stanley Y; Stibitz, Scott; Elkins, Karen L; Merkel, Tod J

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common etiological agents of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Although the majority of S. aureus community-acquired SSTIs are uncomplicated and self-clearing in nature, some percentage of these cases progress into life-threatening invasive infections. Current animal models of S. aureus SSTI suffer from two drawbacks: these models are a better representation of hospital-acquired SSTI than community-acquired SSTI, and they involve methods that are difficult to replicate. For these reasons, we sought to develop a murine model of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus SSTI (CA-MRSA SSTI) that can be consistently reproduced with a high degree of precision. We utilized this model to begin to characterize the host immune response to this type of infection. We infected mice via epicutaneous challenge of the skin on the outer ear pinna using Morrow-Brown allergy test needles coated in S. aureus USA300. When mice were challenged in this model, they developed small, purulent, self-clearing lesions with predictable areas of inflammation that mimicked a human infection. CFU in the ear pinna peaked at day 7 before dropping by day 14. The T(h)1 and T(h)17 cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-12 (IL-12) p70, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-17A, IL-6, and IL-21 were all significantly increased in the draining lymph node of infected mice, and there was neutrophil recruitment to the infection site. In vivo neutrophil depletion demonstrated that neutrophils play a protective role in preventing bacterial dissemination and fatal invasive infection. PMID:23381997

  12. [Epidemiology of community-acquired pneumonia in children. Current data].

    PubMed

    Marguet, C; Bocquel, N; Mallet, E

    1998-01-01

    Viruses, particularly syncitial respiratory virus, are the main aetiology of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in infants, while bacterial agents are more frequently responsible in children older than 3 years. Antimicrobial therapy must take into account the development of reduced susceptibility of penicillin to strains of Streptoccocus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae with beta-lactamase, and high frequency of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections. Although the mortality rate has remained low in France, the morbidity appeared to increase in recent years. PMID:10223154

  13. Clinical decision rules for acute bacterial meningitis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Alain; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Zeni, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) requires rapid diagnosis so that suitable treatment can be instituted within 60 minutes of admitting the patient. The cornerstone of diagnostic examination is lumbar puncture, which enables microbiological analysis and determination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical characteristics. However, microbiological testing is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out this diagnosis. With regard to the analysis of standard CSF cytochemical characteristics (polymorphonuclear count, CSF glucose and protein concentration, and CSF:serum glucose), this is often misleading. Indeed, the relatively imprecise nature of the cutoff values for these BM diagnosis markers can make their interpretation difficult. However, there are two markers that appear to be more efficient than the standard ones: CSF lactate and serum procalcitonin levels. Scores and predictive models are also available; however, they only define a clinical probability, and in addition, their use calls for prior validation on the population in which they are used. In this article, we review current methods of BM diagnosis. PMID:27307768

  14. [Pharmacogenetics of community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, S Sh; Molchanova, O V; Kirpichnikova, N V; Sukhotina, N V; Gorbach, A A

    2010-01-01

    The rate of acetylation of xenobiotics affects the course and prognosis of infectious diseases. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in RA-patients is lower than that in LA-ones. In order to ensure the best antimicrobial effect on the onset of the disease it is required to use regimens with the maximum permissible dose of antibacterial drugs in the regions where the rapid type prevails. PMID:21400754

  15. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  16. [Short course antibiotherapies in community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Yilmaz; Ozlu, Tevfik

    2008-01-01

    The use of antibiotics for longer duration contributes to some disadvantageous conditions such as the development of resistant bacteria, increased bacterial colonization and an increase in the costs. In addition, in terms of suggested therapy durations, there are some differences between guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia. In some studies, especially in the studies performed using new flouroquinolon and macrolide antibiotics in recent years, it has been shown that short course antimicrobial therapies for pneumonia are as effective as the traditional long therapies and are advantageous for lowering bacterial colonization and costs. In this article, short course therapy in community-acquired pneumonia is reviewed under the light of current literature. PMID:18932039

  17. [ANEMIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Labzhaniya, N B; Voronina, E V; Chernov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a most widespread acute infectious disease of socio-economic significance all over the world. Up to 30% of the patients present with anemia responsible for the unfavourable prognosis and elevated mortality. Not infrequently, anemia is not diagnosed during the hospital stay und therefore remains uncorrected. Severe anemia results in enhanced hypercapnia and slowed maturation of red blood cells in the bone marrow which facilitates the development of ischemic syndrome. Hepcidin, a mediator of inflammation and iron-regulatory hormone, plays an important role in the clinical course of community-acquired pneumonia. Hepsidin production increases during inflammation; it suppresses erythtropoiesis and depletes the iron depot leading to so-called anemia of inflammation. Hypoxia and anemia activate erythtropoiesis, and the released erythropoietin inhibits hepsidin production. During pneumonia resolution, hepsidin promotes recovery from anemia by activating iron absorption. The curreni literature contains few data on the use of hepcidin as a diagnostic marker of anemia. The necessity oftreating anemia in patients with pneumonia under hospital conditions is a matter of discussion. Direct involvement of hepcidin in iron metabolism creates a prerequisite for the treatment of anemia. Medicamental suppression of its activity by stimulating erythtropoiesis can facilitate normalization of iron metabolism and restoration of hemoglobin level. PMID:27172725

  18. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  19. Community-acquired Pneumonia and its Complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qiang; Shen, Kun-ling

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in developing and developed countries, and its incidence is highest among children less than 5-y-old. Over the last five years, several international and local guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of pediatric CAP, but there are still several major problems that need to be standardised. The aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the termination, epidemiology, microbiology and pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, treatment, and complications of pediatric CAP. There still are many unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the difficulty to identify its etiological agents, the emergence of drug, and the lack of introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens in developing countries. More research is required in various areas (including therapy of atypical agents), and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination in order to reduce the incidence of the disease. PMID:25976616

  20. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Methods Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler technique applying a visual stimulation paradigm. Resting EEG frequencies, visual evoked potentials as well as resting and stimulated hemodynamic responses were obtained. Disease severity was characterized by laboratory and cognitive parameters as well as related scoring systems. Data were compared to a control group. Results Whereas visually evoked potentials (VEP) remained stable a significant slowing and therefore uncoupling of the hemodynamic responses were found in the acute phase of pneumonia (Rate time: control group: 3.6 ± 2.5 vs. acute pneumonia: 1.6 ± 2.4 s; P < 0.0005). In the initial investigation, patients who deteriorated showed a decreased hemodynamic response as compared with those who recovered (gain: recovered: 15% ± 4% vs. deteriorated: 9% ± 3%, P < 0.05; control: 14% ± 5%). After recovery the coupling normalized. Conclusions Our study underlines the role of an early microcirculatory dysfunction in inflammatory syndromes that become evident in pre-septic conditions with a gradual decline according to disease severity. PMID:22520083

  1. Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Kristopher P; Viera, Anthony J

    2004-04-01

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, or a macrolide is appropriate for outpatient treatment of immunocompetent adult patients. Hospitalized adults should be treated with cefotaxime or ceftriaxone plus a macrolide, or with a fluoroquinolone alone. The same agents can be used in adult patients in intensive care units, although fluoroquinolone monotherapy is not recommended; ampicillin-sulbactam or piperacillin-tazobactam can be used instead of cefotaxime or ceftriaxone. Outpatient treatment of children two months to five years of age consists of high-dose amoxicillin given for seven to 10 days. A single dose of ceftriaxone can be used in infants when the first dose of antibiotic is likely to be delayed or not absorbed. Older children can be treated with a macrolide. Hospitalized children should be treated with a macrolide plus a beta-lactam inhibitor. In a bioterrorist attack, pulmonary illness may result from the organisms that cause anthrax, plague, or tularemia. Sudden acute respiratory syndrome begins with a flu-like illness, followed two to seven days later by cough, dyspnea and, in some instances, acute respiratory distress. PMID:15086042

  2. Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Garenoxacin in Patients with Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Wart, Scott; Phillips, Luann; Ludwig, Elizabeth A.; Russo, Rene; Gajjar, Diptee A.; Bello, Akintunde; Ambrose, Paul G.; Costanzo, Christopher; Grasela, Thaddeus H.; Echols, Roger; Grasela, Dennis M.

    2004-01-01

    Garenoxacin (T-3811ME, BMS-284756) is a novel, broad-spectrum des-F(6) quinolone currently under study for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. This analysis assessed garenoxacin population pharmacokinetics and exposure-response relationships for safety (adverse effects [AE]) and antimicrobial activity (clinical cure and bacteriologic eradication of Streptococcus pneumoniae and the grouping of Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis). Data were obtained from three phase II clinical trials of garenoxacin administered orally as 400 mg once daily for 5 to 10 days for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, and sinusitis. Samples were taken from each patient before drug administration, 2 h following administration of the first dose, and on the day 3 to 5 visit. Individual Bayesian estimates of the fu (fraction unbound), the Cmax, and the fu for the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fu AUC0-24) were calculated as measurements of drug exposure by using an ex vivo assessment of average protein binding. Regression analysis was performed to examine the following relationships: treatment-emergent AE incidence and AUC0-24, Cmax, or patient factors; clinical response or bacterial eradication and drug exposure (fu Cmax/MIC, fu AUC0-24/MIC, and other exposure covariates); or disease and patient factors. Garenoxacin pharmacokinetics were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Clearance was dependent on creatinine clearance, ideal body weight, age, obesity, and concomitant use of pseudoephedrine. The volume of distribution was dependent on weight and gender. Patients with mild or moderate renal dysfunction had, on average, approximately a 16 or 26% decrease in clearance, respectively, compared to patients of the same gender and obesity classification with normal renal function. AE occurrence was not

  3. [Antibiotic therapy of severe community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Molchanova, O V; Suleĭmanov, S Sh; Ostrovskiĭ, A B

    2009-01-01

    Combined antibiotic therapy, including the use of intravenous cefotaxime (a beta-lactam) and azithromycin (a macrolide) was shown advantageous from both clinical and economic viewpoints in the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:19711847

  4. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%). PMID:17338353

  5. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M.; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Self, Wesley H.; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Kan, J. Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R.; Haynes, Lia M.; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. incidence estimates of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates with radiographic confirmation and current laboratory diagnostics are needed. Methods We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children <18 years in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization and severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection by multiple modalities. Chest radiographs were independently reviewed by study radiologists. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations, overall and by age and pathogen. Results From January 2010-June 2012, we enrolled 2638 (69%) of 3803 eligible children; 2358 (89%) had radiographic pneumonia. Median age was 2 years (interquartile range 1-6); 497 (21%) children required intensive care, and three (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a viral and/or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%); ≥1 virus in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and bacterial-viral co-detection in 155 (7%). Annual pneumonia incidence was 15.7/10,000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-16.5], with highest rates among children <2 years [62.2/10,000 (CI 57.6-67.1)]. Respiratory syncytial virus (37% vs. 8%), adenovirus (15% vs. 3%), and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%) were more commonly detected in children <5 years compared with older children; Mycoplasma pneumoniae (19% vs. 3%) was more common in children ≥5 years. Conclusions Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization burden was highest among the very young, with respiratory viruses most commonly detected. PMID:25714161

  6. Staphylococci in community-acquired infections: Increased resistance to penicillin.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Chidi, C C; Macon, W L

    1976-04-01

    One hundred patients with community-acquired staphylococcal infections of the skin and soft tissues were treated in the Emergency Ward of Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital from June to October of 1974. Each staphylococcal infection was considered community-acquired if, within two weeks prior to being treated for the first time, the patient had not received antibiotics, had not been hospitalized, and had not been in contact with other recently hospitalized persons. Of 100 community-acquired staphylococcal infections, 85 were resistant to penicillin. Almost no resistance to other tested antibiotics was observed. Unless indicated otherwise by bacteriologic testing, penicillin is a poor drug of choice in those skin and soft tissue infections suspected of harboring staphylococci. PMID:1267491

  7. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  8. Cumulative clinical experience from over a decade of use of levofloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia: critical appraisal and role in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noreddin, Ayman M; Elkhatib, Walid F; Cunnion, Kenji M; Zhanel, George G

    2011-01-01

    Levofloxacin is the synthetic L-isomer of the racemic fluoroquinolone, ofloxacin. It interferes with critical processes in the bacterial cell such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination by inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases. Levofloxacin has broad spectrum activity against several causative bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Oral levofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and is bioequivalent to the intravenous formulation such that patients can be conveniently transitioned between these formulations when moving from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Furthermore, levofloxacin demonstrates excellent safety, and has good tissue penetration maintaining adequate concentrations at the site of infection. The efficacy and tolerability of levofloxacin 500 mg once daily for 10 days in patients with CAP are well established. Furthermore, a high-dose (750 mg) and short-course (5 days) of once-daily levofloxacin has been approved for use in the US in the treatment of CAP, acute bacterial sinusitis, acute pyelonephritis, and complicated urinary tract infections. The high-dose, short-course levofloxacin regimen maximizes its concentration-dependent antibacterial activity, decreases the potential for drug resistance, and has better patient compliance. PMID:22046107

  9. Community-acquired diarrhea among children and adults in urban settings in Senegal: clinical, epidemiological and microbiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only limited data are available relating to the etiology of diarrhea in children and adults in Senegal. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the epidemiology and etiology of community-acquired diarrheal infections in children and adults living in urban settings. Methods A prospective study was carried out from March 2009 to December 2010, in the urban region of Dakar, Senegal. Patients with acute diarrhea were enrolled, interviewed to collect their clinical history, and their stools were tested for bacteria, virus and parasites. Results A total of 223 patients (including 112 children younger than five years old) with diarrhea were included. At least one enteropathogen was detected in 81% (180/223) of the patients: 29% (64/223) had bacterial infections (mainly diarrheagenic E. coli and Shigella spp), 21% (39/185) viral infections (mainly rotavirus) and 14% (31/223) parasitic infections. Co-infection was identified in 17.8% (32/180) of the patients. Viral infection was significantly more frequent in children under five years old during the dry season. Bacteria and parasites were equally frequent in all age groups. There was a seasonal variation of bacterial infections during the study period, with a higher proportion of infections being bacterial, and due to Salmonella spp. in particular, during the rainy season. Conclusion Our study suggests that in urban settings in Senegal, rotavirus is the principal cause of pediatric diarrhea during the dry season and that the proportion of bacterial infections seems to be higher during the rainy season. Further work is needed to document the burden of diarrheal diseases in sub-Saharan urban communities and to identify risk factors, including those linked to the rapid and unplanned urbanization in Africa. PMID:24321175

  10. Aetiology of community acquired pneumonia in Valencia, Spain: a multicentre prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Blanquer, J; Blanquer, R; Borrás, R; Nauffal, D; Morales, P; Menéndez, R; Subías, I; Herrero, L; Redón, J; Pascual, J

    1991-01-01

    A year long multicentre prospective study was carried out in the Valencia region of Spain, to determine the cause of community acquired pneumonia. The study was based on 510 of 833 patients with pneumonia. Of these, 462 were admitted to hospital, where 31 patients died. A cause was established in only 281 cases--208 of bacterial, 60 of viral, and 13 of mixed infection. The most common microorganisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (14.5%), Legionella sp (14%), Influenza virus (8%), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (4%). There was a higher incidence of Legionella sp than in other studies. PMID:1908605

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Community Acquired Uropathogens at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Jaipur, Rajasthan

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Smita; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are amongst the most common infections described in outpatients setting. Objectives: A study was conducted to evaluate the uropathogenic bacterial flora and its antimicrobial susceptibility profile among patients presenting to the out-patient clinics of a tertiary care hospital at Jaipur, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: 2012 consecutive urine specimens from symptomatic UTI cases attending to the outpatient clinics were processed in the Microbiology lab. Bacterial isolates obtained were identified using biochemical reactions. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production was determined by the double disk approximation test and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (formerly NCCLS) confirmatory method. Results: Pathogens were isolated from 346 (17.16%) of the 2012 patients who submitted a urine sample. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated community acquired uropathogen accounting for 61.84% of the total isolates. ESBL production was observed in 23.83% of E. coli strains and 8.69% of Klebsiella strains. With the exception of Nitrofurantoin, resistance to agents commonly used as empiric oral treatments for UTI was quite high. Conclusion: The study revealed E. coli as the predominant bacterial pathogen for the community acquired UTIs in Jaipur, Rajasthan. An increasing trend in the production ESBLs among UTI pathogens in the community was noted. Nitrofurantoin should be used as empirical therapy for primary, uncomplicated UTIs. PMID:22529539

  12. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  13. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Yao, Dongqi; Walline, Joseph; Xu, Jun; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by human adenovirus (HAdV), especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55) in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Methods We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15) detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI), respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively). The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant. Conclusions HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of

  14. Major advances in managing community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Asrar Khan, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    This article is a non-systematic review of selected recent publications in community-acquired pneumonia, including a comparison of various guidelines. Risk stratification of patients has recently been advanced by the addition of several useful biomarkers. The issue of single versus dual antibiotic treatment remains controversial and awaits a conclusive randomized controlled trial. However, in the meantime, there is a working consensus that more severe patients should receive dual therapy. PMID:24167724

  15. [Antibiotic therapy of mild community-acquired pneumonia in inpatients].

    PubMed

    Molchanova, O V; Suleĭmanov, S Sh; Ostrovskiĭ, A B

    2009-01-01

    From the clinicoeconomic viewpoints the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in patients without risk factors under hospital conditions with aminopenicillins was more appropriate, whereas for the treatment of patients with risk factors the following scheme of antibiotic therapy was advantageous: a beta-lactam (cefotaxime/ceftriaxone) in combination with a macrolide (azithromycin). The recommended therapy provided statistically lower percentage of negative pneumonia processes and decreased the treatment expenditures. PMID:20052921

  16. Overview of recent studies of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, K; Singer, M; Valappil, T; Nambiar, S; Lin, D; Cox, E

    2008-12-01

    All recent studies of antibacterial drugs for the indication of community-acquired pneumonia submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration have been designed as noninferiority studies. We provide a summary of results of 7 recent clinical studies of oral antibacterial drugs for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. In these 7 studies, the majority of patients enrolled had Pneumonia Patient Outcomes Research Team scores of I or II. The percentage of randomized subjects with pathogens identified at baseline ranged from 47% to 76%, and the percentage of subjects with Streptoccocus pneumoniae isolated at baseline ranged from approximately 6% to 20%. The primary end point in these studies was clinical cure, assessed 7-21 days after completion of therapy. Clinical cure rates were >80% in the intent-to-treat populations and >90% in the per-protocol populations. We also briefly summarize the results from several recently submitted clinical studies of intravenously administered antibacterial drugs for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, in which we found similar results. PMID:18986282

  17. Acinetobacter community-acquired pneumonia in a healthy child.

    PubMed

    Moreira Silva, G; Morais, L; Marques, L; Senra, V

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter is involved in a variety of infectious diseases primarily associated with healthcare. Recently there has been increasing evidence of the important role these pathogens play in community acquired infections. We report on the case of a previously healthy child, aged 28 months, admitted for fever, cough and pain on the left side of the chest, which on radiographic examination corresponded to a lower lobe necrotizing pneumonia. After detailed diagnostic work-up, community acquired Acinetobacter lwoffii pneumonia was diagnosed. The child had frequently shared respiratory equipment with elderly relatives with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. As there were no other apparent risk factors, it could be assumed that the sharing of the equipment was the source of infection. The authors wish to draw attention to this possibility, that a necrotising community-acquired pneumonia due to Acinetobacter lwoffii can occur in a previously healthy child and to the dangers of inappropriate use and poor sterilisation of nebulisers. This case is a warning of the dangers that these bacteria may pose in the future in a community setting. PMID:21963110

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  19. Sneezing during Micturition: A Possible Trigger of Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, William Derval

    2015-01-01

    A perfectly well 39-year-old man sneezed during micturition and developed classic features of acute bacterial prostatitis corroborated by laboratory evidence of prostatic inflammation/infection. The prostate-specific antigen level at presentation was 9.6 ng/mL and declined to 1.23 ng/mL one month later on levofloxacin. This is the first report in the medical literature of sneezing while voiding being a possible trigger of acute bacterial prostatitis. A biologically plausible mechanism is provided. PMID:26355536

  20. The Impact of Prior Antibiotic Therapy on Outcomes in Children Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Eran; Breuer, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Here, we review current available literature regarding the effect of prior antibiotic treatment on outcomes of children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). To date, no prospective trial has reported information regarding morbidity or mortality in this group of patients. Retrospective studies have provided evidence for the advantage of treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics in children who failed prior antibiotic therapy. We discuss the changing epidemiology of CAP in the post PCV13 and Hib vaccines era and its relevance to the outcome of pediatric patients hospitalized for CAP. Current studies still report Streptococcus pneumoniae as the most common typical bacterial causative agent in pediatric CAP. However, in children who fail to respond to guideline directed antibiotic therapy, a non-pneumococcal, possibly one of several β-lactam resistant causative bacterial agents should be considered thus clarifying the advantage for broad-spectrum empirical antibiotic treatment in this group of patients. PMID:26715113

  1. Polymicrobial community-acquired pneumonia: An emerging entity.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Civljak, Rok; Nicolini, Antonello; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common than previously recognized. This growing new entity can influence inflammation, host immunity and disease outcomes in CAP patients. However, the true incidence is complicated to determine and probably underestimated due mainly to many cases going undetected, particularly in the outpatient setting, as the diagnostic yield is restricted by the sensitivity of currently available microbiologic tests and the ability to get certain types of clinical specimens. The observed rate of polymicrobial cases may also lead to new antibiotic therapy considerations. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis, microbial interactions in pneumonia, epidemiology, biomarkers and antibiotic therapy for polymicrobial CAP. PMID:26494527

  2. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    PubMed Central

    Bhatawadekar, Sunita M

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra. PMID:23853437

  3. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Bhatawadekar, Sunita M

    2013-04-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra. PMID:23853437

  4. The Complete Genome and Phenome of a Community-Acquired Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Hassan, Karl A.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Brown, Melissa H.; Shah, Bhumika S.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections. PMID:23527001

  5. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gasem, M Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR analysis of throat swabs were concordant with those obtained with acute-phase serum samples, which suggests its potential for use as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for leptospirosis. PMID:26511741

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly: Spanish multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Zalacain, R; Torres, A; Celis, R; Blanquer, J; Aspa, J; Esteban, L; Menéndez, R; Blanquer, R; Borderías, L

    2003-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the elderly has increased as a consequence of an overall increase of the elderly population. A controversy about the aetiology and outcome of CAP in this population still exists and more epidemiological studies are needed. A prospective, 12-month, multicentre study was carried out to assess the clinical characteristics, aetiology, evolution and prognostic factors of elderly patients (> or = 65 yrs) admitted to hospital for CAP. The study included 503 patients (age 76 +/- 7 yrs). The clinical picture lasted < or = 5 days in 318 (63%) and the main clinical features were cough (n = 407, 81%) and fever (n = 380, 76%). Aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 199 (40%) cases, with a definite diagnosis obtained in 164 (33%). Of the 223 microorganisms isolated the main agents found were Streptococcus pneumoniae in 98 (49%) and Haemophilus influenzae in 27 (14%). A total of 53 patients died (11%) and the multivariate analysis showed the following factors of bad prognosis: previous bed confinement, alteration in mental status, absence of chills, plasma creatinine > or = 1.4 mg x dL(-1), oxygen tension in arterial blood/inspiratorv oxygen fraction ratio < 200 at the time of admission, and shock and renal failure during the evolution. The results of this study may aid in the management of empiric antibiotic treatment in elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia and the patients who have a greater probability of bad evolution may be identified based on the risk factors. PMID:12608444

  7. Clinical features of endemic community-acquired psittacosis.

    PubMed

    Branley, J M; Weston, K M; England, J; Dwyer, D E; Sorrell, T C

    2014-01-01

    Following a large outbreak of community-acquired psittacosis in 2002 in residents of the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, Australia, we reviewed new cases in this area over a 7-year period from 2003 to 2009. Using the 2010 criteria from the Centers for Disease Control National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, 85 patients with possible psittacosis were identified, of which 48 were identified as definite or probable infection. Clinical features of these cases are summarized. In addition to Chlamydia-specific serology, specimens, where available, underwent nucleic acid testing for chlamydial DNA using real-time PCR. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA was detected in samples from 23 patients. Four of 18 specimens were culture positive. This is the first description of endemic psittacosis, and is characterized in this location by community-acquired psittacosis resulting from inadvertent exposure to birds. The disease is likely to be under-diagnosed, and may often be mistaken for gastroenteritis or meningitis given the frequency of non-respiratory symptoms, particularly without a history of contact with birds. Clinical characteristics of endemic and outbreak-associated cases were similar. The nature of exposure, risk factors and reasons for the occurrence of outbreaks of psittacosis require further investigation. PMID:25356332

  8. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. PMID:24702978

  9. [CAPNETZ. The competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)].

    PubMed

    Suttorp, Norbert; Welte, Tobias; Marre, Reinhard; Stenger, Steffen; Pletz, Mathias; Rupp, Jan; Schütte, Hartwig; Rohde, Gernot

    2016-04-01

    CAPNETZ is a medical competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which was funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research. It has accomplished seminal work on pneumonia over the last 15 years. A unique infrastructure was established which has so far allowed us to recruit and analyze more than 11,000 patients. The CAPNETZ cohort is the largest cohort worldwide and the results obtained relate to all relevant aspects of CAP management (epidemiology, risk stratification via biomarkers or clinical scores, pathogen spectrum, pathogen resistance, antibiotic management, prevention and health care research). Results were published in more than 150 journals and informed the preparation and update of the national S3-guideline. CAPNETZ was also the foundation for further networks like the Pneumonia Research Network on Genetic Resistance and Susceptibility for the Evolution of Severe Sepsis) (PROGRESS), the Systems Medicine of Community Acquired Pneumonia Network (CAPSyS) and SFB-TR84 (Sonderforschungsbereich - Transregio 84). The main recipients (Charité Berlin, University Clinic Ulm and the Hannover Medical School) founded the CAPNETZ foundation and transferred all data and materials rights to this foundation. Moreover, the ministry granted the CAPNETZ foundation the status of being eligible to apply for research proposals and receive research funds. Since 2013 the CAPNETZ foundation has been an associated member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL). Thus, a solid foundation has been set up for CAPNETZ to continue its success story. PMID:26984399

  10. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  11. Faropenem medoxomil: a treatment option in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hadley, James A; Tillotson, Glenn S; Tosiello, Robert; Echols, Roger M

    2006-12-01

    Faropenem medoxomil is the first oral penem in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics. Faropenem medoxomil has excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and other key pathogens implicated in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Clinical studies have demonstrated that, in the treatment of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults, 7 days of treatment with faropenem medoxomil is as clinically and bacteriologically effective as 10 days of treatment with cefuroxime axetil. One study showed faropenem medoxomil to be superior to cefuroxime axetil. Overall, the safety profile of faropenem medoxomil is similar to that of most comparators. Specifically, the minimal impact of faropenem medoxomil on the gastrointestinal flora leads to less diarrhea and other adverse events than coamoxicillin-clavulanate. Faropenem medoxomil has almost no drug-drug interactions and little requirement for dosage adjustments in the typical acute rhinosinusitis population. PMID:17181408

  12. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. PMID:25488029

  13. Aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Donald; Jawad, Issrah; Ahmad, Aziez; Lukšić, Ivana; Nair, Harish; Zgaga, Lina; Theodoratou, Evropi; Rudan, Igor; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Campbell, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Background 99% of the approximate 1 million annual neonatal deaths from life-threatening invasive bacterial infections occur in developing countries, at least 50% of which are from home births or community settings. Data concerning aetiology of sepsis in these settings are necessary to inform targeted therapy and devise management guidelines. This review describes and analyses the bacterial aetiology of community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries. Methods A search of Medline, Embase, Global Health and Web of Knowledge, limited to post-1980, found 27 relevant studies. Data on aetiology were extracted, tabulated and analysed along with data on incidence, risk factors, case fatality rates and antimicrobial sensitivity. Results The most prevalent pathogens overall were Staphylococcus aureus (14.9%), Escherichia coli (12.2%), and Klebsiella species (11.6%). However, variations were observed both between global regions and age-of-onset categories. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae were most prevalent in Africa, while Klebsiella was highly prevalent in South-East Asia. A notably higher prevalence of Group B Streptococcus was present in neonates aged 7 days or less. The highest case fatality rates were recorded in South-East Asia. Klebsiella species showed highest antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion Data on community-acquired neonatal sepsis in developing countries are limited. Future research should focus on areas of high disease burden with relative paucity of data. Research into maternal and neonatal vaccination strategies and improved diagnostics is also needed. All of this could contribute to the formulation of community-based care packages, the implementation of which has significant potential to lower overall neonatal mortality and hence advance progress towards the attainment of Millennium Development Goal 4. PMID:23198116

  14. Use of penetrating keratoplasty in acute bacterial keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J C

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with bacterial keratitis had penetrating keratoplasties performed for deep indolent ulceration or descemetoceles, during the acute period. The period in hospital (17.6 days) was significantly lower than for a control group (35.4 days) who were treated medically and had subsequent grafts. The number of grafts remaining clear was similar, 70% and 72% respectively. Eleven patients (48%) of those who had an acute graft achieved corrected visual acuities of 6/12 or better. No cases of reinfection occurred and no eyes were lost. Images PMID:3521719

  15. Sporadic community-acquired Legionnaires' disease in France: a 2-year national matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Che, D; Campese, C; Santa-Olalla, P; Jacquier, G; Bitar, D; Bernillon, P; Desenclos, J-C

    2008-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease (LD) is an aetiology of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in adults, with a high case-fatality ratio (CFR). We conducted a matched case-control study to identify risk factors for sporadic, community-acquired LD. Cases of sporadic, community-acquired and biologically confirmed LD, in metropolitan France from 1 September 2002 to 31 September 2004, were matched with a control subject according to age, sex, underlying illness and location of residence within 5 km. We performed a conditional logistic regression on various host-related factors and exposures. Analysis was done on 546 matched pairs. The CFR was 3.5%. Age ranged from 18-93 years (mean 57 years), with a 3.6 male:female sex ratio. Cases were more likely to have smoked with the documentation of a dose-effect relation, to have travelled with a stay in a hotel (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.6-14.2), or to have used a wash-hand basin for personal hygiene (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.7) than controls. Tobacco and travel have been previously described as risk factors for LD, but this is the first time that such a dose-effect for tobacco has been documented among sporadic cases. These findings will provide helpful knowledge about LD and help practitioners in identifying patients at high risk. PMID:18211725

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Marques, M Raquel; Nunes, António; Sousa, Cristina; Moura, Fausto; Gouveia, João; Ramos, Armindo

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of sepsis in adult critical care. We present a retrospective study of patients admitted to a polyvalent intensive care unit with CAP from 1st June 2004 - 31st December 2006. We analysed 76 patients with a mean age of 62.88 (18.75) years. Mean APACHE II score was 24.88 (9.75). Mean SAPS II was 51.18 (18.05), with a predicted mortality of 47.27%. Aetiology was identified in 42.1% of the patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent aetiological agent, but the group of aetiological agents more frequently identified was Gram-negative enteric bacilli. Levofloxacine was the most frequently previously used antibio tic. The most frequently used antibiotherapy scheme was the association ceftriaxone - azithromicine. It was possible to evaluate suitability of treatment in 32 patients; 27 were on suitable antibiotherapy regimes. 66 patients (86.8%) were on respirators, with a median length of 4 days. The median length of stay was 5.3 days. ICU mortality was 36.8% and hospital mortality 55.26%. SAPS II, CRP (C-reactive protein), potassium and initial unsuitable antibiotherapy were related to mortality. After multivariate analysis, only SAPS II maintained statistical significance. Use of antibiotics should be judicious, taking the most frequent agents and their susceptibility into consideration. PMID:20437001

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia related to intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael; van der Eerden, Menno; Chalmers, James; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide; the annual incidence of CAP among adults in Europe has ranged from 1.5 to 1.7 per 1000 population. Intracellular bacteria are common causes of CAP. However, there is considerable variation in the reported incidence between countries and change over time. The intracellular pathogens that are well established as causes of pneumonia are Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and Coxiella burnetii. Since it is known that antibiotic treatment for severe CAP is empiric and includes coverage of typical and atypical pathogens, microbiological diagnosis bears an important relationship to prognosis of pneumonia. Factors such as adequacy of initial antibiotic or early de-escalation of therapy are important variables associated with outcomes, especially in severe cases. Intracellular pathogens sometimes appear to cause more severe disease with respiratory failure and multisystem dysfunction associated with fatal outcomes. The clinical relevance of intracellular pathogens in severe CAP has not been specifically investigated. We review the prevalence, general characteristics, and outcomes of severe CAP cases caused by intracellular pathogens. PMID:27276986

  18. Inpatient Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonias with Integrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Diederich, Klas; Kusserow, Maria; Laubersheimer, Andreas; Kramer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of the presented observational case series was to evaluate the experience in treating patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) within integrative medicine, particularly anthroposophic medicine in a well-experienced and specialized unit. Patients and Methods. Patients with proven CAP were evaluated (CAP-study group) based on a retrospective chart review. To estimate the severity of pneumonia, the pneumonia severity index (PSI) was applied. Treatment efficacy was evaluated regarding body temperature, CRP level, leukocytes blood count, the need to be treated on ICU, and mortality. Results were compared with the inpatient data of the Pneumonia PORT Validation Cohort. Results. 15/18 patients of the CAP-study group belonged to risk class groups I–III (low and moderate risk), 2 patients to risk class IV, and one patient to risk class V (severe pneumonia). 16/18 patients were treated with anthroposophic medicine only and 2/18 got additionally antibiotic therapy (both of risk class IV). A significant reduction of body temperature, CRP level, and leukocytes blood count has been obtained by applying anthroposophic medicine, while neither complications nor pneumonia-related death occurred. Compared with the control group there was no significant difference in mortality rate, whereby no patient had to be treated on the ICU, but the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer in the presented series. Conclusion. Inpatient treatment of CAP with anthroposophic medicine without the use of antibiotics may achieve reasonable results in selected cases. Additional larger sized prospective controlled trials should further clarify the role of AM in the treatment of CAP. PMID:23762145

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  20. Making sense of scoring systems in community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    The site of care decision is one of the most important in the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Several scoring systems have been developed to predict mortality risk in CAP, and these have been applied to guide physicians about whether patients should be admitted to the hospital or to the intensive care unit (ICU). However, these tools were initially developed to predict mortality risk, and studies have demonstrated that the risk for death does not always equate with need for hospitalization or ICU care. The most widely studied scoring systems are the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and the CURB-65 (a modification of the British Thoracic Society rule). Each has advantages and limitations, with the more-complex PSI developed to identify low-mortality risk patients, and the CURB-65, which is simpler, being developed to easily identify more severely ill individuals. No scoring system can replace clinical judgement about the admission decision, and prospective studies have shown that physicians still admit at least 30-60% of low mortality risk patients when using the PSI to guide this decision. Limitations of these prognostic tools include their variable utility in the elderly, and their failure to include certain comorbidities (COPD, immune suppression) and social factors, in their calculations. The need for ICU care is also not well-defined by measuring the PSI or CURB-65, and other tools such as those developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society (IDSA/ATS) guideline committee and the SMART-COP rule may have greater utility for this purpose. In the future, measurements of serum biomarkers, such as procalcitonin, may augment the information provided by prognostic scoring tools for patients with CAP. PMID:19353770

  1. [A community acquired pneumonia case caused by Ralstonia pickettii].

    PubMed

    Küçükbayrak, Abdulkadir; Uğurman, Feza; Dereli, Necla; Cizmeci, Zeynep; Günay, Ersin

    2009-04-01

    Ralstonia pickettii, formerly known as Burkholderia pickettii, is a non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus. It is emerging as an opportunistic pathogen both in the hospital setting and in the environment, leading to outbreaks especially in the intensive care units. The available literature revealed two case reports of pneumonia associated with R. pickettii in adults. In this report, a case of pneumoniae due to R. pickettii, in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was presented. Fifty-six years old male patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of shortness of breath, cough, purulent sputum, weakness, fatigue and green colorred diarrhea lacking blood. Lung auscultation revealed decreased respiratory sounds in the right lower lobe. Laboratory findings yielded decreased arterial pH and paO2 and increased pCO2 values, while hemoglobin, hematocrite, blood urea and creatinine levels were increased. Chest X-ray showed an infiltration on right lower zone. The patient was intubated and imipenem 1 x 500 mg/day and netilmicin 1 x 80 mg/day were initiated. Deep tracheal aspirate specimen revealed gram-negative rods and leukocytes, and cultures yielded growth of non-fermentative gram-negative bacilli on blood agar and EMB agar. These bacilli were identified as R. pickettii by using VITEK 2 system (bi-oMerieux Inc, Mercy L'etoil, France). Antibiotic sensitivity test performed by VITEK 2 GP system (bioMerieux Inc, Mercy L'etoil, France) revealed sensitivity to ceftriaxone, imipenem/cilastatin, piperacillin/tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, cefoperazone-sulbactam and ciprofloxacin. Treatment with imipenem/cilastatin was continued for 14 days and the patient was completely recovered. This case was presented in order to call attention to R. pickettii as a pathogen that may cause community-acquired lower respiratory tract infection. PMID:19621622

  2. [Multidisciplinary guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Barberán, José; Falguera, Miquel; Menéndez, Rosario; Molina, Jesús; Olaechea, Pedro; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2013-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious respiratory disease with an incidence that ranges from 3 to 8 cases per 1,000 inhabitants per year. This incidence increases with age and comorbidities. Forty per cent of CAP patients require hospitalization and around 10% of these patients are admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Several studies have suggested that the implementation of clinical guidelines has a positive impact in the outcome of patients including mortality and length of stay. The more recent and used guidelines are those from Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society, published in 2007, the 2009 from the British Thoracic Society, and that from the European Respiratory Society/European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, published in 2010. In Spain, the most recently released guideline is the Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica-2011 guideline. The present guidelines GNAC are designed to be used by the majority of health-care professionals that can participate in the care of CAP patients including diagnosis, decision of hospital and ICU admission, treatment and prevention. The Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano (CCIB) has participated in summarizing the previous guidelines and in the bibliography search. For each one of the following sections the panel of experts has developed a table with recommendations classified according to its evidence, strength and practical applicability using the Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations (GRADE) system: 1. Epidemiology, microbiological etiology and antibiotic resistances.2. Clinical and microbiological diagnosis.3. Prognostic scales and decision of hospital admission.4. ICU admission criteria. 5. Empirical and definitive antibiotic treatment.6. Treatment failure. 7. Prevention. PMID:23276610

  3. Inhaled drugs as risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J; Bolíbar, I; Serra-Prat, M; Palomera, E; Roig, J; Hospital, I; Carandell, E; Agustí, M; Ayuso, P; Estela, A; Torres, A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of inhaled drugs in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is unclear. This case-control study was designed to determine whether inhaled drugs were risk factors for CAP. All incident cases of confirmed CAP that occurred over 1 yr in patients with chronic bronchitis (CB), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma were included, as well as CB, COPD and asthma controls. Risk factors for CAP and inhaled treatment were recorded during a personal interview. An effect of inhaled drugs on the risk of CAP was observed in COPD and asthma patients after adjusting for the effect of other respiratory diseases and their concomitant treatments. In COPD patients, inhaled steroids had a risk OR of 3.26 (95% CI 1.07-9.98) and in asthma patients inhaled anticholinergics had a risk OR of 8.80 (95% CI 1.02-75.7). In CB patients, no association with CAP was observed for any inhaler. These effects were independent of adjusting variables related to severity and other respiratory and non-respiratory risk factors for CAP, including vaccines. Inhaled β(2)-adrenergic agonists did not show a significant effect on the risk of CAP in any of the respiratory diseases. Inhaled steroids may favour CAP in COPD patients, whereas anticholinergics may favour CAP in asthma patients. It is difficult to differentiate the effect of inhaled therapy from the effect of COPD or asthma severity on the risk of CAP, and these relationships may not be causal, but could call attention to inhaled therapy in COPD and asthma patients. PMID:20525710

  4. Diabetes hinders community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Boavida, J M; Raposo, J F; Froes, F; Nunes, B; Ribeiro, R T; Penha-Gonçalves, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and its impact on hospital length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Research design and methods We carried out a retrospective, nationwide register analysis of CAP in adult patients admitted to Portuguese hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Anonymous data from 157 291 adult patients with CAP were extracted from the National Hospital Discharge Database and we performed a DM-conditioned analysis stratified by age, sex and year of hospitalization. Results The 74 175 CAP episodes that matched the inclusion criteria showed a high burden of DM that tended to increase over time, from 23.7% in 2009 to 28.1% in 2012. Interestingly, patients with CAP had high DM prevalence in the context of the national DM prevalence. Episodes of CAP in patients with DM had on average 0.8 days longer hospital stay as compared to patients without DM (p<0.0001), totaling a surplus of 15 370 days of stay attributable to DM in 19 212 admissions. In-hospital mortality was also significantly higher in patients with CAP who have DM (15.2%) versus those who have DM (13.5%) (p=0.002). Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DM prevalence was significantly increased within CAP hospital admissions, reinforcing other studies’ findings that suggest that DM is a risk factor for CAP. Since patients with CAP who have DM have longer hospitalization time and higher mortality rates, these results hold informative value for patient guidance and healthcare strategies. PMID:27252873

  5. Viral infection in community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Burk, Michael; El-Kersh, Karim; Saad, Mohamed; Wiemken, Timothy; Ramirez, Julio; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The advent of PCR has improved the identification of viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Several studies have used PCR to establish the importance of viruses in the aetiology of CAP.We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that reported the proportion of viral infection detected via PCR in patients with CAP. We excluded studies with paediatric populations. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with viral infection. The secondary outcome was short-term mortality.Our review included 31 studies. Most obtained PCR via nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab. The pooled proportion of patients with viral infection was 24.5% (95% CI 21.5-27.5%). In studies that obtained lower respiratory samples in >50% of patients, the proportion was 44.2% (95% CI 35.1-53.3%). The odds of death were higher in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.32-3.31).Viral infection is present in a high proportion of patients with CAP. The true proportion of viral infection is probably underestimated because of negative test results from nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab PCR. There is increased mortality in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection. PMID:27246595

  6. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chiner, Eusebi; Llombart, Mónica; Valls, Joan; Pastor, Esther; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Andreu, Ada Luz; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can predispose individuals to lower airway infections and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to upper airway microaspiration. This study evaluated the association between OSA and CAP. Methods We performed a case-control study that included 82 patients with CAP and 41 patients with other infections (control group). The controls were matched according to age, sex and body mass index (BMI). A respiratory polygraph (RP) was performed upon admission for patients in both groups. The severity of pneumonia was assessed according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). The associations between CAP and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), OSA, OSA severity and other sleep-related variables were evaluated using logistic regression models. The associations between OSA, OSA severity with CAP severity were evaluated with linear regression models and non-parametric tests. Findings No significant differences were found between CAP and control patients regarding anthropometric variables, toxic habits and risk factors for CAP. Patients with OSA, defined as individuals with an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) ≥10, showed an increased risk of CAP (OR = 2·86, 95%CI 1·29–6·44, p = 0·01). Patients with severe OSA (AHI≥30) also had a higher risk of CAP (OR = 3·18, 95%CI 1·11–11·56, p = 0·047). In addition, OSA severity, defined according to the AHI quartile, was also significantly associated with CAP (p = 0·007). Furthermore, OSA was significantly associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0002), and OSA severity was also associated with CAP severity (p = 0·0006). Conclusions OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP when compared to patients admitted to the hospital for non-respiratory infections. In addition, OSA and OSA severity are associated with CAP severity. These results support the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of CAP and could have clinical implications. This link between OSA and infection risk

  7. Etiology of community acquired pneumonia among children in India: prospective, cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Joseph L.; Singhi, Sunit; Ray, Pallab; Hagel, Eva; Saghafian–Hedengren, Shanie; Bansal, Arun; Ygberg, Sofia; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Kumar, B V Ravi; Nilsson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant problem in developing countries, and confirmation of microbial etiology is important for individual, as well as public health. However, there is paucity of data from a large cohort, examining multiple biological specimens for diverse pathogens (bacteria and viruses). The Community Acquired Pneumonia Etiology Study (CAPES) was designed to address this knowledge gap. Methods We enrolled children with CAP (based on WHO IMCI criteria of tachypnea with cough or breathing difficulty) over 24 consecutive months, and recorded presenting symptoms, risk factors, clinical signs, and chest radiography. We performed blood and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) bacterial cultures, and serology (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae). We also performed multiplex PCR for 25 bacterial/viral species in a subgroup representing 20% of the cohort. Children requiring endotracheal intubation underwent culture and PCR of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. Findings We enrolled 2345 children. NPA and blood cultures yielded bacteria in only 322 (13.7%) and 49 (2.1%) children respectively. In NPA, Streptococcus pneumoniae (79.1%) predominated, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (9.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (6.8%). In blood, S. aureus (30.6%) dominated, followed by S. pneumoniae (20.4%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.2%). M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae serology were positive in 4.3% and 1.1% respectively. Multiplex PCR in 428 NPA specimens identified organisms in 422 (98.6%); of these 352 (82.2%) had multiple organisms and only 70 (16.4%) had a single organism viz. S. pneumoniae: 35 (50%), Cytomegalovirus (CMV): 13 (18.6%), Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): 9 (12.9%), other viruses: 6 (8.7%), S. aureus: 5 (7.1%), and H. influenzae: 2 (2.9%). BAL PCR (n = 30) identified single pathogens in 10 (S. pneumoniae–3, CMV–3, S. aureus–2, H. influenzae–2) and multiple pathogens in 18 children. There were

  8. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: from FOCUS to CAPTURE.

    PubMed

    Carreno, Joseph J; Lodise, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline hereafter) is the latest addition to the armamentarium for the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), which is a recent FDA indication that centers on individuals with documented bacterial pneumonias that arise in the community setting. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the major findings from the Phase III CAP clinical trials as well as the clinical experience with ceftaroline among patients with CAP in the "Ceftaroline Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry" (CAPTURE). In its two Phase III CAP trials, ceftaroline was compared to ceftriaxone among adults with radiographically confirmed CAP requiring hospitalization who were classified as Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III or IV. Among patients with CAP, clinical success at test of cure was 84.3% vs 77.7% (difference 6.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-11.8%) in those treated with ceftaroline and ceftriaxone, respectively, across the two Phase III clinical trials. Among patients with a culture-confirmed CABP, day 4 response rates were numerically higher, albeit non-significant, among patients that received ceftaroline vs. ceftriaxone (69.5% for ceftaroline vs. 59.4% for ceftriaxone, difference 10.1%, 95% CI, -0.6% to 20.6%). The efficacy of ceftaroline is supported by real-world observational data from CAPTURE for patients with both CAP and CABP. In addition, the CAPTURE program afforded an opportunity to assess the outcomes of patients who were excluded or limited in the original Phase III trials in a non-comparative fashion. These underrepresented patient populations with CAP included: patients that received prior antibiotics, patients in the ICU, patients with severe renal dysfunction, and those with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from respiratory or

  9. Comprehensive Molecular Testing for Respiratory Pathogens in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gadsby, Naomi J.; Russell, Clark D.; McHugh, Martin P.; Mark, Harriet; Conway Morris, Andrew; Laurenson, Ian F.; Hill, Adam T.; Templeton, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The frequent lack of a microbiological diagnosis in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) impairs pathogen-directed antimicrobial therapy. This study assessed the use of comprehensive multibacterial, multiviral molecular testing, including quantification, in adults hospitalized with CAP. Methods. Clinical and laboratory data were collected for 323 adults with radiologically-confirmed CAP admitted to 2 UK tertiary care hospitals. Sputum (96%) or endotracheal aspirate (4%) specimens were cultured as per routine practice and also tested with fast multiplex real-time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) assays for 26 respiratory bacteria and viruses. Bacterial loads were also calculated for 8 bacterial pathogens. Appropriate pathogen-directed therapy was retrospectively assessed using national guidelines adapted for local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results. Comprehensive molecular testing of single lower respiratory tract (LRT) specimens achieved pathogen detection in 87% of CAP patients compared with 39% with culture-based methods. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the main agents detected, along with a wide variety of typical and atypical pathogens. Viruses were present in 30% of cases; 82% of these were codetections with bacteria. Most (85%) patients had received antimicrobials in the 72 hours before admission. Of these, 78% had a bacterial pathogen detected by PCR but only 32% were culture-positive (P < .0001). Molecular testing had the potential to enable de-escalation in number and/or spectrum of antimicrobials in 77% of patients. Conclusions. Comprehensive molecular testing significantly improves pathogen detection in CAP, particularly in antimicrobial-exposed patients, and requires only a single LRT specimen. It also has the potential to enable early de-escalation from broad-spectrum empirical antimicrobials to pathogen-directed therapy. PMID:26747825

  10. Severe community-acquired pneumonia: timely management measures in the first 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Phua, Jason; Dean, Nathan C; Guo, Qi; Kuan, Win Sen; Lim, Hui Fang; Lim, Tow Keang

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) range from 17 to 48 % in published studies.In this review, we searched PubMed for relevant papers published between 1981 and June 2016 and relevant files. We explored how early and aggressive management measures, implemented within 24 hours of recognition of severe CAP and carried out both in the emergency department and in the ICU, decrease mortality in severe CAP.These measures begin with the use of severity assessment tools and the application of care bundles via clinical decision support tools. The bundles include early guideline-concordant antibiotics including macrolides, early haemodynamic support (lactate measurement, intravenous fluids, and vasopressors), and early respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannulae, lung-protective ventilation, prone positioning, and neuromuscular blockade for acute respiratory distress syndrome).While the proposed interventions appear straightforward, multiple barriers to their implementation exist. To successfully decrease mortality for severe CAP, early and close collaboration between emergency medicine and respiratory and critical care medicine teams is required. We propose a workflow incorporating these interventions. PMID:27567896

  11. Vitamin D level and risk of community-acquired pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Jovanovich, Anna J; Ginde, Adit A; Holmen, John; Jablonski, Kristen; Allyn, Rebecca L; Kendrick, Jessica; Chonchol, Michel

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OH)D levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OH)D levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% CI 1.08-6.08) were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OH)D levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11-2.77) were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis. PMID:24918697

  12. Lemierre Syndrome Secondary to Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Associated with Cavernous Sinus Thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Craig; Josiah, Anne F.; Fortes, Manuel; Menaker, Jay; Cole, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lemierre’s Syndrome (LS) is a highly aggressive rare disease process with a predilection for young, healthy adolescents. Often beginning with a primary cervicofacial infection, LS rapidly progresses to thrombophlebitis of the cerebral vasculature, metastatic infection, and septicemia. Untreated LS can be rapidly fatal. Thrombus within the cerebral vasculature can have devastating neurological effects. Advances in antibacterial therapy have resulted in a global decline in the incidence of LS, and clinicians may not consider LS early in the disease process. While the mortality of LS has declined, the morbidity associated with the disease has increased, particularly the neurological sequelae. Objectives This report will provide readers with a better understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, evaluation methods, and appropriate treatment of LS. Case Report We present an atypical case of LS secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection progressing to bilateral cavernous sinus and ophthalmic vein thromboses with resultant binocular vision loss secondary to optic nerve and retinal ischemia. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of early recognition of LS in the setting of a community-acquired MRSA infection as the unifying condition in a young patient with multiple acute neurologic impairments. PMID:22989693

  13. Detection Of Viral And Bacterial Pathogens In Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Vrtis, Rose; Barlow, Shari; Muller, Daniel; Gern, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role of bacteria in acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) of adults and interactions with viral infections is incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that bacterial co-infection during ARI adds to airway inflammation and illness severity. Methods Two groups of 97 specimens each were randomly selected from multiplex-PCR identified virus-positive and virus-negative nasal specimens obtained from adults with new onset ARI, and 40 control specimens were collected from healthy adults. All specimens were analyzed for Haemophilus influenza(HI), Moraxella catarrhalis(MC) and Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) by quantitative-PCR. General linear models tested for relationships between respiratory pathogens, biomarkers (nasal wash neutrophils and CXCL8), and ARI-severity. Results Nasal specimens from adults with ARIs were more likely to contain bacteria (37% overall; HI=28%, MC=14%, SP=7%) compared to specimens from healthy adults (5% overall; HI=0%, MC=2.5%, SP=2.5%;p<0.001). Among ARI specimens, bacteria were more likely to be detected among virus-negative specimens compared to virus-positive specimens (46% vs. 27%;p=0.0046). The presence of bacteria was significantly associated with increased CXCL8 and neutrophils, but not increased symptoms. Conclusion Pathogenic bacteria were more often detected in virus-negative ARI, and also associated with increased inflammatory biomarkers. These findings suggest the possibility that bacteria may augment virus-induced ARI and contribute to airway inflammation. Summary We tested whether bacterial pathogens were associated with ARI illness and inflammation. Bacteria were detected more often in nasal secretions during ARI, especially in samples without detectable viruses, and were associated with increased airway inflammation, but not increased symptoms. PMID:24211414

  14. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Suigo, Giulia; Lonni, Sara; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The elderly population has exponentially increased in the last decades and the current epidemiological trends indicate that it is expected to further increase. Therefore, recognizing the special needs of older people is of paramount importance. In this review we address the main differences between elderly and adult patients with pneumonia. We focus on several aspects, including the atypical clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly, the methods to assess severity of illness, the appropriate setting of care, and the management of comorbidities. We also discuss how to approach the common complications of severe pneumonia, including acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Moreover, we debate whether or not elderly patients are at higher risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and which risk factors should be considered when choosing the antibiotic therapy. We highlight the differences in the definition of clinical stability and treatment failure between adults and elderly patients. Finally, we review the main outcomes, preventive and supportive measures to be considered in elderly patients with pneumonia. PMID:24360244

  15. Gender and Age-Dependent Etiology of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Magliano, Enrico; Grazioli, Vittorio; Deflorio, Loredana; Leuci, Antonia Isabella; Mattina, Roberto; Romano, Paolo; Cocuzza, Clementina Elvezia

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most frequent community-acquired infections worldwide. Escherichia coli is the most common UTI pathogen although underlying host factors such as patients' age and gender may influence prevalence of causative agents. In this study, 61 273 consecutive urine samples received over a 22-month period from outpatients clinics of an urban area of north Italy underwent microbiological culture with subsequent bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive samples. A total of 13 820 uropathogens were isolated and their prevalence analyzed according to patient's gender and age group. Overall Escherichia coli accounted for 67.6% of all isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.8%), Enterococcus faecalis (6.3%), Proteus mirabilis (5.2%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5%). Data stratification according to both age and gender showed E. coli isolation rates to be lower in both males aged ≥60 years (52.2%), E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa being more prevalent in this group (11.6% and 7.8%, resp.), as well as in those aged ≤14 years (51.3%) in whom P. mirabilis prevalence was found to be as high as 21.2%. Streptococcus agalactiae overall prevalence was found to be 2.3% although it was shown to occur most frequently in women aged between 15 and 59 years (4.1%). Susceptibility of E. coli to oral antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: fosfomycin (72.9%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (72.9%), ciprofloxacin (76.8%), ampicillin (48.0%), and amoxicillin/clavulanate (77.5%). In conclusion, both patients' age and gender are significant factors in determining UTIs etiology; they can increase accuracy in defining the causative uropathogen as well as providing useful guidance to empiric treatment. PMID:22629135

  16. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mpenge, Mbiye A; MacGowan, Alasdair P

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates), Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates), Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. PMID:25897241

  17. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mpenge, Mbiye A; MacGowan, Alasdair P

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates), Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates), Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. PMID:25897241

  18. Severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia in immunocompetent adults: chest radiographic and CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dingyu; Fu, Yangyang; Wang, Zhiwei; Cao, Jian; Walline, Joseph; Zhu, Huadong

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe adenovirus pneumonia and its associated imaging features are well-described in immunocompromised patients but are rare and poorly understood in immunocompetent adults. We sought to describe the radiographic and CT findings of severe adenovirus community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in eight immunocompetent adults. Methods We reviewed systematically chest imaging manifestations of laboratory-confirmed severe adenovirus pneumonia in eight immunocompetent adults from April 2012 to April 2014. Results All patients showed abnormal results on initial chest radiograph and CT, with the exception of one normal initial chest radiograph. The abnormalities of the initial chest radiographs were unilateral (n=4) or bilateral (n=3), including consolidation (n=4), dense patchy opacity (n=3), ground glass opacity (GGO) (n=1), and pleural effusion (n=1). The initial CT findings consisted of unilateral (n=5) and bilateral (n=3) abnormalities, including consolidation (n=8), GGO (n=2), pleural effusion (n=3) and small nodules (n=1). Focal consolidation was the predominant finding in six patients whose initial CT scans were examined within one week after illness onset. Follow-up radiologic findings showed rapid development of bilateral consolidation within ten days after illness onset, usually accompanied by adjacent ground-glass opacity and pleural effusion. The parenchymal abnormalities began to absorb around two weeks after illness onset, with no appearances of fibrosis. Conclusions Severe adenovirus CAP in immunocompetent adults mainly appears as focal consolidation followed by rapid progression to bilateral consolidation, usually accompanied by adjacent GGO and pleural effusion, which may resemble bacterial pneumonia. Adenovirus should be considered in severe pneumonia cases with negative cultures and failure to respond to antibiotics. PMID:27162658

  19. Oritavancin for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Julia A.; Fowler, Vance G.; Corey, G. Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inpatient treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) exerts a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. Oritavancin is a concentration-dependent, rapidly bactericidal agent approved for the treatment of ABSSSI. Its prolonged half-life with one-time intravenous (IV) dosing offers a potential solution to this burden. In addition, oritavancin represents an alternative therapy for Streptococci and multidrug resistant gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Animal models have also shown promising results with oritavancin for other disease states including those that require long courses of IV therapy. Areas covered This review covers oritavancin’s basic chemistry, spectrum of activity, pharmacodynamics/ pharmacokinetics, efficacy in clinical trials, and provides expert opinion on future directions. To compose this review, a search of PubMed was performed, and articles written in the English language were selected based on full text availability. Expert Opinion If oritavancin is proven to be a cost-effective strategy for outpatient treatment and prevents complications of prolonged IV therapy, it will be sought as an alternative antibiotic therapy for ABSSSI. In addition, further clinical data demonstrating efficacy in gram-positive infections requiring prolonged therapy such as endocarditis and osteomyelitis could support oritavancin’s success in the current market. PMID:25803197

  20. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults: a hospital based study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdulrab, Amin; Algobaty, Faker; Salem, Ahmed K; Mohammed, Y A K

    2010-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity with high rates of long-term neurological sequelae. To determine the clinical presentation, complications, and outcome of acute meningitis in Yemen, a retrospective study in patients 15 years or older with acute bacterial meningitis who were admitted into Al-Thawra Teaching Hospital in Sana'a from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out. There were 121 patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture was performed in 112 (92.6%). The most common pathogen was Streptococcus pneumoniae found in 47.4% of positive cultures, Neisseria meningitidis in 33.9%, and Haemophilus influenzae in 10.2%. The classical triad of acute bacterial meningitis was found in 65% of cases. The mortality rate was 22.3%, with 27 patients dying during hospitalization. S. pneumoniae had a case fatality rate of 35.7%. Frequent complications were impaired consciousness, recurrent convulsion, and chest infection, which occurred in 30.6, 16.5, and 10.7% of the patients, respectively. Risk factors for death among those with acute bacterial meningitis included older age (>or=45 years), altered mental status, chest infection, and S. pneumoniae infection. This study highlights the importance of bacterial meningitis as a serious disease of adults in Yemen and the need for effective methods to prevent its complications. PMID:20332577

  1. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  2. Streptoccocus pyogenes: a forgotten cause of severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Birch, C; Gowardman, J

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Lancefield Group A streptoccocus) that was complicated by a streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Although this micro-organism is an uncommon cause of community-acquired pneumonia, previously well individuals may be infected and the clinical course may be fulminant. A household contact was the likely point of infection. Invasive group A streptococcal disease continues to remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the community and therefore will continue to be encountered by intensive care physicians. Treatment of Group A streptococcal infection remains penicillin; however, clindamycin should be added in severe infection. PMID:10701045

  3. Community-acquired soft-tissue infections caused by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Lam, S; Isenberg, H D; Edwards, B; Hilton, E

    1994-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans has rarely been implicated in human infections. Previously reported cases of infections caused by this bacterium were nosocomially acquired. We report two cases of community-acquired soft-tissue infections due to F. oryzihabitans. It remains unclear how the patients were exposed to the organism. PMID:8075277

  4. Liver Abscess Caused by Infection with Community-Acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Breurec, Sebastien; Melot, Benedicte; Hoen, Bruno; Passet, Virginie; Schepers, Kinda; Bastian, Sylvaine

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of pyogenic liver abscess caused by community-acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae. The infecting isolate had 2 prominent features of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains: the capsular polysaccharide synthesis region for K1 serotype and the integrative and conjugative element ICEKp1, which encodes the virulence factors yersiniabactin, salmochelin, and RmpA. PMID:26890371

  5. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  6. Antimicrobial activity of prulifloxacin in comparison with other fluoroquinolones against community-acquired urinary and respiratory pathogens isolated in Greece.

    PubMed

    Karageorgopoulos, D E; Maraki, S; Vatopoulos, A C; Samonis, G; Schito, G C; Falagas, M E

    2013-11-01

    Prulifloxacin, the prodrug of ulifloxacin, is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone rather recently introduced in certain European countries. We compared the antimicrobial potency of ulifloxacin with that of other fluoroquinolones against common urinary and respiratory bacterial pathogens. The microbial isolates were prospectively collected between January 2007 and May 2008 from patients with community-acquired infections in Greece. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin (for respiratory isolates only), and ulifloxacin using the E-test method. The binary logarithms of the MICs [log2(MICs)] were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. A total of 409 isolates were studied. Ulifloxacin had the lowest geometric mean MIC for the 161 Escherichia coli, 59 Proteus mirabilis, and 22 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates, the second lowest geometric mean MIC for the 38 Streptococcus pyogenes respiratory isolates (after moxifloxacin), and the third lowest geometric mean MIC for the 114 Haemophilus influenzae and the 15 Moraxella catarrhalis respiratory isolates (after ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin). Compared with levofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against E. coli (p < 0.001), P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p < 0.001), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001). Compared with ciprofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p = 0.008), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001), but higher log2(MICs) against H. influenzae (p < 0.001) and M. catarrhalis (p = 0.001). In comparison with other clinically relevant fluoroquinolones, ulifloxacin had the most potent antimicrobial activity against the community-acquired urinary isolates studied and very good activity against the respiratory isolates. PMID:23686506

  7. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  8. Prescription of antibiotics in community-acquired pneumonia in children: are we following the recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca Lima, Eduardo Jorge; Lima, Débora Ellen Pessoa; Serra, George Henrique Cordeiro; Abreu e Lima, Maria Anaide Zacche S; de Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the adequacy of antibiotic prescription in children hospitalized for pneumonia in a reference pediatric hospital in Brazil. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving children aged between 1 month and 5 years who were hospitalized between October 2010 and September 2013. The classification of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was based on the clinical and radiological criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO). The analysis of antibiotic adequacy was performed according to the main guidelines on CAP treatment, which include the WHO guidelines, Brazilian Society of Pediatrics guidelines, and international guidelines (Pediatrics Infectious Diseases Society, the Infectious Disease Society of America, British Thoracic Society, and Consenso de la Sociedad latinoamericana de Infectología). A multivariate analysis was performed including variables that have statistical significance of P≤0.25 in the bivariate analysis. Results The majority of the 452 hospitalized children were classified as having severe or very severe CAP (85.18%), and inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy was started in 26.10% (118/452) of them. Ampicillin was the most used empiric antibiotic therapy (62.17%) for pneumonia, followed by a combination of ampicillin and associated with gentamicin. The initially proposed regimen was modified in 29.6% of the patients, and the most frequent change was the replacement of ampicillin by oxacillin combined with chloramphenicol. The median hospitalization time was 8.5 days, and the lethality rate was 1.55%. There was no statistical difference in adequacy in relation to the severity of pneumonia or degree of malnutrition. In the bivariate analysis, inadequacy of antibiotic therapy regimen was higher in patients undergoing oxygen therapy (P<0.05), which was given to 219 patients (48.45%). Pleural effusion was observed in 118 patients (26.11%) and was associated with higher prescription inadequacy, and it was the only factor

  9. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    PubMed

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity. PMID:27337866

  10. The Effects of Total Colectomy on Bacterial Translocation in a Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Şenocak, Rahman; Yigit, Taner; Kılbaş, Zafer; Coşkun, Ali Kağan; Harlak, Ali; Menteş, Mustafa Öner; Kılıç, Abdullah; Günal, Armağan; Kozak, Orhan

    2015-12-01

    Prevention of secondary infection is currently the main goal of treatment for acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Colon was considered as the main origin of secondary infection. Our aim was to investigate whether prophylactic total colectomy would reduce the rate of bacterial translocation and infection of pancreatic necrosis. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Pancreatitis was created by ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Rats were divided into four groups: group-1, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; group-2, laparotomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate; group-3, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of saline; and group-4, total colectomy + pancreatic ductal infusion of sodium taurocholate. Forty-eight hours later, tissue and blood samples were collected for microbiological and histopathological analysis. Total colectomy caused small bowel bacterial overgrowth with gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms. Bacterial count of gram-negative rods in the small intestine and pancreatic tissue in rats with colectomy and acute pancreatitis were significantly higher than in rats with acute pancreatitis only (group-2 versus group-4; small bowel, p = <0.001; pancreas, p = 0.002). Significant correlation was found between proximal small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic infection (r = 0,836, p = 0.001). In acute pancreatitis, prophylactic total colectomy (which can mimic colonic cleansing and reduction of colonic flora) induces small bowel bacterial overgrowth, which is associated with increased bacterial translocation to the pancreas. PMID:26730036

  11. First initial community-acquired meningitis due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli complicated with multiple aortic mycotic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, Pierre; Ettahar, Nicolas; Legout, Laurence; Meybeck, Agnes; Leroy, Olivier; Senneville, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We report the first case of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing E. coli community-acquired meningitis complicated with multiple aortic mycotic aneurysms. Because of the acute aneurysm expansion with possible impending rupture on 2 abdominal CT scan, the patient underwent prompt vascular surgery and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy but he died of a hemorrhagic shock. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing E. coli was identified from both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture before vascular treatment. The present case report does not however change the guidelines of Gram negative bacteria meningitis in adults. PMID:22321435

  12. Bacteraemia and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community acquired pneumonia: risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrús, Albert; Polverino, Eva; Villegas, Santiago; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Menéndez, Rosario; Niederman, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of blood cultures in the diagnosis of bacteraemia for community-acquired pneumonia is low. Recommendations, by guidelines, to perform blood cultures are discordant. We aimed to determine the incidence, microbial aetiology, risk factors and outcomes of bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia, including cases with antibiotic-resistant pathogens (ARP). A prospective, observational study was undertaken on consecutive adult patients admitted to the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain) with community-acquired pneumonia and blood cultures were obtained. Of the 2892 patients included, bacteraemia was present in 297 (10%) patients; 30 (10%) of whom had ARP (multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and an extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae). In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL(-1) and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. The risk factors for ARP bacteraemia were previous antibiotics and C-reactive protein <22.2 mg·dL(-1), while pleuritic pain was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis. Bacteraemia (excluding ARP), appropriate empiric treatment, neurological disease, arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction <250, pneumonia severity index risk classes IV and V, and intensive care unit admission were independently associated with a 30-day hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis. Inappropriate therapy was more frequent in ARP bacteraemia, compared with other bacteraemias (27% versus 3%, respectively, p<0.001). Antibiotic therapy protected against bacteraemia, but increased specifically the risk of bacteraemia from ARP due to the inappropriate coverage of these pathogens. Identifying patients at risk of ARP bacteraemia would help in

  13. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen. PMID:26689082

  14. Biomarkers in community-acquired pneumonia: A state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Renato; Ramos-Lima, Luis Francisco; do Amaral Oliveira, Vivian; Sanvicente, Carina; Pacheco, Elyara F.; Rosa, Karoline Dalla

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) exhibits mortality rates, between 20% and 50% in severe cases. Biomarkers are useful tools for searching for antibiotic therapy modifications and for CAP diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up treatment. This non-systematic state-of-the-art review presents the biological and clinical features of biomarkers in CAP patients, including procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, copeptin, pro-ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), adrenomedullin, cortisol and D-dimers. PMID:23184211

  15. Analysis of factors that contribute to treatment failure in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Genné, D; Sommer, R; Kaiser, L; Saaïdia, A; Pasche, A; Unger, P F; Lew, D

    2006-03-01

    To determine the causes of treatment failure and to evaluate the prognostic factors in patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, a prospective, observational study of 228 adult patients hospitalized for a community-acquired pneumonia in the University Hospital of Geneva and the La Chaux-de-Fonds Community Hospital, Switzerland, was conducted. The percentage of patients who failed to improve (as defined by guidelines of the Infectious Disease Society of America) and the causes of treatment failure were assessed, and patients who failed to improve under antimicrobial therapy were compared with those who did improve. In the 54 (24%) patients who failed to improve, a mean increase in length of hospitalization of 4 days was observed. Most causes of treatment failure could be attributed to host factors (61%) rather than to the pathogen (16%) or to an inappropriate antibiotic regimen (3%). After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, concomitant neoplasia (OR 3.25; 95%CI 1.11-9.56), neurological disease (OR 2.34; 95%CI 1.07-5.13), and aspiration pneumonia (OR 2.97; 95%CI 29-6.86]) were associated with failure to improve, whereas monocytosis improved prognosis (OR 0.40; 95%CI 0.20-0.80). Almost one out of four patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia failed to respond to empirical antibiotic treatment. Aspiration pneumonia, concomitant neoplasia, and neurological disease were factors positively associated with failure to improve, whereas monocytosis was linked to a better prognosis. PMID:16528540

  16. Clinical data analysis of 19 cases of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Mao-Mao; Pu, Zeng-Hui; Wang, Yun-Qiang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and imaging changes of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults. A retrospective study was performed on 19 adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia cases in Yantai, whereby the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Of 19 cases, 14 (73.68%) had fever and 17 (89.47%) had cough symptoms. Moreover, 14 cases (73.68%) had normal white blood cell counts, while 11 cases (57.89%) exhibited a reduction in lymphocyte proportion. Among the 19 cases, 17 cases exhibited lesions in a single lung, while 2 cases involved bilateral lungs. The lesions predominantly exhibited ground glass-like changes. The clinical manifestations of adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia patients with normal immune functions were mild, with such presenting symptoms as fever, cough, and sputum; most patients did not exhibit high levels of white blood cells or low lymphocyte counts, and the imaging features (ground glass-like effusion) were indicative of single-lung involvement. PMID:26770532

  17. Gender Differences in Community-acquired Meningitis in Adults: Clinical Presentations and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Lavanya; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired meningitis is a serious disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gender differences involved with the clinical presentations of and prognostic factors for this disease. We conducted a retrospective study of 619 adults diagnosed with community-acquired meningitis in Houston, Texas, who were hospitalized between 2005 and 2010. Patients were categorized as male or female. Those who were evaluated to have a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of four or less were classified to have an adverse clinical outcome. Males consisted of 47.2% (292/619) of the total cohort, and more often presented with coexisting medical conditions, fever, abnormal microbiology results, and abnormalities on head computed tomography. Females more often presented with nuchal rigidity. On logistic regression, fever, CSF glucose <45 mg/dL, and an abnormal neurological examination were predictors of an adverse outcome in male patients, while age greater than 60 years and an abnormal neurological examination were associated with a poor prognosis in female patients. Thus, community-acquired meningitis in males differs significantly from females in regards to comorbidities, presenting symptoms and signs, abnormal laboratory and imaging analysis, and predictors of adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:27500284

  18. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  19. Comparing the Bacterial Diversity of Acute and Chronic Dental Root Canal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Adriana L.; Siqueira, José F.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Jesus, Ederson C.; Rosado, Alexandre S.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-01-01

    This study performed barcoded multiplex pyrosequencing with a 454 FLX instrument to compare the microbiota of dental root canal infections associated with acute (symptomatic) or chronic (asymptomatic) apical periodontitis. Analysis of samples from 9 acute abscesses and 8 chronic infections yielded partial 16S rRNA gene sequences that were taxonomically classified into 916 bacterial species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (at 3% divergence) belonging to 67 genera and 13 phyla. The most abundant phyla in acute infections were Firmicutes (52%), Fusobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (13%), while in chronic infections the dominant were Firmicutes (59%), Bacteroidetes (14%) and Actinobacteria (10%). Members of Fusobacteria were much more prevalent in acute (89%) than in chronic cases (50%). The most abundant/prevalent genera in acute infections were Fusobacterium and Parvimonas. Twenty genera were exclusively detected in acute infections and 18 in chronic infections. Only 18% (n = 165) of the OTUs at 3% divergence were shared by acute and chronic infections. Diversity and richness estimators revealed that acute infections were significantly more diverse than chronic infections. Although a high interindividual variation in bacterial communities was observed, many samples tended to group together according to the type of infection (acute or chronic). This study is one of the most comprehensive in-deep comparisons of the microbiota associated with acute and chronic dental root canal infections and highlights the role of diverse polymicrobial communities as the unit of pathogenicity in acute infections. The overall diversity of endodontic infections as revealed by the pyrosequencing technique was much higher than previously reported for endodontic infections. PMID:22132218

  20. Comparing the bacterial diversity of acute and chronic dental root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriana L; Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Jesus, Ederson C; Rosado, Alexandre S; Tiedje, James M

    2011-01-01

    This study performed barcoded multiplex pyrosequencing with a 454 FLX instrument to compare the microbiota of dental root canal infections associated with acute (symptomatic) or chronic (asymptomatic) apical periodontitis. Analysis of samples from 9 acute abscesses and 8 chronic infections yielded partial 16S rRNA gene sequences that were taxonomically classified into 916 bacterial species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (at 3% divergence) belonging to 67 genera and 13 phyla. The most abundant phyla in acute infections were Firmicutes (52%), Fusobacteria (17%) and Bacteroidetes (13%), while in chronic infections the dominant were Firmicutes (59%), Bacteroidetes (14%) and Actinobacteria (10%). Members of Fusobacteria were much more prevalent in acute (89%) than in chronic cases (50%). The most abundant/prevalent genera in acute infections were Fusobacterium and Parvimonas. Twenty genera were exclusively detected in acute infections and 18 in chronic infections. Only 18% (n = 165) of the OTUs at 3% divergence were shared by acute and chronic infections. Diversity and richness estimators revealed that acute infections were significantly more diverse than chronic infections. Although a high interindividual variation in bacterial communities was observed, many samples tended to group together according to the type of infection (acute or chronic). This study is one of the most comprehensive in-deep comparisons of the microbiota associated with acute and chronic dental root canal infections and highlights the role of diverse polymicrobial communities as the unit of pathogenicity in acute infections. The overall diversity of endodontic infections as revealed by the pyrosequencing technique was much higher than previously reported for endodontic infections. PMID:22132218

  1. Dexamethasone treatment for acute bacterial meningitis: how strong is the evidence for routine use?

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K; Haines, T

    1995-01-01

    A methodological appraisal of the published randomised controlled trials on the use of dexamethasone as an adjunct treatment in acute bacterial meningitis was carried out to examine whether the available evidence is strong enough to support the routine use of the drug. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in indexed journals after 1966, written in English, and were randomised controlled trials with dexamethasone as adjunct to antimicrobials in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. All studies were extracted and their adherence to eight methodological principles was graded as adequate, inadequate, or unclear. A sensitivity analysis was done to examine the robustness of the conclusions. Seven studies met the eligibility criteria. No report adhered to all the principles. Major threats to validity of the conclusions included potential bias in analysis in all the studies, and lack of adjustment for baseline imbalances in four. Inadequate reporting of adverse effects hindered risk-benefit analysis. Sensitivity analysis showed that the numbers of patients withdrawn from analysis were enough to invalidate the conclusions. It is concluded that the available evidence is not strong enough to support a routine use of dexamethasone in acute bacterial meningitis. Further research is needed to determine the effect of a policy to use dexamethasone early in the management of suspected acute bacterial meningitis. Future studies should adopt a pragmatic approach, be methodologically rigorous, and meticulously measure the risk as well as the benefit of this policy. PMID:7608706

  2. Overview of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Role of Inflammatory Mechanisms in the Immunopathogenesis of Severe Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Helen C.; Anderson, Ronald; Feldman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the infectious diseases. Despite the implementation of national pneumococcal polyvalent vaccine-based immunisation strategies targeted at high-risk groups, Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) remains the most common cause of CAP. Notwithstanding the HIV pandemic, major challenges confronting the control of CAP include the range of bacterial and viral pathogens causing this condition, the ever-increasing problem of antibiotic resistance worldwide, and increased vulnerability associated with steadily aging populations in developed countries. These and other risk factors, as well as diagnostic strategies, are covered in the first section of this review. Thereafter, the review is focused on the pneumococcus, specifically the major virulence factors of this microbial pathogen and their role in triggering overexuberant inflammatory responses which contribute to the immunopathogenesis of invasive disease. The final section of the review is devoted to a consideration of pharmacological, anti-inflammatory strategies with adjunctive potential in the antimicrobial chemotherapy of CAP. This is focused on macrolides, corticosteroids, and statins with respect to their modes of anti-inflammatory action, current status, and limitations. PMID:24453422

  3. Efficacy and safety of temafloxacin versus those of amoxicillin in hospitalized adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, C; Léophonte, P; Petitpretz, P; Chauvin, J P; Hazebroucq, J

    1992-01-01

    Temafloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone, was compared with amoxicillin in the treatment of adult hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. In this double-blind, multicenter study, patients were randomly assigned to treatment with temafloxacin at 600 mg twice daily (n = 125) or amoxicillin at 500 mg three times daily (n = 121); the average duration of treatment was 10 days. Clinical recovery rates were similar for patients treated with temafloxacin and amoxicillin (89 and 85%), as were bacterial eradication rates (99 and 97%). This was also true for subgroups of patients with pneumococcal pneumonia (n = 100), nonpneumococcal pneumonia (n = 122), or atypical pneumonia (n = 12). Outcomes for temafloxacin- and amoxicillin-treated patients were also similar in terms of defervescence, improvement in leukocytosis, and radiographic evidence of infection. The frequency and severity of adverse events were similar in both groups, consisting primarily of digestive disorders and skin manifestations. We conclude that temafloxacin may be recommended as an alternative antibacterial drug for patients with suspected pneumococcal pneumonia who fail to respond to benzylpenicillin or amoxicillin when the incidence of multiresistant pneumococcal strains is low. In countries where the incidence of these strains is high, temafloxacin may also be recommended. PMID:1323954

  4. [Acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and biofilm].

    PubMed

    Legnani, Delfino

    2009-07-01

    The lower respiratory tract of patients affected by COPD is constantly colonized by pathogenic microrganisms such as H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae. Role of bacterial colonization of big and small airways in patients affected by COPD is still unclear but it is likely to play a role in directly or indirectly maintaining the vicious circle of infection/inflammation. Colonizer pathogens are capable to stimulate mucus production, to alter the ciliary function by inducing dyskinesia and stasis; in addition, they represent a strong stimulus for neutrophils to come in the airways, which release elastase that, in turn, inhibit the mucus-ciliary function. The same pathogens are responsible for epithelial damage and chronic inflammation, by releasing neutrophilic elastase, leading to the damage progression and obstruction. Recent studies have also shown that infection sustained by H. influenzae is not limited to bronchial mucosa, i.e. surface epithelial cells, but that the pathogen is capable to penetrate cells, so spreading the infection in sub-epithelial cellular layers. In addition, the ability to produce biofilm is another possible defence mechanism which allows them to grow and colonise. Such a mechanism could in part explain the lack of response to antimicrobials and contribute to stimulation of parenchymal inflammatory response, the cause of pathological-anatomic damage which occurs in COPD. The impossibility to eradicate chronic infection and bacterial exacerbations of COPD are likely the elements that promt and worsen obstruction, so determining the disease's progression. PMID:19696555

  5. Moxifloxacin Pharmacokinetic Profile and Efficacy Evaluation in Empiric Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Kragh Thomsen, Marianne; Petersen, Eskild; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    When antimicrobials are used empirically, pathogen MICs equal to clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values must be considered. This is to ensure that the most resistant pathogen subpopulation is appropriately targeted to prevent emergence of resistance. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0–24) values predicted for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0–24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0–24/MIC of >75 for H. influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0–24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature of this population pharmacokinetic model to predict therapeutic success. (Clinical Trials Registration no. NCT01983839.) PMID:25666151

  6. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bashir Ahmed; Singh, Gurmeet; Naik, Muzafar Ahmed; Dhobi, Ghulam Nabi

    2010-04-01

    The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29), followed by gram positive (10/29). In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29), Escherichia coli (6/29), Klebsiella spp. (3/29), Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29) and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29). Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26) followed by blood (6), pleural fluid (3), and pus culture (1). Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%), fever (95%), tachycardia (92%), pleuritic chest pain (75%), sputum production (65%) and leucocytosis (43%). The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%), COPD (57%), structural lung disease (21%), diabetes mellitus (13%), and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent) and chronic alcoholism (one per cent). Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and staphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  7. Meteorological factors and risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease in Switzerland: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Conza, Lisa; Casati, Simona; Limoni, Costanzo; Gaia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify meteorological factors that could be associated with an increased risk of community-acquired Legionnaires’ disease (LD) in two Swiss regions. Design Retrospective epidemiological study using discriminant analysis and multivariable Poisson regression. Setting We analysed legionellosis cases notified between January 2003 and December 2007 and we looked for a possible relationship between incidence rate and meteorological factors. Participants Community-acquired LD cases in two Swiss regions, the Canton Ticino and the Basle region, with climatically different conditions were investigated. Primary outcome measures Vapour pressure, temperature, relative humidity, wind, precipitation and radiation recorded in weather stations of the two Swiss regions during the period January 2003 and December 2007. Results Discriminant analysis showed that the two regions are characterised by different meteorological conditions. A multiple Poisson regression analysis identified region, temperature and vapour pressure during the month of infection as significant risk factors for legionellosis. The risk of developing LD was 129.5% (or 136.4% when considering vapour pressure instead of temperature in the model) higher in the Canton Ticino as compared to the Basle region. There was an increased relative risk of LD by 11.4% (95% CI 7.70% to 15.30%) for each 1 hPa rise of vapour pressure or by 6.7% (95% CI 4.22% to 9.22%) for 1°C increase of temperature. Conclusions In this study, higher water vapour pressure and heat were associated with a higher risk of community-acquired LD in two regions of Switzerland. PMID:23468470

  8. Preterm Labor and Maternal Hypoxia in Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinell, Phillip; Martens, Mark G.; Faro, Sebastian

    1996-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine if preterm labor is associated with the degree of maternal hypoxia in pregnant women with community-acquired pneumonia but no other maternal diseases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all antepartum patients admitted with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia to an inner-city university hospital between 1983 and 1987. Included in this review were only the patients with radiologically confirmed diagnose of pneumonia and documented arterial blood gases on room air at the time of admission, but no other maternal diseases. Results: A total of 22 cases were identified. There was no maternal mortality, but there were 2 patients (9%) who developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae was documented in 1 patient (5%). Preterm labor complicated 5 cases (23%) and led to preterm delivery in 3 patients (14%). Terbutaline tocolysis was instituted in 3 patients, but was discontinued in 1 patient who was allowed to deliver because of her worsening condition. Preterm labor was associated with the WBC count on admission, usually > 18,000/mm3, but no statistically significant correlation with the severity of maternal hypoxia was noted. Five patients (23%) were incorrectly diagnosed at the time of admission, 4 with an initial diagnosis of pyelonephritis and 1 with an initial diagnosis of cholecystitis. Conclusions: Community-acquired pneumonia in the antepartum period is responsible for significant maternal and fetal complications even in the absence of other maternal diseases. Preterm labor and delivery remain frequent, and tocolysis should be used cautiously. At the time of admission, the diagnosis may be difficult. The degree of maternal hypoxia on admission does not correlate with the presence of preterm labor. PMID:18476096

  9. Advances in the prevention, management, and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pletz, Mathias W.; Rohde, Gernot G.; Welte, Tobias; Kolditz, Martin; Ott, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the infectious disease with the highest number of deaths worldwide. Nevertheless, its importance is often underestimated. Large cohorts of patients with CAP have been established worldwide and improved our knowledge about CAP by far. Therefore, current guidelines are much more evidence-based than ever before. This article discusses recent major studies and concepts on CAP such as the role of biomarkers, appropriate risk stratification to identify patients in need of hospitalisation or intensive care, appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy (including the impact of macrolide combination therapy and antibiotic stewardship), and CAP prevention with novel influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26998243

  10. Facet joint septic arthritis due to community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Inassi, Jojo; Marthya, Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of facet joint (SAFJ) is extremely rare. Only about sixty cases have been reported so far. A single case of SAFJ in a series of 491 cases of spinal infections was first reported by David-Chaussé in 1981. A case report of SAFJ was published by Halpin in 1987. With the growing availability and use of MRI, more and more cases are being reported. The most common organism that causes SAFJ is Staphylococcus aureus. We are reporting a case of SAFJ caused by community acquired, methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) successfully treated by Linezolid. PMID:26719620

  11. Community-Acquired Moraxella catarrhalis Bacteremic Pneumonia: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; García-Clemente, Marta; Fole-Vázquez, David; Casan, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella (formerly Branhamella) catarrhalis was discovered at the end of the nineteenth century, and for many decades it was considered to be a harmless commensal of the upper respiratory tract. It is a Gram-negative, aerobic diplococcus considered to be the third most common pathogen isolated in childhood sinusitis and otitis media and in adult chronic lower respiratory disease, as well as an etiological agent of pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients or those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moraxella catarrhalis pneumonia is rarely associated with bacteremia. Here, we present two cases of community-acquired Moraxella catarrhalis bacteremic pneumonia. PMID:26989548

  12. Systemic loxoscelism in the age of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karen M; Klotz, Carrie R; Jack, Meg; Seger, Donna

    2011-02-01

    The increase in cases of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as well as its isolation from the majority of skin and soft tissue abscesses in the emergency department, requires the emergency physician to consider this diagnosis in all skin or soft tissue infections. However, making the diagnosis of MRSA when the wound is actually a cutaneous lesion of a brown recluse spider bite may have untoward consequences. Furthermore, the clinical manifestations of systemic loxoscelism may be misdiagnosed as a systemic staphylococcal infection. We present a patient with systemic loxoscelism who was diagnosed with a systemic infection and received an unnecessary surgical procedure. PMID:20817348

  13. [Management of Adult Community-acquired Pneumonia and Prevention - Update 2016].

    PubMed

    Ewig, S; Höffken, G; Kern, W V; Rohde, G; Flick, H; Krause, R; Ott, S; Bauer, T; Dalhoff, K; Gatermann, S; Kolditz, M; Krüger, S; Lorenz, J; Pletz, M; de Roux, A; Schaaf, B; Schaberg, T; Schütte, H; Welte, T

    2016-03-01

    The present guideline provides a new and updated concept of treatment and prevention of adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. It replaces the previous guideline dating from 2009.The guideline was worked out and agreed on following the standards of methodology of a S3-guideline. This includes a systematic literature search and grading, a structured discussion of recommendations supported by the literature as well as the declaration and assessment of potential conflicts of interests.The guideline has a focus on specific clinical circumstances, an update on severity assessment, and includes recommendations for an individualized selection of antimicrobial treatment as well as primary and secondary prevention. PMID:26926396

  14. "I really should've gone to the doctor": older adults and family caregivers describe their experiences with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Caralyn; Krueger, Paul; Lohfeld, Lynne; Loeb, Mark; Edward, H Gayle

    2006-01-01

    Background Responding to acute illness symptoms can often be challenging for older adults. The primary objective of this study was to describe how community-dwelling older adults and their family members responded to symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods A qualitative study that used face-to-face semi-structured interviews to collect data from a purposeful sample of seniors aged 60+ and their family members living in a mid-sized Canadian city. Data analysis began with descriptive and interpretive coding, then advanced as the research team repeatedly compared emerging thematic categories to the raw data. Searches for disconfirming evidence and member checking through focus groups provided additional data and helped ensure rigour. Results Community-acquired pneumonia symptoms varied greatly among older adults, making decisions to seek care difficult for them and their family members. Both groups took varying amounts of time as they attempted to sort out what was wrong and then determine how best to respond. Even after they concluded something was wrong, older adults with confirmed pneumonia continued to wait for days, to over a week, before seeking medical care. Participants provided diverse reasons for this delay, including fear, social obligations (work, family, leisure), and accessibility barriers (time, place, systemic). Several older adults and family members regretted their delays in seeking help. Conclusion Treatment-seeking delay is a variable, multi-phased decision-making process that incorporates symptom assessment plus psychosocial and situational factors. Public health and health care professionals need to educate older adults about the potential causes and consequences of unnecessary waits. Such efforts may reduce the severity of community-acquired pneumonia upon presentation at clinics and hospitals, and that, in turn, could potentially improve health outcomes. PMID:16677391

  15. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacci, M.R.; Leme, R.C.P.; Zing, N.P.C.; Murad, N.; Adami, F.; Hinnig, P.F.; Feder, D.; Chagas, A.C.P.; Fonseca, F.L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI. PMID:25714883

  16. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Bacci, M R; Leme, R C P; Zing, N P C; Murad, N; Adami, F; Hinnig, P F; Feder, D; Chagas, A C P; Fonseca, F L A

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI. PMID:25714883

  17. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: an increasing public health threat

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Khanna, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    There has been a startling shift in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection over the last decade worldwide, and it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of diarrhea in the community. Classically considered a hospital-acquired infection, it has now emerged in populations previously considered to be low-risk and lacking the traditional risk factors for C. difficile infection, such as increased age, hospitalization, and antibiotic exposure. Recent studies have demonstrated great genetic diversity for C. difficile, pointing toward diverse sources and a fluid genome. Environmental sources like food, water, and animals may play an important role in these infections, apart from the role symptomatic patients and asymptomatic carriers play in spore dispersal. Prospective strain typing using highly discriminatory techniques is a possible way to explore the suspected diverse sources of C. difficile infection in the community. Patients with community-acquired C. difficile infection do not necessarily have a good outcome and clinicians should be aware of factors that predict worse outcomes in order to prevent them. This article summarizes the emerging epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes for community-acquired C. difficile infection. PMID:24669194

  18. Incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in the population of four municipalities in eastern Finland.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, C; Heiskanen, L; Juvonen, H; Kallinen, S; Karkola, K; Korppi, M; Kurki, S; Rönnberg, P R; Seppä, A; Soimakallio, S

    1993-05-01

    Between September 1, 1981, and August 31, 1982, all patients with suspected or confirmed pneumonia among the 46,979 inhabitants of four municipalities in the province of Kuopio, Finland, were reported to a pneumonia register by their attending physicians. In addition, two study pathologists reported all cases of pneumonia found at autopsy, and two permanent registers were checked for retrospective identification of patients. Chest radiographs were obtained from 97% of all patients. The final diagnosis was based on radiologic or autopsy criteria. A total 546 patients (323 males and 223 females) had community-acquired pneumonia; of these, 37% were less than 15 years of age, and 31% were 60 years of age or older. Nineteen percent of the patients had defined chronic conditions, and 42% were admitted to hospital. The case fatality rate was 4%. The overall incidence of community-acquired pneumonia per 1,000 inhabitants per year was 11.6 (13.9 in males, 9.4 in females). The age-specific incidence per 1,000 inhabitants per year was as follows: age < 5 years, 36.0; age 5-14 years, 16.2; age 15-59 years, 6.0; age 60-74 years, 15.4; and age > or = 75 years, 34.2. PMID:8317455

  19. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  20. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance. PMID:27514947

  1. Retrospective survey for sialidase activity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates from cases of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sialidase is a well-known virulence factor of other respiratory pathogens, but was only recently documented to occur in some species of Mycoplasma. The sialidase activity expressed can vary quantitatively among strains within a species of mycoplasma, from undetectable to amounts that correlate positively with strain virulence. Very few isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae had ever been examined for sialidase activity, so it was unknown whether sialidase may contribute to diseases involving this species. Findings No sialidase activity was detected by spectrofluorometric assay of 15 laboratory strains and 91 clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae banked over many years from patients having radiologically-confirmed, uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. Conclusions The annotated genome of strain M129 (GenBank NC_000912, ATCC 29342), also isolated from a patient with pneumonia, accurately represents the absence of sialidase genes from strains of M. pneumoniae typically associated with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia. A possible involvement of sialidase in neurologic or other extra-respiratory manifestations of M. pneumoniae mycoplasmosis remains to be investigated. PMID:21676241

  2. [Consensus guidelines for the management of community acquired pneumonia in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    González Del Castillo, Juan; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Llinares, Pedro; Menéndez, Rosario; Mujal, Abel; Navas, Enrique; Barberán, José

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia increases with age and is associated with an elevated morbidity and mortality due to the physiological changes associated with aging and a greater presence of chronic disease. Taking into account the importance of this disease from an epidemiological and prognostic point of view, and the enormous heterogeneity described in the clinical management of the elderly, we believe a specific consensus document regarding this patient profile is necessary. The purpose of the present work was to perform a review of the evidence related to the risk factors for the etiology, the clinical presentation, the management and the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients with the aim of producing a series of specific recommendations based on critical analysis of the literature. This document is the result of the collaboration of different specialists representing the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Care (SEMES), the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SEGG), the Spanish Society of Chemotherapy (SEQ), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI), the Spanish Society of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), Spanish Society of Home Hospitalization (SEHAD) and the Spanish Society of Infectious Disease and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC). PMID:24873864

  3. De-escalation therapy among bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Carugati, M; Franzetti, F; Wiemken, T; Kelley, R R; Kelly, R; Peyrani, P; Blasi, F; Ramirez, J; Aliberti, S

    2015-10-01

    There is no evidence supporting the use of de-escalation therapy (DET) among patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed the outcomes associated with DET among bacteraemic CAP patients. We performed a secondary analysis of the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization database, which contains data on 660 bacteraemic patients hospitalized because of CAP in 35 countries (2001-2013). Exclusion criteria were death within 72 h from admission and an inappropriate empirical antibiotic regimen. DET was defined as changing an appropriate empirical broad-spectrum regimen to a narrower-spectrum regimen according to culture results within 7 days from hospital admission. Two study groups were identified: patients whose antibiotic therapy was de-escalated (the DET group), and patients whose antibiotic therapy was not de-escalated (the N-DET group). The primary study outcome was 30-day mortality. Two hundred and sixty-one bacteraemic CAP patients were included. Gram-positive bacteria were responsible for 88.1% of the cases (Streptococcus pneumoniae, 75.9%). Gram-negative bacteria were responsible for for 7.3% of the cases. DET was performed in 165 patients (63.2%). The N-DET group was characterized by a more severe presentation at admission. After adjustment for confounders, DET was not associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality. DET seems to be safe among bacteraemic patients with CAP. Randomized clinical trials are warranted to further explore these findings. PMID:26115864

  4. New evidence of risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J; Bolíbar, I; Serra-Prat, M; Roig, J; Hospital, I; Carandell, E; Agustí, M; Ayuso, P; Estela, A; Torres, A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with special emphasis on modifiable risk factors and those applicable to the general population. A population-based, case-control study was conducted, with a target population of 859,033 inhabitants aged >14 yrs. A total of 1,336 patients with confirmed CAP were matched to control subjects by age, sex and primary centre over 1 yr. In the univariate analysis, outstanding risk factors were passive smoking in never-smokers aged >65 yrs, heavy alcohol intake, contact with pets, households with >10 people, contact with children, interventions on the upper airways and poor dental health. Risky treatments included amiodarone, N-acetylcysteine and oral steroids. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, and visiting the dentist were protective factors. Multivariable analysis confirmed cigarette smoking, usual contact with children, sudden changes of temperature at work, inhalation therapy (particularly containing steroids and using plastic pear-spacers), oxygen therapy, asthma and chronic bronchitis as independent risk factors. Interventions for reducing community-acquired pneumonia should integrate health habits and lifestyle factors related to household, work and community, together with individual clinical conditions, comorbidities and oral or inhaled regular treatments. Prevention would include vaccination, dental hygiene and avoidance of upper respiratory colonisation. PMID:18216057

  5. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum

    PubMed Central

    Cross, James H.; Bradbury, Richard S.; Fulford, Anthony J.; Jallow, Amadou T.; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M.; Cerami, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, which preferentially scavenges heme iron, was unaffected. These data suggest that even modest oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses. PMID:26593732

  6. Bacterial endocarditis presenting as acute vertebral osteomyelitis: 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Ninet, J; Gayet, J L; Etienne, J; Bonvoisin, B; Vignon, E; Berthou, J D; Delahaye, J P; Pasquier, J; Delaye, J; Normand, J

    1984-10-01

    Association between bacterial endocarditis (BE) and vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) has infrequently been noted. In a retrospective analysis of BE (280 cases) and VO (150 cases) 14 cases were found to have this association. There were 12 males and 2 females, ages ranging from 39 to 72 years, mean age 56.6. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus viridans (6 cases). Str. faecalis (4 cases), staphylococcus (2 cases), Gram negative bacteria (1 case). Organism was not isolated in one case. Fever and severe back pain antedate the diagnosis of VO 3.5 and 2.5 months. X rays films of the spine and bone scans (4 cases) revealed lumbar (6 cases) or cervical (4 cases), or dorsal (3 cases) or combined cervical and dorsal (1 case) locations. History of murmur (4 cases) and development of mitral (8 cases) or aortic (4 cases) or combined mitral and aortic (2 cases) insufficiencies were consistent with concomitant BE. Echocardiogram revealed vegetations in 6 out of 9 cases. Patients received antibiotic therapy for 3.5 months. Ten patients were cured with antibiotics only, 4 required valve replacement. One died. Thus age, sex, history of heart disease, valvular involvement, duration of symptoms prior to admission and bacteriological pictures are the same in BE with VO as in BE without VO. Survival rates are also the same if early recognition of BE and VO with prompt and prolonged antibiotic therapy may prevent severe haemodynamic or vertebral problems. PMID:6519073

  7. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Silvano; Noviello, Silvana; Leone, Sebastiano

    2015-12-01

    Dalbavancin is a novel parenteral lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) in adults. Dalbavancin is highly active against common Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life that allows for once weekly dosing. Phase III trials have demonstrated non-inferiority compared with vancomycin/linezolid in the treatment of ABSSSIs, including those sustained by MRSA. PMID:26700080

  8. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  9. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil). Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1%) children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, p<0.001) whereas gender distribution was similar. The RSV-positive group showed lower means of C-reactive protein (CRP) in comparison to the RSV-negative group (15.3 vs 24.0 mg/dL, p<0.05). Radiological findings showed that 54.2% of RSV-positive group and 50.3% of RSV-negative group had interstitial infiltrate. Bacterial infection was identified predominantly in the RSV-positive group (10% vs 4.5%, p<0.05). Rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction were predominantly observed in the RSV-positive group. A co-circulation of RSV Groups A and B was identified, with a predominance of Group B (209/227). Multivariate analysis revealed that age under 1 year (p<0.015), CRP levels under 48 mg/dL (p<0.001) and bacterial co-infection (p<0.032) were independently associated with the presence of RSV and, in the analyze of symptoms, nasal obstruction

  10. Etiological Diagnosis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adult Patients: A Prospective Hospital-Based Study in Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Hamidreza; Sheybani, Fereshte; Sarvghad, Mohammadreza; Meshkat, Zahra; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is the third most common cause of death in the world, and mortality is highest for patients who require hospitalization. Objectives: This prospective observational study is an etiological survey of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) over a 12-month period in the Iranian city of Mashhad. To our knowledge, this is one of the first prospective hospital-based studies to comprehensively evaluate the epidemiological, demographical, clinical, and prognostic factors of patients with CAP in Iran. Patients and Methods: We studied all adult patients (aged ≥ 16 years) with CAP admitted to Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, between February 2013 and January 2014. The etiological diagnosis of CAP was made through conventional culturing and staining of respiratory secretions (i.e. sputum and pleural fluid), standard BACTEC™ Plus Aerobic/F bottles for blood cultures, and the immunochromatographic assays BinaxNOW® Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen and BinaxNOW® Legionella pneumophila antigen for the detection of S. pneumoniae antigen and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen, respectively. Results: Among 120 patients with CAP, the most common etiology was S. pneumoniae (24.4%), followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (17.5%), S. aureus (6.7%), polymicrobial agents including anaerobes (4.2%), complicated hydatid cyst (2.5%), Influenza A virus (4.2%; including 2 cases of mixed Influenza A-bacterial infection), and Klebsiella pneumoniae, Brucella melitensis, Mucor, and varicella, each in 0.8% of the patients. The diagnosis of pneumonia remained unknown in 49 (40%) patients. Conclusions: Tuberculosis was an important cause of CAP in our region. Hence, it should be considered in all patients admitted with a CAP diagnosis. PMID:26464771

  11. Comparative analysis of the acute response of zebrafish Danio rerio skin to two different bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Wang, Yi; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Aihua; Shen, Lulu; Ming, Qinglei; Feng, Zhaojun

    2013-12-01

    Skin is an important innate immune organ in fish; however, little is known about the skin's immune response to infectious pathogens. We conducted a comparative analysis of the acute immune response of Zebrafish Danio rerio skin against gram-positive (Staphylococcus chromogenes) and gram-negative (Citrobacter freundii) bacterial infections. Gene expression profiles induced from the two different infections were identified by microarray hybridization, with many genes demonstrating an acute immune response in the skin. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in response to stress and stimulus, complement activation, acute-phase response, and defense and immune response. Compared with transcription patterns of skin from the two infections, a similar innate immunity (e.g., transferrin, coagulation factor, complements, and lectins) was observed but with different acute-phase genes (e.g., ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-microglobulin, vitellogenin, and heat shock protein). These results suggest that the skin of fish plays an important role in the innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:24341765

  12. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M.; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we studied gene expression changes in peripheral lymphoid tissues as compared to hepatic expression changes, 14–18 h after lung infection in pigs. The lung infection was established with the pig specific respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Quantitative real-time PCR based expression analysis were performed on samples from liver, tracheobronchial lymph node, tonsils, spleen and on blood leukocytes, supplemented with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14–18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, pig major acute phase protein, and transferrin in peripheral lymphoid tissues. PMID:19236838

  13. British Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia care bundle: results of a national implementation project.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Shen; Rodrigo, Chamira; Turner, Alice M; Welham, Sally; Calvert, James M

    2016-03-01

    In 2013, 16 U.K. hospital trusts participated in a quality improvement programme involving implementation of a community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) care bundle. High-level data were collected on 14,962 patients admitted with CAP; bundle implementation increased from 1% in October 2012 to 20% by September 2013. Analysis of patient-level data on 2118 adults (median age 75.3 years) found that in the bundle-implementation group, significantly more patients received antibiotics within 4 h of admission (adjusted OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.14, p=0.016) and 30-day inpatient mortality was lower (8.8% vs. 13.6%; adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.95, p=0.03). PMID:26197815

  14. Community Acquired Chronic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Previously Healthy Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mesut; Arslan, Ferhat; Mert, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon in the immunocompetent population, despite its occurrence in younger patients with open injuries and in intravenous drug abusers. Here we report a case of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case is unique for several reasons. First, it is a case of septic arthritis in a pregnant woman with no traditional risk factors reported in the literature including history of prior traumatic events, hospitalisation, or chronic underlying disease. She was suspected of having transient osteoporosis associated with pregnancy to involve both hip joints. Second, this is the first reported case of a community acquired chronic septic arthritis due to P. aeruginosa involving large joints of both upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin for 4 weeks followed by oral ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. PMID:25371836

  15. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  16. Adherence to Therapeutic Guidelines for Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Australian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Adler, NR; Weber, HM; Gunadasa, I; Hughes, AJ; Friedman, ND

    2014-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly patients, and is associated with a considerable economic burden on the healthcare system. The combination of high incidence and substantial financial costs necessitate accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients admitted with CAP. This article will discuss the rates of adherence to clinical guidelines, the use of severity scoring tools and the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing for patients diagnosed with CAP. The authors maintain that awareness of national and hospital guidelines is imperative to complement the physicians’ clinical judgment with evidence-based recommendations. Increased use of pneumonia severity assessment tools and greater adherence to therapeutic guidelines will enhance concordant antimicrobial prescribing for patients with CAP. A robust and multifaceted educational intervention, in combination with antimicrobial stewardship programs, may enhance compliance of CAP guidelines in clinical practice in Australia. PMID:25249765

  17. An unusually long-lasting outbreak of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease, 2005-2008, Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, M; Fontana, S; Crippa, S; Caporali, M G; Seyler, T; Veschetti, E; Villa, G; Rota, M C; Ricci, M L

    2015-08-01

    An unusually long-lasting community-acquired outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) occurred in the inhabitants of a town in northern Italy from 2005 to 2008. Overall, 43 cases were diagnosed including five deaths. Hundreds of water samples were collected for Legionella isolation but only two clinical samples were obtained. Clinical strains were ST23 as were environmental isolates detected in most Legionella-positive patients' homes and those from a public fountain. Although no Legionella was found in the municipal water mains, a continuous chlorination was applied in 2008. This action resulted in a halving of cases, although incidence remained tenfold higher than the Italian average incidence until the end of 2013, when it dropped to the expected rate. Retrospective analyses of prevalent wind direction suggested that a hidden cooling tower could have been the main cause of this uncommon outbreak, highlighting the importance of implementation of cooling tower registers in supporting LD investigations. PMID:25427871

  18. Antibiograms from community-acquired uropathogens in Gulu, northern Uganda - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in clinical practice and empirical treatment is largely employed due to predictability of pathogens. However, variations in antibiotic sensitivity patterns do occur, and documentation is needed to inform local empirical therapy. The current edition of the Uganda Clinical Guidelines recommends amoxicillin or cotrimoxazole as choice drugs for empirical treatment of community-acquired UTI. From our clinical observations, we suspected that this recommendation was not effective in our setting. In order to examine validity, we sought to identify bacteria from community-acquired infections and determine their susceptibility against these antibiotics plus a range of potentially useful alternatives for treatment of UTI. Methods A cross-sectional study of mid-stream urine collected from 339 symptomatic patients over a three-month period at Gulu regional referral hospital. Qualitative culture and identification of bacteria and antibiotic sensitivity testing using the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was done. Participants’ demographic and clinical characteristics were collected using a standard form. Results were analyzed by simple proportions among related variables and confidence intervals computed using binomial exact distribution. Results Eighty two cultures were positive for UTI. Staphylococcus spp (46.3%) and Escherichia coli (39%) were the most common pathogens. There was high resistance to cotrimoxazole (73.2%), nalidixic acid (52.4%) and amoxicillin (51.2%). The most favorable antibiograms were obtained with gentamicin, amoxicillin-clavulanate and levofloxacin where 85.4%, 72.0%, 67.1% of isolates respectively, were either sensitive or intermediate. Only 51% of isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Conclusion There was high resistance to most antibiotics tested in this study. The recommendations contained in the current edition of the Uganda Clinical Guidelines are not in tandem with antibiotic

  19. Impact of an Educational Program to Reduce Healthcare Resources in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: The EDUCAP Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Antonella; Jiménez-Martínez, Emilio; Molero, Lorena; González-Samartino, Maribel; Castillo, Elena; Juvé-Udina, María-Eulalia; Alcocer, María-Jesús; Hernández, Carme; Buera, María-Pilar; Roel, Asunción; Abad, Emilia; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Ricart, Pilar; Gonzalez, Anna; Isla, Pilar; Dorca, Jordi; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Background Additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations after discharge are frequent among patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and have a major impact on healthcare costs. We aimed to determine whether the implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP would decrease subsequent healthcare visits and readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge. Methods A multicenter, randomized trial was conducted from January 1, 2011 to October 31, 2014 at three hospitals in Spain. We randomly allocated immunocompetent adults patients hospitalized for CAP to receive either an individualized educational program or conventional information before discharge. The educational program included recommendations regarding fluid intake, adherence to drug therapy and preventive vaccines, knowledge and management of the disease, progressive adaptive physical activity, and counseling for alcohol and smoking cessation. The primary trial endpoint was a composite of the frequency of additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of hospital discharge. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Results We assigned 102 patients to receive the individualized educational program and 105 to receive conventional information. The frequency of the composite primary end point was 23.5% following the individualized program and 42.9% following the conventional information (difference, -19.4%; 95% confidence interval, -6.5% to -31.2%; P = 0.003). Conclusions The implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP was effective in reducing subsequent healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Such a strategy may help optimize available healthcare resources and identify post-acute care needs in patients with CAP. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN39531840 PMID:26460907

  20. Relationship between the Use of Inhaled Steroids for Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Early Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. Methods Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality). Results Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%). In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002) in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787). This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542), with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194), but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027). Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. Conclusions Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis. PMID:24039899

  1. [THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF MODERN METHODS OF MICROBIOLOGICAL VERIFICATION OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN CLINICAL PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Mavzyutova, G A; Kuzovkina, O Z; Mirsayapova, I A

    2015-12-01

    The study was carried out to determine etiological structure and informativeness of different methods of detection of agents of community-acquired pneumonia, the sampling included 274 examined patients aged from 16 to 80 years with community-acquired pneumonia of different degree of severity and being under hospital treatment. Besides of standard laboratory and clinical methods of examination ofpatients with community-acquired pneumonia special techniques of etiological verification were applied: molecular genetic analysis (polymerase chain reaction) of phlegm, qualitative detection of antigen Legionella pneumophila of serogroup 1 and antigen Streptococcus pneumoniae in samples of urine using quick immune chromatographic test, detection of level of serum specific immunoglobulines class M and G to Chlamidophilia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pListeria monocytogenes in dynamics using immunoenzyme technique. The etiological structure of community-acquired pneumonia was established based of study results. The analysis of informativeness of different methods of etiological verification of diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia demonstrated that combination ofpolymerase chain reaction and serological method is the optimal one. PMID:27032250

  2. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  3. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  4. Community-acquired Legionella pneumophila pneumonia: a single-center experience with 214 hospitalized sporadic cases over 15 years.

    PubMed

    Viasus, Diego; Di Yacovo, Silvana; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Verdaguer, Ricard; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and an important public health problem worldwide. We conducted the present study to assess trends in epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of sporadic community-acquired L. pneumophila pneumonia requiring hospitalization at a university hospital over a 15-year period (1995-2010). Among 3934 nonimmunosuppressed hospitalized patients with CAP, 214 (5.4%) had L. pneumophila pneumonia (16 cases were categorized as travel-associated pneumonia, and 21 were part of small clusters). Since the introduction of the urinary antigen test, the diagnosis of L. pneumophila using this method remained stable over the years (p = 0.42); however, diagnosis by means of seroconversion and culture decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The median age of patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia was 58.2 years (SD 13.8), and 76.4% were male. At least 1 comorbid condition was present in 119 (55.6%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia, mainly chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease. The frequency of older patients (aged >65 yr) and comorbidities among patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia increased over the years (p = 0.06 and p = 0.02, respectively). In addition, 100 (46.9%) patients were classified into high-risk classes according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (groups IV-V). Twenty-four (11.2%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy at hospital admission. Compared with patients who received appropriate empirical antibiotic, patients who received inappropriate therapy more frequently had acute onset of illness (p = 0.004), pleuritic chest pain (p = 0.03), and pleural effusion (p = 0.05). The number of patients who received macrolides decreased over the study period (p < 0.001), whereas the number of patients who received levofloxacin increased (p < 0.001). No

  5. Efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin in community acquired pneumonia: a prospective, multicenter, observational study (CAPRIVI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality worldwide. Management of CAP for many patients requires rapid initiation of empirical antibiotic treatment, based on the spectrum of activity of available antimicrobial agents and evidence on local antibiotic resistance. Few data exist on the severity profile and treatment of hospitalized CAP patients in Eastern and Central Europe and the Middle East, in particular on use of moxifloxacin (Avelox®), which is approved in these regions. Methods CAPRIVI (Community Acquired Pneumonia: tReatment wIth AVelox® in hospItalized patients) was a prospective observational study in 12 countries: Croatia, France, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Russia, Ukraine, and Macedonia. Patients aged >18 years were treated with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily following hospitalization with a CAP diagnosis. In addition to efficacy and safety outcomes, data were collected on patient history and disease severity measured by CRB-65 score. Results 2733 patients were enrolled. A low severity index (i.e., CRB-65 score <2) was reported in 87.5% of CAP patients assessed (n = 1847), an unexpectedly high proportion for hospitalized patients. Moxifloxacin administered for a mean of 10.0 days (range: 2.0 to 39.0 days) was highly effective: 96.7% of patients in the efficacy population (n = 2152) improved and 93.2% were cured of infection during the study. Severity of infection changed from “moderate” or “severe” in 91.8% of patients at baseline to “no infection” or “mild” in 95.5% at last visit. In the safety population (n = 2595), 127 (4.9%) patients had treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and 40 (1.54%) patients had serious TEAEs; none of these 40 patients died. The safety results were consistent with the known profile of moxifloxacin. Conclusions The efficacy and safety profiles of moxifloxacin at the recommended

  6. The Effect of Statins Use on the Risk and Outcome of Acute Bacterial Infections in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Raheb; Afshar, Reza Kiaee

    2015-01-01

    Background Beyond their lipid-lowering abilities, statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. In view of these effects, a growing interest has emerged in the possible role of statins, in preventing or decreasing morbidity and mortality from infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether previous statin use is associated with reduced risk of acute bacterial infections and better outcome of these infections. Materials and Methods In this historical cohort study, consecutive adult patients admitted with acute bacterial infection were enrolled. Control group were selected from adult outpatient and without history of acute bacterial infections. Acute bacterial infections included in this study were; pneumonia, acute pyelonephritis, cellulitis and sepsis with unknown origin. Data about baseline characteristics, co-morbidities and statins use of two groups was obtained. Results Finally 144 patients met inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Same numbers of controls were selected. Two groups were matched based on most baseline characteristics and co-morbidities. The patients’ categories were as follows: pneumonia 42.3%, acute pyelonephritis 23.6%, cellulitis 16% and sepsis 18%. From all participants 29.9% of patients and 45.8% controls were statin users. There was significant association between previous statin use and reduced risk of acute bacterial infections (Mantel Haenszel Weighted Odds Ratio=0.51, 95% CI: 0.30-0.85, p=0.009). Duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in statin users (p=0.002). Hospital mortality rate was lower (14.6%) in statins users when compared with non-users (18.8%) with significant difference (p=0.028). Conclusion Prior therapy with statins is associated with considerably reduced onset of acute bacterial infections and better outcome in adult patients. PMID:26676277

  7. Procalcitonin Identifies Cell Injury, Not Bacterial Infection, in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Nahid; Sanders, Corron

    2015-01-01

    Background Because acute liver failure (ALF) patients share many clinical features with severe sepsis and septic shock, identifying bacterial infection clinically in ALF patients is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) has proven to be a useful marker in detecting bacterial infection. We sought to determine whether PCT discriminated between presence and absence of infection in patients with ALF. Method Retrospective analysis of data and samples of 115 ALF patients from the United States Acute Liver Failure Study Group randomly selected from 1863 patients were classified for disease severity and ALF etiology. Twenty uninfected chronic liver disease (CLD) subjects served as controls. Results Procalcitonin concentrations in most samples were elevated, with median values for all ALF groups near or above a 2.0 ng/mL cut-off that generally indicates severe sepsis. While PCT concentrations increased somewhat with apparent liver injury severity, there were no differences in PCT levels between the pre-defined severity groups–non-SIRS and SIRS groups with no documented infections and Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock groups with documented infections, (p = 0.169). PCT values from CLD patients differed from all ALF groups (median CLD PCT value 0.104 ng/mL, (p ≤0.001)). Subjects with acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity, many without evidence of infection, demonstrated median PCT >2.0 ng/mL, regardless of SIRS features, while some culture positive subjects had PCT values <2.0 ng/mL. Summary/Conclusions While PCT appears to be a robust assay for detecting bacterial infection in the general population, there was poor discrimination between ALF patients with or without bacterial infection presumably because of the massive inflammation observed. Severe hepatocyte necrosis with inflammation results in elevated PCT levels, rendering this biomarker unreliable in the ALF setting. PMID:26393924

  8. Role of imaging in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D C; Raghavan, A; Mordekar, S R; Griffiths, P D; Connolly, D J A

    2010-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is a common neurological emergency and a leading cause of death and neurological disability worldwide. Diagnosis is based on clinical and microbiological findings with neuroimaging in the form of CT reserved for those with specific adverse clinical features or when an underlying cause such as mastoiditis is suspected. MRI is extremely useful for detecting and monitoring the complications of meningitis. These can be remembered by the mnemonic HACTIVE (hydrocephalus, abscess, cerebritis/cranial nerve lesion, thrombosis, infarct, ventriculitis/vasculopathy and extra-axial collection). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are useful to distinguish abscess from other ring enhancing lesions. PMID:20709770

  9. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    PubMed

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland. PMID:26277313

  10. Assessment of Treatment of Community Acquired Severe Pneumonia by Two Different Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Jalal Ali; Eldouch, Widad; Abdin, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumonia is common presentation in the emergency room and is still a cause of morbidity and mortality. The rationale of this study was to test the trend of paediatricians to achieve rapid response facing severe pneumonia, the lack of agreed on plan for the management of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the few experiences regarding injectable form of β-lactam antimicrobial. Materials and Methods This is a prospective case control study, purposive randomized sampling, three patients were excluded since their information was incomplete, 132 patients were randomly divided into groups, one group named control group (penicillin according to the guidelines of WHO 2013), 33 patients; second group treated by β-lactam inhibitors (Augmentin IV) 50 patients; and third group treated by 3rd generation cephalosporin (ceftriaxone) 49 patients. The study was conducted at the main tertiary care and paediatrics teaching hospital in Khartoum capital of Sudan. The study was completed within the duration from 2010 to 2011. Results Both group showed more or less similar results regarding response, as well as the failure rate however, the Augmentin and ceftriaxone groups showed a little bit better survival than the control group. Conclusion Antibiotics decrease the mortality rate among the pneumonia patients provided that it is given early in the disease. PMID:27437318

  11. Molecular Inflammatory Responses Measured in Blood of Patients with Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Serrano, Silvia; Dorca, Jordi; Coromines, Mercè; Carratalà, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Manresa, Frederic

    2003-01-01

    In order to analyze the characteristics of the inflammatory response occurring in blood during pneumonia, we studied 38 patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Venous and arterial blood samples were collected at study entry and on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 after inclusion. The concentrations of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and IL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were determined in order to detect differences related to the origin of the sample, the causative organism, the clinical variables, and the final outcome of the episode. Legionella pneumonia infections showed higher concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. After 24 h, plasma IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 concentrations in pneumococcal episodes increased, whereas in the same time interval, cytokine concentrations in Legionella episodes markedly decreased. The characteristics of the inflammatory response in bacteremic pneumococcal episodes were different from those in nonbacteremic episodes, as indicated by the higher plasma cytokine concentrations in the former group. Finally, our analysis of cytokine concentrations with regard to the outcome—in terms of the need for intensive care unit admittance and/or mechanical ventilation as well as mortality—suggests that there is a direct relationship between the intensity of the inflammatory response measured in blood and the severity of the episode. PMID:12965910

  12. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in adults in Europe: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Peetermans, Willy E; Viegi, Giovanni; Blasi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in adults, particularly in the elderly. Methods Structured searches of PubMed were conducted to identify up-to-date information on the incidence of CAP in adults in Europe, as well as data on lifestyle and medical risk factors for CAP. Results The overall annual incidence of CAP in adults ranged between 1.07 to 1.2 per 1000 person-years and 1.54 to 1.7 per 1000 population and increased with age (14 per 1000 person-years in adults aged ≥65 years). Incidence was also higher in men than in women and in patients with chronic respiratory disease or HIV infection. Lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of CAP included smoking, alcohol abuse, being underweight, having regular contact with children and poor dental hygiene. The presence of comorbid conditions, including chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, dementia, dysphagia, HIV or chronic renal or liver disease all increased the risk of CAP by twofold to fourfold. Conclusion A range of lifestyle factors and underlying medical conditions are associated with an increased risk of CAP in European adults. Understanding of the types of individual at greatest risk of CAP can help to ensure that interventions to reduce the risk of infection and burden of disease are targeted appropriately. PMID:24130229

  13. Evaluation of community-acquired sepsis by PIRO system in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Xia; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The predisposition, infection/insult, response, and organ dysfunction (PIRO) staging system for septic patients allows grouping of heterogeneous patients into homogeneous subgroups. The purposes of this single-center, prospective, observational cohort study were to create a PIRO system for patients with community-acquired sepsis (CAS) presenting to the emergency department (ED) and assess its prognostic and stratification capabilities. Septic patients were enrolled and allocated to derivation (n = 831) or validation (n = 860) cohorts according to their enrollment dates. The derivation cohort was used to identify independent predictors of mortality and create a PIRO system by binary logistic regression analysis, and the prognostic performance of PIRO was investigated in the validation cohort by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve. Ten independent predictors of 28-day mortality were identified. The PIRO system combined the components of predisposition (age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoalbuminemia), infection (central nervous system infection), response (temperature, procalcitonin), and organ dysfunction (brain natriuretic peptide, troponin I, mean arterial pressure, Glasgow coma scale score). The area under the ROC of PIRO was 0.833 for the derivation cohort and 0.813 for the validation cohort. There was a stepwise increase in 28-day mortality with increasing PIRO score and the differences between the low- (PIRO 0-10), intermediate- (11-20), and high- (>20) risk groups were very significant in both cohorts (p < 0.01). The present study demonstrates that this PIRO system is valuable for prognosis and risk stratification in patients with CAS in the ED. PMID:23771270

  14. Clinical efficacy of moxifloxacin versus comparator therapies for community-acquired pneumonia caused by Legionella spp.

    PubMed

    Garau, J; Fritsch, A; Arvis, P; Read, R C

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Legionella spp. following treatment with moxifloxacin or a range of comparator antimicrobial agents. Data were pooled from four sequential I.V./P.O. trials of moxifloxacin in the treatment of CAP. Comparators were ceftriaxone +/- erythromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate +/- clarithromycin, trovafloxacin, levofloxacin, or ceftriaxone + levofloxacin. Legionella infection was diagnosed by culture, urine antigen testing and/or serology. Clinical success rates for the efficacy-valid (per protocol) populations were recorded at the test-of-cure visit (5-30 days post-therapy). Severity of CAP was determined using the modified American Thoracic Society criteria.Of 1786 efficacy-valid patients, 33 (1.8%) had documented infection with Legionella spp. (moxifloxacin: n=13; comparator: n=20). Of these, 30 cases were identified by serology and/or urine antigen detection and 3 by respiratory culture. The success rate of moxifloxacin vs. comparator therapy was 92.3% vs. 80.0% for the I.V./P.O. trials.Sequential (I.V./P.O.) moxifloxacin demonstrated clinical efficacy that was at least as good as that of comparator treatments for the treatment of CAP due to Legionella. PMID:20685631

  15. Multiplex PCR for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates suspected to represent community-acquired strains.

    PubMed

    Strommenger, B; Braulke, C; Pasemann, B; Schmidt, C; Witte, W

    2008-02-01

    The continuous spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (caMRSA) and the introduction of these highly virulent isolates into hospitals represent increasing threats. The timely recognition of caMRSA strains is crucial for infection control purposes. Thus, we developed a PCR-based assay for the easy and rapid determination of those caMRSA clones that currently are the most prevalent in Germany and Central Europe. This assay was able to correctly identify the majority of the isolates as caMRSA of sequence type 80 (ST80), clonal complex 1 (USA400), and ST8 (USA300). In combination with spa typing-BURP (based upon repeat pattern) analysis and resistance typing, it provides a means for the extensive characterization of suspicious isolates. Thus, this assay represents a reliable tool for monitoring the emergence and spread of different caMRSA clones. The resulting information, in combination with careful interpretation of the epidemiological records, might help to prevent the further spread of those highly virulent caMRSA clones. PMID:18032620

  16. Using data-driven rules to predict mortality in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Rosenfeld, Roni; Clermont, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available. PMID:24699007

  17. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints. PMID:22610291

  18. Using Data-Driven Rules to Predict Mortality in Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Rosenfeld, Roni; Clermont, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available. PMID:24699007

  19. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  20. Serum Procalcitonin as a Useful Serologic Marker for Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Attack and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with gout are similar to those with bacterial infection in terms of the nature of inflammation. Herein we compared the differences in procalcitonin (PCT) levels between these two inflammatory conditions and evaluated the ability of serum PCT to function as a clinical marker for differential diagnosis between acute gouty attack and bacterial infection. Materials and Methods Serum samples were obtained from 67 patients with acute gouty arthritis and 90 age-matched patients with bacterial infection. Serum PCT levels were measured with an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay. Results Serum PCT levels in patients with acute gouty arthritis were significantly lower than those in patients with bacterial infection (0.096±0.105 ng/mL vs. 4.94±13.763 ng/mL, p=0.001). However, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. To assess the ability of PCT to discriminate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infection, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of serum PCT, uric acid, and CRP were 0.857 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.798–0.917, p<0.001], 0.808 (95% CI, 0.738–0.878, p<0.001), and 0.638 (95% CI, 0.544–0.731, p=0.005), respectively. There were no significant differences in ESR and white blood cell counts between these two conditions. With a cut-off value of 0.095 ng/mL, the sums of sensitivity and specificity of PCT were the highest (81.0% and 80.6%, respectively). Conclusion Serum PCT levels were significantly lower in patients with acute gouty attack than in patients with bacterial infection. Thus, serum PCT can be used as a useful serologic marker to differentiate between acute gouty arthritis and bacterial infections. PMID:27401644

  1. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  2. The prevalence of bacterial infection in acute rhinosinusitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie Shintani; Ference, Elisabeth Henderson; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Tan, Bruce K.; Kern, Robert C.; Chandra, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To systematically assess the prevalence of bacterial infection in adults with acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) Data Sources PubMed and CINAHL databases Review Methods Electronic databases were systematically searched for relevant studies published up to June 2012. Results 29 articles, evaluating a total of 9,595 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ARS, were included in the study. 14 (48%) studies required radiographic confirmation of sinusitis, 1 (3%) required evidence of purulence, 10 (35%) required both for inclusion in the study population, and 4 (14%) required neither. The random effects model estimate of prevalence of bacterial growth on all cultures was 53.7% (CI 48.4%–59.0%), ranging from 52.5% (CI 46.7%–58.3%) in studies requiring radiographic confirmation of sinusitis to 61.1% (CI 54.0%–68.1%) in studies requiring neither radiographic evidence nor purulence on exam. Studies which obtained cultures from antral swab had a prevalence of bacterial growth of 61.0% (CI 54.7%–67.2%), while those utilizing endoscopic meatal sampling had a prevalence of 32.9% (CI 19.0%–46.8%). Conclusion Few studies evaluate the recovery of bacteria via culture in adults with a diagnosis of ABRS or ARS based on clinical criteria alone. With radiographic and/or endoscopic confirmation, antral puncture and endoscopically guided cultures produce positive bacterial cultures in approximately half of patients. Opportunities exist to improve diagnostic accuracy for bacterial infection in ARS. PMID:24723427

  3. [Clinical contribution of the newer fluoroquinolones in acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Niederman, M S

    1999-01-01

    Acute exacerbations occur frequently in patients with chronic bronchitis and the majority of these patients benefit from antimicrobial therapy. The ideal antimicrobial agent for the management of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) should have good activity against the common bacterial pathogens associated with these exacerbations (non-typable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and pneumococci); it should be resistant to bacterial betalactamases; penetrate well into pulmonary tissues and secretions; kill bacteria without inducing excessive airway inflammation; be easy to take (given once or twice a day) in order to ensure high patient compliance, and be cost-effective. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of AECB, but because of the limited activity of certain older agents in this class when administered in standard doses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, they have not be extensively used for this indication. Newer agents including levofloxacin, grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin and trovafloxacin have excellent activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens likely to be involved in AECB. These agents can be administered once daily, making patient compliance and a successful therapeutic outcome more likely. The new quinolones offer promising alternatives for antimicrobial therapy in outpatients with AECB, particularly those with underlying co-morbidity and severe obstruction. PMID:10436551

  4. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Syeda Fasiha; Patil, Asha B.; Nadagir, Shobha D.; Nandihal, Namrata; Lakshminarayana, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods (Latex agglutination test). Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38) cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96) cases and LAT in 17(54.83) cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%. The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Conclusion: Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone. PMID:24339598

  5. Bacterial lysate in the prevention of acute exacerbation of COPD and in respiratory recurrent infections

    PubMed Central

    Braido, F; Tarantini, F; Ghiglione, V; Melioli, G; Canonica, G W

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) represent a serious problem because they are one of the most common cause of human death by infection. The search for the treatment of those diseases has therefore a great importance. In this study we provide an overview of the currently available treatments for RTIs with particular attention to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases exacerbations and recurrent respiratory infections therapy and a description of bacterial lysate action, in particular making reference to the medical literature dealing with its clinical efficacy. Those studies are based on a very large number of clinical trials aimed to evaluate the effects of this drug in maintaining the immune system in a state of alert, and in increasing the defences against microbial infections. From this analysis it comes out that bacterial lysates have a protective effect, which induce a significant reduction of the symptoms related to respiratory infections. Those results could be very interesting also from an economic point of view, because they envisage a reduction in the number of acute exacerbations and a shorter duration of hospitalization. The use of bacterial lysate could therefore represent an important means to achieve an extension of life duration in patients affected by respiratory diseases. PMID:18229572

  6. Differentiation between viral and bacterial acute infections using chemiluminescent signatures of circulating phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Daria; Shneider, Evgeni; Shefer, Alex; Rogachev, Boris; Lobel, Leslie; Last, Mark; Marks, Robert S

    2011-06-01

    Oftentimes the etiological diagnostic differentiation between viral and bacterial infections is problematic, while clinical management decisions need to be made promptly upon admission. Thus, alternative rapid and sensitive diagnostic approaches need to be developed. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or phagocytes act as major players in the defense response of the host during an episode of infection, and thereby undergo functional changes that differ according to the infections. PMNs functional activity can be characterized by quantification and localization of respiratory burst production and assessed by chemiluminescent (CL) byproduct reaction. We have assessed the functional states of PMNs of patients with acute infections in a luminol-amplified whole blood system using the component CL approach. In this study, blood was drawn from 69 patients with fever (>38 °C), and diagnosed as mainly viral or bacterial infections in origin. Data mining algorithms (C4.5, Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Naïve Bayes) were used to induce classification models to distinguish between clinical groups. The model with the best predictive accuracy was induced using C4.5 algorithm, resulting in 94.7% accuracy on the training set and 88.9% accuracy on the testing set. The method demonstrated a high predictive diagnostic value and may assist the clinician one day in the distinction between viral and bacterial infections and the choice of proper medication. PMID:21517122

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography

    PubMed Central

    Moberg, A.B.; Taléus, U.; Garvin, P.; Fransson, S.-G.; Falk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of different clinical and laboratory findings in pneumonia and to explore the association between the doctor’s degree of suspicion and chest X-ray (CXR) result and to evaluate whether or not CXR should be used routinely in primary care, when available. Design A three-year prospective study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2014. Setting Two primary care settings in Linköping, Sweden. Subjects A total of 103 adult patients with suspected pneumonia in primary care. Main outcome measures The physicians recorded results of a standardized medical physical examination, including laboratory results, and rated their suspicion into three degrees. The outcome of the diagnostic variables and the degree of suspicion was compared with the result of CXR. Results Radiographic pneumonia was reported in 45% of patients. When the physicians were sure of the diagnosis radiographic pneumonia was found in 88% of cases (p < 0.001), when quite sure the frequency of positive CXR was 45%, and when not sure 28%. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥ 50mg/L were associated with the presence of radiographic pneumonia when the diagnosis was suspected (p < 0.001). Conclusion This study indicates that CXR can be useful if the physician is not sure of the diagnosis, but when sure one can rely on one’s judgement without ordering CXR. Key pointsThere are different guidelines but no consensus on how to manage community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.When the physician is sure of the diagnosis the judgement is reliable without chest X-ray and antibiotics can be safely prescribed.Chest X-ray can be useful in the assessment of pneumonia in primary care, when the physician is not sure of the diagnosis. PMID:26849394

  8. CAUSATIVE AGENTS OF SEVERE COMMUNITY ACQUIRED VIRAL PNEUMONIA AMONG CHILDREN IN EASTERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Pratheepamornkull, Thitikarn; Ratanakorn, Woranart; Samransamruajkit, Rujipat; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among infants and young children. The most common causes of pneumonia in children are respiratory viruses. In Thailand, the epidemiology of the viruses causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among children is poorly defined. In this cross sectional study we used nasopharyngeal samples collected from hospitalized children diagnosed with severe CAP in accordance with WHO criteria between June 2013 and May 2014 to determine the causes of infection. The samples were analyzed for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza viruses (PIV) types 1,2 and 3, adenovirus, rhinovirus, influenza viruses types A and B and coronavirus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 102 cases of severe CAP, samples were obtained in 91 cases and 48 (52.7%) were positive for respiratory viruses. The most common viruses were RSV (n = 22; 45.8%), rhinovirus (n = 11; 22.9%) and adenovirus (n = 9; 18.7%). Patients were aged 1 month to 4 years 5 months, with a median age of 1 year 1 month. Thirty-seven (77.1%) were male. Asthma was the most common co-morbidity affecting 5 (10.4%) of the 48 cases with an identified virus. The peak prevalence occurred during October (n = 17). All patients required oxygen therapy and 17 (35.4%) required mechanical ventilation. The median length of hospitalization was 11 days. Preterm infants had a significantly higher rate of RSV infection than other respiratory viruses (8 of 21; 38% vs 3 of 27; 11.1%) (p = 0.02). Viruses were most commonly associated with severe CAP among children aged less than 1 year. The peak prevalence occurred during the rainy season. Our findings suggest that young and preterm infants with CAP should be monitored closely due to their high risk for developing serious complications. PMID:26867384

  9. Nasal colonization in children with community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Davoodabadi, Fazlollah; Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Koushki, Ali Mehrabi; Moghadasizadeh, Zahra; Meidani, Mohsen; Shirani, Kiana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of infections. The changing epidemiology of MRSA became evident in the 1990s when CA-MRSA cases were first reported. Nasal carriage of CA-MRSA is associated with an increased risk for development of infections in various populations. Materials and Methods: Anterior nares culture for the presence of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA was taken from 345 children attending kindergartens, who didn’t have any known risk factor for MRSA colonization. Also, children demographic variables were recorded. Identification of SA and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with standard microbiological test was performed. Finally, the susceptibility of isolated to various antibiotics determined. The data were analyzed with Whonet 5.6 software. Results: Of 345 children, 20 children (5.8%) were colonized with CA-MRSA, 86 children (24.9%) with MSSA and 239 cases (69.3%) didn’t have SA colonization. The highest rate of MSSA and MRSA colonization was obtained at the age of 6 years. The frequency distribution of SA (MSSA and MRSA) colonization prevalence didn’t have any significant differences based on age, gender and the admission time (P > 0.05); but it was significantly different in the urban areas (P < 0.001). The lowest resistance rate of CA-MRSA isolates, with a frequency of 10%, was detected with gentamicin, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Conclusions: In summary, CA-MRSA colonization was observed in child care centers remarkably. Therefore, by facing various infections due to SA especially in areas of low socio-economic status, it must be considered. Based on antibiogram test, empirical treatment with rifampin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin is recommended during CA-MRSA infections. PMID:27274501

  10. Tigecycline Versus Levofloxacin in Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Analysis of Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Nathalie; Cooper, C Angel; Castaing, Nathalie; Gandjini, Hassan; Sarkozy, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of tigecycline (TGC) versus levofloxacin (LEV) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) using pooled data and to perform exploratory analyses of risk factors associated with poor outcome. Materials and Methodology: Pooled analyses of 2 phase 3 studies in patients randomized to intravenous (IV) TGC (100 mg, then 50 mg q12h) or IV LEV (500 mg q24h or q12h). Clinical responses at test of cure visit for the clinically evaluable (CE) and clinical modified intention to treat populations were assessed for patients with risk factors including aged ≥65 years, prior antibiotic failure, bacteremia, multilobar disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, alcohol abuse, altered mental status, hypoxemia, renal insufficiency, diabetes mellitus, white blood cell count >30 x 109/L or <4 x 109/L, CURB-65 score ≥2, Fine score category of III to V and at least 2 clinical instability criteria on physical examination. Results: In the CE population of 574 patients, overall cure rates were similar: TGC (253/282, 89.7%); LEV (252/292, 86.3%). For all but one risk factor, cure rates for TGC were similar to or higher than those for LEV. For individual risk factors, the greatest difference between treatment groups was observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (difference of 22.9 for TGC versus LEV; 95% confidence interval, 4.8 - 39.9). Conclusions: TGC achieved cure rates similar to those of LEV in hospitalized patients with CAP. For patients with risk factors, TGC provided generally favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:23526572

  11. Efficacy and safety of tigecycline versus levofloxacin for community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaseanu, Cristina; Milutinovic, Slobodan; Calistru, Petre I; Strausz, Janos; Zolubas, Marius; Chernyak, Valeriy; Dartois, Nathalie; Castaing, Nathalie; Gandjini, Hassan; Cooper, C Angel

    2009-01-01

    Background Tigecycline, an expanded broad-spectrum glycylcycline, exhibits in vitro activity against many common pathogens associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as well as penetration into lung tissues that suggests effectiveness in hospitalized CAP patients. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous (IV) tigecycline with IV levofloxacin in hospitalized adults with CAP. Methods In this prospective, double-blind, non-inferiority phase 3 trial, eligible patients with a clinical diagnosis of CAP supported by radiographic evidence were stratified by Fine Pneumonia Severity Index and randomized to tigecycline or levofloxacin for 7-14 days of therapy. Co-primary efficacy endpoints were clinical response in the clinically evaluable (CE) and clinical modified intent-to-treat (c-mITT) populations at test-of-cure (Day 10-21 post-therapy). Results Of the 428 patients who received at least one dose of study drug, 79% had CAP of mild-moderate severity according to their Fine score. Clinical cure rates for the CE population were 88.9% for tigecycline and 85.3% for levofloxacin. Corresponding c-mITT population rates were 83.7% and 81.5%, respectively. Eradication rates for Streptococcus pneumoniae were 92% for tigecycline and 89% for levofloxacin. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea were the most frequently reported adverse events. Rates of premature discontinuation of study drug or study withdrawal because of any adverse event were similar for both study drugs. Conclusion These findings suggest that IV tigecycline is non-inferior to IV levofloxacin and is generally well-tolerated in the treatment of hospitalized adults with CAP. Trial registration NCT00081575 PMID:19740418

  12. Modified IDSA/ATS Minor Criteria for Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Best Predicted Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-yan; Guo, Qi; Song, Wei-dong; Zhou, Yi-ping; Li, Ming; Chen, Xiao-ke; Liu, Hui; Peng, Hong-lin; Yu, Hai-qiong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Nian; Lü, Zhong-dong; Liang, Li-hua; Zhao, Qing-zhou; Jiang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is not clear whether the IDSA/ATS minor criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) could be simplified or even be modified to orchestrate improvements in predicting mortality. A retrospective cohort study of 1230 CAP patients was performed to simplify and to modify the scoring system by excluding 4 noncontributory or infrequent variables (leukopenia, hypothermia, hypotension, and thrombocytopenia) and by excluding these variables and then adding age ≥65 years, respectively. The simplification and modification were tested against a prospective 2-center validation cohort of 1409 adults with CAP. The increasing numbers of IDSA/ATS, simplified, and modified minor criteria present in the retrospective cohort were positively associated with the mortality, showing significant increased odds ratios for mortality of 2.711, 4.095, and 3.755, respectively. The validation cohort confirmed a similar pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and Youden index of modified minor criteria for mortality prediction were the best pattern in the retrospective cohort. High values of corresponding indices were confirmed in the validation cohort. The highest accuracy of the modified version for predicting mortality in the retrospective cohort was illustrated by the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.925 (descending order: modified, simplified, and IDSA/ATS minor criteria). The validation cohort confirmed a similar paradigm. The IDSA/ATS minor criteria could be simplified to 5 variables and then be modified to orchestrate improvements in predicting mortality in CAP patients. The modified version best predicted mortality. These were more suitable for clinic and emergency department. PMID:26356705

  13. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA) and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE) were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6%) had pandemic (H1N1) influenza A virus, 2 (6.6%) had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3%) had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6%) and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%). The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003) with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005). sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058) and ARDS patients (P = .058). Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013) and sRAGE (P = .05) were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients. PMID:22264245

  14. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  15. Clinical Application of High-Resolution Computed Tomographic Imaging Features of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yunqiang; Li, Cuiyun; Zhang, Jingling; Wang, Hui; Han, Ping; Lv, Xin; Xu, Xinyi; Guo, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Background This article discusses the value of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary infections. Lung infection caused by pathogens is an important cause of death. Traditional methods to treat lung infection involved empirical antibiotic therapy. Thin-slice CT scanning is widely used in the clinical setting, and HRCT scan can very clearly show alveolar and bronchiolar involvement of infection. Material/Methods In total, 178 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were enrolled. All the patients underwent CT scan, qualified sputum, and blood samples for culture or immunological biochemical tests. CT imaging features, pathogenic bacteria, and treatment results were used for statistical analysis. Results In 77 patients with lobar consolidation, the rate of detection was 43.26% (77/178), and in 101 patients with lobular pneumonia it was 56.74% (101/178). In 51 patients, pathogenic bacteria were detected (28.65%, 51/178). Sixteen of 33 patients detected with bacteria had cavities (48.5%, 16/33) and 35 of 145 patients detected with bacteria had no cavities (24.1%, 35/145). The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (χ2=7.795, P=0.005). According to the pathogenic bacteria, 38 patients were cured (74.51%, 38/51), and according to the CT imaging features 81 patients were cured (71.05%, 81/114). No statistically significant difference was found between them (χ2=0.209, P=0.647). Conclusions Treatment effect of CAP based on HRCT findings is not inferior to treatment effect guided by microbial characterization. PMID:27031210

  16. Impact of Macrolide Therapy in Patients Hospitalized With Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Laserna, Elena; Sibila, Oriol; Fernandez, Juan Felipe; Maselli, Diego Jose; Mortensen, Eric M.; Anzueto, Antonio; Waterer, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several studies have described a clinical benefit of macrolides due to their immunomodulatory properties in various respiratory diseases. We aimed to assess the effect of macrolide therapy on mortality in patients hospitalized for Pseudomonas aeruginosa community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods: We performed a retrospective population-based study of > 150 hospitals in the US Veterans Health Administration. Patients were included if they had a diagnosis of CAP and P aeruginosa was identified as the causative pathogen. Patients with health-care-associated pneumonia and immunosuppression were excluded. Macrolide therapy was considered when administered within the first 48 h of admission. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed using 30-day mortality as the dependent measure. Results: We included 402 patients with P aeruginosa CAP, of whom 171 (42.5%) received a macrolide during the first 48 h of admission. These patients were older and white. Macrolide use was not associated with lower 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.70-1.83; P = .5). In addition, patients treated with macrolides had no differences in ICU admission, use of mechanical ventilation, use of vasopressors, and length of stay (LOS) compared with patients not treated with macrolides. A subgroup analysis among patients with P aeruginosa CAP in the ICU showed no differences in baseline characteristics and outcomes. Conclusions: Macrolide therapy in the first 48 h of admission is not associated with decreased 30-day mortality, ICU admission, need for mechanical ventilation, and LOS in hospitalized patients with P aeruginosa CAP. Larger cohort studies should address the benefit of macrolides as immunomodulators in patients with P aeruginosa CAP. PMID:24458223

  17. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Malaysian tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Bahari, Norazlah; Othman, Amizah; Jaafar, Roslinda; Mohamed, Nurul Azmawati; Jabbari, Idimaz; Sulong, Anita; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a pathogen recognized to be distinct in both phenotype and genotype from hospital-acquired MRSA. We have identified CA-MRSA cases in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, including their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genotypic characteristics. Cases were identified during January to December 2009 from routine clinical specimens, where culture and antibiotic susceptibility results yielded pauci-resistant MRSA isolates suspected as being CA-MRSA. The patients' clinical data were collected and their specimens were sent for molecular confirmation and analysis. Five cases of CA-MRSA were identified, which had a multi-sensitive pattern on antibiotic susceptibility tests and were resistant to only penicillin and oxacillin. All cases were skin and soft-tissue infections, including diabetic foot with gangrene, infected scalp hematoma, philtrum abscess in a healthcare worker, thrombophlebitis complicated with abscess and infected bedsore. All five cases were confirmed MRSA by detection of mecA. SCCmec typing (ccr and mec complex) revealed SCCmec type IV for all cases except the infected bedsore case. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene was positive in all isolates. As clinical features among methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA and "nosocomial CA-MRSA" are indistinct, early recognition is necessary in order to initiate appropriate antibiotics and infection control measures. Continual surveillance of pauci-resistant MRSA and molecular analysis are necessary in order to identify emerging strains as well as their epidemiology and transmission, both in the community and in healthcare setting. PMID:23682444

  18. Clinical Pathway and Monthly Feedback Improve Adherence to Antibiotic Guideline Recommendations for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almatar, Maher; Peterson, Gregory M.; Thompson, Angus; McKenzie, Duncan; Anderson, Tara; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Compliance with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) guidelines remains poor despite a substantial body of evidence indicating that guideline-concordant care improves patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of a general educational and a targeted emergency department intervention on improving physicians’ concordance with CAP guidelines. Methods Two distinct interventions were implemented over specific time periods. The first intervention was educational, focusing on the development of local CAP guidelines and their dissemination through hospital-wide educational programmes. The second intervention was a targeted one for the emergency department, where a clinical pathway for the initial management of CAP patients was introduced, followed by monthly feedback to the emergency department (ED) physicians about concordance rates with the guidelines. Data on the concordance rate to CAP guidelines was collected from a retrospective chart review. Results A total of 398 eligible patient records were reviewed to measure concordance to CAP guidelines over the study period. Concordance rates during the baseline and educational intervention periods were similar (28.1% vs. 31.2%; p > 0.05). Significantly more patients were treated in accordance with the CAP guidelines after the ED focused intervention when compared to the baseline (61.5% vs. 28.1%; p < 0.05) or educational period (61.5% vs. 31.2%; p < 0.05). Conclusions A targeted intervention with a CAP clinical pathway and monthly feedback was a successful strategy to increase adherence to empirical antibiotic recommendations in CAP guidelines. PMID:27454581

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity*,**

    PubMed Central

    Cupurdija, Vojislav; Lazic, Zorica; Petrovic, Marina; Mojsilovic, Slavica; Cekerevac, Ivan; Rancic, Nemanja; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65) scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively). The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity); diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays) in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe. PMID:25750674

  20. [Hyponatremia as a risk factor of death in patients with community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Barcia, Ricardo E; Castiglia, Nora I; Villaverde, Marcelo E; Lanosa, Gustavo A; Ujeda Mantello, Carlos J; Aguirre, Marina; Borello, Gustavo J; Caisson, Alejandro M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether hyponatremia is a risk factor of death in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and estimated the relative risk of death by CAP of other risk factors. The design was prospective multicentre cohort study. In 5 centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we studied adults hospitalized with CAP between March 21, 2000 and December 21, 2000. Using stepwise logistic regression, we analyzed risk factors that showed a univariate association with mortality; alpha significance level was 0.05. During a 9-month period, 238 patients were admitted with CAP: 150 (63%) male and 88 (36%) female, mean age 52.99 (+/-20.35) and 55.06 (+/-20.94), respectively. Mortality was 10.5% (25/238). By multivariate analysis, the following variables were statistically associated with evolution: cerebrovascular disease (CD) (B: 2.614, p < 0.001, RRE: 13.6, IC 95%: 3.7-49.6); hyponatremia at admission or during hospitalization (B: 1.994, p<0.001, RRE: 7.3, IC 95%: 2.5-20.8); and elevated blood urea (B: 0.016, p= 0.003, RRE: 1.016, IC 95%: 1.005-1.02). We developed a formula to predict mortality by CAP: P (death) = 1/1 + exp - (-4.03 + 2.61 x l + 1.99 x 2 + 0.016x3), where: x1=CD (yes = 1/ no=0); x2= hyponatremia (yes = 1/ no=0); x3 = blood urea (mg/dl). The predictability was 91.1%. The mortality risk by CAP was statistically higher in patients with CD, hyponatremia and elevated blood urea. PMID:17240620

  1. Distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from adults with community-acquired pneumonia or complicated skin and soft tissue infections in France: the nationwide French PREMIUM study.

    PubMed

    Leprince, C; Desroches, M; Emirian, A; Coutureau, C; Anais, L; Fihman, V; Soussy, C J; Decousser, J W

    2015-10-01

    The empirical therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) must be based on updated bacterial distribution and susceptibility data. A nationwide study consecutively collected 1288 isolates from CAP (n=467) and cSSTIs (n=821) from 18 French hospitals between 2012 and 2013. The MIC values of commonly used antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined. Bacterial distribution featured Pneumococcus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus for CAPs and S. aureus, β-hemolytic streptococci and Enterobacteriaceae for cSSTIs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated i) the sustained third-generation cephalosporins and levofloxacin activity against pneumococci and H. influenzae, ii) no methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emergence among respiratory pathogens, iii) the high in vitro activity of ceftaroline against staphylococci from cSSTIs (98.7% susceptibility), and iv) the worrisome decreasing fluoroquinolone and third-generation cephalosporin susceptibilities among Enterobacteriaceae. This laboratory-based survey depicts a contrasting situation and supports the scoring of patients for the resistant pathogen risk before empirical therapy. PMID:26166208

  2. Inhaled hyaluronic acid as ancillary treatment in children with bacterial acute rhinopharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Varricchio, A; Capasso, M; Avvisati, F; Varricchio, A M; De Lucia, A; Brunese, F P; Ciprandi, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute rhinopharyngitis (ARP) is the most common upper respiratory infection in children and represents a social problem for both the pharmaco-economic impact and a burden for the family. Topical antibiotic therapy is usually effective in bacterial ARP, but ancillary treatment might improve its efficacy. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a promising molecule that has been recently proposed in upper respiratory disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ancillary HA treatment in children with bacterial ARP. Globally, 51 children (27 males, mean age 5.9 ± 2.1 years) with bacterial ARP were enrolled in the study. At baseline, children were randomly assigned to the treatment with: 125 mg of thiamphenicol diluted in 4 mL of saline isotonic solution twice daily (group A) or with 125 mg of thiamphenicol plus 4 ml of sodium hyaluronate 0.2% plus xylitol 5% (Aluneb, Sakura Italia) twice daily (group B) administered by the nasal device Rinowash (Airliquide Medical System, Italy) and connected to an aerosol nebulizer with pneumatic compressor (1.5 bar per 5 L/min) Nebula (Airliquide Medical System, Italy), for 10 days. sVAS, nasopharyngeal spotting, neutrophils and bacteria were assessed at baseline and after the treatment. Both treatments induced significant reduction of symptom perception, spotting, neutrophil and bacteria count. However, thiamphenicol plus HA was able to significantly induce a greater effect on sVAS (p=0.006), neutrophil count (p=0.01), and bacteria count (p=0.0003) than thiamphenicol alone. In conclusion, this study provides the first evidence that intranasal HA, as ancillary treatment, may be able to improve topical antibiotic efficacy in children with bacterial ARP. PMID:25316142

  3. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose (e-nose) could fit this profile but has never been tested in this setting before. In a single-center registered trial (NTR 4601) patients admitted with AECOPD were tested with the Aeonose(®) electronic nose, and a diagnosis of viral or bacterial infection was obtained by bacterial culture on sputa and viral PCR on nose swabs. A neural network with leave-10%-out cross-validation was used to assess the e-nose data. Forty three patients were included. In the bacterial infection model, 22 positive cases were tested versus the negatives; and similarly 18 positive cases were tested in the viral infection model. The Aeonose was able to distinguish between COPD-subjects suffering from a viral infection and COPD patients without infection, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74. Similarly, for bacterial infections, an AUC of 0.72 was obtained. The Aeonose e-nose yields promising results in 'smelling' the presence or absence of a viral or bacterial respiratory infection during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Validation of these results using a new and large cohort is required before introduction into clinical practice. PMID:27310311

  4. Adjunctive Corticotherapy for Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Christophe; Grosgurin, Olivier; Harbarth, Stephan; Combescure, Christophe; Abbas, Mohamed; Rutschmann, Olivier; Perrier, Arnaud; Garin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) induces lung and systemic inflammation, leading to high morbidity and mortality. We systematically reviewed the risks and benefits of adjunctive corticotherapy in the management of patients with CAP. Methods We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials comparing adjunctive corticotherapy and antimicrobial therapy with antimicrobial therapy alone in patients with CAP. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay, time to clinical stability and severe complications. Results 14 trials (2077 patients) were included. The reported 30-day mortality was 7.9% (80/1018) among patients treated with adjunctive corticotherapy versus 8.3% (85/1028) among patients treated with antimicrobial therapy alone (RR 0.84; 95%CI 0.55 to1.29). Adjunctive corticotherapy was associated with a reduction of severe complications (RR 0.36; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.56), a shorter length of stay (9.0 days; 95%CI 7.6 to 10.7 vs 10.6 days; 95%CI 7.4 to 15.3) and a shorter time to clinical stability (3.3 days; 95% CI 2.8 to 4.1 vs 4.3 days; 95%CI 3.6 to 5.1). The risk of hyperglycemia was higher among patients treated with adjunctive corticotherapy (RR 1.59; 95%CI 1.06 to 2.38), whereas the risk of gastro-intestinal bleeding was similar (RR 0.83; 95%CI 0.35 to 1.93). In the subgroup analysis based on CAP severity, a survival benefit was found among patients with severe CAP (RR 0.47; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.96). Conclusion Adjunctive corticotherapy is associated with a reduction of length of stay, time to clinical stability, and severe complications among patients with CAP, but the effect on mortality remains uncertain. PMID:26641253

  5. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  6. Usefulness of Midregional Proadrenomedullin to Predict Poor Outcome in Patients with Community Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gordo-Remartínez, Susana; Sevillano-Fernández, José A.; Álvarez-Sala, Luis A.; Andueza-Lillo, Juan A.; de Miguel-Yanes, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Background midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) is a prognostic biomarker in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We sought to confirm whether MR-proADM added to Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) improves the potential prognostic value of PSI alone, and tested to what extent this combination could be useful in predicting poor outcome of patients with CAP in an Emergency Department (ED). Methods Consecutive patients diagnosed with CAP were enrolled in this prospective, single-centre, observational study. We analyzed the ability of MR-proADM added to PSI to predict poor outcome using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, logistic regression and risk reclassification and comparing it with the ability of PSI alone. The primary outcome was “poor outcome”, defined as the incidence of an adverse event (ICU admission, hospital readmission, or mortality at 30 days after CAP diagnosis). Results 226 patients were included; 33 patients (14.6%) reached primary outcome. To predict primary outcome the highest area under curve (AUC) was found for PSI (0.74 [0.64-0.85]), which was not significantly higher than for MR-proADM (AUC 0.72 [0.63-0.81, p > 0.05]). The combination of PSI and MR-proADM failed to improve the predictive potential of PSI alone (AUC 0.75 [0.65-0.85, p=0.56]). Ten patients were appropriately reclassified when the combined PSI and MR-proADM model was used as compared with the model of PSI alone. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) index was statistically significant (7.69%, p = 0.03) with an improvement percentage of 3.03% (p = 0.32) for adverse event, and 4.66% (P = 0.02) for no adverse event. Conclusion MR-proADM in combination with PSI may be helpful in individual risk stratification for short-term poor outcome of CAP patients, allowing a better reclassification of patients compared with PSI alone. PMID:26030588

  7. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W; Buckley, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Reference/Citation: Salgado CD, Farr BM, Calfee DP. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a meta-analysis of prevalence and risk factors. Clin Infect Dis.20033613113912522744. Clinical Question: What are the prevalence rates and risk factors associated with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)? Data Sources: Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (January 1966–February 2002) and abstracts from scientific meetings (1996–2001). Reviews of citations and reference lists were performed to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included Staphylococcus aureus , infection, colonization, methicillin resistance, community-acquired, community-onset, prevalence, frequency, and risk factors. Study Selection: The search was limited to English-language investigations identified from the electronic and manual searches. Studies were divided into 2 groups, as follows: group 1, retrospective or prospective studies that reported the prevalence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) among hospital patients who were colonized (presence of bacteria without infection) or infected with MRSA; and group 2, studies that reported the prevalence of MRSA colonization in the community. The studies were evaluated independently by 2 authors, and case reports were excluded. Data Extraction: Data extraction and study quality assessment procedures were not fully explained. The outcome measures for hospital patients were definitions of CA-MRSA used in the study, prevalence of CA-MRSA, sample size, number and type of risk factors assessed, and number of patients with ≥1 health care–associated risk factor. The studies were grouped based on type, retrospective or prospective. The pooled prevalence of CA-MRSA was calculated for each group (retrospective or prospective) and was limited to the prevalence among patients with MRSA. The proportion of patients who reported ≥1 health care–associated risk factor was also

  8. An evaluation of prescribing practices for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups worldwide. It may be classified as mild/moderate or severe, the latter usually requiring hospitalisation. Although, there are many studies reported in relation to CAP, there is relatively little known about the treatment of CAP and its antibiotic use in Mongolia. The study aim was to evaluate prescribing practices for the treatment of mild/moderate CAP in Mongolia with respect to national prescribing guidelines. Methods Written prescriptions with a written diagnosis of CAP included were collected prospectively and sequentially for ten weeks from a purposefully selected sample of community pharmacies in rural and urban areas of Mongolia. The data collected included the patient’s age, gender, medication details, frequency and number of doses prescribed. Evaluation was with respect to the Mongolian Standard Treatment Guidelines (2005, 2008). Statistical differences between groups were tested using the Chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests. Results Prescriptions were collected from 22 pharmacies and represented the prescribing practices of 118 doctors. The study enrolled 394 (193 adults and 201 children) patients, with a median age for children of 2.0 years (range: 0.03-12) and adults of 33.0 years (range: 13–92). The most commonly prescribed drugs were aminopenicillins, vitamins, and mucolytics, with the median number of drugs being three per prescription. Inappropriate drug selection was similar for adults (57.7%) and children (56.6%), and the major reason for an overall frequency of inappropriate prescribing for adults was 89.0% and for children 78.0%. Doctors in urban areas prescribed more inappropriate drugs than those in rural areas for both children and adults, p = .0014. The proportion of prescribed injections was 28.4% for adults and 9.0% for children, and for adults was significantly higher in urban areas. The prescribing standard for non

  9. Predicting treatment failure in patients with community acquired pneumonia: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Treatment failure in community-acquired-pneumonia (CAP) patients is associated with a high mortality rate, and therefore are a matter of great concern in clinical management. Those patients have increased mortality and are a target population for randomized clinical trials. Methods A case–control study was performed in patients with CAP (non-failure cases vs. failure cases, discriminating by late and early failure). CRP, PCT, interleukin 1, 6, 8 and 10 and TNF were determined at days 1 and 3 of hospitalization. Results A total of 253 patients were included in this study where 83 patients presented treatment failure. Of these, 40 (48.2%) had early failure. A discriminative effect was found for a higher CURB-65 score among late failure patients (p = 0.004). A significant increase on day 1 of hospitalization in CRP (p < 0.001), PCT (p = 0.004), IL-6 (p < 0.001) and IL-8 (p = 0.02), and a decrease in IL-1 (p = 0.06) in patients with failure was observed compared with patients without failure. On day 3, only the increase in CRP (p < 0.001), PCT (p = 0.007) and IL-6 (p < 0.001) remained significant. Independent predictors for early failure were higher IL-6 levels on day 1 (OR = 1.78, IC = 1.2-2.6) and pleural effusion (OR = 2.25, IC = 1.0-5.3), and for late failure, higher PCT levels on day 3 (OR = 1.60, IC = 1.0-2.5), CURB-65 score ≥ 3 (OR = 1.43, IC = 1.0-2.0), and multilobar involvement (OR = 4.50, IC = 2.1-9.9). Conclusions There was a good correlation of IL-6 levels and CAP failure and IL-6 & PCT with late CAP failure. Pleural effusion and multilobar involvement were simple clinical predictors of early and late failure, respectively. Trial registration IRB Register: http://2009/5451. PMID:24996572

  10. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  11. [Three years of acute bacterial meningitis in the pediatric service at the Temuco Regional Hospital].

    PubMed

    Boehme, C; Soto, L; Rodríguez, G; Serra, J; Illesca, V; Reydet, P

    1993-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study the clinical, epidemiological and laboratory features of 90 children, hospitalized between 1988 and 1991 with the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis in a region with a high proportion of aboriginal population. Twenty six percent of studied patients were of mapuche origin. The causative organism was identified in 82% of cases (H influenzae in 38% of cases, S pneumoniae in 29% and N meningitidis in 10%). H influenzae was resistant to ampicillin in 16% of cases and resistant to chloramphenicol in 4%. This agent was identified in 52% of patients of mapuche origin compared with 33% of non mapuche patients. Seventy three percent of children were less than 2 years old. Thirty seven percent of children had complications during hospitalization, 12 children died (13.3%) and 38% of children had neurological sequelae at the moment of discharge. PMID:8278698

  12. Potential role of tedizolid phosphate in the treatment of acute bacterial skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Olatz; Ferrández, Olivia; Espona, Mercè; Salas, Esther; Ferrández, Irene; Grau, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate (TR-701), a prodrug of tedizolid (TR-700), is a next-generation oxazolidinone that has shown favorable results in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in its first Phase III clinical trial. Tedizolid has high bioavailability, penetration, and tissue distribution when administered orally or intravenously. The activity of tedizolid was greater than linezolid against strains of Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. in vitro studies, including strains resistant to linezolid and those not susceptible to vancomycin or daptomycin. Its pharmacokinetic characteristics allow for a once-daily administration that leads to a more predictable efficacy and safety profile than those of linezolid. No hematological adverse effects have been reported associated with tedizolid when used at the therapeutic dose of 200 mg in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials of up to 3 weeks of tedizolid administration. Given that the clinical and microbiological efficacy are similar for the 200, 300, and 400 mg doses, the lowest effective dose of 200 mg once daily for 6 days was selected for Phase III studies in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, providing a safe dosing regimen with low potential for development of myelosuppression. Unlike linezolid, tedizolid does not inhibit monoamine oxidase in vivo, therefore interactions with adrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic drugs are not to be expected. In conclusion, tedizolid is a novel antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive microorganisms responsible for skin and soft tissue infections, including strains resistant to vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin, thus answers a growing therapeutic need. PMID:23589680

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Q Fever and Etiology of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in a Tropical Region of Southern Taiwan: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chung-Hsu; Chang, Lin-Li; Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chen, Wei-Fang; Wei, Yu-Feng; Chiu, Chien-Tung; Wu, Jiun-Ting; Hsu, Chi-Kuei; Chen, Jung-Yueh; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical characteristics of Q fever are poorly identified in the tropics. Fever with pneumonia or hepatitis are the dominant presentations of acute Q fever, which exhibits geographic variability. In southern Taiwan, which is located in a tropical region, the role of Q fever in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has never been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings During the study period, May 2012 to April 2013, 166 cases of adult CAP and 15 cases of acute Q fever were prospectively investigated. Cultures of clinical specimens, urine antigen tests for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and paired serologic assessments for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) were used for identifying pathogens associated with CAP. From April 2004 to April 2013 (the pre-study period), 122 cases of acute Q fever were also included retrospectively for analysis. The geographic distribution of Q fever and CAP cases was similar. Q fever cases were identified in warmer seasons and younger ages than CAP. Based on multivariate analysis, male gender, chills, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes were independent characteristics associated with Q fever. In patients with Q fever, 95% and 13.5% of cases presented with hepatitis and pneumonia, respectively. Twelve (7.2%) cases of CAP were seropositive for C. burnetii antibodies, but none of them had acute Q fever. Among CAP cases, 22.9% had a CURB-65 score ≧2, and 45.8% had identifiable pathogens. Haemophilus parainfluenzae (14.5%), S. pneumoniae (6.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.8%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (3.0%) were the most common pathogens identified by cultures or urine antigen tests. Moreover, M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and co-infection with 2 pathogens accounted for 9.0%, 7.8%, and 1.8%, respectively. Conclusions In southern Taiwan, Q fever is an endemic disease with hepatitis as the major presentation and is not a common etiology of CAP

  14. Clinical efficacy of dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI)

    PubMed Central

    Leuthner, Kimberly D; Buechler, Kristin A; Kogan, David; Saguros, Agafe; Lee, H Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) are a common disease causing patients to seek treatment through the health care system. With the continued increase of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, these infections are becoming more difficult to successfully cure. Lipoglycopeptides have unique properties that allow the drug to remain active toward both common and challenging pathogens at the infected site for lengthy periods of time. Dalbavancin, a new lipoglycopeptide, provides two unique dosing regimens for the treatment of ABSSSI. The original regimen of 1,000 mg intravenous infusion followed by a 500 mg intravenous infusion after a week has been shown as safe and effective in multiple, randomized noninferiority trials. These studies also demonstrated that dalbavancin was similar to standard regimens in terms of both safety and tolerability. Recently a single 1,500 mg dose was demonstrated to be equivalent to the dalbavancin two-dose regimen for treating ABSSSI. With the introduction of dalbavancin, clinicians have the option to provide an intravenous antimicrobial agent shown to be as effective as traditional therapies, without requiring admission into the hospitals or prescribing a medication which may not be utilized optimally. Further understanding of dalbavancin and its unusual properties can provide unique treatment situations with potential benefits for both the patient and the overall health care system, which should be further explored. PMID:27354809

  15. Acute Exposure to Crystalline Silica Reduces Macrophage Activation in Response to Bacterial Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian L.; Seaver, Benjamin P.; Jessop, Forrest; Shepherd, David M.; Beamer, Celine A.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AMs) and crystalline silica (SiO2) using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes are largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g., 4 h). Interestingly, these responses were dependent on interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:26913035

  16. Acute Exposure to Crystalline Silica Reduces Macrophage Activation in Response to Bacterial Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Gillian L; Seaver, Benjamin P; Jessop, Forrest; Shepherd, David M; Beamer, Celine A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AMs) and crystalline silica (SiO2) using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes are largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g., 4 h). Interestingly, these responses were dependent on interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins. PMID:26913035

  17. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from community-acquired urinary tract infections during 1998-2003 in Manisa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kurutepe, Semra; Surucuoglu, Suheyla; Sezgin, Cenk; Gazi, Horu; Gulay, Mehmet; Ozbakkaloglu, Beril

    2005-06-01

    Urinary tract infections are among the most common infections with an increasing resistance to antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to determine the change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolates from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) for the years 1998 through 2003 and to suggest that the current empirical antibiotic therapy used for these patients is inappropriate. During the study period, 7,335 community urine samples of which 1,203 (16.4%) grew bacterial isolates were analyzed. Among the total of 1,203 isolates, 880 (73.2%) were E. coli. The range of resistance of E. coli to ampicillin was 47.8 to 64.6% and that to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 37.1 to 44.6% during the study period. The susceptibility pattern of E. coli to nitrofurantoin and cefuroxime did not vary significantly over the 6-year period. There was a significant increase in the susceptibility of E. coli to ciprofloxacin (11.3 - 26.7%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (18.4 - 29.2%) and gentamicin (7.0 - 25.6%) (P < 0.05). Empirical initial treatment with ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was thus inadequate in approximately half of UTI cases in our region. PMID:15973007

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of cefditoren and other antimicrobials against Enterobacteriaceae causing community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a Spanish nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Oscar; Cercenado, Emilia; Gimeno, Mercedes; Marín, Mercedes; Coronel, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2010-07-01

    Cefditoren is a third-generation orally administered cephalosporin with a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species. After an oral 400-mg single dose, the mean concentrations in urine are 186.5 mg/L at 2 to 4 h and 12.7 mg/L at 8 to 12 h, and it is a potential drug to be used in the treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI). We performed a multicenter nationwide study in Spain in order to determine the in vitro activity of cefditoren and other comparative agents against Enterobacteriaceae causing community-acquired uncomplicated UTI in women. From June 2008 to March 2009, 89 institutions participated in the study. A total of 2152 Enterobacteriaceae were collected and sent to a coordinating laboratory where identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed against 20 antimicrobials using an automated microdilution method (MicroScan; Siemens, Sacramento, CA). Cefditoren MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines) using the same inoculum. Microorganisms isolated were Escherichia coli (81.8%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.9%), Proteus mirabilis (5.2%), and others (5.1%). A total of 51 isolates (2.4%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, 3 (0.1%) produced plasmidic AmpC enzymes, and 64 (2.9%) produced chromosomal AmpC. The MIC(50)/MIC(90) (mg/L) of cefditoren against all isolates was 0.12/0.5. Cefditoren inhibited 96.5% of isolates at 1 mg/L and was uniformly active against all isolates with the exception of strains producing ESBLs or AmpC enzymes. The MIC(50)/MIC(90) of other antimicrobials were ampicillin (AMP) >16/>16, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (A/C) 2, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (SxT) 4/76, and fosfomycin (FOS)

  19. Chloramphenicol versus ampicillin plus gentamicin for community acquired very severe pneumonia among children aged 2-59 months in low resource settings: multicentre randomised controlled trial (SPEAR study)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether five days’ treatment with injectable ampicillin plus gentamicin compared with chloramphenicol reduces treatment failure in children aged 2-59 months with community acquired very severe pneumonia in low resource settings. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting Inpatient wards within tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh, Ecuador, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Yemen, and Zambia. Participants Children aged 2-59 months with WHO defined very severe pneumonia. Intervention Chloramphenicol versus a combination of ampicillin plus gentamicin. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was treatment failure at five days. Secondary outcomes were treatment failure defined similarly among all participants evaluated at 48 hours and at 10 and 21 days. Results More children failed treatment with chloramphenicol at day 5 (16% v 11%; relative risk 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.97) and also by days 10 and 21. Overall, 112 bacterial isolates were obtained from blood and lung aspirates in 110 children (11.5%), with the most common organisms being Staphylococcus aureus (n=47) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=22). In subgroup analysis, bacteraemia with any organism increased the risk of treatment failure at 21 days in the chloramphenicol group (2.09, 1.41 to 3.10) but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group (1.12, 0.59 to 2.13). Similarly, isolation of S pneumoniae increased the risk of treatment failure at day 21 (4.06, 2.73 to 6.03) and death (5.80, 2.62 to 12.85) in the chloramphenicol group but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group. No difference was found in treatment failure for children with S aureus bacteraemia in the two groups, but the power to detect a difference in this subgroup analysis was low. Independent predictors of treatment failure by multivariate analysis were hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation <90%), receiving chloramphenicol, being female, and poor immunisation status. Conclusion Injectable ampicillin plus

  20. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and toilet bronchoscopy as a bridge to pneumonectomy in severe community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Khabbaza, Joseph E.; Raja, Siva; Mehta, Atul C.; Hatipoğlu, Umur

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia is associated with very high mortality. Though surgical evacuation of necrotic tissue is desirable in patients unresponsive to antimicrobial therapy, most patients are acutely ill precluding surgical intervention. We utilized a combination of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with frequent toilet bronchoscopies to salvage an unaffected right lung from spillage of necrotic pus from left lung cavitary CA-MRSA pneumonia in a 22-year-old patient. Our patient while on ECMO and after decannulation was positioned with the right lung up at all times with 1-2 toilet bronchoscopies every day for almost 30 days. This time was utilized for ventilator weaning and optimizing the nutritional status prior to extrapleural left pneumonectomy. Prevention of soilage of the unaffected right lung and mitigating volutrauma with ECMO support combined with the subsequent surgical evacuation of necrotic left lung tissue led to a favorable outcome in this case. This strategy could be of value in similar presentations of unilateral suppurative pneumonia, where the progressive disease occurs despite optimal medical therapy. PMID:26664570

  1. TGF-β Blood Levels Distinguish Between Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 Virus Sepsis and Sepsis due to Other Forms of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramirez, Erick J; Ortiz-Stern, Alejandro; Martinez-Mejia, Corazon; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rendon, Adrian; Mata-Tijerina, Viviana L; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2015-06-01

    There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. In this study, serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and laboratory markers were evaluated to assess their usefulness as biomarkers of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and their association with fatal cases. Serum samples of consecutive patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and progression to sepsis were evaluated. Serum inflammatory cytokines and routine laboratory tests were performed and correlated with positivity for influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and the results of three clinical severity scores (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], CURB-65, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]). High SOFA scores and some of its individual components, but not CURB-65 or APACHE II scores, correlate with fatal cases regardless of etiology. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, Ca(++), Cl(-), prothrombin times, and partial thromboplastin times discriminate influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. High levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-17 were increased in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (p<0.05). IL-6 levels were significantly elevated in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients and non-(H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (p<0.05). TGF-β serum levels discern between healthy controls, influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients, and patients with other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. TGF-β levels were negatively correlated with SOFA on admission in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients. TGF-β levels are a useful tool for differentiating influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of pneumonia progressing to sepsis. PMID:25923384

  2. TGF-β Blood Levels Distinguish Between Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 Virus Sepsis and Sepsis due to Other Forms of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rendón-Ramirez, Erick J.; Ortiz-Stern, Alejandro; Martinez-Mejia, Corazon; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.; Rendon, Adrian; Mata-Tijerina, Viviana L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. In this study, serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and laboratory markers were evaluated to assess their usefulness as biomarkers of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and their association with fatal cases. Serum samples of consecutive patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and progression to sepsis were evaluated. Serum inflammatory cytokines and routine laboratory tests were performed and correlated with positivity for influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and the results of three clinical severity scores (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], CURB-65, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]). High SOFA scores and some of its individual components, but not CURB-65 or APACHE II scores, correlate with fatal cases regardless of etiology. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, Ca++, Cl−, prothrombin times, and partial thromboplastin times discriminate influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. High levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-17 were increased in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (p<0.05). IL-6 levels were significantly elevated in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients and non-(H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (p<0.05). TGF-β serum levels discern between healthy controls, influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients, and patients with other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. TGF-β levels were negatively correlated with SOFA on admission in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients. TGF-β levels are a useful tool for differentiating influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of pneumonia progressing to sepsis. PMID:25923384

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Escherichia coli isolates as agents of community-acquired urinary tract infection (2008–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Nisel; Ağuş, Neval; Bayram, Arzu; Şamlıoğlu, Pınar; Şirin, M. Cem; Derici, Yeşer Karaca; Hancı, Sevgi Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most frequently seen community-acquired infections worldwide. E. coli causes 90% of urinary system infections. To guide the empirical therapy, the resistance pattern of E. coli responsible for community-acquired UTI was evaluated throughout a seven-year period in this study. Material and methods The urine cultures of patients with urinary tract infections admitted to outpatient clinics between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2014 were analyzed. Presence of ≥105 colony-forming units/mL in urine culture media was considered as significant for UTI. Isolated bacteria were identified by standard laboratory techniques or automated system VITEK2 (BioMerieux, France) and BD PhoenixTM 100 (BD, USA), as required. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method using Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) criteria. Results A total of 13281 uropathogens were isolated. Overall E. coli accounted for 8975 (67%) of all isolates. Resistance rates of E. coli to antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: ampicillin 66.9%, cefazolin 30.9%, cefuroxime 30.9%, ceftazidime 14.9%, cefotaxime 28%, cefepime 12%, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid 36.9%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SXT) 20%, ciprofloxacin 49.9%, amikacin 0.3%, gentamycin 24%, nitrofurantoin 0.9%, and fosfomycin 4.3%. There was no resistance to imipenem nor meropenem. The frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli strains was 24%. Conclusion It is concluded that fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin are appropriate empirical therapy for community-acquired UTI empirical therapy, but the fluoroquinolones and the TMP-SXT shall not be used in the emprical treatment of UTI at this stage. In conclusion, as resistance rates show regional differences, it is necessary to regularly examine regional resistance rates to determine the appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment and national antibiotic usage policies must be reorganized

  4. Oritavancin: a review in acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; Scott, Lesley J

    2015-11-01

    Oritavancin (Orbactiv(®)) is a new generation lipoglycopeptide approved for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is administered as a single 1200 mg intravenous infusion over 3 h. In phase 3 trials in adult patients with ABSSSI, oritavancin was noninferior to vancomycin in terms of a composite outcome (cessation of spreading or reduction in the size of the baseline lesion, absence of fever and no rescue antibacterials required; primary endpoint) assessed at an US FDA-recommended early timepoint of 48-72 h after initiation of treatment. Oritavancin was also noninferior to vancomycin in terms of a ≥20 % reduction in the baseline lesion size at the early timepoint and clinical cure rate 7-14 days after the end of treatment. Oritavancin was generally well tolerated in the phase 3 trials, with most treatment-emergent adverse reactions being mild in severity. The most common adverse events occurring in oritavancin recipients were nausea, headache, vomiting, limb and subcutaneous abscesses, and diarrhoea. Oritavancin offers a number of potential advantages, including a convenient single dose treatment that may shorten or eliminate hospital stays, a reduction in healthcare resource utilization and cost, no need for dosage adjustment in patients with mild to moderate hepatic or renal impairment, no need for therapeutic drug monitoring, and elimination of compliance concerns. Therefore, oritavancin is a useful treatment option for adults with ABSSSI. PMID:26464319

  5. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF. PMID:8521602

  6. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient’s survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis. PMID:27358791

  7. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-06-24

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient's survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis. PMID:27358791

  8. Dalbavancin for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Ramdeen, Sheena; Boucher, Helen W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have increased in incidence and severity. The involvement of resistant organisms, particularly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, presents additional challenges. The lipoglycopeptide dalbavancin has a prolonged half-life, high protein binding, and excellent tissue levels which led to its development as a once-weekly treatment for ABSSSI. In the pivotal DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 trials, dalbavancin proved non-inferior to vancomycin followed by linezolid when used sequentially for ABSSSI, forming the basis for its recent approval in the US and Europe for ABSSSI. Areas covered A literature search of published pharmacologic and clinical data was conducted to review the chemistry, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of dalbavancin. We also discuss its development process, highlighting efficacy and safety data from pertinent clinical trials and the role it could play in the current clinical landscape. Expert opinion DISCOVER 1 and DISCOVER 2 demonstrated dalbavancin’s non-inferiority to vancomycin followed by linezolid for ABSSSI and confirmed its safety and tolerability. They were among the first trials to use new, early primary efficacy endpoints, and dalbavancin was among the first agents designated a Qualified Infectious Disease Product for expedited review. Dalbavancin may prove to be a valuable option for ABSSSI patients in whom conventional therapy is limited. PMID:26239321

  9. Adenoviral augmentation of elafin protects the lung against acute injury mediated by activated neutrophils and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Wallace, W A; Marsden, M E; Govan, J R; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    2001-08-01

    During acute pulmonary infection, tissue injury may be secondary to the effects of bacterial products or to the effects of the host inflammatory response. An attractive strategy for tissue protection in this setting would combine antimicrobial activity with inhibition of human neutrophil elastase (HNE), a key effector of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. We postulated that genetic augmentation of elafin (an endogenous inhibitor of HNE with intrinsic antimicrobial activity) could protect the lung against acute inflammatory injury without detriment to host defense. A replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected A549 cells against the injurious effects of both HNE and whole activated human neutrophils in vitro. Intratracheal replication-deficient adenovirus encoding elafin cDNA significantly protected murine lungs against injury mediated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo. Genetic augmentation of elafin therefore has the capacity to protect the lung against the injurious effects of both bacterial pathogens resistant to conventional antibiotics and activated neutrophils. PMID:11466403

  10. Risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kang, C-I; Song, J-H; Kim, S H; Chung, D R; Peck, K R; So, T M; Hsueh, P-R

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical features of community-onset levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia and to identify risk factors for levofloxacin resistance. Using the database of a surveillance study of community-acquired pneumococcal infections in Asian countries, we conducted a nested case-control study to identify risk factors for levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Of 981 patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 (4.7 %) had levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, of whom 39 evaluable cases were included in the analysis. All cases were from Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Among patients with levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae, 490 controls were selected based on patient country. Of the 39 cases of levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia, 23 (59.0 %) were classified as healthcare-associated, while 164 (33.5 %) of the 490 controls of levofloxacin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (P = 0.001) were classified as healthcare-associated. Multivariate analysis showed that previous treatment with fluoroquinolones, cerebrovascular disease, and healthcare-associated infection were significantly associated with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococcal pneumonia (all P < 0.05). Levofloxacin-nonsusceptible pneumococci pose an important new public health threat in our region, and more information on the emergence and spread of these resistant strains will be necessary to prevent spread throughout the population. PMID:24062235

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cerezer, Vinicius Godoy; Pasternak, Jacyr; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired. PMID:24818127

  12. Nasopharyngeal carriage of community-acquired, antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in a Zambian paediatric population.

    PubMed Central

    Woolfson, A.; Huebner, R.; Wasas, A.; Chola, S.; Godfrey-Faussett, P.; Klugman, K.

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is an international health problem. Apart from South Africa few data on pneumococcal resistance are available for sub-Saharan Africa. This study examines the nasopharyngeal carriage and prevalence of antibiotic resistance in pneumococci isolated from 260 Zambian children aged < 6 years. Pneumococci were isolated from 71.9% of the children; the odds of carrying organisms were twice as high among children < 2 years of age compared with older children. Antibacterial resistance was found in 34.1% of the isolates; resistance to tetracycline, penicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol occurred in 23.0%, 14.3%, 12.7%, and 3.9% of the isolates, respectively. Only 4% of the isolates were resistant to three drugs. High-level resistance was found in all isolates resistant to tetracycline; but only intermediate level penicillin resistance was found. A total of 11.1% of the isolates demonstrated intermediate resistance to sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim. Children aged < 6 months were less likely to carry antibiotic-resistant organisms. Antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae appears to be an emerging public health problem in Zambia, and the national policy for the empirical treatment of pneumococcal meningitis and acute respiratory tract infections may need to be re-evaluated. The establishment of ongoing surveillance to monitor trends in pneumococcal resistance should be considered. PMID:9447779

  13. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization. PMID:27125562

  14. High Rate of Per Oral Mecillinam Treatment Failure in Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections Caused by ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Søraas, Arne; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Jørgensen, Silje Bakken; Liestøl, Knut; Jenum, Pål A.

    2014-01-01

    A population-based study was performed to investigate the efficacy of mecillinam treatment of community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli. The study was conducted in South-Eastern Norway. Data from patients with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing and non-producing (random controls) E. coli were collected through interviews, questionnaires, medical records and the Norwegian Prescription Database. Treatment failure was defined as a new antibiotic prescription appropriate for UTI prescribed within two weeks after the initial antimicrobial therapy. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify treatment agents and patient- or bacterial traits associated with treatment failure. A total of 343 patients (mean age 59) were included, of which 158 (46%) were treated with mecillinam. Eighty-one patients (24%, mean age 54) had infections caused by ESBL producing E. coli, and 41 of these patients (51%) received mecillinam as the primary treatment. Mecillinam treatment failure was observed in 18 (44%) of patients infected by ESBL-producing strains and in 16 (14%) of patients with a CA-UTI caused by ESBL non-producing strains. Multivariable analysis showed that ESBL status (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3–7.8, p = 0.009) and increased MIC of mecillinam (OR 2.0 for each doubling value of MIC, CI 1.4–3.0, p<0.001) were independently associated with mecillinam treatment failure. This study showed a high rate of mecillinam treatment failure in CA-UTIs caused by ESBL producing E. coli. The high failure rate could not be explained by the increased MIC of mecillinam alone. Further studies addressing the use of mecillinam against ESBL-producing E. coli, with emphasis on optimal dosing and combination therapy with β-lactamase inhibitors, are warranted. PMID:24454943

  15. The potential of molecular diagnostics and serum procalcitonin levels to change the antibiotic management of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, David; Gelfer, Gita; Wang, Lian; Myers, Jillian; Bajema, Kristina; Johnston, Michael; Leggett, James

    2016-09-01

    Two diagnostic bundles were compared in 127 evaluable patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Diagnostic modalities in all patients included cultures of sputum (if obtainable) and blood, urine for detection of the antigens of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and nasal swabs for PCR probes for S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. At least one procalcitonin level was measured in all patients. For virus detection, patients were randomized to either a 5-virus, lab-generated PCR panel or the broader and faster FilmArray PCR panel. Overall, an etiologic diagnosis was established in 71% of the patients. A respiratory virus was detected in 39%. The potential for improved antibiotic stewardship was evident in 25 patients with only detectable respiratory virus and normal levels of PCT. PMID:27377675

  16. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  17. Antimicrobial activity of tigecycline against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from North American medical centers.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Deshpande, Lalitagauri; Jones, Ronald N

    2008-04-01

    A total of 1989 community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) were susceptibility tested by broth microdilution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, SCCmec type, and polymerase chain reaction for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were also performed. The overall tigecycline susceptibility rate was 98.2%. Glycopeptides, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, and chloramphenicol were also active against this collection (< or =0.7% resistant). The vast majority (70.8%) of the CA-MRSA was SCCmec type IV, from which 88.4% belonged to the USA300-0114 clone and 94.7% were PVL positive. Tigecycline showed in vitro activity comparable with other highly active parenteral agents and represents an option for treating complicated infections caused by CA-MRSA. PMID:18068326

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Asako; Iwata, Kentaro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Miki, Kanji; Sono, Yumi; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Takeshita, Jumpei; Tomii, Keisuke; Haruta, Tsunekazu

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants) in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly. PMID:24899822

  19. Time to first antibiotic and mortality in adults hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia: a matched-propensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Priya; Rodrigo, Chamira; Mckeever, Tricia M; Woodhead, Mark; Welham, Sally; Lim, Wei Shen

    2016-06-01

    A matched-propensity analysis of national data from the British Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia audit was conducted (n=13 725). Overall, time to first antibiotic (TFA) was ≤4 h in 63%. Adjusted 30-day inpatient (IP) mortality was lower for adults with TFA ≤4 h compared with TFA >4 h (adjusted OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.94; p=0.003). Increasing TFA was associated with greater OR of 30-day IP mortality (p value for trend=0.001), but no TFA threshold was evident. Although we found an association between TFA and mortality, we cannot say whether this is causal or whether TFA might just be a quality measure for overall or other processes of care. PMID:26559161

  20. Spectrum of enteropathogens detected by the FilmArray GI Panel in a multicentre study of community-acquired gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Spina, A; Kerr, K G; Cormican, M; Barbut, F; Eigentler, A; Zerva, L; Tassios, P; Popescu, G A; Rafila, A; Eerola, E; Batista, J; Maass, M; Aschbacher, R; Olsen, K E P; Allerberger, F

    2015-08-01

    The European, multicentre, quarterly point-prevalence study of community-acquired diarrhoea (EUCODI) analysed stool samples received at ten participating clinical microbiology laboratories (Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Romania, and the UK) in 2014. On four specified days, each local laboratory submitted samples from ≤20 consecutive patients to the Austrian Study Centre for further testing with the FilmArray GI Panel (BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT, USA). Of the 709 samples from as many patients received, 325 (45.8%) tested negative, 268 (37.8%) yielded only one organism, and 116 (16.4%) yielded multiple organisms. Positivity rates ranged from 41% (30 of 73 samples) in France to 74% (59 of 80 samples) in Romania. With the exception of Entamoeba histolytica and Vibrio cholerae, all of the 22 targeted pathogens were detected at least once. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter species, toxigenic Clostridium difficile, enteroaggregative E. coli, norovirus and enterotoxigenic E. coli were the six most commonly detected pathogens. When tested according to local protocols, seven of 128 positive samples (5.5%) yielded multiple organisms. Overall, the FilmArray GI Panel detected at least one organism in 54.2% (384/709) of the samples, as compared with 18.1% (128/709) when testing was performed with conventional techniques locally. This underlines the considerable potential of multiplex PCR to improve routine stool diagnostics in community-acquired diarrhoea. Classic culture methods directed at the isolation of specific pathogens are increasingly becoming second-line tools, being deployed when rapid molecular tests give positive results. This optimizes the yield from stool examinations and dramatically improves the timeliness of diagnosis. PMID:25908431

  1. The Viriato study: update on antimicrobial resistance of microbial pathogens responsible for community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Melo-Cristino, José; Santos, Letícia; Silva-Costa, Catarina; Friães, Ana; Pinho, Marcos D; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-06-29

    The Viriato study is a prospective, multicentre laboratory-based surveillance study of antimicrobial susceptibility in which 30 microbiology laboratories throughout Portugal are asked to isolate, identify and submit to a central laboratory for testing Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis responsible for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and Streptococcus pyogenes from tonsillitis. To monitor changes in antimicrobial resistance patterns of these frequent respiratory pathogens. Susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) or using Etest strips following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. From 1999 to 2007 over 13 900 isolates were analysed. Among S. pneumoniae penicillin non-susceptibility decreased from 25% in 1999 to 18% in 2007 (p = 0.002) but resistance to macrolides showed a steady increase, reaching 20% in the last 6 years. Resistance to amoxicillin and the quinolones remained stable and very low (1-2%) throughout the study period. Antimicrobial resistance among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis remained stable. The most significant resistance was to ampicillin, of 10-12% and greater than 80%, respectively, as a result of the production of beta-lactamases. Macrolide resistance among S. pyogenes was stable during 1999-2003 (20-23%) but after 2003 there was a steady decline in resistance, which in 2007 reached 10%. The Viriato surveillance study showed that penicillin remains the most active antimicrobial agent against S. pyogenes causing tonsillitis, and amoxicillin-clavulanate and the quinolones are the most active in vitro simultaneously against S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis responsible for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in Portugal. PMID:20590169

  2. Outcome of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia in Patients with Diabetes: A Historical Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Jesper; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik; Frøslev, Trine; Søgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes (DM) experience increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), but the prognostic impact of diabetes in patients with SAB remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated 30-day all-cause mortality in patients with and without DM. Methods Population-based medical databases were used to conduct a cohort study of all adult patients with community-acquired SAB in Northern Denmark, 2000–2011. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we computed hazard ratios as estimates of 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs) among patients with and without DM. We further investigated whether the prognostic impact of DM differed among patients with and without recent preadmission healthcare contacts (within 30 days of the current hospitalization) and by age, sex, marital status, level of comorbidity, and DM-related characteristics (e.g., duration of DM and presence of DM complications). Results Among 2638 SAB patients, 713 (27.0%) had DM. Thirty-day cumulative mortality was 25.8% in patients with DM and 24.3% in patients without DM, for an adjusted MRR (aMRR) of 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84–1.20). In analyses with and without recent healthcare contacts, the corresponding aMRRs were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62–1.14) and 1.13 (95% CI, 0.91–1.41), respectively. Compared to patients without DM, the aMRR was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.74–1.20) for male patients with DM and 1.13 (95% CI, 0.87–1.47) for female patients with DM. The prognostic influence of DM on mortality did not differ notably with age, level of comorbidity, or characteristics of patients with DM. Conclusion Patients with DM and community-acquired SAB did not experience higher 30-day mortality than patients without DM. PMID:27082873

  3. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  4. Oral immunization with bacterial extracts for protection against acute bronchitis in elderly institutionalized patients with chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Orcel, B; Delclaux, B; Baud, M; Derenne, J P

    1994-03-01

    Acute bronchitis is a major source of morbidity in elderly patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the preventive effects of oral immunisation with a bacterial extract. Three hundred and fifty four patients with chronic bronchitis, living in institutions for the elderly (aged > 65 yrs), were included in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The purpose of the study was to assess preventive effects of OM-85 BV (an immunostimulating agent consisting of lyophilized fractions of eight of the most common pathogens isolated in respiratory tract infections) against acute lower respiratory tract infections. Two hundred and ninety patients completed the study (143 taking placebo and 147 taking OM-85 BV). There was a 28% reduction in the number of lower respiratory tract infections in the patients treated with OM-85 BV; this was entirely due to 40% reduction in the number of episodes of acute bronchitis (p < 0.01), with no difference in the number of episodes of pneumonia and bronchopneumonia. A larger number of patients in the OM-85 BV group were free of acute bronchitis throughout the 6 month study period (96 vs 69) and there was a 28% reduction in the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the OM-85 BV treated group. These results suggest that OM-85 BV has a protective effect against acute bronchitis in elderly patients living in institutions. PMID:8013600

  5. Reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood and sputum neutrophils during bacterial and nonbacterial acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vaitkus, Mindaugas; Lavinskiene, Simona; Barkauskiene, Diana; Bieksiene, Kristina; Jeroch, Jolanta; Sakalauskas, Raimundas

    2013-12-01

    Chronic airway inflammation can be mediated by an enhanced neutrophil oxidative burst. However, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations is highly controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral blood and sputum neutrophils during bacterial and nonbacterial acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). A total of 40 patients with AECOPD, 10 healthy nonsmokers, and 10 "healthy" smokers were enrolled into the study. Peripheral blood and sputum samples were obtained during exacerbation and after recovery. Neutrophils were isolated by high-density gradient centrifugation and magnetic separation. ROS production by neutrophils was investigated after stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. ROS production by neutrophils was assessed as the mean fluorescent intensity using a flow cytometer. IL-8 levels in serum and induced sputum were determinant by ELISA. Spontaneous ROS production was significantly higher in neutrophils from the patients with bacterial AECOPD as compared with nonbacterial AECOPD and stable COPD (P <0.05). ROS production stimulated with PMA and with Staphylococcus aureus was significantly higher in neutrophils isolated from the patients with bacterial AECOPD as compared with nonbacterial and stable COPD (P <0.05). The serum and induced sputum IL-8 levels were significantly increased in the patients with bacterial AECOPD than nonbacterial AECOPD, stable COPS, and "healthy" smokers and nonsmokers (P <0.05) and higher in the induced sputum as the compared with serum in all studied groups (P <0.05). Enlarge CRP level was documented during AECOPD than in all other groups (P <0.05). A markedly increased ROS production in sputum neutrophils during bacterial AECOPD shows an inflammatory response reflecting enhanced local inflammation, which can be mediated by bacterial colonization. PMID:23872721

  6. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  7. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew S.; Yang, Chao; Fung, Ka Yee; Bachem, Annabell; Bourges, Dorothée; Bedoui, Sammy; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; van Driel, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC), which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity. PMID:27300652

  8. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. Patients and Methods From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections. PMID:27226874

  9. The current status of community-acquired pneumonia management and prevention in children under 5 years of age in India: a review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Krishna Kumar; Awasthi, Shally

    2016-01-01

    India has the highest number of global deaths of children under 5 years of age. In the year 2015, it was reported that there were 5.9 million deaths of children under 5 years of age globally, of which 1.2 million (20%) occurred in India alone. Currently, India has an under 5 mortality rate of 48 per 1000 live births. Community-acquired pneumonia contributes to about one sixth of this mortality. Fast breathing is the key symptom of community-acquired pneumonia. The World Health Organization recently categorized community-acquired pneumonia in children under 5 years of age into two, pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Fast breathing with or without chest in-drawing is categorized as pneumonia and fast breathing with any of danger signs as severe pneumonia. Because effective vaccines against two of the common organisms causing community-acquired pneumonia, namely Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b, are available, there should be urgent and phased introduction into the Indian Universal Immunization Programme. Several preventable risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia such as lack of exclusive breast feeding for first 6 months of life, inappropriate complimentary feeding, iron deficiency anemia, malnutrition, and indoor air pollution should be adequately addressed. The community should be aware about the signs and symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia and its danger signs so that delay in qualified care seeking can be avoided. To achieve the sustainable development goal of ⩽25 under five deaths per 1000 live births by 2030, a multipronged approach is the need of the hour. PMID:27536353

  10. The current status of community-acquired pneumonia management and prevention in children under 5 years of age in India: a review.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Krishna Kumar; Awasthi, Shally

    2016-06-01

    India has the highest number of global deaths of children under 5 years of age. In the year 2015, it was reported that there were 5.9 million deaths of children under 5 years of age globally, of which 1.2 million (20%) occurred in India alone. Currently, India has an under 5 mortality rate of 48 per 1000 live births. Community-acquired pneumonia contributes to about one sixth of this mortality. Fast breathing is the key symptom of community-acquired pneumonia. The World Health Organization recently categorized community-acquired pneumonia in children under 5 years of age into two, pneumonia, and severe pneumonia. Fast breathing with or without chest in-drawing is categorized as pneumonia and fast breathing with any of danger signs as severe pneumonia. Because effective vaccines against two of the common organisms causing community-acquired pneumonia, namely Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b, are available, there should be urgent and phased introduction into the Indian Universal Immunization Programme. Several preventable risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia such as lack of exclusive breast feeding for first 6 months of life, inappropriate complimentary feeding, iron deficiency anemia, malnutrition, and indoor air pollution should be adequately addressed. The community should be aware about the signs and symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia and its danger signs so that delay in qualified care seeking can be avoided. To achieve the sustainable development goal of ⩽25 under five deaths per 1000 live births by 2030, a multipronged approach is the need of the hour. PMID:27536353

  11. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Silvina; Murzicato, Sofía; Sandoval, Orlando; Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Mollerach, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient. PMID:25681265

  12. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fever , which may be mild or high Shaking chills Shortness of breath (may only occur when you ... or unexplained weight loss Shortness of breath, shaking chills, or persistent fevers Signs of pneumonia and a ...

  13. New developments in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: considerations for the effective use of dalbavancin

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Janelle J; Mullins, Caitlin F; Peppard, William J; Huang, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Dalbavancin, an intravenous glycopeptide, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in May 2014 for use in adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. The recommended dosing regimen for effective use of dalbavancin is 1,000 mg followed by a 500 mg dose after 1 week. Two multinational, identically designed, non-inferiority trials, DISCOVER 1 and 2, demonstrated similar early clinical success with dalbavancin compared to vancomycin with an option to switch to oral linezolid. In a recently published non-inferiority trial, a single-dose regimen of dalbavancin was compared to the traditional two-dose administration and was found to have a non-inferior clinical response. In the aforementioned trials, dalbavancin was well tolerated, with patients experiencing transient adverse events of mild to moderate severity. The prolonged half-life, excellent skin and soft tissue penetration, bactericidal activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and convenient dosing make dalbavancin a reasonable option for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in adult patients who have tried and failed other therapies. PMID:26937194

  14. A Rare Case of Toxic Myocarditis Caused by Bacterial Liver Abscess Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuhai; Lin, Lin; Xiao, Hua; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Toxic myocarditis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Emergency Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Chills, high fever, right upper abdomen pain, and increased white blood cell count are the main and common clinical features of bacterial liver abscess. It is rare to see bacterial liver abscess present symptoms of myocardial injury first, and this can lead to misdiagnosis. Case Report: We report a case of toxic myocarditis caused by bacterial liver abscess. The patient first presented with chest pain, ST segment elevation, and elevated TNI, which misled us to diagnose myocardial infarction, but the coronary artery had no stenosis or obstructive lesions after emergency coronary angiography. Then we modified the diagnosis to toxic myocarditis. Bacterial liver abscess was the proposed etiology after a series of auxiliary examinations. Finally, antibiotics and percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage were used to improve the clinical outcome. Conclusions: It is rare that patients with bacterial liver abscess first present symptoms of myocardial injury. Differential diagnosis between myocarditis and myocardial infarction should be careful, as myocarditis is a diagnosis of exclusion, and coronary angiography is necessary to confirm coronary disease. Percutaneous liver puncture catheter drainage can effectively cure bacterial liver abscess. PMID:26726772

  15. Elevated Plasma Stromal-Cell-Derived Factor-1 Protein Levels Correlate with Severity in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ping-Kun; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Hsiang-Ling; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate differential changes in plasma levels of stromal-cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) before and after antibiotic treatment in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and observe the association between the severity of CAP and the plasma SDF-1 level. Methods. We gathered blood specimens from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls to measure the plasma concentrations of SDF-1 by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The plasma SDF-1 concentration was elevated significantly in patients with CAP before receiving treatment compared with the controls and decreased significantly after the patients received treatment. Leukocyte (WBC) and neutrophil counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels decreased significantly after antibiotic treatment. Moreover, differences in the plasma concentration of SDF-1 were significantly correlated with PSI, CURB-65, and APACHE II scores (r = 0.389, P = 0.002, and n = 61; r = 0.449, P < 0.001, and n = 61; and r = 0.363, P = 0.004, and n = 61, resp.). Conclusions. An elevated plasma SDF-1 concentration can be used as a biological marker for the early diagnosis of CAP and for the early detection of its severity. PMID:25371597

  16. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity

    PubMed Central

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov–Luchankiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Lee, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient’s blood had been almost unexplored. AIM: To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. RESULTS: In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients’ blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. CONCLUSION: To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes’ redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP. PMID:27275344

  17. Corticosteroids in the adjunctive therapy of community-acquired pneumonia: an appraisal of recent meta-analyses of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Improving the outcome of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an ongoing challenge, even in the setting of significant advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and critical care. Recognition of the underlying involvement of inflammation-mediated organ dysfunction as a determinant of adverse outcomes in CAP has aroused intense interest in the protective potential of adjunctive anti-inflammatory therapies in CAP, particularly the role of corticosteroids (CS). This is the primary topic of the current review which is focused on an evaluation of the latest meta-analyses encompassing both recent and earlier clinical trials, with particular emphasis on the stringent meta-analysis undertaken by Siemieniuk and colleagues (Ann Intern Med 2015;163:519–528). The review highlights the findings and recommendations of these and related published commentaries/critiques, while providing a brief description of those sub-groups of patients who seemingly stand to benefit most from CS therapy. This is preceded by an overview of the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory activities of CS, the interactions of these agents with macrolide antibiotics, and the potential benefits and risks of short-term administration of CS, concluding with a succinct appraisal of priority issues for ongoing and future research. PMID:27076965

  18. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study.

    PubMed

    Donà, D; Mozzo, E; Scamarcia, A; Picelli, G; Villa, M; Cantarutti, L; Giaquinto, C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus (RV) is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV) and Norovirus (NV). Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP) visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74) and NVGEs (1.51) were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER), and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children. PMID:26884770

  19. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  20. Low T3 syndrome is a strong predictor of poor outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinliang; Wu, Xuejie; Lu, Fang; Zhao, Lifang; Shi, Lingxian; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Low T3 syndrome was previously reported to be linked to poor clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive power of low T3 syndrome for clinical outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data for 503 patients were analyzed retrospectively, and the primary end point was 30-day mortality. The intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate and 30-day mortality were 8.3% and 6.4% respectively. The prevalence of low T3 syndrome differed significantly between survivors and nonsurvivors (29.1% vs 71.9%, P < 0.001), and low T3 syndrome was associated with a remarkable increased risk of 30-day mortality and ICU admission in patients with severe CAP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis produced an odds ratio of 2.96 (95% CI 1.14–7.76, P = 0.025) for 30-day mortality in CAP patients with low T3 syndrome. Survival analysis revealed that the survival rate among CAP patients with low T3 syndrome was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.01). Adding low T3 syndrome to the PSI and CURB-65 significantly increased the areas under the ROC curves for predicting ICU admission and 30-day mortality. In conclusion, low T3 syndrome is an independent risk factor for 30-day mortality in CAP patients. PMID:26928863

  1. Recurrent Furunculosis Caused by a Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Strain Belonging to the USA300 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Shirish; Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Salvato, Scott; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Khalida, Chamanara; Kost, Rhonda G.; Evering, Teresa H.; Pastagia, Mina; D'Orazio, Brianna M.; Tomasz, Alexander; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A 24-year-old female with recurrent skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) was enrolled as part of a multicenter observational cohort study conducted by a practice-based research network (PBRN) on community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Methods: Strains were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. MRSA strains were analyzed for SCCmec type and the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) using PCR. Results: In the first episode, S. aureus was recovered from the wound and inguinal folds; in the second, S. aureus was recovered from a lower abdomen furuncle, inguinal folds, and patellar fold. Molecular typing identified CA-MRSA clone USA300 in all samples as spa-type t008, ST8, SCCmecIVa, and a typical PFGE pattern. The strain carried virulence genes pvl and ACME type I. Five SSTI episodes were documented despite successful resolution by antibiotic treatment, with and without incision and drainage. Conclusions: The source of the USA300 strain remains unknown. The isolate may represent a persistent strain capable of surviving extensive antibiotic pressure or a persistent environmental reservoir may be the source, possibly in the patient's household, from which bacteria were repeatedly introduced into the skin flora with subsequent infections. PMID:25668150

  2. Mortality of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Korea: Assessed with the Pneumonia Severity Index and the CURB-65 Score

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye In; Chang, Hyun Ha; Cha, Seung Ick; Lee, Jae Hee; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Cheong, Hae Suk; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Byung Kee; Choo, Eun Ju; Kim, Do Jin; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae Hoon; Suh, Gee Young; Shim, Tae Sun; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Moon, Chi Sook; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Jung, Sook In; Park, Kyung Hwa; Yun, Na Ra; Yoon, Sung Ho; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Jung, Ki Suck

    2013-01-01

    The pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 are widely used tools for the prediction of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate validation of severity scoring system including the PSI and CURB-65 scores of Korean CAP patients. In the prospective CAP cohort (participated in by 14 hospitals in Korea from January 2009 to September 2011), 883 patients aged over 18 yr were studied. The 30-day mortalities of all patients were calculated with their PSI index classes and CURB scores. The overall mortality rate was 4.5% (40/883). The mortality rates per CURB-65 score were as follows: score 0, 2.3% (6/260); score 1, 4.0% (12/300); score 2, 6.0% (13/216); score 3, 5.7% (5/88); score 4, 23.5% (4/17); and score 5, 0% (0/2). Mortality rate with PSI risk class were as follows: I, 2.3% (4/174); II, 2.7% (5/182); III, 2.3% (5/213); IV, 4.5% (11/245); and V, 21.7% (15/69). The subgroup mortality rate of Korean CAP patients varies based on the severity scores and CURB-65 is more valid for the lower scores, and PSI, for the higher scores. Thus, these variations must be considered when using PSI and CURB-65 for CAP in Korean patients. PMID:24015030

  3. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  4. Differential Distribution and Expression of Panton-Valentine Leucocidin among Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Saïd-Salim, Battouli; Mathema, Barun; Braughton, Kevin; Davis, Stacy; Sinsimer, Daniel; Eisner, William; Likhoshvay, Yekaterina; DeLeo, Frank R.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2005-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging threat worldwide. CA-MRSA strains differ from hospital-acquired MRSA strains in their antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic backgrounds. Using several genotyping methods, we clearly define CA-MRSA at the genetic level and demonstrate that the prototypic CA-MRSA strain, MW2, has spread as a homogeneous clonal strain family that is distinct from other CA-MRSA strains. The Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-encoding genes, lukF and lukS, are prevalent among CA-MRSA strains and have previously been associated with CA-MRSA infections. To better elucidate the role of PVL in the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we first analyzed the distribution and expression of PVL among different CA-MRSA strains. Our data demonstrate that PVL genes are differentially distributed among CA-MRSA strains and, when they are present, are always transcribed, albeit with strain-to-strain variability of transcript levels. To directly test whether PVL is critical for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we evaluated the lysis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during phagocytic interaction with PVL-positive and PVL-negative CA-MRSA strains. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between PVL expression and PMN lysis, suggesting that additional virulence factors underlie leukotoxicity and, thus, the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA. PMID:16000462

  5. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area. PMID:24684125

  6. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:27401970

  7. Severe Q fever community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) mimicking Legionnaires' disease: Clinical significance of cold agglutinins, anti-smooth muscle antibodies and thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Nausheen, Sara; Busch, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be caused by zoonotic or nonpulmonary pathogens. However, atypical pathogens are systemic infectious disease accompanied by pneumonia in contrast with typical bacterial pathogens with infection limited to the lungs and absent extrapulmonary findings. Clinically and radiologically, the atypical CAP pathogens that most closely resemble each other are psittacosis, Q fever, and Legionnaires' disease. Psittacosis can usually be readily suspected or eliminated on the basis of a recent psittacine bird contact history. The 2 atypical pneumonias that most closely resemble each other clinically are Q fever and Legionnaires' disease. The epidemiology of Q fever is related to livestock, and sporadic cases are related to contact to parturient cats. In nonendemic areas, Q fever CAP mimics Legionnaires' disease most closely. Both Q fever and Legionella CAP have several clinical and laboratory features in common. However, there are subtle but important differences that allow the astute clinician to differentiate between these 2 disorders on the basis of clinical and nonspecific laboratory findings before definitive diagnostic tests results are reported. We report a case of severe Q fever CAP mimicking Legionnaires' disease in a young adult normal host. Her initial zoonotic contact history was negative, and her clinical presentation suggested Legionnaires' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Against the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease was the patient's age and occurrence of the disease in spring time. In contrast, Legionnaires' disease is usually an infection of older individuals and occurs in late summer/fall. Although the patient did not have splenomegaly, a common finding in Q fever CAP, she did have mild hepatomegaly. Hepatomegaly is a uncommon in Q fever CAP but is not a feature of Legionnaires' disease. In the absence of a positive zoonotic contact history, the cardinal findings pointing to the diagnosis of Q fever in this

  8. Suspected community-acquired pneumonia in an ambulatory setting (CAPA): a French prospective observational cohort study in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Partouche, Henri; Buffel du Vaure, Céline; Personne, Virginie; Le Cossec, Chloé; Garcin, Camille; Lorenzo, Alain; Ghasarossian, Christian; Landais, Paul; Toubiana, Laurent; Gilberg, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few studies have addressed the pragmatic management of ambulatory patients with suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) using a precise description of the disease with or without chest X-ray (X-ray) evidence. Aims: To describe the characteristics, clinical findings, additional investigations and disease progression in patients with suspected CAP managed by French General Practitioners (GPs). Methods: The patients included were older than 18 years, with signs or symptoms suggestive of CAP associated with recent-onset unilateral crackles on auscultation or a new opacity on X-ray. They were followed for up to 6 weeks. Descriptive analyses of all patients and according to their management with X-rays were carried out. Results: From September 2011 to July 2012, 886 patients have been consulted by 267 GPs. Among them, 278 (31%) were older than 65 years and 337 (38%) were at increased risk for invasive pneumococcal disease. At presentation, the three most common symptoms, cough (94%), fever (93%), and weakness or myalgia (81%), were all observed in 70% of patients. Unilateral crackles were observed in 77% of patients. Among patients with positive radiography (64%), 36% had no unilateral crackles. A null CRB-65 score was obtained in 62% of patients. Most patients (94%) initially received antibiotics and experienced uncomplicated disease progression regardless of their management with X-rays. Finally, 7% of patients were hospitalised and 0.3% died. Conclusions: Most patients consulting GPs for suspected CAP had the three following most common symptoms: cough, fever, and weakness or myalgia. More than a third of them were at increased risk for invasive pneumococcal disease. With or without X-rays, most patients received antibiotics and experienced uncomplicated disease progression. PMID:25763466

  9. Clinical features and molecular characteristics of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Taiwanese children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Wong, Kin-Sun; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2007-11-01

    Highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been associated with morbidity and mortality in various countries of the world. We characterized the clinical and molecular features of pediatric invasive CA-MRSA infections in Taiwan. Between July 2000 and June 2005, 31 previously healthy children with invasive CA-MRSA infections were identified from 423 children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The medical records were reviewed. The clinical isolates, if available, were collected for molecular characterization. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male, and the mean age was 5.7 years. Adolescents accounted for 9 (29%) cases. Eighteen children had bone and/or joint infections, 14 had deep-seated soft tissue infections, 11 had pneumonia, and 2 had central nervous system infections. Multiorgan involvement was identified in 8 of 20 bacteremic cases. Twenty-two patients (71%) required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 27.4 days. All of the 15 available isolates were classified as sequence type (ST) 59 or its single locus variant and belonged to 2 previously reported community-associated clones containing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or type V(T) in Taiwan. Most of the isolates were multiresistant to clindamycin (94%) and erythromycin (97%). Eleven (73.3%) isolates carried pvl genes, and the strains harboring pvl genes were significantly associated with lung involvement. In conclusion, invasive CA-MRSA infections in pediatric population were not limited to young children. Surgical interventions were often required, and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy was needed. A multiresistant CA-MRSA clone characterized as ST59 was identified from these children in Taiwan. PMID:17662565

  10. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Among Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Benitez, Alvaro J; Cross, Kristen E; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The molecular characteristics of M pneumoniae detected in patients hospitalized with CAP in the United States are poorly described. Methods.  We performed molecular characterization of M pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children and adults hospitalized with CAP in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, including P1 typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and macrolide susceptibility genotyping. Results.  Of 216 M pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive specimens, 40 (18.5%) were obtained from adults and 176 (81.5%) from children. P1 type distribution differed between adults (64% type 1 and 36% type 2) and children (84% type 1, 13% type 2, and 3% variant) (P < .05) and among sites (P < .01). Significant differences in the proportions of MLVA types 4/5/7/2 and 3/5/6/2 were also observed by age group (P < .01) and site (P < .01). A macrolide-resistant genotype was identified in 7 (3.5%) specimens, 5 of which were from patients who had recently received macrolide therapy. No significant differences in clinical characteristics were identified among patients with various strain types or between macrolide-resistant and -sensitive M pneumoniae infections. Conclusions.  The P1 type 1 genotype and MLVA type 4/5/7/2 predominated, but there were differences between children and adults and among sites. Macrolide resistance was rare. Differences in strain types did not appear to be associated with differences in clinical outcomes. Whole genome sequencing of M pneumoniae may help identify better ways to characterize strains. PMID:26284257

  11. Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, pneumonia severity index and outcomes in patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Moammar, Mahmoud Q; Azam, Hamad M; Blamoun, Adel I; Rashid, Ashraf O; Ismail, Medhat; Khan, M Anees; DeBari, Vincent A

    2008-09-01

    The alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (DeltaA-a) provides a useful assessment of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) examine the correlation between the DeltaA-a and the pneumonia severity index (PSI); and (ii) determine whether these measures were comparable in predicting clinical outcomes. The present study was conducted at a 750-bed teaching hospital. It examined a retrospective cohort of 255 patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) over a 2 year period. Association between the CAP and DeltaA-a was investigated by regression models and correlation, as well as two logistic models for subjects bifurcated by low-risk/moderate-to-high risk. The decision levels (DL) for both PSI and DeltaA-a were then compared as predictors of both length of stay (LOS) and survival. The correlation between PSI and DeltaA-a was strong (rho = 0.76; P < 0.0001) and was best modelled by a curvilinear relationship. Both logistic models indicated a strong association (P < 0.001) between DeltaA-a and PSI and yielded an optimal DL for the DeltaA-a of < 89 mmHg. Inter-test agreement of DeltaA-a with PSI was 76.9% (kappa = 0.60; 95% confidence interval 0.47-0.72; P < 0.0001). At < 89 mmHg, the odds ratios for LOS were similar to those at PSI = 90 in predicting LOS in the range 3-7 days, inclusive. There was no significant difference in the ability of DeltaA-a and PSI to predict survival for either the low- or high-risk group (P = 0.363 and P = 0.951, respectively). The DeltaA-a correlates well with PSI and performs comparably in predicting two major outcomes in subjects hospitalized with CAP. PMID:18518885

  12. Expanded CURB-65: a new score system predicts severity of community-acquired pneumonia with superior efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Xu, Feng; Hui Zhou; Wu, Xue-jie; Shi, Ling-xian; Lu, Rui-qing; Farcomeni, Alessio; Venditti, Mario; Zhao, Ying-li; Luo, Shu-ya; Dong, Xiao-jun; Falcone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to develop a new simpler and more effective severity score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 1640 consecutive hospitalized CAP patients in Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University were included. The effectiveness of different pneumonia severity scores to predict mortality was compared, and the performance of the new score was validated on an external cohort of 1164 patients with pneumonia admitted to a teaching hospital in Italy. Using age ≥ 65 years, LDH > 230 u/L, albumin < 3.5 g/dL, platelet count < 100 × 109/L, confusion, urea > 7 mmol/L, respiratory rate ≥ 30/min, low blood pressure, we assembled a new severity score named as expanded-CURB-65. The 30-day mortality and length of stay were increased along with increased risk score. The AUCs in the prediction of 30-day mortality in the main cohort were 0.826 (95% CI, 0.807–0.844), 0.801 (95% CI, 0.781–0.820), 0.756 (95% CI, 0.735–0.777), 0.793 (95% CI, 0.773–0.813) and 0.759 (95% CI, 0.737–0.779) for the expanded-CURB-65, PSI, CURB-65, SMART-COP and A-DROP, respectively. The performance of this bedside score was confirmed in CAP patients of the validation cohort although calibration was not successful in patients with health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The expanded CURB-65 is objective, simpler and more accurate scoring system for evaluation of CAP severity, and the predictive efficiency was better than other score systems. PMID:26987602

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Intravenous followed by Oral Azithromycin Monotherapy in Hospitalized Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, Joseph; Schwartz, Douglas B.; Kolokathis, Antonia; Sherman, Bruce W.; Arnow, Paul M.; Gezon, John A.; Suh, Byungse; Anzuetto, Antonio; Greenberg, Richard N.; Niederman, Michael; Paladino, Joseph A.; Ramirez, Julio A.; Inverso, Jill; Knirsch, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravenous (i.v.) azithromycin followed by oral azithromycin as a monotherapeutic regimen for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Two trials of i.v. azithromycin used as initial monotherapy in hospitalized CAP patients are summarized. Clinical efficacy is reported from an open-label randomized trial of azithromycin compared to cefuroxime with or without erythromycin. Bacteriologic and clinical efficacy results are also presented from a noncomparative trial of i.v. azithromycin that was designed to give additional clinical experience with a larger number of pathogens. Azithromycin was administered to 414 patients: 202 and 212 in the comparative and noncomparative trials, respectively. The comparator regimen was used as treatment for 201 patients; 105 were treated with cefuroxime alone and 96 were given cefuroxime plus erythromycin. In the comparative trial, clinical outcome data were available for 268 evaluable patients with confirmed CAP at the 10- to 14-day visit, with 106 (77%) of the azithromycin patients cured or improved and 97 (74%) of the comparator patients cured or improved. Mean i.v. treatment duration and mean total treatment duration (i.v. and oral) for the clinically evaluable patients were significantly (P < 0.05) shorter for the azithromycin group (3.6 days for the i.v. group and 8.6 days for the i.v. and oral group) than for the evaluable patients given cefuroxime plus erythromycin (4.0 days for the i.v. group and 10.3 days for the i.v. and oral group). The present comparative study demonstrates that initial therapy with i.v. azithromycin for hospitalized patients with CAP is associated with fewer side effects and is equal in efficacy to a 1993 American Thoracic Society-suggested regimen of cefuroxime plus erythromycin when the erythromycin is deemed necessary by clinicians. PMID:10858333

  14. Comparative Outcome Analysis of Penicillin-Based Versus Fluoroquinolone-Based Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Sheng, Wang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common but potentially life-threatening condition, but limited information exists on the effectiveness of fluoroquinolones compared to β-lactams in outpatient settings. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and outcomes of penicillins versus respiratory fluoroquinolones for CAP at outpatient clinics. This was a claim-based retrospective cohort study. Patients aged 20 years or older with at least 1 new pneumonia treatment episode were included, and the index penicillin or respiratory fluoroquinolone therapies for a pneumonia episode were at least 5 days in duration. The 2 groups were matched by propensity scores. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the rates of hospitalizations/emergence service visits and 30-day mortality. A logistic model was used to compare the likelihood of treatment failure between the 2 groups. After propensity score matching, 2622 matched pairs were included in the final model. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.77–0.99), but no differences were found in hospitalization/emergence service (ES) visits (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.92–1.74) and 30-day mortality (adjusted HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.30–1.62) between the 2 groups. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy for CAP on an outpatient clinic basis. However, this effect may be marginal. Further investigation into the comparative effectiveness of these 2 treatment options is warranted. PMID:26871827

  15. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. PMID:26884428

  16. Determination of neutrophil CD64 expression as a prognostic biomarker in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Los-Arcos, I; Álvarez de la Sierra, D; Falcó, V; Aguiló, A; Sánchez, I; Almirante, B; Martinez-Gallo, M

    2016-09-01

    The expression of CD64 in neutrophils (nCD64) has shown utility in the diagnosis of sepsis. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of nCD64 expression to identify patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) at risk of a poor outcome. A prospective study of nCD64 expression (determined by flow cytometry) in patients with CAP was performed. The sensitivity/specificity of nCD64 in predicting poor outcome [defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission and/or clinical deterioration after arrival at the emergency department] was calculated. Eighty-three adults with CAP were included; 14.5 % had septic shock, 19.3 % required ICU admission, and 10.8 % presented clinical deterioration after admission. The mean of the median fluorescence intensity (MFI) of nCD64 expression was 1140 (±1097). Patients with nCD64 expression ≥2700 MFI had more clinical deterioration (36.4 vs. 7.2 %, p = 0.015) and more ICU admission (45.5 vs. 14.5 %, p = 0.028). To identify clinical deterioration and ICU admission, nCD64 expression showed a sensitivity of 44.4 and 33.3 % and a specificity of 90.1 and 90.8 %, respectively. The addition of nCD64 expression to the Pneumonia Severity Index and CURB-65 severity scores did not improve the accuracy of predicting these outcomes. Although nCD64 expression is associated with an increased risk of ICU admission or clinical deterioration after admission, its accuracy in predicting these poor outcomes is modest and does not significantly improve the predictive ability of the PSI and CURB-65 severity scores. PMID:27240938

  17. Novel characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to multilocus sequence type 59 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Zaraket, Hassan; Otsuka, Taketo; Baranovich, Tatiana; Enany, Shymaa; Saito, Kohei; Isobe, Hirokazu; Dohmae, Soshi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Shibuya, Michiko; Okubo, Takeshi; Yabe, Shizuka; Shi, Da; Reva, Ivan; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains, which often produce Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), are increasingly noted worldwide. In this study, we examined 42 MRSA strains (25 PVL-positive [PVL+] strains and 17 PVL-negative [PVL(-)] strains) isolated in Taiwan for their molecular characteristics. The PVL+ MRSA strains included CA-MRSA strains with multilocus sequence type (ST) 59 (major PVL+ MRSA in Taiwan), its variants, and worldwide CA-MRSA ST30 strains. The PVL(-) MRSA strains included the pandemic Hungarian MRSA ST239 strain, the Hungarian MRSA ST239 variant, MRSA ST59 (largely hospital-acquired MRSA strains) and its variants, the pandemic New York/Japan MRSA ST5 strain (Japanese type), and the MRSA ST8 strain. The major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed a tetracycline resistance-conferring (tetK positive) penicillinase plasmid and a drug resistance gene cluster (a possible composite transposon) for multidrug resistance. Moreover, it carried a novel staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) with two distinct ccrC genes (ccrC2-C8). This SCCmec (previously named SCCmec type V(T)) was tentatively designated SCCmec type VII. Sequencing of the PVL genes revealed the polymorphisms, and the PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed the ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. The data suggest that a significant amount of clonal spread is occurring in Taiwan and that the major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 Taiwan strain exhibits unique genetic characteristics, such as a novel SCCmec type and an ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. PMID:18086843

  18. Prior outpatient antibiotic use as predictor for microbial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia: hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Endeman, Henrik; van Hemert, Remco N; Voorn, G Paul; Deneer, Vera HM; Leufkens, Hubert GM; van den Bosch, Jules MM; Biesma, Douwe H

    2007-01-01

    Objective The causative micro-organism in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often difficult to predict. Different studies have examined chronic morbidity and clinical symptoms as predictors for microbial aetiology of pneumonia. The aim of our study was to assess whether prior outpatient antimicrobial treatment is predictive for determining the microbial aetiology of CAP. Methods This was a hospital-based prospective observational study including all patients admitted with CAP between 1 October 2004 and 1 August 2006. Microbial investigations included sputum, blood culture, sputum PCR, antigen testing and serology. Exposure to antimicrobial drugs prior to hospital admission was ascertained through community pharmacy dispensing records. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess whether prior outpatient antimicrobial treatment is a predictor of microbial aetiology. Patient demographics, co-morbidities and pneumonia severity were considered to be other potential predictors. Results Overall, 201 patients were included in the study. The microbial aetiology was determined in 64% of the patients. The five most prevalent pathogens were Streptococcus pneumoniae, Heamophilus influenzae, Legionella spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Influenza virus A+B. Forty-seven of the patients (23%) had received initial antimicrobial treatment as outpatients. Multivariate analyses revealed that initial outpatient beta-lactam treatment was associated with a threefold increased chance of finding atypical pathogens and a threefold decreased probability of pneumococcal infection; the corresponding odds ratios were 3.51 (95% CI 1.25–9.99) and 0.30 (95% CI 0.10–0.90), respectively. Patients who received macrolides prior to hospitalisation had an increased probability of viral pneumonia. Conclusion Prior outpatient antimicrobial therapy has a predictive value in the diagnostic workup aimed at identifying the causative pathogen and planning corresponding antimicrobial

  19. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay and serology in pediatric community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Kensei; Nishimura, Naoko; Ohshima, Yasunori; Arakawa, Yasuko; Hosono, Haruki; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Iwata, Yasushi; Nakane, Kazumasa; Funahashi, Keiji; Ozaki, Takao

    2012-10-01

    Rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia is required for treatment with effective antimicrobial agents without delay; however, this capacity has not yet been established in clinical practice. Recently, a novel nucleic acid amplification method termed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) has been used to rapidly diagnose various infectious diseases. In this study, we prospectively evaluated the efficacy of the LAMP assay to rapidly diagnose M. pneumoniae pneumonia in clinical practice. Three hundred sixty-eight children (median age, 3.8 years; range, 0.1-14.3 years) admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2010 for community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled in this study. We obtained throat swabs on admission to detect M. pneumoniae DNA and paired serum samples on admission and at discharge to assay M. pneumoniae antibody titers. M. pneumoniae pneumonia was diagnosed by either a positive LAMP assay or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titer. Overall, 46 children (12.5% of the patients with pneumonia) were diagnosed with M. pneumoniae pneumonia; of these, 27 (58.7%) were aged less than 6 years. Of the aforementioned 46 children, 38 (82.6%) and 37 (80.4%) were identified by LAMP and serology, respectively. When the results of serology were taken as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the LAMP assay were 78.4%, 97.3%, 76.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. We concluded the LAMP assay may be useful for rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. PMID:22370920

  20. Predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults with pneumonia: findings from the Community Acquired Pneumonia Impact Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) almost triples for older adults aged 65 years or older. In Canada, CAP is a leading cause of hospital admissions and mortality. Although CAP is very prevalent, complications due to CAP may be reduced with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV). The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among community-dwelling older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. Methods A telephone survey was used to collect detailed information from adults aged 60 years and older with clinically diagnosed CAP. This was a community wide study with participants being recruited from all radiology clinics in one Ontario community. Results The most important predictors of pneumococcal vaccination among older adults included: getting an influenza vaccine within the past year (OR 14.5, 95% CI 4.27 to 49.0); at least weekly contact with a friend (OR 3.97, 95% CI 1.71 to 9.24); having one or more co-morbidities/chronic conditions (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.60 to 8.28); being 70 years of age or older (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.40); having health problems that limited physical activities (OR 5.37, 95% CI 1.49 to 19.3); having little or no bodily pain (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.25 to 6.73); and reporting having spiritual values or religious faith (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.03 to 11.67). Conclusions A wide range of factors, including demographic, co-morbidity, quality of life, social support and lifestyle were found to be associated with pneumococcal vaccination status among older adults with clinically diagnosed CAP. The findings from this study could inform future pneumococcal immunization strategies by identifying individuals who are least likely to receive the PPV. PMID:20591180

  1. Respiratory virus is a real pathogen in immunocompetent community-acquired pneumonia: comparing to influenza like illness and volunteer controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral pathogens were more commonly reported than previously estimated in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. However, the real role of virus was still controversial. Methods Consecutive adult patients with CAP between April and December, 2009 were prospectively enrolled. A four-fold or greater increase of IgG-titres against respiratory viruses in pair sera was tested by means of hemagglutination inhibition assay or indirect immunofluorescence. Swab samples were tested by cell culture and/or nucleic amplification tests. Viral etiology was considered definitive if at least one of the above tests was positive. Results Viral etiology was established in fifty-two (34.9%) of 149 CAP patients, twenty-two (81.5%) of 27 influenza like illness patients, and none of 75 volunteer controls. Forty-seven CAP patients were infected by a single virus (24 influenza A virus, 5 influenza B, 10 parainfluenza virus type 3 [PIV-3], 2 PIV-1, 2 adenovirus, 2 human rhinovirus and 2 coronavirus OC43), five cases by two or three viruses co-infection. Fever ≥ 39°C (66.7%), fatigue (64.6%), and purulent sputum (52.1%) was the most common symptoms in viral pneumonia patients. On multivariate analysis, myalgia was included in the model for pneumonia associated with influenza infection. In the CURB-65 model only influenza infection was found independently associated with severe disease (CURB-65 score ≥ 3) out of variables, including age(years), sex, current smoking status, sick contact with febrile patients, numbers of comorbidity, presence of influenza infection, presence of PIV infection, with P = 0.021, OR 7.86 (95% CI 1.37-45.04). Conclusion Respiratory virus was not a bystander, but pathogenic in pneumonia and was a common cause of CAP. PMID:25178477

  2. A GeXP-Based Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Viruses in Hospitalized Children with Community Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Mengchuan; Shi, Zhongren; Feng, Zhishan; Guo, Weiwei; Yang, Shuo; Liu, Lanping; Li, Guixia

    2016-01-01

    The GeXP-based assay has recently been developed for simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. So far, the application of the GeXP assay to test larger clinical samples has hardly been reported. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause of death in children worldwide and a substantial proportion of childhood CAP is caused by viruses. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of virus infection is important for the clinical management of CAP. In this study, we explored the GeXP assay for simultaneous detection of 20 types/subtypes of viruses in hospitalized children with CAP. A total of 1699 nasopharyngeal swabs were prospectively collected and viral nucleic acid was extracted and assayed. Using viral genomic DNA or RNA as template, we showed that at the concentration of 104 copies of DNA or RNA of each virus/μl, all 20 target viruses were simultaneously identified by the GeXP assay. Fifteen control microorganisms, in contrast, failed to be amplified by the assay. About 65% of cases tested in this study had viral infection, with patients aged <3 years having a 70% positive rate, significantly higher than that in patients aged > 3 years (40%). The most frequently detected virus was RSV followed by PIV3, HRV, ADV and HBoV. Seasonal distribution analysis revealed that RSV was the most predominant in autumn and winter, while in spring and summer PIV3 and RSV were the most frequently identified with similar positive percentages. One hundred twenty randomly-chosen samples tested by the GeXP assay were re-evaluated by mono-RT-PCR, the results showed 97.5% diagnosis agreement between these 2 methods. Our findings suggest that the GeXP assay could be a valuable diagnostic tool for virus infection in pediatric patients with CAP. PMID:27627439

  3. Role of acute-phase proteins in interleukin-1-induced nonspecific resistance to bacterial infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Cantoni, L; Carelli, M; Sironi, M; Ghezzi, P; van der Meer, J W

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge of granulocytopenic and normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. Since IL-1 induces secretion of acute-phase proteins, liver proteins which possess several detoxifying effects, we investigated the role of these proteins in the IL-1-induced protection. Inhibition of liver protein synthesis with D-galactosamine (GALN) completely inhibited the IL-1-induced synthesis of acute-phase proteins. GALN pretreatment abolished the protective effect of IL-1 on survival completely (neutropenic mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or partially (nonneutropenic mice infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae). Pretreatment with IL-6, a cytokine induced by IL-1, did not reproduce the protection offered after IL-1 pretreatment, nor did it enhance or deteriorate the IL-1-enhanced resistance to infection. A protective effect of IL-1 via effects on glucose homeostasis during the acute-phase response was investigated by comparing plasma glucose levels in IL-1-treated mice and control mice before and during infection. Although glucose levels in IL-1-pretreated mice were somewhat higher in the later stages of infection, no significant differences from levels in control mice were present, and the glucose levels in control-treated animals never fell to hypoglycemic values. We conclude that the IL-1-induced nonspecific resistance is mediated neither by the induction of IL-6 nor by the effects of IL-1 on glucose homeostasis. Acute-phase proteins generated after IL-1 pretreatment, however, seem to play a critical role in the IL-1-induced protection to infection. PMID:7509141

  4. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  5. Bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis with iritis induced by unilateral topical application of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Langford, Marlyn P; Foreman, Bridgett D; Srur, Lana; Ganley, James P; Redens, Thomas B

    2013-11-01

    The factors responsible for the conjunctivitis and iritis associated with acute ocular infection and post enteric inflammatory disease are not fully known. The pro-inflammatory activity of unilateral topical application of muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the smallest bio-active Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component) was investigated in adult rabbits. The resultant bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and pyogenic responses were characterized. Bilateral symptoms were graded by slit lamp examinations; tear fluid, Schirmer tests (tear production), blood and aqueous humor (AH) samples were obtained from MDP-treated and untreated rabbits. MDP concentration, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (GGT; key enzyme in glutathione recapture, xenobiotic detoxification, eicosanoid synthesis and neutrophil function), protein concentration, and tear cell density, cytology, and immunofluorescent antibody reactivity to GGT and calreticulin (CRT; MDP-binding protein) were determined. MDP was cleared from ipsilateral tears and serum by 6 h, but was undetected in mock-treated contralateral tears. Bilateral signs of acute transient pyogenic conjunctivitis, characterized by tearing, lid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis and leukocytic infiltrate with iritis (erythema and aqueous flare) were detected. Milder symptoms occurred in the mock-treated contralateral eyes. Bilateral symptoms, tear production, tear protein, GGT activity, and mucopurulent discharge (containing up to 2.5-5.0 × 10(6) cells/mL) were elevated 4-8 h post MDP and resolved to near pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Tear GGT activity and protein levels were higher in MDP-treated and mock-treated contralateral eyes than in eyes of untreated adult rabbits (p's < 0.001). Elevated tear GGT activity was associated with histopathology and increased vascular and epithelial permeability to serum protein, GGT-positive epithelia cells, macrophages and heterophils. Repeat MDP applications induced recurrent

  6. 77 FR 59929 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis in Patients With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... regarding the overall development program and clinical trial designs for drugs to support an indication for... August 22, 2008 (73 FR 49684), which in turn revised the draft guidance for industry entitled ``Acute... for clinical trial sponsors entitled ``Establishment and Operation of Clinical Trial Data...

  7. EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE TO PEROXYACETYL NITRATE ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ACUTE AND CHRONIC BACTERIAL INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant increase in mortality due to acute respiratory pneumonia caused by inhalation of Streptococcus pyogenes aerosol was seen after a single 3-h exposure of mice to 14.8-28.4 mg/cu.m. peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). The excess mortality ranged from 8 to 39% and the decrease ...

  8. Transitions of care in the management of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Jaime E; Hamada, Yukihiro; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) have evolved over a relatively short period of time to become one of the most challenging medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Notably the high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) across the continuum of care has coincided with increased outpatient failures and higher rates of hospital admissions for parental antibiotic therapy. Consequently the management of ABSSSI constitutes a tremendous burden to the healthcare system in terms of cost of care and consumption of institutional and clinical resources. This perspective piece discusses current and new approaches to the management of ABSSSI in a hospital setting and the need for a multifaceted approach. Treatment strategies for the management through the utilization of observation units (OU), Outpatient Parental Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT), and newly developed antibiotics for the use against skin infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria will be discussed in the context of ABSSSI. PMID:27248789

  9. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Gregory J; Morgan, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections occur in 25-35 % of cirrhotics admitted to hospital. Health-care associated and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections are the most common epidemiology, with community acquired infections less common (15-30 %). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and urinary infections are the most common sites, with spontaneous bacteremia, pneumonia, cellulitis and other sites being less common. The risk of infection is increased among subjects with more severe liver disease and an infection in the past 6 months. Bacteria are isolated from approximately half of patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection. Gram-negative enterobacteriaceae are the most common organisms among community acquired infections; Gram-positive cocci are the most common organisms isolated among subjects with nosocomial infections. Up to 30 % of hospital associated infections are with multidrug resistant bacteria. Consequently, empiric antibiotic therapy that is recommended for community acquired infections is often inadequate for nosocomial infections. Infections worsen liver function. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of cirrhotics with infections is significantly higher than among cirrhotics without infection. In-hospital complications of infections, such as severe sepsis and septic shock, and mortality, are increased among subjects with multidrug-resistant infections as compared with cirrhotics with susceptible bacteria. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of cirrhotics with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis of selected cirrhotics with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis reduces infections and improves survival. Albumin administration to cirrhotics with SBP and evidence of advanced liver disease improves survival. The benefit of albumin administration to cirrhotics with infections other than SBP is under investigation. PMID:26201326

  10. Incomplete endothelialisation of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder device followed by meningitis and late acute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Białkowski, Jacek; Pawlak, Szymon; Banaszak, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman with atrial septal defect treated percutaneously with an Amplatzer Septal Occluder 24 months earlier, who presented with a history of bacterial meningitis, was admitted with a diagnosis of endocarditis. After 6 weeks of treatment with antibiotics, the incompletely endothelialised occluder was surgically removed. The present report illustrates the need for long-term follow-up of patients who have received nitinol wire mesh occluders. PMID:26707128

  11. The Role of Prophylaxis of Bacterial Infections in Children With Acute Leukemia/Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elio

    2014-01-01

    Infections represent a well-known complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy that may cause delay of treatment, with alteration of the antineoplastic program and dose-intensity, or even the death of a patient that could heal from his/her neoplasia. Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Therefore a program of antibiotic prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia may be considered in the management strategy of cancer patients. PMID:24987511

  12. Neutrophil CD64 as a Marker of Bacterial Infection in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Huang, Gao-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are responsible for most mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are caused mainly by bacterial infection. We analyzed and compared neutrophil CD64 expression (using the ratio of CD64 level in neutrophils to that in lymphocytes as an index), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT) levels, white blood cell (WBC) count, and neutrophil percentage among healthy subjects and patients with stable COPD or AECOPD. Compared with patients with COPD and healthy subjects, patients with AECOPD demonstrated significantly increased CD64 index, CRP, PCT, WBC count, and neutrophil percentage. Interestingly, CD64 index and PCT were both significantly higher in patients with AECOPD with positive bacterial sputum culture than those with negative culture. Furthermore, CD64 index and PCT were positively correlated in AECOPD, and there was also correlation between CD64 index and CRP, WBC, and neutrophil percentage. These data suggest that CD64 index is a relevant marker of bacterial infection in AECOPD. We divided patients with AECOPD into CD64-guided group and conventional treatment group. In CD64-guided group, clinicians prescribed antibiotics based on CD64 index; while in the conventional treatment group, clinicians relied on experience and clinical symptoms to determine the necessity for antibiotics. We found that the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in CD64-guided group was significantly improved compared with the conventional treatment group, including reduction of hospital stays and cost and shortened antibiotic treatment duration. Thus, the CD64 index has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications for antibiotic treatment of patients with AECOPD. PMID:27224474

  13. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline tested against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Europe (2010).

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S

    2013-01-01

    Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a novel cephalosporin exhibiting in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. The objective of this study was to determine the spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against recent leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) isolated in Europe. A total of 1563 isolates from the 2010 Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation (AWARE) Program were identified as CARTI pathogens by the infection type and/or specimen type recorded by the participating laboratory. Isolates were collected from patients in 52 medical centers located in 19 European countries (including Israel and Turkey). Susceptibility testing for ceftaroline and commonly used antimicrobials was performed by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methodology. Susceptibility interpretations for comparators were as published in CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines, and for ceftaroline US-FDA breakpoints were also applied. Ceftaroline was very active overall against 799 S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90,) ≤ 0.008/0.12 μg/mL) and inhibited 100.0% of all isolates at a MIC ≤ 0.5 μg/mL. Ceftaroline was very potent against penicillin-resistant (CLSI oral penicillin V breakpoints) and -intermediate S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90), 0.12/0.25 and 0.03/0.12 μg/mL, respectively), but potency was lower than observed against penicillin-susceptible isolates (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/≤ 0.008 μg/mL). Ceftaroline was also very active (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/0.015 μg/mL) against 515 Haemophilus influenzae, including β-lactamase-producing strains (MIC(50/90), 0.015/0.06 μg/mL). Ceftaroline also demonstrated good activity against 205 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates (MIC(50

  14. Severe leukopenia in Staphylococcus aureus-necrotizing, community-acquired pneumonia: risk factors and impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Necrotizing pneumonia attributed to Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus has mainly been reported in otherwise healthy children and young adults, with a high mortality rate. Erythroderma, airway bleeding, and leukopenia have been shown to be predictive of mortality. The objectives of this study were to define the characteristics of patients with severe leukopenia at 48-h hospitalization and to update our data regarding mortality predicting factors in a larger population than we had previously described. Methods It was designed as a case-case study nested in a cohort study. A total of 148 cases of community-acquired, necrotizing pneumonia were included. The following data were collected: basic demographic information, medical history, signs and symptoms, radiological findings and laboratory results during the first 48 h of hospitalization. The study population was divided into 2 groups: (1) with severe leukopenia (leukocyte count ≤3,000 leukocytes/mL, n=62) and (2) without severe leukopenia (>3,000 leukocytes/mL, n=86). Results Median age was 22 years, and the male-to-female gender ratio was 1.5. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.2%. Death occurred in 75.8% of severe leukopenia cases with median survival time of 4 days, and in 16.3% of cases with leukocyte count >3,000/mL (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that the factors associated with severe leukopenia were influenza-like illness (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.45, 95% CI (95% confidence interval) 1.67-11.88, P=0.003), airway bleeding (aOR 4.53, 95% CI 1.85-11.13, P=0.001) and age over 30 years (aOR 2.69, 95% CI 1.08-6.68, P=0.033). A personal history of furuncles appeared to be protective (OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.01-0.96, P=0.046). Conclusion S. aureus-necrotizing pneumonia is still an extremely severe disease in patients with severe leukopenia. Some factors could distinguish these patients, allowing better initial identification to initiate adapted, rapid

  15. RNA viruses in community-acquired childhood pneumonia in semi-urban Nepal; a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mathisen, Maria; Strand, Tor A; Sharma, Biswa N; Chandyo, Ram K; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Basnet, Sudha; Adhikari, Ramesh K; Hvidsten, Dag; Shrestha, Prakash S; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2009-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is among the main causes of illness and death in children <5 years of age. There is a need to better describe the epidemiology of viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in developing countries. Methods From July 2004 to June 2007, we examined nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) from 2,230 cases of pneumonia (World Health Organization criteria) in children 2 to 35 months old recruited in a randomized trial of zinc supplementation at a field clinic in Bhaktapur, Nepal. The specimens were examined for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus type A (InfA) and B (InfB), parainfluenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV3), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) using a multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Results We identified 919 virus isolates in 887 (40.0%) of the 2,219 NPA specimens with a valid PCR result, of which 334 (15.1%) yielded RSV, 164 (7.4%) InfA, 129 (5.8%) PIV3, 98 (4.4%) PIV1, 93 (4.2%) hMPV, 84 (3.8%) InfB, and 17 (0.8%) PIV2. CAP occurred in an epidemic pattern with substantial temporal variation during the three years of study. The largest peaks of pneumonia occurrence coincided with peaks of RSV infection, which occurred in epidemics during the rainy season and in winter. The monthly number of RSV infections was positively correlated with relative humidity (rs = 0.40, P = 0.01), but not with temperature or rainfall. An hMPV epidemic occurred during one of the three winter seasons and the monthly number of hMPV cases was also associated with relative humidity (rs = 0.55, P = 0.0005). Conclusion Respiratory RNA viruses were detected from NPA in 40% of CAP cases in our study. The most commonly isolated viruses were RSV, InfA, and PIV3. RSV infections contributed substantially to the observed CAP epidemics. The occurrence of viral CAP in this community seemed to reflect more or less overlapping micro-epidemics with several respiratory viruses, highlighting the challenges of developing and

  16. Vitamin D Status and Long-Term Mortality in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Secondary Data Analysis from a Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Jan C.; Ueland, Thor; Norseth, Jon; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S.; Husebye, Einar; Aukrust, Pål; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Low vitamin D status has been associated with short-term (30-day) mortality in hospitalized adults with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data on its prevalence in these patients are scarce, and impact on long-term prognosis is unknown. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy and their effect on long-term mortality in hospitalized adults with CAP. Methods Secondary follow-up analysis of data from a prospectively recruited (January 2008–January 2011) well-defined cohort of 241 hospital survivors of CAP (Norway, latitude 60°N). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were measured within 48 hours of admission. The etiology of CAP was established in 63% of patients through extensive microbiological investigations. Mortality data were obtained from the national Cause of Death Registry. Explanatory strategy and Cox regression models were used to explore the association between vitamin D status and all-cause mortality. Results Median age was 66 years. Eighty-seven (36%) patients were vitamin D deficient (<30 nmol/L), 81 (34%) were inadequate (30–49 nmol/L), and 73 (30%) were sufficient (≥50 nmol/L). Seventy-two patients died over a median of 1839 days (range 1–2520 days), corresponding to cumulative 5-year survival rates of 66.2% (95% CI 56.2–76.2%), 77.0% (67.6–86.4%), and 77.8% (67.8–87.8%) for vitamin D deficient, inadequate, and sufficient patients, respectively. After adjusting for confounders (age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, immunocompromization and season), vitamin D deficiency, but not inadequacy, was significantly associated with higher mortality compared to patients with sufficiency (HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.06–3.45; P = .031). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and inadequacy among hospitalized adults with CAP. The results of this study also suggest that vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of mortality way beyond

  17. Antimicrobial drug prescribing patterns for community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients: A retrospective pilot study from New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Kotwani, Anita; Kumar, Santosh; Swain, Prafulla Kumar; Suri, J. C.; Gaur, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine patterns and frequency of antimicrobial drug use among hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methodology: A retrospective 5 years (April 2007–March 2012) detailed medical record review of patients diagnosed with CAP and discharged to home from Non-Intensive Care Unit respiratory medicine wards of two public hospitals in Delhi. Results: A total of 261 medical records were analyzed. Over the 5 years, 82.0% (2007–08), 78.6% (2008–09), 59.5% (2009–10), 64.7% (2010–11), and 67.8% (2011–12) patients were prescribed two antimicrobials. In the last two study years, the proportion of patients receiving three antimicrobials increased (from 2.0% to 26.5% and 28.8%), while the proportion receiving monotherapy decreased (from 16.0% to 8.8% and 3.4%). In accordance with guidelines, beta-lactams and macrolides were the two most frequently prescribed antimicrobials (34.1%). However, newer generation beta-lactams were prescribed. A total of 37 patients were prescribed beta-lactam-tazobactam combination preparations. Overall, beta-lactams constituted more than 40% of prescriptions while macrolides were the second most prescribed class. Cephalosporin prescriptions significantly increased (P < 0.01) and penicillin prescriptions significantly decreased over study periods. The prescription of fluoroquinolones also decreased (21.5–6.0%, P < 0.01) and aminoglycoside prescription ranged from 9.7% to 16.4%, over 5 years. Reasons for prescribing three antimicrobials, use of aminoglycosides, or higher-end/reserve antibiotics were not mentioned in the medical records. There were no hospital-specific guidelines for doctors to follow in the treatment of CAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest the need for implementing antimicrobial treatment guidelines. Adequate documentation and monitoring of antibiotic use for feedback are also lacking. An antimicrobial stewardship program may offer the most

  18. Predictors and Implications of Early Clinical Stability in Patients Hospitalized for Moderately Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Garance; Chuard, Christian; Genné, Daniel; Carballo, Sebastian; Hugli, Olivier; Lamy, Olivier; Marti, Christophe; Nendaz, Mathieu; Rutschmann, Olivier; Harbarth, Stephan; Perrier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Background Assessment of early response to treatment is crucial for the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To describe the predictors and the outcomes of early clinical stability Methods We did a secondary analysis of a multicentre randomized controlled trial on CAP treatment in which 580 patients hospitalized for moderately severe CAP were included. The association between demographic, clinical and biological variables available at inclusion and early clinical stability (stabilization of vital signs within 72 hours with predetermined cut-offs) was assessed by multivariate logistic regression. The association between early clinical stability and mortality, severe adverse events, and length of stay was also tested. Results Younger age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96–0.99), lower platelet count (OR per 10 G/L increment 0.96, 95% CI 0.94–0.98), lower respiratory rate (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90–0.97), absence of hypoxemia (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40–0.85), lower numbers of co-morbid conditions (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.69–0.98) and signs or symptoms (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.68–0.90) were significantly associated with early clinical stability. Patients with early clinical stability had lower 90-days mortality (3.4% vs. 11.9%, p<0.001), fewer admissions to the intensive care unit (2.7% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.005) and a shorter length of stay (6.0 days, IQR 4.0–10.0 vs. 10.0 days, IQR 7.0–15.0, p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with younger age, less co-morbidity, fewer signs or symptoms, less respiratory compromise, and a lower platelet count are more likely to reach early clinical stability. Patients without early clinical stability have a worse prognosis and warrant close scrutiny. PMID:27305046

  19. Long-term morbidity and mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jennie; Eurich, Dean T; Majumdar, Sumit R; Jin, Yan; Marrie, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term sequelae of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Therefore, we describe the long-term morbidity and mortality of patients after pneumonia requiring hospitalization. We specifically hypothesized that the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), designed to predict 30-day pneumonia-related mortality, would also be associated with longer-term all-cause mortality. Between 2000 and 2002, 3415 adults with CAP admitted to 6 hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, were prospectively enrolled in a population-based cohort. At the time of hospital admission, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and the PSI was calculated for each patient. Postdischarge outcomes through to 2006 were ascertained using multiple linked administrative databases. Outcomes included all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, and re-hospitalization for pneumonia over a maximum of 5.4 years of follow-up. Follow-up data were available for 3284 (96%) patients; 66%were > or =65 years of age, 53% were male, and according to the PSI fully 63% were predicted to have greater than 18% 30-day pneumonia-related mortality (that is, PSI class IV-V). Median follow-up was 3.8 years. The 30-day, 1-year, and end of study mortality rates were 12%, 28%, and 53%, respectively. Overall, 82(19%) patients aged <45 years died compared with 1456 (67%) patients aged > or =65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06-6.34). Male patients were more likely to die than female patients during follow-up (971 [56%] vs. 767 [49%], respectively; HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.13-1.37). Initial PSI classification predicted not only 30-day mortality, but also long-term postdischarge mortality, with 92 (15%) of PSI class I-II patients dying compared with 616 (82%) PSI class V patients (HR, 11.80; 95% CI, 4.70-14.70). Of 2950 patients who survived the initial CAP hospitalization, 72% were hospitalized again (median, 2 admissions over follow-up) and 16% were re-hospitalized with

  20. Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Outpatient Proton-Pump Inhibitor Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Allison A.; Lam, Jennifer O.; Paik, Julie J.; Ugarte-Gil, Cesar; Drummond, M. Bradley; Crowell, Trevor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most frequently prescribed medications. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity, mortality and healthcare spending. Some studies suggest an increased risk of CAP among PPI users. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the association between outpatient PPI therapy and risk of CAP in adults. Methods We conducted systematic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Web of Science on February 3, 2014. Case-control studies, case-crossover, cohort studies and randomized controlled trials reporting outpatient PPI exposure and CAP diagnosis for patients ≥18 years old were eligible. Our primary outcome was the association between CAP and PPI therapy. A secondary outcome examined the risk of hospitalization for CAP and subgroup analyses evaluated the association between PPI use and CAP among patients of different age groups, by different PPI doses, and by different durations of PPI therapy. Results Systematic review of 33 studies was performed, of which 26 studies were included in the meta-analysis. These 26 studies included 226,769 cases of CAP among 6,351,656 participants. We observed a pooled risk of CAP with ambulatory PPI therapy of 1.49 (95% CI 1.16, 1.92; I2 99.2%). This risk was increased during the first month of therapy (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.39, 3.16), regardless of PPI dose or patient age. PPI therapy also increased risk for hospitalization for CAP (OR 1.61; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.31). Discussion Outpatient PPI use is associated with a 1.5-fold increased risk of CAP, with the highest risk within the first 30 days after initiation of therapy. Providers should be aware of this risk when considering PPI use, especially in cases where alternative regimens may be available or the benefits of PPI use are uncertain. PMID:26042842

  1. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  2. Viral and Bacterial Etiology of Acute Diarrhea among Children under 5 Years of Age in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu-Hui; Tian, Lei; Cheng, Zhong-Ju; Liu, Wei-Yong; Li, Song; Yu, Wei-Ting; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Xiang, Xu; Sun, Zi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute diarrhea remains the serious problem in developing countries, especially among children under 5 years of age. Currently, only two or three common diarrhea pathogens were screened at most hospitals in China. The aim of this study was to provide a wide variety of diarrhea pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in children under 5 years of age. Methods: Totally 381 stool samples collected from Tongji Hospital between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015 were tested by culture and/or polymerase chain reaction for eight kinds of bacteria and five kinds of viruses. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using dilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Viral infections were mainly identified in infants (0–11 months), whereas bacterial infections were more prevalent in the age of 24–59 months. About 69.8% of samples were positive for at least one pathogen, 51.7% of samples were virus positive, followed by bacteria positive cases (19.4%), and 12.6% of cases displayed co-infections with two viruses or a virus and a bacterium. Rotavirus was the most prevalent pathogen, followed closely by norovirus, while Salmonella was the most commonly isolated bacteria, followed by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) and Campylobacter. More than 40% of Salmonella spp. and DEC isolates were resistant to first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline). Around 10% of Salmonella spp. isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin simultaneously. Campylobacter spp. displayed high resistance to ciprofloxacin but kept low resistance to azithromycin and doxycycline. Conclusions: The etiology of acute diarrhea varies in children of different age groups. The high frequency of infection with viruses suggests the urgent demand for new viral vaccine development. Proper use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute diarrhea is crucial due to the high level of antibiotic

  3. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  4. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  5. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season

  6. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  7. Critical role for the AIM2 inflammasome during acute central nervous system bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanamsagar, Richa; Aldrich, Amy; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is essential for eliciting protective immunity during the acute phase of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). We previously demonstrated that microglial IL-1β production in response to live S. aureus is mediated through the Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, including the adapter protein ASC (apoptosis-associated, speck-like, caspase-1 recruiting domain-containing protein), and pro-caspase-1. Here we utilized NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1/11 knockout (KO) mice to demonstrate the functional significance of inflammasome activity during CNS S. aureus infection. ASC and caspase-1/11 KO animals were exquisitely sensitive, with approximately 50% of mice succumbing to infection within 24 h. Unexpectedly, the survival of NLRP3 KO mice was similar to WT animals, suggesting the involvement of an alternative upstream sensor, which was later identified as absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) based on the similar disease patterns between AIM2 and ASC KO mice. Besides IL-1β, other key inflammatory mediators, including IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL10, and CCL2 were significantly reduced in the CNS of AIM2 and ASC KO mice, implicating autocrine/paracrine actions of IL-1β, since these mediators do not require inflammasome processing for secretion. These studies demonstrate a novel role for the AIM2 inflammasome as a critical molecular platform for regulating IL-1β release and survival during acute CNS S. aureus infection. PMID:24484406

  8. The molecular mechanism of acute lung injury caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: from bacterial pathogenesis to host response.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common gram-negative pathogen causing pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Acute lung injury induced by bacterial exoproducts is associated with a poor outcome in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The major pathogenic toxins among the exoproducts of P. aeruginosa and the mechanism by which they cause acute lung injury have been investigated: exoenzyme S and co-regulated toxins were found to contribute to acute lung injury. P. aeruginosa secretes these toxins through the recently defined type III secretion system (TTSS), by which gram-negative bacteria directly translocate toxins into the cytosol of target eukaryotic cells. TTSS comprises the secretion apparatus (termed the injectisome), translocators, secreted toxins, and regulatory components. In the P. aeruginosa genome, a pathogenic gene cluster, the exoenzyme S regulon, encodes genes underlying the regulation, secretion, and translocation of TTSS. Four type III secretory toxins, namely ExoS, ExoT, ExoU, and ExoY, have been identified in P. aeruginosa. ExoS is a 49-kDa form of exoenzyme S, a bifunctional toxin that exerts ADP-ribosyltransferase and GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity to disrupt endocytosis, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell proliferation. ExoT, a 53-kDa form of exoenzyme S with 75% sequence homology to ExoS, also exerts GAP activity to interfere with cell morphology and motility. ExoY is a nucleotidal cyclase that increases the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine and guanosine monophosphates, resulting in edema formation. ExoU, which exhibits phospholipase A2 activity activated by host cell ubiquitination after translocation, is a major pathogenic cytotoxin that causes alveolar epithelial injury and macrophage necrosis. Approximately 20% of clinical isolates also secrete ExoU, a gene encoded within an insertional pathogenic gene cluster named P. aeruginosa pathogenicity island-2. The ExoU secretory phenotype is associated with a poor clinical outcome in P

  9. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Gilley, Ryan Paul; Hinojosa, Cecilia Anahí; Bradley, Kelley Margaret; Kamei, Akinobu; Gao, Geli; Dube, Peter Herman; Bergman, Molly Ann; Orihuela, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK)1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT) induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10), which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention. PMID:26659062

  10. The use of vital signs as predictors for serious bacterial infections in children with acute febrile illness in a pediatric emergency setting in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Elmuntasir Taha; Ahmed, Emad; Elhussien, Manal; Salah, Tarig

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing children with serious infections from those with milder, self-limiting febrile illnesses remains a daily challenge in primary care and hospital emergency department. Measurement of vital signs is recommended as part of this assessment. To determine whether vital signs can predict children with serious bacterial infections, we studied the data of children aged 1 month to < 16 years presented who with acute febrile illness to a Pediatric emergency department in Sudan. Sample size was 150 patients. The severity of infection was classified as serious or not serious bacterial infection. Vital signs and oxygen saturation were recorded and compared to the final outcome of these children. Data analyzed bivariably and multivariably using regression analysis. Ten percent of patients were classified as having serious bacterial infection. Tachycardia and tachypnea were the most sensitive and specific in predicting serious bacterial infections with (80%, 86.6 % sensitivity) and (97.4%, 83.7% specificity), respectively. High temperature, severe hypoxemia and hypotension were the least sensitive but highly specific signs of serious bacterial infections. As a conclusion, vital signs can be used to differentiate children with serious bacterial infections from those with non-serious bacterial infections in pediatric emergency departments and has comparable sensitivity to more complicated triage systems.

  11. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  12. Profile of tedizolid phosphate and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ronald G; Michaels, Heidi N

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is the first once-daily oxazolidinone approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). It is more potent in vitro than linezolid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other gram-positive pathogens causing ABSSSI, even retaining activity against some linezolid-resistant strains. Tedizolid is approximately 90% protein bound, leading to lower free-drug concentrations than linezolid. The impact of the effect of food, renal or hepatic insufficiency, or hemodialysis on tedizolid’s pharmacokinetic have been evaluated, and no dosage adjustment is needed in these populations. In animal and clinical studies, tedizolid’s effect on bacterial killing is optimized by the free-drug area under the curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (fAUC/MIC). The 200 mg once-daily dose is able to achieve the target fAUC/MIC ratio in 98% of simulated patients. Two Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the noninferiority of tedizolid 200 mg once daily for 6 days to linezolid 600 mg twice daily for 10 days. In vitro, animal, and clinical studies have failed to demonstrate that tedizolid inhibits monoamine oxidase to a clinically relevant extent. Tedizolid has several key advantages over linezolid including once daily dosing, decreased treatment duration, minimal interaction with serotonergic agents, possibly associated with less adverse events associated with the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis (eg, myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and peripheral/optic neuropathies), and retains in vitro activity against linezolid-resistant gram-positive bacteria. Economic analyses with tedizolid are needed to describe the cost-effectiveness of this agent compared with other options used for ABSSSI, particularly treatment options active against MRSA. PMID:25960671

  13. Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GSK1322322 in the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Ralph; O'Riordan, William D.; Dumont, Etienne; Jones, Lori S.; Kurtinecz, Milena; Zhu, John Z.

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 represents a new class of antibiotics that targets an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation, peptide deformylase. This multicenter, randomized, phase IIa study compared the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of GSK1322322 at 1,500 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) with that of linezolid at 600 mg b.i.d. in patients suspected of having Gram-positive acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). The primary endpoint was assessment of the safety of GSK1322322, and a key secondary endpoint was the number of subjects with a ≥20% decrease in lesion area from the baseline at 48 and 72 h after treatment initiation. GSK1322322 administration was associated with mild-to-moderate drug-related adverse events, most commonly, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Adverse events (86% versus 74%) and withdrawals (28% versus 11%) were more frequent in the GSK1322322-treated group. Treatment with GSK1322322 and linezolid was associated with ≥20% decreases from the baseline in the lesion area in 73% (36/49) and 92% (24/26) of the patients, respectively, at the 48-h assessment and in 96% (44/46) and 100% (25/25) of the patients, respectively, at the 72-h assessment. Reductions in exudate/pus, pain, and skin infection scores were comparable between the GSK1322322 and linezolid treatments. The clinical success rates within the intent-to-treat population and the per-protocol population that completed this study were 67 and 91%, respectively, in the GSK1322322-treated group and 89 and 100%, respectively, in the linezolid-treated group. These results will be used to guide dose selection in future studies with GSK1322322 to optimize its tolerability and efficacy in patients with ABSSSIs. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01209078 and at http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com [PDF113414].) PMID:25136015

  14. Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis associated with polycystic kidney disease. A case presenting with acute focal bacterial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Sung, J M; Huang, J J; Lin, X Z; Ruaan, M K; Lin, C Y; Chang, T T; Shu, H F; Chow, N H

    1992-12-01

    Congenital cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic biliary ducts (Caroli's disease), until recently, has been infrequently recognized. It is often associated with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We hereby report a case with Caroli's disease, polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and CHF: This 24-year-old female patient initially presented with acute bacterial nephritis (ABN). Renal ultrasonography revealed bilateral enlarged kidneys with multiple cysts. Because her parents showed no renal cyst on ultrasonographic examination, she received further studies. Abdominal ultrasonography showed cystic dilatation of the biliary tree. Computed tomography (CT) with meglumine lotroxinate (biliscopin) infusion study and hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirmed the diagnosis of Caroli's disease. Liver biopsy revealed CHF: The radiographic and scintigraphic pictures are hereby illustrated and CT with biliscopin infusion study is emphasized. We conclude that if radiologic evidence of renal cystic lesions is absent in the parents of patients with PKD, the coexistence of Caroli's disease and CHF should be considered. The clinical pictures of ABN in this patient are also discussed. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of ABN in a patient with PKD and Caroli's disease, and it showed good response to antibiotic therapy. PMID:1468163

  15. Bacterial flora in the sputum and comorbidity in patients with acute exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boixeda, Ramon; Almagro, Pere; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Cabrera, Francisco Javier; Recio, Jesús; Martin-Garrido, Isabel; Soriano, Joan B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine in patients admitted with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD) the association between the isolation of potential pathogens in a conventional sputum culture and comorbidities. Patients and methods The ESMI study is a multicenter observational study. Patients with AE-COPD admitted to the Internal Medicine departments of 70 hospitals were included. The clinical characteristics, treatments, and comorbidities were gathered. The results of conventional sputum cultures were recorded. Results A total of 536 patients were included, of which 161 produced valid sputum and a potentially pathogenic microorganism was isolated from 88 subjects (16.4%). The isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.7%) was associated with a greater severity of the lung disease (previous admissions [P= 0.026], dyspnea scale [P=0.047], post-broncodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) [P=0.005], and the BODEx index [P=0.009]); also with higher prevalence of cor pulmonale (P=0.017), heart failure (P=0.048), and cerebrovascular disease (P=0.026). Streptococcus pneumoniae (26.1%) was associated with more comorbidity according to number of diseases (P=0.018); notably, peripheral artery disease (P=0.033), hypertension (P=0.029), dyslipidemia (P=0.039), osteoporosis (P=0.0001), and depression (P=0.005). Conclusion Patients with AE-COPD and P. aeruginosa present higher severity of COPD, while those with S. pneumoniae present greater comorbidity. The potentially pathogenic microorganism obtained in the sputum culture depends on the associated comorbidities. PMID:26664106

  16. Incidence of Community-Acquired Lower Respiratory Tract Infections and Pneumonia among Older Adults in the United Kingdom: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Elizabeth R. C.; Quint, Jennifer K.; Smeeth, Liam; Daniel, Rhian M.; Thomas, Sara L.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) and pneumonia (CAP) are common causes of morbidity and mortality among those aged ≥65 years; a growing population in many countries. Detailed incidence estimates for these infections among older adults in the United Kingdom (UK) are lacking. We used electronic general practice records from the Clinical Practice Research Data link, linked to Hospital Episode Statistics inpatient data, to estimate incidence of community-acquired LRTI and CAP among UK older adults between April 1997-March 2011, by age, sex, region and deprivation quintile. Levels of antibiotic prescribing were also assessed. LRTI incidence increased with fluctuations over time, was higher in men than women aged ≥70 and increased with age from 92.21 episodes/1000 person-years (65-69 years) to 187.91/1000 (85-89 years). CAP incidence increased more markedly with age, from 2.81 to 21.81 episodes/1000 person-years respectively, and was higher among men. For both infection groups, increases over time were attenuated after age-standardisation, indicating that these rises were largely due to population aging. Rates among those in the most deprived quintile were around 70% higher than the least deprived and were generally higher in the North of England. GP antibiotic prescribing rates were high for LRTI but lower for CAP (mostly due to immediate hospitalisation). This is the first study to provide long-term detailed incidence estimates of community-acquired LRTI and CAP in UK older individuals, taking person-time at risk into account. The summary incidence commonly presented for the ≥65 age group considerably underestimates LRTI/CAP rates, particularly among older individuals within this group. Our methodology and findings are likely to be highly relevant to health planners and researchers in other countries with aging populations. PMID:24040394

  17. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF CEFIXIME AND CIPROFLOXACIN IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ADULTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN IBADAN, NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Ige, O.M.; Okesola, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Initial antibiotic therapy in upper and lower respiratory tract infections is usually empirical. However, the decreasing susceptibility of respiratory pathogens to antibacterials have raised concerns about the decreasing efficacy of currently available antibiotics. Objective: This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of cefixime and ciprofloxacin in the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia among adult Nigerian patients in Ibadan. Method: This was an open-labelled, randomized, parallel-group study of seventy-three (73) radiologically and bacteriologically confirmed adult cases of community-acquired pneumonia, between July 1 and September 31, 2011 at two health care facilities in Ibadan, Nigeria. All of these patients had severity index (CURB 65) scores of either 1 or 2. They were treated with either Cefixime, 400mg twice daily or Ciprofloxacin 500mg twice daily for 14 days. They were evaluated four times during the course of their treatment for clinical responses, radiological and bacteriological clearances and safety of therapy. Results: There were 39 (53.4%) patients in the Cefixime group and 34(46.6%) in Ciprofloxacin group. On day 7, patients on cefixime had a statistically significant lower temperature than patients on ciprofloxacin (P<0.01). By day 14, only 10.3% of patients in cefixime group still had persistent residual radiological changes compared to 38.2% in the ciprofloxacin group (P < 0.01). Bacteria cure was obtained in 96% of the patients in the cefixime group and 83% in the ciprofloxacin group. Conclusion: Cefixime was found to be superior to ciprofloxacin in terms of efficacy in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in adults in Nigeria. However, both antibiotics were well-tolerated by all the patients as there were no reports or documentation of adverse events. PMID:27162517

  18. Long-term mortality after community-acquired pneumonia—impacts of diabetes and newly discovered hyperglycaemia: a prospective, observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Heikki O; Salonen, Päivi H; Romppanen, Jarkko; Niskanen, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Community-acquired pneumonia is associated with a significant long-term mortality after initial recovery. It has been acknowledged that additional research is urgently needed to examine the contributors to this long-term mortality. The objective of the present study was to assess whether diabetes or newly discovered hyperglycaemia during pneumonia affects long-term mortality. Design A prospective, observational cohort study. Setting A single secondary centre in eastern Finland. Participants 153 consecutive hospitalised patients who survived at least 30 days after mild-to-moderate community-acquired pneumonia. Interventions Plasma glucose levels were recorded seven times during the first day on the ward. Several possible confounders were also recorded. The surveillance status and causes of death were recorded after median of 5 years and 11 months. Results In multivariate Cox regression analysis, a previous diagnosis of diabetes among the whole population (adjusted HR 2.84 (1.35–5.99)) and new postprandial hyperglycaemia among the non-diabetic population (adjusted HR 2.56 (1.04–6.32)) showed independent associations with late mortality. New fasting hyperglycaemia was not an independent predictor. The mortality rates at the end of follow-up were 54%, 37% and 10% among patients with diabetes, patients without diabetes with new postprandial hyperglycaemia and patients without diabetes without postprandial hyperglycaemia, respectively (p<0.001). The underlying causes of death roughly mirrored those in the Finnish general population with a slight excess in mortality due to chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumonia was the immediate cause of death in just 8% of all late deaths. Conclusions A previous diagnosis of diabetes and newly discovered postprandial hyperglycaemia increase the risk of death for several years after community-acquired pneumonia. As the knowledge about patient subgroups with an increased late mortality risk is gradually gathering

  19. A Study on the Epidemiology and Aetiology of Acute Gastroenteritis in Adult Patients Presenting at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Tirana, Albania

    PubMed Central

    Stroni, Gentian P.; Dhimolea, Majlinda M.; Pipero, Pëllumb S.; Kraja, Dhimiter V.; Sallavaci, Suela Y.; Bino, Silva F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute gastroenteritis remains a common cause of hospital emergency room visits in Albania. However, the aetiology of severe gastroenteritis leading to hospitalization in adults frequently remains unclear. Aims: Our objective was to study the epidemiology and causes of community-acquired, acute gastroenteritis in adult patients presenting to hospital. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: A prospective study was conducted from January 2010 to January 2012, among patients ≥15 years old with community-acquired gastroenteritis presenting to the emergency room of the University Hospital “Mother Theresa” in Tirana, Albania. Stool samples and rectal swabs were collected from the patients for microbiological testing. Results: The median age of the study patients was 33 (15–88) years and 577 (58%) were females. The median age of males was 35 (15–87) years. The vast majority of cases occurred in urban area (849, 85%), p<0.01. Patients were admitted throughout the year with peak admissions for patients infected by bacterial pathogens in summer and those affected by viral pathogens in autumn. A total of 917 (91.7%) patients underwent a laboratory examination. The overall isolation rate was 51%. Bacterial pathogens were found in 29%, viral pathogens in 19% and protozoal pathogens in 2.5% of patients. No aetiological agent or other cause of acute diarrhoea was found in 449 (49%) patients. Twenty-nine (3.2%) patients were hospitalized. Conclusion: Despite extensive laboratory investigations, enteropathogens were detected in only 51% of adult patients who presented to the hospital ER with acute gastroenteritis. Viral infections ranked as the second most common cause of gastroenteritis in adults. PMID:25625016

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infection patients in Shanghai City, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Zhou, Zhaoyan; Hu, Bijie; Yamamoto, Taro; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important causative pathogen of community-acquired respiratory infection in China. In this study we investigated 37 H. influenzae strains isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) in Shanghai city between Dec 2008 and Apr 2009. H. influenzae clinical isolates were identified, and b-lactamase production tests were conducted and minimal inhibitory concentrations(MIC) were measured. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis(PFGE) was introduced as an effective finger printing method. Two isolates (5.4%) were verified as serotype b strains, and 30 strains (81.1%) were nontypeable H. influenzae. Furthermore, 10 (27.0%) were b-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistance (BLPAR) (TEM-1 type)strains, 11 (29.8%) were low-b-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (Low-BLNAR) strains,and the rest were b-lactamase-negative ampicillin-susceptible(BLNAS) strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations(MIC90; lg/ml) were 2 for ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.05 force fotaxime, 16 for cefaclor, 2 for azithromycin, 0.12 for levofloxacin, and 4 for imipenem. Fingerprint typing by PFGE revealed 23 independent patterns for the isolates. Pattern A (defined in this study) was predominant in BLPAR strains, and a variety of other patterns were detected in Low-BLNAR and BLNAS strains. Although the incidence of ampicillin resistant H. influenzae is increasing in CARTI patients in China, current antimicrobial chemotherapy seems to be effective. PMID:22302696

  1. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis for Efficacy of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Jeffrey P.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Reynolds, Daniel K.; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L.; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H. David; Riccobene, Todd A.; Ambrose, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  2. Effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection and feed deprivation on the metabolic rate of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Jones, M A; Powell, M D; Becker, J A; Carter, C G

    2007-10-31

    In this study, experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an acute necrotic bacterial gill infection on the metabolic rate (M(O2)) of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Fed and unfed Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to a high concentration (5 x 10(12) CFU ml(-1)) of the bacteria Tenacibaculum maritimum, their routine and maximum metabolic rates (M(O2rout) and M(O2max), respectively) were measured, and relative metabolic scope determined. A significant decrease in metabolic scope was found for both fed and unfed infected groups. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM) decrease of 2.21 +/- 0.97 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed fish a mean +/- SEM decrease of 3.16 +/- 1.29 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). The decrease in metabolic scope was a result of significantly increased M(O2rout) of both fed and unfed infected salmon. Fed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase in M(O2rout) of 1.86 +/- 0.66 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1), whilst unfed infected fish had a mean +/- SEM increase of 2.16 +/- 0.72 microM O2 g(-1) h(-1). Interestingly, all groups maintained M(O2max) regardless of infection status. Increases in M(O2rout) corresponded to a significant increase in blood plasma osmolality. A decrease in metabolic scope has implications for how individuals allocate energy; fish with smaller metabolic scope will have less energy to allocate to functions such as growth, reproduction and immune response, which may adversely affect the efficiency of fish growth. PMID:18159670

  3. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection.

    PubMed

    Cates, Jordan E; Mitrani-Gold, Fanny S; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M

    2015-08-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  4. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis To Estimate Antibacterial Treatment Effect in Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Jordan E.; Li, Gang; Mundy, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted to estimate the antibacterial treatment effect for linezolid and ceftaroline to inform on the design of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) noninferiority trials. The primary endpoints included an early clinical treatment response (ECTR) defined as cessation of lesion spread at 48 to 72 h postrandomization and the test-of-cure (TOC) response defined as total resolution of the infection at 7 to 14 days posttreatment. The systematic review identified no placebo-controlled trials in ABSSSI, 4 placebo-controlled trials in uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infection as a proxy for placebo in ABSSSI, 12 linezolid trials in ABSSSI, 3 ceftaroline trials in ABSSSI, and 2 trials for nonantibacterial treatment. The ECTR rates at 48 to 72 h and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 78.7% (95% CI, 61.1 to 96.3%) for linezolid, 74.0% (95% CI, 69.7 to 78.3%) for ceftaroline, and 59.0% (95% CI, 52.8 to 65.3%) for nonantibacterial treatment. The early clinical treatment effect could not be estimated, given no available placebo or proxy for placebo data for this endpoint. Clinical, methodological, and statistical heterogeneity influenced the selection of trials for the meta-analysis of the TOC treatment effect estimation. The pooled estimates of the TOC treatment response were 31.0% (95% CI, 6.2 to 55.9%) for the proxy for placebo, 88.1% (95% CI, 81.0 to 95.1%) for linezolid, and 86.1% (95% CI, 83.7 to 88.6%) for ceftaroline. The TOC clinical treatment effect estimation was 25.1% for linezolid and 27.8% for ceftaroline. The antibacterial treatment effect estimation at TOC will inform on the design and analysis of future noninferiority ABSSSI clinical trials. PMID:25987628

  6. Detection of viral and bacterial pathogens in hospitalized children with acute respiratory illnesses, Chongqing, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, En-Mei; Wo, Yin; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause large disease burden each year. The codetection of viral and bacterial pathogens is quite common; however, the significance for clinical severity remains controversial. We aimed to identify viruses and bacteria in hospitalized children with ARI and the impact of mixed detections.Hospitalized children with ARI aged ≤16 were recruited from 2009 to 2013 at the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR. Bacteria were isolated from NPAs by routine culture methods. Detection and codetection frequencies and clinical features and severity were compared.Of the 3181 hospitalized children, 2375 (74.7%) were detected with ≥1 virus and 707 (22.2%) with ≥1 bacteria, 901 (28.3%) with ≥2 viruses, 57 (1.8%) with ≥2 bacteria, and 542 (17.0%) with both virus and bacteria. The most frequently detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, and influenza virus. Clinical characteristics were similar among different pathogen infections for older group (≥6 years old), with some significant difference for the younger. Cases with any codetection were more likely to present with fever; those with ≥2 virus detections had higher prevalence of cough; cases with virus and bacteria codetection were more likely to have cough and sputum. No significant difference in the risk of pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and intensive care unit admission were found for any codetection than monodetection.There was a high codetection rate of common respiratory pathogens among hospitalized pediatric ARI cases, with fever as a significant predictor. Cases with codetection showed no significant difference in severity than those with single pathogens. PMID:25906103

  7. Incidence of hospitalization due to community-acquired rotavirus infection: a 12-year study (1996-2008).

    PubMed

    Cilla, G; Gomariz, M; Montes, M; Mendiburu, M I; Pérez-Yarza, E G; Pérez-Trallero, E

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of hospitalization for acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a useful parameter to assess the utility of the new rotavirus vaccines in high-income countries. Children hospitalized for AGE were identified by searching hospital discharge data and the records of the microbiology laboratory of Hospital Donostia. Rotavirus antigen was investigated in 96.1% of the 1114 children aged 1 month to <5 years hospitalized for AGE in the study period. Nearly 40% were rotavirus positive (44.9% of the 798 children aged 1 month to <2 years), with G1[P8] being the predominant genotype. The mean annual incidence rate of hospitalization due to rotavirus AGE was 29.8 and 63.7 cases/10 000 inhabitants in the <5 and <2 years age groups, respectively, in 1996-1999, decreasing to 13.6 and 27.4 cases/10 000 inhabitants in <5 and <2 years age groups, respectively, in 2002-2005 (P<0.001). This decrease coincided with a significant increase in the consumption of oral rehydration solutions. PMID:20096147

  8. National and Regional Assessment of Antimicrobial Resistance among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens Identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem Surveillance Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Ian A.; Brown, Steven D.; Traczewski, Maria M.; Tillotson, Glenn S.; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-01-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to β-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. β-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 μg/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 μg/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 μg/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections caused

  9. National and regional assessment of antimicrobial resistance among community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Ian A; Brown, Steven D; Traczewski, Maria M; Tillotson, Glenn S; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-12-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to beta-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. beta-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 mug/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 mug/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 mug/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections

  10. Comparative in vitro activity of oral antimicrobial agents against Enterobacteriaceae from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in three European countries.

    PubMed

    Kresken, M; Körber-Irrgang, B; Biedenbach, D J; Batista, N; Besard, V; Cantón, R; García-Castillo, M; Kalka-Moll, W; Pascual, A; Schwarz, R; Van Meensel, B; Wisplinghoff, H; Seifert, H

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae causing community-acquired urinary tract infections were examined in selected outpatient clinics and hospitals in Belgium, Germany and Spain using EUCAST breakpoints for susceptibility. A total of 1190 isolates were collected. Escherichia coli isolates were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (28.1%), ciprofloxacin (23.4%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21.4%) compared with fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin (each, <1.5%). Ceftibuten (MIC50/90 0.25/0.5 mg/L) and ceftriaxone activity (MIC50/90 ≤0.25 mg/L) was comparable. Ceftibuten (MIC90 ≤0.25 mg/L) was also active against Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella spp. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotypes were 7.1% for E. coli, 5.6% for Klebsiella pneumoniae and 0.4% for P. mirabilis. Resistance was common among men and elderly women. PMID:26321667

  11. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Ryuta; Kuwana, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Kengo; Inamo, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan. PMID:26819794

  12. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment options for skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the evolving epidemiology of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and the appropriate outpatient management of CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infection. Further, the paper will provide the basis upon which an individualized patient educational plan may be developed. Data Sources: To complete this review, a search of English language publications was conducted through Medline and CINAHL databases (1966–2006). Conclusions: The epidemiology of CA-MRSA is becoming increasingly complex. Research that addresses the impact of this organism in high-risk populations and within families is urgently needed. Implications for Practice: Nurse practitioners must remain informed of the epidemiology of common and emerging drug-resistant organisms in their patient populations. PMID:18271763

  13. Vitamin D deficiency in community-acquired pneumonia: low levels of 1,25(OH)2 D are associated with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to explore the association between vitamin D levels and the severity, mortality and microbiological etiology of community-acquired pneumonia. Methods Vitamin D levels (both, the reservoir form 25-OH and the activated form 1,25-OH2) of 300 randomly selected patients with community-acquired pneumonia due to pre-specified pathogens included in the German competence network (CAPNETZ) study were measured. Prior to statistical analysis, values of 25-OH and 1,25-OH2 were power-transformed to achieve parametric distribution. All further analyses were performed with seasonally and age adjusted values. Results There was only a modest (Spearman Coefficient 0.38) positive correlation between 25-OH and 1,25-OH2. For 1,25-OH2 but not 25-OH, the general linear model revealed a significant inverse correlation between serum concentration and CURB score (p = 0.011). Liver and respiratory co-morbidity were associated with significantly lower 25-OH values and renal co-morbidity with significantly lower 1,25-OH2 values. No significant differences of 1,25-OH2 or 25-OH between different pathogens (influenza virus, Legionella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae) were detected. Conclusion For 1,25-OH2, we found a significant and independent (controlled for age, season and pathogen) negative correlation to pneumonia severity. Therefore, supplementation of non-activated vitamin D to protect from pneumonia may be non-sufficient in patients that have a decreased capacity to hydroxylate 25-OH to 1,25-OH2. PMID:24766747

  14. [Empirical therapeutic approach to infection by resistant gram positive (acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and health care pneumonia). Value of risk factors].

    PubMed

    González-DelCastillo, J; Núñez-Orantos, M J; Candel, F J; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic treatment inadequacy is common in these sites of infection and may have implications for the patient's prognosis. In acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the document states that for the establishment of an adequate treatment it must be assessed the severity, the patient comorbidity and the risk factors for multidrug-resistant microorganism. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia is discussed and leads to errors in the etiologic diagnosis and therefore in the selection of antibiotic treatment. This paper discusses how to perform this approach to the possible etiology to guide empirical treatment. PMID:27608306

  15. [Pathogenetic ground of including reamberin and cycloferon combination into the therapy program for patients with severe cases of acute tonsillitis of a mixed viral/bacterial etiology].

    PubMed

    Frolov, V M; Peresadin, N A; Tereshin, V A; Chkhetiani, R B; Kruglova, O V

    2012-03-01

    The increase of severe cases of acute tonsillitis (AT) is presently marked. Severe cases of AT disturb immune and metabolic homoeostasis initiating the development of disease. Therapy optimization is required to select the best treatment. In patients with severe cases of AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology before the treatment it is revealed the increase of general activity of lactatedehydrigenase (LDH) and increase of the level of cathode "anaerobic" factions LDH4+5 and the decline of concentration ATP in the blood. There was a compensatory rise of level of ADP and АМP. The substantial decline of serum interferon (CIF) activity and diminishing maintenance of α-interferon (α-IFN) and γ-interferon (γ-IFN) in the blood of the patients, that testified to oppressing of interferonogenesis. Treatment of severe cases of AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology of modern detoxic preparation reamberin and immunoactive preparation cycloferon combination positively influences the studied laboratory indexes. The improvement of power metabolism is marked, that was characterized by normalization of level adenine nucleotides (ATP, АDP, АМP) and general activity of LDH and its izoenzimes spectrum. At the same time the increase of CIF level is set, maintenances α-IFN and γ-IFN in the blood, that testified to the improvement of interferonogenesis. The results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of reamberin and cycloferon combination for treatment of patients with AT of mixed viral/bacterial etiology. PMID:22573749

  16. Intranasal Immunization with a Colloid-Formulated Bacterial Extract Induces an Acute Inflammatory Response in the Lungs and Elicits Specific Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rial, A.; Lens, D.; Betancor, L.; Benkiel, H.; Silva, J. S.; Chabalgoity, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Nonspecific stimulation of lung defenses by repeated oral administration of immunomodulators, such as bacterial extracts, has shown potential for the prevention of respiratory tract infections. Here, we show that intranasal (i.n.) immunization with a bacterial extract formulated as a colloid induces an acute inflammatory response in the lungs characterized by increased production of CCL and CXCL chemokines and a major influx of dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils, with a higher proportion of DCs showing an activated phenotype (high CD80/CD86 expression). Cytokine levels measured in bronchoalveolar-lavage samples showed a small increase in the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and similar levels of the other cytokines measured (interleukin 10 [IL-10], IL-12, and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]) in immunized mice compared with control mice. However, the recall response of primed animals after antigenic challenge induced increased expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ mRNAs in lung homogenates. Overall, all these effects were not due to the lipopolysaccharide content in the bacterial extract. Furthermore, we found that three i.n. doses administered 2 to 3 weeks apart were enough to elicit long-lasting specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory IgA antibody responses. Assessment of IgG subclasses showed a balanced pattern of IgG1-IgG2a responses. The serum total IgE concentrations were also elevated in immunized mice 2 weeks after the third dose, but they significantly decreased soon afterwards. Our results suggest that simple formulations of bacterial extracts administered i.n. are highly immunogenic, eliciting local and systemic immune responses, and may serve as the basis for cost-effective immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections. PMID:15102776

  17. Intranasal immunization with a colloid-formulated bacterial extract induces an acute inflammatory response in the lungs and elicits specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Rial, A; Lens, D; Betancor, L; Benkiel, H; Silva, J S; Chabalgoity, J A

    2004-05-01

    Nonspecific stimulation of lung defenses by repeated oral administration of immunomodulators, such as bacterial extracts, has shown potential for the prevention of respiratory tract infections. Here, we show that intranasal (i.n.) immunization with a bacterial extract formulated as a colloid induces an acute inflammatory response in the lungs characterized by increased production of CCL and CXCL chemokines and a major influx of dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils, with a higher proportion of DCs showing an activated phenotype (high CD80/CD86 expression). Cytokine levels measured in bronchoalveolar-lavage samples showed a small increase in the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and similar levels of the other cytokines measured (interleukin 10 [IL-10], IL-12, and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) in immunized mice compared with control mice. However, the recall response of primed animals after antigenic challenge induced increased expression of IL-12 and IFN-gamma mRNAs in lung homogenates. Overall, all these effects were not due to the lipopolysaccharide content in the bacterial extract. Furthermore, we found that three i.n. doses administered 2 to 3 weeks apart were enough to elicit long-lasting specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory IgA antibody responses. Assessment of IgG subclasses showed a balanced pattern of IgG1-IgG2a responses. The serum total IgE concentrations were also elevated in immunized mice 2 weeks after the third dose, but they significantly decreased soon afterwards. Our results suggest that simple formulations of bacterial extracts administered i.n. are highly immunogenic, eliciting local and systemic immune responses, and may serve as the basis for cost-effective immunotherapies for the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections. PMID:15102776

  18. Incidence and risk factors for community-acquired hepatitis C infection from birth to 5 years of age in rural Egyptian children

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Doa’a A.; Shebl, Fatma M.; El-Kamary, Samer S.; Magder, Laurence S.; Allam, Alif; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Mikhail, Nabiel; Hashem, Mohamed; Sharaf, Soraya; Stoszek, Sonia K.; Strickland, G. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A prospective study in three Egyptian villages (A, B and C) having a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection examined incidence of community-acquired HCV infection in children; 2852 uninfected infants were prospectively followed from birth for up to 5.5 years. Fifteen seroconverted for either HCV antibodies and/or HCV-RNA (incidence of 0.53%). Ten had both anti-HCV and HCV-RNA; four had only anti-HCV; and one had HCV-RNA in the absence of antibody. The incidence rate at all ages was 2.7/1000 person-years (PY). It was 3.8/1000 PY during infancy and 2.0/1000 PY for the 1–5-years age group. Hospitalization and low birth weight increased the risk of infection; while living in village B, the family having a higher socioeconomic status, and advanced maternal education were protective. Six of eight HCV-infected infants reported iatrogenic exposures (e.g. hospitalization, therapeutic injections, ear piercing) prior to infection whereas only 2/7 children older than 1 year reported these exposures. Having an HCV-positive mother was the only other reported risk in two of these older children. The virus cleared in six (40%) children by the end of follow-up. Health education targeting iatrogenic exposures and focusing on risk factors could reduce HCV infection in children in high-risk populations. PMID:20153495

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmec IVc clone as the major cause of community-acquired invasive infections in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, S; de Vedia, L; Lopez Furst, M J; Gardella, N; Di Gregorio, S; Ganaha, M C; Prieto, S; Carbone, E; Lista, N; Rotrying, F; Stryjewski, M E; Mollerach, M

    2013-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections have become a major concern worldwide. We conducted a prospective multicenter study of invasive CA-MRSA to evaluate clinical features and genotype of strains causing invasive infections in Argentina. A total of 55 patients with invasive CA-MRSA infections were included. Most patients (60%) had bloodstream infections, 42% required admission to intensive care unit and 16% died. No CA-MRSA isolates were multiresistant (resistant ⩾3 classes of antibiotics). All isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) type IV. The majority CA-MRSA strains belonged to ST30 and had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, qualifying as a clonal dissemination of a highly transmissible strain. The main clone recovered from patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections was genotyped as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type C-ST30, SCCmec type IVc-spa type 019, PVL positive. It has become predominant and replaced the previously described CA-MRSA clone (PFGE type A, ST5, SCCmec type IV, spa type 311). PMID:23340226

  20. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:27366172

  1. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a potential diagnosis for a 16-year-old athlete with knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Thier, Susan M.; Barber, Virginia A.; Harvey, Phyllis; Livdans-Forret, Anna B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This case report aims to raise awareness in chiropractic physicians of the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in adolescents who participate in sports activities and to alert the chiropractic physician of the necessity to consider potential diagnoses that are not within their typical clinical heuristic. Clinical Features A 16-year-old adolescent girl entered the clinic with a complaint of left knee pain that had an insidious onset during her involvement in sports activities. Later that same day, her knee became enlarged, red, and had pustular formations with a discharge. She was taken to an urgent care facility and subsequently diagnosed with MRSA. Her history included treatment of a left knee musculoskeletal condition 6 weeks prior to which she had responded favorably. Interventions and Outcomes She was treated medically with an aggressive course of antibiotic therapy and excision of the furuncle. The chiropractic physician played a role in patient education and notifying local school authorities of the case. Conclusion Doctors of chiropractic must prepare themselves for the unexpected and remain open to diagnostic possibilities outside of the normal scope of practice. Knee pain or cellulitis of any type may require additional diagnostic and patient care protocols to make the correct diagnosis. With the incidence of community-acquired MRSA increasing at an alarming rate, it is certainly a diagnosis doctors of chiropractic should be aware of when treating patients, especially those involved in sports activities. PMID:21629397

  2. Occurrence and analysis of irp2 virulence gene in isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from microbiota and hospital and community-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; Rodrigues, Juliana Falcão; Cabral, Adriane Borges; da Silva, Maíra Espíndola; Leal, Nilma Cintra; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Morais Júnior, Marcos Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Eighty-five isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp., originating from hospital- and community-acquired infections and from oropharyngeal and faecal microbiota from patients in Recife-PE, Brazil, were analyzed regarding the presence of irp2 gene. This is a Yersinia typical gene involved in the synthesis of siderophore yersiniabactin. DNA sequencing confirmed the identity of irp2 gene in five K. pneumoniae, five Enterobacter aerogenes and one Enterobacter amnigenus isolates. To our knowledge in the current literature, this is the first report of the irp2 gene in E. amnigenus, a species considered an unusual human pathogen, and in K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes isolates from the normal microbiota and from community infections, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggest the irp2 genes derived from isolates used in this study are more closely related to that of Yersinia pestis P.CE882 than to that of Yersinia enterocolitica 8081. These data demonstrated that K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from normal microbiota and from community- and hospital-acquired infections possess virulence factors important for the establishment of extra-intestinal infections. PMID:27133266

  3. Antibacterial resistance, genes encoding toxins and genetic background among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections in France: a national prospective survey.

    PubMed

    Lamy, B; Laurent, F; Gallon, O; Doucet-Populaire, F; Etienne, J; Decousser, J-W

    2012-06-01

    The epidemiology of staphylococcal community-acquired skin and soft tissues infections (CA-SSTIs) has changed dramatically. We described prospectively the characteristics of the Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 71 non-teaching French hospitals and implicated in CA-SSTIs: antimicrobial susceptibility (mecA polymerase chain reaction [PCR], disk diffusion method), virulence factor gene (sea, tst, pvl) prevalence and genetic background (agr allele). During November 2006, 235 strains were collected (wound infection: 51%, abscess: 21%, whitlow: 8%, diabetic foot: 7%, furunculosis: 3%). sea, tst and pvl were identified in 22.1, 13.2 and 8.9% strains, respectively. agr allele 1 was the most frequently encountered genetic background, whatever the methicillin susceptibility. Among the 34 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, 14.5% of all S. aureus), only one strain (2.9%) harboured pvl (belonging to the European ST80 clone), four (11.8%) tst (belonging to two endemic French clones) and 18 (52.9%) sea gene (mainly the Lyon clone). According to their in vitro activity, pristinamycin or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole could be considered as first-choice antibiotics. To date, the international pvl-positive MRSA clones have not spread in France. MRSA strains isolated from putative CA-SSTIs exhibited a genetic and phenotypic background of hospital-acquired (HA) clones. National survey should be continued, in order to monitor the emergence of virulent clones. PMID:21997773

  4. A questionnaire study of injections prescribed and dispensed for patients diagnosed with mild/moderate community-acquired pneumonia in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Delia; Parsons, Richard W.; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The study aimed to determine the extent of and factors influencing the prescribing of injections for the treatment of mild/moderate community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Mongolia. Methods. Questionnaires were developed and administered to medication providers (34 Pharmacists, 27 pharmacy technicians) and prescribers (22 general doctors and 49 medical specialists) working in Mongolia. Results. Cefalosporins were prescribed for patients with mild pneumonia and doctors tended to prescribe injectable cefalosporins (cefazolin) rather than oral dosage forms. This was supported by the questionnaire study with pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. Additionally, 23 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians indicated that OTC injectable cefalosporins (37.7%) and injectable aminopenicillins (33,9%) were frequently sold by pharmacies for the treatment of mild/moderate CAP. Doctors and particularly pharmacists in the questionnaire studies indicated choosing an injection was to avoid non-compliance problems. Conclusion. High levels of injectable prescribing of antibiotics were found in non-hospitalized patients with CAP in Mongolia. This prevalence level indicated that inappropriate injection prescribing is a public health hazard for Mongolia and requires consideration by the appropriate authorities. PMID:26644968

  5. Comparison of Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay and real time RT-PCR for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Prades, Yara; Ruiz, Mauricio; Pizarro, Rolando; Rossi, Patricio; Lizama, Luis; Garmendia, María Luisa; Meza, Angela; Larrañaga, Carmen; Avendaño, Luis F

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the third cause of death worldwide. Viruses are frequently detected in adult CAP. Highly sensitive diagnostic techniques should be used due to poor viral shedding. Different sampling methods can affect viral detection, being necessary to establish the optimal type of sample for identifying respiratory viruses in adults. The detection rates of respiratory viruses by Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay, real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) (Sacace®), and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in adult CAP were performed in nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) and aspirates (NPA) from 179 hospitalized adults. Positivity was 47.5% for Luminex®, 42.5% for rtRT-PCR (P = 0.3), and 2.7% for IFA (2.7%) (P < 0.0). The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa coefficient of xTAG® RVP compared with rtRT-PCR were 84.2%, 79.6%, and 0.62%, respectively. Luminex® and rtRT-PCR detected 65 (58.0%) and 57 (50.9%) viruses in 112 NPA and 35 (34.3%) and 31 (30.4%) in 102 NPS, respectively (P < 0.01). xTAG® RVP is appropriate for detecting respiratory viruses in CAP adults. Both molecular techniques yielded better results with nasopharyngeal aspirate than swabs. J. Med. Virol. 88:1173-1179, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061405

  6. Incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Pantone-Valentine leucocidin gene at a referral hospital in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Dash, Nihar; Panigrahi, Debadatta; Al Zarouni, Mansour; Yassin, Faten; Al-Shamsi, Moza

    2014-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in hospitalized patients worldwide. The present study was undertaken to identify CA-MRSA in hospitalized patients in a 350-bed tertiary care hospital in Sharjah, UAE over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. CA-MRSA was defined based on identification within first 48 h of admission in the hospital. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing of the CA-MRSA isolates was carried out by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection of PVL and mecA genes was done by PCR using the GenoType(®) MRSA test system (Hain Lifescience). Patient's clinical data and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates were also evaluated. Fifty seven of the 187 MRSA isolates were identified as CA-MRSA. All the CA-MRSA strains in our study belonged to SCCmecIV type and were positive for both PVL and mecA genes. The patients with CA-MRSA infections were young (median age, 32 years) and the majority of infections involved the skin and soft tissue (36%). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates showed a better susceptibility profile to the non-beta-lactam antimicrobials with the exception of ciprofloxacin having 28% resistance. This study evidently strengthens the recent observation of an increase in CA-MRSA emergence among hospitalized patients in the UAE. PMID:23919760

  7. Emergence of the community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 clone in a Japanese child, demonstrating multiple divergent strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Wataru; Mimura, Shigenao; Kurosawa, Yoshihiro; Takano, Tomomi; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Yabe, Shizuka; Razvina, Olga; Nishiyama, Akihito; Ikeda-Dantsuji, Yurika; Sakai, Fuminori; Hanaki, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2010-08-01

    In 2008 we isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from an 11-month-old Japanese girl who lived in Saitama, Japan, and suffered from cellulitis of the lower thigh and sepsis. The MRSA (strain NN47) belonged to multilocus sequence type (ST) 8 and exhibited spa363 (t024), agr1, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IVa, and coagulase type III. It was positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrated that the MRSA was the USA300 clone, which is the predominant community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) in the US. Strain NN47 was divergent, in terms of the spa type and patterns of PFGE and plasmids, from the USA300-0114 type strain or USA300 strain NN36, previously isolated from a visitor (Indian girl) from the US. Strain NN47 was resistant to erythromycin, in addition to beta-lactam agents (e.g., oxacillin). These data demonstrate the first emergence of the USA300 clone in Japanese children who have never been abroad and have had no contact with foreigners (and therefore, the first USA300 spread in Japan), and also emergence of multiple divergent strains of the USA300 clone in Japan. Because the USA300 clone is highly transmissible and virulent, surveillance of the USA300 clone is needed. PMID:20306108

  8. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in serum and sinus fluid after administration of extended-release and immediate-release formulations in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ehnhage, A; Rautiainen, M; Fang, A F; Sanchez, S P

    2008-06-01

    As high drug levels at the infection site are desirable for optimal activity, this study explored whether one dose of azithromycin extended release (AZ-ER) achieved higher azithromycin exposure in sinus fluid than azithromycin immediate release (AZ-IR) in adults with acute bacterial sinusitis. Subjects received AZ-ER (2g single dose; n=5) or AZ-IR (500mg daily for 3 days; n=4) and blood and sinus aspirates were collected until 120 h after initial dosing. Within 24 h, exposure was four- and three-fold higher with AZ-ER than with AZ-IR in serum and sinus fluid, respectively. Sinus fluid exposure was five- and three-fold higher than serum for AZ-IR and AZ-ER, respectively. Azithromycin concentrations in sinus fluid were maintained up to 120 h. PMID:18456465

  9. Effectiveness and safety of short vs. long duration of antibiotic therapy for acute bacterial sinusitis: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Falagas, Matthew E; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos E; Grammatikos, Alexandros P; Matthaiou, Dimitrios K

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of short-course antibiotic treatment for acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) compared with longer duration treatment. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), identified by searching PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We included RCTs that compared short-course (up to 7 days) vs. long-course therapy (≥2 days longer than short-course), with the same antimicrobial agent, in the same daily dosage, for patients with ABS. Twelve RCTs (10 double-blinded) involving adult patients with radiologically confirmed ABS were included. There was no difference in the comparison of short-course (3–7 days) with long-course treatment (6–10 days) regarding clinical success [12 RCTs, 4430 patients, fixed effect model (FEM), odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81, 1.12]; microbiological efficacy; relapses; adverse events (10 RCTs, 4172 patients, random effects model, OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71, 1.09); or withdrawals due to adverse events. In the sensitivity analysis comparing 5- vs. 10-day regimens, clinical success was similar, although adverse events were fewer with short-course treatment (5 RCTs, 2151 patients, FEM, OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63, 0.98). Although antibiotics for acute sinusitis should be reserved for select patients with substantial probability of bacterial disease, accurate clinical diagnosis is often difficult to attain. Short-course antibiotic treatment had comparable effectiveness to a longer course of therapy for ABS. Shortened treatment, particularly for patients without severe disease and complicating factors, might lead to fewer adverse events, better patient compliance, lower rates of resistance development and fewer costs. PMID:19154447

  10. [Efficacy and safety of clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (1: 14) dry syrup in the treatment of children with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Rinya; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Motoyama, Hidekatsu; Yarita, Masao

    2015-06-01

    To demonstrate clinical value of clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (CVA/AMPC) 1:14 combination dry syrup for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS), the efficacy and safety were evaluated in a multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled study in 27 children with ABRS. The proportion of subjects who were 'cured' at the test of cure as the primary endpoint was 88.5%. In subjects with a major pathogenic bacteria at baseline (i.e., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis) bacterial eradication was achieved in ≥ 80% of the subjects with the exception of β-lactamase non-producing ampicillin resistant H. influenzae: BLNAR and β-lactamase producing ampicillin resistant H. influenzae: BLPAR (β-lactamase producing amoxicillin/clavulanic acid resistant H. influenzae: BLPACR). The MIC of CVA/AMPC (1:14) was not higher than 4 μg/mL for all pathogens except one strain each of BLNAR and BLPAR (BLPACR). Drug-related adverse events were reported in 19% of patients (5/27 patients). All of the reported drug-related adverse events were classified as gastrointestinal disorders that have been commonly reported with antibacterial drugs. These results indicate that CVA/AMPC (1:14) was clinically useful for the treatment of ABRS and is also suggested that was effective especially for the treatment of ABRS in children caused by beta-lactamase-producing bacteria including M. catarrhalis. PMID:26349117

  11. Comorbidities as a driver of the excess costs of community-acquired pneumonia in U.S. commercially-insured working age adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adults with certain comorbid conditions have a higher risk of pneumonia than the overall population. If treatment of pneumonia is more costly in certain predictable situations, this would affect the value proposition of populations for pneumonia prevention. We estimate the economic impact of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) for adults with asthma, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) in a large U.S. commercially-insured working age population. Methods Data sources consisted of 2003 through 2007 Thomson Reuters MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters and Thomson Reuters Health Productivity and Management (HPM) databases. Pneumonia episodes and selected comorbidities were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. By propensity score matching, controls were identified for pneumonia patients. Excess direct medical costs and excess productivity cost were estimated by generalized linear models (GLM). Results We identified 402,831 patients with CAP between 2003 through 2007, with 25,560, 32,677, 16,343, and 5,062 episodes occurring in patients with asthma, diabetes, COPD and CHF, respectively. Mean excess costs (and standard error, SE) of CAP were $14,429 (SE=44) overall. Mean excess costs by comorbidity subgroup were lowest for asthma ($13,307 (SE=123)), followed by diabetes ($21,395 (SE=171)) and COPD ($23,493 (SE=197)); mean excess costs were highest for patients with CHF ($34,436 (SE=549)). On average, indirect costs comprised 21% of total excess costs, ranging from 8% for CHF patients to 27% for COPD patients. Conclusions Compared to patients without asthma, diabetes, COPD, or CHF, the excess cost of CAP is nearly twice as high for patients with diabetes and COPD and nearly three times as high for patients with CHF. Indirect costs made up a significant but varying portion of excess CAP costs. Returns on prevention of pneumonia would therefore be higher in adults with these comorbidities. PMID

  12. The impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on the incidence of childhood community-acquired pneumonia and bacteriologically confirmed pneumococcal pneumonia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Naito, S; Tanaka, J; Nagashima, K; Chang, B; Hishiki, H; Takahashi, Y; Oikawa, J; Nagasawa, K; Shimojo, N; Ishiwada, N

    2016-02-01

    Heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced to Japan in 2010. We investigated the impact of PCV7 on childhood community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and pneumococcal pneumonia (PP). Children aged <5 years living in Chiba city, Japan, who were admitted to hospitals were enrolled to estimate the incidence of CAP based on the mid-year population. PP was determined by the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in cultured blood and/or sputum samples of CAP patients. The incidence of CAP and S. pneumoniae isolated from PP patients was compared before (April 2008-March 2009) and after (April 2012-March 2013) the introduction of PCV7 immunization. The annual incidence of CAP was reduced [incidence rate ratio 0·81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·73-0·90]. When comparing post-vaccine with pre-vaccine periods, the odds ratio for PP incidence was 0·60 (95% CI 0·39-0·93, P = 0·024). PCV7-covered serotypes markedly decreased (66·6% in pre-vaccine vs. 15·6% in post-vaccine, P < 0·01), and serotypes 6C, 15A, 15C and 19A increased. Multidrug-resistant international clones in the pre-vaccine period (Spain6B-2/ST90, Taiwan19F-14/ST236) decreased, while Sweden15A-25/ST63 was the dominant clone in the post-vaccine period. A significant reduction in the incidence of both CAP hospitalizations and culture-confirmed PP of vaccine serotypes was observed at 2 years after PCV7 vaccination. PMID:26122538

  13. Clinical and laboratory features distinguishing pandemic H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia from interpandemic community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Thomas; Myles, Puja; Greenwood, Sonia; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Brett, Stephen J; Semple, Malcolm G; Openshaw, Peter J; Bannister, Barbara; Read, Robert C; Taylor, Bruce L; McMenamin, Jim; Enstone, Joanne E; Nicholson, Karl G

    2011-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients with H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia is desirable for the early instigation of antiviral agents. A study was undertaken to investigate whether adults admitted to hospital with H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia could be distinguished clinically from patients with non-H1N1 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods Between May 2009 and January 2010, clinical and epidemiological data of patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection admitted to 75 hospitals in the UK were collected by the Influenza Clinical Information Network (FLU-CIN). Adults with H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia were identified and compared with a prospective study cohort of adults with CAP hospitalised between September 2008 and June 2010, excluding those admitted during the period of the pandemic. Results Of 1046 adults with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection in the FLU-CIN cohort, 254 (25%) had H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia on admission to hospital. In-hospital mortality of these patients was 11.4% compared with 14.0% in patients with inter-pandemic CAP (n=648). A multivariate logistic regression model was generated by assigning one point for each of five clinical criteria: age ≤65 years, mental orientation, temperature ≥38°C, leucocyte count ≤12×109/l and bilateral radiographic consolidation. A score of 4 or 5 predicted H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia with a positive likelihood ratio of 9.0. A score of 0 or 1 had a positive likelihood ratio of 75.7 for excluding it. Conclusion There are substantial clinical differences between H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia and inter-pandemic CAP. A model based on five simple clinical criteria enables the early identification of adults admitted with H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia. PMID:21252388

  14. Detection of New Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Containing the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1 Gene Responsible for Hospital- and Community-Acquired Infections in France

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Geraldine; Bes, Michèle; Meugnier, Helene; Enright, Mark C.; Forey, Françoise; Liassine, Nadia; Wenger, Aline; Kikuchi, Ken; Lina, Gerard; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones harboring the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst) gene have been detected in France and in Switzerland since 2002. During a passive survey conducted between 2002 and 2003, we collected 103 tst-positive S. aureus isolates from 42 towns in France, of which 27 were resistant to methicillin. The tst-positive MRSA belonged to two clones: a major clone comprising 25 isolates of sequence type (ST) 5 and agr group 2 and a minor clone comprising two isolates of ST30 and agr3. The tst-positive MRSA clones were associated with both hospital-acquired (12 cases) and community-acquired (8 cases) infections. The MRSA clones were mainly isolated from children (overall median age, 3 years). They caused a variety of clinical syndromes, including toxic shock syndrome and suppurative infections. Both clones were found to harbor a type IV staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) and to have similar antibiotic resistance profiles (usually resistant to oxacillin, kanamycin, and tobramycin and with intermediate resistance to fusidic acid). The origin of these clones is unclear. The tst-positive agr2 MRSA clone has the same sequence type (ST5) of two pandemic nosocomial MRSA clones, namely, the Pediatric clone and the New York/Japan clone. These findings suggest that all these clones are phylogenetically related. The pulsotype of the tst-positive MRSA clones differed from that of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) clones by a single band involving the SCCmec element. These findings suggest that the tst-positive MRSA clones may have emerged from their respective MSSA counterparts. PMID:16517865

  15. Plasmid-Mediated AmpC: Prevalence in Community-Acquired Isolates in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Risk Factors for Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Reuland, E. Ascelijn; Halaby, Teysir; Hays, John P.; de Jongh, Denise M. C.; Snetselaar, Henrieke D. R.; van Keulen, Marte; Elders, Petra J. M.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; al Naiemi, Nashwan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of pAmpC beta-lactamases in community-acquired Gram negative bacteria in the Netherlands, and to identify possible risk factors for carriage of these strains. Methods Fecal samples were obtained from community-dwelling volunteers. Participants also returned a questionnaire for analysis of risk factors. Screening for pAmpC was performed with selective enrichment broth and a selective screening agar. Confirmation of AmpC-production was performed with two double disc combination tests: cefotaxime and ceftazidime with either boronic acid or cloxacillin as inhibitor. Multiplex PCR was used as gold standard for detection of pAmpC. 16S rRNA PCR and AFLP were performed as required, plasmids were identified by PCR-based replicon typing. Questionnaire results were analyzed with SPSS, version 20.0. Results Fecal samples were obtained from 550 volunteers; mean age 51 years (range: 18–91), 61% were females. pAmpC was present in seven E. coli isolates (7/550, 1.3%, 0.6–2.7 95% CI): six CMY-2-like pAmpC and one DHA. ESBL-encoding genes were found in 52/550 (9.5%, 7.3–12.2 95% CI) isolates; these were predominantly blaCTX-M genes. Two isolates had both ESBL and pAmpC. Admission to a hospital in the previous year was the only risk factor we identified. Conclusions Our data indicate that the prevalence of pAmpC in the community seems still low. However, since pAmpC-producing isolates were not identified as ESBL producers by routine algorithms, there is consistent risk that further increase of their prevalence might go undetected. PMID:25587716

  16. Multidrug resistance dissemination by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing community-acquired urinary tract infection in the Central-Western Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Laura Fernandes; de Oliveira Martins-Júnior, Paulo; de Melo, Ana Beatriz Fabrício; da Silva, Rafaella Christina Rocha Moreira; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Pitondo-Silva, André; de Campos, Tatiana Amabile

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from outpatients with signs of cystitis in Hospital Universitário de Brasília (Brasília, Brazil) during the period July 2013 to April 2014. E. coli isolated from urine culture were identified and their antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by VITEK 2. ESBL-producing strains identified were submitted to PCR for Clermont phylotyping, CTX-M group typing and virulence determinant detection, and clonal relationships were determined by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR. One strain belonging to each cluster of the dendrogram obtained by ERIC-PCR was selected for multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Among 324 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) analysed, 23 (7.1%) were identified as producing ESBL. All ESBL-producing strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR), i.e. presented non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories. Of the 23 ESBL-producing UPEC strains, 9 were assigned to phylogenetic group B2 and 7 each belonged to phylogenetic groups D and A. Virulence genotyping showed that aer was the most prevalent gene observed among the strains (21/23), followed by traT (18/23), pap (5/23), afa (5/23), PAI (5/23), cnf (3/23) and sfa (1/23). Analysis of the dendrogram showed that multidrug resistance and CTX-M ESBL groups were distributed among all strains, independent of clonality and phylogroup. Sequence types (STs) associated with pandemic resistance clones, such as B2-ST131 and D-ST648, were observed among the isolates. In conclusion, the results showed worrisome evidence of the potential for antibiotic multiresistant dissemination among community-acquired urinary tract infection caused by UPEC. PMID:27530830

  17. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and virtual screening of Fructose 1, 6 biphosphate aldolase-II in community acquired- methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Gautam, Budhayash; Singh, Satendra; Yadav, Madhu; Srivastav, Upasana; Singh, Brijendra

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged as a nosocomial pathogen to the community which commonly causes skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). This strain (MW2) has now become resistant to the most of the beta-lactam antibiotics; therefore it is the urgent need to identify the novel drug targets. Recently fructose 1,6 biphosphate aldolase-II (FBA) has been identified as potential drug target in CA-MRSA. The FBA catalyses the retro-ketolic cleavage of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to yield dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) in glycolytic pathway. In the present research work the 3D structure of FBA was predicted using the homology modeling method followed by validation. The molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the predicted model was carried out using the 2000 ps time scale and 1000000 steps. The MDS results suggest that the modeled structure is stable. The predicted model of FBA was used for virtual screening against the NCI diversity subset-II ligand databases which contain 1364 compounds. Based on the docking energy scores, it was found that top four ligands i.e. ZINC01690699, ZINC13154304, ZINC29590257 and ZINC29590259 were having lower energy scores which reveal higher binding affinity towards the active site of FBA. These ligands might act as potent inhibitors for the FBA so that the menace of antimicrobial resistance in CA-MRSA can be conquered. However, pharmacological studies are required to confirm the inhibitory activity of these ligands against the FBA in CA-MRSA. PMID:23423142

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infections in China: Results from the CARTIPS Antimicrobial Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, Feifei; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Zhanwei; Cao, Bin; Du, Yan; Feng, Xianju; Hu, Yunjian; Hu, Bijie; Ji, Ping; Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Yong; Liao, Wanzhen; Lu, Juan; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Zhongxin; Xu, Xiuli; Xu, Xuesong; Yang, Qing; Yu, Yunsong; Zhang, Rong; Zhuo, Chao

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis isolates causing adult community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs) in China. A multicentre resistance surveillance study (CARTIPS) investigating 1046 clinical isolates from 19 hospitals in China was conducted from 2013 to 2014. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints of oral penicillin, the percentages of penicillin-resistant, penicillin-intermediate and penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae were 44.1%, 13.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The rates of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae ranged from 27.9% to 72.2% in different cities, with the highest rate in Nanchang. Macrolides, including azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin, showed the lowest activities against S. pneumoniae isolates, with resistance rates of 90.5%, 92.2% and 93.0%, respectively. However, 98% of these strains were susceptible to levofloxacin and moxifloxacin. For H. influenzae isolates, most of the antimicrobials agents exhibited good activities. However, ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole showed relatively lower activity against H. influenzae, with resistance rates of 35.0% and 54.4%, respectively. β-lactamase production rates amongst H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were 31.0% and 87.1%, respectively. In addition, a total of 15 β-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant (BLNAR) strains identified in this study were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefaclor and cefuroxime. Most of the antimicrobial agents showed excellent activity against M. catarrhalis, with susceptibility rates of >90%. The results from the current study confirmed the regional variations in antimicrobial susceptibility of major CARTI pathogens and provided some choices for the treatment of these organisms. Continuous national surveillance of the epidemiology of CARTIs is strongly warranted in China. PMID:27436464

  19. Clinical characteristics and risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: A retrospective, case-control study in a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nobuaki; Aoki, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed in the past decade. The incidence, prevalence, and severity of community-acquired CDI (CA-CDI) have increased. However, the epidemiology of CA-CDI in Japan has not been investigated. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for CA-CDI in Japan, we conducted a retrospective, case-control study of CA-CDI at the National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center between January 2010 and December 2014. Two age- and sex-matched C. difficile toxin- and culture-negative controls were assigned for each case. A total of 26 patients were identified with CA-CDI were identified. The incidence rate for CA-CDI was 1.4 per 100,000 patient-years. Of the CA-CDI patients, 6 (23.1%) had no underlying comorbidity, 22 (84.6%) had prior exposure to antimicrobials, and 5 (19.2%) had prior exposure to antacids. Although 5 patients (19.2%) required hospitalization, none required intensive care or died. Recurrence was observed in 1 patient (3.8%). Patients with CA-CDI cases were more likely to have been recently exposed to antimicrobials compared to controls (odds ratio [OR]: 8.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.43-26.98). However, exposure to antacids was not associated with CA-CDI (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.19-1.85). Our findings indicate that the incidence rate for CA-CDI in Japan is relatively low compared to the US and Europe, and that CA-CDI is usually not severe. Previous antimicrobial exposure was the main risk factor for CA-CDI, suggesting that clinicians should consider CDI in patients presenting with diarrhea who have recently received antimicrobials. PMID:26482373

  20. Comparative Treatment Failure Rates of Respiratory Fluoroquinolones or β-Lactam + Macrolide Versus β-Lactam Alone in the Treatment for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adult Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chang, Shy-Shin; Chan, Ya-Lan; Pang, Laura; Hsu, Sue-Ming; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract No comparative effectiveness study has been conducted for the following 3 antibiotics: respiratory fluoroquinolone, β-lactam, and β-lactam + advanced macrolide. To gain insights into the real-world clinical effectiveness of these antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia in adult outpatients, our study investigated the treatment failure rates in 2 million representative participants from the National Health Informatics Project (NHIP) of Taiwan. A new-user cohort design was used to follow NHIP participants from January 2000 until December 2009. Treatment failure was defined by either one of the following events: a second antibiotic prescription, hospitalization due to CAP, an emergency department visit with a diagnosis of CAP, or 30-day nonaccident-related mortality. From 2006 to 2009, we identified 9256 newly diagnosed CAP outpatients, 1602 of whom were prescribed levofloxacin, 2100 were prescribed moxifloxacin, 5049 were prescribed β-lactam alone, and 505 were prescribed advanced macrolide + β-lactam. Compared with the β-lactam-based regimen, the propensity score-matched odds ratio for composite treatment failure was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.67–0.97) for moxifloxacin, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.90–1.35) for levofloxacin, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.67–1.35) for macrolide +β-lactam. Moxifloxacin was associated with lower treatment failure rates compared with β-lactam alone, or levofloxacin in Taiwanese CAP outpatients. However, due to inherent limitations in our claims database, more randomized controlled trials are required before coming to a conclusion on which antibiotic is more effective for Taiwanese CAP outpatients. More population-based comparative effectiveness studies are also encouraged and should be considered as an integral piece of evidence in local CAP treatment guidelines. PMID:26426664

  1. Antibiotic expected effectiveness and cost under real life microbiology: evaluation of ertapenem and ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia for elderly patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Santiago; Lozano, Virginia; Valladares, Amparo; Cavanillas, Rafael; Xie, Yang; Nocea, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical efficacy of antibiotics may be affected by changes in the susceptibility of microorganisms to antimicrobial agents. The purpose of this study is to assess how these changes could affect the initial efficacy of ertapenem and ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in elderly patients and the potential consequences this may have in health care costs. Methods Initial efficacy in elderly was obtained from a combined analysis of two multicenter, randomized studies. An alternative scenario was carried out using initial efficacy data according to the pneumonia severity index (PSI). Country-specific pathogens distribution was obtained from a national epidemiological study, and microbiological susceptibilities to first- and second-line therapies were obtained from Spanish or European surveillance studies. A decision analytic model was used to compare ertapenem versus ceftriaxone for CAP inpatient treatment. Inputs of the model were the expected effectiveness previously estimated and resource use considering a Spanish national health system perspective. Outcomes include difference in proportion of successfully treated patients and difference in total costs between ertapenem and ceftriaxone. The model performed one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results First-line treatment of CAP with ertapenem led to a higher proportion of successfully treated patients compared with ceftriaxone in Spain. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that length of stay was the key parameter of the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ertapenem can be a cost-saving strategy compared with ceftriaxone, with a 59% probability of being dominant (lower costs with additional health benefits) for both, elderly patients (>65 years) and patients with PSI >3. Conclusion The incorporation of the current antimicrobial susceptibility into the initial clinical efficacy has a significant impact in outcomes and costs in CAP treatment. The

  2. Etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a population-based study: Link between etiology and patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The etiologic profile of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) for each age group could be similar among inpatients and outpatients. This fact brings up the link between etiology of CAP and its clinical evolution and outcome. Furthermore, the majority of pneumonia etiologic studies are based on hospitalized patients, whereas there have been no recent population-based studies encompassing both inpatients and outpatients. Methods To evaluate the etiology of CAP, and the relationship among the different pathogens of CAP to patients characteristics, process-of-care, clinical evolution and outcomes, a prospective population-based study was conducted in Spain from April 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007. Patients (age >18) with CAP were identified through the family physicians and the hospital area. Results A total of 700 patients with etiologic evaluation were included: 276 hospitalized and 424 ambulatory patients. We were able to define the aetiology of pneumonia in 55.7% (390/700). The most frequently isolated organism was S. pneumoniae (170/390, 43.6%), followed by C. burnetti (72/390, 18.5%), M. pneumoniae (62/390, 15.9%), virus as a group (56/390, 14.4%), Chlamydia species (39/390, 106%), and L. pneumophila (17/390, 4.4%). The atypical pathogens and the S. pneumoniae are present in pneumonias of a wide spectrum of severity and age. Patients infected by conventional bacteria were elderly, had a greater hospitalization rate, and higher mortality within 30 days. Conclusions Our study provides information about the etiology of CAP in the general population. The microbiology of CAP remains stable: infections by conventional bacteria result in higher severity, and the S. pneumoniae remains the most important pathogen. However, atypical pathogens could also infect patients in a wide spectrum of severity and age. PMID:22691449

  3. Targets for Antibiotic and Health Care Resource Stewardship in Inpatient Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Comparison of Management Practices with National Guideline Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Timothy C.; Stella, Sarah A.; Cervantes, Lilia; Knepper, Bryan C.; Sabel, Allison L.; Price, Connie S.; Shockley, Lee; Hanley, Michael E.; Mehler, Philip S.; Burman, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infection leading to hospitalization in the U.S. The objective of this study was to evaluate management practices for inpatient CAP in relation to IDSA/ATS guidelines to identify opportunities for antibiotic and health care resource stewardship. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of adults hospitalized for CAP at a single institution from April 15, 2008 – May 31, 2009. Results Of 209 cases, 166 (79%) were admitted to a medical ward and 43 (21%) to the intensive care unit (ICU). 61 (29%) cases were candidates for outpatient therapy per IDSA/ATS guidance with a CURB-65 score of 0 or 1 and absence of hypoxemia. 110 sputum cultures were ordered; however, an evaluable sample was obtained in 49 (45%) cases, median time from antibiotic initiation to specimen collection was 11 (IQR 6–19) hours, and a potential pathogen was identified in only 18 (16%). Blood cultures were routinely obtained for both non-ICU (81%) and ICU (95%) cases, but 15 of 36 (42%) positive cultures were false-positive results. The most common antibiotic regimen was ceftriaxone plus azithromycin (182, 87% cases). Discordant with IDSA/ATS recommendations, oral step-down therapy consisted of a new antibiotic class in 120 (66%), most commonly levofloxacin (101, 55%). Treatment durations were typically longer than suggested with a median of 10 (IQR 8 – 12) days. Conclusions In this cohort of patients hospitalized for CAP, management was frequently inconsistent with IDSA/ATS guideline recommendations revealing potential targets to reduce unnecessary antibiotic and health care resource utilization. PMID:23160837

  4. Molecular characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from outpatients with skin and soft tissue infections in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Jiansheng; Jiang, Yuanshan; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lihua; Zhou, Yanfei; Xu, Huiqiong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristics and virulence genes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) isolates with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Outpatients with SSTIs visiting five medical and health institutions were enrolled from 2011 to 2013. Available ITALIC! S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of PVL genes. For CA-MRSA isolates, we performed typing of staphylococcal cassette chromosome ITALIC! mec(SCC ITALIC! mec), multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and carriage of 27 virulence genes. A total of 203 ITALIC! S. aureusstrains were isolated from 1400 outpatients with SSTIs, and 21 (10.3%) were CA-MRSA isolates. The positive rate of PVL genes among ITALIC! S. aureus, CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible ITALIC! S. aureus(MSSA) isolates were 39.4%, 71.4% and 35.7%, respectively. CA-MRSA strains had greater sensitivity to non-β-lactam antimicrobial agents. All CA-MRSA isolates belonged to SCC ITALIC! mecIV and V, accounting for 47.6% and 52.4%, respectively. ST59 was the most common lineage accounting for 76.2%; ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIVa-PVL-positive clone was found to be the predominant clone, accounting for 38.1%. All CA-MRSA isolates were found to be positive for one or more virulence genes, 28.6% of isolates carried PVL, ITALIC! seb, ITALIC! sek, ITALIC! seq, ITALIC! hla, ITALIC! hlb, ITALIC! hldand ITALIC! hlg-2. CA-MRSA infections were relatively uncommon in outpatients with SSTIs, but they carried many virulence genes, ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIV a-PVL-positive clone was the predominant clone in Wuhan, China. PMID:27060098

  5. Impact of microbiological samples in the hospital management of community-acquired, nursing home-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia in older patients.

    PubMed

    Putot, A; Tetu, J; Perrin, S; Bailly, H; Piroth, L; Besancenot, J-F; Bonnotte, B; Chavanet, P; d'Athis, P; Charles, P-E; Sordet-Guépet, H; Manckoundia, P

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the positivity rate, the detection rates for non-covered pathogens and the therapeutic impact of microbiological samples (MS) in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in elderly hospitalised patients. Patients aged 75 years and over with pneumonia and hospitalised between 1/1/2013 and 30/6/2013 in the departments of medicine (5) and intensive care (1) of our university hospital were included. Microbiological findings, intra-hospital mortality and one-year mortality were recorded. Among the 217 patients included, there were 138 CAP, 56 NHAP and 23 HAP. MS were performed in 89.9, 91.1 and 95.6 % of CAP, NHAP and HAP, respectively. Microbiological diagnosis was made for 29, 11.8 and 27.3 % of patients for CAP, NHAP and HAP, respectively (p = 0.05). Non-covered pathogens were detected for 8 % of CAP, 2 % of NHAP and 13.6 % of HAP (p = 0.1). The antimicrobial spectrum was significantly more frequently reduced when the MS were positive (46.7 % vs. 10.8 % when MS were negative, p = 10(-7)). The MS positivity rate was significantly lower in NHAP than in CAP and HAP. MS revealed non-covered pathogens in only 2 % of NHAP. These results show the poor efficiency and weak clinical impact of MS in the management of pneumonia in hospitalised older patients and suggest that their use should be rationalised. PMID:26753994

  6. Impact of pneumococcal vaccination in children on serotype distribution in adult community-acquired pneumonia using the serotype-specific multiplex urinary antigen detection assay.

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W; Ewig, Santiago; Rohde, Gernot; Schuette, Hartwig; Rupp, Jan; Welte, Tobias; Suttorp, Norbert; Forstner, Christina

    2016-04-29

    The aim of the study was to compare the distribution of the vaccine-serotypes covered by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13) in adult patients with pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in Germany between the periods 2002-2006 and 2007-2011 using a novel serotype-specific multiplex urinary antigen detection assay (SSUA). Vaccination of children started with PCV7 in 2007, which was replaced by PCV13 in 2010. Following confirmation of the accuracy of SSUA in long-term stored urine samples from 112 patients with confirmed pneumonia and known pneumococcal serotype, urine samples of 391 CAPNETZ patients with documented pneumococcal pneumonia (i.e. positive BinaxNOW(®) Streptococcus pneumoniae urine antigen test) but unknown serotype were tested for the 13 vaccine-serotypes using SSUA. The proportion of PCV7-serotypes significantly decreased in adult patients with pneumonia from 30.6% (2002-6) to 13.3% (2007-11, p<0.001); in bacteremic pneumonia, PCV7-serotypes completely disappeared (3/14 versus 0/19, p=0.058). Conversely, pneumococcal serotypes included by PCV13 remained stable during study period with a coverage of 61.5% (2002-06) and 59.7% (2007-11) in non-bacteremic pneumonia and 79% (for both periods) in bacteremic pneumonia, mainly due to an increase in pneumococcal serotypes 1, 3 and 7F during the second period. Thus, implementation of PCV7 in children in Germany in 2007 was associated with a significant decrease in vaccine-serotypes covered by PCV7 in adult patients with non-bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and with an elimination of PCV7 vaccine-serotypes in bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia. PCV13 coverage remained high up to 2011, mainly due to an increase in serotypes 1, 3 and 7F. German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00005274. PMID:27016653

  7. Accuracy of Lung Ultrasonography versus Chest Radiography for the Diagnosis of Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Review of the Literature and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiong; Xiao, Hui; Chen, Bo; Zhang, SuiYang

    2015-01-01

    Lung ultrasonography (LUS) is being increasingly utilized in emergency and critical settings. We performed a systematic review of the current literature to compare the accuracy of LUS and chest radiography (CR) for the diagnosis of adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We searched in Pub Med, EMBASE dealing with both LUS and CR for diagnosis of adult CAP, and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of LUS in comparison with CR. The diagnostic standard that the index test compared was the hospital discharge diagnosis or the result of chest computed tomography scan as a "gold standard". We calculated pooled sensitivity and specificity using the Mantel-Haenszel method and pooled diagnostic odds ratio using the DerSimonian-Laird method. Five articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. Using hospital discharge diagnosis as reference, LUS had a pooled sensitivity of 0.95 (0.93-0.97) and a specificity of 0.90 (0.86 to 0.94), CR had a pooled sensitivity of 0.77 (0.73 to 0.80) and a specificity of 0.91 (0.87 to 0.94). LUS and CR compared with computed tomography scan in 138 patients in total, the Z statistic of the two summary receiver operating characteristic was 3.093 (P = 0.002), the areas under the curve for LUS and CR were 0.901 and 0.590, respectively. Our study indicates that LUS can help to diagnosis adult CAP by clinicians and the accuracy was better compared with CR using chest computed tomography scan as the gold standard. PMID:26107512

  8. Bacterial characteristics as predictors of posttherapy recurrent bacteriuria among children with acute uncomplicated cystitis caused by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Johnston, Brian; Murray, Andrew; Kuskowski, Michael A; Maslow, Joel N; Johnson, Candice

    2007-12-01

    Multiple characteristics of pretherapy Escherichia coli urine isolates from 39 children with acute, uncomplicated cystitis (including specific virulence genes and phylogenetic groups) identified an increased risk for recurrent bacteriuria after 3-day (but not 10-day) therapy with amoxicillin-clavulanate. Rapid testing conceivably could facilitate rational selection of treatment duration for pediatric cystitis. Certain traits might represent good targets for preventive interventions. PMID:18043456

  9. Atorvastatin along with imipenem attenuates acute lung injury in sepsis through decrease in inflammatory mediators and bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Soumen; Kandasamy, Kannan; Maruti, Bhojane Somnath; Addison, M Pule; Kasa, Jaya Kiran; Darzi, Sazad A; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Parida, Subhashree; Dash, Jeevan Ranjan; Singh, Vishakha; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2015-10-15

    Lung is one of the vital organs which is affected during the sequential development of multi-organ dysfunction in sepsis. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem could attenuate sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture. Lung injury was assessed by the presence of lung edema, increased vascular permeability, increased inflammatory cell infiltration and cytokine levels in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Treatment with atorvastatin along with imipenem reduced the lung bacterial load and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) level in BALF. The markers of pulmonary edema such as microvascular leakage and wet-dry weight ratio were also attenuated. This was further confirmed by the reduced activity of MPO and ICAM-1 mRNA expression, indicating the lesser infiltration and adhesion of inflammatory cells to the lungs. Again, expression of mRNA and protein level of iNOS in lungs was also reduced in the combined treatment group. Based on the above findings it can be concluded that, combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem dampened the inflammatory response and reduced the bacterial load, thus seems to have promising therapeutic potential in sepsis-induced lung injury in mice. PMID:26375251

  10. Factors predisposing to acute and recurrent bacterial non-necrotizing cellulitis in hospitalized patients: a prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Karppelin, M; Siljander, T; Vuopio-Varkila, J; Kere, J; Huhtala, H; Vuento, R; Jussila, T; Syrjänen, J

    2010-06-01

    Acute non-necrotizing cellulitis is a skin infection with a tendency to recur. Both general and local risk factors for erysipelas or cellulitis have been recognized in previous studies using hospitalized controls. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for cellulitis using controls recruited from the general population. We also compared patients with a history of previous cellulitis with those suffering a single episode, with regard to the risk factors: length of stay in hospital, duration of fever, and inflammatory response as measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) level and leukocyte count. Ninety hospitalized cellulitis patients and 90 population controls matched for age and sex were interviewed and clinically examined during the period April 2004 to March 2005. In multivariate analysis, chronic oedema of the extremity, disruption of the cutaneous barrier and obesity were independently associated with acute cellulitis. Forty-four (49%) patients had a positive history (PH) of at least one cellulitis episode before entering the study. Obesity and previous ipsilateral surgical procedure were statistically significantly more common in PH patients, whereas a recent (<1 month) traumatic wound was more common in patients with a negative history (NH) of cellulitis. PH patients had longer duration of fever and hospital stay, and their CRP and leukocyte values more often peaked at a high level than those of NH patients. Oedema, broken skin and obesity are risk factors for acute cellulitis. The inflammatory response as indicated by CRP level and leukocyte count is statistically significantly more severe in PH than NH patients. PMID:19694769

  11. Risk Factors for Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections Caused by ESBL-Producing Enterobacteriaceae –A Case–Control Study in a Low Prevalence Country

    PubMed Central

    Søraas, Arne; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Sandven, Irene; Brunborg, Cathrine; Jenum, Pål A.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI) is the most common infection caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, but the clinical epidemiology of these infections in low prevalence countries is largely unknown. A population based case-control study was conducted to assess risk factors for CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae. The study was carried out in a source population in Eastern Norway, a country with a low prevalence of infections caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The study population comprised 100 cases and 190 controls with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae, respectively. The following independent risk factors of ESBL-positive UTIs were identified: Travel to Asia, The Middle East or Africa either during the past six weeks (Odds ratio (OR) = 21; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5–97) or during the past 6 weeks to 24 months (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1–4.4), recent use of fluoroquinolones (OR = 16; 95% CI: 3.2–80) and β-lactams (except mecillinam) (OR = 5.0; 95% CI: 2.1–12), diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.0–11) and recreational freshwater swimming the past year (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0–4.0). Factors associated with decreased risk were increasing number of fish meals per week (OR = 0.68 per fish meal; 95% CI: 0.51–0.90) and age (OR = 0.89 per 5 year increase; 95% CI: 0.82–0.97). In conclusion, we have identified risk factors that elucidate mechanisms and routes for dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a low prevalence country, which can be used to guide appropriate treatment of CA-UTI and targeted infection control measures. PMID:23936052

  12. Risk Factors for Long-Term Mortality after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Jan C.; Ueland, Thor; Jenum, Pål A.; Müller, Fredrik; Brunborg, Cathrine; Frøland, Stig S.; Aukrust, Pål; Husebye, Einar; Heggelund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributors to long-term mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain unclear, with little attention paid to pneumonia etiology. We examined long-term survival, causes of death, and risk factors for long-term mortality in adult patients who had been hospitalized for CAP, with emphasis on demographic, clinical, laboratory, and microbiological characteristics. Methods Two hundred and sixty-seven consecutive patients admitted in 2008–2011 to a general hospital with CAP were prospectively recruited and followed up. Patients who died during hospital stay were excluded. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected within 48 hours of admission. Extensive microbiological work-up was performed to establish the etiology of CAP in 63% of patients. Mortality data were obtained from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Cox regression models were used to identify independent risk factors for all-cause mortality. Results Of 259 hospital survivors of CAP (median age 66 years), 79 (30.5%) died over a median of 1,804 days (range 1–2,520 days). Cumulative 5-year survival rate was 72.9% (95% CI 67.4–78.4%). Standardized mortality ratio was 2.90 for men and 2.05 for women. The main causes of death were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), vascular diseases, and malignancy. Independent risk factors for death were the following (hazard ratio, 95% CI): age (1.83 per decade, 1.47–2.28), cardiovascular disease (2.63, 1.61–4.32), COPD (2.09, 1.27–3.45), immunocompromization (1.98, 1.17–3.37), and low serum albumin level at admission (0.75 per 5g/L higher, 0.58–0.96), whereas active smoking was protective (0.32, 0.14–0.74); active smokers were younger than non-smokers (P < 0.001). Microbial etiology did not predict mortality. Conclusions Results largely confirm substantial comorbidity-related 5-year mortality after hospitalization for CAP and the impact of several well-known risk factors for death, and extend

  13. An Italian experience of sequential intravenous and oral azithromycin plus intravenous ampicillin/sulbactam in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Todisco, T; Dal Farra, F; Ciliberti, G; Pirina, P; Pirica, P; Guelfi, R; Ghelfi, R; Serra, G; Paris, R; Mancuso, I; Cepparulo, M

    2008-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of intravenous (i.v.) azithromycin followed by the oral form, given in addition to i.v. ampicillin-sulbactam, were evaluated in 151 patients hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Azithromycin 500 mg i.v. once daily plus ampicillin/sulbactam 3 g i.v. twice daily were administered for 2-5 days, then followed by oral azithromycin 500 mg once daily plus the same i.v. ampicillin/sulbactam regimen for a total of 7-10 days of treatment. The clinical response at day 14 was defined as cure, improvement or failure (with the addition of relapse at follow-up at day 30). The other efficacy measures included microbiological (eradication, presumed eradication, persistence, relapse, superinfection) and radiological (resolution, improvement, failure) findings, and outcome of signs and symptoms. Adverse events, vital signs and routine laboratory tests were the safety variables. The number and rate of patients with a positive clinical outcome at day 14 (cured + improved) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis (n = 138) were 119 (86.2%), while 118 (87.4%) were cured or improved in the per-protocol population (PP) subset (n = 135). The rate of success at day 14 was slightly lower in the treated population (78.8%), which included all patients discontinued due to any cause. Clinical failures in the ITT population were 19 (13.8%) at day 14 and 1 (0.9%) at day 30, while 4 patients (3.6%) relapsed at day 30. Signs and symptoms of CAP improved from baseline to endpoint. The results in patients with a pathogen isolated at baseline in the cultures of respiratory tract secretions showed that 17 patients (77.3%) had eradication and 5 (22.7%) had presumed eradication (i.e. absence of adequate sputum for culture) at day 14, with no cases of persistence or superinfection. In the X-ray exam at day 30, 96 patients (85.0%) had resolution, 11 (9.7%) had improvement and 4 (3.5%) had failure. Treatment-related adverse events were reported in 10 patients (6

  14. Passive smoking at home is a risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia in older adults: a population-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether passive smoking exposure at home is a risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults. Setting A population-based case-control study was designed in a Mediterranean area with 860 000 inhabitants >14 years of age. Participants 1003 participants who had never smoked were recruited. Primary and secondary outcome measures Risk factors for CAP, including home exposure to passive smoking, were registered. All new cases of CAP in a well-defined population were consecutively recruited during a 12-month period. Methods A population-based case-control study was designed to assess risk factors for CAP, including home exposure to passive smoking. All new cases of CAP in a well-defined population were consecutively recruited during a 12-month period. The subgroup of never smokers was selected for the present analysis. Results The study sample included 471 patients with CAP and 532 controls who had never smoked. The annual incidence of CAP was estimated to be 1.14 cases×10–3 inhabitants in passive smokers and 0.90×10−3 in non-passive smokers (risk ratio (RR) 1.26; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.55) in the whole sample. In participants ≥65 years of age, this incidence was 2.50×10−3 in passive smokers and 1.69×10−3 in non-passive smokers (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.03). In this last age group, the percentage of passive smokers in cases and controls was 26% and 18.1%, respectively (p=0.039), with a crude OR of 1.59 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.38) and an adjusted (by age and sex) OR of 1.56 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.45). Conclusions Passive smoking at home is a risk factor for CAP in older adults (65 years or more). PMID:24928592

  15. Poor outcomes of empiric ceftriaxone ± azithromycin for community-acquired pneumonia caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    So, Wonhee; Crandon, Jared L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-06-01

    While ceftriaxone 1 g q24h is commonly used for hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), the prescribing information recommends 2-4 g a day to treat methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Similarly, recent pharmacodynamic analyses suggest shortcomings of 1 g q24h against the bulk of the MSSA. We evaluated the outcomes of empiric ceftriaxone 1 g q24h ± azithromycin in patients with MSSA pneumonia, as compared with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adult patients admitted to Hartford Hospital from 1/2005 to 12/2014 with respiratory culture for MSSA or S. pneumoniae were considered for inclusion. Non-ICU, CAP patients were included. Early clinical failure (ECF) was defined as persistent signs/symptoms or change of antibiotic due to poor response at 72-96 h. A multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate predictors of ECF. Over the study period, 403 MSSA and 227 S. pneumoniae positive respiratory cultures were identified. The majority of patients were excluded due to the following: no signs/symptoms of pneumonia, hospital-acquired pneumonia, alternative antibiotics, and polymicrobial infection. Thirty-nine patients met inclusion/exclusion criteria. All but three patients in the S. pneumoniae group received ceftriaxone + azithromycin. ECF was greater in the MSSA group (53 vs. 4 %, P = 0.003), as was length of stay (7.5 ± 5.4 vs. 4.6 ± 3.3 days, P = 0.006). When controlling for disease severity and macrolide non-susceptibility in a multivariate analysis, MSSA was significantly correlated with ECF (OR 12.3, 95 % CI 0.8-188.8). Poor clinical outcomes were observed in patients empirically treated with ceftriaxone ± azithromycin for MSSA CAP. Despite the popularity of ceftriaxone 1 g q24h, these data suggest this dose or compound may be inadequate for CAP caused by MSSA. PMID:26531307

  16. Comparative genomics of community-acquired ST59 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan: novel mobile resistance structures with IS1216V.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Khokhlova, Olga; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with ST59/SCCmecV and Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene is a major community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) lineage in Taiwan and has been multidrug-resistant since its initial isolation. In this study, we studied the acquisition mechanism of multidrug resistance in an ST59 CA-MRSA strain (PM1) by comparative genomics. PM1's non-β-lactam resistance was encoded by two unique genetic traits. One was a 21,832-bp composite mobile element structure (MES(PM1)), which was flanked by direct repeats of enterococcal IS1216V and was inserted into the chromosomal sasK gene; the target sequence (att) was 8 bp long and was duplicated at both ends of MES(PM1). MES(PM1) consisted of two regions: the 5'-end side 12.4-kb region carrying Tn551 (with ermB) and Tn5405-like (with aph[3']-IIIa and aadE), similar to an Enterococcus faecalis plasmid, and the 3'-end side 6,587-bp region (MES(cat)) that carries cat and is flanked by inverted repeats of IS1216V. MES(cat) possessed att duplication at both ends and additional two copies of IS1216V inside. MES(PM1) represents the first enterococcal IS1216V-mediated composite transposon emerged in MRSA. IS1216V-mediated deletion likely occurred in IS1216V-rich MES(PM1), resulting in distinct resistance patterns in PM1-derivative strains. Another structure was a 6,025-bp tet-carrying element (MES(tet)) on a 25,961-bp novel mosaic penicillinase plasmid (pPM1); MES(tet) was flanked by direct repeats of IS431, but with no target sequence repeats. Moreover, the PM1 genome was deficient in a copy of the restriction and modification genes (hsdM and hsdS), which might have contributed to the acquisition of enterococcal multidrug resistance. PMID:23071689

  17. Retrospective epidemiological study for the characterization of community- acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia in adults in a well-defined area of Badalona (Barcelona, Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has large impact on direct healthcare costs, especially those derived from hospitalization. This study determines impact, clinical characteristics, outcome and economic consequences of CAP in the adult (≥18 years) population attended in 6 primary-care centers and 2 hospitals in Badalona (Spain) over a two-year period. Methods Medical records were identified by codes from the International Classification of Diseases in databases (January 1st 2008-December 31st 2009). Results A total of 581 patients with CAP (55.6% males, mean age 57.5 years) were identified. Prevalence: 0.64% (95% CI: 0.5%-0.7%); annual incidence: 3.0 cases/1,000 inhabitants (95% CI: 0.2-0.5). Up to 241 (41.5%) required hospitalization. Hospital admission was associated (p<0.002) with liver disease (OR=5.9), stroke (OR=3.6), dementia (OR=3.5), COPD (OR=2.9), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.9) and age (OR=1.1 per year). Length of stay (4.4±0.3 days) was associated with PSI score (β=0.195), in turn associated with age (r=0.827) and Charlson index (r=0.497). Microbiological tests were performed in all inpatients but only in 35% outpatients. Among patients with microbiological tests, results were positive in 51.7%, and among them, S pneumoniae was identified in 57.5% cases. Time to recovery was 29.9±17.2 days. Up to 7.5% inpatients presented complications, 0.8% required ICU admission and 19.1% readmission. Inhospital mortality rate was 2.5%. Adjusted mean total cost was €2,332.4/inpatient and €698.6/outpatient (p<0.001). Patients with pneumococcal CAP (n=107) showed higher comorbidity and hospitalization (76.6%), higher PSI score, larger time to recovery and higher overall costs among inpatients. Conclusions Strategies preventing CAP, thus reducing hospital admissions could likely produce substantial costs savings in addition to the reduction of CAP burden. PMID:23114195

  18. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-10-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  19. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  20. Which individuals are at increased risk of pneumococcal disease and why? Impact of COPD, asthma, smoking, diabetes, and/or chronic heart disease on community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Blasi, Francesco; Dartois, Nathalie; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal disease (including community-acquired pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease) poses a burden to the community all year round, especially in those with chronic underlying conditions. Individuals with COPD, asthma or who smoke, and those with chronic heart disease or diabetes mellitus have been shown to be at increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with those without these risk factors. These conditions, and smoking, can also adversely affect patient outcomes, including short-term and long-term mortality rates, following pneumonia. Community-acquired pneumonia, and in particular pneumococcal pneumonia, is associated with a significant economic burden, especially in those who are hospitalised, and also has an impact on a patient's quality of life. Therefore, physicians should target individuals with COPD, asthma, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and those who smoke, for pneumococcal vaccination at the earliest opportunity at any time of the year. PMID:26219979

  1. Acute induction of anomalous and amyloidogenic blood clotting by molecular amplification of highly substoichiometric levels of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Mbotwe, Sthembile; Bester, Janette; Robinson, Christopher J; Kell, Douglas B

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that a variety of inflammatory diseases are accompanied by hypercoagulability, and a number of more-or-less longer-term signalling pathways have been shown to be involved. In recent work, we have suggested a direct and primary role for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in this hypercoagulability, but it seems never to have been tested directly. Here, we show that the addition of tiny concentrations (0.2 ng l(-1)) of bacterial LPS to both whole blood and platelet-poor plasma of normal, healthy donors leads to marked changes in the nature of the fibrin fibres so formed, as observed by ultrastructural and fluorescence microscopy (the latter implying that the fibrin is actually in an amyloid β-sheet-rich form that on stoichiometric grounds must occur autocatalytically). They resemble those seen in a number of inflammatory (and also amyloid) diseases, consistent with an involvement of LPS in their aetiology. These changes are mirrored by changes in their viscoelastic properties as measured by thromboelastography. As the terminal stages of coagulation involve the polymerization of fibrinogen into fibrin fibres, we tested whether LPS would bind to fibrinogen directly. We demonstrated this using isothermal calorimetry. Finally, we show that these changes in fibre structure are mirrored when the experiment is done simply with purified fibrinogen and thrombin (±0.2 ng l(-1) LPS). This ratio of concentrations of LPS : fibrinogen in vivo represents a molecular amplification by the LPS of more than 10(8)-fold, a number that is probably unparalleled in biology. The observation of a direct effect of such highly substoichiometric amounts of LPS on both fibrinogen and coagulation can account for the role of very small numbers of dormant bacteria in disease progression in a great many inflammatory conditions, and opens up this process to further mechanistic analysis and possible treatment. PMID:27605168

  2. Proposal for a New Score-Based Approach To Improve Efficiency of Diagnostic Laboratory Workflow for Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Adults.

    PubMed

    Lagi, Filippo; Bartalesi, Filippo; Pecile, Patrizia; Biagioli, Tiziana; Caldini, Anna Lucia; Fanelli, Alessandra; Giannazzo, Giuseppe; Grifoni, Stefano; Massacesi, Luca; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-07-01

    Microbiological tests on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) utilize a common urgent-care procedure that does not take into account the chemical and cytological characteristics of the CSF, resulting sometimes in an unnecessary use of human and diagnostic resources. The aim of this study was to retrospectively validate a simple scoring system (bacterial meningitis-Careggi score [BM-CASCO]) based on blood and CSF sample chemical/cytological parameters for evaluating the probability of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in adults. BM-CASCO (range, 0 to 6) was defined by the following parameters: CSF cell count, CSF protein levels, CSF lactate levels, CSF glucose-to-serum glucose ratio, and peripheral neutrophil count. BM-CASCO was retrospectively calculated for 784 cases of suspected ABM in adult subjects observed during a four-and-a-half-year-period (2010 to 2014) at the emergency department (ED) of a large tertiary-care teaching hospital in Italy. Among the 28 confirmed ABM cases (3.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent cause (16 cases). All ABM cases showed a BM-CASCO value of ≥3. Most negative cases (591/756) exhibited a BM-CASCO value of ≤1, which was adopted in our laboratory as a cutoff to not proceed with urgent microbiological analysis of CSF in cases of suspected ABM in adults. During a subsequent 1-year follow-up, the introduction of the BM-CASCO in the diagnostic workflow of ABM in adults resulted in a significant decrease in unnecessary microbiological analysis, with no false negatives. In conclusion, BM-CASCO appears to be an accurate and simple scoring system for optimization of the microbiological diagnostic workflow of ABM in adults. PMID:27170017

  3. [Reduction of acute recurrence in patients with chronic recurrent hypertrophic sinusitis by treatment with a bacterial immunostimulant (Enterococcus faecalis Bacteriae of human origin].

    PubMed

    Habermann, Werner; Zimmermann, Kurt; Skarabis, Horst; Kunze, Rudolf; Rusch, Volker

    2002-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study in 157 patients with chronic recurrent sinusitis investigated the occurrence of acute relapses during treatment of patients with a bacterial immunostimulant (3 x 30 drops/day), comprised of cells and autolysate of human Enterococcus faecalis bacteria (Symbioflor 1, n = 78) in comparison to placebo (n = 79). The study included a treatment period of 6 months and a follow-up period of 8 months. Under verum the occurrence of relapses (50 incidents) was about half (56%) the number observed under placebo (90 incidents). In the Kaplan-Meier test the verum preparation emerged as significantly superior (p = 0.045, log rank test) compared to placebo. This superiority of verum was found during the treatment period with 17 vs. 33 relapses (p = 0.019) as well as during the follow-up observation with 33 vs. 57 relapses (p = 0.013). The time interval to the first relapse was clearly longer under verum (513 days) than under placebo (311 days). The relative risk for a relapse under the test preparation compared to placebo was 49.0% during the treatment and 55.8% during the follow-up period. Severity of the acute relapses was comparable in both groups. However, antibiotic therapy was only required in 2 patients treated with verum compared to 6 patients in the placebo group. Both preparations were well tolerated and serious side effects did not occur in either group. No changes in laboratory tests--hematology and clinical chemistry--were observed. Potential immunomodifying effects of the test preparation in view of the significant reduction in relapses were discussed. PMID:12236051

  4. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Conover, Matt S.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Palermo, Joseph J.; Hibbing, Michael E.; Dodson, Karen W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies. PMID:27073089

  5. Mucosal immunisation with novel Streptococcus pneumoniae protein antigens enhances bacterial clearance in an acute mouse lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Maha; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains many proteins that have not been evaluated as potential protective vaccine antigens. In this study we isolated proteins from a serotype 3 strain of S. pneumoniae for use in mouse immunisation studies. Separation of the protein mix was achieved by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis followed by electro-elution to isolate individual proteins. This procedure successfully separated 21 fractions from which six proteins were selected based on purity and quantity and were initially denoted by their molecular masses: 14-, 34-, 38-, 48-, 57- and 75-kDa. The immunogenicity of these proteins was investigated in a mucosal immunisation model in mice involving a primary inoculation to the intestinal Peyer's patches followed by an intra-tracheal boost two weeks later. The immune response was assessed by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of infection, recruitment of phagocytes to the lungs and induction of an antibody response. Two of the proteins, the 14-kDa identified as a L7/L12 ribosomal protein, and the 34-kDa identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase resulted in up to 99% and 94%, respectively, enhanced clearance of infection within 5 h following pulmonary challenge with S. pneumoniae. This study has shown that novel pneumococcal proteins have the potential to be vaccine candidates to enhance clearance of an acute mucosal S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:15780579

  6. Telavancin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections, a Post Hoc Analysis of the Phase 3 ATLAS Trials in Light of the 2013 FDA Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Pushkin, Richard; Barriere, Steven L.; Corey, G. Ralph; Stryjewski, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Two phase 3 ATLAS trials demonstrated noninferiority of telavancin compared with vancomycin for complicated skin and skin structure infections. Data from these trials were retrospectively evaluated according to 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. This post hoc analysis included patients with lesion sizes of ≥75 cm2 and excluded patients with ulcers or burns (updated all-treated population; n = 1,127). Updated day 3 (early) clinical response was defined as a ≥20% reduction in lesion size from baseline and no rescue antibiotic. Updated test-of-cure (TOC) clinical response was defined as a ≥90% reduction in lesion size, no increase in lesion size since day 3, and no requirement for additional antibiotics or significant surgical procedures. Day 3 (early) clinical responses were achieved in 62.6% and 61.0% of patients receiving telavancin and vancomycin, respectively (difference, 1.7%, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of −4.0% to 7.4%). Updated TOC visit cure rates were similar for telavancin (68.0%) and vancomycin (63.3%), with a difference of 4.8% (95% CI, −0.7% to 10.3%). Adopting current FDA guidance, this analysis corroborates previous noninferiority findings of the ATLAS trials of telavancin compared with vancomycin. PMID:26248356

  7. Antimicrobial Activity of the Investigational Pleuromutilin Compound BC-3781 Tested against Gram-Positive Organisms Commonly Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, Douglas J.; Paukner, Susanne; Ivezic-Schoenfeld, Zrinka; Jones, Ronald N.

    2012-01-01

    BC-3781 is a novel semisynthetic pleuromutilin antimicrobial agent developed as an intravenous and oral therapy for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and respiratory tract infections (RTI). BC-3781 and comparator agents were tested by the broth microdilution method against 1,893 clinical Gram-positive organisms predominantly causing ABSSSI. BC-3781 exhibited potent activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.25 μg/ml), coagulase-negative staphylococci (MIC50/90, 0.06/0.12 μg/ml), β-hemolytic streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.03/0.06 μg/ml), viridans group streptococci (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.5 μg/ml), and Enterococcus faecium (including vancomycin-nonsusceptible strains) (MIC50/90, 0.12/2 μg/ml). Compared with other antibiotics in use for the treatment of ABSSSI, BC-3781 displayed the lowest MICs and only a minimal potential for cross-resistance with other antimicrobial classes. PMID:22232289

  8. Lemierre's syndrome secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection presenting with cardiac tamponade, a rare disease with a life-threatening presentation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lemierre's syndrome is a rare condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of internal jugular vein, septicemia and septic metastatic infection of different organs. It is preceded by an oropharyngeal infection by anaerobic organisms. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is now emerging as a causative organism in Lemierre's syndrome. Clinical manifestations vary depending on the organ system affected by the infection. Although rare, patients may present with life-threatening conditions such as cardiac tamponade. Case presentation We report the first case, to our knowledge, of Lemierre's syndrome presenting with cardiac tamponade secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus in a previously well 45-year-old Sri Lankan lady. Fever, sore throat and left-sided neck pain complicated with facial and left upper limb swelling were followed by severe shortness of breath for 24 h. There was tachycardia with pulsus paradoxus, low blood pressure and soft heart sounds. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade was detected on echocardiogram and methicillin-resistant S. aureus species were isolated in both blood and pericardial fluid cultures. Venous duplex of neck veins and computed tomography scan of the neck showed thrombosis of left-sided internal jugular, external jugular, subclavian and axillary veins. Diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome was made, and patient had a satisfactory recovery following emergency pericardiocentesis and a prolonged course of antibiotics. Conclusions Although uncommon, Lemierre's syndrome is a life-threatening condition. Patients may present with cardiac tamponade secondary to purulent pericarditis in Lemierre's syndrome, where emergency pericardiocentesis is lifesaving. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus is emerging as a causative agent in Lemierre's syndrome, and awareness is required amongst physicians for prompt diagnosis and appropriate empirical treatment to prevent mortality

  9. The UK joint specialist societies guideline on the diagnosis and management of acute meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in immunocompetent adults.

    PubMed

    McGill, F; Heyderman, R S; Michael, B D; Defres, S; Beeching, N J; Borrow, R; Glennie, L; Gaillemin, O; Wyncoll, D; Kaczmarski, E; Nadel, S; Thwaites, G; Cohen, J; Davies, N W S; Miller, A; Rhodes, A; Read, R C; Solomon, T

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal sepsis are rare conditions with high case fatality rates. Early recognition and prompt treatment saves lives. In 1999 the British Infection Society produced a consensus statement for the management of immunocompetent adults with meningitis and meningococcal sepsis. Since 1999 there have been many changes. We therefore set out to produce revised guidelines which provide a standardised evidence-based approach to the management of acute community acquired meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in adults. A working party consisting of infectious diseases physicians, neurologists, acute physicians, intensivists, microbiologists, public health experts and patient group representatives was formed. Key questions were identified and the literature reviewed. All recommendations were graded and agreed upon by the working party. The guidelines, which for the first time include viral meningitis, are written in accordance with the AGREE 2 tool and recommendations graded according to the GRADE system. Main changes from the original statement include the indications for pre-hospital antibiotics, timing of the lumbar puncture and the indications for neuroimaging. The list of investigations has been updated and more emphasis is placed on molecular diagnosis. Approaches to both antibiotic and steroid therapy have been revised. Several recommendations have been given regarding the follow-up of patients. PMID:26845731

  10. Executive Summary: The Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Infants and Children Older Than 3 Months of Age: Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Byington, Carrie L.; Shah, Samir S.; Alverson, Brian; Carter, Edward R.; Harrison, Christopher; Kaplan, Sheldon L.; Mace, Sharon E.; McCracken, George H.; Moore, Matthew R.; St Peter, Shawn D.; Stockwell, Jana A.; Swanson, Jack T.

    2011-01-01

    Evidenced-based guidelines for management of infants and children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were prepared by an expert panel comprising clinicians and investigators representing community pediatrics, public health, and the pediatric specialties of critical care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, infectious diseases, pulmonology, and surgery. These guidelines are intended for use by primary care and subspecialty providers responsible for the management of otherwise healthy infants and children with CAP in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Site-of-care management, diagnosis, antimicrobial and adjunctive surgical therapy, and prevention are discussed. Areas that warrant future investigations are also highlighted. PMID:21890766

  11. A multicentre study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in China: susceptibility to ceftaroline and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Zhao, Ying; Wang, He; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility to ceftaroline of hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates causing acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSIs) in China and to examine their relationship by genotyping. A total of 251 HA-MRSA isolates causing ABSSSIs were collected from a multicentre study involving 56 hospitals in 38 large cities across 26 provinces in mainland China. All isolates were characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, spa typing and detection of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin locus (lukS-PV and lukF-PV). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 14 antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined by broth microdilution and were interpreted using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints. The ceftaroline MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were 1 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL, respectively; 33.5% (n=84) of the isolates studied were ceftaroline-non-susceptible, with MICs of 2 μg/mL, but no isolate exhibited ceftaroline resistance (MIC>2 μg/mL). All of the ceftaroline-non-susceptible isolates belonged to the predominant HA-MRSA clones: 95.2% (n=80) from MLST clonal complex 8 (CC8), with the remaining 4.8% (n=4) from CC5. The high rate of non-susceptibility to ceftaroline amongst HA-MRSA causing ABSSSIs in China is concerning. PMID:25649348

  12. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  13. A multifactorial regression analysis of the features of community-acquired rotavirus requiring hospitalization in Spain as represented in the Minimum Basic Data Set.

    PubMed

    Redondo-González, O; Tenías-Burillo, J M

    2016-09-01

    Over 10% of acute rotavirus gastroenteritis (ARGE) requires hospitalization because of complications. The aggravating factors have been widely analysed, but in an isolated way. We aimed to explore the interrelationship between the clinical and epidemiological factors that characterize rotavirus hospitalizations in Spain using information from the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS). Using ICD-9-CM codes, we classified acute gastroenteritis (AGE) cases by principal diagnosis fields and then categorized their comorbidities, complications, and epidemiological features by secondary fields. A multivariable, logistic, step-wise regression model was then constructed. We identified 1657 ARGE cases from 17 415 cases of AGE. Rotavirus hospitalizations were associated with place of residence, age, and season (P < 0·0001), as well as with dehydration [odds ratio (OR) 12·44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·52-40·38], intravenous rehydration (OR 1·74, 95% CI 1·29-2·35), metabolic acidosis (OR 1·51, 95% CI 1·24-1·83), respiratory tract infections (RTIs) (OR 1·60, 95% CI 1·09-1·98), and concomitant AGE (OR 1·52, 95% CI 1·03-2·25). Dehydration was four times more likely in patients aged <5 years (OR 4·36, 95% CI 1·20-12·96) and was associated with acidosis when ARGE and RTI were present simultaneously (P < 0·0001). Specific co-infecting viruses may play a role in acute respiratory symptoms and aggravation of gastrointestinal manifestations of rotaviruses, thus leading to complications requiring hospitalization. PMID:27150980

  14. Rapidly Progressive Seeding of a Community Acquired Pathogen in an Immune-competent Host--End Organ Damage from Head to Bone.

    PubMed

    Torres-Miranda, Daisy; Al-Saffar, Farah; Ibrahim, Saif; Font-Diaz, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a 64-years-old male patient that presented to our hospital with a chief complaint of acute worsening of his usual chronic lower back pain, progressive weakness in lower extremities and subjective fevers at home. Spine CT failed to demonstrate any infectious foci but showed partially visualized lung cavitary lesion and renal pole abnormalities. Blood cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA). Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) showed no signs of infective endocarditis (IE). Later, the patient experienced an acute deterioration on clinical status and examination showed development of a new murmur. He also developed new hemiparesis with up-going babinski reflex. A head MRI showed multiple infarcts. MRI spine displayed osteomyelitis at T12-L1. Cerebro-spinal fluid was positive for meningitis. A transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) was performed demonstrating new severe mitral and mild tricuspid regurgitations with a definitive 1.5 cm mobile vegetation on posterior mitral leaflet. We present is a very interesting case of a rapidly progressive MSSA infection. MSSA meningitis is a rare disease; there are only few reported cases in the literature to date. We describe a case of MSSA bacteremia, of questionable source, that resulted in MSSA endocarditis affecting right and left heart in a patient who did not have a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) or immunosuppression. The case was complicated by septic emboli to systemic circulation involving the kidneys, vertebral spine (osteomyelitis), lungs and brain with consequent meningitis and stroke. Even when MSSA infections are well known, to our knowledge there are no previous case reports describing such an acute-simultaneous-manifestation of multi-end-organ failure, including meningitis and stroke. These latter are rarely reported, even individually. PMID:26434076

  15. Acute lower respiratory infections in ≥5 year -old hospitalized patients in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country: clinical characteristics and pathogenic etiology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few data exist on viral and bacterial etiology of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in ≥5 year –old persons in the tropics. Methods We conducted active surveillance of community-acquired ALRI in two hospitals in Cambodia, a low-income tropical country. Patients were tested for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) by direct sputum examination, other bacteria by blood and/or sputum cultures, and respiratory viruses using molecular techniques on nasopharyngeal/throat swabs. Pulmonologists reviewed clinical/laboratory data and interpreted chest X-rays (CXR) to confirm ALRI. Results Between April 2007 - December 2009, 1,904 patients aged ≥5 years were admitted with acute pneumonia (50.4%), lung sequelae-associated ALRI (24.3%), isolated pleural effusions (8.9%) or normal CXR-related ALRI (17.1%); 61 (3.2%) died during hospitalization. The two former diagnoses were predominantly due to bacterial etiologies while viral detection was more frequent in the two latter diagnoses. AFB-positive accounted for 25.6% of acute pneumonia. Of the positive cultures (16.8%), abscess-prone Gram-negative bacteria (39.6%) and Haemophilus influenzae (38.0%) were most frequent, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (17.7%). Of the identified viruses, the three most common viruses included rhinoviruses (49.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (17.7%) and influenza viruses (12.1%) regardless of the diagnostic groups. Wheezing was associated with viral identification (31.9% vs. 13.8%, p < 0.001) independent of age and time-to-admission. Conclusions High frequency of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae infections support the need for introduction of the respective vaccines in the national immunization program. Tuberculosis was frequent in patients with acute pneumonia, requiring further investigation. The relationship between respiratory viruses and wheezing merits further studies. PMID:23432906

  16. Surveillance of community-acquired viral infections due to respiratory viruses in Rhone-Alpes (France) during winter 1994 to 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Lina, B; Valette, M; Foray, S; Luciani, J; Stagnara, J; See, D M; Aymard, M

    1996-01-01

    Nasal swab from patients with acute flu-like illness were evaluated for the presence of respiratory viruses in the Rhone-Alpes region of France from 1 October 1994 through 2 May 1995. The relative frequencies and seasonal distributions of the specific viruses were assessed. In addition, virus type was correlated with specific clinical signs and symptoms. During the study, 962 samples were collected by 75 medical practitioners participating in the Groupe Regional d'Observation de la Grippe surveillance network. One or more viruses were detected from 348 samples (36.1%), including 108 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 64 influenza virus A type H3N2, 47 influenza virus B, 64 coronavirus, 35 rhinovirus, 22 adenovirus, 5 enterovirus, and 3 parainfluenza-fluenza strains. There were 16 mixed infections. RSV infections peaked in the early winter, and influenza viruses A and B infections peaked during the late winter and early spring. There were two peaks of coronavirus infections (late fall and late winter). Other viruses were detected at lower levels throughout the study period. Patients from whom adenovirus was isolated were significantly more likely to have a fever of > 39.5 degrees C than were patients with other detectable viruses (P < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between influenza and cough (P < 0.01) and RSV and bronchiolitis (P < .001). Thus, the current study defined the overall and relative frequencies of respiratory virus detection from nasal swab specimens in patients with an acute flu-like illness in the Rhone-Alpes region of France during a 7-month period. Correlation with clinical signs and symptoms and provisional conclusions regarding seasonality were also determined. PMID:8940439

  17. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Single-Dose Versus Weekly Dalbavancin for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Michael W.; Puttagunta, Sailaja; Giordano, Philip; Krievins, Dainis; Zelasky, Michael; Baldassarre, James

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) are a cause of significant morbidity and therapy can be a burden to the healthcare system. New antibiotics that simplify treatment and avoid hospitalization are needed. This study compared the safety and efficacy of a single intravenous infusion of 1500 mg of dalbavancin to the 2-dose regimen. Methods. This study was a randomized, double-blind trial in patients aged >18 years with ABSSSIs. Patients were randomized to dalbavancin 1500 mg either as a single intravenous (IV) infusion or 1000 mg IV on day 1 followed 1 week later by 500 mg IV. The primary endpoint was a ≥20% reduction in the area of erythema at 48–72 hours in the intent-to-treat population. Noninferiority was to be declared if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) on the difference in the outcomes was greater than −10%. Clinical outcome was also assessed at days 14 and 28. Results. Six hundred ninety-eight patients were randomized. Demographic characteristics were similar on each regimen, although there were more patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at baseline on the 2-dose regimen (36/210 [17.1%] vs 61/220 [27.7%]). Dalbavancin delivered as a single dose was noninferior to a 2-dose regimen (81.4% vs 84.2%; difference, −2.9% [95% CI, −8.5% to 2.8%]). Clinical outcomes were also similar at day 14 (84.0% vs 84.8%), day 28 (84.5% vs 85.1%), and day 14 in clinically evaluable patients with MRSA in a baseline culture (92.9% vs 95.3%) in the single- and 2-dose regimens, respectively. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 20.1% of the single-dose patients and 19.9% on the 2-dose regimen. Conclusions. A single 1500-mg infusion of dalbavancin is noninferior to a 2-dose regimen, has a similar safety profile, and removes logistical constraints related to delivery of the second dose. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02127970. PMID:26611777

  18. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Correlated to Compromised Cerebral Metabolism in Patients Suffering from Acute Bacterial Meningitis; An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, Jiri; Thelin, Eric Peter; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Glimaker, Martin; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients suffering from acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) with a decreased level of consciousness have been shown to have an improved clinical outcome if treated with an intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. By using intracranial microdialysis (MD) to monitor cerebral metabolism in combination with serum samples of biomarkers indicating brain tissue injury, S100B and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), additional information might be provided. The aim of this study was to evaluate biomarkers in serum and MD parameters in patients with ABM. Methods From a prior study on patients (n = 52) with a confirmed ABM and impaired consciousness (GCS ≤ 9, or GCS = 10 combined with lumbar spinal opening pressure > 400 mmH2O), a subgroup of patients (n = 21) monitored with intracerebral MD and biomarkers was included in the present study. All patients were treated in the NICU with intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. Serum biomarkers were obtained at admission and every 12 hours. The MD parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were analyzed. Outcome was assessed at 12–55 months after discharge from hospital. Mann-Whitney U-Test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test were applied. Results The included patients had a mean GCS of 8 (range, 3–10) on admission and increased ICP (>20 mmHg) was observed in 62% (n = 13/21) of the patients. Patients with a lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR) >40 (n = 9/21, 43%) had significantly higher peak levels of serum NSE (p = 0.03), with similar, although non-significant observations made in patients with high levels of glycerol (>500 μmol/L, p = 0.11) and those with a metabolic crisis (Glucose <0.8 mmol/L, LPR >25, p = 0.09). No associations between serum S100B and MD parameters were found. Furthermore, median MD glucose levels decreased significantly between day 1 (0–24h) and day 3 (48–72h) after admission to the NICU (p = 0.0001). No correlation between MD parameters or biomarkers and outcome was found

  19. Examination of hospital length of stay in Canada among patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Potashman, Michele H; Stokes, Michael; Liu, Jieruo; Lawrence, Robin; Harris, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Skin infections, particularly those caused by resistant pathogens, represent a clinical burden. Hospitalization associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major contributor to the economic burden of the disease. This study was conducted to provide current, real-world data on hospitalization patterns for patients with ABSSSI caused by MRSA across multiple geographic regions in Canada. Patients and methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated length of stay (LOS) for hospitalized patients with ABSSSI due to MRSA diagnosis across four Canadian geographic regions using the Discharge Abstract Database. Patients with ICD-10-CA diagnosis consistent with ABSSSI caused by MRSA between January 2008 and December 2014 were selected and assigned a primary or secondary diagnosis based on a prespecified ICD-10-CA code algorithm. Results Among 6,719 patients, 3,273 (48.7%) and 3,446 (51.3%) had a primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively. Among patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis, the cellulitis/erysipelas subtype was most common. The majority of patients presented with 0 or 1 comorbid condition; the most common comorbidity was diabetes. The mean LOS over the study period varied by geographic region and year; in 2014 (the most recent year analyzed), LOS ranged from 7.7 days in Ontario to 13.4 days in the Canadian Prairie for a primary diagnosis and from 18.2 days in Ontario to 25.2 days in Atlantic Canada for a secondary diagnosis. A secondary diagnosis was associated with higher rates of continuing care compared with a primary diagnosis (10.6%–24.2% vs 4.6%–12.1%). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the mean LOS associated with ABSSSI due to MRSA in Canada was minimally 7 days. Clinical management strategies, including medication management, which might facilitate hospital discharge, have the potential to reduce hospital LOS and related economic

  20. H1N1 influenza pneumonia and bacterial coinfection.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Robles, Alejandro; Sangil, Anna; Benet, Susana; Viladot, Maria Eugenia; Pascual, Vanesa; Barreiro, Bienvenido

    2011-12-01

    The model described by Bewick et al seems to be able to distinguish between H1N1 influenza-related pneumonia and non-H1N1 community acquired pneumonia (CAP) based on five criteria. However, bacterial infection in the influenza group has not been accurately excluded. Therefore, this model could misidentify these patients and lead to an inappropriate treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study to compare mixed pneumonia vs viral pneumonia. In the mixed pneumonia group patients were older, had higher levels of procalcitonine and higher scores of severity. In our cohort the model proposed by Bewick et al would not identify patients with coinfection. PMID:21994246

  1. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Microbiota on Brazilian Currency Note Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pereira da Fonseca, Tairacan Augusto; Pessôa, Rodrigo; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2015-10-01

    Currency notes have been implicated as a vehicle for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial population residing on banknotes is still unknown in Brazil. In this study, we aimed to investigate the overall bacterial population from 150 different Brazilian Rial (R$) notes in circulation using a culture-independent Illumina massively parallel sequencing approach of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were randomly collected from three different street markets or "feiras" in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Proteobacteria phyla, followed by Firmicutes and Streptophyta, with a total of 1193 bacterial families and 3310 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human, animal, and environmental origins. Also, our analysis revealed the presence of some potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, and Klebsiella. The results demonstrate that there is a tremendous diversity of bacterial contamination on currency notes, including organisms known to be opportunistic pathogens. One of the factors that may contribute to the richness of bacterial diversity in currency notes is personal hygiene. Thus, our results underscore the need to increase public awareness of the importance of personal hygiene of money handlers who also handle food. PMID:26506368

  2. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Acute Effects of TiO2 Nanomaterials on the Viability and Taxonomic Composition of Aquatic Bacterial Communities Assessed via High-Throughput Screening and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A.; Kelly, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  4. Acute effects of TiO2 nanomaterials on the viability and taxonomic composition of aquatic bacterial communities assessed via high-throughput screening and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A; Kelly, John J

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  5. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  6. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral®), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  7. [Community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Füri, Julia; Oestmann, Andreas; Repond, Fernand

    2016-04-13

    We report the case of a 88 years old patient with cough and new onset confusion. Delirium was caused by a necrotizing Methicillin-sensible staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy for several weeks and fall of inflammatory markers the patient died from consequences of delirium. PMID:27078731

  8. Superior in vitro activity of carbapenems over anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and some related antimicrobial agents for community-acquired MRSA but not for hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-02-01

    Eighty-eight strains of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive and -negative community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and 152 strains of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) were examined for susceptibility to carbapenems, oxacillin, and other antimicrobial agents. CA-MRSA strains were more susceptible to carbapenems (MIC(90), 1-4 microg/ml) than HA-MRSA strains (MIC(90), 32-64 microg/ml). Among the carbapenems examined, CA-MRSA strains were most susceptible to imipenem (MIC(50), 0.12 microg/ml; MIC(90), 1 microg/ml). A similar tendency was observed with oxacillin, but less markedly (MIC(90): 32 microg/ml for CA-MRSA and > or =256 microg/ml for HA-MRSA). This difference was also observed between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA in susceptibility levels to cephems, erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin, but not to ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin. The data indicate that, in terms of MIC(50) or MIC(90) values, CA-MRSA is 64-256 times more susceptible to imipenem than HA-MRSA, and for CA-MRSA, some carbapenems, e.g., imipenem, show better in vitro activity than anti-MRSA or some related agents. PMID:19280303

  9. Clinical efficacy and safety of a short regimen of azithromycin sequential therapy vs standard cefuroxime sequential therapy in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia: an international, randomized, open-label study.

    PubMed

    Kuzman, I; Daković-Rode, O; Oremus, M; Banaszak, A M

    2005-12-01

    An international, randomized, open-label, comparative study was undertaken in order to assess the efficacy and safety of azithromycin and cefuroxime, short sequential vs standard sequential therapy, respectively, in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). 180 adult patients were included in the study. 89 patients received azithromycin 500 mg intravenously (i.v.) once daily for 1-4 days followed by azithromycin 500 mg orally once daily for 3 days. 91 patients received cefuroxime 1.5 g i.v. three times daily for 1-4 days followed by cefuroxime axetil 500 mg orally twice daily for 7 days. Clinical efficacy was achieved in 67/82 (81.7%) patients treated with azithromycin, and in 73/89 (82.0%) patients treated with cefuroxime. The mean duration of total (i.v. and oral) therapy was significantly shorter for the azithromycin group than for the cefuroxime group (6.2 days vs 10.1 days). Adverse events were recorded in 38.2% of patients treated with azithromycin, and in 29.7% of patients treated with cefuroxime (p = 0.20). Shorter sequential i.v.-to-oral azithromycin therapy of patients with CAP was as effective as standard sequential i.v.-to-oral cefuroxime therapy. PMID:16433194

  10. A Rat Model of Central Venous Catheter to Study Establishment of Long-Term Bacterial Biofilm and Related Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Lebeaux, David; Decante, Benoit; Kriegel, Irene; Escande, Marie-Christine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections. PMID:22615964

  11. A randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 study to evaluate subjective and objective outcomes in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections treated with delafloxacin, linezolid or vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Jeff; Mehra, Purvi; Lawrence, Laura E.; Henry, Eugenia; Duffy, Erin; Cammarata, Sue K.; Pullman, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Delafloxacin is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone being developed to treat infections caused by Gram-positive and -negative organisms. This clinical trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of delafloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs). Methods In a double-blind, Phase 2 trial, 256 patients were randomized (1 : 1 : 1) to 300 mg of delafloxacin, 600 mg of linezolid or 15 mg/kg vancomycin (actual body weight), each administered intravenously twice daily for 5–14 days. Randomization was stratified by infection category. The primary endpoint was the investigator's assessment of cure, defined as complete resolution of baseline signs and symptoms at follow-up. Secondary endpoints included reductions in the total areas of erythema and induration and assessments of bacterial eradication. This trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01283581. Results Cure rates were significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin (mean difference: −16.3%; 95% CI, −30.3% to −2.3%; P = 0.031); differences were significant for obese patients (BMI ≥30 kg/m2; mean difference: −30.0%; 95% CI, −50.7% to −9.3%; P = 0.009), but not for non-obese patients. Cure rates with delafloxacin and linezolid were similar. Using digital measurement, the percentage decrease in total erythema area was significantly greater with delafloxacin versus vancomycin at follow-up (−96.4% versus −84.5%; P = 0.028). There were no differences in bacterial eradication among the treatment groups. The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea and vomiting. Conclusions These data show that delafloxacin is effective in the treatment of ABSSSIs and is well tolerated. PMID:26679243

  12. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  13. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  14. Comprehensive Proteomic and Metabolomic Signatures of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced Acute Otitis Media Reveal Bacterial Aerobic Respiration in an Immunosuppressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alistair; Dubois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Moseley, M Arthur; Hardison, Rachael L; Heimlich, Derek R; Stoddard, Alexander; Kerschner, Joseph E; Justice, Sheryl S; Thompson, J Will; Mason, Kevin M

    2016-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the molecular details of the interactions between bacteria and host are critical to ultimately prevent disease. Recent technological advances allow simultaneous analysis of host and bacterial protein and metabolic profiles from a single small tissue sample to provide insight into pathogenesis. We used the chinchilla model of human otitis media to determine, for the first time, the most expansive delineation of global changes in protein and metabolite profiles during an experimentally induced disease. After 48 h of infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, middle ear tissue lysates were analyzed by high-resolution quantitative two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Dynamic changes in 105 chinchilla proteins and 66 metabolites define the early proteomic and metabolomic signature of otitis media. Our studies indicate that establishment of disease coincides with actin morphogenesis, suppression of inflammatory mediators, and bacterial aerobic respiration. We validated the observed increase in the actin-remodeling complex, Arp2/3, and experimentally showed a role for Arp2/3 in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae invasion. Direct inhibition of actin branch morphology altered bacterial invasion into host epithelial cells, and is supportive of our efforts to use the information gathered to modify outcomes of disease. The twenty-eight nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae proteins identified participate in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and include cell wall-associated metabolic proteins. Quantitative characterization of the molecular signatures of infection will redefine our understanding of host response driven developmental changes during pathogenesis. These data represent the first comprehensive study of host protein and metabolite profiles in vivo in response to infection and show the feasibility of extensive characterization of host protein profiles during disease. Identification of

  15. Treatment of acute or chronic severe, intractable pain and other intractable medical problems associated with unrecognized viral or bacterial infection: Part I.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y

    1990-01-01

    In many cases of chronic intractable pain without any discernible causes, when both Western medical treatment and acupuncture treatment failed to eliminate the pain, this pain is often due to the unrecognized presence of viral or bacterial infection. Even effective anti-viral or bacterial agents often fail to eliminate or inhibit the infection, as these drugs may also fail to reach the most painful area where often unrecognizable circulatory disturbances co-exist. Using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Molecular Identification Method, we were able to localize substance P and thromboxane B2 (a good indicator of the presence and degree of circulatory disturbances) in the painful area along with virus or bacteria. Based on the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test localization method for specific substances or microbes, the author has successfully treated cases of chronic intractable pain by the combination of anti-viral or bacterial agents with either manual acupuncture, electro-acupuncture or transcutaneous electrical stimulation through a pair of surface electrodes. Among a variety of infections, the most common cause of severe intractable pain was herpes simplex virus, and the most common bacterial cause of intractable pain of moderate degree was campylobacter. In addition, chlamydia was a very common cause of mild intractable pain. When peripheral nerve fibers are hypersensitive from nerve injury due to viral infection, in addition to the drug therapy for infection, use of Vitamin B1 25 mg., 2 times a day for an average adult often accelerates recovery time. As an anti-viral agent for the herpes virus family, the author found that EPA (Omega 3 fish oil, Eicosa Pentaenoic Acid, C20:5 omega 3), at doses between 180 mg. and 350 mg (depending upon body weight) 4 times a day for 2 to 6 weeks, without prescribing the common anti-viral agent Acyclovir, often eliminated the symptoms due to viral infection including all well-known types of the herpes virus, such as herpes simplex virus

  16. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women.

    PubMed

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina; Ferry, Sven; Holm, Stig; Monsen, Tor; Lundholm, Rolf; Frimodt-Moller, Niels

    2006-05-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed by reinfection). In the placebo group the majority had E. coli at the first follow-up. PFGE showed that among these patients 96% (50/52) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 4% (2/50) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (both had persistence followed by reinfection). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI. PMID:16672406

  17. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Typing of Escherichia coli Strains from Samples Collected before and after Pivmecillinam or Placebo Treatment of Uncomplicated Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina; Ferry, Sven; Holm, Stig; Monsen, Tor; Lundholm, Rolf; Frimodt-Moller, Niels

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed by reinfection). In the placebo group the majority had E. coli at the first follow-up. PFGE showed that among these patients 96% (50/52) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 4% (2/50) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (both had persistence followed by reinfection). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI. PMID:16672406

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from patients with community-acquired pneumonia and molecular analysis of multidrug-resistant serotype 19F and 23F strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Qin, L; Watanabe, H; Yoshimine, H; Guio, H; Watanabe, K; Kawakami, K; Iwagaki, A; Nagai, H; Goto, H; Kuriyama, T; Fukuchi, Y; Matsushima, T; Kudoh, S; Shimada, K; Matsumoto, K; Nagatake, T; Mizota, T; Oishi, K

    2006-12-01

    A nationwide study was undertaken to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Japan. S. pneumoniae was isolated from 114 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia over 22 months at 20 hospitals and medical centres in different regions in Japan. All but five isolates were from sputum. Forty-eight isolates (42.1%) were susceptible, 40 (35.1%) showed intermediate resistance (MIC, 0.12-1.0 microg/ml) and 26 (22.8%) were resistant (MIC, >or=2.0 microg/ml) to penicillin G. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone (breakpoint 1 microg/ml), imipenem (4 microg/ml) and vancomycin (4 microg/ml). Most were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin; only two were resistant to levofloxacin. Differences were found in the distribution of serotypes among isolates showing susceptibility to penicillin (predominant types 3, 6B, and 19F), intermediate resistance (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and full resistance (19F and 23F). PFGE typing showed that 14 of the 25 strains of serotype 19F had a single DNA profile, pattern A, a pattern closely similar to that of the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 19F clone. Twelve pattern A strains were not susceptible to penicillin but carried the macrolide resistance gene mef(A). The DNA profiles of the 15 strains of 23F were also heterogeneous but six were highly similar (pattern b) yet distinct from the Spanish multidrug-resistant 23F clone although possibly related to the Taiwan multidrug-resistant 23F clone. The pattern b strains were not susceptible to penicillin and also harboured either mef(A) or erm(B). Our results indicate that multidrug-resistant pneumococci are spreading rapidly in Japan. Efforts to prevent the spread of the pandemic multidrug-resistant serotypes should be intensified. PMID:16650327

  19. Comparative Treatment Failure Rates of Respiratory Fluoroquinolones or β-Lactam + Macrolide Versus β-Lactam Alone in the Treatment for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adult Outpatients: An Analysis of a Nationally Representative Claims Database.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chang, Shy-Shin; Chan, Ya-Lan; Pang, Laura; Hsu, Sue-Ming; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-09-01

    No comparative effectiveness study has been conducted for the following 3 antibiotics: respiratory fluoroquinolones, β-lactam, and β-lactam + advanced macrolide. To gain insights into the real-world clinical effectiveness of these antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia in adult outpatients, our study investigated the treatment failure rates in 2 million representative participants from the National Health Informatics Project (NHIP) of Taiwan. A new-user cohort design was used to follow NHIP participants from January 2000 until December 2009. Treatment failure was defined by either one of the following events: a second antibiotic prescription, hospitalization due to CAP, an emergency department visit with a diagnosis of CAP, or 30-day nonaccident-related mortality. From 2006 to 2009, we identified 9256 newly diagnosed CAP outpatients, 1602 of whom were prescribed levofloxacin, 2100 were prescribed moxifloxacin, 5049 were prescribed β-lactam alone, and 505 were prescribed advanced macrolide + β-lactam. Compared with the β-lactam-based regimen, the propensity score-matched odds ratio for composite treatment failure was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.67-0.97) for moxifloxacin, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.90-1.35) for levofloxacin, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.67-1.35) for macrolide +β-lactam. Moxifloxacin was associated with lower treatment failure rates compared with β-lactam alone, or levofloxacin in Taiwanese CAP outpatients. However, due to inherent limitations in our claims database, more randomized controlled trials are required before coming to a conclusion on which antibiotic is more effective for Taiwanese CAP outpatients. More population-based comparative effectiveness studies are also encouraged and should be considered as an integral piece of evidence in local CAP treatment guidelines. PMID:26426664

  20. Rapid detection of amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli in fresh uncultured urine: a new tool to limit the use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy of community-acquired pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Chapelet, Guillaume; Corvec, Stéphane; Montassier, Emmanuel; Herbreteau, Guillaume; Berrut, Gilles; Batard, Eric; de Decker, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Because of the high prevalence of amoxicillin resistance among uropathogens, amoxicillin is not recommended as an empirical treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Quick detection of an amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli (ASEC) would allow prescribing amoxicillin without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment in uncomplicated pyelonephritis. To quickly diagnose UTIs due to ASEC, we developed a real-time PCR that detects in fresh uncultured urine the E. coli-specific gene yccT as well as the blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes. The ASEC rapid test was considered positive if the PCR was positive for the yccT gene but negative for blaTEM and blaCTX-M. The test was compared with culture and susceptibility testing. Among 200 patients with a suspected community-acquired UTI, 61 (30.5%) had a monobacterial UTI due to ASEC. The ASEC rapid test result was obtained in 3 h 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 12-3 h 15] and was positive for 43 patients (21.5%). Specificity and sensitivity were 97.8% (95% CI 95.8-99.8%) and 65.6% (95% CI 59.0-72.1%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 93.0% (95% CI 89.5-96.5%) and 86.6% (95% CI 81.9-91.3%), respectively. Owing to its high specificity and positive predictive value, the ASEC rapid test allows the diagnosis of UTI due to ASEC only 3 h after urine sampling. A positive ASEC rapid test may be used to treat uncomplicated pyelonephritis with amoxicillin from the start, without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment. The ASEC rapid test is a promising tool to spare fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in UTIs. PMID:27211827

  1. Relationships between periodontal disease and bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, F A; Mylotte, J M

    1996-10-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. The continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., penicillin-resistant pneumococci) suggests that bacterial pneumonia will assume increasing importance in the coming years. Thus, knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and risk factors for, bacterial pneumonia is critical to the development of strategies for prevention and treatment of these infections. Bacterial pneumonia in adults is the result of aspiration of oropharyngeal flora into the lower respiratory tract and failure of host defense mechanisms to eliminate the contaminating bacteria, which multiply in the lung and cause infection. It is recognized that community-acquired pneumonia and lung abscesses can be the result of infection by anaerobic bacteria; dental plaque would seem to be a logical source of these bacteria, especially in patients with periodontal disease. It is also possible that patients with high risk for pneumonia, such as hospitalized patients and nursing home residents, are likely to pay less attention to personal hygiene than healthy patients. One important dimension of this personal neglect may be diminished attention to oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease may promote oropharyngeal colonization by potential respiratory pathogens (PRPs) including Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, etc.), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. This paper provides the rationale for the development of this hypothesis especially as it pertains to mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients and nursing home residents, two patient groups with a high risk for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:8910830

  2. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  3. Microbial etiologies of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N

    2010-08-01

    Hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia (HABP) and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (VABP) can be caused by a wide variety of bacteria that originate from the patient flora or the health care environment. We review the medical and microbiology literature and the results of the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1997-2008) to establish the pathogens most likely to cause HABP or VABP. In all studies, a consistent 6 organisms (Staphylococcus aureus [28.0%], Pseudomonas aeruginosa [21.8%], Klebsiella species [9.8%], Escherichia coli [6.9%], Acinetobacter species [6.8%], and Enterobacter species [6.3%]) caused approximately 80% of episodes, with lower prevalences of Serratia species, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and community-acquired pathogens, such as pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae. Slight changes in the pathogen order were noted among geographic regions; Latin America had an increased incidence of nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli. In addition, VABP isolates of the same species had a mean of 5%-10% less susceptibility to frequently used extended-spectrum antimicrobials, and the rate of drug resistance among HABP and VABP pathogens has been increasing by 1% per year (2004-2008). In conclusion, the empirical treatment of HABP and VABP due to prevailing bacterial causes and emerging drug resistance has become more challenging and requires use of multidrug empirical treatment regimens for routine clinical practice. These facts have profound impact on the choices of comparison therapies to be applied in contemporary new drug clinical trials for pneumonia. PMID:20597676

  4. Neglected Bacterial Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. While many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which a broad spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. Thus, this review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis, and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  5. Potency and antimicrobial spectrum update for piperacillin/tazobactam (2000): emphasis on its activity against resistant organism populations and generally untested species causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David M; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Jones, Ronald N

    2002-05-01

    ceftazidime inhibited 100.0% of the isolates at < or = 0.25 microg/ml. These in vitro surveillance results from the year 2000 on three continents, demonstrated a sustained potent activity of piperacillin/tazobactam against selected problematic nosocomial and community-acquired pathogens. The potential importance of these findings is that this beta-lactamase inhibitor combination can be used an empiric treatment of serious infections in hospital environments where resistance has emerged, as well as covering nearly all isolates of fastidious respiratory tract pathogens acquired in the community setting. PMID:12052629

  6. First report in South America of companion animal colonization by the USA1100 clone of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST30) and by the European clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (ST71)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant staphylococci can colonize and cause diseases in companion animals. Unfortunately, few molecular studies have been carried out in Brazil and other countries with the aim of characterizing these isolates. Consequently, little is known about the potential role of companion animals in transmitting these resistant bacteria to humans. In this work we searched for mecA gene among Staphylococcus isolates obtained from nasal microbiota of 130 healthy dogs and cats attended in a veterinary clinic located in the west region of Rio de Janeiro. The isolates recovered were identified to the species level and characterized using molecular tools. Results A community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) isolate related to USA1100 (Southwest Pacific clone) and susceptible to all non-β-lactams was detected in a cat (1.7%, 1/60). Another coagulase-positive isolate harboring mecA was recovered from a dog (1.4%, 1/70) and identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) related to the European clone (ST71). The two isolates of Staphylococcus conhii subsp. urealyticus (1.4%, 1/70 dogs and 1.7%, 1/60 cats), similarly to the MRSP isolate, also presented high-level multiresistance. The majority of the methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci recovered were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (5.7%, 4/70 dogs and 6.7%, 4/60 cats) and all clustered into the same PFGE type. Conclusions This work demonstrates that mecA-harboring Staphylococcus isolates are common members of the nasal microbiota of the healthy companion animals studied (9.2%, 12/130 animals), including some high-level multiresistant isolates of S. pseudintermedius and S. conhii subsp. urealyticus. The detection, for the first time in South America, of USA1100-related CA-MRSA and of ST71 MRSP (European clone), colonizing companion animals, is of concern. Both S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus are important agents of infections for animals. The USA1100 CA

  7. Bacterial lysate (I.R.S. 19) applied intranasally in the prevention of acute respiratory diseases in children: a randomized double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Srámek, J; Josífko, M; Helcl, J; Holoubková, E; Janout, V; Kozesník, B; Macátová, I

    1986-01-01

    A controlled trial was undertaken to test I.R.S. 19 (a commercial intranasal spray) versus placebo in the prevention of acute respiratory diseases (ARD) in 825 maternity-school children in three cities; another control group of 327 children received neither I.R.S. 19 nor placebo. The spraying was done twice a day for a total of 20 spraying days in each child; sprayings were interrupted on weekends and during absence, the mean spraying period being 34 calendar days. During the 6-month study (1 November to 30 April) the children were monitored for ARD morbidity causing absence from school. A total of 1,585 such ARD cases occurred; their etiology was not investigated. The indices evaluated were: total duration of ARD-associated absence, ARD incidence, and mean duration of one illness. With the administration schedule used, I.R.S. 19 did not, in an overall evaluation, surpass placebo in any of these indices in either normal children or a subgroup of children with presumed enhanced ARD susceptibility. PMID:3805711

  8. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  9. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of faropenem daloxate and cefuroxime axetil for the treatment of acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Ralf; Berg, Olof; Gehanno, Pierre; Leiberman, Alberto; Martinkenas, Jonas Laimutis; Nikolaidis, Paul; Arvis, Pierre; Alefelder, Melody; Reimnitz, Peter

    2003-04-01

    In this multicentre, multinational, comparative, double-blind clinical trial, outpatients with both clinical signs and symptoms and radiographic evidence of acute sinusitis were randomly assigned to receive for 7 days either a twice-daily oral regimen of faropenem daloxate (300 mg) or a twice daily oral regimen of cefuroxime axetil (250 mg). Among 452 patients considered valid for clinical efficacy, faropenem daloxate treatment was found to be statistically equivalent to cefuroxime axetil (89.0% vs. 88.4%-95% CI=-5.2%; +6.4%) at the 7-16 days post-therapy assessment. At 28-35 days post-therapy, the continued clinical cure rate in the faropenem daloxate group was 92.6% and that for the cefuroxime axetil group was 94.9% (95% CI: -6.8%; +1.2%). A total of 148 organisms was obtained in 136 microbiologically valid patients (30.1%). The predominant causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (47.1%), Haemophilus influenzae (30.1%), Staphylococcus aureus (14.7%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (8.8%). The bacteriological success rate at the 7-16 days post-therapy evaluation was similar in both treatment groups: 91.5% and 90.8% in the faropenem daloxate and cefuroxime axetil groups, respectively (95% CI=-9.2%; +9.5%). Eradication or presumed eradication was detected for 97.3% and 96.3% of S. pneumoniae, 85.0% and 90.5% of H. influenzae, 88.9% and 90.9% of S. aureus and 100.0% and 83.3% of M. catarrhalis in faropenem daloxate and cefuroxime axetil recipients, respectively. At least one drug-related event was reported by 9.5% of the faropenem daloxate-treated patients and by 10.3% of those who received cefuroxime axetil. The most frequently reported drug-related events were diarrhoea (2.2% versus 2.9%), nausea/vomiting (1.5% vs. 0.7%), abdominal pain (0.7% vs 1.5%) and skin reactions (1.5% vs. 1.1%). Overall, faropenem daloxate was at least as effective clinically and bacteriologically as cefuroxime axetil and was well tolerated. PMID:12709801

  10. Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Dowd, Scot E.; Wise, Andy; Kedia, Sapna; Vohra, Varun; Banerjee, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Public fitness centers and exercise facilities have been implicated as possible sources for transmitting community-acquired bacterial infections. However, the overall diversity of the bacterial community residing on the surfaces in these indoor environments is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the overall bacterial ecology of selected fitness centers in a metropolitan area (Memphis, TN, USA) utilizing culture-independent pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from the skin-contact surfaces (e.g., exercise instruments, floor mats, handrails, etc.) within fitness centers. Taxonomical composition revealed the abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacter and Actinobacteria, with a total of 17 bacterial families and 25 bacterial genera. Most of these bacterial genera are of human and environmental origin (including, air, dust, soil, and water). Additionally, we found the presence of some pathogenic or potential pathogenic bacterial genera including Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Klebsiella, and Micrococcus. Staphylococcus was found to be the most prevalent genus. Presence of viable forms of these pathogens elevates risk of exposure of any susceptible individuals. Several factors (including personal hygiene, surface cleaning and disinfection schedules of the facilities) may be the reasons for the rich bacterial diversity found in this study. The current finding underscores the need to increase public awareness on the importance of personal hygiene and sanitation for public gym users. PMID:25479039

  11. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  12. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II, Multicenter Study Evaluating the Safety/Tolerability and Efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a Novel Fluoroquinolone, Compared with Linezolid for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Paul; Davenport, J. Michael; Andrae, David; O'Riordan, William; Liverman, Lisa; McIntyre, Gail; Almenoff, June

    2011-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a fluoroquinolone with broad coverage including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A double-blind, multicenter, phase II noninferiority study treated 161 patients for 7 to 14 days, testing the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 (250 mg, twice a day [BID]) versus linezolid (600 mg, BID) in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). The prespecified criterion for noninferiority was 15%. Primary intent-to-treat analysis was unable to declare noninferiority, as the risk difference lower bound of the 95% confidence interval between treatments was 19% at 36 to 84 h postrandomization for the composite end point of lesion assessment and temperature. Prespecified clinical cure rates 2 to 14 days after completion of therapy were similar (83.1% for JNJ-Q2 versus 82.1% for linezolid). Post hoc analyses revealed that JNJ-Q2 was statistically noninferior to linezolid (61.4% versus 57.7%, respectively; P = 0.024) based on the 2010 FDA guidance, which defines treatment success as lack of lesion spread and afebrile status within 48 to 72 h postrandomization. Despite evidence of systemic disease, <5% of patients presented with fever, suggesting fever is not a compelling surrogate measure of systemic disease resolution for this indication. Nausea and vomiting were the most common adverse events. Of the patients, 86% (104/121) had S. aureus isolated from the infection site; 63% of these were MRSA. The results suggest JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment for ABSSSI, demonstrating (i) efficacy for early clinical response (i.e., lack of spread of lesions and absence of fever at 48 to 72 h), and (ii) cure rates for ABSSSI pathogens (especially MRSA) co