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Sample records for acute dermal ld50

  1. [Acute toxicity testing (LD50) of Chinese mineral drugs].

    PubMed

    Yue, W; Liu, W H; Wang, L F; Fu, S X; Li, Y S; Kong, Z K; Tang, Z X; Chen, Z L

    1989-02-01

    Acute toxicity and LD50 of 62 mineral drugs were determined by ig, ip or iv in mice, in order to provide some guidelines for safety in clinical use, as well as for pharmacological and toxicological studies. In the present investigation, the difference in the acute toxicity and LD50 between raw drugs and medicines prepared by roasting is explained. PMID:2506896

  2. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg. PMID:27461039

  3. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo. PMID:23246604

  4. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts. PMID:11695884

  5. Assessment of acute oral and dermal toxicity of 2 ethyl-carbamates with activity against Rhipicephalus microplus in rats.

    PubMed

    Prado-Ochoa, María Guadalupe; Gutiérrez-Amezquita, Ricardo Alfonso; Abrego-Reyes, Víctor Hugo; Velázquez-Sánchez, Ana María; Muñoz-Guzmán, Marco Antonio; Ramírez-Noguera, Patricia; Angeles, Enrique; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The acute oral and dermal toxicity of two new ethyl-carbamates (ethyl-4-bromophenyl-carbamate and ethyl-4-chlorophenyl-carbamate) with ixodicide activity was determined in rats. The oral LD50 of each carbamate was 300 to 2000 mg/kg, and the dermal LD50 of each carbamate was >5000 mg/kg. Clinically, the surviving rats that had received oral doses of each carbamate showed decreased weight gain (P < 0.05) and had slight nervous system manifestations. These clinical signs were evident from the 300 mg/kg dose and were reversible, whereas the 2000 mg/kg dose caused severe damage and either caused their death or was motive for euthanasia. At necropsy, these rats had dilated stomachs and cecums with diffuse congestion, as well as moderate congestion of the liver. Histologically, the liver showed slight degenerative lesions, binucleated hepatocytes, focal coagulative necrosis, and congestion areas; the severity of the lesions increased with dosage. Furthermore, an slight increase in gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine was observed in the plasma. The dermal application of the maximum dose (5000 mg/kg) of each carbamate did not cause clinical manifestations or liver and skin alterations. This finding demonstrates that the carbamates under study have a low oral hazard and low acute dermal toxicity. PMID:24883331

  6. Assessment of Acute Oral and Dermal Toxicity of 2 Ethyl-Carbamates with Activity against Rhipicephalus microplus in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Ochoa, María Guadalupe; Gutiérrez-Amezquita, Ricardo Alfonso; Abrego-Reyes, Víctor Hugo; Velázquez-Sánchez, Ana María; Muñoz-Guzmán, Marco Antonio; Ramírez-Noguera, Patricia; Angeles, Enrique; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The acute oral and dermal toxicity of two new ethyl-carbamates (ethyl-4-bromophenyl-carbamate and ethyl-4-chlorophenyl-carbamate) with ixodicide activity was determined in rats. The oral LD50 of each carbamate was 300 to 2000 mg/kg, and the dermal LD50 of each carbamate was >5000 mg/kg. Clinically, the surviving rats that had received oral doses of each carbamate showed decreased weight gain (P < 0.05) and had slight nervous system manifestations. These clinical signs were evident from the 300 mg/kg dose and were reversible, whereas the 2000 mg/kg dose caused severe damage and either caused their death or was motive for euthanasia. At necropsy, these rats had dilated stomachs and cecums with diffuse congestion, as well as moderate congestion of the liver. Histologically, the liver showed slight degenerative lesions, binucleated hepatocytes, focal coagulative necrosis, and congestion areas; the severity of the lesions increased with dosage. Furthermore, an slight increase in gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine was observed in the plasma. The dermal application of the maximum dose (5000 mg/kg) of each carbamate did not cause clinical manifestations or liver and skin alterations. This finding demonstrates that the carbamates under study have a low oral hazard and low acute dermal toxicity. PMID:24883331

  7. Acute oral, dermal, and inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    Thomann, P; Krüger, L

    1975-01-01

    By appropriate testing procedures, it has been demonstrated that the compounds used as fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) have a very low order of systemic toxicity in acute experiments. No evidence of dermal toxicity has been found. The full chemical names of the fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) investigated in this study are listed below. They have been numbered for easy identification and classified by chemical groups. PMID:1064537

  8. The Use of Dermal Substitutes in Burn Surgery: Acute Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Anna, Arno; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are increasingly becoming an essential part of the burn care strategy. During the acute phase of burn treatment, dermal substitutes improve functional and cosmetic results long-term and thus increase quality of life. In the chronic wound setting, dermal substitutes are used to reconstruct and improve burn scars and other defects. Despite some successes in the use of dermal substitutes there are more needs and requirements to further improve outcomes and hence further research is required not only to strengthen scientific evidence regarding their effects but also to develop new technology and products. Dermal substitutes also emerge as pivotal research strategies to develop adequate scaffolds for stem cells, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications to obtain long-lasting and scarless artificial skin. This review discusses status-quo of dermal substitutes and novel strategies in the use of dermal substitutes with a focus on burn care. PMID:24393152

  9. An LD50 model for predicting psychotropic drug toxicity using biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-Torrelo, C; Sagrado-Vives, S; Villanueva-Camañas, R M; Medina-Hernández, M J

    2001-02-01

    The LD50 determination is the main way to measure the acute toxicity of all types of substances. At the present time, however, there is increasing opposition to the use of living animals in research and testing activities from animal rights groups as well as some scientists. Nevertheless, the need to have a tool for estimating the potential toxicity of new compounds for human consumption has encouraged the development of alternative methods. Under adequate conditions, the partitioning in micellar liquid chromatography can describe the drug biopartitioning. We have named this chromatographic system biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC). In this paper, an LD50 QRAR model developed for psychotropic drugs from their retention data in BMC, is described. The model's ability to predict new psychotropic drug toxicity is statistically proved. PMID:11180298

  10. Acute and subchronic dermal toxicity of nanosilver in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Korani, M; Rezayat, SM; Gilani, K; Bidgoli, S Arbabi; Adeli, S

    2011-01-01

    Silver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for a long time in different forms, but silver nanoparticles (nanosilver) have recently been recognized as potent antimicrobial agents. Although nanosilver is finding diverse medical applications such as silver-based dressings and silver-coated medical devices, its dermal and systemic toxicity via dermal use has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the potential toxicity of colloidal nanosilver in acute and subchronic guinea pigs. Before toxicity assessments, the size of colloidal nanosilver was recorded in sizes <100 nm by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. For toxicological assessments, male guinea pigs weighing 350 to 400 g were exposed to two different concentrations of nanosilver (1000 and 10,000 μg/mL) in an acute study and three concentrations of nanosilver (100, 1000, and 10,000 μg/mL) in a subchronic study. Toxic responses were assessed by clinical and histopathologic parameters. In all experimental animals the sites of exposure were scored for any type of dermal toxicity and compared with negative control and positive control groups. In autopsy studies during the acute test, no significant changes in organ weight or major macroscopic changes were detected, but dose-dependent histopathologic abnormalities were seen in skin, liver, and spleen of all test groups. In addition, experimental animals subjected to subchronic tests showed greater tissue abnormalities than the subjects of acute tests. It seems that colloidal nanosilver has the potential to provide target organ toxicities in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PMID:21720498

  11. The LD50 associated with exposure to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Fujita, S; Kato, H; Schull, W J

    1991-03-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to estimate the distance at which 50% of the individuals exposed to the A-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki died, ostensibly from their exposure to ionizing radiation. It is difficult to convert most of these distance estimates to a dose-related LD50, since radiation shielding was ignored. The recent reassessment of the atomic bomb radiation dosimetry has provided an opportunity for the estimation of the bone marrow LD50. There is a surprising concordance in the various estimates that have been made given the different groups of survivors involved and the methods used to estimate the LD50/60. PMID:1762100

  12. Acute concentrated phenol dermal burns: Complications and management.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Tapan Jayantilal

    2015-05-01

    Phenol burns can result in multiple organ failure. This is a case report of acute severe phenol dermal burn after accidental splash of 94% phenol on 35-year-old patient's body who was brought to hospital after 90 min of exposure. Decontamination was done with high-density water and glycerol. Early complications in form of metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure required hemodialysis. Extensive protein denaturation was managed with IV albumin and high protein diet. Patient also developed pleural effusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome, but these were successfully managed by intercostal drain tube insertion and noninvasive ventilation. The patient survived after multiple organ failures and widespread burns despite the fact that it has been observed that outcome of phenol burns with >60(2) inches of skin affected or two or more organs failure involving renal system is nearly fatal. PMID:25983436

  13. Acute dermal toxicity of guanidine hydrochloride in rabbits. Report for 18 May-1 August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.F.; Sanso, S.K.; Korte, D.W.

    1989-12-01

    The acute dermal toxicity of guanidine hydrochloride was evaluated in five male and five female New Zealand White rabbits. Guanidine hydrochloride (2 g/kg) was applied topically to the clipped dorsal skin surface for 24 hours. No compound-related deaths or clinical signs were observed; however, guanidine hydrochloride did produce dermal irritation, necrosis, and eschar formation under conditions of the study.

  14. LD50 and repellent effects of essential oils from Argentinian wild plant species on Varroa destructor.

    PubMed

    Ruffinengo, Sergio; Eguaras, Martin; Floris, Ignazio; Faverin, Claudia; Bailac, Pedro; Ponzi, Marta

    2005-06-01

    The repellent and acaricidal effects of some essential oils from the most typical wild plant species of northern Patagonia, Argentina, on Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman were evaluated using a complete exposure test. Honey bees, Apis mellifera L., and mites (five specimens of each per dish) were introduced in petri dishes having different oil concentrations (from 0.1 to 25 micro per cage). Survival of bees and mites was registered after 24, 48, and 72 h. An attraction/repellence test was performed using a wax tube impregnated with essential oil and another tube containing wax only. The lowest LD50 values for mites were registered for Acantholippia seriphioides (A. Gray) Mold. (1.27 microl per cage) and Schinus molle L. (2.65 microl per cage) after 24 h, and for Wedelia glauca (Ortega) O. Hoffm. ex Hicken (0.59 microl per cage) and A. seriphioides (1.09 microl per cage) after 72 h of treatment. The oil with the highest selectivity ratio (A. mellifera LD50/V. destructor LD50) was the one extracted from S. molle (>16). Oils of Lippia junelliana (Mold.) Troncoso, Minthostachys mollis (HBK) Grieseb., and Lippia turbinata Grieseb. mixed with wax had repellent properties. None of the oils tested had attractive effects on Varroa mites. PMID:16022288

  15. Acute oral and percutaneous toxicity of pesticides to mallards: Correlations with mammalian toxicity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, R.H.; Haegele, M.A.; Tucker, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Acute oral (po) and 24-hr percutaneous (perc) LD50 values for 21 common pesticides (19 anticholinesterases, of which 18 were organophosphates, and one was a carbamate; one was an organochlorine central nervous system stimulant; and one was an organonitrogen pneumotoxicant) were determined in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Three of the pesticides tested were more toxic percutaneously than orally. An index to the percutaneous hazard of a pesticide, the dermal toxicity index (DTI = po LD50/perc LD50 ? 100), was also calculated for each pesticide. These toxicity values in mallards were compared with toxicity data for rats from the literature. Significant positive correlations were found between log po and log percutaneous LD50 values in mallards (r = 0.65, p 0.10). Variations in percutaneous methodologies are discussed with reference to interspecies variation in toxicity values. It is recommended that a mammalian DTI value approaching 30 be used as a guideline for the initiation of percutaneous toxicity studies in birds, when the po LD50 and/or projected percutaneous LD50 are less than expected field exposure levels.

  16. Estimation of ED50 or LD50 using a programmable pocket calculator.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S C; Jain, D K; Gupta, C K

    1991-01-01

    A program is developed for estimation of median effective dose (ED50 or LD50), using the hand-held programmable pocket calculator HP41CV. The well-known Finney's algorithm of probit analysis is used. Input of data is simple, but is restricted to a maximum of 15 groups. The program structure makes use of the technique of indirect addressing for storage, and statistical register manipulation for weighted regression. The ability of the calculator to give sufficiently precise results can be exploited in other similar situations. PMID:1914446

  17. Emerging toxicity of 5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane (MDAI): Pharmacokinetics, behaviour, thermoregulation and LD50 in rats.

    PubMed

    Páleníček, Tomáš; Lhotková, Eva; Žídková, Monika; Balíková, Marie; Kuchař, Martin; Himl, Michal; Mikšátková, Petra; Čegan, Martin; Valeš, Karel; Tylš, Filip; Horsley, Rachel R

    2016-08-01

    MDAI (5,6-Methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane) has a reputation as a non-neurotoxic ecstasy replacement amongst recreational users, however the drug has been implicated in some severe and lethal intoxications. Due to this, and the fact that the drug is almost unexplored scientifically we investigated a broad range of effects of acute MDAI administration: pharmacokinetics (in sera, brain, liver and lung); behaviour (open field; prepulse inhibition, PPI); acute effects on thermoregulation (in group-/individually-housed rats); and systemic toxicity (median lethal dose, LD50) in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics of MDAI was rapid, maximum median concentration in serum and brain was attained 30min and almost returned to zero 6h after subcutaneous (sc.) administration of 10mg/kg MDAI; brain/serum ratio was ~4. MDAI particularly accumulated in lung tissue. In the open field, MDAI (5, 10, 20 and 40mg/kg sc.) increased exploratory activity, induced signs of behavioural serotonin syndrome and reduced locomotor habituation, although by 60min some effects had diminished. All doses of MDAI significantly disrupted PPI and the effect was present during the onset of its action as well as 60min after treatment. Unexpectedly, 40mg/kg MDAI killed 90% of animals in the first behavioural test, hence LD50 tests were conducted which yielded 28.33mg/kg sc. and 35mg/kg intravenous but was not established up to 40mg/kg after gastric administration. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) with brain oedema was concluded as a direct cause of death in sc. treated animals. Finally, MDAI (10, 20mg/kg sc.) caused hyperthermia and perspiration in group-housed rats. In conclusion, the drug had fast pharmacokinetics and accumulated in lipohilic tissues. Behavioural findings were consistent with mild, transient stimulation with anxiolysis and disruption of sensorimotor processing. Together with hyperthermia, the drug had a similar profile to related entactogens, especially 3

  18. Serum Profiling of Rat Dermal Exposure to JP-8 Fuel Reveals an Acute-Phase Response.

    PubMed

    Larabee, Jason L; Hocker, James R; Cheung, John Y; Gallucci, Randle M; Hanas, Jay S

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dermal exposure to JP-8 petroleum jet fuel leads to toxicological responses in humans and rodents. Serum profiling is a molecular analysis of changes in the levels of serum proteins and other molecules in response to changes in physiology. This present study utilizes serum profiling approaches to examine biomolecular changes in the sera of rats exposed to dermal applications of JP-8 (jet propulsion fuel-8). Using gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS), levels of serum proteins as well as low-mass constituents were found to change after dermal exposures to JP-8. The serum protein levels altered included the acute-phase response proteins haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, alpha(1)-inhibitor III, and apolipoprotein A-IV. Haptoglobin levels increased after a 1-day JP-8 dermal exposure and continued to increase through 7 days of exposure. Ceruloplasmin levels increased after 5 days of exposure. Serum alpha(1)-inhibitor III was reduced after a 1-day exposure and the depletion continued after 7 days of exposure. Apolipoprotein A-IV increased after a 1-day exposure and then returned to basal levels after 3- and 5-day exposures of JP-8. Levels of the acute-phase protein alpha(2)-macroglobulin were found to not vary over these time course studies. Using ESI-MS analysis directly on the sera from rats exposed to dermal JP-8, low-mass sera constituents were found to correlate with control (acetone) or JP-8 exposure. PMID:20020890

  19. Molecular characterization and LD(50) identify virulent isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis from adult sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herndona, B L; Bialkowska-Hobrzanska, H; Dall, L

    2000-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis plays an important role in infections of patients with implanted prosthetic devices. The exact clinical significance of recovered S. epidermidis from clinical specimens is difficult to assess, as they are inhabitants of the normal skin. In this study, 11 adults with clinical sepsis and blood cultures that grew only S. epidermidis were the host population. Bacterial virulence in vivo was determined by using the mouse LD(50) assay where the intravenous lethality was determined for each patient isolate. Bacterial dose (CFU x 10(9)) that produced lethality in 50% of the animals at 12 h was the value used for comparison. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used for identification of individual strains and their clonal organization. Confirmation of species assignment was done by RFLP analysis of 16S + 23S rRNA gene regions (ribotyping). Plasmid profile analysis was also conducted. Four of 11 blood isolates from adults with S. epidermidis sepsis had indistinguishable or closely related DNA patterns and were considered clone A. The same clone was previously seen to account for the majority of sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit. There were significant differences in virulence characteristics of the S. epidermidis isolates. Clone A isolates produced lethality by LD(50) in mice at a dose averaging 2.35; clone B isolate at a dose of 2.54, and the remaining isolates, representing six distinct clones, were lethal to mice at significantly larger doses (3.51-5.17, average 4.16). These data suggest that individual clones of S. epidermidis isolated from septic adults have detectable differences in virulence as defined by an animal bioassay, and the more virulent clone is widespread. PMID:10705046

  20. Dextran sulfate sodium-induced acute colitis impairs dermal lymphatic function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agollah, Germaine D; Wu, Grace; Peng, Ho-Lan; Kwon, Sunkuk

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether dermal lymphatic function and architecture are systemically altered in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced acute colitis. METHODS: Balb/c mice were administered 4% DSS in lieu of drinking water ad libitum for 7 d and monitored to assess disease activity including body weight, diarrhea severity, and fecal bleeding. Control mice received standard drinking water with no DSS. Changes in mesenteric lymphatics were assessed following oral administration of a fluorescently-labelled fatty acid analogue, while dermal lymphatic function and architecture was longitudinally characterized using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging following intradermal injection of indocyanine green (ICG) at the base of the tail or to the dorsal aspect of the left paw prior to, 4, and 7 d after DSS administration. We also measured dye clearance rate after injection of Alexa680-bovine serum albumin (BSA). NIRF imaging data was analyzed to reveal lymphatic contractile activity after selecting fixed regions of interest (ROIs) of the same size in fluorescent lymphatic vessels on fluorescence images. The averaged fluorescence intensity within the ROI of each fluorescence image was plotted as a function of imaging time and the lymphatic contraction frequency was computed by assessing the number of fluorescent pulses arriving at a ROI. RESULTS: Mice treated with DSS developed acute inflammation with clinical symptoms of loss of body weight, loose feces/watery diarrhea, and fecal blood, all of which were aggravated as disease progressed to 7 d. Histological examination of colons of DSS-treated mice confirmed acute inflammation, characterized by segmental to complete loss of colonic mucosa with an associated chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate that extended into the deeper layers of the wall of the colon, compared to control mice. In situ intravital imaging revealed that mice with acute colitis showed significantly fewer fluorescent mesenteric lymphatic vessels

  1. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos. PMID:24929227

  2. 77 FR 43089 - Evaluation of an Up-and-Down Procedure for Acute Dermal Systemic Toxicity Testing: Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... (NICEATM), in collaboration with the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative... validation status of an up-and-down procedure (UDP) for acute dermal systemic toxicity testing. NICEATM... Panel and made available to the public. The Panel will meet in public session to review the...

  3. Improving reptile ecological risk assessment: oral and dermal toxicity of pesticides to a common lizard species (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Yu, Shuangying; Talent, Larry G; Maul, Jonathan D; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Reptiles have been understudied in ecotoxicology, which limits consideration in ecological risk assessments. The goals of the present study were 3-fold: to improve oral and dermal dosing methodologies for reptiles, to generate reptile toxicity data for pesticides, and to correlate reptile and avian toxicity. The authors first assessed the toxicity of different dosing vehicles: 100 μL of water, propylene glycol, and acetone were not toxic. The authors then assessed the oral and dermal toxicity of 4 pesticides following the up-and-down procedure. Neither brodifacoum nor chlorothalonil caused mortality at doses ≤ 1750 μg/g. Under the "neat pesticide" oral exposure, endosulfan (median lethal dose [LD50] = 9.8 μg/g) was more toxic than λ-cyhalothrin (LD50 = 916.5 μg/g). Neither chemical was toxic via dermal exposure. An acetone dosing vehicle increased λ-cyhalothrin toxicity (oral LD50 = 9.8 μg/g; dermal LD50 = 17.5 μg/g), but not endosulfan. Finally, changes in dosing method and husbandry significantly increased dermal λ-cyhalothrin LD50s, which highlights the importance of standardized methods. The authors combined data from the present study with other reptile LD50s to correlate with available avian data. When only definitive LD50s were used in the analysis, a strong correlation was found between avian and reptile toxicity. The results suggest it is possible to build predictive relationships between avian and reptile LD50s. More research is needed, however, to understand trends associated with chemical classes and modes of action. PMID:25760295

  4. QSAR modeling of acute toxicity on mammals caused by aromatic compounds: the case study using oral LD50 for rats.

    PubMed

    Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Kusić, Hrvoje; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Koprivanac, Natalija

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the study was to predict toxicity in vivo caused by aromatic compounds structured with a single benzene ring and the presence or absence of different substituent groups such as hydroxyl-, nitro-, amino-, methyl-, methoxy-, etc., by using QSAR/QSPR tools. A Genetic Algorithm and multiple regression analysis were applied to select the descriptors and to generate the correlation models. The most predictive model is shown to be the 3-variable model which also has a good ratio of the number of descriptors and their predictive ability to avoid overfitting. The main contributions to the toxicity were shown to be the polarizability weighted MATS2p and the number of certain groups C-026 descriptors. The GA-MLRA approach showed good results in this study, which allows the building of a simple, interpretable and transparent model that can be used for future studies of predicting toxicity of organic compounds to mammals. PMID:21491673

  5. Safety of Pochonia chlamydosporia var catenulata in acute oral and dermal toxicity/pathogenicity evaluations in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    García, Liseth; Bulnes, Carlos; Melchor, Gleiby; Vega, Ernesto; Ileana, Miranda; de Oca, Nivian Montes; Hidalgo, Leopoldo; Marrero, Eva

    2004-10-01

    The nematophagous fungus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulata (Kamyschlco ex Barron & Onions) Zare & W-Gams, was investigated as a potential biocontrol agent in integrated pest management strategy for Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood in vegetable crops in Cuba. An acute oral and dermal toxicity/patogenicity study was performed to determine the safety of this fungus in non-target organisms. In the first study, a 1-dose level of 5 x 10(8) units of the microbial pest control agent/treated rat was used. Mortality or clinical signs were not evident and no adverse effects on body weight, hematology, microbiology and gross or microscopic pathology were observed. Food and water consumption was not significantly different between control and treated groups. In the acute dermal toxicity study, there was neither mortality nor clinical signs of toxicity, and no toxic effects in gross and microscopic pathology were detected. Thus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulate (Vcc-108, IMI SD 187), administered oral and dermally to rats and rabbits respectively, was safe in toxicity/pathogenicity studies. PMID:15487645

  6. Acute and subacute dermal toxicity of Break-Free CLP: a weapons cleaning and maintenance compound.

    PubMed

    Arfsten, D P; Johnson, E W; Thitoff, A R; Jung, A E; Still, K R; Brinkley, W W; Schaeffer, D J; Jederberg, W W; Bobb, A J

    2005-01-01

    Break-Free CLP((R)) is a commercial cleaning, lubricating and preserving compound used in both the military and civilian sectors for maintenance of small- and large-caliber weapons. Like many commercial mixtures, there is very little information available on the toxicity of Break-Free CLP. Studies were conducted to characterize the biological effects of single or repeat dermal application of Break-Free CLP to the clipped backs of CD-1 mice. Break-Free CLP was applied neat, 50 microl three times of week for up to 2 weeks. Foci of epithelial ulceration were observed in skin sections from 22% of Break-Free CLP-treated animals in conjunction with markedly thickened epithelium suggesting that robust epithelial regeneration was occurring in these animals. Skin histopathology of Break-Free CLP-treated animals closely matched the histopathology from mice treated repeatedly with 2% croton oil in acetone (dermal irritation positive control). Serum alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly (P < 0.05) lower for mice treated with Break-Free CLP, 2% croton oil or 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) compared with negative and vehicle control mice. Skin nitric oxide (NO) levels were not significantly elevated for mice treated with Break-Free CLP but were significantly elevated for mice treated with dermal irritation positive control compound DMBA. The cumulative skin changes in Break-Free CLP-treated animals support conducting a subchronic dermal application study. The observed decreases in serum alkaline phosphatase activity suggest that future studies should include the liver and bone as possible target organs. Additionally, dermal penetration studies could provide key health risk assessment information for characterizing the potential health risks associated with chronic dermal exposure to Break-Free CLP. PMID:16025432

  7. Acute oral toxicity test of chemical compounds in silkworms.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimihito; Nishida, Satoshi; Sugita, Takuya; Ueki, Takuro; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Okumura, Hidenobu; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    This study performed an acute oral toxicity test of 59 compounds in silkworms. These compounds are listed in OECD guidelines as standard substances for a cytotoxicity test, and median lethal dose (LD(50)) werecalculated for each compound. Acute oral LD(50) values in mammals are listed in OECD guidelines and acute oral LD(50) values in silkworms were determined in this study. R(2) for the correlation between LD(50) values in mammals and LD(50) values in silkworms was 0.66. In addition, the acute oral toxicity test in silkworms was performed by two different facilities, and test results from the facilities were highly reproducible. These findings suggest that an acute oral toxicity test in silkworms is a useful way to evaluate the toxicity of compounds in mammals. PMID:26971557

  8. Sensitivity of species to chemicals: dose-response characteristics for various test types (LC(50), LR(50) and LD(50)) and modes of action.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, A Jan; Awkerman, Jill A; de Zwart, Dick; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-11-01

    While variable sensitivity of model species to common toxicants has been addressed in previous studies, a systematic analysis of inter-species variability for different test types, modes of action and species is as of yet lacking. Hence, the aim of the present study was to identify similarities and differences in contaminant levels affecting cold-blooded and warm-blooded species administered via different routes. To that end, data on lethal water concentrations LC50, tissue residues LR50 and oral doses LD50 were collected from databases, each representing the largest of its kind. LC50 data were multiplied by a bioconcentration factor (BCF) to convert them to internal concentrations that allow for comparison among species. For each endpoint data set, we calculated the mean and standard deviation of species' lethal level per compound. Next, the means and standard deviations were averaged by mode of action. Both the means and standard deviations calculated depended on the number of species tested, which is at odds with quality standard setting procedures. Means calculated from (BCF) LC50, LR50 and LD50 were largely similar, suggesting that different administration routes roughly yield similar internal levels. Levels for compounds interfering biochemically with elementary life processes were about one order of magnitude below that of narcotics disturbing membranes, and neurotoxic pesticides and dioxins induced death in even lower amounts. Standard deviations for LD50 data were similar across modes of action, while variability of LC50 values was lower for narcotics than for substances with a specific mode of action. The study indicates several directions to go for efficient use of available data in risk assessment and reduction of species testing. PMID:23932508

  9. Potential of the insect growth regulator, fluazuron, in the control of Rhipicephalus sanguineus nymphs (Latreille, 1806) (Acari: Ixodidae): determination of the LD95 and LD50.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Calligaris, Izabela Braggião; Roma, Gislaine Cristina; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Pizano, Marcos Aparecido; Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2012-05-01

    Conventional pesticides have suffered two main drawbacks: (a) broad spectrum of action and (b) selection of target species resistant to the different active ingredients. Thus compounds that are less harmful to the environment and to human health, more specific and that do not induce resistance need to be developed. One alternative are insect growth regulators, such as fluazuron. The present study examined the efficacy of fluazuron (active ingredient of the acaricide Acatak®) and the sensitivity of Rhipicephalus sanguineus nymphs exposed to different doses of this chemical, and determined the lethal doses of fluazuron: 95% - LD(95) and 50% - LD(50). Different doses of fluazuron were applied in duplicates on the dorsal region of hosts ("pour on"). Distilled water was used in the control group. On the first day after the treatment with fluazuron, hosts were artificially infested with R. sanguineus nymphs. After engorgement, nymphs were removed, placed on Petri dishes, identified, and maintained in BOD incubator for 15days. Dead R. sanguineus nymphs after the treatment with 13 different doses of fluazuron were quantified and the LD(95) was estimated to be 100mg/kg and LD(50), 19.544mg/kg (12.478-22.636), with a confidence interval of 95%. Nymphs of R. sanguineus were sensitive to fluazuron at various levels, indicating that this insect growth regulator (IGR) may be used to control this parasite in this stage of its biological cycle, reducing the significant damage it causes. PMID:22465612

  10. Acute and environmental toxicity studies with hexazinone

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, G.L. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    The acute toxicity of hexazinone, a herbicide intended for general noncropland areas and selected crop uses (alfalfa and sugarcane), has been evaluated to establish proper handling guidelines and to measure its potential impact on the environment. The material is slightly to moderately toxic when given as a single oral dose; its LD50 in male rats is 1690 mg/kg, in male guinea pigs 860 mg/kg, and in male dogs greater than 3400 mg/kg although in the dog emesis prevented accurate quantitation. When the material is administered intraperitoneally, the LD50 in rats is 530 mg/kg. In both studies, no gross or histologic alterations were apparent. Hexazinone is a moderate to severe eye irritant in the rabbit and produced only mild erythema in rabbit skin at 5278 mg/kg, a dose which did not produce lethality or other clinical signs. Subchronic dermal exposures (10 consecutive doses) to rabbits produced increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase at the highest levels tested (680 and 770 mg/kg in two separate experiments) with no effects seen at 150 mg/kg. One-hour inhalation exposure of up to 7.48 mg/liter did not produce mortality in rats.

  11. Acute and environmental toxicity studies with hexazinone.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, G L

    1984-08-01

    The acute toxicity of hexazinone, a herbicide intended for general noncropland areas and selected crop uses (alfalfa and sugarcane), has been evaluated to establish proper handling guidelines and to measure its potential impact on the environment. The material is slightly to moderately toxic when given as a single oral dose; its LD50 in male rats is 1690 mg/kg, in male guinea pigs 860 mg/kg, and in male dogs greater than 3400 mg/kg although in the dog emesis prevented accurate quantitation. When the material is administered intraperitoneally, the LD50 in rats is 530 mg/kg. Repeated doses (five oral doses per week for 2 weeks) of 300 mg/kg to rats produced slight weight loss in one of two replicate experiments. In both studies, no gross or histologic alterations were apparent. Hexazinone is a moderate to severe eye irritant in the rabbit and produced only mild erythema in rabbit skin at 5278 mg/kg, a dose which did not produce lethality or other clinical signs. Subchronic dermal exposures (10 consecutive doses) to rabbits produced increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase at the highest levels tested (680 and 770 mg/kg in two separate experiments) with no effects seen at 150 mg/kg. There were no alterations in livers from treated rabbits examined by light microscopy. No dermal sensitization was produced when concentrations of up to 50% were tested in guinea pigs. One-hour inhalation exposure of up to 7.48 mg/liter did not produce mortality in rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6479506

  12. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of “Zapote” Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist

    PubMed Central

    Dutok, Carlos M. S.; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, “Mamey or Zapote,” in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  13. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of "Zapote" Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist.

    PubMed

    Dutok, Carlos M S; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M C

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, "Mamey or Zapote," in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  14. Acute toxicity of 2-butyne-1,4-diol in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Jedrychowski, R A; Czajkowska, T; Stetkiewicz, J; Stetkiewicz, I

    1992-04-01

    Acute toxicity of 2-butyne-1,4-diol (BYD) was evaluated in laboratory animals. The evaluation involved acute oral and dermal toxicity in rats, dermal and ocular irritation in rabbits and skin sensitization in guinea pigs. The oral LD50 values for BYD were 132 mg kg-1 in male rats and 176 mg kg-1 in female rats. Post-mortem histology showed severe damage in lungs, liver and kidneys. In surviving rats, moderate to severe degenerative changes were observed in the liver but only mild lesions in the kidneys. In acute dermal toxicity studies the test chemical was applied either as a solid substance or as 40% aqueous solution at a dose of 5 g kg-1 for 24 h. Within 48 h of application of the diluted test material, half of the rats died. Liver and kidneys were the primary targets and different stages of degeneration, including necrosis, were observed. No deaths occurred after application of the solid substance. In rabbits, BYD was slightly irritant to skin and eyes. No allergic contact dermatitis was observed in guinea pigs. PMID:1556377

  15. Dermal peels.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W P

    2001-07-01

    Dermal chemical peeling is a very satisfying procedure for patients and physicians alike. Although not providing the ablation of deep wrinkles and scars that dermabrasion and laser procedures may accomplish, trichloroacetic acid peels usually result in few complications and rapid recovery. Patients can usually expect photographic improvement in their skin. The results are usually long lasting, and most patients do not need to repeat dermal peels for at least 2 years. Of all resurfacing procedures, dermal peeling provides the best benefit-to-risk ratio. PMID:11599397

  16. Characterization of acute and long-term pathologies of superficial and deep dermal sulfur mustard skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Kamus-Elimeleh, Dikla; Fishbine, Eliezer; Sahar, Rita; Gez, Rellie; Brandeis, Rachel; Horwitz, Vered; Kadar, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard induces severe acute and prolonged damage to the skin and only partially effective treatments are available. We have previously validated the use of hairless guinea pigs as an experimental model for skin lesions. The present study aimed to characterize a model of a deep dermal lesion and to compare it with the previously described superficial lesion. Clinical evaluation of the lesions was conducted using reflectance colorimetry, trans-epidermal water loss and wound area measurements. Prostaglandin E(2) content, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activity, and histopathology were conducted up to 4 weeks post-exposure. Sulfur mustard skin injury, including erythema and edema, impairment of skin barrier and wounds developed in a dose-dependent manner. Prostaglandin E(2) content and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activities were elevated during the wound development and the healing process. Histological evaluation revealed severe damage to the epidermis and deep dermis and vesications. At 4 weeks postexposure, healing was not completed: significantly impaired stratum corneum, absence of hair follicles, and epidermal hyperplasia were observed. These results confirm the use of the superficial and deep dermal skin injuries in the hairless guinea pigs as suitable models that can be utilized for the investigation of the pathological processes of acute as well as long-term injuries. These models will be further used to develop treatments to improve the healing process and prevent skin damage and long-term effects. PMID:23082902

  17. Acute toxicity of four anticholinesterase insecticides to American kestrels, eastern screech-owls and northern bobwhites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Sparling, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    American kestrels (Falco sparverius), eastern screech-owls (Otus asio), and northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were given single acute oral doses of four widely diverse anticholinesterase pesticides: EPN, fenthion, carbofuran, and monocrotophos. LD50s, based on birds that died within 5 d of dosage, were computed for each chemical in each species. Sex differences in the sensitivity of northern bobwhites in reproductive condition were examined. American kestrels were highly sensitive to all chemicals tested (LD50s 0.6--4.0 mg/kg). Eastern screech-owls were highly tolerant to EPN (LD50 274 mg/kg) but sensitive to the remaining chemicals (LD50s 1.5-3.9 mg/kg). Northern bobwhites were highly sensitive to monocrotophos (LD50 0.8 mg/kg) and less sensitive to the remaining chemicals (LD50s 4.6--31 mg/kg). Female bobwhites (LD50 3.1 mg/kg) were more sensitive to fenthion than males (LD50 7.0 mg/kg). Mean percent depression of brain cho[inesterase (ChE) of birds that died on the day of dosing exceeded 65% for all chemicals in all species. The response of one species to a given pesticide should not be used to predict the sensitivity of other species to the same pesticide. The need for research on several topics is discussed

  18. Inadequate Processing of Decellularized Dermal Matrix Reduces Cell Viability In Vitro and Increases Apoptosis and Acute Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Aaron H.; Chang, Julie; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Decellularized tissue scaffolds are commonly used in the clinic because they can be used as substitutes for more traditional biomaterials, while imparting additional physiological effects. Nevertheless, reports of complications associated with their use are widespread and poorly understood. This study probes possible causes of these complications by examining cell viability and apoptosis in response to eluents from decellularized dermis. Using multiple sources of decellularized dermis, this study shows that typical decellularized scaffolds (prepared with commonly used laboratory techniques, as well as purchased from commercial sources) contain soluble components that are cytotoxic and that these components can be removed by extensive washes in cell culture media. In addition, this study demonstrates that these observed in vitro phenotypes correlate with increased apoptosis and acute inflammation when implanted subcutaneously in mice. PMID:27500014

  19. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  20. Development of an Orientia tsutsugamushi Lc-1 Murine Intraperitoneal Challenge Model for Scrub Typhus: Determination of Murine Lethal Dose (MuLD50), Tissue Bacterial Loads, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; McCardle, Wesley; Chan, Teik-Chye; Schuster, Anthony L; Richards, Allen L

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no vaccine has been developed to protect humans from naturally acquired heterologous Orientia tsutsugamushi infections. To enhance the validity of vaccine candidates, we are developing a murine chigger challenge model with the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis Line-1. To this end, an intraperitoneal (i.p.) murine challenge model using an O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 isolate was developed for eventual validation of the chigger challenge model. We have determined that the murine lethal dose that kills 50% of the challenged mice (MuLD50) of a liver/spleen homogenate developed from O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected ICR Swiss mice to be 10(-6.9). Employing different inoculum doses of this homogenate, the bacterial load using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was determined to range from 60 to 1.6 × 10(5) genome equivalent copies (GEC)/μL of liver and 33.4 to 2.2 × 10(5) GEC/μL of spleen tissue. The clinical outcomes relative to homogenate dose levels followed a dose-dependent pattern. The successful development and characterization of the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 i.p. challenge model will assist in the development and validation of a mouse chigger challenge scrub typhus model. PMID:26378973

  1. Thymus-directed immunotoxicity of airborne dust particles from Upper Silesia (Poland) under acute extrapulmonary studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowska, E.; Krzystniak, K.; Drela, N.

    1996-12-27

    Industrial air pollutants from Upper Silesia, Poland, contain over 250 polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals that have been shown to from DNA adducts. Over 4 million habitants of Silesia are permanently exposed to the industrial pollution by pulmonary and dermal routes and by contaminated food and water. These chemicals, when examined separately in animals models, were proven immunotoxic. We studied the extrapulmonary immunotoxic potential of a typical mixture of Silesian filter-suspended matter from a selected area, over a specific season and time period. Early changes in the immune system were analyzed in BALB/c mice exposed ip to acute doses of 20-330 mg dust mixture/kg body weight (0.06-1.0 LD50). No major changes were noted for weight and the cellularity of spleen, liver and kidneys. However, dramatic decrease in thymus weight index and thymocyte cell count were noted as early as 24-72 h postexposure, which correlated with almost complete depletion of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} thymocytes. Changes in spleen were less profound; however, increased depletion of B cells over T cells was noted at high doses of the suspended matter. Exposure to the airborne dust also decreased cytokine production by spleen cells, such as interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). Overall, a single exposure to Silesian dust, even at the relatively low 0.06 LD50 dose, affected lymphokine production, suppressed B-cell proliferative response, and depleted thymuses of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells. A chemical synergism is suspected. To our knowledge, none of the known components of Silesian suspended matter, when examined as a single chemical, was shown to exert such a profound biological effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  2. The value of acute toxicity testing of pharmaceuticals for estimation of human response.

    PubMed

    Barle, Ester Lovšin; Looser, Roland; Cerne, Manica; Bechter, Rudolf

    2012-04-01

    The determination of single high doses of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is used mostly to fulfill regulatory demands. Oral LD(50) values in animals for over 300 API were compared to the minimal effective therapeutic doses (METD) in humans in order to find a correlation between animal and human data. The highest correlation between human METD and animal LD(50) was found for the dog (R=0.323), the lowest for the rat (0.287). It was determined that acute oral LD(50) of rats have poor correlation with the METD, and cannot be used as a classification criteria into official acute toxic categories. Only 13% of API has been classified as fatal if swallowed according to the EU CLP regulation, none of the substances with very low therapeutic dose have been identified as EU CLP acute toxicity category 1. Substances with very low therapeutic doses, which could potentially have toxic effects in humans, are not identified with the use of oral LD(50) and current classification system. We propose that the acute toxicity based on rat LD(50) dose is not used as a basis for classification of pharmaceuticals, and that the METD is applied as basis for classification. PMID:22306828

  3. Acute toxicity of seeds of the sapodilla (Achras sapota L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, P D; Simon, W R; West, M E

    1984-01-01

    An aqueous extract of the sapodilla seed (Achras sapota L.) was acutely toxic to mice and rats (i.p. LD50 = 190 and 250 mg/kg, respectively) with symptoms of dyspnoea, apnoea and convulsions. Soxhlet extraction and chromatographic separation of the seed constituents yielded a brown amorphous solid containing saponin. This was heat-stable and toxic by the i.p. route (LD50 = 30-50 mg/kg) but non-toxic by the oral route in mice and rats. It is proposed that the toxicity of the sapodilla seed is due mainly to the saponin content. PMID:6719472

  4. ACUTE, 14-DAY REPEATED DOSING, AND 90-DAY SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY STUDIES OF POTASSIUM PICLORAM (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potassium picloram was administered either by gavage (acute studies) or in drinking water to male and female Sprague-Dawley derived rats (14-day and 90-day studies). The acute oral LD50 was 950 mg/kg (812-1120) for males and 686 mg/kg (599-786) for females. Depression, prostratio...

  5. Efficacy of topical phenol decontamination strategies on severity of acute phenol chemical burns and dermal absorption: in vitro and in vivo studies in pig skin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Jackson, H; Dunn, B; Dimond, S

    2001-05-01

    Pure phenol is colorless and used in the manufacture of phenolic resins, plastics, explosives, fertilizers, paints, rubber, textiles, adhesives, pharmaceuticals, paper, soap, and wood preservatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of several phenol decontamination strategies following dermal exposure using the pig as a model for human exposure, and then assess the effect of the two best treatments on phenol absorption in the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF). Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were exposed to 89% aqueous phenol for 1 min using Hilltop chambers (10 skin sites/pig; 400 microl/site). Exposure to phenol was followed by one of 10 different decontamination procedures: 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min water wash; Ivory soap solution; polyethylene glycol (PEG 400); PEG 400/industrial methylated spirits (IMS); PEG 400/ethanol (EtOH); polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/70% isopropanol (IPA); and 70% IPA. For each of the last five strategies, 1-min treatment washes were repeatedly alternated with 1-min water washes for a total of 15 min. Evaluation was based on scoring of erythema, edema, and histological parameters such as intracellular and intercellular epidermal edema, papillary dermal edema, perivascular infiltrates, pyknotic stratum basale cells, and epidermal-dermal separation. It was concluded that PEG 400 and 70% IPA were superior to the other treatments investigated and equally efficacious in the reduction of phenol-induced skin damage. In addition, phenol absorption was assessed utilizing the two most effective in vivo treatments in the IPPSF. The assessment of percutaneous absorption of phenol found the PEG 400, 70% IPA, and 15-min water treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced phenol absorption relative to no treatment. PMID:12479505

  6. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. PMID:26256397

  7. Dermal fillers: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Annelyse Cristine; Brandt, Fredric S; Cazzaniga, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Injection of dermal fillers is the second most frequent nonsurgical cosmetic procedure performed in the USA. Dermal fillers are an option in the treatment of volume deficiency, scars, and rhytides; facial sculpting; facial contouring; and augmentation of specific anatomical sites such as the lips. The number of injectable dermal fillers available on the market increases yearly. Dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons should regularly review treatment options to provide patients with safe and effective filler options. This paper extensively reviews the properties of the available fillers, such as their rheology, longevity, and adverse effects, and how these properties affect the choice of filler agent for a particular patient or a particular site. Also, trends in dermal filler injections are discussed. PMID:26081021

  8. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. PMID:23161399

  9. Acute toxicity and primary irritancy of alkylalkanolamines.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Leung, H W

    1996-12-01

    The acute handling hazards of several alkylalkanolamines were determined by investigating their potential acute toxicity and primary irritancy. Materials studied were N-methylethanolamine (MEA), N, N, -dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), N, N, -dimethylisopropanolamine (DMIPA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and tertbutyldiethanolamine (BDEA). All these alkylalkanolamines were of comparable acute peroral toxicity in the rat (LD50 range 1.48-2.83 ml/kg). By 24 h occluded epicutaneous contact in the rabbit, MEA, DMEA and DMIPA were of moderate acute percutaneous toxicity (LD50 range 1.13-2.0 ml/kg), MDEA was of slight acute percutaneous toxicity (LD50 male 9.85 ml/kg, female 10.90 ml/kg), and BDEA of intermediate toxicity (LD50 6.4 ml/kg). Due to differences in vapor pressure the acute vapor exposure toxicity of the alkylalkanolamines to rats varied; MEA, MDEA and BDEA were of a low order of acute toxicity, and DMIPA was moderately toxic with an LT50 of 3.2 h for a saturated vapor atmosphere exposure. A 4 h-LC50 (rat combined sex) of 1461 ppm was determined for DMEA. All alkylalkanolamines studied, except MDEA, were moderately to markedly irritating and caused variable degrees of skin corrosivity; MDEA caused only transient minor skin irritation. In accord with the skin irritancy results, the eye irritancy from 0.005 ml MEA, DMEA, DMIPA and BDEA was severe, and that from MDEA was slight. Exposure to these compounds has implications for occupational health procedures. PMID:8948072

  10. Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and studies supporting the medical chemical defense program. Determination of the minimum effective pyridostigmine pretreatment dose in monkeys challenged with 5 x LD50 Soman and treated with atropine/2-PAM. Final report, 22 October 1992-31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.T.; Menton, R.G.; Kiser, R.C.; Hayes, T.L.; Matthews, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    This task was conducted to determine the minimum dose of pyridostigmine (PYR), and the associated level of erythrocyte acetycholinesterase inhibition (AChE-I), that provides protection from 5 X 48-br GD LD50 of untreated monkeys. Monkeys were injected im with GD and treated with 0.4 mg atropine (ATR) free base and 25.7 mg pralidoxime (2-PAM) per kg BW.

  11. Poisoning from dermal absorption of promethazine.

    PubMed Central

    Shawn, D H; McGuigan, M A

    1984-01-01

    Two cases in which dermal absorption of promethazine hydrochloride resulted in a toxic neurologic syndrome are reported. The symptoms included central nervous system depression, acute excitomotor manifestations, ataxia and visual hallucinations. In addition, peripheral anticholinergic effects occurred. These symptoms are comparable with those of oral, intramuscular and rectal overdose of promethazine. The demonstrated risks of the topical use of promethazine outweigh any benefits. PMID:6733616

  12. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  13. Saving two birds with one stone: using active substance avian acute toxicity data to predict formulated plant protection product toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Samuel K; Edwards, Peter; Wheeler, James R

    2014-07-01

    Environmental safety assessments for exposure of birds require the provision of acute avian toxicity data for both the pesticidal active substance and formulated products. As an example, testing on the formulated product is waived in Europe using an assessment of data for the constituent active substance(s). This is often not the case globally, because some countries require acute toxicity tests with every formulated product, thereby triggering animal welfare concerns through unnecessary testing. A database of 383 formulated products was compiled from acute toxicity studies conducted with northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) or Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) (unpublished regulatory literature). Of the 383 formulated products studied, 159 contained only active substances considered functionally nontoxic (median lethal dose [LD50] > highest dose tested). Of these, 97% had formulated product LD50 values of >2000 mg formulated product/kg (limit dose), indicating that no new information was obtained in the formulated product study. Furthermore, defined (point estimated) LD50 values for formulated products were compared with LD50 values predicted from toxicity of the active substance(s). This demonstrated that predicted LD50 values were within 2-fold and 5-fold of the measured formulated product LD50 values in 90% and 98% of cases, respectively. This analysis demonstrates that avian acute toxicity testing of formulated products is largely unnecessary and should not be routinely required to assess avian acute toxicity. In particular, when active substances are known to be functionally nontoxic, further formulated product testing adds no further information and unnecessarily increases bird usage in testing. A further analysis highlights the fact that significant reductions (61% in this dataset) could be achieved by using a sequential testing design (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development test guideline 223), as opposed to established single

  14. The effects of fasting on the acute oral toxicity of nine chemicals in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dashiell, O L; Kennedy, G L

    1984-12-01

    Nine chemicals, with a range from extremely to slightly toxic, were used to measure the oral LD50 in both fasted (24-h) and non-fasted rats. Each chemical was tested as a solution or suspension in corn oil, responses within 14 days post-treatment were evaluated, and LD50S were calculated. Hexachlorophene was more toxic in non-fasted rats. The LD50 values for tetraethyl lead, methomyl and hexamethylenediamine were essentially the same in both fasted and non-fasted rats. Adiponitrile, bromobenzene, caffeine, carbon tetrachloride and N-butyl-1,6-hexamediamine yielded lower LD50 values in fasted rats. The use of non-fasted rats in acute oral toxicity determinations allows both the establishment of relative potency and the estimation of dosage levels for further repeated dose oral studies. The LD50 values obtained were generally (7 of 9) higher in non-fasted rats, but the magnitude of the differences was not great enough to suggest routine use of both fasted and non-fasted rats in oral toxicity studies. PMID:6520321

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Acute Toxicity of the Essential Oil of Allium tuberosum Leaves and Its Selected Major Constituents Against Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jizhe; Liu, Xinchao; Li, Zhen; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate acute toxicity of the essential oil of leaves of Chinese chives, Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng (Asparagales: Alliaceae) and its major constituents against Apolygus lucorum Meyer-Dür (Hemiptera: Miridae). The essential oil of A. tuberosum leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituents of the oil were sulfur-containing compounds, including allyl methyl trisulfide (36.24%), diallyl disulfide (27.26%), diallyl trisulfide (18.68%), and dimethyl trisulfide (9.23%). The essential oil of A. tuberosum leaves exhibited acute toxicity against Ap. lucorum with an LD50 value of 20.03 μg per adult. Among the main compounds, diallyl trisulfide (LD50 = 10.13 μg per adult) showed stronger acute toxicity than allyl methyl trisulfide (LD50 = 21.10 μg per adult) and dimethyl trisulfide (LD50 = 21.65 μg per adult). The LD50 value of diallyl disulfide against Ap. lucorum was 28.10 μg per adult. The results indicated that the essential oil of A. tuberosum and its major constituents may have a potential to be developed as botanical insecticides against Ap. lucorum. PMID:26254289

  16. WEB-BASED INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (WEB-ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY: USER MANUAL V2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to environmental risk Assessment where data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ...

  17. ACUTE SULFOLANE EXPOSURE PRODUCES TEMPERATURE-INDEPENDENT AND DEPENDENT CHANGES IN VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the consequences of acute exposure to sulfolane upon the visual system, as measured using flash evoked potential (FEPs) and pattern reversal evoked potentials (PREPs). A single injection of either 1/2 or 1/4, but not 1/8 the i.p. LD50 (1600 mg/kg) produced si...

  18. BEHAVIORAL TOXICITY OF ACUTE AND SUBACUTE EXPOSURE TO TRIETHYLTIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triethyltin (TET), the most toxic of the alkyltin compounds is used industrially as both a catalyst and a biocide (NIOSH, 1976). Stoner et al. (1955) determined the acute toxicity of a series of alkyltins and reported that in the rat, the LD50 for TET was 5.7 mg/kg. Barnes and St...

  19. Comparative acute and subchronic toxicity of ethylene glycol monopropyl ether and ethylene glycol monopropyl ether acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, G V; Krasavage, W J; Terhaar, C J

    1984-01-01

    The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol monopropyl ether (EGPE) and ethylene glycol monopropyl ether acetate (EGPEA) was determined in a series of standardized tests. The oral LD50 in rats was 3089 and 9456 mg/kg EGPE and EGPEA, respectively. Skin irritation was slight following an occluded single dose application of either compound to the guinea pig abdomen. The dermal LD50 for guinea pigs was 1 to 5 mL/kg and greater than 20 mL/kg EGPE and EGPEA, respectively. EGPE produced a very weak positive sensitization response in one of five guinea pigs. No positive response was elicited when 10 guinea pigs were similarly challenged with EGPEA. EGPE produced transient moderate to severe eye irritation in rabbits while EGPEA produced slight eye irritation. Subchronic toxicity was determined in a series of oral and inhalation studies. Groups of 10 male rats were dosed with 15, 7.5, 3.75 or 1.88 mmole/kg EGPE and 30, 15 or 7.5 mmole/kg EGPEA by gavage 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Hemoglobinuria was seen at least once at all dose levels of both compounds. EGPE had little effect on feed consumption or body weight gain, while body weight gain was reduced in the two high dose groups exposed to EGPEA and feed consumption was reduced at all dose levels. Hematologic changes were seen at all dose levels of both compounds. Absolute and/or relative spleen weights were increased at all but the lowest EGPE dose level and at all EGPEA dose levels. Gross and histopathologic examinations revealed significant effects on the spleen of animals exposed to EGPE and on the spleen, liver, kidney and testes of animals exposed to EGPEA. The no-observed effect level (NOEL) for splenic changes was 1.88 mmole/kg EGPE. A NOEL for hematology was not established. The NOEL for liver and testicular changes were 15 and 7.5 mmole/kg EGPEA, respectively while a NOEL for hematologic, splenic and renal changes was not established. Groups of 10 rats (5M, 5F) were exposed to 800, 400, 200 or 100 ppm EGPE or EGPEA 6 hr

  20. ECVAM's ongoing activities in the area of acute oral toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Bulgheroni, Anna; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-12-01

    The 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (2003/15/EC) set up timelines for banning animal testing and marketing of cosmetic products and their ingredients tested on animals. For most of the human health effects, including acute toxicity, the deadline for these bans was in March 2009. Moreover, the new Regulation EC 1907/2006 on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) provided a strong impetus towards the application of alternative approaches to reduce the number of animals used for toxicological testing. Therefore, the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) is currently putting considerable effort into developing and validating alternative methods in the field of acute toxicity. The main activities in this area include: (1) the Integrated Project ACuteTox, funded by the European Commission's 6th Framework Programme in 2005 with the aim to develop and pre-validate a testing strategy to fully replace acute oral toxicity testing in vivo; (2) a follow-up validation study to assess the predictive capacity of the validated BALB/3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay to discriminate between toxic/hazardous (LD(50)<2,000 mg/kg) substances and substances not classified for acute toxicity (LD(50)>2,000 mg/kg); (3) an approach to identify compounds with LD(50)>2,000 mg/kg using information from 28-days repeated dose toxicity studies. PMID:19591916

  1. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual Version 3.1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to ecological risk assessment because data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ge...

  2. Flexible Dermal Armor in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2012-04-01

    Many animals possess dermal armor, which acts primarily as protection against predators. We illustrate this through examples from both our research and the literature: alligator, fish (alligator gar, arapaima, and Senegal bichir), armadillo, leatherback turtle, and a lizard, the Gila monster. The dermal armor in these animals is flexible and has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining mineralized units (scales, tiles, or plates). This combination significantly increases the strength and flexibility in comparison with a simple monolithic mineral composite or rigid dermal armor. This dermal armor is being studied for future bioinspired armor applications providing increased mobility.

  3. Improvement of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (VCG 0124/5) through induced mutagenesis: Determination of LD50 specific to mutagen, explants, toxins and in vitro and in vivo screening for Fusarium wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, M S; Kannan, G; Uma, S; Thangavelu, R; Backiyarani, S

    2016-05-01

    Shoot tips and in vitro grown proliferating buds of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) were treated with various concentrations and durations of chemical mutagens viz., EMS, NaN3 and DES. LD50 for shoot tips based on 50% reduction in fresh weight was determined as 2% for 3 h, 0.02% for 5 h and 0.15% for 5 h, while for proliferating buds, they were 0.6% for 30 min, 0.01% for 2 h and 0.06% for 2 h for the mutagens EMS, NaN3 and DES, respectively. Subsequently, the mutated explants were screened in vitro against fusarium wilt using selection agents like fusaric acid and culture filtrate. LD50 for in vitro selection agents calculated based on 50% survival of explants was 0.050 mM and 7% for fusaric acid and culture filtrate, respectively and beyond which a rapid decline in growth was observed. This was followed by pot screening which led to the identification of three putative resistant mutants with an internal disease score of 1 (corm completely clean, no vascular discolouration). The putative mutants identified in the present study have also been mass multiplied in vitro. PMID:27319054

  4. Porcine dermal lesions produced by 1540-nm laser radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2001-07-01

    Completion of recent studies within our group indicates a breed-based difference in dermal response to 1540 nm 0.8 millisecond laser pulses. Laser exposure to Yucatan Mini- Pigs (highly pigmented skin) and Yorkshire pigs (lightly pigmented skin) demonstrate statistical differences between the ED50's of the two breeds. Laser delivery is accomplished using an Er:Glass system producing 1540 nm of light at millisecond exposure times and in the range of 5 to 95 J/cm2. Dermal lesion development was evaluated for acute, 1 hour, and 24-hour post exposure presentation. Our data contradicts the theory that water absorption is the sole mechanism of dermal tissue damage observed from 1540 nm laser exposures, as skin chromophores appear to play a role in lesion development.

  5. Generalized mid dermal elastolysis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria João; Barros, Ana Margarida; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Mid-dermal elastolysis (MDE) is a rare skin disorder clinically characterized by the appearance of diffuse fine wrinkling, most often of the trunk and arms. This entity is distinguished from other elastolytic disorders by its characteristic selective loss of elastic fibers of the mid dermis. The aetiopathogenesis of the disease is still unclear as well as the effective treatment. Half of the cases described in the literature are associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure. Other reported triggering conditions such as urticaria, eczema and granuloma annulare suggests different eliciting inflammatory pathways. The authors describe the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed an urticarial eruption during months which progressed to generalized and severe fine wrinkling. PMID:25386304

  6. Carbofuran occupational dermal toxicity, exposure and risk assessment†

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Derek W; Liu, Zhiwei; Becker, John M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbofuran is a carbamate insecticide that inhibits AChE. Although toxic by ingestion in mammals, it has low dermal toxicity, with relatively few confirmed worker illnesses. This risk assessment describes its time of onset, time to peak effect and time to recovery in rats using brain AChE inhibition in acute and 21 day dermal studies; in vitro rat/human relative dermal absorption for granular (5G) and liquid (4F) formulations; occupational exposure estimates using the Pesticide Handlers' Exposure Database and Agricultural Handlers' Exposure Database (PHED/AHED). RESULTS The point of departure for acute risk calculation (BMDL10) was 6.7 mg kg−1 day−1 for brain AChE inhibition after 6 h exposure. In a 21 day study, the BMDL10 was 6.8 mg kg−1 day−1, indicating reversibility. At 75 mg kg−1 day−1, time of onset was ≤30 min and time to peak effect was 6–12 h. Rat skin had ca tenfold greater dermal absorption of carbofuran (Furadan® 5G or 4F) than human skin. Exposure estimates for 5G in rice and 4F in ten crops had adequate margins of exposure (>100). CONCLUSION Rat dermal carbofuran toxicity was assessed in terms of dose and time-related inhibition of AChE. Comparative dermal absorption in rats was greater than in humans. Worker exposure estimates indicated acceptable risk for granular and liquid formulations of carbofuran. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:21834090

  7. LD50 value, phototoxicity and convulsion induction test of the new quinolone antibacterial agent (S)-10-[(S)-(8-amino-6-azaspiro[3,4]octan-6-yl)]-9-fluoro-2, 3-dihydro-3-methyl-7-oxo-7H-pyrido[1,2,3-de][1,4]benzoxazine-6-carboxyl ic acid hemihydrate in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, K; Akahane, K; Nomura, M; Kato, M

    1996-06-01

    (S)-10-[(S)-(8-Amino-6-azaspiro[3,4]octan-6-yl)]-9-fluoro-2, 3-dihydro-3-methyl-7-oxo-7H-pyrido[1,2,3-de][1,4]benzoxazine-6-carboxyli c acid hemihydrate (CAS 151390-79-3, DV-7751a) a new quinolone antibacterial agent, was examined for LD50 value, phototoxicity and convulsion inducing potential in laboratory animals. A single oral administration of DV-7751a induced soft stool in rats at 1000 and 2000 mg/ kg and in monkeys at 250 mg/kg and vomiting in monkeys at 500 mg/kg or more. A single intravenous administration caused a decrease in locomotor activity, respiratory depression, convulsion, pulmonary edema and death in rats and mice. The LD50 values with oral administration were more than 2000 mg/ kg for rats and mice and more than 250 mg/kg for monkeys, and those with intravenous administration were 164.3 mg/kg for rats of both sexes at an injection rate of 2 ml/min, 118.8 mg/kg for male rats and 104 to 125 mg/kg for female rats at 0.5 ml/min, and 184.7 mg/kg for male mice and 187.4 mg/kg for female mice. DV-7751a showed very weak phototoxicity in mice after single oral administration of 600 mg/kg, followed by UVA irradiation, but no convulsion after oral administration of 200 or 1000 mg/kg in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid at 400 mg/kg. PMID:8767355

  8. Methylisothiazolinone: dermal and respiratory immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Pollaris, Lore; Van Den Broucke, Sofie; Seys, Sven; Goossens, An; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2015-06-15

    Methylisothiazolinone (MI), a widely used chemical preservative in industrial and household products, and cosmetics, has been associated with allergic contact dermatitis. However, the asthmogenic capacity of MI is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the capacity of MI to elicit asthma-like responses in a validated mouse model. On days 1 and 8, mice (C57Bl/6 and BALB/c) were dermally treated with MI or vehicle on each ear. On day 15, mice received a single intranasal challenge with MI or vehicle. Immediately after the challenge, the early ventilatory response was measured using a double chamber plethysmograph. One day later, airway hyperreactivity, pulmonary inflammation and immune-related parameters were assessed. Dermal treatment with MI in both C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice induced increased T- and B-cell proliferation in the auricular lymph nodes, along with IFN-γ production and limited increases in total serum IgE, confirming dermal sensitization. An airway challenge with MI led to an early ventilatory response (decreased breathing frequency), indicative for acute sensory irritation. However, 24h later no allergic respiratory response (no airway hyperreactivity (AHR) nor pulmonary inflammation) was found in either mouse strains. Our study indicates that MI can be classified as a strong dermal sensitizer and irritant, but not an asthmogen after initial dermal sensitization, followed by an airway challenge. PMID:25907379

  9. Acute oral toxicity of the herbicide BUREX EKO in pheasants.

    PubMed

    Legáth, J; Mlynarcíková, H; Svický, E; Lenhardt, L; Kacmár, P; Benová, K; Kovác, G

    1996-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute LD50, clinical symptoms and pathological changes of acute BUREX EKO intoxication in pheasants according to OECD No 205. Medium lethal dose (LD50) of BUREX EKO in pheasant is 3.84 ml/kg body weight with the upper level of reliability 4.50 ml and lower level of reliability 3.27 ml/kg body weight. As far as the calculation to the effective substance is concerned it is 1077 mg of chloridazone per kg body weight with the interval of reliability from 919 to 1263 mg/kg body weight. Calculated the effective substance of chloridazone (3.84 ml is LD50 of BUREX EKO which contains 1077 mg of chloridazone) BUREX EKO can be classified as the moderately toxic substance to pheasants. There were following clinical symptoms of the BUREX EKO intoxication in pheasants: apathy, drowsiness, incapability to move, ruffled feathers, slight diarrhoea, strenuous respiration, tonico-clonical cramps before death, decease with the head expressively bent rearwards. There was a relatively fast beginning of rigor mortis in dead pheasants. Pathologico-anatomical dissection of the pheasants obtained under conditions of acute intoxication did not reveal any changes on the organs of both experimental and control pheasants which would be immediately connected with the effect of the administered substance. Hyperaemia was recorded by histologico-pathological investigation of the liver and kidneys. No changes on the brain and intestine wall were recorded. PMID:9022351

  10. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24 h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R?) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex? and Phos-Chek WD881?) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881? and Silv-Ex? were above the predetermined 2000 mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R? because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  11. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nimish B; Spann, James W; Hill, Elwood F

    2009-03-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex and Phos-Chek WD881) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881 and Silv-Ex were above the predetermined 2000mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested. PMID:19038451

  12. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kue, Chin Siang; Tan, Kae Yi; Lam, May Lynn; Lee, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD(50)) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD(50) values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson's correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r(2)=0.42 - 0.68, P<0.005-0.05) between the ideal LD(50) values obtained using the CAM model with LD(50) values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  13. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 − 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  14. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA. PMID:21309017

  15. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  16. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  17. [Alteration of the acute toxicity and various pharmacologic effects of streptomycin sulfate by calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Korablev, M V; Kopelevich, V M

    1983-10-01

    The effect of calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP) on acute toxicity of streptomycin and the decrease by the antibiotic of the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex, body temperature and oxygen intake was studied on 258 albino mice weighing 22-26 g. Medical calcium pantothenate (CPA) was used for control purposes. CPP is an antagonist of streptomycin sulfate. In a dose of 1/10 or 1/5 of the LD50 injected intraperitoneally CPP lowered acute toxicity of streptomycin and prevented its effect in a dose of 0.11--1.1 g/kg injected subcutaneously on the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex and body temperature. The spectrum index of the CPP antitoxic effect was equal to 22.5. By its acute toxicity CPP (LD50 1.18 +/- 0.07 g/kg) did not differ from CPA (LD50 1.25 +/- 0.08 g/kg). The efficacy of CPP, by its antitoxic spectrum, was 1.8 times higher than that of CPA. CPA lowered the streptomycin effect on the "holes" reflex and body temperature, while CPP prevented it. Both the drugs did not influence the decrease in the oxygen consumption induced by streptomycin. PMID:6651265

  18. Acute and sub-acute toxicological assessment of the aqueous seed extract of Persea americana mill (Lauraceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozolua, Raymond I; Anaka, Ogochukwu N; Okpo, Stephen O; Idogun, Sylvester E

    2009-01-01

    The aqueous seed extract of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) is used by herbalists in Nigeria for the management of hypertension. As part of our on-going scientific evaluation of the extract, we designed the present study to assess its acute and sub-acute toxicity profiles in rats. Experiments were conducted to determine the oral median lethal dose (LD(50)) and other gross toxicological manifestations on acute basis. In the sub-acute experiments, the animals were administered 2.5 g/kg (p.o) per day of the extract for 28 consecutive days. Animal weight and fluid intake were recorded during the 28 days period. Terminally, kidneys, hearts, blood/sera were obtained for weight, haematological and biochemical markers of toxicity. Results show that the LD(50) could not be determined after a maximum dose of 10 g/kg. Sub-acute treatment with the extract neither affected whole body weight nor organ-to-body weight ratios but significantly increased the fluid intake (P < 0.0001). Haematological parameters and the levels of ALT, AST, albumin and creatinine were not significantly altered. However, the concentration of total proteins was significantly increased in the treated group. In conclusion, the aqueous seed extract of P. americana is safe on sub-acute basis but extremely high doses may not be advisable. PMID:20606779

  19. Acute toxicity of diazinon is similar for eight stocks of bobwhite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Camardese, M.B.; Heinz, G.H.; Spann, J.W.; DeBevec, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nine-week-old bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) from eight different game farms were tested for their sensitivity to an acute oral exposure of technical-grade diazinon (phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl-O-[6-methyl- 2-(1 -methylethy 1)-4-pyrimidinyl]ester). Extraneous variables associated with interlaboratory differences in husbandry were eliminated by incubating eggs and rearing chicks to test age for all stocks simultaneously in the same facilities at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Under this single set of conditions, the responses of the eight stocks of bobwhite to diazinon were statistically inseparable, with LD50 values varying from 13 mg/kg (95% confidence interval, 8-21 mg/kg) to 17 mg/kg (95% confidence interval, 11-25 mg/kg). The pooled LD50 for the eight stocks was 14.7 mg/kg (95% confidence interval,13.1-16.5 mg/kg).

  20. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dermal toxicity. 798.2250 Section 798.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  1. ISSUES IN DERMAL EXPOSURE OF INFANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infants' dermal exposures to environmental contaminants are expected to be different and, in many cases, much higher than adults. Because of the potential importance of the dermal exposure route, there is currently a significant amount of work being conducted to reduce the uncer...

  2. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section 798.4100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798.4100 Dermal sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the...

  3. Acute and Cytotoxicity Studies of Aqueous and Ethanolic Leaf Extracts of Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Asomugha, R N; Ezejiofor, A N; Okafor, P N; Ijeh, I I

    2015-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata, a commonly used traditional remedy for different ailments, believed to be quite safe in terms of toxicity was evaluated for acute toxicity and cytotoxic potentials. Acute toxicity was done on albino Wistar rats using the Lorke method while brine shrimps were used to test for cytotoxicity. The results showed that the estimated LD50 for the aqueous and ethanolic extracts was 2154 and > 5000 mg kg(-1) body weight, respectively. Cytotoxicity to brine shrimps showed LC50 values of 324 and 392 ppm for aqueous and ethanolic extracts, respectively. These results indicate the relative non toxic nature of Chromolaena odorata extracts. PMID:26353417

  4. Species Typing in Dermal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leishmania is an infectious protozoan parasite related to African and American trypanosomes. All Leishmania species that are pathogenic to humans can cause dermal disease. When one is confronted with cutaneous leishmaniasis, identification of the causative species is relevant in both clinical and epidemiological studies, case management, and control. This review gives an overview of the currently existing and most used assays for species discrimination, with a critical appraisal of the limitations of each technique. The consensus taxonomy for the genus is outlined, including debatable species designations. Finally, a numerical literature analysis is presented that describes which methods are most used in various countries and regions in the world, and for which purposes. PMID:25672782

  5. Acute and subacute toxicity of 10B-paraboronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Taniyama, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Kuno, T.; Saito, N.; Shuntoh, H.; Sakaue, M.; Tanaka, C. )

    1989-07-01

    The acute and subacute toxicities of 10B-paraboronophenylalanine (10B-BPA) were investigated in the rat, according to the Good Laboratory Practice Standard for safety studies on drugs in Japan. In the acute toxicity test of 10B-BPA, LD50 values of acidic 10B-BPA for intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections were 640 mg/kg for male and 710 mg/kg for female rats, and more than 1,000 mg/kg for male and female rats, respectively. The LD50 values of neutral 10B-BPA for intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections were more than 3,000 mg/kg for male and female rats. The difference in LD50 values between acidic and neutral 10B-BPA may be attributed to the acidity of material. From the subacute toxicity test, in which the rats were injected daily subcutaneously for 28 days, the following toxic effects of 10B-BPA were observed. Increase in ketone level in the urine was induced in all rats treated with 10B-BPA. High dose of 10B-BPA (1,500 mg/kg) induced increase in spleen weight and reticulocyte count, and decrease in hemoglobin count, thereby suggesting that 10B-BPA causes hemolysis. Increases in the leukocyte count and the ratio of neutrophils and lymphocytes were also observed in rats treated with a high dose of 10B-BPA. This may be attributed to local reactions at the injection site. There were no significant differences in the findings between control rats and rats treated with a low dose of 10B-BPA (300 mg/kg). Thus, low doses of neutral 10B-BPA may be available for use as a drug.

  6. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  7. Interim report on the genetic and animal toxicity testing of SRC-I products, intermediates, and waste materials. Appendix D. Acute animal studies reports

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdowicz, B.Z.; Kelly, C.M.

    1983-09-01

    Appendix D is a collection of 25 individual reports on the toxicity of SRC-I products, intermediates and residues to rabbits, rats and guinea pigs with acute oral, dermal and inhalation exposure. It includes also eye and dermal irritation tests in rabbits and guinea pigs and dermal sensitization studies in albino guinea pigs. (LTN)

  8. Acute Toxicity-Supported Chronic Toxicity Prediction: A k-Nearest Neighbor Coupled Read-Across Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Friedman, Ran; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification model was constructed for 118 RDT NEDO (Repeated Dose Toxicity New Energy and industrial technology Development Organization; currently known as the Hazard Evaluation Support System (HESS)) database chemicals, employing two acute toxicity (LD50)-based classes as a response and using a series of eight PaDEL software-derived fingerprints as predictor variables. A model developed using Estate type fingerprints correctly predicted the LD50 classes for 70 of 94 training set chemicals and 19 of 24 test set chemicals. An individual category was formed for each of the chemicals by extracting its corresponding k-analogs that were identified by k-NN classification. These categories were used to perform the read-across study for prediction of the chronic toxicity, i.e., Lowest Observed Effect Levels (LOEL). We have successfully predicted the LOELs of 54 of 70 training set chemicals (77%) and 14 of 19 test set chemicals (74%) to within an order of magnitude from their experimental LOEL values. Given the success thus far, we conclude that if the k-NN model predicts LD50 classes correctly for a certain chemical, then the k-analogs of such a chemical can be successfully used for data gap filling for the LOEL. This model should support the in silico prediction of repeated dose toxicity. PMID:26006240

  9. Oral and dermal pharmacokinetics of triclopyr in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, N G; Nolan, R J; Perkins, J M; Davies, R; Warrington, S J

    1989-11-01

    Blood levels and urinary excretion of triclopyr, the active ingredient in Garlon herbicides, were followed in six volunteers given single oral doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg body weight. Five of these volunteers later received dermal applications of Garlon 4 herbicide formulation equivalent to 3.7 mg triclopyr/kg body weight applied to the forearm. Following oral administration blood levels peaked at 2-3 h and declined to undetectable levels within 48 h; more than 80% of the dose was found as unchanged triclopyr in the urine. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of triclopyr clearance; half-lives for the rapid initial and slower terminal phases were 1.3 h and 5.1 h respectively, and were independent of dose. Due to the slow half-life for dermal absorption (t1/2 = 16.8 h) the rapid initial elimination phase was obscured and the pharmacokinetics could be simplified by a one-compartment model. An average of 1.37% of the applied dose was recovered in the urine; when corrected for recovery after oral administration this was equivalent to an absorption of 1.65%. Triclopyr is slowly absorbed through skin and is rapidly eliminated. It has very low potential to accumulate in man or to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. PMID:2591984

  10. Analysis of finite dose dermal absorption data: Implications for dermal exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, H Frederick; Dotson, G Scott; Bunge, Annette L; Chen, Chen-Peng; Cherrie, John W; Kasting, Gerald B; Kissel, John C; Sahmel, Jennifer; Semple, Sean; Wilkinson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A common dermal exposure assessment strategy estimates the systemic uptake of chemical in contact with skin using the fixed fractional absorption approach: the dermal absorbed dose is estimated as the product of exposure and the fraction of applied chemical that is absorbed, assumed constant for a given chemical. Despite the prominence of this approach there is little guidance regarding the evaluation of experiments from which fractional absorption data are measured. An analysis of these experiments is presented herein, and limitations to the fixed fractional absorption approach are discussed. The analysis provides a set of simple algebraic expressions that may be used in the evaluation of finite dose dermal absorption experiments, affording a more data-driven approach to dermal exposure assessment. Case studies are presented that demonstrate the application of these tools to the assessment of dermal absorption data. PMID:23715085

  11. Effectiveness of donepezil, rivastigmine, and (+/-)huperzine A in counteracting the acute toxicity of organophosphorus nerve agents: comparison with galantamine.

    PubMed

    Aracava, Yasco; Pereira, Edna F R; Akkerman, Miriam; Adler, Michael; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2009-12-01

    Galantamine, a centrally acting cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor and a nicotinic allosteric potentiating ligand used to treat Alzheimer's disease, is an effective and safe antidote against poisoning with nerve agents, including soman. Here, the effectiveness of galantamine was compared with that of the centrally active ChE inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and (+/-)huperzine A as a pre- and/or post-treatment to counteract the acute toxicity of soman. In the first set of experiments, male prepubertal guinea pigs were treated intramuscularly with one of the test drugs and 30 min later challenged with 1.5 x LD(50) soman (42 microg/kg s.c.). All animals that were pretreated with galantamine (6-8 mg/kg), 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (+/-)huperzine A survived the soman challenge, provided that they were also post-treated with atropine (10 mg/kg i.m.). However, only galantamine was well tolerated. In subsequent experiments, the effectiveness of specific treatment regimens using 8 mg/kg galantamine, 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (+/-)huperzine A was compared in guinea pigs challenged with soman. In the absence of atropine, only galantamine worked as an effective and safe pretreatment in animals challenged with 1.0 x LD(50) soman. Galantamine was also the only drug to afford significant protection when given to guinea pigs after 1.0 x LD(50) soman. Finally, all test drugs except galantamine reduced the survival of the animals when administered 1 or 3 h after the challenge with 0.6 or 0.7 x LD(50) soman. Thus, galantamine emerges as a superior antidotal therapy against the toxicity of soman. PMID:19741148

  12. Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla, and modulate hair type.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Waleed; Abbasi, Sepideh; Hagner, Andrew; Raharjo, Eko; Kumar, Ranjan; Hotta, Akitsu; Magness, Scott; Metzger, Daniel; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) provide instructive signals required to activate epithelial progenitors and initiate hair follicle regeneration. DP cell numbers fluctuate over the hair cycle, and hair loss is associated with gradual depletion/atrophy of DP cells. How DP cell numbers are maintained in healthy follicles remains unclear. We performed in vivo fate mapping of adult hair follicle dermal sheath (DS) cells to determine their lineage relationship with DP and found that a subset of DS cells are retained following each hair cycle, exhibit self-renewal, and repopulate the DS and the DP with new cells. Ablating these hair follicle dermal stem cells and their progeny retarded hair regrowth and altered hair type specification, suggesting that they function to modulate normal DP function. This work identifies a bipotent stem cell within the adult hair follicle mesenchyme and has important implications toward restoration of hair growth after injury, disease, and aging. PMID:25465495

  13. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  14. Comparative acute toxicity and primary irritancy of the ethylidene and vinyl isomers of norbornene.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Myers, R C; Klonne, D R

    1997-01-01

    The acute toxicity and primary irritancy of the industrial chemicals 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (ENB) and 5-vinyl-2-norbornene (VNB) were studied. They are of moderate acute peroral toxicity in the rat, with LD50 values for ENB of 2.54 (male) and 5.66 (female) ml kg(-1), and for VNB of 5.90 (male) and 11.9 (female) ml kg(-1). Percutaneous toxicity is slight in the rabbit by 24-h occluded contact, with no mortalities for ENB up to 8.0 ml kg(-1) and only one mortality (male) at 16.0 ml kg(-1) VNB. Dynamically generated saturated vapor atmosphere LT50 values for ENB in the rat were 75 (male) and 125 (female) min, and for VNB they were 28 (male) and 37 (female) min. The 4-h LC50 values for ENB were 2717 (male) and 3015 (female) ppm, and for VNB they were 2231 (male) and 2518 (female) ppm. Intravenously, the ENB LD50 ranged from 0.09 (male rabbit) to 0.11 ml kg(-1) (female); corresponding LD50 values for VNB were 0.10-0.05 mg kg(-1). Acute neurotoxic signs were seen by the intravenous and inhalation routes of exposure, including tremors, ataxia and convulsions; the latter were sufficient to cause vertebral column luxation or fracture, producing spinal cord compression and resultant hindlimb paralysis. Both ENB and VNB are moderately irritating to the skin (rabbit), causing erythema and edema, but not necrosis. Both materials cause slight conjunctival hyperemia and chemosis in rabbits, but not corneal injury. PMID:9285533

  15. Development of a QSAR for worst case estimates of acute toxicity of chemically reactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Freidig, A P; Dekkers, S; Verwei, M; Zvinavashe, E; Bessems, J G M; van de Sandt, J J M

    2007-05-15

    Future EU legislations enforce a fast hazard and risk assessment of thousands of existing chemicals. If conducted by means of present data requirements, this assessment will use a huge number of test animals and will be neither cost nor time effective. The purpose of the current research was to develop methods to increase the acceptability of in vitro data for classification and labelling regarding acute toxicity. For this purpose, a large existing database containing in vitro and in vivo data was analysed. For more than 300 compounds in the database, relations between in vitro cytotoxicity and rat or mouse intravenous and oral in vivo LD50 values were re-evaluated and the possibilities for definition of mechanism based chemical subclasses were investigated. A high in vitro-in vivo correlation was found for chemicals classified as irritants. This can be explained by a shared unspecific cytotoxicity of these compounds which will act as the predominant mode of action for both endpoints, irritation and acute toxicity. For this subclass, which covered almost 40% of all compounds in the database, the LD50 values after intravenous dosing could be predicted with high accuracy. A somewhat lower accuracy was found for the prediction of oral LD50 values based on in vitro cytotoxicity data. Based on this successful correlation, a classification and labelling scheme was developed, that includes a hazard based definition of the applicability domain (irritants) and a prediction of the labelling of compounds for their acute iv and oral toxicity. The scheme was tested by an external validation. PMID:17462838

  16. Effects of continuous wave and fractionated diode laser on human fibroblast cancer and dermal normal cells by zinc phthalocyanine in photodynamic therapy: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Navaeipour, Farzaneh; Afsharan, Hadi; Tajalli, Habib; Mollabashi, Mahmood; Ranjbari, Farideh; Montaseri, Azadeh; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    In this experimental study, cancer and normal cells behavior during an in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT) under exposure of continuous wave (CW) and fractionated mode of laser with different irradiation power and time intervals was compared and investigated. At the first, human fibroblast cancer cell line (SW 872) and human dermal normal (HFFF2) cell line were incubated with different concentrations of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), as a PDT drug. The cells, then, were irradiated with a 675nm diode laser and the cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Under optimized conditions, the viability of the cancer cells was eventually reduced to 3.23% and 13.17%, and that of normal cells was decreased to 20.83% and 36.23% using CW and fractionated diode lasers, respectively. In general, the ratio of ZnPc LD50 values for the normal cells to the cancer cells with CW laser was much higher than that of the fractionated laser. Subsequently, cancer cells in comparison with normal ones were found to be more sensitive toward the photodynamic damage induced by ZnPc. In addition, treatment with CW laser was found to be more effective against the cancer cells with a lower toxicity to the normal cells compared with the fractionated diode laser. PMID:27318602

  17. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  18. A confirmatory study of the up-and-down method for acute oral toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Bruce, R D

    1987-01-01

    Ten materials have been tested in parallel both by the "classical" method for acute oral toxicity (LD50) and by the up-and-down method. Materials tested included laundry and dishwashing detergents, a shampoo, a flavor, potassium hydroxide, and caffeine. All testing was done in Sprague-Dawley rats. Excellent agreement was seen between the two methods. The classical method typically used 40 to 50 animals while the up-and-down method required only six to nine animals per material. PMID:3556826

  19. LINKING DERMAL MODELING AND LOADING DATA TO PREDICT LONG-TERM DOSES FROM INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assess dermal exposure and dose resulting from intermittent contact with residue-contaminated surfaces. These estimates require an understanding of (1) the quantitative relationship between exposure and absorbed dose; (2) the impact of intermittent exposure on ...

  20. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin. PMID:24269878

  1. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  2. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  3. Effectiveness of Donepezil, Rivastigmine, and (±)Huperzine A in Counteracting the Acute Toxicity of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents: Comparison with Galantamine

    PubMed Central

    Aracava, Yasco; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Akkerman, Miriam; Adler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Galantamine, a centrally acting cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor and a nicotinic allosteric potentiating ligand used to treat Alzheimer's disease, is an effective and safe antidote against poisoning with nerve agents, including soman. Here, the effectiveness of galantamine was compared with that of the centrally active ChE inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and (±)huperzine A as a pre- and/or post-treatment to counteract the acute toxicity of soman. In the first set of experiments, male prepubertal guinea pigs were treated intramuscularly with one of the test drugs and 30 min later challenged with 1.5 × LD50 soman (42 μg/kg s.c.). All animals that were pretreated with galantamine (6–8 mg/kg), 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A survived the soman challenge, provided that they were also post-treated with atropine (10 mg/kg i.m.). However, only galantamine was well tolerated. In subsequent experiments, the effectiveness of specific treatment regimens using 8 mg/kg galantamine, 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A was compared in guinea pigs challenged with soman. In the absence of atropine, only galantamine worked as an effective and safe pretreatment in animals challenged with 1.0 × LD50 soman. Galantamine was also the only drug to afford significant protection when given to guinea pigs after 1.0 × LD50 soman. Finally, all test drugs except galantamine reduced the survival of the animals when administered 1 or 3 h after the challenge with 0.6 or 0.7 × LD50 soman. Thus, galantamine emerges as a superior antidotal therapy against the toxicity of soman. PMID:19741148

  4. Acute Toxicity and General Pharmacological Action of QGC EXT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Mi; Im, Wi Joon; Nam, Yoon Jin; Oh, Kyung Hoon; Lim, Jae Chun; Whang, Wan Kyunn

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that QGC isolated and purified from Rumecis folium found protective effects of gastritis and esophagitis which EXT is an ethanol extract of it. We examined acute toxicity and the general pharmacological action of QGC EXT to search for any side effects of it in rats, mice, guinea pigs, and cats. In a single dose toxicity study, QGC EXT didn't show toxicological effects in rats and mice, and the LD50 was over 5 g/kg in both animals, and there were also no changes in weight, feed and water intake during these toxicological experimental periods. We examined the general pharmacological action on central controlled behavior responses, and peripheral organs including blood pressure, heart rate, respiration and gastrointestinal system, We found that there were no significant changes in body temperature, locomotors activity, stereotyped behaviors, sleeping time, and convulsion. In other studies, writhing reaction, normal body temperature, there did not appear to be any changes. The large intestine movement and electrical field stimulation-induced contraction was not changes by its EXT. In addition, the influences on blood pressure, heart rates, and respiration by QGC EXT were not found. These results indicate that QGC EXT may be very safe as a new drug, since its LD50 was very high over 5 g/kg and any side effects were not found. PMID:22416220

  5. Dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals: Criteria for skin notation

    SciTech Connect

    Fiserova-Bergerova, V.; Pierce, J.T.; Droz, P.O. )

    1990-01-01

    A dermal penetration rate (flux), predicted from physical properties of 132 chemicals, is suggested as an index of the dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals. The prediction is designed for organic nonelectrolytes. Two reference values are recommended as criteria for skin notation: (1) dermal absorption potential, which relates to dermal absorption raising the dose of nonvolatile chemicals or biological levels of volatile chemicals 30% above those observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only--dermal absorption of chemicals belonging to this category should be considered when data obtained by biological monitoring are interpreted; and (2) dermal toxicity potential, which relates to dermal absorption that triples biological levels as compared with levels observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only. Chemicals belonging in this category should carry a skin notation. The toxicity criteria may not be valid for chemicals whose TLVs are based on preventing irritation and discomfort.

  6. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... prior to the test before the test animals are randomized and assigned to the treatment groups....

  7. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... prior to the test before the test animals are randomized and assigned to the treatment groups....

  8. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... prior to the test before the test animals are randomized and assigned to the treatment groups....

  9. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... prior to the test before the test animals are randomized and assigned to the treatment groups....

  10. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the... prior to the test before the test animals are randomized and assigned to the treatment groups....

  11. Exploring waiving opportunities for mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Asturiol, David; Prieto, Pilar; Worth, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    A survey was carried out to explore opportunities for waiving mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests. We were interested in finding out whether data from a sub-acute toxicity test could be used to predict the outcome of an acute systemic toxicity test. The survey was directed at experts in the field of toxicity testing, and was carried out in the context of the upcoming 2018 final registration deadline for chemicals under the EU REACH Regulation. In addition to the survey, a retrospective data analysis of chemicals that had already been registered with the European Chemicals Agency, and for which both acute and sub-acute toxicity data were available, was carried out. This data analysis was focused on chemicals that were administered via the oral route. The answers to the questionnaire showed a willingness to adopt waiving opportunities. In addition, the responses showed that data from a sub-acute toxicity test or dose-range finding study might be useful for predicting chemicals that do not require classification for acute oral toxicity (LD50 > 2000mg/kg body weight). However, with the exception of substances that fall into the non-classified category, it is difficult to predict current acute oral toxicity categories. PMID:27494626

  12. A method for measuring dermal exposure to solvents and fumigants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a method for evaluating dermal exposure to deposits of volatile liquids. Telone II, a fumigant containing 1,3-dichloropropene (DCP), was used as an example. The approach included direct monitoring of dermal deposits and estimating the dermal absorbed dose. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters were developed for retaining the volatile deposits. Estimates are given for the retention efficiencies to be expected in various field conditions. The dermally absorbed dose is affected by the evaporation rate from the skin and by the percutaneous absorption rate (flux). Both factors were studied by the dermal dosing of ras with Telone, and monitoring evaporation and urine metabolites of cis-DCP. While relatively high flux values were calculated for rat and estimated for man, due to fast evaporation, the estimated absorbed fraction from a localized dermal deposit was less than 0.2%. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters and charcoal tubes were used in ten studies to monitor dermal and respiratory exposure of field applicators to Telone. The charcoal cloth dosimeter method is applicable for monitoring dermal exposure to other volatile chemicals also. However, evaluation of the exposure could be associated with relatively large variability, rendering the method semiquantitative.

  13. Dermal Adipocytes: From Irrelevance to Metabolic Targets?

    PubMed

    Kruglikov, Ilja L; Scherer, Philipp E

    2016-01-01

    Dermal white adipose tissue (dWAT) has received little appreciation in the past as a distinct entity from the better recognized subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). However, recent work has established dWAT as an important contributor to a multitude of processes, including immune response, wound healing and scarring, hair follicle (HF) growth, and thermoregulation. Unique metabolic contributions have also been attributed to dWAT, at least in part due to its thermic insulation properties and response to cold exposure. Dermal adipocytes can also undergo an adipocyte-myofibroblast transition (AMT), a process that is suspected to have an important role in several pathophysiological processes within the skin. Here, we discuss emerging concepts regarding dWAT physiology and its significance to a variety of cellular processes. PMID:26643658

  14. A morphoelastic model for dermal wound closure.

    PubMed

    Bowden, L G; Byrne, H M; Maini, P K; Moulton, D E

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model of wound healing in the framework of finite elasticity, focussing our attention on the processes of growth and contraction in the dermal layer of the skin. The dermal tissue is treated as a hyperelastic cylinder that surrounds the wound and is subject to symmetric deformations. By considering the initial recoil that is observed upon the application of a circular wound, we estimate the degree of residual tension in the skin and build an evolution law for mechanosensitive growth of the dermal tissue. Contraction of the wound is governed by a phenomenological law in which radial pressure is prescribed at the wound edge. The model reproduces three main phases of the healing process. Initially, the wound recoils due to residual stress in the surrounding tissue; the wound then heals as a result of contraction and growth; and finally, healing slows as contraction and growth decrease. Over a longer time period, the surrounding tissue remodels, returning to the residually stressed state. We identify the steady state growth profile associated with this remodelled state. The model is then used to predict the outcome of rewounding experiments designed to quantify the amount of stress in the tissue, and also to simulate the application of pressure treatments. PMID:26264498

  15. Ventral vs. dorsal chick dermal progenitor specification.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ingrid; Viallet, Jean P; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The dorsal and the ventral trunk integuments of the chick differ in their dermal cell lineage (originating from the somatic and somatopleural mesoderm respectively) and in the distribution of their feather fields. The dorsal macropattern has a large spinal pteryla surrounded by semi-apteria, whereas the ventral skin has a true medial apterium surrounded by the ventral pterylae. Comparison of the results of heterotopic transplantations of distal somatopleure in place of somatic mesoderm (Mauger 1972) or in place of proximal somatopleure (our data), leads to two conclusions. These are that the fate of the midventral apterium is not committed at day 2 of incubation and that the signals from the environment which specify the ventral and dorsal featherforming dermal progenitors are different. Effectively, Shh, but not Wnt -1 signalling can induce the formation of feather forming dermis from the embryonic somatopleure. Shh is not able, however, to trigger the formation of a feather forming dermis from the extra embryonic somatopleure. This brief report constitutes the first attempt, by comparing old and new preliminary results, to understand whether dermal progenitors at different sites are specified by different signalling pathways. PMID:15272375

  16. Evaluation of electric arc furnace-processed steel slag for dermal corrosion, irritation, and sensitization from dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Troese, Matthew J; Hall, Debra A; Yasso, Blair; Yzenas, John J; Proctor, Debora M

    2014-12-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag is alkaline (pH of ~11-12) and contains metals, most notably chromium and nickel, and thus has potential to cause dermal irritation and sensitization at sufficient dose. Dermal contact with EAF slag occurs in many occupational and environmental settings because it is used widely in construction and other industrial sectors for various applications including asphaltic paving, road bases, construction fill, and as feed for cement kilns construction. However, no published study has characterized the potential for dermal effects associated with EAF slag. To assess dermal irritation, corrosion and sensitizing potential of EAF slag, in vitro and in vivo dermal toxicity assays were conducted based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. In vitro dermal corrosion and irritation testing (OECD 431 and 439) of EAF slag was conducted using the reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) tissue model. In vivo dermal toxicity and delayed contact sensitization testing (OECD 404 and 406) were conducted in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. EAF slag was not corrosive and not irritating in any tests. The results of the delayed contact dermal sensitization test indicate that EAF slag is not a dermal sensitizer. These findings are supported by the observation that metals in EAF slag occur as oxides of low solubility with leachates that are well below toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits. Based on these results and in accordance to the OECD guidelines, EAF slag is not considered a dermal sensitizer, corrosive or irritant. PMID:24395402

  17. Evaluation of dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Matsuda, Akitaka; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Naya, Masato; Nakanishi, Junko

    2011-12-01

    The present paper summarizes the results of our studies on dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whose potential applications and uses are wide and varied, including CNT-enhanced plastics, electromagnetic interference/radio-frequency (EMI/RFI) shielding, antistatic material, flexible fibers and advanced polymers, medical and health applications, and scanning probe microscopy. Skin and eyes have the highest risk of exposure to nanomaterials, because deposition of nanomaterials to the surficial organs has the potential to be a major route of exposure during the manufacturing, use, and disposal of nanomaterials. Two products composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and two products composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were tested regarding acute dermal and acute eye irritation using rabbits, and skin sensitization using guinea pigs. The concentrations of the CNTs in the substances were the maximum allowable for administration. The two products of SWCNTs and one of the products of MWCNTs were not irritants to the skin or eyes. The other product of MWCNTs caused very slight erythema at 24h, but not at 72h, after patch removal in the dermal irritation experiments and conjunctival redness and blood vessel hyperemia at 1h, but not at 24h, in eye irritation experiments. These findings showed that one product of MWCNTs was a very weak acute irritant to the skin and eyes. No products of SWCNTs and MWCNTs exhibited skin-sensitization effects. Our knowledge of the toxicological effects of CNTs is still limited. Further information is needed to clarify the potential for irritation and sensitization given the complex nature of CNTs. PMID:21893152

  18. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  19. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposures of firefighters during suppression of structural burns.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Fent, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposures over a working lifetime, in particular about low-level exposures that might serve as initiating events for adverse outcome pathways (AOP) leading to cancer. As part of a larger US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study of dermal exposure protection from safety gear used by the City of Chicago firefighters, we collected pre- and post-fire fighting breath samples and analyzed for single-ring and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as bioindicators of occupational exposure to gas-phase toxicants. Under the assumption that SCBA protects completely against inhalation exposures, any changes in the exhaled profile of combustion products were attributed to dermal exposures from gas and particle penetration through the protective clothing. Two separate rounds of firefighting activity were performed each with 15 firefighters per round. Exhaled breath samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analyzed with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a targeted approach using selective ion monitoring. We found that single ring aromatics and some PAHs were statistically elevated in post-firefighting samples of some individuals, suggesting that fire protective gear may allow for dermal exposures to airborne contaminants. However, in comparison to a previous occupational study of Air Force maintenance personnel where similar compounds were measured, these exposures are much lower suggesting that firefighters' gear is very effective. This study suggests that exhaled breath sampling and analysis for specific targeted compounds is a suitable method for assessing systemic dermal exposure in a simple and non-invasive manner. PMID:25190461

  20. Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Das, Dipti; Das, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is a rare nevoid condition characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities, having distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually present at birth or in childhood. We present here a case of late-onset PEODDN in a 23-year-old man who had lesions on the palm, forearm, arm and the chest along the lines of Blaschko, strictly localized to the left side of the body. PMID:25821735

  1. Acute toxicity of pinnatoxins E, F and G to mice.

    PubMed

    Munday, Rex; Selwood, Andrew I; Rhodes, Lesley

    2012-11-01

    The acute toxicities to mice of pinnatoxins E, F and G, members of the cyclic imine group of phycotoxins, by intraperitoneal injection and/or oral administration, have been determined. These substances were all very toxic by intraperitoneal injection, with LD(50) values between 12.7 and 57 μg/kg. Pinnatoxin E was much less toxic by oral administration than by intraperitoneal injection, but this was not the case for pinnatoxin F. The median lethal doses of the latter substance by gavage and by voluntary intake were only 2 and 4 times higher than that by injection. The high oral toxicity of pinnatoxin F raises concerns as to the possibility of adverse effects of this substance in shellfish consumers, although it should be noted that no toxic effects in humans have been recorded with pinnatoxins or with any other compound of the cyclic imine group. PMID:22813782

  2. CARD14 Expression in Dermal Endothelial Cells in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Jamie L.; Lewis, Steven M.; Pierson, Katherine C.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S.; Zaba, Lisa C.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M.; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31+ endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14+ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14+ CD31+ ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  3. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  4. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  5. Pseudoxantoma elasticum-like dermal elastolysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    López, Verónica; Revert, Angeles; Santonja, Nuria; Jordá, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    Elastic fibers are components of dermal connective tissue that can be affected in several acquired disorders. Recently, a new entity known as pseudoxanthoma-like papillary dermal elastolysis has been described. We present a case in a 61-year-old woman. PMID:21549088

  6. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  8. The botulinum toxin LD50 potency assay - another chapter, another mystery.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Andy

    2012-09-01

    Observers of the potency assay used for botulinum toxin were greeted last year with the news that one company had an alternative, non-animal alternative in place. But all was not as it seemed from the press release, and over a year later, information is still lacking. PMID:23067303

  9. Evaluation of Caenorhabditis elegans as an acute lethality and a neurotoxicity screening model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This investigation evaluated C. elegans as a lethality and neurotoxicity screening model. The lethality experiments were performed in both agar and an aquatic medium. The salts of 8 metals (Hg, Be, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and Sr) were used in the agar studies and the salts of 14 metals (Ag, Hg, Cu, Be, Al, Pb, Cr, As, Tl, Zn, Cd, Ni, Sr, and Sb) were used in the aquatic tests. In each of these tests an LC50 value was determined. The data from the agar plates were compared to the published mammalian oral LD50 values for salts of the same metals. Within this set of chemicals C. elegans was found to be a predictor of mammalian acute lethality, generating LC50 values parallel to the rat and mouse LD50 values. The aquatic data were compared to data from EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents. C. elegans was found to be less sensitive than Daphnia but generally more sensitive than the other invertebrate organisms that are presently used. The neurotoxicity testing also was performed in both agar and an aquatic media. The testing in agar was conducted with the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg) and 2 organophosphate pesticides (malathion and vapona). The studies in an aquatic medium tested the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg).

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity testing of 30 reference chemicals to predict acute human and animal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Arjun, S.; Borges, L. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted in cooperation with the Scandinavian Society of Cell Toxicology, as part of the Multicenter Evaluation for In Vitro Cytotoxicity (MEIC), and was designed to develop an in vitro model for predicting acute human and animal toxicity. The technique relies on the ability of cultured transformed rat lung epithelial cells (L2) to incorporate radiolabled amino acids into newly synthesized proteins in the absence or presence of increasing doses of the test chemical, during a 24-hr incubation. IC50 values were extrapolated from the dose-response curves after linear regression analysis. Human toxic blood concentrations estimated from rodent LD50 values suggest that our experimental IC50's are in close correlation with the former. Validation of the data by the MEIC committee shows that our IC50 values predicted human lethal dosage as efficient as rodent LD50's. It is anticipated that this and related procedures may supplement or replace currently used animal protocols for predicting human toxicity.

  11. Cytogenetic and hematological alterations induced by acute oral exposure of imidacloprid in female mice.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Sudhir Kumar; Chhillar, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Ajay; Tomar, Monika; Malik, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Imidacloprid (IMD), 1(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl)-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine, was administered in female mice to study in vivo cytogenetic (chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronucleus assay) and hematological effects. The acute oral LD50 was determined to be 150 mg/kg bw in mice following OECD guidelines using AOT StatPgm425 software. The mice were administered orally with distilled water (negative control); mitomycin C (MMC), 1 mg/kg (positive control) and sub-lethal doses of 37.5 (low), 75.0 (medium) and 112.5 (high) mg/kg bw (25%, 50% and 75% of LD50) of IMD to analyze CAs and hematological effects after 24 h, whereas micronucleus test (MT) after 48 h. The genotoxicity analysis revealed that selected test doses of IMD--medium and high doses--induced significantly mitotic inhibition (p < 0.01), CAs (p < 0.01) and at high dose micronucleus (MN) formation (p < 0.05). Significant changes in red blood cell (RBC; p < 0.01), hemoglobin (Hb; p < 0.01) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR; p < 0.001) were observed, except WBC in which significant increase (p < 0.001) was observed. Present observation substantiates overall significant dose dependent genotoxic potential (p < 0.05; r = 0.98) of IMD. Precautions should be taken to minimize possible risk to exposed farmers of the state of Haryana (India)--an agrarian economy. PMID:25826183

  12. Acute and subacute toxicity study of 1,8-cineole in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiao; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Yin, Zhong-Qiong; Wei, Qin; Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Li; Du, Yong-Hua; Jia, Ren-Yong; Li, Mei; Fan, Qiao-Jia; Liang, Xiao-Xia; He, Chang-Liang; Yin, Li-Zi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of acute and subacute toxicity of 1,8-cineole in Kunming mice were studied. After acute oral administration, the LD50 value (95% CL) was 3849 mg/kg (3488.8~4247.1 mg/kg). In the subacute toxicity study, there were no significant differences in body weight and relative organ weight between the control group and 1,8-cineole treatment groups. The histopathological examinations showed that granular degeneration and vacuolar degeneration appeared in liver and kidney tissue after administration of high dose of 1,8-cineole. Under electron microscopy, a series of ultrastructural changes were observed: The electron microscopy assays indicated that the influence of 1,8-cineole on the target organ at the subcellular level were mainly on the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and other membrane type structure of liver and kidney. PMID:24817945

  13. Acute mouse and chronic dog toxicity studies of danthron, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, poloxalkol and combinations.

    PubMed

    Case, M T; Smith, J K; Nelson, R A

    Because of an apparent typographic error in a US patent, there has been some confusion as to the acute oral toxicity of danthron and danthron in combination with dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DSS). Acute oral toxicity studies in mice revealed LD50 values of greater than 7 gm/kg for danthron, 2.64 gm/kg for DSS and 3.42 gm/kg for danthron/DSS mixture (1:2 ratio). These results indicate that the lethality of these compounds is in the gm/kg range and not in the mg/kg range. A one year chronic toxicity study of danthron, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, poloxalkol and combinations in dogs failed to reveal any toxic effects. In particular, there was no evidence of hepatotoxicity or of any changes in the myenteric plexuses in the chronically treated dogs. PMID:90594

  14. Toxicological evaluation of neem (Azadirachta indica) oil: acute and subacute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun-xia; Cao, Mei; Shi, Dong-xia; Yin, Zhong-qiong; Jia, Ren-yong; Xu, Jiao; Wang, Chuan; Lv, Cheng; Liang, Xiao-xia; He, Chang-liang; Yang, Zhi-rong; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica), popularly known as traditional medicine is a native plant in India. Neem oil is a vegetable oil derived from seeds or fruits of the neem tree through pressing or solvent extraction, and largely used in popular medicine to have antifungal, antibacterial, antimalarial, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, as well as immunemodulatory properties in different animal species. In the present study, acute and 28-day subacute toxicity tests were carried out. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of neem oil were found to be 31.95g/kg. The subacute treatment with neem oil failed to change body weight gain, food and water consumption. Serum biochemistry analysis showed no significant differences in any of the parameters examined under the dose of 1600mg/kg/day. Histopathological exams showed that the target organs of neem oil were testicle, liver and kidneys up to the dose of 1600mg/kg/day. PMID:23353547

  15. Dermal exposure to environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Moody, R P; Chu, I

    1995-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature to determine the importance of the dermal route of exposure for swimmers and bathers using Great Lakes waters and summarizes the chemical water contaminants of concern in the Great Lakes along with relevant dermal absorption data. We detail in vivo and in vitro methods of quantifying the degree of dermal absorption and discuss a preference for infinite dose data as opposed to finite dose data. The basic mechanisms of the dermal absorption process, routes of chemical entry, and the environmental and physiological factors affecting this process are also reviewed, and we discuss the concepts of surface slick exposure to lipophilic compounds and the adsorption of contaminants to water sediment. After presenting mathematical constructs for calculating the degree of exposure, we present in vitro data concerning skin absorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed to Great Lakes water sediment to show that in a worst-case scenario exposure via the dermal route can be equally important to the oral route. We have concluded that prolonged exposure of the skin, especially under conditions that may enhance dermal absorption (e.g., sunburn) may result in toxicologically significant amounts of certain water contaminants being absorbed. It is recommended that swimming should be confined to public beaches, people should refrain from swimming if they are sunburned, and skin should be washed with soap as soon as possible following exposure. Future studies should be conducted to investigate the importance of the dermal exposure route to swimmers and bathers. PMID:8635434

  16. Dermal exposure to environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, R P; Chu, I

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature to determine the importance of the dermal route of exposure for swimmers and bathers using Great Lakes waters and summarizes the chemical water contaminants of concern in the Great Lakes along with relevant dermal absorption data. We detail in vivo and in vitro methods of quantifying the degree of dermal absorption and discuss a preference for infinite dose data as opposed to finite dose data. The basic mechanisms of the dermal absorption process, routes of chemical entry, and the environmental and physiological factors affecting this process are also reviewed, and we discuss the concepts of surface slick exposure to lipophilic compounds and the adsorption of contaminants to water sediment. After presenting mathematical constructs for calculating the degree of exposure, we present in vitro data concerning skin absorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed to Great Lakes water sediment to show that in a worst-case scenario exposure via the dermal route can be equally important to the oral route. We have concluded that prolonged exposure of the skin, especially under conditions that may enhance dermal absorption (e.g., sunburn) may result in toxicologically significant amounts of certain water contaminants being absorbed. It is recommended that swimming should be confined to public beaches, people should refrain from swimming if they are sunburned, and skin should be washed with soap as soon as possible following exposure. Future studies should be conducted to investigate the importance of the dermal exposure route to swimmers and bathers. PMID:8635434

  17. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Brouwer, Derk H; Vermeulen, Roel; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others, resulting in a ranking of tasks and subsequently jobs. DREAM consists of an inventory and evaluation part. Two examples of dermal exposure of workers of a car-construction company show that DREAM characterizes tasks and gives insight into exposure mechanisms, forming a basis for systematic exposure reduction. DREAM supplies estimates for exposure levels on the outside clothing layer as well as on skin, and provides insight into the distribution of dermal exposure over the body. Together with the ranking of tasks and people, this provides information for measurement strategies and helps to determine who, where and what to measure. In addition to dermal exposure assessment, the systematic description of dermal exposure pathways helps to prioritize and determine most adequate measurement strategies and methods. DREAM could be a promising approach for structured, semi-quantitative, dermal exposure assessment. PMID:12505908

  18. Evaluation of systemic and dermal toxicity and dermal photoprotection by sour cherry kernels.

    PubMed

    Bak, Istvan; Czompa, Attila; Csepanyi, Evelin; Juhasz, Bela; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Najm, Khadija; Aghel, Nasreen; Varga, Balazs; Haines, David D; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-11-01

    The present report describes outcomes of animal studies conducted to determine the systemic and dermal toxicity of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) seed kernel contents; and a separate evaluation of the photoprotective capacity of the kernel oil fraction. B6 mice and Hartley guinea-pigs were used for these experiments. Dosage groups of 6-8 animals were administered whole kernel meal in a dose range of 0-3000 mg/kg by gavage for 8 days, following which they were killed. The liver and kidney weights were recorded and histological examination performed on sections of these organs. Kidney function was assessed as blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and liver function by measurement of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. Dermal toxicity was evaluated in a Hartley guinea-pig model by comparing UVB-irradiated shaved skin to which the kernel oil had been applied with distilled water controls. In conclusion, no evidence of toxicity was observed to result from the consumption or dermal application of sour cherry seed kernel in the dose range at which it is likely to be used in foods or healthcare. Moreover, it was shown to have a powerful capacity to protect skin from UV damage. These results suggest it will prove to be a highly safe and effective addition to a wide range of products for general use. PMID:21751269

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Dermal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Sharif; Mohan, Yedathore; Malik, Asif; Malik, Ghaus; Gonik, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is an uncommon form of spinal dysraphism. Although postdelivery identification in the neonate is aided by several associated physical examination findings, establishing this diagnosis prenatally has proven to be elusive. Case Report We present a case of CDS where the prenatal findings at 20 weeks gestation led to the diagnosis, which was confirmed postnatally. The associated protrusion of fibrotic membranes through the sinus tract helped in the identification of this lesion prenatally, but created confusion with a more common type of lesion, an open neural tube defect. This is the first case report in the literature describing prenatal diagnosis of fetal CDS. Conclusion Prenatal diagnosis with postnatal confirmation of CDS leads to early intervention, better long-term outcomes, and lesser complications. PMID:26199797

  20. Formulation of diclofenac for dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choon Fu; Lane, Majella E

    2014-10-01

    Diclofenac (DF) was first synthesized in the 1960's and is currently available as ophthalmic, oral, parenteral, rectal and skin preparations. This review focuses on the administration of DF to the skin. As a member of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) group of drugs the primary indications of DF are for the management of inflammation and pain but it is also used to treat actinic keratosis. The specific aims of this paper are to: (i) provide an overview of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of DF following oral and topical administration; (ii) examine critically the various formulation approaches which have been investigated to enhance dermal delivery of DF; and (iii) identify new formulation strategies for enhanced DF skin penetration. PMID:25091375

  1. Porokeratotic Eccrine Ostial and Dermal Duct Nevus

    PubMed Central

    Naraghi, Mona Masoumeh; Goodarzi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    PEODDN is a rare benign cutaneous disorder that clinically resembles comedo nevus but favors the palms and soles, where pilosebaceous follicles are absent. Widespread involvement along Blaschko's lines can also occur. It is a disorder of keratinization involving the intraepidermal eccrine duct (acrosyringium) and is characterized by eccrine hamartoma and cornoid lamellation in pathology. The patient is a 29-year-old man with an 8-year history of pruritic skin lesions on his right lateral ankle. In the pathologic examination, multiple small epidermal invagination with overlying parakeratotic cornoid lamellation, loss of granular layer, and few dyskeratotic cells at the base of epidermal invagination are revealed. After clinic-pathologic correlation, the diagnosis of porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) was made. Late-onset and rare clinical presentation as pruritic lesion are the characteristic features that make this patient an extraordinary presentation of PEODDN. PMID:24307955

  2. Dermal-exposure assessment: Principles and applications. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the document is to describe the principles of dermal absorption and show how to apply these principles in actual human exposure scenarios. The primary focus of the document is on dermal contact with water, soils and vapors. For each of these media, the experimental data on the dermal properties of specific compounds are summarized and methods are provided for predicting these properties when data is lacking. Additionally, scenario factors describing the frequency, duration and intensity of contact are presented for the soil and water media.

  3. Dermal reflectivity determined by optical coherence tomography is an indicator of epidermal hyperplasia and dermal edema within inflamed skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Levitz, David; Choudhury, Niloy; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of inflammation in psoriasis remain unclear. We undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to noninvasively document cutaneous alterations in mouse skin treated topically with Imiquimod (IMQ), an established model of a psoriasis-like disease. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a two parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(x, y, z) = ρ(x, y)exp [ - μ(x, y)z]. Ensemble averaging over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed no significant changes in the average dermal attenuation rate, <μ>, however the average local dermal reflectivity <ρ>, decreased significantly following 1, 3, and 6 days of IMQ treatment (p < 0.001) in comparison to vehicle-treated control mice. In contrast, epidermal and dermal thickness changes were only significant when comparing controls and 6-day IMQ treated mice. This suggests that dermal alterations, attributed to collagen fiber bundle enlargement, occur prior to epidermal thickness changes due to hyperplasia and dermal thickness changes due to edema. Dermal reflectivity positively correlated with epidermal hyperplasia (repi2 = 0.78) and dermal edema (rderm2 = 0.86). Our results suggest that dermal reflectivity as measured by OCT can be utilized to quantify a psoriasis-like disease in mice, and thus has the potential to aid in the quantitative assessment of psoriasis in humans.

  4. Dermal and epidermal chromatophores of the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Obika, M; Meyer-Rochow, V B

    1990-01-01

    The physiological response and ultrastructure of the pigment cells of Trematomus bernacchii, an Antarctic teleost that lives under the sea ice north of the Ross Ice Shelf, were studied. In the integument, two types of epidermal chromatophores, melanophores and xanthophores, were found; in the dermis, typically three types of chromatophores--melanophores, xanthophores, and iridophores--were observed. The occurrence of epidermal xanthophore is reported for the first time in fish. Dermal melanophores and xanthophores have well-developed arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules. They responded rapidly to epinephrine and teleost melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) with pigment aggregation and to theophylline with pigment dispersion. Total darkness elicited pigment aggregation in the majority of dermal xanthophores of isolated scales, whereas melanophores remained dispersed under both light and dark conditions. Pigment organelles of epidermal and dermal xanthophores that translocate during the pigmentary responses are carotenoid droplets of relatively large size. Dermal iridophores containing large reflecting platelets appeared to be immobile. PMID:2377579

  5. Dermal exposure and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among asphalt roofing workers

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, M.D.; Rinehart, R.D.; Sapkota, A.; Cavallari, J.M.; Herrick, R.F.

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify significant determinants of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among asphalt roofing workers and use urinary 1-hydroxyprene (1-OHP) measurements to evaluate the effect of dermal exposure on total absorbed dose. The study population included 26 asphalt roofing workers who performed three primary tasks: tearing off old roofs, putting down new roofs, and operating the kettle at ground level. During multiple consecutive work shifts, dermal patch samples were collected from the underside of each worker's wrists and were analyzed for PACs, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BAP). During the same work week, urine samples were collected at pre-shift, post-shift, and bedtime each day and were analyzed for 1-OHP (205 urine samples). Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the dermal measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of exposure, and to evaluate urinary 1-OHP measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of total absorbed dose. Dermal exposures to PAC, pyrene, and BAP were found to vary significantly by roofing task and by the presence of an old coal tar pitch roof. For each of the three analytes, the adjusted mean dermal exposures associated with tear-off were approximately four times higher than exposures associated with operating the kettle. Exposure to coal tar pitch was associated with a 6-fold increase in PAC exposure, an 8-fold increase in pyrene exposure and a 35-fold increase in BAP exposure. The presence of coal tar pitch was the primary determinant of dermal exposure, particularly for exposure to BAP. However, the task-based differences that were observed while controlling for pitch suggest that exposure to asphalt also contributes to dermal exposures.

  6. Morphological and physiological characteristics of dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Takigami, Satoshi; Sunada, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Tetsuro; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Dermal photoreceptors located in the mantle of Lymnaea stagnalis were histologically and physiologically characterized. Our previous study demonstrated that the shadow response from dermal photoreceptors induces the whole-body withdrawal response. Through the interneuron, RPeD11, we detected that the light-off response indirectly originated from a dermal photoreceptor. Previous observations, based on behavioral pharmacology, revealed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate acts as a second messenger in the dermal photoreceptor. Furthermore, gastropods possess dermal photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, as a photopigment, and another photo-sensitive protein, arrestin, responsible for terminating the light response. Thus, we chose three antibodies, anti-cGMP, anti-rhodopsin, and anti-β-arrestin, to identify the dermal photoreceptor molecules in Lymnaea mantle. Extracellular recording, using a suction electrode on the mantle, revealed a light off-response from the right parietal nerve. Overlapping structures, positive against each of the antibodies, were also observed. Numerous round, granular particles of 3–47 μm in diameter with one nucleus were distributed around pneumostome and/or inside the mantle. The cells surrounding the pneumostome area, located 10 μm beneath the surface, tended to have smaller cell soma ranging from 3 to 25 μm in diameter, while cells located in other areas were distributed uniformly inside the mantle, with a larger diameter ranging from 12 to 47 μm. The histological examination using back-filing Lucifer Yellow staining of the right parietal nerve with the three dermal photoreceptor antibodies confirmed that these overlapping-stained structures were dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea. PMID:27493502

  7. Defining the identity of mouse embryonic dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Budnick, Isadore; Hamburg-Shields, Emily; Chen, Demeng; Torre, Eduardo; Jarrell, Andrew; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Cordovan, Olivia; Spitale, Rob C; Scacheri, Peter; Atit, Radhika P

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic dermal fibroblasts in the skin have the exceptional ability to initiate hair follicle morphogenesis and contribute to scarless wound healing. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is critical for dermal fibroblast fate selection and hair follicle induction. In humans, mutations in Wnt pathway components and target genes lead to congenital focal dermal hypoplasias with diminished hair. The gene expression signature of embryonic dermal fibroblasts during differentiation and its dependence on Wnt signaling is unknown. Here we applied Shannon entropy analysis to identify the gene expression signature of mouse embryonic dermal fibroblasts. We used available human DNase-seq and histone modification ChiP-seq data on various cell-types to demonstrate that genes in the fibroblast cell identity signature can be epigenetically repressed in other cell-types. We found a subset of the signature genes whose expression is dependent on Wnt/β-catenin activity in vivo. With our approach, we have defined and validated a statistically derived gene expression signature that may mediate dermal fibroblast identity and function in development and disease. genesis 54:415-430, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27265328

  8. Under-dermal emulator of vascular identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Joseph; Blake, Robert; Rich, Alex; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper and research effort is to develop a simple and clear apparatus and approach to quantify the effectiveness of sensor systems as it relates to their ability to penetrate camouflage and resolve skin depth. Over the last decade, several attempts have been made to leverage advances in Infrared (IR) imaging, made by the military, into medical sensing [1]. Several promising technologies have been evaluated and thus far determined to be lacking when compared to the current standards of care based on x-ray imaging [2]. While progress has been made this general class of technology has not generated wide spread interest from the medical community. This lack of interest is discouraging, especially when considering the great potential for good that would result in successfully demonstrating a truly passive tumor detection system based on thermal signatures. Recently, this team participated as part of a larger group in the development and testing of a novel class of algorithms using images from two separate IR spectra. This area of spectral fusing algorithms is called the Single Pixel-Blind Source Separation (SP-BSS). While the goal of experiment is not new, our results showed this approach provided potential improvements over more traditional thermography, particularly in the area of overcoming environmental noise. These promising results have motivated us to develop a method for running controlled experiments so that the equipment and algorithms can be optimized and the significant engineering challenges of frame registration, data standardization, and sensor optimization for wellness screening can be accomplished. Conducting these efforts using data from human subjects is both impractical and unwarranted at this time. We have developed a physics-physiological under-dermal model of internal vascular circulation that approximates not only a healthy human body (angiogenesis effect) but also a human body developing a tumor (neo-angiogenesis effect). This

  9. Comparison of International Guidelines of Dermal Absorption Tests Used in Pesticides Exposure Assessment for Operators

    PubMed Central

    So, Jaehwan; Ahn, Junyoung; Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Kyung-Hun; Paik, Min-Kyoung; Jeong, Mihye; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-01-01

    The number of farmers who have suffered from non-fatal acute pesticide poisoning has been reported to vary from 5.7% to 86.7% in South Korea since 1975. Absorption through the skin is the main route of exposure to pesticides for farmers who operate with them. Several in vitro tests using the skins of humans or animal and in vivo tests using laboratory animals are introduced for the assessment of human dermal absorption level of pesticides. The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare international guidelines and strategies of dermal absorption assessments and to propose unique approaches for applications into pesticide registration process in our situation. Until present in our situation, pesticide exposure level to operator is determined just using default value of 10 as for skin absorption ratio because of data shortage. Dermal absorption tests are requested to get exposure level of pesticides and to ultimately know the safety of pesticides for operators through the comparison with the value of AOEL. When the exposure level is higher than AOEL, the pesticide cannot be approved. We reviewed the skin absorption test guidelines recommended by OECD, EFSA and EPA. The EPA recommends assessment of skin absorption of pesticides for humans through the TPA which includes all the results of in vitro human and animal and animal in vivo skin absorption studies. OECD and EFSA, employ a tiered approach, which the requirement of further study depends on the results of the former stage study. OECD guidelines accept the analysis of pesticide level absorbed through skin without radioisotope when the recovery using the non-labeled method is within 80~120%. Various factors are reviewed in this study, including the origin of skin (gender, animal species and sites of skin), thickness, temperature and, etc., which can influence the integrity of results. PMID:25584144

  10. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action. PMID:19569979

  11. ABCB5 identifies immunoregulatory dermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Yang, Jun; Kleffel, Sonja; Uehara, Mayuko; Barthel, Steven R.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Zhan, Qian; Dudeney, Stephen; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Lee, Nayoung; de Vries, Juliane C.; Meier, Barbara; Vander Beken, Seppe; Kluth, Mark A.; Ganss, Christoph; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Abdi, Reza; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Murphy, George F.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-based strategies represent a new frontier in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, the paucity of markers for isolation of molecularly-defined immunomodulatory cell populations poses a barrier to this field. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies dermal immunoregulatory cells (DIRCs) capable of exerting therapeutic immunoregulatory functions through engagement of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). Purified Abcb5+ DIRCs suppressed T-cell proliferation, evaded immune rejection, homed to recipient immune tissues and induced Tregs in vivo. In fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allotransplantation models, allogeneic DIRCs significantly prolonged allograft survival. Blockade of DIRC-expressed PD-1 reversed the inhibitory effects of DIRCs on T-cell activation, inhibited DIRC-dependent Treg induction, and attenuated DIRC-induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival, indicating that DIRC immunoregulatory function is mediated, at least in part, through PD-1. Our results identify ABCB5+ DIRCs as a distinct immunoregulatory cell population and suggest promising roles of this expandable cell subset in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26321644

  12. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  13. Human dermal fibroblasts in psychiatry research.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, S; Garbett, K A; Janka, Z; Mirnics, K

    2016-04-21

    In order to decipher the disease etiology, progression and treatment of multifactorial human brain diseases we utilize a host of different experimental models. Recently, patient-derived human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cultures have re-emerged as promising in vitro functional system for examining various cellular, molecular, metabolic and (patho)physiological states and traits of psychiatric disorders. HDF studies serve as a powerful complement to postmortem and animal studies, and often appear to be informative about the altered homeostasis in neural tissue. Studies of HDFs from patients with schizophrenia (SZ), depression, bipolar disorder (BD), autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders have significantly advanced our understanding of these devastating diseases. These reports unequivocally prove that signal transduction, redox homeostasis, circadian rhythms and gene*environment (G*E) interactions are all amenable for assessment by the HDF model. Furthermore, the reported findings suggest that this underutilized patient biomaterial, combined with modern molecular biology techniques, may have both diagnostic and prognostic value, including prediction of response to therapeutic agents. PMID:26855193

  14. Acute toxicity of polyethylene glycol p-isooctylphenol ether in Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation or bronchopulmonary lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Damon, E.G.; Halliwell, W.H.; Henderson, T.R.; Mokler, B.V.; Jones, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    Dose-response studies were conducted with Syrian hamsters exposed to polyethylene glycol p-isooctylphenyl ether (Triton X-100) via inhalation or bronchopulmonary lavage. Syrian hamsters were exposed to an aerosol of Triton X-100 with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.5 ..mu..m and a concentration of 3.0 mg/liter. Estimated initial lung burdens of Triton X-100 ranged from 800 to 3100 ..mu..g. Hamsters were lavaged with concentrations of Triton X-100 ranging from 0.01 to 0.10% in isotonic saline resulting in initial lung burdens of Triton X-100 that ranged from 300 to 3200 ..mu..g. The LD50/7 values were 1700 ..mu..g (1300 to 2100 ..mu..g, 95% confidence limits) for the inhalation study and 2100 (1900 to 2700) ..mu..g for the lavage study. The difference between the LD50/7 values for the two methods of exposure was not significant. However, histopathological examination revealed differences in the nature and distribution of pathologic changes observed in animals exposed by the two routes of administration. Animals exposed by inhalation died as a result of ulcerative laryngitis and laryngeal edema with only minimal pulmonary pathologic alterations. Animals exposed by lavage, where the larynx was not exposed to Triton X-100, died from pulmonary edema and acute exudative pneumonia. These results demonstrate the need for careful selection of exposure methods to meet the specific objectives of a toxicology study.

  15. Antinociceptive and acute toxicity evaluation of Vernonia condensata Baker leaves extracted with different solvents and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Risso, Wagner E; Scarminio, Ieda S; Moreira, Estefania G

    2010-08-01

    Extract of Vernonia condensata (Asteraceae = Compositae) leaves has different uses in Brazilian folk medicine, which includes analgesic and antiinflamatory agent. The aim of this study was to apply a modified simplex-centroid mixture design to evaluate the best extractor system for the antinociceptive activity, evaluated by writhing test. Different solvents (acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol and ethyl acetate) as well as their binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures were used. For comparison, aqueous extract was also evaluated. LD50 was estimated and qualitative phytochemical screening, conducted. The extracts with antinociceptive activity were: aqueous, acetone, dicloromethane (DCM), ethanol (ETOH), acetone-DCM, acetone-ETOH, acetone-ethyl acetate, ETOH-ethyl acetate, acetone-DCM-ethyl acetate, acetone-ETOH-ethyl acetate and DCM-ETOH-ethyl acetate. The higher margin of safety (LD50/ED50) was for acetone > acetone-ETOH-ethyl acetate > aqueous > ETOH = acetone-ETOH > DCM > acetone-ethyl acetate > DCM-ETOH-ethyl acetate > acetone-DCM > acetone-DCM-ethyl acetate. Phytochemical screening showed that all the extracts contained alkaloids, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, tannins and saponins. In conclusion, the extractor system influences both the pharmacological activity and acute toxicity of leaves from V. condensata. Acetone and the ternary mixture, acetone-ETOH-ethyl acetate extracts showed higher margin of safety than aqueous extract. PMID:21341539

  16. [Toxicodynamic properties of liquids used for cooling high-power turbines. I. Acute, subacute and chronic toxicity].

    PubMed

    Seńczuk, W; Florek, E

    1983-01-01

    Oils IWiOL-3 and OMTI are used to cool the high-power turbines. Their toxicodynamic properties are little known, therefore the studies described herein have been undertaken. The studies did not reveal high acute toxicity, as A-DL50 was found to exceed 15 g/kg of body weight. The simultaneous measurements of cholinesterase activity demonstrated its clear decrease, The studies of subacute toxicity after Lim showed that OMTI after a year's exploitation is the most toxic fluid, as C-LD50 for this compound is 6,21 g/kg of body weight, whereas C-LD50 for the other oils is: 22.449 g/kg of body weight for IW i 02-3-n and 20.93 g/kg of body weight for IWiOL-3-e. Studies of chronic toxicity showed decreased cholinesterase activity and no significant changes in the measurements of certain biochemical and haematological. indices. PMID:6645933

  17. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample. PMID:21524677

  18. Human Dermal Stem/Progenitor Cell-Derived Conditioned Medium Improves Senescent Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Shim, Joong Hyun; Choi, Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Adult skin stem cells are recognized as potential therapeutics to rejuvenate aged skin. We previously demonstrated that human dermal stem/progenitor cells (hDSPCs) with multipotent capacity could be enriched from human dermal fibroblasts using collagen type IV. However, the effects of hDSPCs on cellular senescence remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether conditioned medium (CM) collected from hDSPC cultures (hDSPC-CM) exhibits beneficial effects on senescent fibroblasts. We found that hDSPC-CM promoted proliferation and decreased the expression level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase in senescent fibroblasts. In addition, p53 phosphorylation and p21 expression were significantly reduced in senescent fibroblasts treated with hDSPC-CM. hDSPC-CM restored the expression levels of collagen type I, collagen type III, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, and antagonized the increase of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that hDSPC-CM significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels by specifically up-regulating the expression level of superoxide dismutase 2. Taken together, these data suggest that hDSPC-CM can be applied as a potential therapeutic agent for improving human aged skin. PMID:26287165

  19. Antibacterial and dermal toxicological profiles of ethyl acetate extract from Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence in recent years of numerous resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria to a range of formerly efficient antibiotics constitutes a serious threat to public health. Crassocephalum bauchiense, a medicinal herb found in the West Region of Cameroon is used to treat gastrointestinal infections as well as liver disorders. The ethyl acetate extract from the leaves of C. bauchiense was evaluated for its antibacterial activity as well as acute and sub-acute toxicities. Methods The plant extract was prepared by maceration in ethyl acetate. Its phytochemical screening was done by standard methods. The broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity. The in vivo antibacterial activity of a gel formulation (0.05, 1 and 2% w/v) of this extract was evaluated using a Staphylococcus aureus-induced dermatitis in a murine model. Selected haematological and biochemical parameters were used to evaluate the dermal sub-acute toxicity of the extract in rats. Results Phytochemical screening of the C. bauchiense extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, tannins and sterols. In vitro antibacterial activities were observed against all the tested microorganisms (MIC = 0.04-6.25 mg/ml). Formulated extract-gel (2% w/v) and gentamycin (reference drug) eradicated the microbial infection after five days of treatment. A single dermal dose of this extract up to 32 g/kg body weight (bw) did not produce any visible sign of toxicity. Also, daily dermal application of the C. bauchiense extract gel formulation for 28 days did not show any negative effect, instead some biochemical parameters such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT and AST), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglycerides were significantly (p < 0.05) affected positively. Conclusion These results indicate that the C. bauchiense ethyl acetate extract can be used safely for the treatment of some bacterial infections. PMID:21615960

  20. Delisting toxicity evaluation of HTH and oxone(trade name) decontaminated VX. Final report, July 1989-March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Manthei, J.H.; Heitkamp, D.H.; Buettner, L.C.; Lawrence-Beckett, E.M.; Samuel, J.B.

    1992-07-01

    The acute percutaneous (bare skin) LD50 was determined for EA 2192 in the rabbit. Also established were the effective doses (ED50s) for the major toxic signs observed. Dermal, Department of Transportation (DOT), tests with rabbits indicated that VX/HTH decontaminated waste is a Class B poison after being aged only 24 hr following initiation of the decontamination procedure. The same reaction, when allowed to age through about 2 half-lives (28-30 days), was no longer a Class B poison and was nonhazardous by Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) toxicity criteria. The DOT tests with OXONE decontaminated/neutralized VX showed this solution to be less than a Class B poison by all three routes of administration (rat oral, rat inhalation, and rabbit dermal) after only 24-hr aging and a nonhazardous material by COMAR toxicity criteria.... vx, Rat, Half-life, ED50, EA 2192, Rabbit, COMAR, Decontaminated/Neutralized, HTH, OXONE, LD50.

  1. Use of lanthanum to detect changes in the permeability barrier of rat skin after dermal exposure to organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Mattie, D.R.; McDougal, J.N.; Chase, M.R.; Hixson, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Occupational dermal exposures to organic solvents are of importance due to local effects in the skin and systematic toxicity if penetration occurs through the skin. Repeated or prolonged contact with organic solvents have been shown to penetrate the skin; little information is available however, concerning effects on the barrier properties of skin after dermal exposure to solvents. This investigation examines the ultrastructural changes in rat skin after exposure of 3 organic chemicals and to correlate changes with the location of an electron-dense tracer, lanthanum, which is normally excluded by the permeability barrier in the stratum corneum. Male rats were exposed for 24 h to sterile saline, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), or toluene using dermal-exposure cells developed in this laboratory. Rat skin exposed to saline for 24 h appeared normal. Rat skin exposed to neat TCE, PERC or toluene for 24 h caused acute, coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and upper 1/2 to 1/3 of the dermis.

  2. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  3. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices. PMID:24828202

  4. Ciprofloxacin Improves the Stemness of Human Dermal Papilla Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Tengamnuay, Parkpoom; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in the expansion method of adult stem cells may augment their use in regenerative therapy. Using human dermal papilla cell line as well as primary dermal papilla cells as model systems, the present study demonstrated that ciprofloxacin treatment could prevent the loss of stemness during culture. Clonogenicity and stem cell markers of dermal papilla cells were shown to gradually decrease in the culture in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of the cells with nontoxic concentrations of ciprofloxacin could maintain both stem cell morphology and clonogenicity, as well as all stem cells markers. We found that ciprofloxacin exerted its effect through ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase/glycogen synthase kinase3β dependent mechanism which in turn upregulated β-catenin. Besides, ciprofloxacin was shown to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in DPCs as the transcription factors ZEB1 and Snail were significantly increased. Furthermore, the self-renewal proteins of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, Nanog and Oct-4 were significantly upregulated in the ciprofloxacin-treated cells. The effects of ciprofloxacin in preserving stem cell features were confirmed in the primary dermal papilla cells directly obtained from human hair follicles. Together, these results revealed a novel application of ciprofloxacin for stem cell maintenance and provided the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for the stemness in dermal papilla cells. PMID:26649051

  5. Subchronic dermal exposure to T-2 toxin produces cardiac toxicity in experimental Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Islam, Johirul; Goyary, Danswrang; Agnihotri, Amit; Karmakar, Sanjev; Banerjee, Subham; Singh, Lokendra; Veer, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    Our study aimed to determine the cardiac toxicities of T-2 toxin, a representative mycotoxin that frequently contaminates maize, cereals, and other agricultural products, harvested and stored under damp and cold conditions. Dermal exposure to T-2 toxin caused severe cardiotoxicity in experimental Wistar rats. Electrocardiography studies showed the conduction abnormalities including prolongation of the QT and corrected QT interval, shortening of the PR interval, and tachycardia. Biochemical studies also reported the toxicity of T-2 toxin. T-2 toxin induced acute cardiotoxicity in rats and characterized by significant (p < 0.05) elevation of serum troponin I, creatine kinase (CK) isoenzyme MB, CK isoenzyme NAC, and lactate dehydrogenase as compared to control rats. It is concluded that cardiotoxicity effects of T-2 toxin are thought to be due to direct action on electrocardiac potentials and biochemical changes. PMID:24193048

  6. Sub-chronic Dermal Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Guinea Pig: Special Emphasis to Heart, Bone and Kidney Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Korani, Mitra; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Arbabi Bidgoli, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been widely used as new potent antimicrobial agents in cosmetic and hygienic products. Present study compares the tissue levels of Ag NPs in different organs of Guiana Pigs quantitatively after dermal application and analysis the morphological changes and pathological abnormalities on the basis of the Ag NPs tissue levels. Before toxicological assessments,the size of colloidal nanosilver was recorded by X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscope tests and the sizes of samples were recorded in sizes less than 100 nm. For toxicological evaluation, male guinea pigs were exposed to three concentrations of Ag NPs (100, 1000 and 10000 ppm) according to acute pretests for further assessments in subchronic model in a period of 13 weeks . A close correlation between dermal exposure and tissue levels of Ag NPs was found (p < 0.05) and tissue uptakes happened in dose dependent manner with the following ranking: ki dney>muscle>bone>skin>liver>heart >spleen. In histopathological studies, severe proximal convoluted tubule degeneration and distal convoluted tubule were seen in the kidneys of the middle and high-dose animals. Separated lines and marrow space narrow were determined as two major signs of bone toxicities which observed in three different dose levels of Ag NPs. Increased dermal dose of Ag NPs caused cardiocyte deformity, congestion and inflammation. The three different Ag NPs concentration gave comparable results for several endpoints measured in heart, bone and kidney, but differed in tissue concentrations and the extent of histopathological changes. It seems that Ag ions could be detected in different organs after dermal exposure ,which has the potential to provide target organ toxicities in a time and dose dependent manner. PMID:24250657

  7. Actions and interactions of cholinolytics and cholinesterase reactivators in the treatment of acute organophosphorus toxicity.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, S; Ghosh, A K; Chowdhri, B L; Asthana, S N; Batra, B S

    1991-01-01

    Different drug combinations consisting of cholinolytic and a cholinesterase (ChE) reactivator provide greater therapeutic efficacy in acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in mice than when used alone. Maximum protection, as determined by a shift of the LD50 for the two OP agents, was observed with the cholinolytic benactyzine. A protection index (P.I.) of 42 was obtained when benactyzine was given along with obidoxime in diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) intoxication. With the more toxic OP agent soman (o-pinacolylmethylphosphonofluoridate), the same cholinolytic only offered a maximum P.I. of 3.2 when administered with HS-6, another bispyridinium ChE reactivator. This beneficial effect of benactyzine is possibly due to its greater antimuscarinic effect in the central nervous system than atropine or dexetimide. PMID:1935707

  8. Acute toxicity study of the oil from Azadirachta indica seed (neem oil).

    PubMed

    Gandhi, M; Lal, R; Sankaranarayanan, A; Banerjee, C K; Sharma, P L

    1988-01-01

    The seed oil of Azadirachta indica (neem oil) is well known for its medicinal properties in the indigenous Indian system of medicine. Its acute toxicity was documented in rats and rabbits by the oral route. Dose-related pharmacotoxic symptoms were noted along with a number of biochemical and histopathological indices of toxicity. The 24-h LD50 was established as 14 ml/kg in rats and 24 ml/kg in rabbits. Prior to death, animals of both species exhibited comparable pharmacotoxic symptoms in order and severity, with lungs and central nervous system as the target organs of toxicity. Edible mustard seed oil (80 ml/kg) was tested in the same manner to document the degree to which the physical characteristics of an oil could contribute to the oral toxicity of neem oil. PMID:3419203

  9. Pesticides re-entry dermal exposure of workers in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, V; Conte, E; Correnti, A; Gatti, R; Musmeci, F; Morali, G; Spagnoli, G; Tranfo, G; Triolo, L; Vita, M; Zappa, G

    2004-01-01

    This research has the aim to evaluate the risk of pesticide dermal exposure for workers in greenhouses. We considered the following crops: tomato, cucumber and strawberry, largely spread in Bracciano lake district. The pesticides monitored were: tetradifon on strawberry: metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and fenarimol on cucumber; acrinathrin, azoxystrobin and chlorpyrifos ethyl on tomato. The dermal exposure was evaluated by Dislodgeable Foliar Residue (DFR) measurements employing transfer coefficients got from literature. For risk evaluation, we have compared the dermal exposures with Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels (AOEL). The re-entry time were obtained intercepting the dose decay curves with AOEL values. The re-entry times result higher than two days in the cases of chlorpyrifos on tomato (re-entry time: 3 days), azoxystrobin on tomato (4 days), and tetradifon on strawberry (8 days). The need of measuring specific transfer coefficients is pointed out. PMID:15756864

  10. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no other cases related to the injection of this brand of dermal filler. This is the first report of cutaneous M chelonae infections following the injection of dermal fillers. It adds to a growing body of literature on postinjection M chelonae infections and reinforces the importance of optimal skin disinfection steps prior to percutaneous procedures. PMID:23335647

  11. Dermal Filler Injection: A Novel Approach for Limiting Infarct Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Liam P.; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Noma, Mio; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Eperjesi, Thomas J.; Plappert, Theodore J.; St. John-Sutton, Martin G.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Early infarct expansion after coronary occlusion compromises contractile function in perfused myocardial regions and promotes adverse long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling. We hypothesized that injection of a tissue-expanding dermal filler material into a myocardial infarction (MI) would attenuate infarct expansion and limit LV remodeling. Methods Fifteen sheep were subjected to an anteroapical MI involving approximately 20% of the LV followed by the injection of 1.3 mL of a calcium hydroxyapatite–based dermal filler into the infarct. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography was performed at baseline, 30 minutes after MI, and 15 minutes after injection to assess infarct expansion. Sixteen additional sheep were subjected to the same infarction and followed echocardiographically and hemodynamically for 4 weeks after MI to assess chronic remodeling. Eight animals had injection with dermal filler as described above immediately after MI, and 8 animals were injected with an equal amount of saline solution. Results All animals exhibited infarct expansion soon after coronary occlusion. The regional ejection fraction of the apex became negative after infarction, consistent with systolic dyskinesia. Injection of the dermal filler converted the apical wall motion from dyskinetic to akinetic and resulted immediately in significant decreases in global, regional, and segmental LV volumes. Chronically, relative to saline control, dermal filler injection significantly reduced LV end-systolic volume (62.2 ± 3.6 mL versus 44.5 ± 3.9 mL; p < 0.05) and improved global ejection fraction (0.295 ± 0.016 versus 0.373 ± 0.017; p < 0.05) at 4 weeks after infarction. Conclusions Injection of an acellular dermal filler into an MI immediately after coronary occlusion reduces early infarct expansion and limits chronic LV remodeling. PMID:19101288

  12. Accuracy of a semiquantitative method for Dermal Exposure Assessment (DREAM)

    PubMed Central

    van Wendel, de Joo... B; Vermeulen, R; van Hemmen, J J; Fransman, W; Kromhout, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: The authors recently developed a Dermal Exposure Assessment Method (DREAM), an observational semiquantitative method to assess dermal exposures by systematically evaluating exposure determinants using pre-assigned default values. Aim: To explore the accuracy of the DREAM method by comparing its estimates with quantitative dermal exposure measurements in several occupational settings. Methods: Occupational hygienists observed workers performing a certain task, whose exposure to chemical agents on skin or clothing was measured quantitatively simultaneously, and filled in the DREAM questionnaire. DREAM estimates were compared with measurement data by estimating Spearman correlation coefficients for each task and for individual observations. In addition, mixed linear regression models were used to study the effect of DREAM estimates on the variability in measured exposures between tasks, between workers, and from day to day. Results: For skin exposures, spearman correlation coefficients for individual observations ranged from 0.19 to 0.82. DREAM estimates for exposure levels on hands and forearms showed a fixed effect between and within surveys, explaining mainly between-task variance. In general, exposure levels on clothing layer were only predicted in a meaningful way by detailed DREAM estimates, which comprised detailed information on the concentration of the agent in the formulation to which exposure occurred. Conclusions: The authors expect that the DREAM method can be successfully applied for semiquantitative dermal exposure assessment in epidemiological and occupational hygiene surveys of groups of workers with considerable contrast in dermal exposure levels (variability between groups >1.0). For surveys with less contrasting exposure levels, quantitative dermal exposure measurements are preferable. PMID:16109819

  13. THE PROLONGED GASTROINTESTINAL SYNDROME IN RHESUS MACAQUES: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GASTROINTESTINAL, HEMATOPOIETIC, AND DELAYED MULTI-ORGAN SEQUELAE FOLLOWING ACUTE, POTENTIALLY LETHAL, PARTIAL-BODY IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    MacVittie, Thomas J.; Bennett, Alexander; Booth, Catherine; Garofalo, Michael; Tudor, Gregory; Ward, Amanda; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Gelfond, Daniel; McFarland, Emylee; Jackson, William; Lu, Wei; Farese, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The dose response relationship for the acute gastrointestinal syndrome following total-body irradiation prevents analysis of the full recovery and damage to the gastrointestinal system, since all animals succumb to the subsequent 100% lethal hematopoietic syndrome. A partial-body irradiation model with 5% bone marrow sparing was established to investigate the prolonged effects of high-dose radiation on the gastrointestinal system, as well as the concomitant hematopoietic syndrome and other multi-organ injury including the lung. Herein, cellular and clinical parameters link acute and delayed coincident sequelae to radiation dose and time course post-exposure. Male rhesus Macaca mulatta were exposed to partial-body irradiation with 5% bone marrow (tibiae, ankles, feet) sparing using 6 MV linear accelerator photons at a dose rate of 0.80 Gy min−1 to midline tissue (thorax) doses in the exposure range of 9.0 to 12.5 Gy. Following irradiation, all animals were monitored for multiple organ-specific parameters for 180 d. Animals were administered medical management including administration of intravenous fluids, antiemetics, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, antidiarrheals, supplemental nutrition, and analgesics. The primary endpoint was survival at 15, 60, or 180 d post-exposure. Secondary endpoints included evaluation of dehydration, diarrhea, hematologic parameters, respiratory distress, histology of small and large intestine, lung radiographs, and mean survival time of decedents. Dose- and time-dependent mortality defined several organ-specific sequelae, with LD50/15 of 11.95 Gy, LD50/60 of 11.01 Gy, and LD50/180 of 9.73 Gy for respective acute gastrointestinal, combined hematopoietic and gastrointestinal, and multi-organ delayed injury to include the lung. This model allows analysis of concomitant multi-organ sequelae, thus providing a link between acute and delayed radiation effects. Specific and multi-organ medical countermeasures can be assessed for

  14. Electrophysiological study of infant and adult rats under acute intoxication with fluoroacetamide.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sergey V; Jenkins, Richard O; Goncharov, Nikolay V

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted of acute intoxication of infant and adult Wistar rats with fluoroacetamide (FAA), an inhibitor of oxidative metabolism. FAA was administered orally to adult rats at 1/2 LD(50) and subcutaneously to infant rats at LD(100) or 1/10 LD(50). Electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration and motor activity were registered for 7 days. Clinical analysis of ECG and the heart rate variability (HRV) was carried out to assess the state of the vegetative nervous system. In adult rats, FAA caused marked disturbances in the activity of cardiovascular and respiratory systems, including the development of a potentially lethal acute cor pulmonale. Conversely, there were no significant changes of cardiac function and respiration in infant rats; they died because of extreme emaciation accompanied by retardation of development. In adult rats, bursts of associated cardiac and respiratory tachyarrhythmia, as well as regular high amplitude spasmodic sighs having a deca-second rhythm were observed. In both infant and adult rats, FAA caused short-term enhancement of humoral (metabolic) and sympathetic activities, followed by a gradual and stable predominance of parasympathetic influence on HRV. Under conditions of FAA inhibition of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the observed physiological reactions may be explained by activation of alternative metabolic pathways. This is also supported by a lack of ontogenetically caused inhibition of spontaneous motor activity in infant rats poisoned with FAA, which highlights the significance of the alternative metabolic pathways for implementation of deca-second and minute rhythms and a lack of a rigid dependence of these rhythms upon activity of neuronal networks. PMID:17351914

  15. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  16. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  17. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DERMAL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 8 pesticides in 86 dermal wipe samples over 86 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The Dermal/Pesticide hand wipe was collected 7 d...

  18. Acute, reproductive toxicity and two-generation teratology studies of a standardized quassinoid-rich extract of Eurycoma longifolia Jack in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Low, Bin-Seng; Das, Prashanta Kumar; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2014-07-01

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia Jack are popularly sought as herbal medicinal supplements to improve libido and general health amongst the local ethnic population. The major quassinoids of E. longifolia improved spermatogenesis and fertility but toxicity studies have not been well documented. The reproductive toxicity, two generation of foetus teratology and the up-and-down acute toxicity were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats orally treated with quassinoid-rich E. longifolia extract (TAF273). The results showed that the median lethal dose (LD50 ) of TAF273 for female and male rats was 1293 and >2000 mg/kg, respectively. Fertility index and litter size of the TAF273 treated were significantly increased when compared with those of the non-treated animals. The TAF273-treated dams decreased in percentage of pre-implantation loss, post-implantation loss and late resorption. No toxic symptoms were observed on the TAF273-treated pregnant female rats and their foetuses were normal. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from reproductive toxicity and teratology studies of TAF273 in rats was 100 mg/kg body weight/day, being more than 10-fold lower than the LD50 value. Thus, any human dose derived from converting the rat doses of 100 mg/kg and below may be considered as safe for further clinical studies. PMID:24318772

  19. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  20. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  1. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg(-1). In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg(-1)). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered. PMID:23970938

  2. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg−1. In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg−1). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered. PMID:23970938

  3. The Effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Extract on Mouse Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Sara Nadia; Qi, Yu Qing; Liu, Quan Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract on mouse dermal fibroblasts. Recent studies have shown that this plant may possess great antioxidant properties, which can be very beneficial in combating oxidative stress. Methods. Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract was prepared and mouse dermal fibroblasts were obtained and cultured as per our laboratory protocols. Twelve samples of cells were cultured under the same conditions and both negative and positive controls were established. Induction of oxidative stress was carried out using ultraviolet C (UVC) light. Viable cell count was carried out, using microscopy. The analysis of the overall results was processed using SPSS version 16.0. Results. Statistical analysis showed strong positive correlation between the concentration of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and the mean duration of cell viability (rs = 1), with a high level of statistical significance (P < 0.01). Likewise, strong positive correlation existed between trials of cell viability (rs = 0.988–1), with statistical significance (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract prolongs viability of mouse dermal fibroblasts damaged by UVC light-induced oxidative stress. The results show the potential benefits of this extract on dermal cell aging. PMID:24729883

  4. CONTROLLED, SHORT-TERM DERMAL AND INHALATION EXPOSURE TO CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake by humans of chloroform as a result of controlled short-term dermal and inhalation exposures. The approach used continuous real-time breath analysis to determine exhaled-breath profiles and evaluate chloroform kinetics in the huma...

  5. DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: A SUMMARY OF EPA APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report presents a concise description and evaluation of the approaches used in the Agency for dermal exposure assessment including a discussion about harmonization and research needs in this area. The report is intended to be used by EPA program offices in their effort...

  6. PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    M.J.K. Selgrade, E.H. Boykin, N.H. Coates, D.L. Doerfler, S.H. Gavett
    Experimental Toxicology Div., National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  7. DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE. TL Leavens1, MW Case1, RA Pegram1, BC Blount2, DM DeMarini1, MC Madden1, and JL Valentine3. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3RTI, RTP, NC, USA.
    The disinfection byproduct ...

  8. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  9. The Effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Extract on Mouse Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Sara Nadia; Qi, Yu Qing; Liu, Quan Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Background. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract on mouse dermal fibroblasts. Recent studies have shown that this plant may possess great antioxidant properties, which can be very beneficial in combating oxidative stress. Methods. Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract was prepared and mouse dermal fibroblasts were obtained and cultured as per our laboratory protocols. Twelve samples of cells were cultured under the same conditions and both negative and positive controls were established. Induction of oxidative stress was carried out using ultraviolet C (UVC) light. Viable cell count was carried out, using microscopy. The analysis of the overall results was processed using SPSS version 16.0. Results. Statistical analysis showed strong positive correlation between the concentration of Gynostemma pentaphyllum and the mean duration of cell viability (rs = 1), with a high level of statistical significance (P < 0.01). Likewise, strong positive correlation existed between trials of cell viability (rs = 0.988-1), with statistical significance (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract prolongs viability of mouse dermal fibroblasts damaged by UVC light-induced oxidative stress. The results show the potential benefits of this extract on dermal cell aging. PMID:24729883

  10. Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus - revisited.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Deblina; Ghosh, Shouvik; Rudra, Olympia; Biswas, Surajit Kumar

    2014-09-01

    We hereby report a rare case of a 14-year-old girl presenting with asymptomatic pitted papules over the flexor aspect of her right 4th and 5th digits. This was histopathologically proven to be porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN). PMID:25244169

  11. IN VIVO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased agricultural and residential use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin in the rat. Hair on...

  12. Dermal Contributions to Human Interfollicular Epidermal Architecture and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Kynan T.; Kaur, Pritinder

    2015-01-01

    The human interfollicular epidermis is renewed throughout life by populations of proliferating basal keratinocytes. Though interfollicular keratinocyte stem cells have been identified, it is not known how self-renewal in this compartment is spatially organized. At the epidermal-dermal junction, keratinocytes sit atop a heterogeneous mix of dermal cells that may regulate keratinocyte self-renewal by influencing local tissue architecture and signalling microenvironments. Focusing on the rete ridges and complementary dermal papillae in human skin, we review the identity and organisation of abundant dermal cells types and present evidence for interactions between the dermal microenvironment and the interfollicular keratinocytes. PMID:26602926

  13. Calcium pantothenate modulates gene expression in proliferating human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Tonio; Heise, Ruth; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Joussen, Sylvia; Erdmann, Kati; Schröder, Henning; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2009-11-01

    Topical application of pantothenate is widely used in clinical practice for wound healing. Previous studies identified a positive effect of pantothenate on migration and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, these studies were mainly descriptive with no molecular data supporting a possible model of its action. In this study, we first established conditions for an in vitro model of pantothenate wound healing and then analysed the molecular effects of pantothenate. To test the functional effect of pantothenate on dermal fibroblasts, cells were cultured and in vitro proliferation tests were performed using a standardized scratch test procedure. For all three donors analysed, a strong stimulatory effect of pantothenate at a concentration of 20 microg/ml on the proliferation of cultivated dermal fibroblasts was observed. To study the molecular mechanisms resulting in the proliferative effect of pantothenate, gene expression was analysed in dermal fibroblasts cultivated with 20 microg/ml of pantothenate compared with untreated cells using the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A number of significantly regulated genes were identified including genes coding for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Id1, HMOX-1, HspB7, CYP1B1 and MARCH-II. Regulation of these genes was subsequently verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Induction of HMOX-1 expression by pantothenol and pantothenic acid in dermal cells was confirmed on the protein level using immunoblots. Functional studies revealed the enhanced suppression of free radical formation in skin fibroblasts cultured with panthenol. In conclusion, these studies provided new insight in the molecular mechanisms linked to the stimulatory effect of pantothenate and panthenol on the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. PMID:19397697

  14. Acute contact toxicity test of insecticides (Cipermetrina 25, Lorsban 48E, Thionex 35) on honeybees in the southwestern zone of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Branchiccela, María Belén

    2012-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivation is expanding rapidly in Uruguay, with its land area having increased by 95 times during the past 10 years. Because of the region's Neotropical conditions, insecticide use is required to ensure adequate soybean productivity. However, in areas shared by soybean crops and beekeepers - such as the southwestern zone of Uruguay (SWZU) - the use of insecticides can increase the risks of honeybee death and honey contamination. Uruguayan commercial and legal guidelines set out practices and field doses designed to prevent acute intoxication with insecticides. However, honeybees in the SWZU are predominantly a polyhybrid subspecies different from that used to set international reference values, and hence they may have a different acute toxicity response, thus rendering such precautions ineffective. The aim of this work was to assess the acute toxicity response of polyhybrid honeybees in the SWZU to cypermethrin (commercial formulation: Cipermetrina 25 Agrin®), chlorpyrifos (commercial formulation: Lorsban 48E®), and endosulfan (commercial formulation: Thionex 35®). Acute toxicity bioassays were conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of each insecticide for the honeybees. The results indicate that, compared with EU reference values, SWZU honeybees have a higher toxicological sensitivity to chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, and a lower toxicological sensitivity to cypermethrin, based on the commercial formulations tested. However, when these results were adjusted according to their field dose equivalents, only chlorpyrifos emerged as a potential problem for beekeeping, as the maximum recommended field dose of Lorsban 48E® for soybean crops in Uruguay is 23 times the corresponding LD(50) for honeybees in the SWZU. PMID:22440636

  15. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  16. Age-related disruption of autophagy in dermal fibroblasts modulates extracellular matrix components

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Kanae; Shishido, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Keiko; Hirota, Yuko; Yo, Kazuyuki; Gomi, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Autophagosomes accumulate in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagic degradation is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagy disruption affects extracellular matrix components in dermal fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system that is believed to be involved in the aging process. The contribution of autophagy to age-related changes in the human skin is unclear. In this study, we examined the relationship between autophagy and skin aging. Transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of skin tissue and cultured dermal fibroblasts derived from women of different ages revealed an increase in the number of nascent double-membrane autophagosomes with age. Western blot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II, a form associated with autophagic vacuolar membranes, was significantly increased in aged dermal fibroblasts compared with that in young dermal fibroblasts. Aged dermal fibroblasts were minimally affected by inhibition of autophagic activity. Although lipofuscin autofluorescence was elevated in aged dermal fibroblasts, the expression of Beclin-1 and Atg5—genes essential for autophagosome formation—was similar between young and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the increase of autophagosomes in aged dermal fibroblasts was due to impaired autophagic flux rather than an increase in autophagosome formation. Treatment of young dermal fibroblasts with lysosomal protease inhibitors, which mimic the condition of aged dermal fibroblasts with reduced autophagic activity, altered the fibroblast content of type I procollagen, hyaluronan and elastin, and caused a breakdown of collagen fibrils. Collectively, these findings suggest that the autophagy pathway is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts, which leads to deterioration of dermal integrity and skin fragility.

  17. Use of acellular dermal replacement in reconstruction of nonhealing lower extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Steven Alexander; Beers, Ryan J; Lentz, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    Dermal templates are well established in the treatment of burn wounds and acute nonburn wounds. However, the literature regarding their use for reconstruction of chronic, nonhealing wounds is limited. This study describes a series of patients with chronic wounds reconstructed with a commercially available bilayer, acellular dermal replacement (ADR) containing a collagen-glycosaminoglycan dermal template and a silicone outer layer. A retrospective review was performed of 10 patients treated for chronic wounds with ADR and negative pressure dressing followed by split-thickness skin graft between July 2006 and January 2009. Data collected included age, gender, comorbidities, medications, wound type or location, wound size, the number of applications of ADR, the amount of ADR applied (in square centimeter), the amount of time between ADR placement and grafting, complications, need for reoperation, and percentage of graft take after 5 and 14 days. The mean age of study subjects was 44 years. All patients in the study had comorbidities that interfere with wound healing and were treated for lower extremity wounds (four to legs, five to ankles, and one to foot). The wounds had a variety of causative factors including venostasis ulcers (6, 60%), trauma in diabetic patients (2, 20%), brown recluse bite (1, 10%), and a wound caused from purpura fulminans (1, 10%). The average wound size and amount of ADR applied was 162±182 cm². Each patient required only one application of ADR. The average time between ADR placement and skin grafting was 36.5 days. The mean percentage of graft take at 5 days was 89.55%, 14 days was 90%, and 21 days was 87.3%. Only two patients required regrafting, and one of these grafts was lost because of patient noncompliance. ADR can be used successfully in the treatment of chronic wounds. ADR provides direct wound coverage and can conform to a variety of anatomical sites. This study demonstrates that the use of ADR in treating chronic wounds results

  18. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  19. Change in the quantity and acute toxicity of pesticides sold in South African crop sectors, 1994 –1999

    PubMed Central

    Africa, Algernon; London, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND South African pesticide market sales data, for two years, 1994 and 1999, were audited to identify change in total and per hectare mass sold and acute toxicity indicator (ATI) (kg sold/rat oral LD50) in the grape, pome, stone fruit, potato and wheat sectors. RESULTS Total pesticide sales (62%), amount per hectare (42%) and number of active ingredients (23%) increased in 1999 compared to 1994 with the grape fruit sector, the most significant contributor over the two years. Total (14%) and per hectare ATI (19%) decreased in 1999, but not substantially with the potato sector the most significant contributor. CONCLUSIONS Toxic pesticides were still used in 1999 which highlights a need to develop alternative agricultural and non-chemical pest control methods that reduce usage of pesticides. PMID:19185919

  20. Analgesic activity and acute toxicity study of Semecarpus anacardium stem bark extracts using mice

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraju, G. M.; Hoskeri, H. Joy; Krishna, V.; Babu, P. Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The analgesic activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of Semecarpus anacardium was investigated by tail flicking and writhing method using acetyl salicylic acid as the standard reference. Materials and Methods: The staircase method was adopted for the determination of the acute toxicity. LD50 of the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract was 700 mg/kg; however, the LD50 for the methanol extract was 500 mg/kg. After 1 h of oral administration of the extracts, 0.6% acetic acid was administered intraperitoneally and the analgesic activity was evaluated. Results: The number of writhing observed in the control group was 73.33 writhes. The methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity, with 28.33 writhes, than the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract. But, all the extracts showed proved to be less potent than the standard drug which showed 2.33 writhes. Animals pretreated with saline did not show a signify cant effect on the latent period of tail-flick response. The analgesic effect of the petroleum ether extract was comparatively less evident. The maximum possible analgesia (MPA) increased up to 9.1% which remained elevated above the basal levels throughout the observation period. The MPA calculated for the chloroform extract increased to 14.03%. However, the analgesic effect of the methanol extract was also observed at 0.5 h following oral administration and the effect remained significant throughout the 3 h observation period, and was increased to 20.43%. Conclusion: Consistent analgesic activity of all the three S. anacardium extracts was observed by both the methods. The methanol extract was more potent than the petroleum ether and chloroform extracts but was less effective than the standard drug. This investigation supported the ethnomedicinal claims of S. anacardium. PMID:21731397

  1. Mitigation of the Hematopoietic and Gastrointestinal Acute Radiation Syndrome by Octadecenyl Thiophosphate, a Small Molecule Mimic of Lysophosphatidic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenlin; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Gududuru, Veeresh; Wu, Wenjie; Balogh, Andrea; Szabo, Erzsebet; Thompson, Karin Emmons; Yates, C. Ryan; Balazs, Louisa; Johnson, Leonard R.; Miller, Duane D.; Strobos, Jur; McCool, W. Shannon; Tigyi, Gabor J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the small molecule octadecenyl thiophosphate (OTP), a synthetic mimic of the growth factor-like mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), showed radioprotective activity in a mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) when given orally or intraperitoneally 30 min before exposure to 9 Gy γ radiation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of OTP, delivered subcutaneously, for radioprotection or radiomitigation from −24 h before to up to +72 h postirradiation using a mouse TBI model with therapeutic doses at around 1 mg/kg. OTP was injected at 10 mg/kg without observable toxic side effects in mice, providing a comfortable safety margin. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a single dose of OTP over the time period from −12 h before to +26 h after a lethal dose of TBI reduced mortality by 50%. When administered at +48 h to +72 h postirradiation (LD50/30 to LD100/30), OTP reduced mortality by ≥34%. OTP administered at +24 h postirradiation significantly elevated peripheral white blood cell and platelet counts, increased crypt survival in the jejunum, enhanced intestinal glucose absorption and reduced endotoxin seepage into the blood. In the 6.4–8.6 Gy TBI range using LD50/10 as the end point, OTP yielded a dose modification factor of 1.2. The current data indicate that OTP is a potent radioprotector and radiomitigator ameliorating the mortality and tissue injury of acute hematopoietic as well as acute gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. PMID:25807318

  2. Antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and acute toxicity effects of Salvia leriifolia Benth seed extract in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Haddadkhodaparast, Mohammad H; Arash, Ali R

    2003-04-01

    The antinociceptive and antiinflammatory effects as well as the acute toxicity of Salvia leriifolia aqueous seed extract were studied in mice and rats. Antinociceptive activity was assessed using the hot-plate and tail flick tests. The effect on acute inflammation was studied using vascular permeability increased by acetic acid and xylene-induced ear oedema in mice. The activity against chronic inflammation was assessed using the cotton pellet test in rats. The LD(50) of the extract was found to be 19.5 g/kg (i.p.) in mice. The aqueous seed extract showed significant and dose-dependent (1.25-10 g/kg) antinociceptive activity over 7 h, and was inhibited by naloxone pretreatment. Significant and dose-dependent (2.5-10 g/kg) activity was observed against acute inflammation induced by acetic acid and in the xylene ear oedema test. In the chronic inflammation test the extract (2.5-5 g/kg) showed significant and dose-dependent antiinflammatory activity. The aqueous seed extract of S. leriifolia may therefore have supraspinal antinociceptive effects which may be mediated by opioid receptors, and showed considerable effects against acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:12722156

  3. Application of OECD Guideline 423 in assessing the acute oral toxicity of moniliformin.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Martina; Jestoi, Marika; Nathanail, Alexis V; Kokkonen, Ulla-Maija; Anttila, Marjukka; Koivisto, Pertti; Karhunen, Pirkko; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2013-03-01

    Moniliformin is a Fusarium mycotoxin highly prevalent in grains and grain-based products worldwide. In this study, the acute oral toxicity of moniliformin was assessed in Sprague-Dawley male rats according to OECD Guideline 423 with a single-dose exposure. Clinical observations and histopathological changes were recorded together with the excretion of moniliformin via urine and feces, utilizing a novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. According to our study, moniliformin is acutely toxic to rats with a rather narrow range of toxicity. Moniliformin can be classified into category 2 (LD(50) cut-off value 25 mg/kg b.w.), according to the Globally Harmonized System for the classification of chemicals. The clinical observations included muscular weakness, respiratory distress and heart muscle damage. Pathological findings confirmed that heart is the main target tissue of acute moniliformin toxicity. A significant proportion (about 38%) of the administered moniliformin was rapidly excreted in urine in less than 6 h. However, the toxicokinetics of the majority of the administered dose still requires clarification, as the total excretion was only close to 42%. Considering the worldwide occurrence of moniliformin together with its high acute toxicity, research into the subchronic toxicity is of vital importance to identify the possible risk in human/animal health. PMID:23201451

  4. Genetic and acute toxicological evaluation of an algal oil containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Collins, M L; Lynch, B; Barfield, W; Bull, A; Ryan, A S; Astwood, J D

    2014-10-01

    Algal strains of Nannochloropsis sp. were developed, optimized, cultivated and harvested to produce a unique composition of algal oil ethyl esters (Algal-EE) that are naturally high in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 23-30%) and palmitoleic acid (20-25%), and contain no docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Algal-EE was evaluated for mutagenic activity (Ames bacterial reverse mutation, in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration, in vivo micronucleus test) and for acute oral toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, rats received a single oral gavaged dose of Algal-EE (2000 mg/kg body weight). Clinical observations were made for 14 days before sacrifice on Day 15. Macroscopic evaluation involved the examination of all organs in the cranial, thoracic, and abdominal cavities. Algal-EE showed no evidence of mutagenicity, did not produce an increase in the frequency of structural chromosome aberrations, and did not cause an increase in the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. There were no macroscopic abnormalities. Algal-EE up to 2000 mg/kg body weight did not affect body weight, organ appearance or produce any toxic-related signs of morbidity. The acute median lethal dose (LD50) of Algal-EE was >2000 mg/kg body weight. Based on these assays, Algal-EE does not appear to have any genetic or acute oral toxicity. PMID:25057807

  5. Late-onset congenital lateral dermal sinus tract.

    PubMed

    Nishimon, Mari; Shimizu, Yusuke; Ueno, Mari; Iwanami, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Cases of laterally located, congenital dermal sinus tracts are extremely rare, with only six having been reported to date. We describe a case of a 14-year-old girl who developed symptoms of this type of sinus tract at an age that was considerably older than is usually reported. At the age of 12 years, the patient exhibited a purulent discharge from a pit on the right buttock. MRI indicated the presence of two tracts running from the right buttock skin to a cystic lesion that had formed on the right ala of the sacral spine. The lesion was surgically resected and successfully reconstructed using a partial iliocostalis lumborum muscle flap, without any functional morbidity. From our experience, such flaps appear to be appropriate treatment choices for lateral congenital dermal sinus tracts that develop late and result in large defects. PMID:25535223

  6. Evaluating dermal myelinated nerve fibers in skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on small, unmyelinated fibers in the skin, little research has investigated dermal myelinated fibers in comparison. Glabrous, non-hairy skin contains mechanoreceptors that afford a vantage point for observation of myelinated fibers that have previously been seen only with invasively obtained nerve biopsies. This review discusses current morphometric and molecular expression data of normative and pathogenic glabrous skin obtained by various processing and analysis methods for cutaneous myelinated fibers. Recent publications have shed light on the role of glabrous skin biopsy in identifying signs of peripheral neuropathy and as a potential biomarker of distal myelin and mechanoreceptor integrity. The clinical relevance of a better understanding of the role of dermal myelinated nerve terminations in peripheral neuropathy will be addressed in light of recent publications in the growing field of skin biopsy. PMID:23192899

  7. Mid-dermal elastophagocytosis presenting as a persistent reticulate erythema.

    PubMed

    Bannister, M J; Rubel, D M; Kossard, S

    2001-02-01

    Two men are presented with a widespread persistent reticulate erythema concentrated within the chronically sun-damaged skin on their trunk. A fine papular element was present in one case and both lacked annular lesions. One patient was human immunodeficiency virus positive. Multiple skin biopsies showed an interstitial infiltrate of histiocytes containing multiple elastic fibres in the upper dermis. There was scant perivascular lymphocytic inflammation but no evident necrobiosis or palisaded granulomas seen typically with granuloma annulare. Elastic stains showed focal mid-dermal elastolysis. Diffuse reticulate erythema in sun-damaged skin may be a clinical marker for elastophagocytosis. This presentation differs from that previously described with actinic granuloma, diffuse granuloma annulare or the inflammatory phase of mid-dermal elastolysis and expands the clinical spectrum of this phenomenon. PMID:11233723

  8. [Granulomatous reactions from aesthetic dermal micro-implants].

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F

    2008-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation is a rare but possible late complication occurring both with permanent (more frequent) and biodegradable or resorbable products. Predictions cannot be made for possible late reactions, sometimes occurring even after 18 years. Although clinical diagnosis seems to be an easy task, the issue is sometimes challenging if cosmetic intervention is denied or not mentioned by the patient or by the referring physician. Identifying the filler is therefore difficult and experts may be called in trials to solve the problem. Histopathology is the best means to obtain the correct diagnosis and to identify the type of filler particles. In fact, the particular configuration of the vacuoles and cystic structures inside the granulomas reflects the shape of the injected implants particles. The clinical and microscopic features, the pathogenesis and the treatment of the granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation will be presented and discussed. PMID:18442665

  9. Temporal, personal and spatial variability in dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kromhout, H; Vermeulen, R

    2001-06-01

    A database of dermal exposure measurements (DERMDAT) comprising data from 20 surveys was created. The majority of dermal exposure measurements were from agricultural settings in which workers' exposure to pesticides was investigated. Other data came from studies of workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. coke-oven workers and paving workers) and from studies of subjects exposed to complex mixtures (rubber industry). The database contains approximately 6400 observations. Grouping the workers by job title, factory and body location and excluding groups with more than 25% data below the limit of detection, or with less than two workers with at least two repeats, resulted in 283 groups with 1065 workers and 2716 measurements. Analyses of variability showed median values of the total, within- and between-worker geometric standard deviations of respectively 2.55, 1.98 and 1.47, strikingly similar to what has been published previously for respiratory exposure. Within-worker variability ((w)S(2)y) was in general higher than between-worker variability ((b)S(2)y) in dermal exposure levels. Agricultural groups of re-entry workers showed very little to no between-worker variability, while industrial groups did show some variability in individual mean exposures (range (b)S(2)y=0.15-0.29). When the between-body-location component (bl)S(2)y) was also addressed, it turned out to be the most prominent component (median (b)S(2)y=0.004; median (w)S(2)y=0.12; median (bl)S(2)y=0.34). In agriculture the between-body-location component was smaller than in industry. Day-to-day variability in dermal exposure levels appeared to be significant for specific locations, but not for the average of several body-location. Underlying exposure scenarios (transfer and deposition) also played an important role. PMID:11378147

  10. Long-term complications associated with permanent dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Kunjur, Jayanth; Witherow, Helen

    2013-12-01

    We report a case series of patients with serious long-term complications associated with the injection of permanent dermal fillers. Although such complications are relatively rare, the consequences are potentially life-long, and the psychological and medical effects can often have a profound impact on the patient. The continued routine offering of these treatments will require doctors to communicate effectively with patients about the nature of the complications and the probability of risk compared with alternative treatments. PMID:23962591

  11. Clinical application of cultured epithelial autografts on acellular dermal matrices in the treatment of extended burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Lineaweaver, William C; Sailes, Frederick C; Kisner, Carson; Zhang, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Achieving permanent replacement of skin in extensive full-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn injuries and chronic wounds remains one of the fundamental surgical problems. Presently, split-thickness skin grafts are still considered the best material for surgical repair of an excised burn wound. However, in burns that affect greater than 50% of total body surface area, the patient has insufficient areas of unaffected skin from which split-thickness skin grafts can be harvested. The use of cultured epithelial (or epidermal) autografts (CEAs) has achieved satisfactory results. But the take rate of CEAs is poor in full-thickness bed or in chronically infected area. Providing temporary cover with allograft skin, or a more permanent allodermis, may increase clinical take. This review aims to (1) describe the use of CEAs in the regeneration of the epidermis, (2) introduce the application of the acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in the clinics, and (3) enhance understanding of the CEAs applied with ADM as an appropriate strategy to treat the extended burn injuries. The current evidence regarding the cultured epithelial cell or keratinocyte autograft and dermal grafts applied in the treatment of burn injuries was investigated with an extensive electronic and manual search (MEDLINE and EMBASE). The included literature (N=136 publications) was critically evaluated focusing on the efficacy and safety of this technique in improving the healing of the deep dermal and full-thickness burn injuries. This review concluded that the use of ADM with CEAs is becoming increasingly routine, particularly as a life-saving tool after acute thermal trauma. PMID:24322642

  12. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination. PMID:25788148

  13. Monitoring contractile dermal lymphatic activity following uniaxial mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Worsley, P R; Voegeli, D; Bader, D L

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that direct mechanical loading can impair dermal lymphatic function, contributing to the causal pathway of pressure ulcers. The present study aims to investigate the effects of loading on human dermal lymphatic vessels. Ten participants were recruited with ages ranging from 24 to 61 years. Participants had intradermal Indocyanine Green injections administrated between left finger digits. Fluorescence was imaged for 5min sequences with an infra-red camera prior to lymph vessel loading, immediately after axial loading (60mmHg) and following a recovery period. Image processing was employed to defined transient lymph packets and compare lymph function between each test phase. The results revealed that between 1-8 transient events (median=4) occurred at baseline, with a median velocity of 8.1mm/sec (range 4.1-20.1mm/sec). Immediately post-loading, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in velocity (median=6.4, range 2.2-13.5mm/sec), although the number of transient lymph packages varied between participants. During the recovery period the number (range 1-7) and velocity (recovery median=9.6mm/sec) of transient packets were largely restored to basal values. The present study revealed that some individuals present with impaired dermal lymphatic function immediately after uniaxial mechanical loading. More research is needed to investigate the effects of pressure and shear on lymphatic vessel patency. PMID:27245749

  14. Potentials of new nanocarriers for dermal and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2011-01-01

    Nanocarriers (NCs) are colloidal systems having structures below a particle or droplet size of 500 nm. In the previous years, the focus for the application of NCs was primarily placed on the parenteral and oral application. However, NCs applied to the skin are in the center of attention and are expected to be increasingly applied as the skin offers a lot of advantages for the administration of such systems. For the use of NCs to the skin, one has to differentiate between the desired effects: the local effect within the skin (dermal drug delivery) or a systemic effect accompanied by the permeation through the skin (transdermal drug delivery). Both for dermal and transdermal drug delivery, the stratum corneum (SC), the main barrier of the skin, has to be overcome. SC is one of the tightest barriers of the human body. Therefore, it is the primary goal of new NC to overcome this protective and effective barrier. For that purpose, new NCs such as microemulsions, vesicular (liposomes) and nanoparticular NCs are developed and investigated. This article evaluates the potentials of these NCs for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. PMID:21111043

  15. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  16. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priti; Bihari, Vipin; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108) along with asymptomatic controls (n = 148) from a non contaminated reference community. Exposed symptomatic group consisted of 36.8% subjects who were GSTM1 null genotyped as compared to asymptomatic where only 19.4% subjects were null. The exposed subjects with GSTM1 null genotype were more susceptible to dermal adversities in comparison with wild genotyped subjects (OR = 2.42; 95% CI = 1.071–5.451). Age, smoking, gender or duration of residence were not found to have any confounding effect towards this association. Association with other genes was not statistically significant, nonetheless, possible contribution by these genes cannot be ruled out. In conclusion, variation in the polymorphic status of GSTM1 gene may influence dermal outcomes among residents from Cr(VI) contaminated areas. Further studies are therefore, needed to examine these observations among different population groups. PMID:22919465

  17. Citral: identifying a threshold for induction of dermal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Lalko, Jon; Api, Anne Marie

    2008-10-01

    Citral [CAS# 5392-40-5; EINECS# 226-394-6; RIFM # 116; cis- and trans-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-Octadienal] is an important fragrance ingredient appreciated for its powerful lemon-aroma. It is widely used in fragrance formulations and incorporated into numerous consumer products. A comprehensive review of the dermal sensitization data available for citral was undertaken with the goal of identifying a threshold for the induction of dermal sensitization. In 2007, a complete literature search was conducted. On-line databases that were surveyed included Chemical Abstract Services and the National Library of Medicine. In addition, the toxicologic database of the Research Institute for Fragrance materials, Inc. (RIFM) was searched, which includes numerous unpublished reports. Based on a weight of evidence approach, the data from this survey demonstrate that the human NOEL (No Observed Effect Level) for induction of dermal sensitization to citral is 1400 microg/cm(2). The identification of this induction threshold will allow for risk assessments to focus on primary prevention of contact allergy to citral based on a new Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) paradigm. This subsequent assessment will form the basis of a risk management approach; specifically a new IFRA (International Fragrance Association) standard on the use of citral in consumer products. PMID:18353514

  18. Dermal insecticide residues from birds inhabiting an orchard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Gentry, S.; Borges, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency conducts risk assessments of insecticide applications to wild birds using a model that is limited to the dietary route of exposure. However, free-flying birds are also exposed to insecticides via the inhalation and dermal routes. We measured azinphos-methyl residues on the skin plus feathers and the feet of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in order to quantify dermal exposure to songbirds that entered and inhabited an apple (Malus x domestica) orchard following an insecticide application. Exposure to azinphos-methyl was measured by sampling birds from an aviary that was built around an apple tree. Birds sampled at 36 h and 7-day post-application were placed in the aviary within 1 h after the application whereas birds exposed for 3 days were released into the aviary 4-day post-application. Residues on vegetation and soil were also measured. Azinphos-methyl residues were detected from the skin plus feathers and the feet from all exposure periods. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating dermal exposure into avian pesticide risk assessments.

  19. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  20. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. PMID:24283346

  1. Tropoelastin incorporation into a dermal regeneration template promotes wound angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Mithieux, Suzanne M; Kong, Yvonne; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chong, Cassandra; Fathi, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba; Panas, Eleni; Kemnitzer, John; Daniels, Robert; Kimble, Roy M; Maitz, Peter K; Li, Zhe; Weiss, Anthony S

    2015-03-11

    Severe burn injury results in substantial skin loss and cannot be treated by autografts. The Integra Dermal Regeneration Template (IDRT) is the leading synthetic skin substitute because it allows for wound bed regeneration and wound healing. However, all substitutes suffer from slow blood vessel ingrowth and would benefit considerably from enhanced vascularization to nurture tissue repair. It is shown here that by incorporating the human elastic protein tropoelastin into a dermal regeneration template (TDRT) we can promote angiogenesis in wound healing. In small and large animal models comprising mice and pigs, the hybrid TDRT biomaterial and IDRT show similar contraction to autografts and decrease wound contraction compared to open wounds. In mice, TDRT accelerates early stage angiogenesis by 2 weeks, as evidenced by increased angiogenesis fluorescent radiant efficiency in live animal imaging and the expression of endothelial cell adhesion marker CD146. In the pig, a full thickness wound repair model confirms increased numbers of blood vessels in the regenerating areas of the dermis closest to the hypodermis and immediately below the epidermis at 2 weeks post-surgery. It is concluded that including tropoelastin in a dermal regeneration template has the potential to promote wound repair through enhanced vascularization. PMID:25469903

  2. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use. PMID:26894006

  3. Amorphous cyclosporin A nanoparticles for enhanced dermal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gregori B; Arntjen, Anja; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2016-02-10

    Cylosporin A (CyA) was formulated as amorphous nanoparticle suspension to increase dermal penetration, e.g. applicable in psoriasis. The suspension consisted of 5% CyA in water, stabilized with vitamin E polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS, Kolliphor TPGS) and was produced by bead milling. The diameter of the bulk population was about 350 nm, laser diffraction diameter 99% was 690 nm. The suspension was physically stable over one year of storage at room temperature, and most important the amorphous state also remained stable. Despite the high dispersitivity and related large surface area in contact with water, the drug content reduced only by 5% over 1 year of storage. i.e. the formulation is feasible as commercial product with expiry date. The CyA nanoparticles and μm-sized CyA particles were incorporated into hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) gels and the penetration studied into fresh pig ear skin applying the tape stripping method. At tape number 30, the penetrated cumulative amount of CyA from nanoparticles was 6.3 fold higher compared to the μm-sized raw drug powder (450.1 μg/cm(2) vs. 71.3 μg/cm(2)). A theoretical mechanism is presented to explain the observed superiority in penetration. Based on amorphous CyA nanoparticles, dermal formulations for improved dermal CyA delivery seem to be feasible. PMID:26688038

  4. The value of selected in vitro and in silico methods to predict acute oral toxicity in a regulatory context: results from the European Project ACuteTox.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, A; Stanzel, S; Albella, B; Artursson, P; Campillo, N; Cecchelli, R; Cerrato, L; Díaz, L; Di Consiglio, E; Guerra, A; Gombau, L; Herrera, G; Honegger, P; Landry, C; O'Connor, J E; Páez, J A; Quintas, G; Svensson, R; Turco, L; Zurich, M G; Zurbano, M J; Kopp-Schneider, A

    2013-06-01

    ACuteTox is a project within the 6th European Framework Programme which had as one of its goals to develop, optimise and prevalidate a non-animal testing strategy for predicting human acute oral toxicity. In its last 6 months, a challenging exercise was conducted to assess the predictive capacity of the developed testing strategies and final identification of the most promising ones. Thirty-two chemicals were tested blind in the battery of in vitro and in silico methods selected during the first phase of the project. This paper describes the classification approaches studied: single step procedures and two step tiered testing strategies. In summary, four in vitro testing strategies were proposed as best performing in terms of predictive capacity with respect to the European acute oral toxicity classification. In addition, a heuristic testing strategy is suggested that combines the prediction results gained from the neutral red uptake assay performed in 3T3 cells, with information on neurotoxicity alerts identified by the primary rat brain aggregates test method. Octanol-water partition coefficients and in silico prediction of intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier passage are also considered. This approach allows to reduce the number of chemicals wrongly predicted as not classified (LD50>2000 mg/kg b.w.). PMID:22922246

  5. Dermal toxicity evaluation of neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS) with an overview of the dermal toxicity of vesicant agents and their degradation products. Final report, January-September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olajos, E.J.; Cameron, K.P.; Way, R.A.; Manthei, J.H.; Heitkamp, D.H.

    1996-10-01

    Acute dermal toxicity (limit test) and skin irritation studies were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits to ascertain the systemic toxicity and skin-injury potential of chemically-neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS). Studies also included the assessment of oxidant/solvent systems and solvent induced toxicity. The toxicity limit test consisted of a 24-hr occluded exposure to 1.0 ml/kg of `test article.` Dermal irritation studies were based on a 4-hr occluded exposure to 0.5 ml of `test article.` Chemical neutralization of CAIS resulted in complex product solutions (wastestreams) containing ppm levels of agent and an array of degradation products. Findings from the skin irritation testing of wastestreams and oxidant/solvent systems indicate that wastestream-induced skin effects (edema and erythema) were equivalent to or less in severity than the skin effects produced by exposure to oxidant/solvent systems. Systemic effects were not observed in 4/5 wastestream-exposed groups; however, 2/5 wastestream-treated groups exhibited systemic effects. Lethality was noted in only 1/5 wastestream-treated groups. Limit test data indicate that agents (HD, HN, or L) were destroyed by reaction with oxidant to less toxic materials.

  6. Neocollagenesis in human tissue injected with a polycaprolactone-based dermal filler.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseo Antonio; Van Abel, Daan

    2015-04-01

    A novel dermal filler containing polycaprolactone (PCL) has been introduced into the aesthetic market. A recently published study has shown that the PCL-based dermal filler induces neocollagenesis, a process associated with improvement in appearance of the skin, in rabbit tissue. In this pilot study, we investigated whether the PCL-based dermal filler induces neocollagenesis in human tissue by histological analysis. Two patients who were enrolled in the study, and were willing to undergo temple lifting surgery, were injected intra-dermally with the PCL-based dermal filler. Thirteen months post-injection, biopsies were obtained for subsequent histological analysis. Histological analysis of tissue obtained from the biopsies (13 months post-injection) revealed that the PCL-based dermal filler shows collagen formation around the PCL particles and, therefore, supports similar findings previously shown in rabbit tissue. In conclusion, PCL particles are maintained in their original state 13 months post-injection. PMID:25260139

  7. Acute toxicity and risk assessment of permethrin, naled, and dichlorvos to larval butterflies via ingestion of contaminated foliage.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M

    2015-02-01

    Three Florida native larval butterflies (Junonia coenia, Anartia jatrophae, Eumaeus atala) were used in the present study to determine the acute toxicity, hazard, and risk of a 24h ingestion of leaves contaminated with the adult mosquito control insecticides permethrin, naled, and dichlorvos to late 4th and early 5th in-star caterpillars. Based on 24-h LD50s for ingestion, naled was more acutely toxic than permethrin and dichlorvos to caterpillars. Hazard quotients using the ratio of the highest doses and the 90th percentile doses from field measurements in host plant foliage following actual mosquito control applications to the toxicological benchmarks from laboratory toxicity tests indicate potential high acute hazard for naled compared to permethrin and dichlorvos. Based on probabilistic ecological risk methods, naled exposure doses in the environment also presented a higher acute risk to caterpillars than permethrin and dichlorvos. The acute toxicity laboratory results and ecological risk assessment are based only on dietary ingestion and single chemical doses. It does not include other typical exposure scenarios that may occur in the environment. It is thus plausible to state that the ecological risk assessment presented here underestimates the potential risks in the field to caterpillars. However, one assumption that is scientifically feasible and certainly real from the results - if the environmental exposure doses of mosquito control operations are similar or higher to those presented here in leaves from the field, after applications, there will likely be significant mortalities and other adverse effects on caterpillar populations. PMID:25462317

  8. Effect of Adhesive Strips and Dermal Sutures vs Dermal Sutures Only on Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Custis, Trenton; Armstrong, April W.; King, Thomas H.; Sharon, Victoria R.; Eisen, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although applying adhesive strips to a wound closure has been shown to have outcomes equivalent to those with cuticular suturing, it is unknown whether adhesive strips provide additional benefit compared with dermal suturing alone. OBJECTIVE To determine whether the addition of adhesive strips to a wound closed with buried interrupted subcuticular sutures improves outcomes following wound closure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, randomized split-wound intervention was conducted between November 14, 2013, and May 16, 2014, in patients who underwent cutaneous surgical procedures at the University of California, Davis, outpatient dermatology clinic. Fifty-seven patients 18 years or older with postoperative defects of at least 3 cm, resulting from either Mohs micrographic surgical procedures or surgical excision, were screened for participation. Nine patients were excluded and 48 were enrolled. INTERVENTIONS Half of each wound was randomized to receive buried interrupted subcuticular sutures and overlying adhesive strips and the other half received buried interrupted subcuticular sutures only. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES At 3 months’ follow-up, each patient and 2 blinded observers evaluated the wound using the Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. RESULTS The total mean (SD) Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score for observers for the side that received a combination of adhesive strips and buried interrupted subcuticular suturing (12.3 [4.8]) and the side that received sutures only (12.9 [6.3]) did not differ significantly at 3 months (P = .32). There was no significant difference in the total patient assessment scale score between the combination closure (14.0 [7.6]) and sutures only (14.7 [7.6]) sides at 3 months (P = .39). There was also no significant difference between the 2 closure methods in terms of mean (SD) scar width (both methods: 1.1 [0.8] mm, P = .89) at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Combination closure with

  9. Comparison of Dermal Substitutes in Wound Healing Utilizing a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Anh-Tuan N.; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Latenser, Barbara A.; Wiley, Dorion E.; Walter, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dermal skin substitutes have become a standard of care in burn treatment. Objective: To compare and assess wound contracture reduction and histologic incorporation into the wound, dermal substitutes were implanted into full-thickness skin wounds in nude mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven mice received a full-thickness 2 × 2 cm dorsal skin wound, and were either implanted with an acellular dermal matrix, Alloderm, Dermagraft-TC, Dermalogen, or Integra or assigned to the control group (with no dermal substitute). At 28 days postsurgery, the wounds were assessed for contraction, epithelialization, and other histological characteristics. Results: Each dermal substitute decreased wound contracture, but Alloderm and the acellular dermal matrix did so significantly compared to the control (P < .01 and P < .03, respectively). Within-group and control comparisons showed no significant differences with respect to the presence of dystrophic calcification, squamous hyperplasia, infiltration of neutrophils, fibroblasts, and macrophages, epidermal keratinocyte stratification, or collagen fiber configuration. Conclusions: Integra elicited the greatest foreign body response. Although the Dermalogen group had the thickest elastin fiber fragments, Dermagraft may have initiated the earliest elastin fiber formation in the wounds. While all dermal substitutes were incorporated into the wound bed and wound contracture was decreased, acellular dermal matrix and Alloderm, both human skin–derived products, produced less contraction and the thickest new “dermis” in the healed wounds compared to the control or synthetic dermal substitutes. PMID:16921409

  10. The Acute Gastrointestinal Syndrome in High-Dose Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Catherine; Tudor, Gregory; Tudor, Julie; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The most detailed reports of the response of the gastrointestinal system to high dose acute radiation have focused mainly on understanding the histopathology. However, to enable medical countermeasure assessment under the animal rule criteria, it is necessary to have a robust model in which the relationship between radiation dose and intestinal radiation syndrome incidence, timing and severity are established and correlated with histopathology. Although many mortality studies have been published, they have used a variety of mouse strains, ages, radiation sources and husbandry conditions, all of which influence the dose response. Further, it is clear that the level of bone marrow irradiation and supportive care can influence endpoints. In order to create robust baseline data we have generated dose response data in adult male mice, maintained under identical conditions, and exposed to either total or partial-body irradiation. Partial-body irradiation includes both extensive (40%) and minimal (5%) bone marrow sparing models, the latter designed to correlate with an established primate model and allow assessment of effects of any medical countermeasure on all three major radiation syndromes (intestinal, bone marrow and lung) in the surviving mice. Lethal dose (LD30, LD50 and LD70) data are described in the various models, along with the impact of enteric flora and response to supportive care. Correlation with diarrhea severity and histopathology are also described. This data can be used to aid the design of good laboratory practice (GLP) compliant Animal Rule studies that are reflective of the conditions following accidental radiation exposure. PMID:23091876

  11. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  12. Acute and subchronic toxicity of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil in mallards and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, W.A.; Hancock, G.A.; Ford, W.H.; Ringer, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The toxic properties of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil (WEVC) were assessed in a battery of acute and subchronic toxicity tests using mallards, Anas platyrhynchos, and European ferrets, Mustela putorius. Adult mallard acute oral toxicity study results indicated no mortalities or signs o toxicity, i.e., no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) and median lethal dose (LD50) > 5,000 mg/kg. Acute oral feeding and food avoidance tests with ducklings also indicated no toxicity (NOAEL and LC50 > 50,000 mg/kg diet) with no evidence of food avoidance (FAC50 > 20,000 mg/kg diet). No mortalities or toxic signs were noted in a 14-d feeding study with adult birds at dietary concentrations up to 100,000 mg WEVC/kg diet. Among clinical and physiological end points evaluated, the only significant difference noted was an increase in liver: body weight ratios in the 100,000-mg WEVC/kg diet dose group. No differences in clinical chemistry or hematological parameters were noted, and there were no consistent differences in histological evaluations of organ tissues. Daily oral doses of up to 5,000 mg/kg of WEVC over 5 d resulted in minimal effects on ferrets. Increased serum albumin concentrations were observed in the 5,000-mg/kg dose group females and decreased spleen weights were noted in females of all WEVC treatment groups. No other significant observations were noted.

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  14. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  15. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  16. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  17. Acute toxicity testing of chemicals-Opportunities to avoid redundant testing and use alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Creton, Stuart; Dewhurst, Ian C; Earl, Lesley K; Gehen, Sean C; Guest, Robert L; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Indans, Ian; Woolhiser, Michael R; Billington, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the acute systemic oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicities, skin and eye irritancy, and skin sensitisation potential of chemicals is required under regulatory schemes worldwide. In vivo studies conducted to assess these endpoints can sometimes be associated with substantial adverse effects in the test animals, and their use should always be scientifically justified. It has been argued that while information obtained from such acute tests provides data needed to meet classification and labelling regulations, it is of limited value for hazard and risk assessments. Inconsistent application of in vitro replacements, protocol requirements across regions, and bridging principles also contribute to unnecessary and redundant animal testing. Assessment of data from acute oral and dermal toxicity testing demonstrates that acute dermal testing rarely provides value for hazard assessment purposes when an acute oral study has been conducted. Options to waive requirements for acute oral and inhalation toxicity testing should be employed to avoid unnecessary in vivo studies. In vitro irritation models should receive wider adoption and be used to meet regulatory needs. Global requirements for sensitisation testing need continued harmonisation for both substance and mixture assessments. This paper highlights where alternative approaches or elimination of tests can reduce and refine animal use for acute toxicity requirements. PMID:20144136

  18. Class 3 semaphorins negatively regulate dermal lymphatic network formation

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M.; Suto, Fumikazu; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a patterned lymphatic vascular network is essential for proper lymphatic functions during organ development and homeostasis. Here we report that class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3s), SEMA3F and SEMA3G negatively regulate lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth and sprouting to control dermal lymphatic network formation. Neuropilin2 (NRP2) functions as a receptor for SEMA3F and SEMA3G, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC). In culture, Both SEMA3F and SEMA3G inhibit VEGFC-mediated sprouting and proliferation of human dermal LECs. In the developing mouse skin, Sema3f is expressed in the epidermis and Sema3g expression is restricted to arteries, whereas their receptor Nrp2 is preferentially expressed by lymphatic vessels. Both Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants exhibit increased LEC growth in the skin. In contrast, Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants display increased lymphatic branching, while Nrp2 mutants exhibit reduced lymphatic branching. A targeted mutation in PlexinA1 or PlexinA2, signal transducers forming a receptor complex with NRP2 for SEMA3s, exhibits an increase in LEC growth and lymphatic branching as observed in Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants. Our results provide the first evidence that SEMA3F and SEMA3G function as a negative regulator for dermal lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The reciprocal phenotype in lymphatic branching between Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants suggest a complex NRP2 function that regulates LEC behavior both positively and negatively, through a binding with VEGFC or SEMA3s. PMID:26319580

  19. Class 3 semaphorins negatively regulate dermal lymphatic network formation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M; Suto, Fumikazu; Mukouyama, Yoh-Suke

    2015-01-01

    The development of a patterned lymphatic vascular network is essential for proper lymphatic functions during organ development and homeostasis. Here we report that class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3s), SEMA3F and SEMA3G negatively regulate lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth and sprouting to control dermal lymphatic network formation. Neuropilin2 (NRP2) functions as a receptor for SEMA3F and SEMA3G, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC). In culture, Both SEMA3F and SEMA3G inhibit VEGFC-mediated sprouting and proliferation of human dermal LECs. In the developing mouse skin, Sema3f is expressed in the epidermis and Sema3g expression is restricted to arteries, whereas their receptor Nrp2 is preferentially expressed by lymphatic vessels. Both Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants exhibit increased LEC growth in the skin. In contrast, Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants display increased lymphatic branching, while Nrp2 mutants exhibit reduced lymphatic branching. A targeted mutation in PlexinA1 or PlexinA2, signal transducers forming a receptor complex with NRP2 for SEMA3s, exhibits an increase in LEC growth and lymphatic branching as observed in Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants. Our results provide the first evidence that SEMA3F and SEMA3G function as a negative regulator for dermal lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The reciprocal phenotype in lymphatic branching between Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants suggest a complex NRP2 function that regulates LEC behavior both positively and negatively, through a binding with VEGFC or SEMA3s. PMID:26319580

  20. Survey of dermal protection in Washington State collision repair industry.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Fent, Kenneth W; Whittaker, Stephen G; Gaines, Linda G T; Thomasen, Jennifer M; Flack, Sheila L; Nylander-French, Leena A; Yost, Michael G; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K

    2011-09-01

    Substantial exposure to isocyanates may occur during spray painting in autobody shops, yet information is lacking on the efficacy of the protective clothing used during spray painting. We investigated the personal and workplace factors associated with painters' dermal protection use during a large-scale exposure assessment study. Survey data indicated that 69% of painters always used gloves, with latex gloves (47%) and nitrile gloves (34%) used most frequently. Among latex glove users, 53% used thin latex (0.05-0.13 mm), 6% used medium latex (0.15-0.20 mm), and 12% used thick latex (> 0.20 mm). Among nitrile glove users, 27% used thin nitrile and 45% used medium nitrile. Sixty-three percent of painters always used coveralls, 44% preferring one particular brand. Although overspray presents an opportunity for dermal exposure to the neck and face, only 19% of painters protected these areas with personal protective equipment. Painters who always used coveralls were more likely to use gloves (odds ratio = 7.9, p = 0.061). Painters who reported ever having smoked cigarettes used gloves (p = 0.05) and coveralls (p = 0.04) more frequently. Painters who sprayed more than 34 clear coat jobs per month used coveralls most frequently (p = 0.038). Exact logistic regressions along with random sample calculations indicated that the survey results were independent of the shops. Because of the small sample size in this study, future research is warranted to corroborate these results. Studying the effectiveness of gloves and coveralls against polyurethane paints and understanding the underlying motivators and preferences for painters and business owners is needed for the development of best practices for the selection and use of dermal protection. PMID:21830873

  1. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  2. A method for measuring dermal exposure to multifunctional acrylates.

    PubMed

    Surakka, J; Johnsson, S; Rosén, G; Lindh, T; Fischer, T

    1999-12-01

    UV-curable acrylates are used increasingly for coating wood surfaces in the furniture industry. One of the active components, tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA), is known to be both an allergen and irritant to the skin. Methods to measure dermal exposure to skin irritants and allergens, such as acrylates, are insufficient for exposure assessment and there is none for this compound. The aim of this investigation was to develop a skin and surface sampling method, based on tape stripping, and a gas chromatographic method for quantitative analysis for assessing occupational skin exposure to multifunctional acrylates. Twelve adhesives were tested for their efficiency to remove TPGDA and UV-coating from a glass surface, the skin of guinea pigs and human volunteers employing the tape-stripping method in order to find the best performing tape. Variables that affect removal efficiency such as the applied dose and its retention time on the skin, tape adhesion time on the skin, and the number of strippings required to detect the contaminant from the skin were studied. Fixomull tape performed the best during sampling and analysis and had the most consistent removal efficiencies for the studied substances. The average removal efficiency with a single stripping at the 2 microliters TPGDA exposed skin sites was 85% (RSD = 14.1), and for UV-resin exposed sites 63% (RSD = 20.2). The results indicated that this method can be used for measuring dermal exposure to multifunctional acrylates efficiently, accurately, and economically. This method provides a sensitive and powerful tool for the assessment of dermal exposure to multifunctional acrylates both from the skin and from other contaminated surfaces in occupational field settings. PMID:11529185

  3. Dermal Toxicity of Flake-Like α-Alumina Pigments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, HyunJeong; Jang, Seongwan; Lee, Sang-Geun; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum is one of the most widely used nonferrous metals and an important industrial material, especially for automotive coatings. However, potential toxicity caused by aluminum in humans limits the used of this metal. α-alumina is the most stable form of aluminum in various phases. Although the results of studies evaluating the dermal toxicity of α-alumina remained unclear, this compound can still be used as a pigment in cosmetics for humans. In the current study, we further evaluated the dermal cytotoxic effects of α-alumina on human skin cells and an in vivo mouse model. We also measured the in vitro penetration profile of flake-like α-alumina in porcine skin and assessed the degree of cellular metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrated that treatment with flake-like α-alumina did not significantly affect cell viability up to 24 h. This compound was found to have a non-penetration profile based on a Franz modified diffusion cell assay. In addition, flake-like α-alumina was not found to induce dermal inflammation as assessed by histology of epidermal architecture, hyperplasia, and the expression of Interleukin-1β and Cyclooxygenase-2. Results of the cellular metabolic disorder assay indicated that flake-like α-alumina does not exert a direct effect on human skin cells. Taken together, our findings provided not only evidence that flake-like α-alumina may serve as a pearlescent pigment in cosmetics but also experimental basis utilizing α-alumina for human application. Our results also obviously provide new insight of the further toxicity study to aluminum based nanoparticles for skin. PMID:26353706

  4. A functional dual-coated (FDC) microtiter plate method to replace the botulinum toxin LD50 test.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yvonne Y B; Rigsby, Peter; Sesardic, Dorothea; Marks, James D; Jones, Russell G A

    2012-06-01

    Conventional capture ("Sandwich") ELISAs equally detect denatured inactive and native active botulinum type A toxin. Light chain endoprotease activity assays also fail to distinguish between various inactive molecules including partially denatured and fragmented material still retaining this protease activity. By co-coating microtiter plates with SNAP25 substrate and a monoclonal antibody specific for a conformational epitope of the toxin's Hc domain, it was possible to develop a highly sensitive (130 aM LoD), precise (1.4% GCV) new assay specific for the biologically active toxin molecule. Capture was performed in phosphate buffer with a fixed optimal concentration of chaotropic agent (e.g., 1.2 M urea) to differentially isolate functional toxin molecules. Addition of enzymatically favorable buffer containing zinc and DTT reduced the interchain disulfide bond releasing and activating the captured L-chain with subsequent specific cleavage of the SNAP25(1-206) substrate. A neoepitope antibody specific for the newly exposed Q(197) epitope was used to quantify the cleaved SNAP25(1-197). The assay's requirement for the intact toxin molecule was demonstrated with pre-reduced toxin (heavy and light chains), recombinant LHn fragments, and stressed samples containing partially or fully denatured material. This is the first known immunobiochemical assay that correlates with in vivo potency and provides a realistic alternative. PMID:22406430

  5. The neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid, affects Bombus impatiens (bumblebee) sonication behavior when consumed at doses below the LD50.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Callin M; Combes, Stacey A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated changes in sonication (or buzz-pollination) behavior of Bombus impatiens bumblebees, after consumption of the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid. We measured sonication frequency, sonication length, and flight (wing beat) frequency of marked bees collecting pollen from Solanum lycopsersicum (tomato), and then randomly assigned bees to consume 0, 0.0515, 0.515, or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid. We recorded the number of bees in each treatment group that resumed sonication behavior after consuming imidacloprid, and re-measured sonication and flight behavior for these bees. We did not find evidence that consuming 0.0515 ng imidacloprid affected the sonication length, sonication frequency, or flight frequency for bees that sonicated after consuming imidacloprid; we were unable to test changes in these variables for bees that consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng because we did not observe enough of these bees sonicating after treatment. We performed Cox proportional hazard regression to determine whether consuming imidacloprid affected the probability of engaging in further sonication behavior on S. lycopersicum and found that bumblebees who consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid were significantly less likely to sonicate after treatment than bees who consumed no imidacloprid. At the end of the experiment, we classified bees as dead or alive; our data suggest a trend of increasing mortality with higher doses of imidacloprid. Our results show that even modest doses of imidacloprid can significantly affect the likelihood of bumblebees engaging in sonication, a behavior critical for the pollination of a variety of crops and other plants. PMID:27189613

  6. Contribution of dermal-derived mesenchymal cells during liver repair in two different experimental models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Dai, Tingyu; Liu, Dengqun; Chen, Zelin; Wu, Liao; Gao, Li; Wang, Yu; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-01-01

    Progressive liver disease is a major health issue for which no effective treatment is available, leading to cirrhosis and orthotopic liver transplantation. However, the lack of availability of donor organs and other adverse factors including rejection limit its extensive clinical application. Cell-based therapy using mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may represent an attractive therapeutic option. Dermal-derived mesenchymal cells (DMCs) are attractive as one of the abundant sources from which to isolate mesenchymal cells for therapeutic applications and can be easily accessed with minimal harm to the donor. In this study, we used two different animal models to investigate potential therapeutic effect of DMCs transplantation in liver injury. We found that DMCs administration alleviated liver fibrosis and restored the liver function in fibrotic mice induced by CCl4. Furthermore, in an acute irradiation induced damage model, a unique population of DMCs could engraft into the liver tissue for a long period, exhibiting the phenotype of both mesenchymal cells and macrophage cells, and improve the survival of mice exposed to 8 Gy lethally total-body irradiation. These discoveries provide important evidence that DMCs therapy has a beneficial effect on liver injury, and provide new insight into liver injury therapy depending on the alternative cells. PMID:27126764

  7. Contribution of dermal-derived mesenchymal cells during liver repair in two different experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Dai, Tingyu; Liu, Dengqun; Chen, Zelin; Wu, Liao; Gao, Li; Wang, Yu; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-01-01

    Progressive liver disease is a major health issue for which no effective treatment is available, leading to cirrhosis and orthotopic liver transplantation. However, the lack of availability of donor organs and other adverse factors including rejection limit its extensive clinical application. Cell-based therapy using mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may represent an attractive therapeutic option. Dermal-derived mesenchymal cells (DMCs) are attractive as one of the abundant sources from which to isolate mesenchymal cells for therapeutic applications and can be easily accessed with minimal harm to the donor. In this study, we used two different animal models to investigate potential therapeutic effect of DMCs transplantation in liver injury. We found that DMCs administration alleviated liver fibrosis and restored the liver function in fibrotic mice induced by CCl4. Furthermore, in an acute irradiation induced damage model, a unique population of DMCs could engraft into the liver tissue for a long period, exhibiting the phenotype of both mesenchymal cells and macrophage cells, and improve the survival of mice exposed to 8 Gy lethally total-body irradiation. These discoveries provide important evidence that DMCs therapy has a beneficial effect on liver injury, and provide new insight into liver injury therapy depending on the alternative cells. PMID:27126764

  8. Polarized Microscopy in Lesions With Altered Dermal Collagen.

    PubMed

    Elbendary, Amira; Valdebran, Manuel; Parikh, Kruti; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dermal collagen are noted in dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, hypertrophic scars, and keloids. The authors sought to determine whether variations in birefringence of collagen by polarized microscopy could be of help in diagnosing such conditions. Representative hematoxylin and eosin sections of 400 cases, including dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, hypertrophic scars, keloid, morphea, and lichen sclerosus, were examined under polarized microscopy. Distinct patterns of birefringence of collagen for each disease were noted under polarized microscopy. This study highlights the use of polarized microscopy as adjunctive tool in differentiating different diseases with collagen alteration. PMID:26959692

  9. Effect of microemulsions on cell viability of human dermal fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juyi; Mironava, Tatsiana; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam; Garti, Nissim

    Microemulsions are optically clear, thermostable and isotropic mixture consisting of water, oil and surfactants. Their advantages of ease preparation, spontaneous formation, long-term stability and enhanced solubility of bioactive materials make them great potentials as vehicles in food and pharmaceutical applications. In this study, comparative in vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed to select a best formulation of microemulsion with the least toxicity for human dermal fibroblasts. Three different kinds of oils and six different kinds of surfactants were used to form microemulsions by different ratios. The effect of oil type and surfactant type as well as their proportions on cell proliferation and viability were tested.

  10. Dermal exposure from transfer of lubricants and fuels by consumers.

    PubMed

    Galea, Karen S; Davis, Alice; Todd, Davis; MacCalman, Laura; McGonagle, Carolyn; Cherrie, John W

    2014-11-01

    Consumer uses of fuels and lubricants in Europe are subject to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of CHemicals (REACH) legislation. Ten volunteers completed a series of exposure situations to simulate filling a vehicle fuel tank with diesel (ES1 Diesel), adding lubricant to a car engine (two situations, one filling point easier to reach (ES2 Easy) than the other (ES3 Hard)) and lubricating a bicycle chain (ES4 Bike). Dermal exposure to the hands and forearms was assessed using a wipe sampling method. A high proportion of samples was less than the limit of detection (ES1=38%, ES3=60%, ES2 and 4, both 78%). In ES1 Diesel, dermal exposure to the hands and forearms ranged from <0.25 μg/cm(2) to 96.21 μg/cm(2). Significantly higher dermal exposure was observed when a lower level of care was taken to complete the task. In ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard, the hand and forearm results ranged from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.33 μg/cm(2) and from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.54 μg/cm(2), respectively. In ES4 Bike, the hand and forearm exposures ranged from <0.35 μg/cm(2) to 5.25 μg/cm(2). Not all volunteers fully complied with the ES4 instructions, thus highlighting that this situation may have more variability in consumer behaviour. The ratio of the amount measured on the hands and forearms to the amount of product handled for ES1 Diesel, ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard was less than 0.0001%, for ES4 Bike it was 0.04%. Mixed effect models showed that the between and within volunteer variations are small for all except ES1 Diesel, where the within volunteer variation was relatively large (likely due to the few high measurements). This study reports dermal exposure measurement data, which will be of value when updating REACH and other exposure assessments for these, and similar, petroleum products. PMID:24938510

  11. Exposed tibial bone after burns: Flap reconstruction versus dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Pirayesh, Ali; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Monstrey, Stan

    2016-03-01

    A 44 years old male patient had suffered extensive 3rd degree burns on both legs, undergoing thorough surgical debridement, resulting in both tibias being exposed. Approximately 5 months after the incident he was referred to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University Hospital Gent, Belgium, to undergo flap reconstruction. Free flap surgery was performed twice on both lower legs but failed on all four occasions. In between flap surgery, a dermal substitute (Integra(®)) was applied, attempting to cover the exposed tibias with a layer of soft tissue, but also without success. In order to promote the development of granulation tissue over the exposed bone, small holes were drilled in both tibias with removal of the outer layer of the anterior cortex causing the bone to bleed and subsequently negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was applied. The limited granulation tissue resulting from this procedure was then covered with a dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)), consisting of acellular human dermis with an average thickness of 0.25mm. This dermal substitute was combined with a NPWT-dressing, and then served as an extracellular matrix (ECM), guiding the distribution of granulation tissue over the remaining areas of exposed tibial bone. Four days after initial application of Glyaderm(®) combined with NPWT both tibias were almost completely covered with a thin coating of soft tissue. In order to increase the thickness of this soft tissue cover two additional layers of Glyaderm(®) were applied at intervals of approximately 1 week. One week after the last Glyaderm(®) application both wounds were autografted. The combination of an acellular dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)) with negative pressure wound therapy and skin grafting proved to be an efficient technique to cover a wider area of exposed tibial bone in a patient who was not a candidate for free flap surgery. An overview is also provided of newer and simpler techniques for coverage of

  12. Research on Acute Toxicity and the Behavioral Effects of Methanolic Extract from Psilocybin Mushrooms and Psilocin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuk, Olga; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Poliwoda, Anna; Kazakova, Anastasia; Godovan, Vladlena V.; Halama, Marek; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological activities and acute toxicity of the psilocin (PC) and dried residues of the crude extracts of psychotropic mushrooms were investigated in mice. The hallucinogenic substances were effectively isolated, by using methanol, from the species of Psilocybe semilanceata and Pholiotina cyanopus, that were collected in the north-east region of Poland. The chemical analysis of these extracts, which was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS), indicated the presence of psilocin and other hallucinogenic substances, including indolealkylamines and their phosphorylated analogues. When the pure psilocin or fungal extracts were used, slight differences in determined LD50 values were observed. However, the application of PC evoked the highest level of toxicity (293.07 mg/kg) compared to the activity of extracts from Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata, where the level of LD50 was 316.87 mg/kg and 324.37 mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the behavioral test, which considered the head-twitching response (HTR), was used to assess the effects of the studied psychotropic factors on the serotonergic system. Both, the fungal extracts and psilocin evoked characteristic serotoninergic effects depending on the dose administered to mice, acting as an agonist/partial agonist on the serotonergic system. A dose of 200 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced spontaneous head-twitching in mice (100% effect), as a result of the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. Compared to the activity of 5-HTP, the intraperitoneal administration of 1mg/kg of psilocin or hallucinogenic extracts of studied mushrooms (Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata) reduced the number of head-twitch responses of about 46% and 30%, respectively. In contrast, the administration of PC exhibited a reduction of about 60% in HTR numbers. PMID:25826052

  13. Research on acute toxicity and the behavioral effects of methanolic extract from psilocybin mushrooms and psilocin in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuk, Olga; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Poliwoda, Anna; Kazakova, Anastasia; Godovan, Vladlena V; Halama, Marek; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2015-04-01

    The pharmacological activities and acute toxicity of the psilocin (PC) and dried residues of the crude extracts of psychotropic mushrooms were investigated in mice. The hallucinogenic substances were effectively isolated, by using methanol, from the species of Psilocybe semilanceata and Pholiotina cyanopus, that were collected in the north-east region of Poland. The chemical analysis of these extracts, which was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS), indicated the presence of psilocin and other hallucinogenic substances, including indolealkylamines and their phosphorylated analogues. When the pure psilocin or fungal extracts were used, slight differences in determined LD50 values were observed. However, the application of PC evoked the highest level of toxicity (293.07 mg/kg) compared to the activity of extracts from Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata, where the level of LD50 was 316.87 mg/kg and 324.37 mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the behavioral test, which considered the head-twitching response (HTR), was used to assess the effects of the studied psychotropic factors on the serotonergic system. Both, the fungal extracts and psilocin evoked characteristic serotoninergic effects depending on the dose administered to mice, acting as an agonist/partial agonist on the serotonergic system. A dose of 200 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced spontaneous head-twitching in mice (100% effect), as a result of the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. Compared to the activity of 5-HTP, the intraperitoneal administration of 1mg/kg of psilocin or hallucinogenic extracts of studied mushrooms (Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata) reduced the number of head-twitch responses of about 46% and 30%, respectively. In contrast, the administration of PC exhibited a reduction of about 60% in HTR numbers. PMID:25826052

  14. ISSUES IN UNDERSTANDING DERMAL EXPOSURES RESULTING FROM CONTACT WITH CONTAMINATED SURFACES, MEASURING SURFACE CONTAMINATION, AND CHARACTERIZING TRANSFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although monitoring for surface contamination in work with radioactive materials and dermal monitoring of pesticide exposure to agricultural workers have been standard practice for 50 years, regular surface sampling and dermal monitoring methods have only been applied to indust...

  15. Acute and subacute (28 days) oral toxicity assessment of the oil extracted from Acrocomia aculeata pulp in rats.

    PubMed

    Traesel, Giseli Karenina; de Souza, Juliane Coelho; de Barros, Aline Lima; Souza, Marcos Alexandre; Schmitz, Wanderley Onofre; Muzzi, Rozanna Marques; Oesterreich, Silvia Aparecida; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2014-12-01

    Acrocomia aculeata, popularly known as “bocaiúva”, is a species used for nutritional purposes and for the treatment of various diseases, as it has, among other things, high levels of antioxidant compounds. This study aimed to assess the toxicological profile of A. aculeata, through acute and subacute toxicity tests. Male and female rats (Wistar) received by gavage 2000 mg/kg of oil extracted from the pulp of A. aculeata (OPAC) for the acute toxicity test and 125, 250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg of OPAC for subacute toxicity test. In the acute toxicity study no mortality or behavioral changes were observed in rats treated with 2000 mg/kg, indicating that the LD50 is higher than this dose. In the subacute toxicity test, the tested doses produced no significant changes in hematological, biochemical or histopathological parameters in the animals exposed. These results demonstrate the absence of acute and subacute toxicity after oral exposure to A. aculeata oil in rats. However, further studies in animals and in humans are needed in order to have sufficient safety evidence for its use in humans. PMID:25445758

  16. Acute and repeated doses (28 days) oral toxicity study of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Mohan, V; Thakurdesai, Prasad A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present work was to study acute and subacute (28-days repeated dose) oral toxicity effect of glycosides based standardized fenugreek seed extract (SFSE-G) in vivo. SFSE-G was prepared by resin-based chromatography and standardized to glycosides namely trigoneoside Ib (76%) and vicenin 1 (15%). The acute oral toxicity (AOT) and subacute toxicity studies were performed in Swiss albino mice (5 mice/sex/group) as per OECD 425 (up-and-down procedure) and OCED 407 guidelines respectively. Acute oral administration of 5000mg/kg of SFSE-G showed 40% mortality with no mortality in lower dosages. The subacute oral administration of SFSE-G did not show observational or toxicological effects on the body or organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmic effects, locomotor activity, hematology, blood biochemistry, urinalysis, or histopathology at dose 250mg/kg. However, SFSE-G (1000mg/kg) showed mortality and minor alterations to body weight, relative liver weights, hematology and blood chemistry parameters related to treatment but it was within normal laboratory ranges. In conclusion, SFSE-G showed median lethal dose (LD50) more than 4350mg/kg and no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of 250mg/kg for both sexes during AOT and sub-acute toxicity study, respectively. PMID:25979642

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--PAHS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PAHs in Dermal Wipe Samples data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 PAHs in 40 dermal wipe samples over 40 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The sampling period occurred on the last day of each...

  18. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipe Samples data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 4 metals in 343 dermal wipe samples over 80 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The sampling period occurred on the first day of...

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--PESTICIDES IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pesticides in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 3 pesticides in 177 dermal wipe samples over 177 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The Derma...

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL WIPES ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 179 dermal wipe samples over 179 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household during Stage III of the NHEXAS study. The sampling per...

  1. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--METALS IN DERMAL ANALYTICAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Metals in Dermal Wipes data set contains analytical results for measurements of up to 11 metals in 86 dermal wipe samples over 86 households. Each sample was collected from the primary respondent within each household. The sampling period occurred on the first day of the fi...

  2. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN RAT AND HUMAN SKIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethriods are a class of neurotoxic pesticides and their use may lead to dermal exposure. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids in rat and human skin. Dorsal skin removed from adult male LD rats (hair clipped 24 h previously) was dermatomed and mou...

  3. DERMAL, ORAL, AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive, used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors has contaminated drinking water leading to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhalation ki...

  4. DERMAL, ORAL AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors, has contaminated drinking water and can lead to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhal...

  5. In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flowthrough diffusi...

  6. PHARMACOKINETICS OF OXYGENATE MIXES IN THE YOUNG AND ELDERLY HUMANS BY THE DERMAL ROUTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will build on the recently completed study in which 15 young men were exposed to MTBE by three routes of exposure (oral, dermal, and inhalation). The dermal route of exposure was selected because it can be a significant portal of entry for environmental contaminants du...

  7. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.; Kimbrough, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. 128 refs., 7 tabs.

  8. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, E; Kimbrough, R D

    1993-01-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. PMID:8020435

  9. Efficacy and safety of catnip (Nepeta cataria) as a novel filth fly repellent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Zeng, X-P; Berkebile, D; DU, H-J; Tong, Y; Qian, K

    2009-09-01

    Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is known for its pseudo-narcotic effects on cats. Recently, it has been reported as an effective mosquito repellent against several Aedes and Culex species, both topically and spatially. Our laboratory bioassays showed that catnip essential oil (at a dosage of 20 mg) resulted in average repellency rates of 96% against stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) and 79% against houseflies, Musca domestica (L.), respectively. This finding suggested that the application of repellent could be used as part of filth fly management. Further evaluations of catnip oil toxicity were conducted to provide a broad-spectrum safety profile of catnip oil use as a potential biting and nuisance insect repellent in urban settings. Acute oral, dermal, inhalation, primary dermal and eye irritation toxicity tests were performed. The acute oral LD(50) of catnip oil was found to be 3160 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 2710 mg/kg BW in female and male rats, respectively. The acute dermal LD50 was > 5000 mg/kg BW. The acute inhalation LD50 was observed to be > 10,000 mg/m3. Primary skin irritation tested on New Zealand white rabbits showed that catnip oil is a moderate irritant. Catnip oil was classified as practically non-irritating to the eye. In comparison with other U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved mosquito repellents (DEET, picaridin and p-menthane-3,8-diol), catnip oil can be considered as a relatively safe repellent, which may cause minor skin irritation. PMID:19712151

  10. Dermal absorption of benzene in occupational settings: estimating flux and applications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela R D; Sahmel, Jennifer; Knutsen, Jeffrey; Spencer, John; Bunge, Annette L

    2011-02-01

    There is growing emphasis in the United States and Europe regarding the quantification of dermal exposures to chemical mixtures and other substances. In this paper, we determine the dermal flux of benzene in neat form, in organic solvents, and in aqueous solutions based on a critical review and analysis of the published literature, and discuss appropriate applications for using benzene dermal absorption data in occupational risk assessment. As part of this effort, we synthesize and analyze data for 77 experimental results taken from 16 studies of benzene skin absorption. We also assess the chemical activity of benzene in simple hydrocarbon solvent mixtures using a thermodynamic modeling software tool. Based on the collective human in vivo, human in vitro, and animal in vitro data sets, we find that the steady-state dermal flux for neat benzene (and benzene-saturated aqueous solutions) ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 mg/(cm²·h). Observed outlier values for some of the animal in vivo data sets are possibly due to the use of test species that have more permeable skin than humans or study conditions that resulted in damage to the skin barrier. Because relatively few dermal absorption studies have been conducted on benzene-containing organic solvents, and available test results may be influenced by study design or vehicle effects, it is not possible to use these data to quantify the dermal flux of benzene for other types of solvent mixtures. However, depending on the application, we describe several potential approaches that can be used to derive a rough approximation of the steady-state benzene dermal flux for these mixtures. Important limitations with respect to quantifying and evaluating the significance of dermal exposures to benzene in occupational settings include a lack of data on (1) factors that affect the dermal uptake of benzene, (2) the dermal flux of benzene for different organic solvent mixtures, (3) meaningful metrics for evaluating the dermal uptake of benzene

  11. Hanford Tank Ventilation System Condensates and Headspace Vapors: An Assessment of Potential Dermal Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.; Springer, David L.

    2006-04-24

    This study considers the question of whether potential dermal exposures to Hanford high-level radioactive waste tank headspace vapors and their condensates could result in significant exposure to workers. Three types of potential exposures were evaluated; dermal contact with aqueous condensate, organic condensate, and direct contact with head space vapors. The dermal absorption rates from aqueous and organic condensates were estimated for selected chemicals using a model described by EPA (1992) with a modified correlation for dermal permeability suggested by Wilschut et al. (1995). Dermal absorption rates of vapors were estimated using a model given by AIHA (2000). Results were compared to an ''equivalent inhalation dose'' calculated by multiplying the inhalation occupational exposure limit by a nominal daily inhalation rate. The results should provide guidance for industrial hygienists to prepare specific recommendations based on specific scenarios.

  12. Effect of Arctium lappa (burdock) extract on canine dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pomari, Elena; Stefanon, Bruno; Colitti, Monica

    2013-12-15

    Although the biological activities of Arctium lappa (burdock) have been already investigated in human and other species, data evaluating the molecular mechanisms have not been reported in the dog. In this study we analyzed for the first time the effect of a root extract of burdock on molecular responses in canine dermal fibroblasts with H2O2 stimulation (H group), with burdock treatment (B group) and with H2O2 stimulation and burdock treatment (BH group), using RNAseq technology. Differentially expressed genes (P<0.05) of H, B and BH groups in comparison to the untreated sample (negative control, C group) were identified with MeV software and were functional annotated and monitored for signaling pathways and candidate biomarkers using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). The expression profile of canine dermal fibroblasts treated with burdock extract with or without H2O2 stimulation, showed an up-regulation of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disheveled 3 (DVL3) and chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (CSGALNACT2). The data suggested that burdock has implications in cell adhesion and gene expression with the modulation of Wnt/β catenin signaling and Chondroitin Sulphate Biosynthesis that are particularly important for the wound healing process. PMID:24192279

  13. Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum Papillary Dermal Elastolysis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rubina; Ferreira, Lurdes; Vale, Esmeralda; Bordalo, Olívia

    2010-01-01

    PXE-PDE is a rare clinicopathological entity with few cases reported. It affects more often elderly women and is characterized by asymptomatic bilateral and symmetrical yellowish papules localized predominantly on the neck and supraclavicular regions. It is clinically similar to Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum. The authors report a case of a 64-year-old woman presenting asymptomatic, yellowish, non-follicular papules, affecting the occipital and the posterior region of the neck for 1 year. The patient denied pruritic or inflammatory changes, marked solar exposition or trauma on the affected areas. Routine laboratory studies: thoracic x-ray and ophthalmologic examination were normal. The histopathologic examination of a biopsy of one of the cutaneous lesions showed an absence of elastic fibers in the papillary dermis.The diagnosis of Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum—like Papillary Dermal Elastolysis (PXE-PDE) was made. Of great importance is the differential diagnosis with Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), but we have also to consider other elastolytic disorders: mid-dermal elastolysis (MDE), linear focal elastosis (LFE) and white fibrous papulosis of the neck (WFPN). Until know, there is no effective treatment for this pathology. PMID:20827433

  14. Acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstructions - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2016-08-01

    During the last two decades, acellular dermal matrices (ADM) have been more widely used in reconstructive procedures i.e. breast reconstructions. Several, both synthetic and biologic products derived from human, porcine and bovine tissue, have been introduced. Until this point postoperative complications for the acellular dermal matrices, as a group, have been the main focus. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge on the each biologic product used in breast reconstructions, including product specific complication frequencies. A systematic search of the literature was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases, identifying 55 relevant articles, mainly evidence level III. AlloDerm seems to be associated with severe complicating matters in the reconstructive process compared to other products. This could be due to the higher number of investigating studies relative to the others. The surgical area faces certain challenges comparing results, due to surgical variance, the data collection and follow-up. More well-defined guidelines and more high-evidence randomized studies could increase the overall level of evidence in this area. PMID:26881927

  15. Gene Electrotransfer in 3D Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer into the skin is of particular interest for the development of medical applications including DNA vaccination, cancer treatment, wound healing or treatment of local skin disorders. However, such clinical applications are currently limited due to poor understanding of the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer within human tissue. Nowadays, most studies are carried out in rodent models but rodent skin varies from human skin in terms of cell composition and architecture. We used a tissue-engineering approach to study gene electrotransfer mechanisms in a human tissue context. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were cultured according to the self-assembly method to produce 3D reconstructed human dermal tissue. In this study, we showed that cells of the reconstructed cutaneous tissue were efficiently electropermeabilized by applying millisecond electric pulses, without affecting their viability. A reporter gene was successfully electrotransferred into this human tissue and gene expression was detected for up to 48h. Interestingly, the transfected cells were solely located on the upper surface of the tissue, where they were in close contact with plasmid DNA solution. Furthermore, we report evidences that electrotransfection success depends on plasmid mobility within tissue- rich in collagens, but not on cell proliferation status. In conclusion, in addition to proposing a reliable alternative to animal experiments, tissue engineering produces valid biological tool for the in vitro study of gene electrotransfer mechanisms in human tissue. PMID:27029947

  16. Nanoparticle coated emulsions as novel dermal delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Eskandar, Nasrin Ghouchi; Simovic, Spomenka; Prestidge, Clive A

    2009-08-01

    The dermal delivery characteristics of hydrophilic silica nanoparticle coated medium chain triglyceride oil-in-water emulsions are reported and correlated with the physicochemical and interfacial properties of the emulsion based drug carriers. The synergistic drug/stabiliser/nanoparticle interactions are demonstrated to be a function of the charge and concentration of the initial emulsion stabiliser; charge and initial loading phase of nanoparticles and physicochemical properties of the drug molecule. The improved physical stability of the emulsions and the chemical stability of two model lipophilic agents (all-trans-retinol and acridine orange 10-nonyl bromide) confirm that engineered nanoparticle layers can enhance the shelf-life of liable lipophilic agents. Nanoparticle coatings are shown to control the in-vitro release of active agents from emulsions and significantly promote skin retention. The lipophilic agents distributed into the deeper viable skin layers without permeation through full-thickness skin and hence systemic exposure. Nanoparticle-coated submicron oil-in-water emulsions can serve as novel dermal carriers with controlled release kinetics and targeted drug delivery. PMID:19534710

  17. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  18. Noninvasive assessment of dermal carotenoids as a biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake123

    PubMed Central

    Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J; Welch, Erin; Ermakov, Igor; Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Background: Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) has been suggested as a feasible method for noninvasive carotenoid measurement of human skin. However, before RRS measures of dermal carotenoids can be used as a biomarker, data on intra- and intersubject variability and validity are needed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility and validity of RRS measures of dermal total carotenoids and lycopene in humans. Design: In study 1, 74 men and women with diverse skin pigmentation were recruited. RRS measures of the palm, inner arm, and outer arm were obtained at baseline, 1 wk, 2 wk, 1 mo, 3 mo, and 6 mo (to maximize seasonal variation). The RRS device used visible light at 488 nm to estimate total carotenoids and at 514 nm to estimate lycopene. Reproducibility was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). In study 2, we recruited 28 subjects and assessed dietary carotenoid intake, obtained blood for HPLC analyses, performed RRS measures of dermal carotenoid status, and performed dermal biopsies (3-mm punch biopsy) with dermal carotenoids assessed by HPLC. Results: ICCs for total carotenoids across time were 0.97 (palm), 0.95 (inner arm), and 0.93 (outer arm). Total dermal carotenoids assessed by RRS were significantly correlated with total dermal carotenoids assessed by HPLC of dermal biopsies (r = 0.66, P = 0.0001). Similarly, lycopene assessed by RRS was significantly correlated with lycopene assessed by HPLC of dermal biopsies (r = 0.74, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: RRS is a feasible and valid method for noninvasively assessing dermal carotenoids as a biomarker for studies of nutrition and health. PMID:20685953

  19. Acquired dermal melanocytosis confined to the palm with a review of published cases of acquired dermal melanocytosis on the hands.

    PubMed

    Nakauchi, Emi; Oka, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Masanobu; Nishigori, Chikako

    2016-06-01

    Acquired dermal melanocytosis (ADM) classically occurs on the face. However, extrafacial ADM including palmar ADM has been reported on rare occasions. We present the first report of ADM confined to the palm without ADM lesions in other regions in a 30-year-old Japanese woman. The patient presented with several interspersed macules up to 1 cm in diameter with poorly defined margins, containing faint slate-gray spots 1-2 mm in diameter, on the left palm near the first and second fingers and on the palmar side of the first finger near the metacarpophalangeal joint. These slate-gray spots were prominent on and around palmar creases and on wrinkles on the metacarpophalangeal joint. The patient was right hand-dominant. Histopathological examination revealed scattered spindle-shaped cells with melanin granules and melanophages in the upper to middle dermis. Pigment-bearing spindle-shaped cells were demonstrated to be dermal melanocytes because of positive staining for Melan-A after melanin removal. We review the published work for ADM on the hands. PMID:26703756

  20. Elastin sequences trigger transient proinflammatory responses by human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Almine, Jessica F.; Wise, Steven G.; Hiob, Matti; Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Tiwari, Krishna Kumar; Vali, Shireen; Abbasi, Taher; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    Following penetrating injury of the skin, a highly orchestrated and overlapping sequence of events helps to facilitate wound resolution. Inflammation is a hallmark that is initiated early, but the reciprocal relationship between cells and matrix molecules that triggers and maintains inflammation is poorly appreciated. Elastin is enriched in the deep dermis of skin. We propose that deep tissue injury encompasses elastin damage, yielding solubilized elastin that triggers inflammation. As dermal fibroblasts dominate the deep dermis, this means that a direct interaction between elastin sequences and fibroblasts would reveal a proinflammatory signature. Tropoelastin was used as a surrogate for elastin sequences. Tropoelastin triggered fibroblast expression of the metalloelastase MMP-12, which is normally expressed by macrophages. MMP-12 expression increased 1056 ± 286-fold by 6 h and persisted for 24 h. Chemokine expression was more transient, as chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 8 (CXCL8), CXCL1, and CXCL5 transcripts increased 11.8 ± 2.6-, 10.2 ± 0.4-, and 8593 ± 996-fold, respectively, by 6–12 h and then decreased. Through the use of specific inhibitors and protein truncation, we found that transduction of the tropoelastin signal was mediated by the fibroblast elastin binding protein (EBP). In silico modeling using a predictive computational fibroblast model confirmed the up-regulation, and simulations revealed PKA as a key part of the signaling circuit. We tested this prediction with 1 μM PKA inhibitor H-89 and found that 2 h of exposure correspondingly reduced expression of MMP-12 (63.9±12.3%) and all chemokine markers, consistent with the levels seen with EBP inhibition, and validated PKA as a novel node and druggable target to ameliorate the proinflammatory state. A separate trigger that utilized C-terminal RKRK of tropoelastin reduced marker expression to 65.0–76.5% and suggests the parallel involvement of integrin αVβ3. We propose that the solubilization

  1. Irradiated PVAl membrane swelled with chitosan solution as dermal equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodas, A. C. D.; Ohnuki, T.; Mathor, M. B.; Lugao, A. B.

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic membranes as dermal equivalent can be applied at in vitro studies for developing new transdermal drugs or cosmetics. These membranes could be composed to mimic the dermis and seed cultivated keratinocytes as epidermal layer on it. The endothelial cells ingrowth to promote neovascularization and fibroblasts ingrowth to promote the substitution of this scaffold by natural components of the dermis. As, they can mimic the scaffold function of dermis; the membranes with biological interaction could be used for in vivo studies as dermal equivalent. For this application, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAl) membranes crosslinked by gamma radiation were swelled with chitosan solution. PVAl do not interact with the organism when implanted and is intended to mimic the mechanical characteristics of the dermal scaffold. The chitosan as a biocompatible biosynthetic polysaccharide were incorporated into PVAl membranes to improve the organism response. Degradation of chitosan by the organism occurs preferably by hydrolysis or enzymatic action, for example, by lysozyme. For this purpose the swelling kinetic of PVAl membranes with chitosan solution were performed and it was verified their degradation in vitro. The results showed that the swelling equilibrium of the PVAl membranes with chitosan membranes was reached in 120 h with average swelling of 1730%. After swelling, PVAl and chitosan/PVAl membranes were dried and immersed in phosphate buffer solution pH 5.7 and pH 7.4, with and without lysozyme, as those pH values are the specific physiologic pH for external skin and the general physiological pH for the organism, respectively. It was verified that the pure PVAl membrane did not showed change in their mass during 14 days. PVAl membranes swelled with chitosan solution showed mass decrease from 1 to 14 days inside these solutions. The highest mass decrease was verified at pH 5.7 in phosphate buffer solution without lysozyme. The smallest mass decrease was verified at pH 7.4 in

  2. Safety and toxicological evaluation of Aflapin: a novel Boswellia-derived anti-inflammatory product.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraju, A V; Sundararaju, D; Vamsikrishna, U; Suryachandra, R; Machiraju, G; Sengupta, K; Trimurtulu, G

    2010-11-01

    Boswellia serrata gum resin has been used for treatment of various ailments in different cultures for thousands of years. Aflapin(®) is a novel synergistic composition derived from B. serrata gum resin (Indian Patent Application No. 2229/CHE/2008). Aflapin is significantly better as an anti-inflammatory agent compared to the Boswellia extracts presently available in the market. To assess the safety of Aflapin, a battery of acute and sub-acute toxicity studies were conducted in various animal models according to the OECD test guidelines. The acute oral LD50 of Aflapin was greater than 5000 mg/kg in female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Acute dermal LD50 of Aflapin was greater than 2000 mg/kg in SD rats. A primary dermal irritation study conducted using New Zealand White rabbits indicated that Aflapin is non-irritating to skin. Aflapin caused minimal ocular irritation in a primary eye irritation test conducted on New Zealand Albino rabbits. A repeat dose 28-day sub-acute oral toxicity study in SD rats demonstrated no significant signs of toxicity. Various evaluations including hematology, clinical chemistry, gross necropsy, and histopathology did not show any significant adverse changes. The NOAEL of Aflapin was found to be greater than 2500 mg/kg body weight. These studies demonstrate broad spectrum safety of Aflapin in animal models. PMID:20874664

  3. Photoprotective effect and acute oral systemic toxicity evaluation of the novel heterocyclic compound LQFM048.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Daniela C; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Vieira, Marcelo S; Luzin, Rangel M; Quintino, Michelle P; Nunes, Liliane M; Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos Chaves; de Camargo, Henrique Santiago; Pinto, Angelo C; Dos Santos Júnior, Helvécio M; Chiari, Bruna G; Isaac, Vera; Valadares, Marize C; Martins, Tatiana Duque; Lião, Luciano M; de S Gil, Eric; Menegatti, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    The new heterocyclic derivative LQFM048 (3) (2,4,6-tris ((E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate)-1,3,5-triazine) was originally designed through the molecular hybridization strategy from Uvinul® T 150 (1) and (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (2) sunscreens, using green chemistry approach. This compound was obtained in global yields (80%) and showed an interesting redox potential. In addition, it is thermally stable up to temperatures around 250°C. It was observed that LQFM048 (3) showed a low degradation after 150min of sunlight exposure at 39°C, whereas the extreme radiation conditions induced a considerable photodegradation of the LQFM048 (3), especially when irradiated by VIS and VIS+UVA. During the determination of sun protection factor, LQFM048 (3) showed interesting results, specially as in association with other photoprotective compounds and commercial sunscreen. Additionally, the compound (3) did not promote cytotoxicity for 3T3 fibroblasts. Moreover, it was not able to trigger acute oral systemic toxicity in mice, being classified as a compound with low acute toxicity hazard (2.000mg/kg>LD50<5.000mg/kg). Therefore, this compound synthesized using green chemistry approach is promising showing potential to development of a new sunscreen product with advantage of presenting redox potential, indicating antioxidant properties. PMID:27208746

  4. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. PMID:27539747

  5. Chemical composition, protoscolicidal effects and acute toxicity of Pistacia atlantica Desf. fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Kheirandish, Farnaz; Ghasemi Kia, Mehdi; Tavakoli Kareshk, Amir; Yarahmadi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the chemical composition and scolicidal effects of Pistacia atlantica Desf. extract against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts and its acute toxicity in mice model. Various concentrations of the methanolic extract (5-50 mg/mL) were used for 10-60 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed using eosin exclusion test (0.1%). Acute toxicity was also determined in mice model. The main components were β-myrcene (41.4%), α-pinene (32.48%) and limonene (4.66%). Findings demonstrated that P. atlantica extract at the concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/mL after 20 and 10 min of exposure killed 100% protoscoleces. The LD50 of the intraperitoneal injection of the P. atlantica methanolic extract was 2.43 g/kg and the maximum non-fatal dose was 1.66 g/kg. Obtained results showed the potential of P. atlantica extract as a natural source with no significant toxicity for the production of new scolicidal agent to use in hydatid cyst surgery. PMID:26252652

  6. Acute and Subchronic Toxic Effects of the Fruits of Physalis peruviana L.

    PubMed

    Perk, Basak Ozlem; Ilgin, Sinem; Atli, Ozlem; Duymus, Hale Gamze; Sirmagul, Basar

    2013-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis peruviana L. (PPL) has been traditionally used as antispasmodic, diuretic, antiseptic, sedative, and analgesic all over the world. We aimed to perform qualitative content analysis of the fruits of PPL and to clarify the in vitro genotoxicity and in vivo acute and subchronic toxicity of the fruit. Lyophilized fruit juice does not induce genetic damage. In the acute toxicity studies, LD50 value of the fruit was found to be more than 5000 mg kg(-1) for both sexes. According to the subchronic toxicity studies, hepatic, renal, and hematological toxic effects were not induced in both sexes. Plasma troponin I (only in the group treated with 5000 mg kg(-1) of lyophilized fruit juice) and troponin T levels were significantly increased in male groups treated with lyophilized fruit juice compared to the control group. Furthermore, potassium level was significantly increased in the male group treated with 5000 mg kg(-1) of lyophilized fruit juice. These findings were considered to indicate the myocardial damage particularly in the male group treated with 5000 mg kg(-1) of lyophilized fruit juice. In conclusion, lyophilized fruit juice of PPL is shown to induce cardiac toxicity only at high doses and in male gender. PMID:24369482

  7. Acute and Subchronic Toxic Effects of the Fruits of Physalis peruviana L.

    PubMed Central

    Perk, Basak Ozlem; Ilgin, Sinem; Atli, Ozlem; Duymus, Hale Gamze; Sirmagul, Basar

    2013-01-01

    The fruit of Physalis peruviana L. (PPL) has been traditionally used as antispasmodic, diuretic, antiseptic, sedative, and analgesic all over the world. We aimed to perform qualitative content analysis of the fruits of PPL and to clarify the in vitro genotoxicity and in vivo acute and subchronic toxicity of the fruit. Lyophilized fruit juice does not induce genetic damage. In the acute toxicity studies, LD50 value of the fruit was found to be more than 5000 mg kg−1 for both sexes. According to the subchronic toxicity studies, hepatic, renal, and hematological toxic effects were not induced in both sexes. Plasma troponin I (only in the group treated with 5000 mg kg−1 of lyophilized fruit juice) and troponin T levels were significantly increased in male groups treated with lyophilized fruit juice compared to the control group. Furthermore, potassium level was significantly increased in the male group treated with 5000 mg kg−1 of lyophilized fruit juice. These findings were considered to indicate the myocardial damage particularly in the male group treated with 5000 mg kg−1 of lyophilized fruit juice. In conclusion, lyophilized fruit juice of PPL is shown to induce cardiac toxicity only at high doses and in male gender. PMID:24369482

  8. Formation of dermal skeletal and dental tissues in fish: a comparative and evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Sire, Jean-Yves; Huysseune, Ann

    2003-05-01

    Osteichthyan and chondrichthyan fish present an astonishing diversity of skeletal and dental tissues that are often difficult to classify into the standard textbook categories of bone, cartilage, dentine and enamel. To address the question of how the tissues of the dermal skeleton evolved from the ancestral situation and gave rise to the diversity actually encountered, we review previous data on the development of a number of dermal skeletal elements (odontodes, teeth and dermal denticles, cranial dermal bones, postcranial dermal plates and scutes, elasmoid and ganoid scales, and fin rays). A comparison of developmental stages at the tissue level usually allows us to identify skeletogenic cell populations as either odontogenic or osteogenic on the basis of the place of formation of their dermal papillae and of the way of deposition of their tissues. Our studies support the evolutionary affinities (1) between odontodes, teeth and denticles, (2) between the ganoid scales of polypterids and the elasmoid scales of teleosts, and (3) to a lesser degree between the different bony elements. There is now ample evidence to ascertain that the tissues of the elasmoid scale are derived from dental and not from bony tissues. This review demonstrates the advantage that can be taken from developmental studies, at the tissue level, to infer evolutionary relationships within the dermal skeleton in chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. PMID:12803422

  9. Comparison of dermal and inhalation routes of entry for organic chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepson, Gary W.; Mcdougal, James N.; Clewell, Harvey J., III

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of the chemical concentration inside the body as the result of a dermal exposure versus an inhalation exposure is useful for assessing human health risks and deciding on an appropriate protective posture. In order to describe the relationship between dermal and inhalation routes of exposure, a variety of organic chemicals were evaluated. The types of chemicals chosen for the study were halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, non-polar hydrocarbons and inhalation anesthetics. Both dermal and inhalation exposures were conducted in rats and the chemicals were in the form of vapors. Prior to the dermal exposure, rat fur was closely clipped and during the exposure rats were provided fresh breathing air through latex masks. Blood samples were taken during 4-hour exposures and analyzed for the chemical of interest. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to predict permeability constants (cm/hr) consistent with the observed blood concentrations of the chemical. The ratio of dermal exposure to inhalation exposure required to achieve the same internal dose of chemical was calculated for each test chemical. The calculated ratio in humans ranged from 18 for styrene to 1180 for isoflurane. This methodology can be used to estimate the dermal exposure required to reach the internal dose achieved by a specific inhalation exposure. Such extrapolation is important since allowable exposure standards are often set for inhalation exposures, but occupational exposures may be dermal.

  10. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for dermal absorption of organic chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J W; McKim, J M; Lien, G J; Hoffman, A D; Bertelsen, S L; Elonen, C M

    1996-06-01

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model was developed to describe dermal absorption of waterborne organic chemicals by fish. The skin was modeled as a discrete compartment into which compounds diffuse as a function of chemical permeability and the concentration gradient. The model includes a countercurrent description of chemical flux at fish gills and was used to simulate dermal-only exposures, during which the gills act as a route of elimination. The model was evaluated by exposing adult rainbow trout and channel catfish to hexachloroethane (HCE), pentachloroethane (PCE), and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE). Skin permeability coefficients were obtained by fitting model simulations to measured arterial blood data. Permeability coefficients increased with the number of chlorine substituent groups, but not in the manner expected from a directly proportional relationship between dermal permeability and skin:water chemical partitioning. An evaluation of rate limitations on dermal flux in both trout and catfish suggested that chemical absorption was limited more by diffusion across the skin than by blood flow to the skin. Modeling results from a hypothetical combined dermal and branchial exposure indicate that dermal uptake could contribute from 1.6% (TCE) to 3.5% (HCE) of initial uptake in trout. Dermal uptake rates in catfish are even higher than those in trout and could contribute from 7.1% (TCE) to 8.3% (PCE) of initial uptake in a combined exposure. PMID:8789789

  11. Nucleolin enhances the proliferation and migration of heat-denatured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bimei; Li, Yuanbin; Liang, Pengfei; Liu, Yanjuan; Huang, Xu; Tong, Zhongyi; Zhang, Pihong; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhenguo

    2015-01-01

    Denatured dermis, a part of dermis in burned skin, has the ability to restore its normal morphology and functions after their surrounding microenvironment is improved. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the denatured dermis could improve wound healing are still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of nucleolin during the recovery of heat-denatured human dermal fibroblasts. Nucleolin mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased time-dependently during the recovery of heat-denatured human dermal fibroblasts (52 °C, 30 seconds). Heat-denaturation promoted a time-dependent cell proliferation, migration, chemotaxis, and scratched wound healing during the recovery of human dermal fibroblasts. These effects were prevented by knockdown of nucleolin expression with small interference RNA (siRNA), whereas overexpression of nucleolin enhanced cell proliferation, migration, and chemotaxis of human dermal fibroblasts with heat-denaturation. In addition, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) was significantly increased during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis and human dermal fibroblasts. TGF-β1 expression was up-regulated by nucleolin in human dermal fibroblasts. The results suggest that nucleolin expression is up-regulated, and play an important role in promoting cell proliferation, migration, and chemotaxis of human dermal fibroblasts during the recovery of heat-denatured dermis with a mechanism probably related to TGF-β1. PMID:26148015

  12. Linear psoriasis with porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee-Joon; Ko, Joo-Youn; Kwon, Hyeok-Man; Kim, Jeong-Soo

    2004-05-01

    Linear psoriasis is an uncommon form of psoriasis characterized by the linear distribution of the psoriatic lesions. It usually follows the lines of Blaschko with unilateral involvement. Poro keratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct (PEODD) nevus is another rare dermatosis that follows Blaschko's line. The pathogenesis of linear psoriasis and PEODD nevus is unclear, but both could be best explained by a specific somatic mutation. Hence, it has been suggested that the mutation responsible for PEODD nevus would constitute a rare but critical psoriasis gene. In the literature, 1 case of linear psoriasis with PEODD nevus was reported, which may support this suggestion. This article describes another case of linear psoriasis and PEODD nevus. A 7-year-old boy had a 4-month history of multiple psoriasiform plaques, arranged in linear distribution, and had congenital linear hyperkeratotic papules and pits on the right side of his trunk and right arm. PMID:15097935

  13. Discrete papular dermal mucinosis with Hashimoto thyroiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ertam, Ilgen; Karaca, Nezih; Ceylan, Can; Kazandi, Alican; Alper, Sibel

    2011-03-01

    The cutaneous focal mucinoses are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by deposition of mucin found either focally or diffusely in the dermis. A 47-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic flesh-colored papules on the neck, inguinal area, intergluteal area, vulvar area, and extremities of 5 months' duration. There was no history of preceding trauma or insect bites. The patient had undergone a subtotal thyroidectomy 21 years prior but had not used any thyroid medication before she was referred to our clinic. Thyroid ultrasonography was consistent with Hashimoto thyroiditis. During dermatologic examination, flesh-colored, well-defined, smooth papules that measured approximately 1.5 x 1 cm in size on the genital region, fingers, face, and scalp were seen. Histopathologic examination of a lesional biopsy revealed no abnormalities in the epidermis. Alcian blue staining showed that abundant deposits of dermal mucin had replaced collagen in the dermis. PMID:21488572

  14. Primary cutaneous dermal mucinosis on herpes zoster scars.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Diana; Feltes, Federico; Machán, Salma; Pielasinski, Úrsula; Fariña, María C; Gavin, Eduardo; Requena, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The term isotopic response refers to the appearance of a new skin disease at the site of another unrelated and already healed skin disorder. Often, the first disease is herpes zoster (HZ). Several cutaneous reactions have been described in a dermatome recently affected by HZ. We present the case of a 33-year-old man who developed whitish papules with a zosteriform distribution on HZ scars. Histopathologic study with hematoxylin and eosin and Alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining demonstrated abundant deposits of mucin interstitially arranged between collagen bundles of the papillary dermis. Cutaneous dermal mucinosis as a postherpetic isotopic response is rare, but it should be added to the list of cutaneous reactions arising in HZ scars. PMID:27529717

  15. [Evaluation of liberation of caffeine from dermal semisolids drugs].

    PubMed

    Kodadová, Alexandra; Vitková, Zuzana; Herdová, Petra

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with formulation of caffeine into dermal semisolid dosage forms - hydrogels. Caffeine was chosen as a model drug because its properties can be successfully used just in hydrogels. Protective and tranquilization effects can be used in the preparations for sunbathing, and its lipolytic and regenerative effect can be used for the treatment of androgenic alopecia or cellular bioprotection. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different concentrations of chitosan and caffeine on the liberation of gels. Besides, stability of the prepared samples was evaluated by means of the evaluation of their rheological parameters. Based on the obtained results, there was determined the optimal drug concentration - caffeine 0.2% (w/w) and also the gel forming substance - chitosan 2.3% (w/w). PMID:24237472

  16. Bioactives from probiotics for dermal health: functions and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lew, L-C; Liong, M-T

    2013-05-01

    Probiotics have been extensively reviewed for decades, emphasizing on improving general gut health. Recently, more studies showed that probiotics may exert other health-promoting effects beyond gut well-being, attributed to the rise of the gut-brain axis correlations. Some of these new benefits include skin health such as improving atopic eczema, atopic dermatitis, healing of burn and scars, skin-rejuvenating properties and improving skin innate immunity. Increasing evidence has also showed that bacterial compounds such as cell wall fragments, their metabolites and dead bacteria can elicit certain immune responses on the skin and improve skin barrier functions. This review aimed to underline the mechanisms or the exact compounds underlying the benefits of bacterial extract on the skin based on evidences from in vivo and in vitro studies. This review could be of help in screening of probiotic strains with potential dermal enhancing properties for topical applications. PMID:23311666

  17. Biomonitoring as a tool in the human health risk characterization of dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, P J

    2008-04-01

    Dermal exposure is an important factor in risk characterization. In occupational settings it becomes relatively more important because of the continuous reduction in inhalation exposure. In the public health arena, dermal exposure may also form a significant contribution to the total exposure. Dermal exposure, however, is difficult to assess directly because it is determined by a host of factors, which are difficult to quantify. As a consequence, dermal exposure is often estimated by application of models for external exposure. In combination with modeled or measured data for percutaneous penetration, these provide an estimate for the internal exposure that is directly related to the systemic effects. The advantages and drawbacks of EASE (Estimation and Assessment of Substance Exposure) and RISKOFDERM (Risk Assessment of Occupational Dermal Exposure), two models for external exposure that are mentioned in the Technical Guidance Document for the European Union risk assessments performed under the Existing Substances Regulation (EEC/793/93), are discussed. Although new chemicals regulation (REACh, 1907/2006/EC) is now in place in the European Union, the principles applied under the previous legislation do not change and the same models will continue to be used. The results obtained with these models for styrene, 2-butoxyethanol, and 1-methoxy-2-propanol in specific exposure scenarios are compared with an alternative method that uses biomonitoring data to assess dermal exposure. Actual external exposure measurements combined with measured or modeled percutaneous penetration data give acceptable results in risk assessment of dermal exposure, but modeled data of external dermal exposure should only be used if no other data are available. However, if available, biomonitoring should be considered the method of choice to assess (dermal) exposure. PMID:18684800

  18. Dermal exposure to jet fuel (JP-8) in US Air Force personnel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yi-Chun E; Gibson, Roger L; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2005-10-01

    Limited research has been conducted on dermal exposure and risk assessment, owing to the lack of reliable measurement techniques and data for quantitative risk assessment. We investigated the magnitude of dermal exposure to jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8), using naphthalene as a surrogate, on the US Air Force fuel-cell maintenance workers. Dermal exposure of 124 workers routinely working with JP-8 was measured using a non-invasive tape-strip technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The contribution of job-related factors to dermal exposure was determined using multiple linear regression analyses. Average whole body dermal exposure to naphthalene (as a marker for JP-8) was 7.61 +/- 2.27 ln(ng m(-2)). Significant difference (P < 0.0001) between the high-exposure group [8.34 +/- 2.23 ln(ng m(-2))] and medium- and low-exposure groups [6.18 +/- 1.35 ln(ng m(-2)) and 5.84 +/- 1.34 ln(ng m(-2)), respectively] was observed reflecting the actual exposure scenarios. Skin irritation, use of booties, working inside the fuel tank and the duration of JP-8 exposure were significant factors explaining the whole body dermal exposure. This study clearly demonstrates the efficiency and suitability of the tape-strip technique for the assessment of dermal exposure to JP-8 and that naphthalene can serve as a useful marker of exposure and uptake of JP-8 and its components. It also showed that the skin provides a significant route for JP-8 exposure and that actions to reduce exposure are required. Studies to investigate the relative contribution of dermal uptake of JP-8 on total body dose and the toxicokinetics of dermal exposure to JP-8 are underway. PMID:16006502

  19. Harmonization of future needs for dermal exposure assessment and modeling: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Marquart, H; Maidment, S; McClaflin, J L; Fehrenbacher, M C

    2001-02-01

    Dermal exposure assessment and modeling is still in early phases of development. This article presents the results of a workshop organized to harmonize the future needs in this field. Methods for dermal exposure assessment either assess the mass of contaminant that is transferred to the skin, or the transfer of contaminant through the skin. Models for dermal exposure are either knowledge-based or deterministic. Any method or model should be transparent, validated, and open to further development. Some (partly) validated and standardized methods are available for measuring or modeling permeation of the skin or of personal protective equipment (PPE). Further validation and standardization is necessary. More research is needed on permeation of dusts and aerosols and more realistic tests should be developed and used for PPE. Several methods have been developed to measure contamination of surfaces or skin, but they are not validated or standardized. A number of non-validated models exist to assess dermal exposure. A clear need exists for more studies of dermal exposure, regarding measurement methods, models and actual exposure levels. A running four-year European study will greatly expand the knowledge in this field. Simple tools to assess and control the risks of dermal exposure in small and medium sized enterprises are also needed. Increasing the general knowledge of practitioners (e.g., safety professionals, occupational hygienists and physicians) in the field of dermal exposure is a first requirement. Available data, for example, on the permeation of PPE, should be made more readily available, using modern information technology. When information on dermal exposure is gathered and stored, the core information needs are partly the same as those for inhalation exposure. Some elements of process and activity, substance and product or worker, specific for dermal exposure, have been suggested by the workshop. PMID:11217714

  20. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism. Recent Advances: Advances in tissue culture, tissue engineering, and ex vivo models have made the examination and precise measurements of ECM components in wound healing possible. Likewise, the development of specific transgenic animal models has created the opportunity to characterize the role of various ECM molecules in healing wounds. In addition, the recent characterization of new ECM molecules, including matricellular proteins, dermatopontin, and FACIT collagens (Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices), further demonstrates our cursory knowledge of the ECM in coordinated wound healing. Critical Issues: The manipulation and augmentation of ECM components in the healing wound is emerging in patient care, as demonstrated by the use of acellular dermal matrices, tissue scaffolds, and wound dressings or topical products bearing ECM proteins such as collagen, hyaluronan (HA), or elastin. Once thought of as neutral structural proteins, these molecules are now known to directly influence many aspects of cellular wound healing. Future Directions: The role that ECM molecules, such as CCN2, osteopontin, and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine, play in signaling homing of fibroblast progenitor cells to sites of injury invites future research as we continue investigating the heterotopic origin of certain populations of fibroblasts in a healing wound. Likewise, research into differently sized fragments of the same polymeric ECM molecule is warranted as we learn that fragments of molecules such as HA and tenascin-C can have opposing effects on dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26989578

  1. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-11-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations - telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines - epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 - were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines - interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin - being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  2. Effect of water temperature on dermal exposure to chloroform.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S M; Wallace, L A; Callahan, P J; Kenny, D V; Brinkman, M C

    1998-01-01

    We have developed and applied a new measurement methodology to investigate dermal absorption of chloroform while bathing. Ten subjects bathed in chlorinated water while breathing pure air through a face mask. Their exhaled breath was delivered to a glow discharge source/ion trap mass spectrometer for continuous real-time measurement of chloroform in the breath. This new method provides abundant data compared to previous discrete time-integrated breath sampling methods. The method is particularly well suited to studying dermal exposure because the full face mask eliminates exposure to contaminated air. Seven of the 10 subjects bathed in water at two or three different temperatures between 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Subjects at the highest temperatures exhaled about 30 times more chloroform than the same subjects at the lowest temperatures. This probably results from a decline in blood flow to the skin at the lower temperatures as the body seeks to conserve heat forcing the chloroform to diffuse over a much greater path length before encountering the blood. These results suggest that pharmacokinetic models need to employ temperature-dependent parameters. Two existing models predict quite different times of about 12 min and 29 min for chloroform flux through the stratum corneum to reach equilibrium. At 40 degrees C, the time for the flux to reach a near steady-state value is 6-9 min. Although uptake and decay processes involve several body compartments, the complicating effect of the stratum corneum lag time made it difficult to fit multiexponential curves to the data; however, a single-compartment model gave a satisfactory fit. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9618350

  3. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations – telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines – epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 – were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines – interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin – being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  4. Formulation of microemulsion systems for dermal delivery of silymarin.

    PubMed

    Panapisal, Vipaporn; Charoensri, Sawitree; Tantituvanont, Angkana

    2012-06-01

    Silymarin is a standardized extract from Silybum marianum seeds, known for its many skin benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, the potential of several microemulsion formulations for dermal delivery of silymarin was evaluated. The pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed for the various microemulsion formulations which were prepared using glyceryl monooleate, oleic acid, ethyl oleate, or isopropyl myristate as the oily phase; a mixture of Tween 20®, Labrasol®, or Span 20® with HCO-40® (1:1 ratio) as surfactants; and Transcutol® as a cosurfactant. Oil-in-water microemulsions were selected to incorporate 2% w/w silymarin. After six heating-cooling cycles, physical appearances of all microemulsions were unchanged and no drug precipitation occurred. Chemical stability studies showed that microemulsion containing Labrasol® and isopropyl myristate stored at 40°C for 6 months showed the highest silybin remaining among others. The silybin remainings depended on the type of surfactant and were sequenced in the order of: Labrasol® > Tween 20® > Span 20®. In vitro release studies showed prolonged release for microemulsions when compared to silymarin solution. All release profiles showed the best fits with Higuchi kinetics. Non-occlusive in vitro skin permeation studies showed absence of transdermal delivery of silybin. The percentages of silybin in skin extracts were not significantly different among the different formulations (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, some silybin was detected in the receiver fluid when performing occlusive experiments. Microemulsions containing Labrasol® also were found to enhance silymarin solubility. Other drug delivery systems with occlusive effect could be further developed for dermal delivery of silymarin. PMID:22350738

  5. Microporous Dermal-Like Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Accelerated Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Thomas, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3–4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration. PMID:24568584

  6. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Edwards, Brenda C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to pyrethroid pesticides is a potential cause for concern. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin, and permethrin in the rat. Dorsal hair on adult male Long-Evans rats was removed. The next day, the skin was dosed with 1750 nmol (312.5 nmol/cm(2)) of radiolabeled (5 µCi) bifenthrin, deltamethrin, or permethrin in acetone. A nonoccluding plastic cover was glued over the dosing site. The animals were placed in metabolism cages to collect excreta. At 24 h postdosing, the skin was washed with soap and water, and rats in one group were euthanized and their tissues were collected. The skin was removed and tape stripped. The remaining animals were returned to the metabolism cages after the wash for 4 d. These rats were then euthanized and handled as already described. Excreta, wash, tape strips, tissues, and carcass were analyzed for pyrethroid-derived radioactivity. The wash and tape strips removed >50% of the dose and skin retained 9-24%. Cumulative radioactivity in excreta was 0.5-7% at 24 h and 3-26% at 120 h. Radioactivity in tissues was <0.3% of the dose, while carcass retained 2 to 5%. Assuming absorption equals cumulative recovery in skin (washed and tape stripped), excreta, tissues, and carcass, absorption was permethrin ~ bifenthrin > deltamethrin at 24 h and permethrin > deltamethrin > bifenthrin at 120 h. Using the parallelogram approach with published in vitro data, human dermal absorption of these pyrethroids was estimated to be <10% of the dose. PMID:26817658

  7. Safety assessment of aditoprim acute, subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Tan, Ziqiang; Pan, Yuanhu; Ihsan, Awais; Liu, Qianying; Huang, Lingli; Cheng, Guyue; Chen, Dongmei; Tao, Yanfei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-11-01

    Aditoprim (ADP), a new developed dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor, has great potential in clinical veterinary medicine because of its greater pharmacokinetic properties than structural analogs. Preclinical toxicology studies were performed to assess the safety of ADP including an acute oral toxicity test, a subchronic toxicity test and five mutagenicity tests. In the acute oral toxicity test, ADP was administered singly by oral gavage to Wistar rats and Kunming mice. The LD50 calculated was 1400 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW) day(-1) in rats and 1130 mg kg(-1) BW day(-1) in mice. In a subchronic study, Wistar rats were administered ADP at dose levels of 0, 20, 100 and 1000 mg kg(-1) diet for 90 days. Significant decreases were observed on body weight and food efficiency in the high-dose group. Treatment-related changes in clinical serum biochemistry were found in the medium- and high-dose groups. Significant increases in the relative weights of livers and kidneys in females and testis in males in the 1000 mg kg(-1) diet, and significant decrease in relative weights of livers in males in the 100 mg kg(-1) diet were noted. Histopathological observations revealed that the 1000 mg kg(-1) ADP diet could induce lymphocytic infiltration and hepatocytic necrosis near the hepatic portal area. The genotoxicity of ADP was negative in tests, such as the bacterial reverse mutation assay, mice bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay, in vitro chromosomal aberration test, in vitro cho/hgprt mammalian cell mutagenesis assay and mice testicle cells chromosome aberration. Based on the subchronic study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level for ADP was a 20 mg kg(-1) diet, which is about 1.44-1.53 mg kg(-1) BW day(-1) in rats. PMID:25663419

  8. Identification of potential biomarkers for predicting acute dermal irritation by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Dai, Taoli; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Minjing; Xiao, Xue; Hu, Hao; Zou, Ping; Liu, Xia; Xiang, Qi; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2011-11-01

    In vitro alternative tests aiming at replacing the traditional animal test for predicting the irritant potential of chemicals have been developed, but the assessment parameters or endpoints are still not sufficient for analysis. To discover novel endpoints for skin irritation responses, a proteomics approach was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate in the present study. Among the 20 identified proteins with altered expression, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] were down-regulated while cofilin-1 was up-regulated significantly in response to the chemical challenge. Keratinocytes were exposed to acid and basic chemicals for further validation of the proteins. HSP27 displayed the most significant alteration both in mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by nuclear translocation. The irritation also induced an increased production of interleukin-1α in keratinocytes. These findings suggest that these proteins may be combinational biomarkers or additional endpoints for skin hazard assessment. Further investigation into the protein alterations would be helpful for the mechanistic understanding of skin irritation. PMID:21469165

  9. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of eucalyptus oil-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Ruizhang; Xiang, Fa; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xinghong; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Li; Yin, Lizi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Shu, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil has performed a variety of indirect services used as insect/pest repellent. The present study investigated the acute and subchronic toxicity of eucalyptus oil emulsion in water (EOE). In addition, we conduct safety pharmacology evaluation of EOE to supplement the toxicity tests and provide a basis for a comprehensive understanding of the toxicity of EOE. Acute administration of EOE was done as single dose from 2772 mg to 5742 mg of EOE per kg/bodyweight (b.wt.) and subchronic toxicity study for thirty days was done by daily oral administration of EOE at doses of 396, 792 and 1188 mg/kg b.wt. In SPF SD rats. The acute toxicity study showed the LD50 of EOE was 3811.5 mg/kg. The subchronic toxicity study suggested the high-dose and middle-dose EOE slowed down the growth of male rats. The clinical pathology showed the high-dose and middle-dose EOE could cause damage to liver and kidney. The safety pharmacology indicated that EOE had no side effects on rats. These results suggest that EOE is a safe veterinary medicine for external use. PMID:25663980

  10. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of eucalyptus oil-water emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Ruizhang; Xiang, Fa; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xinghong; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Li; Yin, Lizi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Shu, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil has performed a variety of indirect services used as insect/pest repellent. The present study investigated the acute and subchronic toxicity of eucalyptus oil emulsion in water (EOE). In addition, we conduct safety pharmacology evaluation of EOE to supplement the toxicity tests and provide a basis for a comprehensive understanding of the toxicity of EOE. Acute administration of EOE was done as single dose from 2772 mg to 5742 mg of EOE per kg/bodyweight (b.wt.) and subchronic toxicity study for thirty days was done by daily oral administration of EOE at doses of 396, 792 and 1188 mg/kg b.wt. In SPF SD rats. The acute toxicity study showed the LD50 of EOE was 3811.5 mg/kg. The subchronic toxicity study suggested the high-dose and middle-dose EOE slowed down the growth of male rats. The clinical pathology showed the high-dose and middle-dose EOE could cause damage to liver and kidney. The safety pharmacology indicated that EOE had no side effects on rats. These results suggest that EOE is a safe veterinary medicine for external use. PMID:25663980

  11. Toxicological evaluation of advanced glycation end product Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine: Acute and subacute oral toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zheng, Liangqing; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Gang; Xiao, Shensheng; Qiao, Xiaoting; Wu, Yongning; Gong, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) as a novel potential noxious compound in various food products has aroused extensive concern in recent years. This study aimed to investigate the oral acute and subacute toxicity of CML in mice as per OECD 420 and 407 guidelines. Acute administration of 2000 and 5000 mg/kg CML did not induce any mortality within 14 days, nevertheless some toxicological symptoms and histopathological changes were observed. The estimated LD50 of CML was >5000 mg/kg. In subacute toxicity test, CML was dosed at 200, 500 and 1000 mg/kg in both genders for 28 days. The body weights reduced which was accompanied with the decrease of food consumptions. Hematology parameters viz. RBC, HGB and MCH showed minor alteration but these were still within normal range. Biochemical analysis of hepatic and renal function markers showed significant elevating in AST, ALT, Cr and BUN etc. Histopathological alterations were observed in lung, liver, kidney and spleen. Subacute toxicity of CML involved oxidative stress caused by reducing antioxidant enzyme (SOD and GSH-Px) activities, and significantly increasing lipid peroxide (MDA) level. In conclusion, CML was unlikely to present an acute hazard, but repeated administration could produce deleterious effects on mice especially inducing liver and kidney damage through oxidative stress. PMID:26921796

  12. The radiological features of Goltz syndrome: focal dermal hypoplasia. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, A E; Hall, C M

    1988-01-01

    Two female infants with Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia) were recently investigated in the Department of Radiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street for severe feeding problems and failure to thrive. Both demonstrated severe skeletal malformations and marked gastrooesophageal reflux with laxity of the hiatus. One child (case 1) exhibited nasal regurgitation during feeding. Interestingly, both children had undergone surgery; Case 1 or a right parasagittal abdominal hernia associated with focal dermal hypoplasia of the abdominal wall and Case 2 for an exomphalos also associated with dermal hypoplasia. This observation suggests a more widespread mesodermal abnormality. PMID:3201278

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  14. A Newborn with Congenital Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia After In Vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Hacer; Özdemir, Özmert M A; Karaca, Abdullah; Türk, Nilay Şen; Düzcan, Füsun; Ergin, Şeniz; Kazancı, Elif; Vergin, Canan; Erbay, Ayşe

    2015-08-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare disease. The majority of cases of this disease are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare and most often is of B cell lineage. Rarely, some cases have been designated biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). Herein, we report a preterm newborn referred to us as a result of the appearance of blue-violaceous dermal nodules on her body at birth. She was a twin and the product of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancy. Physical examination showed jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, and peripheral facial nerve palsy in addition to dermal nodules. Bone marrow aspiration showed 40% blasts of lymphoid lineage; skin biopsy and its immunohistochemistry revealed myeloblastic infiltration of the dermis. Cytogenetic analysis (46,XX), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and cranial magnetic resonance were normal. The patient was diagnosed with congenital MPAL, and an association between IVF and congenital leukemia was suggested. PMID:23639745

  15. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E.; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid–base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange. PMID:22535781

  16. LPS-Stimulated Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells Enhance Neo-Vascularization during Dermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Schumann, Sandra; Stang, Felix H.; Siemers, Frank; Matthießen, Anna E.

    2015-01-01

    High numbers of adult stem cells are still required to improve the formation of new vessels in scaffolds to accelerate dermal regeneration. Recent data indicate a benefit for vascularization capacity by stimulating stem cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, stem cells derived from human skin (SDSC) were activated with LPS and seeded in a commercially available dermal substitute to examine vascularization in vivo. Besides, in vitro assays were performed to evaluate angiogenic factor release and tube formation ability. Results showed that LPS-activated SDSC significantly enhanced vascularization of the scaffolds, compared to unstimulated stem cells in vivo. Further, in vitro assays confirmed higher secretion rates of proangiogenic as well as proinflammatoric factors in the presence of LPS-activated SDSC. Our results suggest that combining activated stem cells and a dermal substitute is a promising option to enhance vascularization in scaffold-mediated dermal regeneration. PMID:26565617

  17. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis.

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-08-01

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid-base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange. PMID:22535781

  18. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption. PMID:26794662

  19. FEASIBILITY OF USING THE MACROACTIVITY APPROACH TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S DERMAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results derived from an initial assessment of critical exposure pathways for children indicate that dermal contact may result in high residential exposures to pesticides. However, data on children's exposures and activities are insufficient to support quantitative assessments ...

  20. Advective and diffusive dermal processes for estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Historically, evaluation of pesticide risk to both amphibians and reptiles has been achieved by comparing ingestion and inhalat...

  1. ESTIMATING CONTAMINANT DOSE FOR INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT: MODEL DEVELOPMENT, TESTING, AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of aggregate exposure to pesticides and other surface contamination in residential environments are often driven by assumptions about dermal contacts. Accurately predicting cumulative doses from realistic skin contact scenarios requires characterization of exposure sc...

  2. USE OF THE MACROACTIVITY APPROACH TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S DERMAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES IN RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients (TC) to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing scr...

  3. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  4. Congenital dermal sinuses, dermoid and epidermoid cysts of the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Schijman, E; Monges, J; Cragnaz, R

    1986-01-01

    Dermal sinuses are abnormal communications between the skin and deeper tissues. Seven cases are presented of occipital dermal sinuses associated with dermoid or epidermoid cysts of the posterior fossa. The cysts were interdural, subdural and intracerebellar. Although they are benign lesions, there is a high incidence of complications, especially infections such as bacterial or aseptic meningitis and cerebellar abscess. The clinical features, radiological and tomographical characteristics, and the relationship to meningeal structures, dural sinuses and cerebellar parenchyma are described. PMID:3731173

  5. Dermal melanin concentration of yellow perch Perca flavescens in relation to water transparency.

    PubMed

    Rheault, G; Langevin, M; Cabana, G; Glémet, H

    2015-11-01

    A positive relationship was observed between Secchi disc depth and dermal melanin concentration in yellow perch Perca flavescens sampled from 11 humic lakes located on the Canadian Shield in southern Quebec (Canada). Secchi disc depth explained 23% of the variations of dermal melanin concentration. Secchi disc depth and thus water transparency appear to have a positive influence on melanin production in the dermis of P. flavescens. PMID:26399476

  6. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis.

    PubMed

    Hantash, Basil M; Bedi, Vikramaditya P; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K; Herron, G Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-01-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 microm or 140 microm 1e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  7. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantash, Basil M.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K.; Herron, G. Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-07-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 µm or 140 µm 1/e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  8. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  9. The effect of chlorine substitution on the disposition of polychlorinated biphenyls following dermal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, C. Edwin . E-mail: cegarner@rti.org; Demeter, Jennifer; Matthews, H.B.

    2006-10-01

    The fate of selected polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) was investigated following single dermal administration (0.4 mg/kg) to determine the effects of chlorine content and position on the disposition of PCBs following dermal absorption. Single dermal doses of {sup 14}C-labeled mono-, di-, tetra- and hexachlorobiphenyls were administered to 1 cm{sup 2} areas on the backs of F-344 male rats. Distribution of radioactivity in selected tissues and excreta was determined by serial sacrifice at time points up to 2 weeks. Unabsorbed radioactivity was removed from the dose site at either sacrifice or 48 h post-dose. The time course of radioactivity in the tissues showed a dependence on rate and extent of absorption. The most rapidly absorbed PCBs reached peak tissue concentrations at early times and were cleared from the tissues rapidly. The higher chlorinated PCBs were slowly absorbed and tended to accumulate in the adipose and skin after removal of unabsorbed dose. Excretion of absorbed radioactivity varied with chlorine content ranging from 27% to ca. 100% at 2 weeks post-dose. Excretion profiles following dermal doses tended to differ from profiles following equivalent IV doses, as did the metabolite profiles in excreta. Skin slice incubation experiments suggested that first pass metabolism in the dermal dose site was responsible for metabolism and disposition differences between routes of administration. The data further suggest that the rate of absorption, and therefore the disposition of PCBs following dermal administration may be mediated, either in part or fully, by transdermal metabolism.

  10. CTRP6 inhibits fibrogenesis in TGF-β1-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong-Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Zi; Wu, Hang-Li; Gao, Wen-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Skin fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM). C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 6 (CTRP6), a member of CTRPs, has been involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of CTRP6 in skin fibrosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CTRP6 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that CTRP6 was lowly expressed in scar tissues and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated dermal fibroblasts. CTRP6 overexpression significantly inhibited the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as well as suppressed the expression of ECM in TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CTRP6 overexpression markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, the data reported here demonstrate that CTRP6 is able to inhibit the proliferation and ECM expression in human dermal fibroblasts through suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that CTRP6 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skin fibrosis. PMID:27155158

  11. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation. PMID:25557326

  12. Sexual Dimorphisms in the Dermal Denticles of the Lesser-Spotted Catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Neil; Babey, Lucy; Haddon, William J.; Love, Adrian C.; Waring, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The dermal layers of several elasmobranch species have been shown to be sexually dimorphic. Generally, when this occurs the females have thicker dermal layers compared to those of males. This sexual dimorphism has been suggested to occur as a response to male biting during mating. Although male biting as a copulatory behaviour in Scyliorhinus canicula has been widely speculated to occur, only relatively recently has this behaviour been observed. Male S. canicula use their mouths to bite the female’s pectoral and caudal fins as part of their pre-copulatory behaviour and to grasp females during copulation. Previous work has shown that female S. canicula have a thicker epidermis compared to that of males. The structure of the dermal denticles in females may also differ from that of males in order to protect against male biting or to provide a greater degree of friction in order to allow the male more purchase. This study reveals that the length, width and density of the dermal denticles of mature male and female S. canicula are sexually dimorphic across the integument in areas where males have been observed to bite and wrap themselves around females (pectoral fin, area posterior to the pectoral fin, caudal fin, and pelvic girdle). No significant differences in the dermal denticle dimensions were found in other body areas examined (head, dorsal skin and caudal peduncle). Sexually dimorphic dermal denticles in mature S. canicula could be a response to male biting/wrapping as part of the copulatory process. PMID:24116179

  13. Characterization of dermal plates from armored catfish Pterygoplichthys pardalis reveals sandwich-like nanocomposite structure.

    PubMed

    Ebenstein, Donna; Calderon, Carlos; Troncoso, Omar P; Torres, Fernando G

    2015-05-01

    Dermal plates from armored catfish are bony structures that cover their body. In this paper we characterized structural, chemical, and nanomechanical properties of the dermal plates from the Amazonian fish Pterygoplichthys pardalis. Analysis of the morphology of the plates using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the dermal plates have a sandwich-like structure composed of an inner porous matrix surrounded by two external dense layers. This is different from the plywood-like laminated structure of elasmoid fish scales but similar to the structure of osteoderms found in the dermal armour of some reptiles and mammals. Chemical analysis performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed similarities between the composition of P. pardalis plates and the elasmoid fish scales of Arapaima gigas. Reduced moduli of P. pardalis plates measured using nanoindentation were also consistent with reported values for A. gigas scales, but further revealed that the dermal plate is an anisotropic and heterogeneous material, similar to many other fish scales and osteoderms. It is postulated that the sandwich-like structure of the dermal plates provides a lightweight and tough protective layer. PMID:25732181

  14. Molecular mechanisms and in vivo mouse models of skin aging associated with dermal matrix alterations.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Yi, Bo-Rim; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2011-03-01

    Skin is the most superficial body organ and plays an important role in protecting the body from environmental damage and in forming social relations. With the increase of the aging population in our society, dermatological and cosmetic concerns of skin aging are rapidly increasing. Skin aging is a complex process combined with intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic or chronological skin aging results from the passage of time and is influenced by genetic factors. Extrinsic skin aging is mainly determined by UV irradiation, also called photoaging. These two types of aging processes are superimposed on sun-exposed skin, and have a common feature of causing dermal matrix alterations that mostly contribute to the formation of wrinkles, laxity, and fragility of aged skin. The dermal matrix contains extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans that confer the strength and resiliency of skin. Skin aging associated with dermal matrix alterations and atrophy can be caused by cellular senescence of dermal cells like fibroblasts, and decreased synthesis and accelerated degradation of dermal matrix components, especially collagen fibers. Both intrinsic aging and photoaging exert influence during each step of dermal matrix alteration via different mechanisms. Mouse models of skin aging have been extensively developed to elucidate intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, to validate in vitro biochemical data, and to test the effects of pharmacological tools for retarding skin aging because they have the advantages of being genetically similar to humans and are easily available. PMID:21826153

  15. Human dermal exposure to galaxolide from personal care products.

    PubMed

    Correia, P; Cruz, A; Santos, L; Alves, A

    2013-06-01

    Musks are synthetic fragrances applied on personal care and household products as fixatives, by retarding the release of other fragrances with higher volatility. Galaxolide is the most used polycyclic musk since the 90th decade, and it has been detected in several environmental and biological matrices, particularly in human tissues and fluids. For exposure assessment purposes, large-monitoring data need to be obtained and rapid but reliable analytical techniques are requested. The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a new and fast analytical methodology to quantify galaxolide in personal care products and to apply this method to real matrices like skin care products (creams and lotions), shower products (soap bar), hair care products (shampoo and hair conditioner) and oral care products (toothpaste), to evaluate the human dermal exposure risk. A dispersive solid-phase extraction is proposed, using QuEChERS methodology, followed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Some extraction parameters were studied, like the ratio of sample/solvent amounts, the homogenization time, the salt addition effect and the used sorbents. The validation parameters of the developed method were the following: a linearity range of 0.005-1.002 mg kg⁻¹ sample, a limit of detection of 0.001 mg kg⁻¹ sample, repeatability between 0.7% and 11.3% (variation coefficient of six standard injections), an intermediate precision of 2.5% (variation coefficient of six independent analysis of the same sample), mean recoveries ranging from 65% (soap bar) to 95% (body cream) and 3% of global uncertainty in most of the working range. The time of analysis, including the extraction steps, is 60 min, allowing a throughput of 4 samples h⁻¹ . Galaxolide was detected in all of the seven analysed products in concentrations ranging from 0.04 ± 0.01 mg kg⁻¹ sample (toothpaste) to 280.78 ± 8.19 mg kg⁻¹ sample (perfumed body cream), which may correspond to a significant estimated

  16. Chronic dermal studies of petroleum streams in mice.

    PubMed

    Broddle, W D; Dennis, M W; Kitchen, D N; Vernot, E H

    1996-03-01

    During petroleum refining, a large number of products are generated which have varying chemical and physical properties. These are known in the industry as petroleum streams. In order to characterize their carcinogenic activity, a number of these commercially produced streams were administered to C3H/HeJ mice in chronic dermal bioassays. The bioassays were conducted using one of two study designs: the first set of test materials was applied for a lifetime and the second set for 24 months. In the lifetime study, the last mice in the test groups survived for periods of 31 to 32 months. Middle distillates, boiling in the range 115-390 degrees C, were found to decrease the lifespan of exposed mice compared to controls or streams of higher and lower boiling ranges. These middle distillate streams included straight run kerosine, hydrodesulfurized middle distillate, straight run middle distillate, light catalytic cracked distillate, and 90/10% and 70/30% mixtures of the last two. The middle distillate streams also proved to be active as carcinogens, with tumor incidence ranging from 16 to 67%. Light alkylate naphtha, heavy catalytic reformed naphtha, vacuum residuum, and unleaded gasoline did not demonstrate significant carcinogenic potency. Heavy thermal cracked naphtha, heavy catalytic cracked naphtha, and hydrotreated light naphthenic distillate were dermal carcinogens of low potency in this study. Administration of light catalytic cracked naphtha led to a low incidence of very late developing tumors with a mean latency of 118 weeks. Application of the 0.1% solution of catalytic cracked clarified oil in toluene did not result in a significant incidence of tumors, but the 10% solution caused almost 100% mortality and 100% tumor incidence in 12 months. There was no correlation between carcinogenic potency and the indices of irritation, alopecia, erythema, and scabbing. Only two of the streams tested, hydrotreated light naphthenic distillate and 10% catalytic cracked

  17. Lycopene from tomatoes: vesicular nanocarrier formulations for dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ascenso, Andreia; Pinho, Sónia; Eleutério, Carla; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Silva, Olga; Simões, Sandra

    2013-07-31

    This experimental work aimed to develop a simple, fast, economic, and environmentally friendly process for the extraction of lycopene from tomato and incorporate this lycopene-rich extract into ultradeformable vesicular nanocarriers suitable for topical application. Lycopene extraction was conducted without a cosolvent for 30 min. The extracts were analyzed and incorporated in transfersomes and ethosomes. These formulations were characterized, and the cellular uptake was observed by confocal microscopy. Dermal delivery of lycopene formulations was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Lycopene extraction proved to be quite safe and selective. The vesicular formulation was taken up by the cells, being more concentrated around the nucleus. Epicutaneous application of lycopene formulations decreased the level of anthralin-induced ear swelling by 97 and 87%, in a manner nonstatistically different from the positive control. These results support the idea that the lycopene-rich extract may be a good alternative to the expensive commercial lycopene for incorporation into advanced topical delivery systems. PMID:23826819

  18. Acquired dermal melanocytosis of the face and extremities.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, T; Ishii, K; Nishikawa, T; Ishiko, A

    2016-08-01

    Acquired dermal melanocytosis (ADM) is a relatively rare, but well-described disease among adolescent to middle-aged East Asian women, particularly those of Japanese and Chinese descent. Clinically, ADM manifests as multiple punctate and greyish-brown pigmented areas 1-3 mm in diameter occurring on both sides of the forehead and zygomatic region. The subtype of ADM affecting the face and extremities is extremely rare even in East Asian women. We describe three patients with ADM of the face and extremities (ADMFE) and their characteristic clinical features. All patients were Japanese women, and showed multiple greyish-brown pigmentations on both nasal wings and on the extensor surface of the extremities. We found that the clinical features were strikingly uniform, and that a pigmented lesion on the nasal wing can be an important clue to distinguish ADMFE from other hyperpigmented diseases of the hands and feet. One patient was treated with Q-switched ruby laser with excellent outcome. Increased awareness of ADMFE can lead to earlier diagnosis and potential treatment. PMID:27338120

  19. Cognitive and psychological functioning in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Deidrick, Kathleen K M; Early, Martha; Constance, Jordan; Stein, Margot; Fete, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a condition caused by heterozygous mutation of the PORCN gene on chromosome Xp22.3. It impacts the primitive ectoderm and mesoderm, affecting skin, teeth, nails, hair, musculoskeletal development, and vision and hearing. To date, there has been no systematic research examining the psychoeducational impact of the disorder. The current study examined emotional, behavioral, adaptive, and intellectual ability in 17 subjects with ages ranging from 3 to 55 with FDH attending the 2013 Annual Family Conference of the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias. Findings suggested overall average functioning in all areas. However, wide variability was noted in this sample, with 3 participants (18%) exhibiting overall cognitive ability in the borderline to impaired range. These findings are consistent with previous reports suggesting intellectual impairment in 15% of persons with FDH. Similarly, a subgroup of children was rated by parents as exhibiting difficulties with behavior (2 out of 11; 18%) and emotions (5 out of 11; 45%). Of particular concern was withdrawn behavior, reported by 65% of parents. These findings suggest that clinicians should routinely screen persons with FDH to rule out cognitive and emotional/behavioral difficulties and offer timely treatment. Future research should focus on identifying risk factors for psychoeducational problems in this population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26818018

  20. Dermal carcinogenic activity of petroleum-derived middle distillate fuels.

    PubMed

    Biles, R W; McKee, R H; Lewis, S C; Scala, R A; DePass, L R

    1988-12-30

    In general, the carcinogenic potential of petroleum-derived materials is related to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. Thus it has been assumed that liquids which boil below the PAH distillation range (i.e., below approx. 370 degrees C (700 degrees F) would not be carcinogenic. Several early studies supported this conclusion but were of relatively short duration. Several recent and more rigorous studies have shown that repeated application of certain petroleum-derived materials boiling between approximately 177-370 degrees C (350-700 degrees F) (i.e., middle distillate fuels) can produce tumors in mouse skin. The current studies assessed the tumorigenic potential of a series of middle distillates which varied with respect to boiling range, composition, and source of blending stocks. All of the samples produced evidence of weak tumorigenic activity which was characterized by low tumor yields and long median latencies. However, the majority of the tumor yields were significantly different from the control. There were no apparent differences in response among the samples. Thus the various parameters examined did not substantially influence tumor outcome. In particular, there was no association of tumorigenic activity with aromatic carbon content; this finding, coupled with evidence that PAH levels were low, suggested that the tumorigenic responses were not PAH-dependent. In addition to the tumors, there was evidence of non-neoplastic dermal changes including hyperplasia. These may have contributed to the tumorigenic responses; however, the actual mechanism of tumor induction is unknown. PMID:3212789

  1. Nanoparticles and their interactions with the dermal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Stracke, Frank; Hansen, Steffi; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2009-01-01

    The dermal application of drugs is promising due to the ease of application. In this context nano-scale carrier systems were already evaluated in several studies with respect to the skin interaction and the impact on drug penetration. At the same time the upcoming production of engineered nano-scale materials requires a thorough safety evaluation. Drug delivery as well as risk assessment depends crucially on the ability of such carriers to overcome the skin barrier and reach deeper tissue layers. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and especially skin models is an intriguing field. However, the data obtained do not show a clear image on the effect of nano-carriers. Especially the penetration of such particles is an open and controversially discussed topic. The literature reports different results mainly on pig or murine skin showing strong penetration (pig and mouse) or the opposite. Looking only at the sizes of the particles also no conclusive picture can be obtained. Nevertheless, size is regarded to play an important role for skin penetration. Furthermore, the state of the skin influences penetration (hydration) and the mechanical stress is of outmost importance. PMID:20592791

  2. Occular and dermal toxicity of Jatropha curcas phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Roach, Joy S; Makkar, Harinder P S; Becker, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Jatropha curcas seeds are a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. However, Jatropha seed oil and other plant parts are toxic due to the presence of phorbol esters (PEs). The ever-increasing cultivation of toxic genotype of J. curcas runs the risk of increased human exposure to Jatropha products. In the present study, effects of J. curcas oil (from both toxic and nontoxic genotypes), purified PEs-rich extract and purified PEs (factors C1, C2, C(3mixture), (C4+C5)) on reconstituted human epithelium (RHE) and human corneal epithelium (HCE) were evaluated in vitro. The PEs were purified from toxic Jatropha oil. In both RHE and HCE, the topical application of PEs containing samples produced severe cellular alterations such as marked oedema, presence of less viable cell layers, necrosis and/or partial tissue disintegration in epithelium and increased inflammatory response (interleukin-1α and prostaglandin E2). When compared to toxic oil, histological alterations and inflammatory response were less evident (P<0.05) in nontoxic oil indicating the severity of toxicity was due to PEs. Conclusively, topical applications of Jatropha PEs are toxic towards RHE and HCE models, which represents dermal and occular toxicity respectively. Data obtained from this study would aid in the development of safety procedures for Jatropha biodiesel industries. It is advised to use protective gloves and glasses when handling PEs containing Jatropha products. PMID:23706600

  3. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26960166

  4. Evaluation of dermal symptoms in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Razi, Ahad; Golforoushan, Farideh; Nejad, Amir Bahrami Shahla Babaee; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-06-01

    Many symptoms arise in thyroid diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermal symptoms in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. In this cross sectional study, 120 patients with hyperthyroidism and 50 patients suffering from hypothyroidism were studied. Cutaneous, hair and nail clinical symptoms were studied and registered in a special questionnaire. Mean age of patients suffering from hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were 38.24 +/- 14.45 and 25.86 +/- 14.69 years old. Dry and Coarse/rough skin were the most prevalent manifestations in the skin involvement in hypothyroidism since softness was the most prevalent ones in hyperthyroidism. Fragileness was the most prevalent symptom in patients with nail involvement in hypothyroidism since soft skin was the most prevalent ones in hyperthyroidism. Coarse/rough skin was observed more in patients with hair involvement in hypothyroidism since the most prevalent ones was separation of nail from its bed in hyperthyroidism. High prevalence of skin, hair and nail symptoms in thyroid patients, early diagnosis of the signs may be helpful in premature diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. PMID:24498824

  5. Dermal absorption and penetration of jet fuel components in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, David; Andersen, Melvin E; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2006-08-01

    Jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) is the largest source of chemical exposures on military bases. Dermal exposure to JP-8 has been investigated in vitro using rat or pig skin, but not in vivo in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate the absorption and penetration of aromatic and aliphatic components of JP-8 in humans. A surface area of 20 cm2 was delineated on the forearms of human volunteers and 1 ml of JP-8 was applied to the skin. Tape-strip samples were collected 30 min after application. Blood samples were taken before exposure (t=0 h), after exposure (t=0.5 h), and every 0.5 h for up to 4 h past exposure. The tape-strip samples showed evidence of uptake into the skin for all JP-8 components. The blood data was used to estimate an apparent permeability coefficient (Kp). The rank order of the apparent Kp was naphthalene>1-methyl naphthalene=2-methyl naphthalene>decane>dodecane>undecane. This rank order is similar to results from rat and pig-skin studies. However, this study demonstrates that rat and pig models of the skin over predict the internal dose of JP-8 components in humans. PMID:16497449

  6. Dkk2/Frzb in the dermal papillae regulates feather regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qiqi; Cai, Linyan; Fu, Yu; Chen, Xi; Yan, Zhipeng; Lin, Xiang; Zhou, Guixuan; Han, Hao; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-ming; Wu, Wei; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-03-15

    Avian feathers have robust growth and regeneration capability. To evaluate the contribution of signaling molecules and pathways in these processes, we profiled gene expression in the feather follicle using an absolute quantification approach. We identified hundreds of genes that mark specific components of the feather follicle: the dermal papillae (DP) which controls feather regeneration and axis formation, the pulp mesenchyme (Pp) which is derived from DP cells and nourishes the feather follicle, and the ramogenic zone epithelium (Erz) where a feather starts to branch. The feather DP is enriched in BMP/TGF-β signaling molecules and inhibitors for Wnt signaling including Dkk2/Frzb. Wnt ligands are mainly expressed in the feather epithelium and pulp. We find that while Wnt signaling is required for the maintenance of DP marker gene expression and feather regeneration, excessive Wnt signaling delays regeneration and reduces pulp formation. Manipulating Dkk2/Frzb expression by lentiviral-mediated overexpression, shRNA-knockdown, or by antibody neutralization resulted in dual feather axes formation. Our results suggest that the Wnt signaling in the proximal feather follicle is fine-tuned to accommodate feather regeneration and axis formation. PMID:24463139

  7. Solid lipid microparticles for enhanced dermal delivery of tetracycline HCl.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Yahya; Javadzadeh, Yousef; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Acne vulgaris (commonly called acne) is a most common skin disease during adolescence, afflicting more than 85% of teenagers. Topical tetracycline (Tc) is used for mild inflammatory acne and as an adjunct to systemic treatment in more severe forms. Solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) are useful tool for topical delivery because of their biodegradable, biocompatible and low toxic characteristic accompanying with excellent skin hydration, occlusiveness and controlled release properties. The purpose of this study was to prepare Tc-loaded SLMs were produced by the spray drying technique and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry and differential scanning calorimetry. In vitro and ex vivo release characteristics of Tc through SLMs and control formulations (aqueous carbopol gel) were evaluated over 24h using a vertical Franz diffusion cell through cellulose acetate membranes and exercised rat skin, respectively. SLM formulations present high encapsulation values above 97% without significant different among formulations (p<0.05). The sustained release pattern of Tc through SLMs was illustrated by in vitro release study. The ex vivo drug skin permeation study revealed that Tc dermal deposition of optimum SLMs formulation was about 7 times that of the control formulations. The enhanced skin penetration and accumulation of Tc observed for Tc-loaded SLMs may increase the efficiency of acne therapy and decrease the associated Tc side effects. PMID:27131093

  8. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  9. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  10. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  11. Summary of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) workshop on carcinogenesis bioassay via the dermal route. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-29

    Traditionally, the oral route has been the most common route of administration in bioassays which tested the potential carcinogenicity of chemicals. Regulatory agencies, however, prefer to have test chemicals applied by the same route as expected human exposure, whenever possible. Since human exposure to industrial chemicals is frequently via the dermal route, this has become a route of choice for animal testing of certain chemicals. However, protocol design for dermal bioassays presents many unique problems which must be addressed before guidelines for bioassays by the dermal route can be formulated. Furthermore, it may be feasible to develop a limited dermal protocol to screen certain classes of chemicals such as acrylates/methacrylates. Recognizing the need for this workshop, it was designed in two distinct parts; to address the problems inherent in the development of a generic protocol for dermal bioassays and, a specific limited dermal bioassay protocol for acrylates/methacrylates.

  12. Dermal absorption of three waterborne chloroethanes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    McKim, J M; Nichols, J W; Lien, G J; Hoffman, A D; Gallinat, C A; Stokes, G N

    1996-06-01

    In vivo estimates of xenobiotic chemical flux across the dermal surface of intact fish were obtained by measuring chemical loss from venous blood to expired water. An experimental system was developed to separate the dermal route of exposure from all other routes. The system was then used to measure dermal absorption of tetrachloroethane (TCE), pentachloroethane (PCE), and hexachloroethane (HCE) in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), two fish with very different skin anatomies. The kinetics of accumulation varied among chemicals, but for each compound were similar among species. TCE accumulated rapidly, reaching steady state in blood within 48 hr. Steady state was not reached in 48 hr with PCE or HCE, although blood levels of PCE were probably close to steady-state values. Dermal flux estimates (based on branchial efflux) for TCE, PCE, and HCE were two to four times greater in catfish than in trout. Arterial blood concentrations of each compound were three to six times greater in catfish. These observations are indicative of greater flux across catfish skin, augmented by higher blood:water chemical partitioning. Trout skin is covered with scales and has no taste buds, while catfish skin does not possess scales and has numerous taste bud papillae. Both scales and taste bud papillae originate in the dermis and extend to the skin surface through the epidermis. In catfish these taste buds may offer channels through which chemicals diffuse across the epidermis to the more vascularized dermis. A comparison of dermal and branchial uptake was made by estimating zero-time dermal and branchial fluxes for all three chloroethanes. The mean dermal fluxes for TCE, PCE, and HCE ranged from 1.4 to 2.8, 1.8 to 3.6, and 1.4 to 3.2% of the total flux (branchial plus dermal) in rainbow trout and channel catfish, respectively. This research demonstrates that dermal absorption of waterborne chemicals occurs in large adult fish and results in

  13. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  14. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general. PMID:24179028

  15. Toxicological assessment of enzyme-treated asparagus extract in rat acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuya; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    The safety of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) developed as a novel anti-stress functional material was assessed in acute and subchronic studies and genotoxicity assays. In the acute oral dose toxicity study, all rats survived during the test period and ETAS did not influence clinical appearance, body weight gain and necropsy findings at a dosage of 2000mg/kg body weight. Thus, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ETAS was determined to be greater than 2000mg/kg. The 90-day subchronic study (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg body weight, delivered by gavage) in rats reported no significant adverse effects in food consumption, body weight, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. In the micronucleus test of mice, the incidence of micronuclei in ETAS-administered groups (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day, injected twice) was equivalent to that of the negative control group, while the positive control group receiving mitomycin C showed a high incidence. The potential of ETAS to induce gene mutation was tested using four Salmonella typhimurium strains and Escherichia coli WP2uvrA. The test sample was not mutagenic to the test strains. These results support the safety of ETAS as food and dietary supplement. PMID:24389363

  16. Acute and subchronic toxicological evaluation of the semipurified extract of seeds of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) in rodents.

    PubMed

    Antonelli-Ushirobira, T M; Kaneshima, E N; Gabriel, M; Audi, E A; Marques, L C; Mello, J C P

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of a semipurified extract (EPA fraction, containing caffeine and several flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins) of seeds of the native Amazon plant Paullinia cupana (guaraná) in rodents. Acute toxicity was tested in male Swiss mice, which received different doses orally (OR) and intraperitoneally (ip); control groups received water. These tests produced acute mortality, with LD(50) of 1.825 g/kg (OR) and 0.827 g/kg (ip), and a significant weight decrease in lungs of mice receiving a dose of 0.1g/kg. In the repeated-dose toxicity test, the EPA was administered OR daily to male and female Wistar rats at doses of 30, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day/90 days. Their behavior, mortality, weight changes, laboratory tests, and the weights and histopathology of organs were evaluated. No rats died during the tests. Males dosed at 150 or 300 mg/kg gained weight more slowly and lost kidney weight (absolute and relative weights, compared to the control group). Hematological and biochemical tests showed few changes, differing somewhat between males and females; the histopathological evaluation indicated no significant changes. These results indicate that the EPA fraction of guaraná caused no toxicity in rats at the smallest dose evaluated (30 mg/kg). No other species was evaluated. PMID:20398723

  17. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Christopher M; Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Moyseenko, James J; Youssef, Nadeer; Krause, Charles R

    2013-02-01

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. To develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant-based essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instars of the Japanese beetle Popillia japonica Newman, European chafer Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), oriental beetle Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Diluted solutions were topically applied to the thorax, which allowed for calculating LD50 and LD90 values associated with 1 d after treatment. A wide range in acute toxicity was observed across all four scarab species. Of the 24 oils tested, allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon leaf, clove, garlic, and red thyme oils exhibited toxicity to all four species. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic oil tested against the European chafer, and among the most toxic against the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, and northern masked chafer. Red thyme was also comparatively toxic to the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer. Interspecific variability in susceptibility to the essential oils was documented, with 12, 11, 8, and 6 of the 24 essential oils being toxic to the oriental beetle, Japanese beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer, respectively. Analysis of the active oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a diverse array of compounds, mostly consisting of mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results will aid in identifying active oils and their constituents for optimizing the development of plant essential oil mixtures for use against scarab larvae. PMID:23448028

  18. Automation of an in vitro cytotoxicity assay used to estimate starting doses in acute oral systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Bories, Gilles; Casado, Juan; Coecke, Sandra; Norlén, Hedvig; Parissis, Nicholaos; Rodrigues, Robim M; Whelan, Maurice P

    2012-06-01

    Application of High Throughput Screening (HTS) to the regulatory safety assessment of chemicals is still in its infancy but shows great promise in terms of facilitating better understanding of toxicological modes-of-action, reducing the reliance on animal testing, and allowing more data-poor chemicals to be assessed at a reasonable cost. To promote the uptake and acceptance of HTS approaches, we describe in a stepwise manner how a well known cytotoxicity assay can be automated to increase throughput while maintaining reliability. Results generated with selected reference chemicals compared very favourably with data obtained from a previous international validation study concerning the prediction of acute systemic toxicity in rodents. The automated assay was then included in a formal ECVAM validation study to determine if the assay could be used for binary classification of chemicals with respect to their acute oral toxicity, using a threshold equivalent to a dose of 2000 mg/kg b.w. in a rodent bioassay (LD50). This involved the blind-testing of 56 reference chemicals on the HTS platform to produce concentration-response and IC50 data. Finally, the assay was adapted to a format more suited to higher throughput testing without compromising the quality of the data obtained. PMID:22465836

  19. Toxicity assessment of perfluorooctane sulfonate using acute and subchronic male C57BL/6J mouse models.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jichun; Wang, Eryin; Yin, Boxing; Fang, Dongsheng; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a principal representative and the final degradation product of several commercially produced perfluorinated compounds. However, PFOS has a high bioaccumulation potential and therefore can exert toxicity on aquatic organisms, animals, and cells. Considering the widespread concern this phenomenon has attracted, we examined the acute and subchronic toxic effects of varying doses of PFOS on adult male C57BL/6 mice. The acute oral LD50 value of PFOS in male C57BL/6J mice was 0.579 g/kg body weight (BW). Exposure to the subchronic oral toxicity of PFOS at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg PFOS/kg BW/day for 30 days disrupted the homeostasis of antioxidative systems, induced hepatocellular apoptosis (as revealed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay), triggered liver injury (as evidenced by the increased serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine amino transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and by the altered histology), and ultimately increased the liver size and relative weight of the mice. PFOS treatment caused liver damage but only slightly affected the kidneys and spleen of the mice. This study provided insights into the toxicological effects of PFOS. PMID:26807985

  20. Acute and Subchronic Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Aqueous Root Extract of Dicoma anomala Sond. in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Fatai Oladunni; Tom Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the safety of aqueous root extract of Dicoma anomala (AQRED) through acute and subchronic toxicity studies. Single oral dose of AQRED at the concentration of 0, 5, 300, and 2000 mg/kg as well as 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg/day was administered to rats for 14-day acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies. The results revealed no mortalities or observed clinical signs of toxicity in all the rats during both investigation periods. In subchronic toxicity testing, administration of AQRED also did not cause any changes in body weight as well as food and water consumption patterns. The haematological parameters and blood chemistry revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the treatment and the control except in platelet count, alkaline phosphatase, and sodium levels where there was a significant increase (p < 0.05), although there was also a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatinine when compared to control. However, these changes were not reflecting the results from histology. Conclusively, the obtained results suggested that the LD50 of AQRED is in excess of 2000 mg/kg and its oral administration for 90 days revealed that it is unlikely to be toxic, hence, safe. PMID:27200099

  1. A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship for acute oral toxicity of pesticides on rats: Validation, domain of application and prediction.

    PubMed

    Hamadache, Mabrouk; Benkortbi, Othmane; Hanini, Salah; Amrane, Abdeltif; Khaouane, Latifa; Si Moussa, Cherif

    2016-02-13

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models are expected to play an important role in the risk assessment of chemicals on humans and the environment. In this study, we developed a validated QSAR model to predict acute oral toxicity of 329 pesticides to rats because a few QSAR models have been devoted to predict the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) of pesticides on rats. This QSAR model is based on 17 molecular descriptors, and is robust, externally predictive and characterized by a good applicability domain. The best results were obtained with a 17/9/1 Artificial Neural Network model trained with the Quasi Newton back propagation (BFGS) algorithm. The prediction accuracy for the external validation set was estimated by the Q(2)ext and the root mean square error (RMS) which are equal to 0.948 and 0.201, respectively. 98.6% of external validation set is correctly predicted and the present model proved to be superior to models previously published. Accordingly, the model developed in this study provides excellent predictions and can be used to predict the acute oral toxicity of pesticides, particularly for those that have not been tested as well as new pesticides. PMID:26513561

  2. Androgen action in cultured dermal papilla cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Randall, V A; Thornton, M J; Hamada, K; Messenger, A G

    1994-01-01

    Androgens are major regulators of human hair growth with paradoxically different effects on hair follicles depending on their body site. They stimulate terminal growth in many regions including the face, have no effect on eyelashes, but may cause inhibition and balding on the scalp in genetically disposed individuals. How this occurs is unknown. However, androgens may act on the hair follicle via the cells of the dermal papilla; these would then influence the other cells of the hair follicle by altering the production of regulatory substances such as growth factors and/or extracellular matrix components. Therefore, primary lines of dermal papilla cells have been established from androgen-sensitive hair follicles, such as beard, and control, relatively androgen-independent, non-balding scalp cells and their mechanism of androgen action has been compared. Isolated beard dermal papillae were larger than those from scalp follicles. Although dermal papilla cells did not respond to in vitro androgens by alterations in growth, androgen-dependent dermal papilla cells contained higher levels of specific, low capacity, high affinity androgen receptors than non-balding scalp cells. The ability of the cells to metabolise testosterone to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone in culture also varied in parallel to that predicted from studies of hair growth in the 5 alpha-reductase deficiency syndrome. These results support the hypothesis that androgens act via the dermal papilla. They also show that dermal papilla cells retain differences in gene expression in culture which appear to correspond with their androgenic response in vivo. Further studies of such cells should help elucidate why bald men can grow beards! PMID:8003318

  3. Disposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid dimethylamine by Fischer 344 rats dosed orally and dermally

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, O.; Ritter, L.; Caron, J.; Somers, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The dimethylamine salt of 14C-ring-labeled 2,4-D was administered to Fischer 344 rats orally (1 and 0.4 mg/kg body weight) and dermally (10 mg/kg body weight). Absorption, distribution, and elimination were determined from 14C-labeled 2,4-D in blood, tissues, and excreta. Quantitatively, most of the orally administered dose (94-96%) became systemically available within 6 h. Following dermal administration 10% of the dose became systemically available over 72 h. However, peak concentrations in blood and kidneys were achieved within 30 min of dosing by either route. By 1.5 h after dosing, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys had decreased in both the orally dosed and dermally dosed animals. Between 2 and 8 h, the blood, muscle, liver and kidney concentrations in dermally dosed animals maintained a plateau while urinary excretion increased, presumably due to continued absorption of 2,4-D from the skin. The concentrations in orally dosed animals continued to decrease. Following 7 h of dermal exposure, skin cleansing removed about 63% of the applied dose; about 17% of the applied dose remained at the site of dermal dosing. At 8 h, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys of dermally dosed animals began to decrease, most likely a result of the removal of the reservoir on the skin. However, 2,4-D continued to be absorbed from skin site, resulting in a slower decline of the 2,4-D concentrations in these tissues over remainder of the 72-h study period. By comparison, in animals that had been orally dosed, the absorbed dose was almost completely excreted within 24 h.

  4. Development and application of quantitative methods for monitoring dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Flack, Sheila; Goktepe, Ipek; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative methods to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to the fungicide propiconazole were developed in the laboratory and applied in the occupational exposure setting for monitoring five farm workers' exposure during pesticide preparation and application to peach crops. Dermal exposure was measured with tape-strips applied to the skin, and the amount of propiconazole was normalized to keratin content in the tape-strip. Inhalation exposure was measured with an OVS tube placed in the worker's breathing-zone during pesticide handling. Samples were analyzed by GC-MS in EI+ mode (limit of detection 6 pg microl(-1)). Dermal exposure ranged from non-detectable to 32.1 +/- 22.6 ng per microg keratin while breathing-zone concentrations varied from 0.2 to 2.2 microg m(-3). A positive correlation was observed between breathing-zone concentrations and ambient air temperature (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.01). Breathing-zone concentrations did not correlate with dermal exposure levels (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.52). Propiconazole levels were below limit of detection when rubber gloves, coveralls, and full-face mask were used. The total-body propiconazole dose, determined for each worker by summing the estimated dermal dose and inhalation dose, ranged from 0.01 to 12 microg per kg body weight per day. Our results show that tape-stripping of the skin and the OVS can be effectively utilized to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole, respectively, and that the dermal route of exposure contributed substantially more to the total dose than the inhalation route. PMID:18392276

  5. The spindle-shaped cells in cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologic simulators include factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Griffiths, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a neoplasm that develops as multifocal lesions, often involving the skin, characterized by a complex histologic picture including numerous vascular spaces, perivascular and interstitial spindle-shaped cells, and extravasated erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Using an antibody against factor XIIIa, which identifies dermal dendrocytes, numerous factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were detected among the spindle-shaped cells in 12 acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated, and five non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were also increased in histologic simulators of Kaposi's sarcoma such as dermatofibroma, angiomatoid malignant fibrous histiocytoma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing, but were absent in keloids. The increased number of dermal dendrocytes, which are often in an angiocentric configuration and which also express CD4, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and Leu M3 in Kaposi's sarcoma, may be important to the angioproliferative response. The results suggested that the spindle-shaped cells that are present in a variety of cutaneous lesions are dermal dendrocytes and belong to the reticuloendothelial system, unlike other mesenchymal cell types such as the endothelial cell. Apparently a diverse array of stimuli, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and trauma, can stimulate the accumulation of factor XIIIa expressing dermal dendrocytes in the skin. These cells can then participate in different stages of a variety of cutaneous alterations including Kaposi's sarcoma, dermatofibroma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing. Thus, the factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocyte is a common cellular denominator among diverse clinical entities that share some histologic features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p797-a PMID:2573283

  6. The spindle-shaped cells in cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologic simulators include factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J; Griffiths, C E

    1989-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a neoplasm that develops as multifocal lesions, often involving the skin, characterized by a complex histologic picture including numerous vascular spaces, perivascular and interstitial spindle-shaped cells, and extravasated erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Using an antibody against factor XIIIa, which identifies dermal dendrocytes, numerous factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were detected among the spindle-shaped cells in 12 acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated, and five non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were also increased in histologic simulators of Kaposi's sarcoma such as dermatofibroma, angiomatoid malignant fibrous histiocytoma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing, but were absent in keloids. The increased number of dermal dendrocytes, which are often in an angiocentric configuration and which also express CD4, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and Leu M3 in Kaposi's sarcoma, may be important to the angioproliferative response. The results suggested that the spindle-shaped cells that are present in a variety of cutaneous lesions are dermal dendrocytes and belong to the reticuloendothelial system, unlike other mesenchymal cell types such as the endothelial cell. Apparently a diverse array of stimuli, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and trauma, can stimulate the accumulation of factor XIIIa expressing dermal dendrocytes in the skin. These cells can then participate in different stages of a variety of cutaneous alterations including Kaposi's sarcoma, dermatofibroma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing. Thus, the factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocyte is a common cellular denominator among diverse clinical entities that share some histologic features. PMID:2573283

  7. Modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on survival of animal population: acute versus chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present paper was application of a model, which was originally developed to simulate chronic ionizing radiation effects in a generic isolated population, to the case of acute exposure, and comparison of the dynamic features of radiation effects on the population survival in cases of acute and chronic exposure. Two modes of exposure were considered: acute exposure (2-35 Gy) and chronic lifetime exposure with the same integrated dose. Calculations were made for a generic mice population; however, the model can be applied for other animals with proper selection of parameter values. In case of acute exposure, in the range 2-11 Gy, the population response was in two phases. During a first phase, there was a depletion in population survival; the second phase was a recovery period due to reparation of damage and biosynthesis of new biomass. Model predictions indicate that a generic mice population, living in ideal conditions, has the potential for recovery (within a mouse lifetime period) from acute exposure with dose up to 10-11 Gy, i.e., the population may recover from doses above an LD50 (6.2 Gy). Following acute doses above 14 Gy, however, the mice population went to extinction without recovery. In contrast, under chronic lifetime exposures (500 days), radiation had little effect on population survival up to integrated doses of 14-15 Gy, so the survival of a population subjected to chronic exposure was much better compared with that after an acute exposure with the same dose. Due to the effect of "wasted radiation", the integrated dose of chronic exposure could be about two times higher than acute dose, producing the same effect on survival. It is concluded that the developed generic population model including the repair of radiation damage can be applied both to acute and chronic modes of exposure; results of calculations for generic mice population are in qualitative agreement with published data on radiation effects in mice. PMID

  8. A Prospective Study Assessing Complication Rates and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Breast Reconstructions Using a Novel, Deep Dermal Human Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael M.; De Oliveira, Gildasio S.; Mayer, Kristen E.; Blough, Jordan T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The value proposition of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) taken from the deep dermis is that the allograft may be more porous, allowing for enhanced integration and revascularization. In turn, this characteristic may attenuate complications related to foreign body reactions, seromas, and infection. However, this is juxtaposed against the potential loss of allograft structural integrity, with subsequent risk of malposition and extrusion. Despite the active use of novel, deep dermal ADMs, the clinical outcomes of this new technology has not been well studied. Methods: This is a prospective study to evaluate surgical and patient-reported outcomes using a deep dermal ADM, FlexHD Pliable. Surgical outcomes and BREAST-Q patient-reported outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at 2- and 6-month time points. Results: Seventy-two breasts (41 patients) underwent reconstruction. Complication rate was 12.5%, including 2 hematomas and 7 flap necroses. One case of flap necrosis led to reconstructive failure. Notably, there were no cases of infection, seroma, or implant extrusion or malposition. Average BREAST-Q scores were satisfaction with outcome (70.13 ± 23.87), satisfaction with breasts (58.53 ± 20.00), psychosocial well being (67.97 ± 20.93), sexual well being (54.11 ± 27.72), and physical well being (70.45 ± 15.44). Two-month postoperative BREAST-Q scores decreased compared with baseline and returned to baseline by 6 months. Postoperative radiation therapy had a negative effect on satisfaction with breasts (P = 0.004) and sexual well being (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Deep dermal ADM is a novel modification of traditional allograft technology. Use of the deep dermal ADM yielded acceptably low complication rates and satisfactory patient-reported outcomes. PMID:26894010

  9. Assessment of Antioxidant Potential and Acute Toxicity Studies of Whole Plant Extract of Pergularia Daemia (Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Vaithiyanathan, Veluchamy; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pergularia daemia (Asclepiadacea) is a fetid- smelling perennial herb growing well along the river bang and road sides of India. Naturally the plant has powerful antioxidants including polyphenols, flavanoids, steroids and terpenoids. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential and to determine the median lethal dose (LD50) of crude ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Pergularia daemia. The plant Pergularia daemia possess effective scavenging activity against 2, 2' azino bis (3 ethylbenzothiazoline 6 sulfonic acid (ABTS), nitric oxide and reducing power radicals at different concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 & 500 µg/mL) of both extracts. Results: From the above in vitro assay we have exposed that the methanolic extract exert higher antioxidant activity at 400 µg/mL than ethyl acetate extract. Acute toxicity study revealed that the extracts showed no signs of toxicity upto a dose level of 2500 mg/kg b.wt. Conclusion: Thus our findings provide that both extracts of Pergularia daemia possess a strong antioxidant capacity and are relatively has high margin of safety. PMID:26862261

  10. Acute toxic effects in mice of an extract from the marine algae Gonyaulax monilata.

    PubMed

    Erker, E F; Slaughter, L J; Bass, E L; Pinion, J; Wutoh, J

    1985-01-01

    Unialgal cultures of Gonyaulax monilata were cultured and harvested. A modified Westphall procedure was used to prepare an extract which did not contain saxitoxin, the gonyautoxins and structurally related toxins. The extract was administered i.p. to young adult, male CD-1 mice and produced: sedation, abdominal constriction, fecal clumping in the perianal area, ataxia, tremors, cyanosis, loss of reflexes, convulsions and death (LD50 = 2.28 mg/kg). Gross and microscopic pathology in the treated mice included: acute active hyperemia of the viscera, multifocal areas of necrosis of the musculature of the intestinal wall and diaphragm and the presence of cytoplasmic vacuoles in the peripheral margins of the acinar portion of the pancreas. Clinical pathology of the mice which survived 24 hr included significant elevation in the levels of serum lactic dehydrogenase, glutamic pyruvic and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminases. Some of these mice also had significantly decreased white blood cell counts. The extract administered orally produced similar signs without the abdominal constriction and convulsions (median lethal oral dose = 6.73 mg/kg). Gross pathology findings included extensive and severe congestion of the abdominal visceral organs. Vehicle control mice were normal. In conclusion, G. monilata, previously reported as nontoxic in homeotherms, yields an extract which contains a water soluble glycosidic substance(s) which is lethal to mice. PMID:4089872

  11. Acute, mutagenicity, teratogenicity and subchronic oral toxicity studies of diaveridine in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Sun, Feifei; Tang, Shusheng; Zhang, Suxia; Cao, Xingyuan

    2015-09-01

    Diaveridine (DVD) is a member of the 2,4-pyrimidinediamine class of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. It is used in combination with sulfaquinoxaline as an antiprotozoal agent in animals for the prophylaxis and treatment of coccidiosis and leucocytozoonosis. Herein, we report a complete toxicological safety assessment of DVD for clinical use. The study of toxicity, genetic toxicity (mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, mice sperm abnormality test and in vivo chromosome aberration test of mammalian bone marrow), 90-day sub-chronic toxicity and teratogenicity test were performed. In the acute oral toxicity tests, median lethal dose, LD50, was more than 2378mg/kg body weight in Sprague Dawley rats (1025mg/kg body weight in ICR mice). The testing results for three terms of mutagenicity toxicity (mouse chromosome aberration, erythrocyte micronucleus and sperm abnormality) were all negative at 128-512mg/kg body weight. For 90-day feeding of DVD at the dosage of 10mg/kg body weight in both male and female SD rats, no signs of toxicological effects were detected. Meanwhile, for teratogenicity test in female SD rats at the dosage of 37mg/kg body weight, there were no toxicological signs observed. Thus, our results suggested that the DVD is safe when administered orally in rats at 10mg/kg body weight per day. PMID:26397222

  12. Acute Toxicity Study of Zerumbone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier on BALB/c Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Rasedee, Abdullah; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Namvar, Farideh; Abdul Samad, Nozlena; Andas, Reena Joys; Ng, Kuan Beng; How, Chee Wun

    2014-01-01

    Zerumbone- (ZER-) loaded nanostructure lipid carrier (NLC) (ZER-NLC) prepared for its antileukemia effect in vitro was evaluated for its toxicological effects by observing changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow stem cells. The acute toxicity study for ZER-NLC was conducted by orally treating BALB/c mice with a single dose with either water, olive oil, ZER, NLC, or ZER-NLC for 14 days. The animals were observed for clinical and behavioral abnormalities, toxicological symptoms, feed consumption, and gross appearance. The liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and brain tissues were assessed histologically. Total haemogram was counted by hemocytometry and microhematocrit reader. Bone marrow examination in terms of cellular morphology was done by Wright staining with bone marrow smear. Furthermore, serum biochemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Grossly all treated mice, their investigated tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow were normal. At oral doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg ZER-NLC there was no sign of toxicity or mortality in BALB/c mice. This study suggests that the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ZER-NLC is higher than 200 mg/kg, thus, safe by oral administration. PMID:25276798

  13. Clinical & pathological features of acute toxicity due to Cassia occidentalis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, V M; John, T J; Kumar, Amod

    2009-07-01

    Cassia occidentalis is an annual shrub found in many countries including India. Although bovines and ovines do not eat it, parts of the plant are used in some traditional herbal medicines. Several animal studies have documented that fresh or dried beans are toxic. Ingestion of large amounts by grazing animals has caused serious illness and death. The toxic effects in large animals, rodents and chicken are on skeletal muscles, liver, kidney and heart. The predominant systems involved depend upon the animal species and the dose of the beans consumed. Brain functions are often affected. Gross lesions at necropsy consist of necrosis of skeletal muscle fibres and hepatic centrilobular necrosis; renal tubular necrosis is less frequent. Muscle and liver cell necrosis is reflected in biochemical abnormalities. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) is 1 g/kg for mice and rats. Toxicity is attributed to various anthraquinones and their derivatives and alkaloids, but the specific toxins have not been identified. Data on human toxicity are extremely scarce. This review summarizes information available on Cassia toxicity in animals and compares it with toxic features reported in children. The clinical spectrum and histopathology of C. occidentalis poisoning in children resemble those of animal toxicity, affecting mainly hepatic, skeletal muscle and brain tissues. The case-fatality rate in acute severe poisoning is 75-80 per cent in children. PMID:19700797

  14. Acute toxicity and mutagenic activity of Mexican plants used in traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Angeles-López, Guadalupe E; Navarrete, Andrés; Mata, Rachel

    2007-03-21

    The present work was undertaken to determine safety parameters of selected Mexican medicinal plants chosen on the basis of their frequency of medicinal use and commercial importance. The medicinal herbs included Amphipteryngium adstringens, Hintonia standleyana, Hintonia latiflora, Piper sanctum, Haemathoxylon brasiletto, Iostephane heterophylla, Valeriana procera, Arracacia tolucensis, Brickellia veronicaefolia, Scaphyglottis livida, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri, Poliomintha longiflora and Gnaphalium sp. In the acute toxicity studies in mice performed according to the Lorke procedure, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri and Poliomintha longiflora were the most toxic with LD(50) values between 1085 and 2mg/kg. The Ames test revealed that Gnaphalium sp. and Valeriana procera extracts induced mutations of S. typhimurium TA98 with or without the S9 microsomal fraction, and TA100 in the presence of the enzymatic fraction, respectively. The tincture of Valeriana procera, however, was non-mutagenic. Finally, in the Artemia salina lethality test Brickellia veronicaefolia, Arracacia tolucensis, Poliomintha longiflora and Piper sanctum caused significant mortality of the crustacean larvae with LC(50) in the range of 37-227 microg/mL. PMID:17101253

  15. Antidiarrheal activity and acute oral toxicity of Mentha longifolia L. essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Maham, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Mentha longifolia L. (Lamiaceae) is an annual herb that is used in the Iranian traditional medicine for treating stomach and intestinal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effect of M. longifolia on experimental diarrhea in a rat model. Materials and Methods: The antidiarrheal activity of essential oil of M. longifolia (20-80 mg/kg) was investigated against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats using loperamide as the standard reference drug. In acute toxicity evaluation, rats were orally administrated with single dose of EOML at doses ranging from 10 to 1000 mg/kg. Results: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg). EOML at oral doses of 20 and 80 mg/kg protected the animals against castor oil-induced diarrhea significantly (p<0.05). EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control. The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat. Conclusion: Since the inhibition of intestinal hyperactivity and hypersecretory are the bases of the treatment of diarrhea, results obtained in the present study suggest that EOML is endowed with antidiarrheal activity. EOML is moderately toxic for oral medication. PMID:25949954

  16. Citrus peel extract attenuates acute cyanide poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The primary aimed of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of methanolic extract of citrus peel (MECP) on acute cyanide (KCN) poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats. The intraperitoneal LD50 value of KCN (6.3 mg/Kg bwt), based on 24 hrs mortality, was significantly increased by 9, 52 or 113% by oral administration of MECP (500 mg/Kg bwt) pre-administered for 1, 2 and 3 days, respectively, in rats in a time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of the sublethal dose of KCN (3 mg/Kg bwt) into rats increased, 24 hrs later, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), glutamate levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. KCN also decreased brain glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in these animals. Pre-treatment of rats with MECP inhibited KCN-induced increases in LPO, NO, and glutamate levels and AChE activity as well as decreases in brain GSH level and SOD and CAT activities. In addition, KCN significantly decreased norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin levels in different brain regions which were resolved by MECP. From the present results, it can be concluded that the neuroprotective effects of MECP against KCN-induced seizures and oxidative stress may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress overproduction and maintenance of antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:24308563

  17. Toxicologic evaluation of DHA-rich algal oil: Genotoxicity, acute and subchronic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Tran, N; Peach, J; Bauter, M; Marone, P

    2012-10-01

    DHA-rich algal oil ONC-T18, tested in a battery of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests, did not show mutagenic or genotoxic potential. The acute oral LD50 in rats has been estimated to be greater than 5000 mg/kg of body weight. In a 90-day subchronic dietary study, administration of DHA-rich algal oil at concentrations of 0, 10,000, 25,000, and 50,000 ppm in the diet for 13 weeks did not produce any significant toxicologic manifestations. The algal oil test article was well tolerated as evidenced by the absence of major treatment-related changes in the general condition and appearance of the rats, neurobehavioral endpoints, growth, feed and water intake, ophthalmoscopic examinations, routine hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, urinalysis, or necropsy findings. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was the highest level fed of 50,000 ppm which is equivalent to 3,305 and 3,679 mg/kg bw/day, for male and female rats, respectively. The studies were conducted as part of an investigation to examine the safety of DHA-rich algal oil. The results confirm that it possesses a toxicity profile similar to other currently marketed algal oils and support the safety of DHA-rich algal oil for its proposed use in food. PMID:22898615

  18. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  19. The effect of suramin on healing adult rodent dermal wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, J; Shah, M; Ferguson, M W

    1995-01-01

    Scarring, leading to impaired function, growth and appearance, is a major problem following many forms of surgery. Fetal wounds, unlike those in the adult, are characterised by a reduced growth factor profile and the absence of scar tissue (Whitby & Ferguson, 1991 a, b). The antiparasitic drug, suramin (a heparin analogue) inhibits binding of various growth factors (e.g. PDGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, EGF, IGF-I, IGF-II) to their receptors in vitro. These growth factors play key roles in wound healing. We attempted to manipulate experimentally their effectiveness in healing adult rat dermal incisional wounds by injecting suramin into the wound margins and comparing the resultant healing with an unmanipulated control wound in the same animal. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that, on d 7 and 14 postwounding, the numbers of monocytes/macrophages and blood vessels are markedly increased in suramin treated wounds compared with controls. Extracellular matrix deposition is lower, although very compact in organisation, lacking the usual honeycombed appearance of normal skin. These effects are widespread, being present not only in the wound area, but also in the surrounding tissue. No difference was detected at 70 d postwounding between the scars of suramin-treated and unmanipulated control wounds in the same animals. All such effects are increased slightly through the concentration range of 0.04-40 mg/kg suramin, with no significant change as concentrations greater than 40 mg/kg are applied. This suggests that suramin has marked effects on the early stages of wound healing, which plateau at 40 mg/kg concentration, but has no effect on scar formation. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7649820

  20. The immunology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL).

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Eduard E

    2016-01-01

    Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a common complication of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. Because of its possible role in transmission it is considered a public health problem in VL endemic areas. The clinical features include a skin rash consisting of macules, papules or nodules in an otherwise healthy individual; this presentation is determined by the immune response towards parasites in the skin that probably persisted from the previous VL episode. The immune response in VL, cured VL and PKDL is the result of changes in the cytokine profile that only in part can be captured under the Th1 and Th2 dichotomy. Regulatory T cells and Th 17 cells also play a role. VL is characterized by an absent immune response to Leishmania with a predominantly Th2 type of response with high levels of IL-10; after successful treatment the patient will be immune with in vitro features of a Th1 type of response and in vivo a positive leishmanin skin test. PKDL takes an intermediate position with a dissociation of the immune response between the skin and the viscera, with a Th2 and Th1 type of response, respectively. It is likely that immune responses determine the different epidemiological and clinical characteristics of PKDL in Asia and Africa; various risk factors for PKDL may influence this, such as incomplete and inadequate treatment of VL, parasite resistance and genetic factors. It should be noted that PKDL is a heterogeneous and dynamic condition and patients differ with regard to time of onset after visceral leishmaniasis (VL), chronicity, extent and appearance of the rash including related immune responses, all of which may vary over time. Better understanding of these immune responses may offer opportunities for manipulation including combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy for VL to prevent PKDL from occurring and similarly in the treatment of chronic or treatment resistant PKDL cases. PMID:27553063

  1. Establishment of banking system for allogeneic cultured dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu; Kubo, Kentaro; Matsui, Hiromich; Kim, Hyun Jung; Numari, Shinichiro; Mabuchi, Yho; Kagawa, Shizuko

    2004-01-01

    Allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) was prepared by culturing fibroblasts on a two-layered spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid (HA) and atelo-collagen (Col). Allogeneic CDS can be cryopreserved and transported to other hospitals in a frozen state. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, keratinocytes growth factor (KGF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were contained in the culture medium which was used in preparing CDS over a cultivation period of one week (fresh CDS culture medium sample). After thawing a cryopreserved CDS, the CDS was recultured in a culture medium for one week. VEGF, bFGF, HGF, TGF-beta1 and IL-8 were contained in the culture medium which was used in reculturing CDS for one week (cryopreserved CDS culture medium sample), although some cytokines were detected at a lower level than those before freezing. This finding suggests that the cryopreserved CDS retains its ability to release these cytokines. Clinical research on allogeneic CDS, which was newly developed at the R & D Center for Artificial Skin of Kitasato University, has been carried out in medical centers across Japan with the support of the Millennium Project of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. It was demonstrated that the allogeneic CDS functions as an excellent cell therapy for intractable skin ulcers as well as burn injuries. The spongy matrix itself, as well as the cytokines released from the allogeneic CDS, seemed to be beneficial for the treatment of intractable skin defect. PMID:14720283

  2. Estimation of individual dermal and respiratory uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in 12 coke oven workers.

    PubMed Central

    VanRooij, J G; Bodelier-Bade, M M; Jongeneelen, F J

    1993-01-01

    Twelve workers from a coke plant in The Netherlands participated in an intensive skin monitoring programme combined with personal air sampling and biological monitoring during five consecutive eight hour workshifts. The purpose of the study was to make a quantitative assessment of both the dermal and respiratory intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Pyrene was used as a marker compound for both dermal and respiratory exposure to PAHs. The biological measure for the internal exposure to PAHs was urinary 1-OH-pyrene concentration. Measurements on exposure pads at six skin sites showed that mean total skin contamination of the 12 workers ranged between 21 and 166 micrograms pyrene a day. The dermal uptake of pyrene ranged between 4 and 34 micrograms/day, which was about 20% of the pyrene contamination on skin. The mean concentration of total pyrene in the breathing zone air of the 12 coke oven workers ranged from 0.1 to 5.4 micrograms/m3. The mean respiratory uptake of pyrene varied between 0.5 and 32.2 micrograms/day. Based on the estimates of the dermal and respiratory pyrene uptake it is concluded that an average 75% (range 28%-95%, n = 12) of the total absorbed amount of pyrene enters the body through the skin. Because of the difference in the pyrene:benzo(a)pyrene ratio between the air samples and the skin contamination samples, the dermal uptake of benzo(a)pyrene was also estimated. This was about 51% of the total absorbed amount (range 8%-92%, n = 12). The total excreted amount of urinary 1-OH-pyrene as a result of exposure to PAHs during the five consecutive workshifts varied between 36 and 239 nmol. A multiple regression model of the mass balance between pyrene dose (both dermal and respiratory) and 1-OH-pyrene excretion confirmed the relevance of the dermal exposure route. The variation in urinary 1-OH-pyrene excretion was determined more by the dermal pyrene dose than by the respiratory dose. The model showed an estimate of the percentage of

  3. Dermal fillers in aesthetics: an overview of adverse events and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Funt, David; Pavicic, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever-expanding range of dermal filler products for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation is of benefit for patients and physicians, but as indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications will likely also increase. Objective To describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide structured and clear guidance on their treatment and avoidance. Methods Reports of dermal filler complications in the medical literature were reviewed and, based on the publications retrieved and the authors’ extensive experience, recommendations for avoiding and managing complications are provided. Results Different dermal fillers have widely varying properties, associated risks, and injection requirements. All dermal fillers have the potential to cause complications. Most are related to volume and technique, though some are associated with the material itself. The majority of adverse reactions are mild and transient, such as bruising and trauma-related edema. Serious adverse events are rare, and most are avoidable with proper planning and technique. Conclusion For optimum outcomes, aesthetic physicians should have a detailed understanding of facial anatomy; the individual characteristics of available fillers; their indications, contraindications, benefits, and drawbacks; and ways to prevent and avoid potential complications. PMID:24363560

  4. [Pediatric Patient with anaerobic Bacterial Meningitis Who was Infected through a Spinal Congenital Dermal Sinus Route].

    PubMed

    Okui, Hideyuki; Fukasawa, Chie; Tokutake, Shoko; Takei, Haruka; Sato, Junichi; Hoshino, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a pediatric patient in whom a spinal congenital dermal sinus was detected after the onset of anaerobic bacterial meningitis. The patient was a 4-month-old boy. He had a recurrent fever for 2 weeks before admission. On admission, he presented with a convulsive status and a bulging anterior fontanel. The previously consulted physician had made a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Spinal fluid cultures tested positive for Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a spinal subdural abscess and cranial subdural hydrops; therefore, the patient was transported to our hospital for surgical treatment. A sacral dimple was noted on his lower back, and an MRI showed a spinal congenital dermal sinus. Antimicrobial therapy, cranial subdural aspiration, dermal sinus excision, and drainage were performed. He was discharged on the 60th hospital day. When pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. or anaerobic bacteria invade through a dermal sinus, it can result in meningitis. Involvement of a dermal sinus should be suspected when meningitis is caused by these pathogens or when recurrent meningitis occurs. PMID:27529968

  5. Role of clothing in both accelerating and impeding dermal absorption of airborne SVOCs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Glenn C; Weschler, Charles J; Bekö, Gabriel; Koch, Holger M; Salthammer, Tunga; Schripp, Tobias; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of clothing on dermal uptake of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), we measured uptake of selected airborne phthalates for an individual wearing clean clothes or air-exposed clothes and compared these results with dermal uptake for bare-skinned individuals under otherwise identical experimental conditions. Using a breathing hood to isolate dermal from inhalation uptake, we measured urinary metabolites of diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) from an individual exposed to known concentrations of these compounds for 6 h in an experimental chamber. The individual wore either clean (fresh) cotton clothes or cotton clothes that had been exposed to the same chamber air concentrations for 9 days. For a 6-h exposure, the net amounts of DEP and DnBP absorbed when wearing fresh clothes were, respectively, 0.017 and 0.007 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)); for exposed clothes the results were 0.178 and 0.261 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)), respectively (values normalized by air concentration and body mass). When compared against the average results for bare-skinned participants, clean clothes were protective, whereas exposed clothes increased dermal uptake for DEP and DnBP by factors of 3.3 and 6.5, respectively. Even for non-occupational environments, wearing clothing that has adsorbed/absorbed indoor air pollutants can increase dermal uptake of SVOCs by substantial amounts relative to bare skin. PMID:26058800

  6. Effects of temperature, surfactants and skin location on the dermal penetration of haloacetonitriles and chloral hydrate.

    PubMed

    Trabaris, Maria; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Weisel, Clifford P

    2012-07-01

    Dermal exposure has been recognized as an important contributor to the total internal dose to disinfection-by-products (DBPs) in water. However, the effect of the use of surfactants, water temperature and area of the body exposed to DBPs on their dermal flux has not been characterized and was the focus of the present study using an in-vitro system. The dermal flux of mg/l concentrations of haloacetonitriles and chloral hydrate (CH), important cytotoxic DBPs, increased by approximately 50% to 170% with increasing temperature from 25 °C to 40 °C. The fluxes for the torso and dorsum of the hand were much higher than that of palm and scalp skin. An increase in flux was observed for chloroacetonitrite and dichloroacetonitrile, two less lipophilic HANs, but not for trichloroacetonitrile or CH, with the addition of 2% sodium lauryl sulfate or 2% sodium laureth sulfate, two surfactants commonly used in soaps and shampoos used in showering and bathing. Thus, factors such as temperature, surfactants and skin location affect dermal penetration and should be considered when evaluating dermal absorption. PMID:22549718

  7. Derivation of a No-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hughes, B; Becker, R A; Hays, S M

    2016-04-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) has been found to produce liver and kidney tumors in mice following lifetime dermal exposures. Data regarding the mode of action by which DEA produces these tumors were used to support a dose-response assessment that resulted in a no-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to DEA. DEA and its metabolites are structural analogs to endogenous agents important to choline homeostasis. Sufficient information is available to support an epigenetic MOA involving the perturbation of choline homeostasis and hepatic methylation reactions in the formation of mouse liver tumors. This MOA may also apply to mouse kidney tumors, but direct measurements for key events in kidney are lacking. For both tumor types, dose-response data were pooled across four cancer bioassays conducted for DEA and DEA-containing condensates in order to provide a more robust characterization of the dose-response relationships. Doses were expressed in terms of dermally absorbed dose so that the dose-dependency and species differences in the dermal absorption of DEA were addressed. The resulting NSRL value of 3400 ug/day for dermal exposures to DEA is considered to be protective of human health for both tumor endpoints. PMID:26850685

  8. A new technique to assess dermal absorption of volatile chemicals in vitro by thermal gravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rauma, Matias; Isaksson, Tina S; Johanson, Gunnar

    2006-10-01

    Potential health hazards of dermal exposure, variability in reported dermal absorption rates and potential losses from the skin by evaporation indicate a need for a simple, inexpensive and standardized procedure to measure dermal absorption and desorption of chemical substances. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility to measure dermal absorption and desorption of volatile chemicals using a new gravimetric technique, namely thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and trypsinated stratum corneum from pig. Changes in skin weight were readily detected before, during and after exposure to vapours of water, 2-propanol, methanol and toluene. The shape and height of the weight curves differed between the four chemicals, reflecting differences in diffusivity and partial pressure and skin:air partitioning, respectively. As the skin weight is highly sensitive to the partial pressure of volatile chemicals, including water, this technique requires carefully controlled conditions with respect to air flow, temperature, chemical vapour generation and humidity. This new technique may help in the assessment of dermal uptake of volatile chemicals. Only a small piece of skin is needed and skin integrity is not necessary, facilitating the use of human samples. The high resolution weight-time curves obtained may also help to elucidate the characteristics of absorption, desorption and diffusion of chemicals in skin. PMID:16631342

  9. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  10. Acute-toxicity evaluation of nitroaromatic compounds. Final report, 29 Sep 89-29 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, G.B.; Austin, A.; DiGuilio, N.

    1991-03-01

    The nitroaromatics 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), 1,2,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and N-methyl-n,2,4,6-tetranitroaniline (tetryl) have been detected as environmental contaminants of water and soil near production waste sites and at military test grounds. Acute toxicity evaluations were carried out with these compounds to develop environmental and health effects criteria. Dermal and eye irritation tests and acute dermal sensitization (Buehler) tests in guinea pigs were conducted according to EPA standard protocols. The sensitization tests showed that DNB and tetryl are not skin sensitizers while TNB caused a mild allergic reaction. None of these compounds produced skin irritation but positive (DNB) to severe (TNB, tetryl) eye irritation potentials were observed.

  11. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  12. Dermal penetration of 14C-labeled diisopropyl methylphosphonate in swine. Toxicological study

    SciTech Connect

    Snodgrass, H.L.; Metker, L.W.

    1991-10-01

    DIMP is a water contaminant resulting from the manufacture of the chemical warfare agent GB. To determine its potential contribution to human exposure, its dermal penetration was assessed in swine. Pigs received a single dermal application of 14C-labeled DIMP at one of three exposure levels, i.e., 400, 40, or 4 micro g/cm2 of skin. Absorption was quantitated by measuring radiocarbon in the urine or feces through 7 days and in tissues collected at necropsy. It was concluded that DIMP is a minimal skin penetrant to pigs and absorption by man would be expected to be less than 10% of a dermal exposure. Absorbed dose would be rapidly metabolized in the body, primarily to isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid, and excreted in the urine within 24 to 48 hours. No bioaccumulation would be anticipated. Significant evaporation from the skin surface would predictably occur within 1 to 3 hours.

  13. Oral and dermal toxicity of MSMA to New Zealand white rabbits, Oryctalagus cuniculus

    SciTech Connect

    Jaghabir, M.T.W.; Abdelghani, A.; Anderson, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The 24 day LD/sub 50/ of monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) for New Zealand white rabbits was estimated to be 102 mg MSMA/kg body weight. The average size of the rabbit dermal irritant patch tests was 1.0, indicating that MSMA is a mild irritant to intact skin. Relatively little work has been done on the toxicity of organic arsenicals, especially the herbicide monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA). The EPA review reported a dermal study carried out on 6 adult male rabbits. The clipped skin areas of the rabbits were exposed to doses of MSMA for a 24 hours period. The animals were observed for a period of 2 weeks for signs of toxicity following the exposure. The dermal LD/sub 50/ value was found to be between 2 and 4 g/kg.

  14. “A two-component pre-seeded dermal-epidermal scaffold”

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, I.P.; Gabriel, D.; Timko, B.P.; Hashimoto, M.; Karajanagi, S.; Tong, R.; Marques, A.P.; Reis, R.L.; Kohane, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a bilayered dermal-epidermal scaffold for application in the treatment of full thickness skin defects. The dermal component gels in situ and adapts to the lesion shape, delivering human dermal fibroblasts in a matrix of fibrin and cross-linked hyaluronic acid modified with a cell adhesion-promoting peptide. Fibroblasts were able to form a tridimensional matrix due to material features such as tailored mechanical properties, presence of protease degradable elements and cell binding ligands. The epidermal component is a robust membrane containing cross-linked hyaluronic acid and poly-L-lysine, on which keratinocytes were able to attach and to form a monolayer. Amine-aldehyde bonding at the interface between the two components allows the formation of a tightly bound composite scaffold. Both parts of the scaffold were designed to provide cell type specific cues to allow for cell proliferation and form a construct that mimics the skin environment. PMID:25192821

  15. Insights into reptile dermal contaminant exposure: Reptile skin permeability to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Talent, Larry G; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    There is growing interest in improving ecological risk assessment exposure estimation, specifically by incorporating dermal exposure. At the same time, there is a growing interest in amphibians and reptiles as receptors in ecological risk assessment, despite generally receiving less research than more traditional receptors. Previous research has suggested that dermal exposure may be more important than previously considered for reptiles. We measured reptile skin permeability to four pesticides (thiamethoxam, malathion, tebuthiuron, trifluralin) using ventral skin samples. All four pesticides penetrated the skin but generally had low permeability. There was no apparent relationship between physicochemical properties and permeability coefficients. Malathion had a significantly greater permeability rate at all time points compared to the other pesticides. Tebuthiuron had a greater permeability than thiamethoxam. Reptiles and mammals appear to have similar skin permeability suggesting that dermal exposure estimates for mammals may be representative of reptiles. PMID:27037770

  16. Seizure caused by dermal application of over-the-counter eucalyptus oil head lice preparation.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Neil

    2011-10-01

    Natural plant oils such as eucalyptus are common worldwide in non-prescription natural health products. Oral ingestion of eucalyptus oil is well known to produce neurological symptoms and seizures; however, its dermal use is presumed to be safe. We describe a brief, self-limited, tonic-clonic seizure in a healthy 4-year-old girl following dermal exposure to eucalyptus oil as directed for treatment of head lice. Initial symptoms were vomiting, lethargy, and ataxia followed by a grand mal seizure. Recovery occurred rapidly after the skin was washed. Health care providers should be aware that eucalyptus oil toxicity may occur with dermal exposure and should report additional cases. PMID:21867365

  17. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  18. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  19. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  20. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-02-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H(2)O(2) in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H(2)O(2), but application oat peptides with H(2)O(2) at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H(2)O(2)-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  1. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four‐layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel‐fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel‐fibred bone, showing osteon‐like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we

  2. Cell therapy for full-thickness wounds: are fetal dermal cells a potential source?

    PubMed

    Akershoek, J J; Vlig, M; Talhout, W; Boekema, B K H L; Richters, C D; Beelen, R H J; Brouwer, K M; Middelkoop, E; Ulrich, M M W

    2016-04-01

    The application of autologous dermal fibroblasts has been shown to improve burn wound healing. However, a major hurdle is the availability of sufficient healthy skin as a cell source. We investigated fetal dermal cells as an alternative source for cell-based therapy for skin regeneration. Human (hFF), porcine fetal (pFF) or autologous dermal fibroblasts (AF) were seeded in a collagen-elastin substitute (Novomaix, NVM), which was applied in combination with an autologous split thickness skin graft (STSG) to evaluate the effects of these cells on wound healing in a porcine excisional wound model. Transplantation of wounds with NVM+hFF showed an increased influx of inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages, CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes) compared to STSG, acellular NVM (Acell-NVM) and NVM+AF at post-surgery days 7 and/or 14. Wounds treated with NVM+pFF presented only an increase in CD8(+) lymphocyte influx. Furthermore, reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) expression in wound areas and reduced contraction of the wounds was observed with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM. Xenogeneic transplantation of NVM+hFF increased αSMA expression in wounds compared to NVM+AF. An improved scar quality was observed for wounds treated with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM, NVM+hFF and NVM+pFF at day 56. In conclusion, application of autologous fibroblasts improved the overall outcome of wound healing in comparison to fetal dermal cells and Acell-NVM, whereas application of fetal dermal fibroblasts in NVM did not improve wound healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine model. Although human fetal dermal cells demonstrated an increased immune response, this did not seem to affect scar quality. PMID:26453400

  3. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bing; Ma, Lai-ji; Yao, Jin-jing; Fang, Yun; Mei, Yan-ai; Wei, Shao-min

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties; no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level. Therefore, the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Kjeldahl determination, phenol-sulfuric acid method, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%, of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1 301.01 Da. Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis. Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2, but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not. Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the inhibition of malondialdehyde (MDA). The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level. Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury. PMID:23365008

  4. Dermal carotenoids as measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy as a biomarker of response to a fruit/vegetable intervention study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dermal carotenoid status may have utility as a biomarker for vegetable and fruit consumption. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) is a valid, non-invasive method to assess dermal carotenoids as a biomarker of usual vegetable and fruit intake, but has not been evaluated in response to a whole-diet in...

  5. MATURATIONAL CHANGES IN DERMAL ABSORPTION OF 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) IN FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An earlier study indicated that dermal absorption of a 40 nmol dose of TCDD decreased with aging in rats, suggesting that the potential for systemic exposure following dermal contact would be decreased in older age groups. his study examined maturational changes in potential for ...

  6. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sandeep R.; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O.; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L. M. Sharath; Prakash, N. S.; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body’s vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  7. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L M Sharath; Prakash, N S; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body's vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  8. New nanosized technologies for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. A review.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Engelbrecht, Tanja; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Goebel, Alexandra S B

    2010-10-01

    Nanocarriers are promising dermal and transdermal drug delivery systems. The review recapitulates the most prominent nanocarriers such as microemulsions, liposomes and micro- and nanoparticles for the dermal and transdermal application. Microemulsions have a high solubilization capacity even for poorly soluble drugs and combined with their permeation enhancing effect high flux rates can be obtained. Liposomal carrier systems exhibit a high flexibility and mobility, whereas the follicular penetration of micro- and nanoparticular systems show an increase in the penetration depth. However, it is necessary to understand the particular mechanism of each transport system in order to limit undesired effects. PMID:21329045

  9. Avoiding Malar Edema During Midface/Cheek Augmentation with Dermal Fillers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    As dermal fillers have evolved, volume restoration and contour enhancement have become the objective of advanced injectors. The value of injections of dermal fillers into the midface is well documented in the literature. However, the midface, particularly the infraorbital hollow, is the facial area most prone to adverse events from filler treatment. Malar edema is a particularly significant and long-lasting untoward event that is frequently reported. This article reviews the anatomic basis for malar edema, relates it to filler injection technique, and presents the author's preferred method of injection to help ensure avoidance of this adverse event. PMID:22191006

  10. Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide and magnesium oxide in vitro dermal absorption in human skin.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Deon; Tawde, Snehal; Pickrell, John A; Erickson, Larry E

    2009-01-01

    The dermal absorption potential of a nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (MgO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) mixture in dermatomed human skin was assessed in vitro using Bronaugh-type flow-through diffusion cells. Nanocrystalline material was applied to the skin surface at a dose rate of 50 mg/cm(2) as a dry powder, as a water suspension, and as a water/surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate) suspension, for 8 hours. Dermal absorption of nanocrystalline MgO and TiO(2) through human skin with intact, functional stratum corneum was not detectable under the conditions of this experiment. PMID:19514931

  11. Simple analytical test and a formula to predict the potential for dermal carcinogenicity from petroleum oils

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.M.; Dimeler, G.R.; Basil, E.W.; Wilkins, G.W.; Nutter, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    A correlation for predicting dermal carcinogenicity of petroleum oils in laboratory animals has been developed using two simple analytical tests. The tests are the Food and Drug Administration test (FDA) commonly used to measure white oil purity, and a viscosity test. In the correlation, FDA is a measure of aromaticity, and viscosity is used to account for molecular weight. The FDA test alone appears to be comparable to other predictors now in use, but incorporating viscosity significantly increases the accuracy of predicting dermal carcinogenicity. A formula is proposed, using both the FDA test results and viscosity, that predicts the percentage of mice which will develop neoplastic skin tumors.

  12. Acute inhalation toxicity testing: considerations of technical and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, J; Bury, D; Föst, U; Gamer, A; Hoernicke, E; Hofmann, T; Kunde, M; Neustadt, T; Schlede, E; Schnierle, H; Wettig, K; Westphal, D

    1996-01-01

    The EU regulatory statute for the acute hazard identification of chemicals requires selection of the two most appropriate routes of administration. Testing employing the oral route is mandatory, whereas selection of the dermal or inhalation route requires expert judgement, i.e. considerations of structural alerts with regard to the inherent acute inhalation toxicity as well as the likelihood of dermal and inhalation exposure, respectively. Currently, testing of chemicals requires acute inhalation exposure of 4-h and 1-h durations according the EU classification and labelling and UN Transport Guidelines, respectively. The analysis made revealed that 1-h exposures appear to add little knowledge in addition to existing 4-h LC50 values and a default value of 4 should be used for conversion of 4-h to 1-h LC50 values, independently of the physical state of the chemical. Therefore, also the unit of concentration of exposure atmospheres should be independent of nominal features of the test substance. Hence, the preferred dose metric is mass (mg/liter air) rather than volume (ppm). Taking into account the overall variability of acute toxicity data the recommendations given are classification into the following groups of 4-h LC50 values: < or = 0.05, > 0.05-0.2, > 0.2-1, > 1-5 and > 5.0 mg/l. No distinction should be made concerning vapours and aerosols with regard to units and conversion factors from 4-h to 1-h LC50 values and the default factor of 4 appears to be most suitable. Further differentiation of classification is not indicated due to technical variability of acute inhalation testing and resolution of the acute bioassay. PMID:9010579

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  14. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  15. A distributed parameter physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for dermal and inhalation exposure to volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.; Weisel, C.P.; Lioy, P.J.; Georgopouelous, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    Estimates of dermal dose from exposures to toxic chemicals are typically derived using models that assume instantaneous establishment of steady-state dermal mass flux. However, dermal absorption theory indicates that this assumption is invalid for short-term exposures to volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). A generalized distributed parameter physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model (DP-PBPK), which describes unsteady state dermal mass flux via a partial differential equation (Fickian diffusion), has been developed for inhalation and dermal absorption of VOCs. In the present study, the DP-PBPK model has been parameterized for chloroform, and compared with two simpler PBPK models of chloroform. The latter are lumped parameter models, employing ordinary differential equations, that do not account for the dermal absorption time lag associated with the accumulation of permeant chemical in tissue represented by permeability coefficients. All three models were evaluated by comparing simulated post-exposure exhaled breath concentration profiles with measured concentrations following environmental chloroform exposures. The DP-PBPK model predicted a time-lag in the exhaled breath concentration profile, consistent with the experimental data. The DP-PBPK model also predicted significant volatilization of chloroform, for a simulated dermal exposure scenario. The end-exposure dermal dose predicted by the DP-PBPK model is similar to that predicted by the EPA recommended method for short-term exposures, and is significantly greater than the end-exposure dose predicted by the lumped parameter models. However, the net dermal dose predicted by the DP-PBPK model is substantially less than that predicted by the EPA method, due to the post-exposure volatilization predicted by the DP-PBPK model. The net dermal dose of chloroform predicted by all three models was nearly the same, even though the lumped parameter models did not predict substantial volatilization. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  17. The relationship between inadvertent ingestion and dermal exposure pathways: a new integrated conceptual model and a database of dermal and oral transfer efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; Semple, Sean; Cherrie, John W; Christopher, Yvette; Northage, Christine; Tielemans, Erik; Veroughstraete, Violaine; Van Tongeren, Martie

    2012-11-01

    Occupational inadvertent ingestion exposure is ingestion exposure due to contact between the mouth and contaminated hands or objects. Although individuals are typically oblivious to their exposure by this route, it is a potentially significant source of occupational exposure for some substances. Due to the continual flux of saliva through the oral cavity and the non-specificity of biological monitoring to routes of exposure, direct measurement of exposure by the inadvertent ingestion route is challenging; predictive models may be required to assess exposure. The work described in this manuscript has been carried out as part of a project to develop a predictive model for estimating inadvertent ingestion exposure in the workplace. As inadvertent ingestion exposure mainly arises from hand-to-mouth contact, it is closely linked to dermal exposure. We present a new integrated conceptual model for dermal and inadvertent ingestion exposure that should help to increase our understanding of ingestion exposure and our ability to simultaneously estimate exposure by the dermal and ingestion routes. The conceptual model consists of eight compartments (source, air, surface contaminant layer, outer clothing contaminant layer, inner clothing contaminant layer, hands and arms layer, perioral layer, and oral cavity) and nine mass transport processes (emission, deposition, resuspension or evaporation, transfer, removal, redistribution, decontamination, penetration and/or permeation, and swallowing) that describe event-based movement of substances between compartments (e.g. emission, deposition, etc.). This conceptual model is intended to guide the development of predictive exposure models that estimate exposure from both the dermal and the inadvertent ingestion pathways. For exposure by these pathways the efficiency of transfer of materials between compartments (for example from surfaces to hands, or from hands to the mouth) are important determinants of exposure. A database of

  18. Ocular findings in quarter horses with hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare ocular structures of Quarter Horses homozygous for hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) with those of Quarter Horses not affected by HERDA (control horses) and to determine the frequency of new corneal ulcers for horses with and without HERDA ...

  19. Post-kala-azar Dermal Leishmaniasis Developing in Miltefosine-Treated Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Koley, Sankha; Mandal, Rajesh Kumar; Choudhary, Sanjiv; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya

    2013-01-01

    Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is an unusual dermatosis occurring following an attack of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). There are only few reports of PKDL after successful treatment with miltefosine. We report two cases of PKDL that developed after successful treatment of VL with miltefosine. PMID:23723490

  20. IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF 2-METHOXYETHANOL ADMINISTERED DERMALLY OR ORALLY TO FISCHER 344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of rats to 2-methoxyethanol by gavage for 10 consecutive days results in immunotoxicity. o determine whether dermal exposure to ME also induces immunotoxicity, undiluted ME was applied to Fisher 344 male rats at dose levels of 150, 300, 600, 900 or 1200 mg/kg/d on shaved...

  1. Transdermal Delivery of Iron Using Soluble Microneedles: Dermal Kinetics and Safety.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H Nanjappa; McCrudden, Maeliosa T C; Donnelly, Ryan F; Banga, Ajay; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the iron compounds are administered via oral and parenteral routes in patients of all ages, to treat iron deficiency. Despite continued efforts to supplement iron via these conventional routes, iron deficiency still remains the most prevalent nutritional disorder all over the world. Transdermal replenishment of iron is a novel, potential approach of iron replenishment. Ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) was found to be a suitable source of iron for transdermal replenishment. The safety of FPP was assessed in this project by challenging the dermal fibroblast cells with high concentration of FPP. The cell viability assay and reactive oxygen species assay were performed. The soluble microneedle array was developed, incorporated with FPP and the kinetics of free iron in the skin; extracellular fluid following dermal administration of microneedle array was investigated in hairless rats. From the cell based assays, FPP was selected as one of the potential iron sources for transdermal delivery. The microneedles were found to dissolve in the skin fluid within 3 hours of administration. The FPP concentration in the dermal extracellular fluid declined after complete dissolution of the microneedle array. Overall, the studies demonstrated the safety of FPP for dermal delivery and the feasibility of soluble microneedle approach for transdermal iron replenishment therapy. PMID:26928401

  2. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  3. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  4. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  5. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  6. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew JA

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model. PMID:27335694

  7. DERMAL ABSORPTION AND DISPOSITION OF 1,3-DIPHENYLGUANIDINE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal absorption, distribution, and metabolism of 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG), widely used as an accelerator in processing rubbers and in food packaging, was studied in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. DPG shows 10% penetration through clipped back skin of the rats in 5 days. T...

  8. HANDWIPE SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROCEDURE FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF DERMAL CONTACT WITH PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A handwipe sampling and analysis procedure was developed for the measurement of dermal contract to pesticides. his procedure utilizes cellulose dressing sponges wetted with 2-propanol. wo-step wiping procedure is described that ensures that the entire hand is sampled. emoval effi...

  9. Cytotoxic evaluation of biomechanically improved crosslinked ovine collagen on human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Awang, M A; Firdaus, M A B; Busra, M B; Chowdhury, S R; Fadilah, N R; Wan Hamirul, W K; Reusmaazran, M Y; Aminuddin, M Y; Ruszymah, B H I

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies in our laboratory demonstrated that collagen extracted from ovine tendon is biocompatible towards human dermal fibroblast. To be able to use this collagen as a scaffold in skin tissue engineering, a mechanically stronger scaffold is required that can withstand manipulation before transplantation. This study was conducted to improve the mechanical strength of this collagen sponge using chemical crosslinkers, and evaluate their effect on physical, chemical and biocompatible properties. Collagen sponge was crosslinked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and glutaraldehyde (GA). Tensile test, FTIR study and mercury porosimetry were used to evaluate mechanical properties, chemical property and porosity, respectively. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of crosslinked collagen sponge on human dermal fibroblasts. The FTIR study confirmed the successful crosslinking of collagen sponge. Crosslinking with EDC and GA significantly increased the mechanical strength of collagen sponge, with GA being more superior. Crosslinking of collagen sponge significantly reduced the porosity and the effect was predominant in GA-crosslinked collagen sponge. The GA-crosslinked collagen showed significantly lower, 60% cell viability towards human dermal fibroblasts compared to that of EDC-crosslinked collagen, 80% and non-crosslinked collagen, 100%. Although the mechanical strength was better when using GA but the more toxic effect on dermal fibroblast makes EDC a more suitable crosslinker for future skin tissue engineering. PMID:24948455

  10. Distinct fibroblast lineages determine dermal architecture in skin development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Simons, Ben D.; Charalambous, Marika; Ferron, Sacri R.; Herault, Yann; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts are the major mesenchymal cell type in connective tissue and deposit the collagen and elastic fibers of the extracellular matrix (ECM)1. Even within a single tissue fibroblasts exhibit remarkable functional diversity, but it is not known whether this reflects the existence of a differentiation hierarchy or is a response to different environmental factors. Here we show, using transplantation assays and lineage tracing, that the fibroblasts of skin connective tissue arise from two distinct lineages. One forms the upper dermis, including the dermal papilla that regulates hair growth and the arrector pili muscle (APM), which controls piloerection. The other forms the lower dermis, including the reticular fibroblasts that synthesise the bulk of the fibrillar ECM, and the pre-adipocytes and adipocytes of the hypodermis. The upper lineage is required for hair follicle formation. In wounded adult skin, the initial wave of dermal repair is mediated by the lower lineage and upper dermal fibroblasts are recruited only during re-epithelialisation. Epidermal beta-catenin activation stimulates expansion of the upper dermal lineage, rendering wounds permissive for hair follicle formation. Our findings explain why wounding is linked to formation of ECM-rich scar tissue that lacks hair follicles2-4. They also form a platform for discovering fibroblast lineages in other tissues and for examining fibroblast changes in ageing and disease. PMID:24336287

  11. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures. PMID:25790729

  12. 40 CFR 795.232 - Inhalation and dermal pharmacokinetics of commercial hexane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Office of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. This material... reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following information shall be reported. (i... after dermal and inhalation administration. (2) Compare the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  13. 40 CFR 795.232 - Inhalation and dermal pharmacokinetics of commercial hexane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Director of the Office of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. This... reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following information shall be reported. (i... after dermal and inhalation administration. (2) Compare the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  14. 40 CFR 795.232 - Inhalation and dermal pharmacokinetics of commercial hexane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Office of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. This material... reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following information shall be reported. (i... after dermal and inhalation administration. (2) Compare the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  15. 40 CFR 795.232 - Inhalation and dermal pharmacokinetics of commercial hexane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Director of the Office of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. This... reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following information shall be reported. (i... after dermal and inhalation administration. (2) Compare the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  16. A COMPARISON OF CYTOKINE MESSAGE AND PROTEIN PROFILES OBTAINED FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO DIISOCYANATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to certain low molecular weight chemicals is associated with asthma. A simple method to identify this hazard is needed. Increased expression of Th2 cytokine mRNA in draining lymph nodes following dermal exposure and increased production of Th2 cytokines by cultured cell...

  17. Comparative analysis of toxicological evaluations for dermal exposure performed under two different EU regulatory frameworks.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, Emma; Schenk, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Dermal exposure to chemicals is highly relevant in relation to the use of cosmetic products, both in consumers and in individuals exposed occupationally. Regulatory frameworks exist within the EU to limit the dermal exposure of the general population and workers to chemicals in general, as well as to limit the use of certain substances in cosmetic products. The objective of the study was to investigate and compare toxicological evaluations of dermal exposure performed under current regulatory frameworks. The publicly disseminated hazard information under the respective regulatory frameworks was compiled and compared for the five substances resorcinol, p-phenylenediamine, p-aminophenol, N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether. A low consistency between evaluations was observed in respect to data coverage and cited dose descriptors. No systematic differences over all five substances were identified from the viewpoint of dermal hazard assessment. The critical effect and corresponding systemic effect dose descriptor was identical for two substances, differed somewhat for two other (a factor of 2-2.5). For N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine a critical effect was only identified under REACH. PMID:24269627

  18. Imaging dermal blood flow through the intact rat skin with an optical clearing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wang, Jing; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wen, Xiang; Luo, Qingming

    2010-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of skin microcirculation is very significant for clinical diagnosis and therapy of peripheral vascular disease. In this study, an optical clearing method enables a laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique to image dermal blood flow through intact rat skin. The optical clearing effect of rat skin in vitro caused by a mixture of PEG-400 and Thiazone is evaluated by a commercially available spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. A LSCI system is applied to image the dermal blood flow of in vivo rat skin after topical treatment of the agents. The results show that the reduced scattering coefficient (630 nm) is down to 60% of the initial value after 40 min of topical treatment of the mixture on skin in vitro. In vivo experimental results show that a 12-min treatment of the mixture on the epidermis can make the skin transparent and dermal vessels can be observed, while treatment with pure PEG-400 cannot. The process of skin optical clearing lasts, and the skin can be recovered by treatment of saline solution. Because optical clearing decreases the temporal contrast, dermal blood flow can be obtained by the laser speckle contrast imaging technique.

  19. Repair of a Gingival Fenestration Using an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Breault, Lawrence G; Brentson, Raquel C; Fowler, Edward B; Bisch, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    A case report illustrating the successful treatment of a gingival fenestration with an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) allograft. After 2½ months of healing, the ADM was completely integrated into the soft tissues of the mandibular anterior gingiva with complete resolution of the gingival fenestration, resulting in excellent gingival esthetics. PMID:26874103

  20. DERMAL PENETRATION OF [14C] CAPTAN IN YOUNG AND ADULT RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal penetration of [14C] Captan was determined in young (33 day old) and adult (82 day old) female Fischer 344 rats by an in vivo method and two in vitro methods. ermal penetration in vivo at 72 hours was about 9% of the dose in both young and adult rats. o significant differe...

  1. DERMAL AND MOUTHING TRANSFERS OF SURFACE RESIDUES MEASURED USING FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and non-dietary ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study to develop and test methods for measuring...

  2. [Dermal and inhalation poisoning. Rare guests in our intensive care units?].

    PubMed

    Sagoschen, I

    2013-09-01

    Patients with dermal and inhalation poisoning are uncommon in intensive care treatment. We describe the diagnostics and specific toxicological treatment of patients with hydrofluoric acid burns. For inhalation poisoning, we focus on smoke inhalation, especially the management of cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning. Special attention is given to the use of hyperbaric oxygenation for the treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:23925447

  3. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can infect wounds and produce difficult-to- treat biofilms. To determine the extent that MRSA biofilms can deplete oxygen, change pH and damage host tissue, we developed a porcine dermal explant model on which we cultured GFP-labeled MRSA biofilms. ...

  4. Race Does Not Predict Melanocyte Heterogeneous Responses to Dermal Fibroblast-Derived Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sirimahachaiyakul, Pornthep; Sood, Ravi F.; Muffley, Lara A.; Seaton, Max; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Qiao, Liang; Armaly, Jeffrey S.; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal pigmentation following cutaneous injury causes significant patient distress and represents a barrier to recovery. Wound depth and patient characteristics influence scar pigmentation. However, we know little about the pathophysiology leading to hyperpigmentation in healed shallow wounds and hypopigmentation in deep dermal wound scars. We sought to determine whether dermal fibroblast signaling influences melanocyte responses. Methods and Materials Epidermal melanocytes from three Caucasians and three African-Americans were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the entire genome. Melanocyte genetic profiles were determined using principal component analysis. We assessed melanocyte phenotype and gene expression in response to dermal fibroblast-conditioned medium and determined potential mesenchymal mediators by proteome profiling the fibroblast-conditioned medium. Results Six melanocyte samples demonstrated significant variability in phenotype and gene expression at baseline and in response to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Genetic profiling for SNPs in receptors for 13 identified soluble fibroblast-secreted mediators demonstrated considerable heterogeneity, potentially explaining the variable melanocyte responses to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Discussion Our data suggest that melanocytes respond to dermal fibroblast-derived mediators independent of keratinocytes and raise the possibility that mesenchymal-epidermal interactions influence skin pigmentation during cutaneous scarring. PMID:26418010

  5. CYTOKINE PROFILES DO NOT PREDICT ANTIBODY RESPONSES AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses following dermal exposure has been proposed as a test to identify chemicals that pose a risk of occupational asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that relative differences in cytokine profiles for dini...

  6. Ultrapulse carbon dioxide laser treatment of porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shalu; Sardana, Kabir; Garg, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is a rare, benign, cutaneous hamartoma. Approximately 45 cases of PEODDN have been reported, with little information regarding treatment. We report a patient with PEODDN treated successfully using an ultrapulse carbon dioxide laser. PMID:22339989

  7. Cadherin 11 Involved in Basement Membrane Damage and Dermal Changes in Melasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan-Hyung; Choi, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Ai-Young

    2016-06-15

    Basement membrane (BM) disruption and dermal changes (elastosis, collagenolysis, vascular ectasia) have been reported in melasma. Although ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can induce these changes, UV is not always necessary for melasma development. Cadherin 11 (CDH11), which is upregulated in some melasma patients, has previously been shown to stimulate melanogenesis. Because CDH11 action requires cell-cell adhesion between fibroblasts and melanocytes, BM disruption in vivo should facilitate this. The aim of this study was to examine whether CDH11 overexpression leads to BM disruption and dermal changes, independent of UV irradiation. Immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and zymography suggested that BM disruption/dermal changes and related factors were present in the hyperpigmented skin of CDH11-upregulated melasma patients and in CDH11-overexpressing fibroblasts/keratinocytes. The opposite was seen in CDH11-knockdown cells. UV irradiation of the cultured cells did not increase CDH11 expression. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CDH11 overexpression could induce BM disruption and dermal changes in melasma, regardless of UV exposure. PMID:26671310

  8. Acute toxicity and synergistic and antagonistic effects of the aromatic compounds of some essential oils against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae.

    PubMed

    Pavela, Roman

    2015-10-01

    The efficacy of 30 aromatic compounds and their mutual binary combinations was assessed for acute toxicity against the larvae Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on comparison of the lethal doses, thymol and p-cymene were selected as the most effective (LD50 = 18 and 21 mg L(-1), respectively, and LD90 = 25 and 30 mg L(-1), respectively). Although the LD50 for terpinolene and trans-anethole was also estimated at 21 mg L(-1), their LD90 was significantly higher compared to the substances above (245 and 34 mg L(-1), respectively). In total, 435 binary combinations were tested, of which 249 combinations showed a significant synergistic effect, while 74 combinations showed a significant antagonistic effect on mortality. Only nine substances were identified as being able to create a synergistic effect with more than 20 substances: limonene, trans-anethole, 4-allylanisole, carvacrol, isoeugenol, menthone, carvone, borneol, and camphor. The highest synergistic effect on larval mortality was achieved for the combinations: eugenol and isoeugenol, carvone and carvacrol, carvone and 4-allylanisole, carvone and α-terpineol, carvone and menthone, limonene and trans-anethole, limonene and menthone, α-pinene and menthone, β-citronellol and menthone, carvacrol and 4-allylanisole, carvacrol and terpineol, α-terpinene and trans-anethole, camphor and menthone, camphene and menthone, and 4-allylanisole and menthone. Significant differences between achieved mortality and the mutual mixing ratio were found for the five selected binary mixtures that had shown the most significant synergistic effect in the previous tests. The mixture of limonene and trans-anethole showed the highest mortality, with the mixing ratio 1:1; the mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol caused 90.2% mortality, with the mixing ratio 1:3. One hundred percent mortality was achieved if carvacrol was contained in a mixture with carvone in a ratio >2. After a comparison of all our results, based on our experiments, we

  9. Recombinant expression of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin components of Indian isolate in Escherichia coli and determination of its acute toxicity level in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, Suryanarayana; Vanlalhmuaka; Verma, Sarika; Tuteja, Urmil; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LeTx) is the principle factor responsible for toxaemia and anthrax related death. Lethal toxin consist of two proteins viz protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor which combines in a typical fashion similar to other toxins belonging to A-B toxin super family. The amount of LeTx required to kill a particular organism generally differs among strains owing to their geographical distributions and genetic variation. In the present study, we have cloned PA and LF genes from B. anthracis clinical isolate of Indian origin and expressed them in soluble form employing Escherichia coli expression system. Both the proteins were purified to near homogeneity level using Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further we have used equal ratio of both the proteins to form LeTx and determined its acute toxicity level in Balb/c mice by graphical method of Miller and Tainter. The LD50 value of LeTx by intravenous (i.v) route was found to be 0.97 ± 0.634 mg kg(-1) Balb/c mice. This study highlights the expression of recombinant LeTx from E. coli and assessing its acute toxicity level in experimental mouse model. PMID:26472254

  10. Estimation of acute oral toxicity using the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) from the 28 day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Anna; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Acute systemic toxicity is one of the areas of particular concern due to the 2009 deadline set by the 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC), which introduces a testing and marketing ban of cosmetic products with ingredients tested on animals. The scientific community is putting considerable effort into developing and validating non-animal alternatives in this area. However, it is unlikely that validated and regulatory accepted alternative methods and/or strategies will be available in March 2009. Following the initiatives undertaken in the pharmaceutical industry to waive the acute oral toxicity testing before going to clinical studies by using information from other in vivo studies, we proposed an approach to identify non-toxic compounds (LD50>2000mg/kg) using information from 28 days repeated dose toxicity studies. Taking into account the high prevalence of non-toxic substances (87%) in the New Chemicals Database, it was possible to set a NOAEL threshold of 200mg/kg that allowed the correct identification of 63% of non-toxic compounds, while <1% of harmful compounds were misclassified as non-toxic. Since repeated dose toxicity studies can be performed in vivo until 2013, the proposed approach could have an immediate impact for the testing of cosmetic ingredients. PMID:18977273

  11. [EFFECT OF 4-METHYLPYRAZOLE ON IMMUNE RESPONSE, FUNCTION OF Th1 AND Th2 LYMPHOCYTES, AND CYTOKINE CONCENTRATION IN RAT BLOOD AFTER ACUTE METHANOL POISONING].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskii, P F; Maslyakov, V V; Gromov, M S

    2016-01-01

    It was established in experiments on noninbred albino rats that the acute intoxication with methanol (1.0 LD50) decreased cellular and humoral immune responses, Th2-lymphocyte activity (to a greater extent as compared to the function of Th1 cells), reduced the blood concentration of immunoregulatory (IFN-g, IL-2, IL-4) and proinflammatory (TNF, IL-1b, IL-6) cytokines on the average by 36.5% (p < 0.05), and did not affect the content of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13). Methanol antidote 4-methylpyrazole (non-competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) administered upon acute intoxication with methanol at a dose of 1.0 DL50 partially reduces the intoxication-induced suppression of humoral and cellular immune response, activity of T-helper cells, and production of IL-4 and restores blood levels of TNF, IL-1b, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-2, IL-6 to the control values. PMID:27455577

  12. Kinetics of 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)camphor in rats and humans after dermal application

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, Ute M.D.; Voelkel, Wolfgang; Heusener, Alexander; Colnot, Thomas; Broschard, Thomas H.; Landenberg, Friedrich von; Dekant, Wolfgang . E-mail: dekant@toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-10-15

    The toxicokinetics of 4-MBC after dermal administration were investigated in human subjects and in rats. Humans (3 male and 3 female subjects) were exposed to 4-MBC by topical application of a commercial sunscreen formulation containing 4% 4-MBC (w/w), covering 90% of the body surface and resulting in a mean dermal 4-MBC dose of 22 mg/kg bw. In rats, dermal 4-MBC doses of 400 and 2000 mg/kg bw were applied in a formulation using an occlusive patch for 24 h. Concentrations of 4-MBC and its metabolites were monitored over 96 h in plasma (rats and humans) and urine (humans). In human subjects, plasma levels of 4-MBC peaked at 200 pmol/ml in males and 100 pmol/ml in females 6 h after application and then decreased to reach the limit of detection after 24 h (females), respectively, 36 h (males). After dermal application of 4-MBC, peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 50-80 pmol/ml at 12 h and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 100-200 pmol/ml at 24 h. In male and female rats, peak plasma levels of 4-MBC were 200 (dose of 400 mg/kg bw) and 1 200 pmol/ml (dose of 2000 mg/kg bw). These levels remained constant for up to 24-48 h after dermal application. Peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 18,000 pmol/ml (males) and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 55,000 pmol/ml (females) between 48 and 72 h after application of the high dose of 4-MBC. In human subjects, only a small percentage of the dermally applied dose of 4-MBC was recovered in the form of metabolites in urine, partly as glucuronides. The obtained results suggest a more intensive biotransformation of 4-MBC in rats as compared to humans after dermal application and a poor absorption of 4-MBC through human skin.

  13. Kinetics of 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)camphor in rats and humans after dermal application.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Ute M D; Völkel, Wolfgang; Heusener, Alexander; Colnot, Thomas; Broschard, Thomas H; von Landenberg, Friedrich; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2006-10-15

    The toxicokinetics of 4-MBC after dermal administration were investigated in human subjects and in rats. Humans (3 male and 3 female subjects) were exposed to 4-MBC by topical application of a commercial sunscreen formulation containing 4% 4-MBC (w/w), covering 90% of the body surface and resulting in a mean dermal 4-MBC dose of 22 mg/kg bw. In rats, dermal 4-MBC doses of 400 and 2000 mg/kg bw were applied in a formulation using an occlusive patch for 24 h. Concentrations of 4-MBC and its metabolites were monitored over 96 h in plasma (rats and humans) and urine (humans). In human subjects, plasma levels of 4-MBC peaked at 200 pmol/ml in males and 100 pmol/ml in females 6 h after application and then decreased to reach the limit of detection after 24 h (females), respectively, 36 h (males). After dermal application of 4-MBC, peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 50-80 pmol/ml at 12 h and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 100-200 pmol/ml at 24 h. In male and female rats, peak plasma levels of 4-MBC were 200 (dose of 400 mg/kg bw) and 1 200 pmol/ml (dose of 2000 mg/kg bw). These levels remained constant for up to 24-48 h after dermal application. Peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 18,000 pmol/ml (males) and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 55,000 pmol/ml (females) between 48 and 72 h after application of the high dose of 4-MBC. In human subjects, only a small percentage of the dermally applied dose of 4-MBC was recovered in the form of metabolites in urine, partly as glucuronides. The obtained results suggest a more intensive biotransformation of 4-MBC in rats as compared to humans after dermal application and a poor absorption of 4-MBC through human skin. PMID:16814339

  14. Acute and sub-acute oral toxicity assessment of the methanolic extract from leaves of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Purobi; Yadav, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The leaves of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (Malvaceae) are used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhea, to promote draining of abscesses and as analgesic agent in the traditional medicine of Cook Islands, Haiti, Japan and Mexico. Aim: The present study investigated the oral acute and subacute toxicity of methanol leaf extract of H. rosa-sinensis in mice. Materials and Methods: In the acute toxicity study, a single oral dose of 2000 mg/kg of extract was given to five mice at 48 h intervals. Animals were observed individually for any clinical signs of toxicity or mortality for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, mice were treated with 400 mg/kg and 800 mg/kg doses of the extract for 14 days. The hematological and biochemical parameters and histopathology of liver and kidneys of animals were studied at the end of the experiment. Results: For acute treatment, the extract did not reveal any signs of toxicity or mortality in any animal, during the 14 days observation period. The LD50 of extract was estimated to be greater than 2000 mg/kg. In the sub-acute toxicity study, administration of 400 mg/kg and 800 mg/kg doses of extract to mice for two weeks did not reveal any marked adverse effects on hematological, biochemical parameters and histopathology of liver and kidney in the 400 mg/kg group. However, hepato-renal toxicity as evidenced by elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total and indirect bilirubin, urea and creatinine was seen in the animals that received 800 mg/kg dose of extract for 14 days. In addition, in the same group of animals, the histological assessments of liver and kidney also showed various adverse effects viz. dilated sinusoids, apoptotic nuclei and inflammatory infiltrate inside sinusoidal capillaries in the liver, and marked the disorganization of tubules and glomeruli, and enlarged interstitial spaces in the kidney. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that for traditional medicinal

  15. The effect of collagen-chitosan porous scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration in a one-stage grafting procedure.

    PubMed

    Haifei, Shi; Xingang, Wang; Shoucheng, Wu; Zhengwei, Mao; Chuangang, You; Chunmao, Han

    2014-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are used as dermal regeneration templates to reduce scar formation and improve wound healing. Unlike autografts, dermal substitutes lack normal vascular networks. The increased distance required for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft following interpositioning of the substitute dramatically affects graft survival. To evaluate the effect of collagen-chitosan scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration, single-layer collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds of 0.5-, 1- and 2-mm thicknesses were fabricated and used to treat full-thickness wounds in a one-stage grafting procedure in a rat model. Skin-graft viability, wound contraction, histological changes, and wound tensile strength were evaluated. The results indicated that the distance for the diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft in the 2-mm-thick scaffold provided less support for graft take, which resulted in graft necrosis, extensive inflammatory reaction, marked foreign-body reaction (FBR), rapid scaffold degradation, and abnormal collagen deposition and remodeling. In contrast, the thinner scaffolds, especially of that 0.5-mm thickness, promoted earlier angiogenesis, ensuring skin-graft viability with a mild FBR, and ordered fibroblast infiltration and better collagen remodeling. It can be concluded that collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds with a thickness of <1mm are more suitable for dermal regeneration and can be used as dermal templates for treatment of dermal defects using a one-stage grafting procedure. PMID:24076783

  16. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of traditional Chinese medicine “Huhezi”

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaqin; Chen, Shufan; Song, Chenhui; Yin, Zhongqiong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Jia, Renyong; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; Zou, Yuanfeng; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Lv, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and safety pharmacology of the traditional Chinese medicine, “Huhezi” granules. The results of acute toxicity test showed that the granules’ LD50 was more than 5000 mg/kg, which indicated that the “Huhezi” belonged to actually non-toxic drug. Subchronic toxicity study showed that non-toxic reaction were detected in high (1000 mg/kg), medium (500 mg/kg) and low dose (250 mg/kg) of “Huhezi” groups by measuring rat body weight, organ coefficient, blood physiological indexes and blood biochemical indexes. Pathological examination showed that no tissue lesions were observed in test organs except liver (mild granular degenerationand reversible vesicular degeneration), spleen (Langerhans cells infiltrating) and kidney (homogeneous red staining of renal tubule). Safety pharmacology study found that “Huhezi” had no effects on the central nervous system, respiratory system and cardiovascular system. These results suggested that the dose of “Huhezi” at or below 1000 mg/kg through oral administration is considered safe. PMID:26550447

  17. Evaluation of Acute 13-Week Subchronic Toxicity and Genotoxicity of the Powdered Root of Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia Jack)

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Liao, Po-Lin; Huang, Wei-Kuang; Tse, Ling-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) is an indigenous traditional herb in Southern Asia. Its powdered root has been processed to produce health supplements, but no detailed toxicology report is available. In this study, neither mutagenicity nor clastogenicity was noted, and acute oral LD50 was more than 6 g/kg b.w. After 4-week subacute and 13-week subchronic exposure paradigms (0, 0.6, 1.2, and 2 g/kg b.w./day), adverse effects attributable to test compound were not observed with respect to body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, macropathology, or histopathology. However, the treatment significantly reduced prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and cholesterol levels, especially in males (P < 0.05). These changes were judged as pharmacological effects, and they are beneficial to health. The calculated acceptable daily intake (ADI) was up to 1.2 g/adult/day. This information will be useful for product development and safety management. PMID:24062779

  18. Assessment of antidiabetic activity and acute toxicity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. in guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Kasali, Félicien Mushagalusa; Kadima, Justin Ntokamunda; Mpiana, Pius Tshimankinda; Ngbolua, Koto-te-Nyiwa; Tshibangu, Damien Sha-Tshibey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the antidiabetic activity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. popularly used in the Eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and to point out the possible toxicity. Method Aqueous decoctions prepared from dried leaves powder were administrated to guinea pigs at the dose range of 100 mg/kg to 3.2 g/kg of body weight. The hypoglycemic activity was evaluated by glucose tolerance test, loading animals with glucose 4 g/kg and measuring blood glucose concentrations at various times. The effect was compared to the control and glibenclamide as antidiabetic reference drug. Acute toxicity was evaluated by recording mortality rate, changes on blood biomarkers and damage caused to vital organs. Results At a dose of 100 mg/kg, the aqueous extract induced a significant reduction of peak concentration at 30 min after glucose loading as compared with control or reference (P<0.05). At doses greater than 400 mg, some alterations on blood, kidney and liver markers were observed. Upper 800 mg/kg, mortality was observed with LD50 estimated at about 1 280 mg/kg. At the autopsy, vital organs were in haemorrhage and swelling state. Conclusion The crude aqueous extracts from the leaves of Physalis peruviana L. present hypoglycemic activity in animal model, but at high doses the plant may cause severe intoxication.

  19. Human Dermal Fibroblasts Demonstrate Positive Immunostaining for Neuron- and Glia- Specific Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, C. J.; de Rooij, K. E; Locher, H; de Groot, S. C.; de Groot, J. C. M. J.; Frijns, J. H. M.; Huisman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In stem cell cultures from adult human tissue, undesirable contamination with fibroblasts is frequently present. The presence of fibroblasts obscures the actual number of stem cells and may result in extracellular matrix production after transplantation. Identification of fibroblasts is difficult because of the lack of specific fibroblast markers. In our laboratory, we isolate and expand neural-crest-derived stem cells from human hair follicle bulges and investigate their potential to differentiate into neural cells. To establish cellular identities, we perform immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for glial and neuronal markers, and use fibroblasts as negative control. We frequently observe that human adult dermal fibroblasts also express some glial and neuronal markers. In this study, we have sought to determine whether our observations represent actual expression of these markers or result from cross-reactivity. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human adult dermal fibroblasts using acknowledged glial and neuronal antibodies followed by verification of the data using RT-qPCR. Human adult dermal fibroblasts showed expression of the glia-specific markers SOX9, glial fibrillary acidic protein and EGR2 (KROX20) as well as for the neuron-specific marker class III β-tubulin, both at the protein and mRNA level. Furthermore, human adult dermal fibroblasts showed false-positive immunostaining for S100β and GAP43 and to a lower extent for OCT6. Our results indicate that immunophenotyping as a tool to determine cellular identity is not as reliable as generally assumed, especially since human adult dermal fibroblasts may be mistaken for neural cells, indicating that the ultimate proof of glial or neuronal identity can only be provided by their functionality. PMID:26678612

  20. Evaluation of potential dermal exposure of pesticide spray operators in greenhouses by use of visible tracers.

    PubMed

    Machera, Kyriaki; Kapetanakis, Evangelos; Charistou, Agathi; Goumenaki, Eleni; Glass, Richard Christer

    2002-03-01

    In the present study, the potential dermal and inhalation exposure of the operator was measured, following simulation of insecticide application with the dye tracer Sunset Yellow in greenhouse cucumbers and tomatoes. For the monitoring of operator exposure, the whole body technique was used. The potential inhalation exposure was measured with a personal air sampler equipped with a glass fiber filter. The potential dermal operator exposure ranged from 84.4 to 526.7 ml of spray solution (s.s.)/h for the whole body and from 18.5 to 62.5 ml s.s./h for hands in the case of greenhouse cucumbers. The respective inhalation exposure was between 0.17 and 1.0 ml s.s./h. For greenhouse tomatoes, the potential body exposure was in the range of 22.4 to 62.1 ml s.s./h. The hand exposure varied from 5.5 to 6.1 ml s.s./h. The potential inhalation exposure was in the range of 0.33 to 0.43 ml s.s./h. The potential dermal operator exposure is a highly variable parameter, with a variation factor higher than 100% in many cases. One of the most critical factors for the determination of both potential dermal and inhalation exposure is the application pressure. Other field and operational conditions, including unpredictable factors, are also important for the determination of operator exposure levels. The measured potential dermal operator exposure values were above the levels of exposure estimated with mathematical models. PMID:11990365

  1. Bioavailability of soil-bound TCDD: dermal bioavailability in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, H.; Teitelbaum, P.; Webb, A.S.; Marple, L.; Brunck, B.; Dei Rossi, D.; Murray, F.J.; Paustenbach, D.

    1988-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an unwanted by-product formed during the manufacture of hexachlorophene and phenoxyherbicides, has been found as an environmental contaminant in many U.S. and Western European sites. This study examines in the rat the degree of dermal absorption of TCDD bound to soil. Such information would assist regulatory agencies in evaluating the degree of exposure of humans who come in contact with TCDD-contaminated soil. Several parameters which may influence dermal absorption were studied, including TCDD dose, duration of contact, presence of crankcase oil as a co-contaminant, and environmentally contaminated vs laboratory-prepared soil. The dermal penetration of TCDD following 4 hr of contact with skin was approximately 60% of that following 24 hr of contact (P less than or equal to 0.05). Following 24 hr of contact with the skin, the degree of dermal uptake of TCDD contaminated soil was approximately 1% of the administered dose. Under the conditions of the present study, the degree of uptake does not appear to be influenced to any significant extent by the concentration of TCDD on soil, the presence of crankcase oil as co-contaminants, or by environmentally vs laboratory-contaminated soil. Although a number of parameters examined in this study did not significantly influence the degree of dermal absorption of TCDD in the rat following 24 hr of contact with the contaminated soil, the unqualified use of the 1% value to estimate human exposure would overestimate human exposure, since there is general agreement among researchers that rat skin tends to be more permeable than human skin to highly lipid-soluble compounds such as TCDD.

  2. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, Pilar de la

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  3. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  4. Respiratory response to toluene diisocyanate depends on prior frequency and concentration of dermal sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Tarkowski, Maciej; Ceuppens, Jan L; Verbeken, Erik K; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M

    2004-08-01

    Occupational asthma is the principal cause of work-related respiratory disease in the industrial world. In the absence of satisfactory models for predicting the potential of low molecular weight chemicals to cause asthma, we verified that dermal sensitization prior to intranasal challenge influences the respiratory response using toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a known respiratory sensitizer. BALB/c mice received TDI or vehicle (acetone/olive oil) on each ear on three consecutive days (days 1, 2, and 3; 0.3 or 3% TDI) or only once (day 1, 1% TDI). On day 7, the mice received similar dermal applications of vehicle or the same concentration of TDI as before ("boost"). On day 10, they received an intranasal dose of TDI (0.1%) or vehicle. Ventilatory function was monitored by whole body plethysmography for 40 min after intranasal application, and reactivity to inhaled methacholine was assessed 24 h later. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and histology. Mice that received an intranasal dose of TDI without having received a prior dermal application of TDI did not exhibit any ventilatory response or inflammatory changes compared to vehicle controls. In contrast, mice that had received prior application(s) of TDI, even if only on day 7, exhibited the following: ventilatory responses, compatible with bronchoconstriction, immediately after intranasal application with TDI; enhanced methacholine responsiveness 24 h later; and pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophils. This was, however, not the case in mice that received the highest dermal amount of TDI (3% on days 1, 2, and 3). These findings suggest that respiratory response to TDI depends on prior frequency and concentration of dermal sensitization in mice. PMID:15129019

  5. Optimized In Vivo Transfer of Small Interfering RNA Targeting Dermal Tissue Using In Vivo Surface Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  7. IL-13-producing CD8+ T cells mediate dermal fibrosis in patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fuschiotti, Patrizia; Larregina, Adriana T.; Ho, Johnan; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Medsger, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fibrosis is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). T cells are the predominant inflammatory infiltrate in affected tissues and are thought to produce cytokines that drive the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins by fibroblasts, resulting in excessive fibrosis. We showed that aberrant IL-13 production by peripheral blood effector CD8+ T cells from SSc patients correlates with the extent of skin fibrosis. Here we investigate the role of IL-13 production by CD8+ T cells in dermal fibrosis, an early and specific manifestation of SSc. METHODS Extracellular matrix production by normal dermal fibroblasts co-cultured with SSc CD8+ T-cell-supernatants was determined by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Skin-homing receptor expression and IL-13 production by peripheral blood SSc CD8+ T cells were measured by flow cytometry, whereas immunohistochemistry identified IL-13+ and CD8+ cells in sclerotic skin. RESULTS IL-13-producing circulating SSc CD8+ T cells express skin-homing receptors and induce a pro-fibrotic phenotype in normal dermal fibroblasts that is inhibited by an anti-IL-13 antibody. High numbers of CD8+ T cells and IL-13+ cells are found in the skin lesions of patients, particularly in the early inflammatory phase of the disease. Thus, IL-13-producing CD8+ T cells are directly involved in modulating dermal fibrosis in SSc. CONCLUSIONS We make an important mechanistic contribution to understanding the pathogenesis of dermal fibrosis in SSc by showing that CD8+ T cells homing to the skin early in the disease are associated with accumulation of IL-13 and may represent an important target for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:23001877

  8. Dermal filler complications: a clinicopathologic study with a spectrum of histologic reaction patterns.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Fawzy, Sameh; Saied, Asmaa; Al Said, Mohammed; Amer, Ahmed; Eassa, Bayoumi

    2015-02-01

    Although dermal fillers are generally accepted as safe and well-tolerable cosmetic tools, adverse reaction still forms a prognostic problem. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinicopathologic patterns of dermal filler complications in our center. A 5-year single-center study that included patients complained from filler complications and referred to the dermatopathology unit in Al-Azhar University for histologic assessment. The study included 38 female patients with an average age of 47 years. The mean onset of complications was 14.6 ± 5.27 months after injection. The injected material included hyaluronic acid (18.4%), silicone (52.6%), bovine collagen (15.8%) and polyacrylamide hydrogel (13.2%). Most lesions were located on the face (55.3%), less commonly on the hands (18.4%), buttocks (21%), and rarely on the vulva (5.3%). The clinical spectrum included indurated plaque (23.7%), nodular lesion (31.6%), inflammatory mass (15.8%), atrophic lesion (10.5%), skin discoloration (13.1%) and ulceration (5.3%). Histologically, granulomatous reaction was the major finding, either a foreign body granuloma (34.2%) or infectious granuloma (13.2%). Other histologic reactions included dermal pseudocysts with chronic inflammation (26.3%), dermal fibrosis (15.8%), and eosinophilic panniculitis (10.5%). Our results confirmed that dermal fillers could be manifested with variable clinical presentations and show different histologic reactions. Because of long-standing duration until complications occur, history taking is crucial and should be emphasized in every suspected patient. It is hoped that this article will increase awareness for recognition of these variable complications and help select the appropriate therapy. PMID:25553966

  9. Viscoelastic, physical, and bio-degradable properties of dermal scaffolds and related cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Patel, Nimesha; Kohli, Nupur; Ravindran, Nivedita; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Dermal scaffolds promote healing of debilitating skin injuries caused by burns and chronic skin conditions. Currently available products present disadvantages and therefore, there is still a clinical need for developing new dermal substitutes. This study aimed at comparing the viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties of two dermal scaffolds, the collagen-based and clinically well established Integra(®) and a novel fibrin-based dermal scaffold developed at our laboratory called Smart Matrix(®), to further evaluate our previous published findings that suggested a higher influx of cells, reduced wound contraction and less scarring for Smart Matrix(®) when used in vivo. Rheological results showed that Integra(®) (G'  =  313.74 kPa) is mechanically stronger than Smart Matrix(®) (G'  =  8.26 kPa), due to the presence of the silicone backing layer in Integra(®). Micro-pores were observed on both dermal scaffolds, although nano-pores as well as densely packed nano-fibres were only observed for Smart Matrix(®). Average surface roughness was higher for Smart Matrix(®) (Sa  =  114.776 nm) than for Integra(®) (Sa  =  75.565 nm). Both scaffolds possess a highly porous structure (80-90%) and display a range of pore micro-sizes that represent the actual in vivo scenario. In vitro proteolytic bio-degradation suggested that Smart Matrix(®) would degrade faster upon implantation in vivo than Integra(®). For both scaffolds, the enzymatic digestion occurs via bulk degradation. These observed differences could affect cell behaviour on both scaffolds. Our results suggest that fine-tuning of scaffolds' viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties can maximise cell behaviour in terms of attachment, proliferation and infiltration, which are essential for tissue repair. PMID:27586397

  10. Human Dermal Fibroblasts Demonstrate Positive Immunostaining for Neuron- and Glia- Specific Proteins.

    PubMed

    Janmaat, C J; de Rooij, K E; Locher, H; de Groot, S C; de Groot, J C M J; Frijns, J H M; Huisman, M A

    2015-01-01

    In stem cell cultures from adult human tissue, undesirable contamination with fibroblasts is frequently present. The presence of fibroblasts obscures the actual number of stem cells and may result in extracellular matrix production after transplantation. Identification of fibroblasts is difficult because of the lack of specific fibroblast markers. In our laboratory, we isolate and expand neural-crest-derived stem cells from human hair follicle bulges and investigate their potential to differentiate into neural cells. To establish cellular identities, we perform immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for glial and neuronal markers, and use fibroblasts as negative control. We frequently observe that human adult dermal fibroblasts also express some glial and neuronal markers. In this study, we have sought to determine whether our observations represent actual expression of these markers or result from cross-reactivity. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human adult dermal fibroblasts using acknowledged glial and neuronal antibodies followed by verification of the data using RT-qPCR. Human adult dermal fibroblasts showed expression of the glia-specific markers SOX9, glial fibrillary acidic protein and EGR2 (KROX20) as well as for the neuron-specific marker class III β-tubulin, both at the protein and mRNA level. Furthermore, human adult dermal fibroblasts showed false-positive immunostaining for S100β and GAP43 and to a lower extent for OCT6. Our results indicate that immunophenotyping as a tool to determine cellular identity is not as reliable as generally assumed, especially since human adult dermal fibroblasts may be mistaken for neural cells, indicating that the ultimate proof of glial or neuronal identity can only be provided by their functionality. PMID:26678612

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Induces Hypoxia and Cellular Damage in Porcine Dermal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a porcine dermal explant model to determine the extent to which Staphylococcus aureus biofilm communities deplete oxygen, change pH, and produce damage in underlying tissue. Microelectrode measurements demonstrated that dissolved oxygen (DO) in biofilm-free dermal tissue was 4.45 ± 1.17 mg/liter, while DO levels for biofilm-infected tissue declined sharply from the surface, with no measurable oxygen detectable in the underlying dermal tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that biofilm-free dermal tissue had a significantly lower relative effective diffusion coefficient (0.26 ± 0.09 to 0.30 ± 0.12) than biofilm-infected dermal tissue (0.40 ± 0.12 to 0.48 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001). Thus, the difference in DO level was attributable to biofilm-induced oxygen demand rather than changes in oxygen diffusivity. Microelectrode measures showed that pH within biofilm-infected explants was more alkaline than in biofilm-free explants (8.0 ± 0.17 versus 7.5 ± 0.15, respectively; P < 0.002). Cellular and nuclear details were lost in the infected explants, consistent with cell death. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics demonstrated that both proapoptotic programmed cell death protein 5 and antiapoptotic macrophage migration inhibitory factor accumulated in the infected-explant spent medium, compared with uninfected-explant spent media (1,351-fold and 58-fold, respectively), consistent with the cooccurrence of apoptosis and necrosis in the explants. Biofilm-origin proteins reflected an extracellular matrix-adapted lifestyle of S. aureus. S. aureus biofilms deplete oxygen, increase pH, and induce cell death, all factors that contribute to impede wound healing. PMID:25847960

  12. Human dermal absorption of chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants; implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa Abdallah, Mohamed; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-01-15

    Tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-1,3-dichloropropyl phosphate (TDCIPP) are organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) widely applied in a plethora of consumer products despite their carcinogenic potential. Human dermal absorption of these PFRs is investigated for the first time using human ex vivo skin and EPISKIN™ models. Results of human ex vivo skin experiments revealed 28%, 25% and 13% absorption of the applied dose (500 ng/cm(2), finite dose) of TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP, respectively after 24h exposure. The EPISKIN™ model showed enhanced permeability values (i.e. weaker barrier), that were respectively 16%, 11% and 9% for TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP compared to human ex vivo skin. However, this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Estimated permeability constants (Kp, cm/h) showed a significant negative correlation with log Kow for the studied contaminants. The effect of hand-washing on dermal absorption of PFRs was investigated. Washing reduced overall dermal absorption, albeit to varying degrees depending on the physicochemical properties of the target PFRs. Moreover, slight variations of the absorbed dose were observed upon changing the dosing solution from acetone to 20% Tween 80 in water, indicating the potential influence of the dose vehicle on the dermal absorption of PFRs. Finally, estimated dermal uptake of the studied PFRs via contact with indoor dust was higher in UK toddlers (median ΣPFRs=36 ng/kg bw day) than adults (median ΣPFRs=4 ng/kg bw day). More research is required to fully elucidate the toxicological implications of such exposure. PMID:26712466

  13. Optimized in vivo transfer of small interfering RNA targeting dermal tissue using in vivo surface electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  14. Fertilizer use and self-reported respiratory and dermal symptoms among tree planters.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; Stjernberg, Ernst; Koehoorn, Mieke; Demers, Paul A; Winters, Meghan; Davies, Hugh W

    2013-01-01

    In British Columbia, some tree planting operations require workers to fertilize planted seedlings with polymer-coated nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (NPK) fertilizers. This study examined respiratory and dermal health associated with fertilizer exposure among tree planters. We interviewed 223 tree planters using an adapted version of the American Thoracic Society questionnaire supplemented with questions on dermal health. Subjects were grouped by categories of increasing duration of exposure, with workers who had not worked with fertilizer as a reference group. The relationship between exposure and reported work-related symptoms was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, cumulative tobacco cigarettes smoked, marijuana smoking status, sex, and exposure to abrasive spruce needles. An elevated odds ratio was seen for work-related cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, nosebleed, and skin rash in the highest exposure group (>37 days of fertilizer use in the past 2 years) but was significant only for phlegm (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-11.70). Trends of increasing odds ratios with increasing exposure were seen for cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, and skin rash. The results suggest a weak association between respiratory and dermal irritation and work with fertilizer. Results highlight the need for further exposure monitoring within the tree planting industry, and larger studies to investigate the relationship between work with fertilizer and respiratory and dermal health symptoms. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a PDF file containing a respiratory and dermal health questionnaire.]. PMID:23194098

  15. Safety Evaluation of Yukmijihwang-tang: Assessment of Acute and Subchronic Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Jun Kyoung; Lee, Ho Young; Koh, Woo Suk; Seo, Chang Seob; Lee, Mi-Young; Huang, Dae Sun; Shin, Hyeunkyoo

    2011-01-01

    Yukmijihwang-tang (YMJ; Liu wei di huang tang (China), Rokumigan (Japan)) has been used in the treatment of diseases including renal disorder, cognitive vitality, and diabetes mellitus. However, there is very little information regarding the toxicity of YMJ to give an assurance of safety for clinical treatment. To provide safety information for YMJ, we evaluated its acute and sub-chronic toxicity in rats. The single-dose toxicity of YMJ was examined using Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were treated with YMJ extract orally at 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg body weight. After a single administration, clinical signs were observed every day for two weeks, and body weights were measured five times, including an initial measurement on day 1 (the day of administration). In the sub-chronic oral toxicity study, YMJ was administered to rats at 0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg/day for 13 weeks. Mortalities, clinical signs, body weight changes, food and water consumption, ophthalmologic findings, urinalysis, hematological and biochemical parameters, gross findings, organ weights, and histological examination were monitored during the study period. We found no mortality and no abnormalities in clinical signs, body weights, and necropsy findings for any of the animals in the acute and sub-chronic studies following oral administration in the rat at up to 2000 mg/kg/day YMJ. YMJ may not have any single-dose toxicity; the LD50 of YMJ was over 2000 mg/kg, and it is safe for rats. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was considered to be 2000 mg/kg/day. PMID:21234385

  16. Cholinesterase inhibition and alterations of hepatic metabolism by oral acute and repeated chlorpyrifos administration to mice.

    PubMed

    Cometa, Maria Francesca; Buratti, Franca Maria; Fortuna, Stefano; Lorenzini, Paola; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Parisi, Laura; Testai, Emanuela; Meneguz, Annarita

    2007-05-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide bioactivated in vivo to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPFO), a very potent anticholinesterase. A great majority of available animal studies on CPF and CPFO toxicity are performed in rats. The use of mice in developmental neurobehavioural studies and the availability of transgenic mice warrant a better characterization of CPF-induced toxicity in this species. CD1 mice were exposed to a broad range of acute (12.5-100.0mg/kg) and subacute (1.56-25mg/kg/day from 5 to 30 days) CPF oral doses. Functional and biochemical parameters such as brain and serum cholinesterase (ChE) and liver xenobiotic metabolizing system, including the biotransformation of CPF itself, have been studied and the no observed effect levels (NOELs) identified. Mice seem to be more susceptible than rats at least to acute CPF treatment (oral LD(50) 4.5-fold lower). The species-related differences were not so evident after repeated exposures. In mice a good correlation was observed between brain ChE inhibition and classical cholinergic signs of toxicity. After CPF-repeated treatment, mice seemed to develop some tolerance to CPF-induced effects, which could not be attributed to an alteration of P450-mediated CPF hepatic metabolism. CPF-induced effects on hepatic microsomal carboxylesterase (CE) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels observed at an early stage of treatment and then recovered after 30 days, suggest that the detoxifying mechanisms are actively involved in the protection of CPF-induced effects and possibly in the induction of tolerance in long term exposure. The mouse could be considered a suitable experimental model for future studies on the toxic action of organophosphorus pesticides focused on mechanisms, long term and age-related effects. PMID:17382447

  17. Acute Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Hammad; Fasanya, Adebayo; Cheema, Tariq; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    Acute pneumonia is an active infection of the lungs that results when an individual at risk gets exposed to a particular microbiological pathogen. Acute pneumonia is the leading cause of death in the United States that is attributable to an infection. The risk factors, pathogenesis, and microbiological organisms involved differ if the pneumonia develops in the community versus health care-associated environment. The development of concise and comprehensive guidelines has led to an improvement in the management of the problem. However, the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the increase in the percentage of elderly population keep mortality risk very substantial. PMID:26919676

  18. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  19. Towards Development of a Dermal Pain Model: In Vitro Activation of Rat and Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Repeat 1 and Safe Dermal Injection of o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile to Rat.

    PubMed

    Annas, Anita; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nyman, Eva; Meijer, Thomas; Lundgren, Viveka; Franzén, Bo; Ståhle, Lars

    2015-12-01

    During clinical development of analgesics, it is important to have access to pharmacologically specific human pain models. o-Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) is a selective and potent agonist of the transient receptor potential ankyrin repeat 1 (TRPA1), which is a transducer molecule in nociceptors sensing reactive chemical species. While CS has been subject to extensive toxicological investigations in animals and human beings, its effects on intradermal or subcutaneous injection have not previously been reported. We have investigated the potential of CS to be used as an agonist on TRPA1 in human experimental pain studies. A calcium influx assay was used to confirm the capacity of CS to activate TRPA1 with >100,000 times the selectivity over the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1. CS dose-dependently (EC50 0.9 μM) released calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat dorsal root ganglion cultures, supporting involvement in pain signalling. In a local tolerance study, injection of a single intradermal dose of 20 mM CS to rats resulted in superficial, circular crusts at the injection sites after approximately 4 days. The histopathology evaluation revealed a mild, acute inflammatory reaction in the epidermis and dermis at the intradermal CS injection site 1 day after administration. After 14 days, the epidermal epithelium was fully restored. The symptoms were not considered to be adverse, and it is suggested that doses up to 20 μL of 20 mM CS can be safely administered to human beings. In conclusion, our data support development of a CS human dermal pain model. PMID:26046936

  20. Acute, sub-chronic oral toxicity studies and evaluation of antiulcer activity of Sooktyn in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Phool; Sachan, Neetu; Kishore, Kamal; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Sooktyn (SKN), mineralo-herbal drug which is being used largely by the patients for its extremely good therapeutic value to treat the gastric ulcers. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the toxicity studies and antiulcer activity of SKN. Acute and sub-chronic toxicities were studied in male and female Wistar rats. A single acute SKN of 2 000 mg/kg was administered by oral gavage for acute toxicity. Sub-chronic doses were 400 and 800 mg/kg/day. The major toxicological end points examined included animal body weight and food intake, selected tissue weights, and detailed gross necropsy. In addition, we examined blood elements: hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte count, total leukocyte count and MCH, MCHC and platelets as well as biochemical parameters: urea, sugar, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, and creatinine. Also, anti-ulcer activity was carried out by employing indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models. LD50 may be greater than 2 000 mg/kg (orally) for SKN and there were no signs of toxicity on 28 days sub-chronic oral administration of 400 and 800 mg/kg of SKN in rats on the basis of blood elements and biochemical parameters. The ulcer indices decrease in all ulcer models with 66.62%, 61.24%, 80.18%, and 74.76% in indomethacin, ethanol, pylorus ligation, and hypothermic-stress-induced ulcer models, respectively. The results suggest that SKN has no signs of toxicity at 2 000 mg/kg body weight of rats orally; sub-chronically. The drug is safe and has antiulcer activity. PMID:22837960

  1. Dermal and inhalation exposure to methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI) in iron foundry workers.

    PubMed

    Liljelind, I; Norberg, C; Egelrud, L; Westberg, H; Eriksson, K; Nylander-French, L A

    2010-01-01

    Diisocyanates are a group of chemically reactive agents, which are used in the production of coatings, adhesives, polyurethane foams, and parts for the automotive industry and as curing agents for cores in the foundry industry. Dermal and inhalation exposure to methylene bisphenyl isocyanate (MDI) is associated with respiratory sensitization and occupational asthma. However, limited research has been performed on the quantitative evaluation of dermal and inhalation exposure to MDI in occupationally exposed workers. The objective of this research was to quantify dermal and inhalation exposure levels in iron foundry workers. Workers involved in mechanized moulding and mechanized production of cores were monitored: 12 core makers, 2 core-sand preparers, and 5 core installers. Personal breathing-zone levels of MDI were measured using impregnated filter sampling. Dermal exposure to MDI was measured using a tape-strip technique. Three or five consecutive tape-strip samples were collected from five exposed skin areas (right and left forefingers, left and right wrists, and forehead). The average personal air concentration was 0.55 microg m(-3), 50-fold lower than the Swedish occupational exposure limit of 30 microg m(-3). The core makers had an average exposure of 0.77 microg m(-3), which was not significantly different from core installers' and core-sand preparers' average exposure of 0.16 microg m(-3) (P = 0.059). Three core makers had a 10-fold higher inhalation exposure than the other core makers. The core makers' mean dermal exposure at different skin sites varied from 0.13 to 0.34 microg while the two other groups' exposure ranged from 0.006 to 0.062 microg. No significant difference was observed in the MDI levels between the skin sites in a pairwise comparison, except for left forefinger compared to left and right wrist (P < 0.05). In addition, quantifiable but decreasing levels of MDI were observed in the consecutive tape strip per site indicating MDI penetration

  2. Measurements of the protective effect of topically applied sunscreens using in vitro three-dimensional dermal and skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Augustin, C; Collombel, C; Damour, O

    1997-12-01

    For preventing or minimizing acute and chronic skin damage caused by UV radiation, the use of sunscreens is probably the most important measure. To screen the protective efficacy of new sunscreen molecules or formulations against UV rays, we evaluated as in vitro testing methods the use of two three-dimensional models, a dermal equivalent (DE) and a skin equivalent (SE). The DE is composed of a porous collagen-glycosaminoglycans-chitosan matrix populated by normal human fibroblasts. The SE is comprised of a fully differentiated epidermis realized by seeding keratinocytes onto the DE. In this study, we demonstrated that the DE and SE models react to the deleterious effects of UVA and UVB. Then, we extended our research to the evaluation of their usefulness for photoprotection trials. Sunscreen agents (Eusolex 8020 and 6300) and commercially available sunscreens (chemical and physical filter formulations) that protect the skin against either UVA or UBV were evaluated. The tested products were applied (n = 6) topically (10 microL) and incubated for 30 min prior to irradiation over a range of UVA (0-50 J/cm2) or UVB (0-5 J/cm2). The photoprotection provided by the tested sunscreen molecules and formulations was evaluated by measurement of residual cellular viability 24 h postirradiation using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and assessment of the inflammation response by interleukin-1 alpha release assay. When sunscreens were applied prior to UV exposure, a higher residual cellular viability versus control was obtained, demonstrating the photoprotective effects of the tested products. These in vitro models could be used for screening tests to evaluate the protective effects of sunscreen molecules and formulations, especially for UVA trials because there is a lack of consensus for an in vivo method. PMID:9421971

  3. Novel system for testing dermal and epidermal toxicity in vitro. Final report, 15 August 1989-15 February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Naughton, G.K.

    1990-02-15

    The purpose of this Phase I project has been the modification and characterization of a dermal equivalent and full-thickness skin substrate as models for cytotoxicity and penetration studies. The dermal equivalent consists of mitotically and metabolically active fibroblasts and naturally secreted matrix proteins. A dermal/epidermal junction is present in the full-thickness skin model along with stratified keratinocytes and a stratum corneum. The work has involved optimization of cell growth and uniform preparation of the three-dimensional (3D) substrates, establishment of standard operating procedures to ensure quality control and reproducibility of test material, adaptation of commonly utilized in vitro cytotoxicity assays for use with our substrates, performance of standard tests using a series of known toxicant and irritants in conjunction with the 3D substrates, and correlation of in vitro data with known in vivo toxicity and irritancy values.... In vitro human skin model, Human cells, Dermal toxicity, Screening tests, RA III, SBIR.

  4. Florid pustular dermatitis of breast: A case report on a unusual complication from acellular dermal matrix use

    PubMed Central

    James, Justin; Jackson, Lee; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic erythematous reaction of the breast (Red breast syndrome) is a known complication following breast reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix. However pustular dermatitis like presentation is not previously known. Presentation of case We present a 42-year-old lady who developed bilateral pustular dermatitis like appearance following breast reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix slings. Though surgical washout was done, both expanders and flex HD could be preserved. Discussion Acellular dermal matrix use is the only possible explanation for such a presentation and this can be considered a variant of red breast syndrome. Conclusion Pustular dermatitis like presentation can be associated with acelluar dermal matrix use and should be considered in similar clinical presentations, since this can avoid unnecessary surgical procedures. PMID:27058152

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN AGGREGATE SURFACE SAMPLING METHOD FOR USE IN ASSESSING DERMAL EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing screenin...

  6. Acute toxicity of selected crude and refined shale oil derived and petroleum-derived substances

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.H.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.

    1980-01-01

    General information was obtained on the toxicity of selected samples of crude Paraho shale oil and some of its derivatives, some crude petroleums, and 3 refined petroleum products. Five tests were used to determine the acute toxicity of these substances: acute lethality in mice following oral or intraperitoneal administration of a single dose; acute dermal toxicity of a single dose in rats; delayed-type allergic contact hypersensitivity in guinea pigs; primary eye irritation and primary skin irritation of a single dose in rabbits. Histopathologic changes induced in mice following intraperitoneal injection of a single large dose of crude shale oil and two of its hydrotreated derivatives were examined. Studies also have been initiated to examine the tumor inducing potential of selected samples. The test system used was the mouse lung adenoma bioassay. The present report describes our findings and shows that all compounds tested have very low or no acute toxic effects in laboratory animals.

  7. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations. PMID:24506120

  8. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  9. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  10. Acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, N

    2000-09-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis (AGN) is a representative disease of acute nephritic syndrome characterized by the sudden appearance of edema, hematuria, proteinuria, and hypertension. The prototype of AGN is acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). "Nephritogenic streptococci" are defined as organisms that are cultured from a patient who develops AGN. Although only a limited number of M-types of streptococci have been recognized as "nephritogenic streptococci", all M-types of streptococci may have nephritogenic potential because the genes for major putative nephritogenic antigens such as SPEB and NAPIr are found to be present in all group A streptococci thus far examined. Pathogenic mechanisms for APSGN involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity have been recently proposed. The role of humoral immunity is presumed to be mediated by the in situ formation of nephritogenic streptococcal antigen-antibody complexes and circulating immune complexes. While in the cellular immune component a role for delayed-type hypersensitivity has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of APSGN. PMID:10969898

  11. In-vitro methods for testing dermal absorption and penetration of toxic gases.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Edwards, John W; Bromwich, David; Reed, Sue; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This technical note provides details of an experimental technique for in-vitro skin studies with atmospheric chemical challenge. There appear to be major evidence gaps in relation to dermal exposure of gases. We describe a modification of standard OECD protocols for an atmospheric delivery system which can be used to understand interaction of toxic gases and the skin. The system can be used to examine the mechanisms by which skin uptake occurs. Auxiliary components which allow for parameter variation such as temperature and relative humidity are also described. Methodology presented in this technical note uses examples of gas challenges (ammonia, chlorine) to illustrate its application to gases of differing physicochemical properties. This adapted protocol can be applied in the context of HAZMAT scenarios involving atmospheric toxic chemical release and dermal absorption potential under variable exposure conditions. PMID:24156547

  12. Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrices: Achieving Predictability and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2016-05-01

    The use of acellular dermal matrices in the setting of prosthetic breast reconstruction has captured the attention of many plastic surgeons. The regenerative capacity of these materials has provided additional tissue support to the mastectomy skin flaps with the ultimate result of improving surgical and aesthetic outcomes. Despite the benefits, there remains a significant diversity with regard to outcomes with some surgeons reporting increased morbidity. The reasons for this are varied but ultimately related to differences in patient selection and surgical techniques. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for using acellular dermal matrix to achieve success in a manner that is usually associated with outcomes that are predictable and reproducible. PMID:27579223

  13. Pioneering technique using Acellular Dermal Matrix in the rescue of a radiation ulcer

    PubMed Central

    NASEEM, S.; PATEL, A.D.; DEVALIA, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy as an adjuvant to mastectomy is integral to the treatment of breast cancer, but can result in skin ulceration. Skin ulceration following radiotherapy is traditionally managed by removing the implant and allowing the skin to heal by secondary intention. Case report A 42-year-old woman underwent radiotherapy following a breast reconstruction. She developed a 2 x 3cm radiation ulcer. The ulcer was managed by removing the implant and performing capsulectomy. A Beckers 50 expander was placed and reinforced with acellular dermal matrix inferolaterally. At follow-up the patient had a good cosmetic outcome. Conclusion Post-radiation skin ulcers present a challenge to treat with no current standardised management. The use of acellular dermal matrix may present a new technique to promote healing in these testing cases. PMID:27142826

  14. Topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns. Further assessment of efficacy using an experimental piq model.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B J; MacKinnon, M A; Knowlden, N F; Billmaier, D J; Derelanko, M J; Rusch, G M; Naas, D J; Dahlgren, R R

    1996-05-01

    Several topical treatments for hydrofluoric acid dermal burns (Zephiran, calcium acetate and magnesium hydroxide antacid soaks, and calcium gluconate gel) were assessed for efficacy in a pig model. Gross appearance and histopathology of treated and untreated burn sites were evaluated. For superficial burns, Zephiran was most effective; calcium acetate, magnesium hydroxide antacid, and calcium gluconate gel were less effective. For deep burns, gross observations showed that calcium acetate and Zephiran were most efficacious, whereas histopathology indicated comparable efficacy of Zephiran, calcium acetate, and calcium gluconate gel for all skin layers. Magnesium hydroxide antacid demonstrated efficacy only for the subdermis. The clinically beneficial effects of both Zephiran and calcium gluconate gel were affirmed. Although results suggest that calcium acetate and magnesium-containing antacids may be beneficial for human hydrofluoric acid dermal burns, these are not established clinical treatments. PMID:8733642

  15. Skin Pigmentation and Pigmentary Disorders: Focus on Epidermal/Dermal Cross-Talk

    PubMed Central

    Bastonini, Emanuela; Kovacs, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human skin and hair color is the most notable aspect of human variability and several studies in evolution, genetics and developmental biology contributed to explain the mechanisms underlying human skin pigmentation, which is responsible for differences in skin color across the world's populations. Despite skin pigmentation is primarily related to melanocytes functionality, the surrounding keratinocytes and extracellular matrix proteins and fibroblasts in the underlying dermal compartment actively contribute to cutaneous homeostasis. Many autocrine/paracrine secreted factors and cell adhesion mechanisms involving both epidermal and dermal constituents determine constitutive skin pigmentation and, whenever deregulated, the occurrence of pigmentary disorders. In particular, an increased expression of such mediators and their specific receptors frequently lead to hyperpigmentary conditions, such as in melasma and in solar lentigo, whereas a defect in their expression/release is related to hypopigmented disorders, as seen in vitiligo. All these interactions underline the relevant role of pigmentation on human evolution and biology. PMID:27274625

  16. Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction With Acellular Dermal Matrices: Achieving Predictability and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The use of acellular dermal matrices in the setting of prosthetic breast reconstruction has captured the attention of many plastic surgeons. The regenerative capacity of these materials has provided additional tissue support to the mastectomy skin flaps with the ultimate result of improving surgical and aesthetic outcomes. Despite the benefits, there remains a significant diversity with regard to outcomes with some surgeons reporting increased morbidity. The reasons for this are varied but ultimately related to differences in patient selection and surgical techniques. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for using acellular dermal matrix to achieve success in a manner that is usually associated with outcomes that are predictable and reproducible. PMID:27579223

  17. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, V; Mylona, E; Mouravas, V; Tsakalidis, C; Spyridakis, I; Mitsiakos, G; Karagianni, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  18. DermACELL: Human Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cole, Windy E

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes often causes ulcers on the feet of diabetic patients. A 56-year-old, insulin-dependent, diabetic woman presented to the wound care center with a Wagner grade 3 ulcer of the right heel. She reported a 3-week history of ulceration with moderate drainage and odor and had a history of ulceration and osteomyelitis in the contralateral limb. Rigorous wound care, including hospitalization; surgical incision and drainage; intravenous antibiotic drug therapy; vacuum-assisted therapy; and a new room temperature, sterile, human acellular dermal matrix graft were used to heal the wound, save her limb, and restore her activities of daily living. This case presentation involves alternative treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer with this new acellular dermal matrix, DermACELL. PMID:27031550

  19. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mylona, E.; Tsakalidis, C.; Spyridakis, I.; Mitsiakos, G.; Karagianni, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  20. Treatment of photoaged skin with topical tretinoin increases epidermal-dermal anchoring fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, D.T.; Briggaman, R.A. ); Zelickson, A.S. ); Hamilton, T.A.; Weiss, J.S.; Ellis, C.N.; Voorhees, J.J. )

    1990-06-13

    Topical 0.1% tretinoin or vehicle control was applied daily to the forearm skin of six caucasian adults for 4 months. Two-millimeter punch biopsy specimens were obtained from treatment sites at the beginning and end of the study period for electron microscopy. Anchoring fibrils within the epidermal-dermal junction of skin treatment sites were quantitated by blinded, standardized, computer-assisted morphometry. After 4 months of continual daily treatment, skin sites that received topical tretinoin showed double the anchoring fibril density compared with vehicle control sites. The possible mechanism by which topical tretinoin increases anchoring fibrils in skin include the drug's property of inhibiting collagenase, a dermal enzyme that degrades anchoring fibril collagen. The authors speculate that increased numbers of collagenous anchoring fibrils within the papillary dermis of human skin is one of the connective-tissue correlates of the clinical improvement observed in photoaged skin after treatment with topical tretinoin.