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Sample records for acute dermal ld50

  1. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg.

  2. The acute lethal dose 50 (LD50) of caffeine in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Richard H

    2016-10-01

    An acute LD50 is a statistically derived amount of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of the animals when given by a specified route as a single dose and the animals observed for a specified time period. Although conducting routine acute toxicity testing in rodents has been criticized, it can serve useful functions and also have practical implications. Material safety data sheets (MSDS) will reflect the acute toxicity of a substance and may require workers to wear protective gear, if appropriate, based on the LD50. There is no information in the scientific published literature which calculates a mean LD50 and standard deviation for caffeine administered orally to rats, using studies performed under good laboratory practice (GLP) or equivalent. This report does that and should be useful to manufacturers, packagers, transporters and regulators of this material. Using data from studies that are reproducible and reliable, the most accurate estimate of the acute LD50 of caffeine administered orally in male albino rats is hereby reported to be 367/mg/kg. PMID:27461039

  3. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo. PMID:23246604

  4. Assessment of the predictive capacity of the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity test method to identify substances not classified for acute oral toxicity (LD50>2000 mg/kg): results of an ECVAM validation study.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Pilar; Cole, Thomas; Curren, Rodger; Gibson, Rosemary M; Liebsch, Manfred; Raabe, Hans; Tuomainen, Anita M; Whelan, Maurice; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka

    2013-04-01

    Assessing chemicals for acute oral toxicity is a standard information requirement of regulatory testing. However, animal testing is now prohibited in the cosmetics sector in Europe, and strongly discouraged for industrial chemicals. Building on the results of a previous international validation study, a follow up study was organised to assess if the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake cytotoxicity assay could identify substances not requiring classification as acute oral toxicants under the EU regulations. Fifty-six coded industrial chemicals were tested in three laboratories, each using one of the following protocols: the previously validated protocol, an abbreviated version of the protocol and the protocol adapted for an automation platform. Predictions were very similar among the three laboratories. The assay exhibited high sensitivity (92-96%) but relatively low specificity (40-44%). Three chemicals were under predicted. Assuming that most industrial chemicals are not likely to be acutely toxic, this test method could prove a valuable component of an integrated testing strategy, a read-across argument, or weight-of-evidence approach to identify non toxic chemicals (LD50>2000 mg/kg). However, it is likely to under predict chemicals acting via specific mechanisms of action not captured by the 3T3 test system, or which first require biotransformation in vivo.

  5. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts. PMID:11695884

  6. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts.

  7. Assessment of Acute Oral and Dermal Toxicity of 2 Ethyl-Carbamates with Activity against Rhipicephalus microplus in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Ochoa, María Guadalupe; Gutiérrez-Amezquita, Ricardo Alfonso; Abrego-Reyes, Víctor Hugo; Velázquez-Sánchez, Ana María; Muñoz-Guzmán, Marco Antonio; Ramírez-Noguera, Patricia; Angeles, Enrique; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The acute oral and dermal toxicity of two new ethyl-carbamates (ethyl-4-bromophenyl-carbamate and ethyl-4-chlorophenyl-carbamate) with ixodicide activity was determined in rats. The oral LD50 of each carbamate was 300 to 2000 mg/kg, and the dermal LD50 of each carbamate was >5000 mg/kg. Clinically, the surviving rats that had received oral doses of each carbamate showed decreased weight gain (P < 0.05) and had slight nervous system manifestations. These clinical signs were evident from the 300 mg/kg dose and were reversible, whereas the 2000 mg/kg dose caused severe damage and either caused their death or was motive for euthanasia. At necropsy, these rats had dilated stomachs and cecums with diffuse congestion, as well as moderate congestion of the liver. Histologically, the liver showed slight degenerative lesions, binucleated hepatocytes, focal coagulative necrosis, and congestion areas; the severity of the lesions increased with dosage. Furthermore, an slight increase in gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine was observed in the plasma. The dermal application of the maximum dose (5000 mg/kg) of each carbamate did not cause clinical manifestations or liver and skin alterations. This finding demonstrates that the carbamates under study have a low oral hazard and low acute dermal toxicity. PMID:24883331

  8. Optimization irradiation conditions for determination of LD50 in pigs.

    PubMed

    Procházka, Z; Hampl, J; Sedlácek, M; Rodák, L

    1975-11-01

    Radiation LD50/30 values were determined in 36 twelve-week-old pigs (with a mean body weigth of 21 kg) exposed to whole-body X-ray irradiation on a revolvable table rotated at a rate of 2.5 rpm using the following conditions: 180 kV, 15 mA, focal distance 79 cm, HVT 0.9 mm Cu, dose rate 2.42 X 10(-3) to 2.68 X 10(-3) C kg-1 min-1 (9.4 to 10.4 R/min) depending upon the animal size. The coefficient of mean irradiation uniformity was 1.4. Under these conditions the LD50/30 for pigs was found to be 5.89 X 10(-2) C kg-1 min-1 (228.3 R) with the biological range of effectiveness being 5.22 X 10(-2) to 6.90 X 10-(2) C kg-1 (202.4 to 267.6 R). Furthermore experiments on 77 pigs showed that LD50 determined in this study had actually the median lethal effect.

  9. Acute and subchronic dermal toxicity of nanosilver in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Korani, M; Rezayat, S M; Gilani, K; Arbabi Bidgoli, S; Adeli, S

    2011-01-01

    Silver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for a long time in different forms, but silver nanoparticles (nanosilver) have recently been recognized as potent antimicrobial agents. Although nanosilver is finding diverse medical applications such as silver-based dressings and silver-coated medical devices, its dermal and systemic toxicity via dermal use has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the potential toxicity of colloidal nanosilver in acute and subchronic guinea pigs. Before toxicity assessments, the size of colloidal nanosilver was recorded in sizes <100 nm by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. For toxicological assessments, male guinea pigs weighing 350 to 400 g were exposed to two different concentrations of nanosilver (1000 and 10,000 μg/mL) in an acute study and three concentrations of nanosilver (100, 1000, and 10,000 μg/mL) in a subchronic study. Toxic responses were assessed by clinical and histopathologic parameters. In all experimental animals the sites of exposure were scored for any type of dermal toxicity and compared with negative control and positive control groups. In autopsy studies during the acute test, no significant changes in organ weight or major macroscopic changes were detected, but dose-dependent histopathologic abnormalities were seen in skin, liver, and spleen of all test groups. In addition, experimental animals subjected to subchronic tests showed greater tissue abnormalities than the subjects of acute tests. It seems that colloidal nanosilver has the potential to provide target organ toxicities in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  10. Acute oral and percutaneous toxicity of pesticides to mallards: Correlations with mammalian toxicity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, R.H.; Haegele, M.A.; Tucker, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Acute oral (po) and 24-hr percutaneous (perc) LD50 values for 21 common pesticides (19 anticholinesterases, of which 18 were organophosphates, and one was a carbamate; one was an organochlorine central nervous system stimulant; and one was an organonitrogen pneumotoxicant) were determined in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Three of the pesticides tested were more toxic percutaneously than orally. An index to the percutaneous hazard of a pesticide, the dermal toxicity index (DTI = po LD50/perc LD50 ? 100), was also calculated for each pesticide. These toxicity values in mallards were compared with toxicity data for rats from the literature. Significant positive correlations were found between log po and log percutaneous LD50 values in mallards (r = 0.65, p 0.10). Variations in percutaneous methodologies are discussed with reference to interspecies variation in toxicity values. It is recommended that a mammalian DTI value approaching 30 be used as a guideline for the initiation of percutaneous toxicity studies in birds, when the po LD50 and/or projected percutaneous LD50 are less than expected field exposure levels.

  11. Emerging toxicity of 5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane (MDAI): Pharmacokinetics, behaviour, thermoregulation and LD50 in rats.

    PubMed

    Páleníček, Tomáš; Lhotková, Eva; Žídková, Monika; Balíková, Marie; Kuchař, Martin; Himl, Michal; Mikšátková, Petra; Čegan, Martin; Valeš, Karel; Tylš, Filip; Horsley, Rachel R

    2016-08-01

    MDAI (5,6-Methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane) has a reputation as a non-neurotoxic ecstasy replacement amongst recreational users, however the drug has been implicated in some severe and lethal intoxications. Due to this, and the fact that the drug is almost unexplored scientifically we investigated a broad range of effects of acute MDAI administration: pharmacokinetics (in sera, brain, liver and lung); behaviour (open field; prepulse inhibition, PPI); acute effects on thermoregulation (in group-/individually-housed rats); and systemic toxicity (median lethal dose, LD50) in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics of MDAI was rapid, maximum median concentration in serum and brain was attained 30min and almost returned to zero 6h after subcutaneous (sc.) administration of 10mg/kg MDAI; brain/serum ratio was ~4. MDAI particularly accumulated in lung tissue. In the open field, MDAI (5, 10, 20 and 40mg/kg sc.) increased exploratory activity, induced signs of behavioural serotonin syndrome and reduced locomotor habituation, although by 60min some effects had diminished. All doses of MDAI significantly disrupted PPI and the effect was present during the onset of its action as well as 60min after treatment. Unexpectedly, 40mg/kg MDAI killed 90% of animals in the first behavioural test, hence LD50 tests were conducted which yielded 28.33mg/kg sc. and 35mg/kg intravenous but was not established up to 40mg/kg after gastric administration. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) with brain oedema was concluded as a direct cause of death in sc. treated animals. Finally, MDAI (10, 20mg/kg sc.) caused hyperthermia and perspiration in group-housed rats. In conclusion, the drug had fast pharmacokinetics and accumulated in lipohilic tissues. Behavioural findings were consistent with mild, transient stimulation with anxiolysis and disruption of sensorimotor processing. Together with hyperthermia, the drug had a similar profile to related entactogens, especially 3

  12. Oral LD50 toxicity modeling and prediction of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals on rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were performed using the LD(50) oral toxicity data of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) on rodents: rat and mouse. PFCs are studied under the EU project CADASTER which uses the available experimental data for prediction and prioritization of toxic chemicals for risk assessment by using the in silico tools. The methodology presented here applies chemometrical analysis on the existing experimental data and predicts the toxicity of new compounds. QSAR analyses were performed on the available 58 mouse and 50 rat LD(50) oral data using multiple linear regression (MLR) based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA). Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori from available experimental datasets in terms of structure and response. These sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the models were verified on 376 per- and polyfluorinated chemicals including those in REACH preregistration list. The rat and mouse endpoints were predicted by each model for the studied compounds, and finally 30 compounds, all perfluorinated, were prioritized as most important for experimental toxicity analysis under the project. In addition, cumulative study on compounds within the AD of all four models, including two earlier published models on LC(50) rodent analysis was studied and the cumulative toxicity trend was observed using principal component analysis (PCA). The similarities and the differences observed in terms of descriptors and chemical/mechanistic meaning encoded by descriptors to prioritize the most toxic compounds are highlighted.

  13. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of the vehicle on penetration of skin by the test substance should be taken into account. It is... of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of treated animals when applied to the skin... need to be considered. (2) (e) Conventional acute toxicity test—(1) Principle of the test method....

  14. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the vehicle on penetration of skin by the test substance should be taken into account. It is... of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of treated animals when applied to the skin... need to be considered. (2) (e) Conventional acute toxicity test—(1) Principle of the test method....

  15. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the vehicle on penetration of skin by the test substance should be taken into account. It is... of a substance that can be expected to cause death in 50% of treated animals when applied to the skin... need to be considered. (2) (e) Conventional acute toxicity test—(1) Principle of the test method....

  16. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos.

  17. Extensive review of fish embryo acute toxicities for the prediction of GHS acute systemic toxicity categories.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ortmann, Julia; Klüver, Nils; Léonard, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Distribution and marketing of chemicals require appropriate labelling of health, physical and environmental hazards according to the United Nations global harmonisation system (GHS). Labelling for (human) acute toxicity categories is based on experimental findings usually obtained by oral, dermal or inhalative exposure of rodents. There is a strong societal demand for replacing animal experiments conducted for safety assessment of chemicals. Fish embryos are considered as alternative to animal testing and are proposed as predictive model both for environmental and human health effects. Therefore, we tested whether LC50s of the fish embryo acute toxicity test would allow effectively predicting of acute mammalian toxicity categories. A database of published fish embryo LC50 containing 641 compounds was established. For these compounds corresponding rat oral LD50 were identified resulting in 364 compounds for which both fish embryo LC50 and rat LD50 was available. Only a weak correlation of fish embryo LC50 and rat oral LD50 was obtained. Fish embryos were also not able to effectively predict GHS oral acute toxicity categories. We concluded that due to fundamental exposure protocol differences (single oral dose versus water-borne exposure) a reverse dosimetry approach is needed to explore the predictive capacity of fish embryos. PMID:24929227

  18. Acute and neurotoxicity of two structurally related acetylenic compounds: 5,7,11-dodecatriyn-1-ol and 5,7,11,13-octadecatetrayne-1,18-diol.

    PubMed

    Gad, S C; Dunn, B J; Gavigan, F A; Reilly, C; Peckham, J C

    1988-02-01

    Two structurally related acetylenic compounds, 5,7,11-Dodecatriyn-1-ol, (Compound A), and 5,7,11,13-Octadecatetrayne-1,18-Diol (Compound B), were evaluated in a tier I toxicology testing program as part of an ongoing research and development program. This battery of acute tests included acute oral, guinea pig maximization, photosensitization, dermal irritation, Ames and multiple genetic endpoint and a 2 week oral fetotoxicity study. Compound A was found to have an oral LD50 of 0.25 ml/kg, be an extreme dermal sensitizer, a mild dermal irritant (PDII of 1.7), and not mutagenic or fetotoxic in the tests employed. Compound B had an oral LD50 greater than 4 g/kg, was a moderate dermal sensitizer and mild dermal irritant (PDII of 1.4), was not mutagenic in the Ames test but weakly increased the incidence of SCEs and gene mutations in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and was not fetotoxic. Neither compound was found to be a photosensitizer, but during the course of the photosensitization study Compound A was found to cause neuromuscular signs (including hind limb paralysis) and a bilateral necrosis of the medulla oblongata in female guinea pigs. A similar lesion was found in female rats receiving a single oral dose of 0.25 ml/kg and in nonpregnant females dosed daily for two weeks at 0.03 ml/kg. Compound B was not found to produce any of these neurologic effects.

  19. Improving reptile ecological risk assessment: oral and dermal toxicity of pesticides to a common lizard species (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Yu, Shuangying; Talent, Larry G; Maul, Jonathan D; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Reptiles have been understudied in ecotoxicology, which limits consideration in ecological risk assessments. The goals of the present study were 3-fold: to improve oral and dermal dosing methodologies for reptiles, to generate reptile toxicity data for pesticides, and to correlate reptile and avian toxicity. The authors first assessed the toxicity of different dosing vehicles: 100 μL of water, propylene glycol, and acetone were not toxic. The authors then assessed the oral and dermal toxicity of 4 pesticides following the up-and-down procedure. Neither brodifacoum nor chlorothalonil caused mortality at doses ≤ 1750 μg/g. Under the "neat pesticide" oral exposure, endosulfan (median lethal dose [LD50] = 9.8 μg/g) was more toxic than λ-cyhalothrin (LD50 = 916.5 μg/g). Neither chemical was toxic via dermal exposure. An acetone dosing vehicle increased λ-cyhalothrin toxicity (oral LD50 = 9.8 μg/g; dermal LD50 = 17.5 μg/g), but not endosulfan. Finally, changes in dosing method and husbandry significantly increased dermal λ-cyhalothrin LD50s, which highlights the importance of standardized methods. The authors combined data from the present study with other reptile LD50s to correlate with available avian data. When only definitive LD50s were used in the analysis, a strong correlation was found between avian and reptile toxicity. The results suggest it is possible to build predictive relationships between avian and reptile LD50s. More research is needed, however, to understand trends associated with chemical classes and modes of action. PMID:25760295

  20. Improving reptile ecological risk assessment: oral and dermal toxicity of pesticides to a common lizard species (Sceloporus occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Yu, Shuangying; Talent, Larry G; Maul, Jonathan D; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Reptiles have been understudied in ecotoxicology, which limits consideration in ecological risk assessments. The goals of the present study were 3-fold: to improve oral and dermal dosing methodologies for reptiles, to generate reptile toxicity data for pesticides, and to correlate reptile and avian toxicity. The authors first assessed the toxicity of different dosing vehicles: 100 μL of water, propylene glycol, and acetone were not toxic. The authors then assessed the oral and dermal toxicity of 4 pesticides following the up-and-down procedure. Neither brodifacoum nor chlorothalonil caused mortality at doses ≤ 1750 μg/g. Under the "neat pesticide" oral exposure, endosulfan (median lethal dose [LD50] = 9.8 μg/g) was more toxic than λ-cyhalothrin (LD50 = 916.5 μg/g). Neither chemical was toxic via dermal exposure. An acetone dosing vehicle increased λ-cyhalothrin toxicity (oral LD50 = 9.8 μg/g; dermal LD50 = 17.5 μg/g), but not endosulfan. Finally, changes in dosing method and husbandry significantly increased dermal λ-cyhalothrin LD50s, which highlights the importance of standardized methods. The authors combined data from the present study with other reptile LD50s to correlate with available avian data. When only definitive LD50s were used in the analysis, a strong correlation was found between avian and reptile toxicity. The results suggest it is possible to build predictive relationships between avian and reptile LD50s. More research is needed, however, to understand trends associated with chemical classes and modes of action.

  1. Safety of Pochonia chlamydosporia var catenulata in acute oral and dermal toxicity/pathogenicity evaluations in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    García, Liseth; Bulnes, Carlos; Melchor, Gleiby; Vega, Ernesto; Ileana, Miranda; de Oca, Nivian Montes; Hidalgo, Leopoldo; Marrero, Eva

    2004-10-01

    The nematophagous fungus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulata (Kamyschlco ex Barron & Onions) Zare & W-Gams, was investigated as a potential biocontrol agent in integrated pest management strategy for Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood in vegetable crops in Cuba. An acute oral and dermal toxicity/patogenicity study was performed to determine the safety of this fungus in non-target organisms. In the first study, a 1-dose level of 5 x 10(8) units of the microbial pest control agent/treated rat was used. Mortality or clinical signs were not evident and no adverse effects on body weight, hematology, microbiology and gross or microscopic pathology were observed. Food and water consumption was not significantly different between control and treated groups. In the acute dermal toxicity study, there was neither mortality nor clinical signs of toxicity, and no toxic effects in gross and microscopic pathology were detected. Thus, Pochonia chlamydosporia var. catenulate (Vcc-108, IMI SD 187), administered oral and dermally to rats and rabbits respectively, was safe in toxicity/pathogenicity studies. PMID:15487645

  2. Fatality due to acute fluoride poisoning following dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid in a palynology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Muriale, L; Lee, E; Genovese, J; Trend, S

    1996-12-01

    A fatal accident involving concentrated hydrofluoric acid in a palynological laboratory is described. Similar deaths due to dermal exposure to concentrated hydrofluoric acid have been reported in the literature. It is evident that rigorous control measures including proper personal protective equipment and first aid are of utmost importance in the prevention of death and injury when handling hydrofluoric acid. Possible factors that may have contributed to the accident are reviewed.

  3. Sensitivity of species to chemicals: dose-response characteristics for various test types (LC(50), LR(50) and LD(50)) and modes of action.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, A Jan; Awkerman, Jill A; de Zwart, Dick; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-11-01

    While variable sensitivity of model species to common toxicants has been addressed in previous studies, a systematic analysis of inter-species variability for different test types, modes of action and species is as of yet lacking. Hence, the aim of the present study was to identify similarities and differences in contaminant levels affecting cold-blooded and warm-blooded species administered via different routes. To that end, data on lethal water concentrations LC50, tissue residues LR50 and oral doses LD50 were collected from databases, each representing the largest of its kind. LC50 data were multiplied by a bioconcentration factor (BCF) to convert them to internal concentrations that allow for comparison among species. For each endpoint data set, we calculated the mean and standard deviation of species' lethal level per compound. Next, the means and standard deviations were averaged by mode of action. Both the means and standard deviations calculated depended on the number of species tested, which is at odds with quality standard setting procedures. Means calculated from (BCF) LC50, LR50 and LD50 were largely similar, suggesting that different administration routes roughly yield similar internal levels. Levels for compounds interfering biochemically with elementary life processes were about one order of magnitude below that of narcotics disturbing membranes, and neurotoxic pesticides and dioxins induced death in even lower amounts. Standard deviations for LD50 data were similar across modes of action, while variability of LC50 values was lower for narcotics than for substances with a specific mode of action. The study indicates several directions to go for efficient use of available data in risk assessment and reduction of species testing.

  4. Sensitivity of species to chemicals: dose-response characteristics for various test types (LC(50), LR(50) and LD(50)) and modes of action.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, A Jan; Awkerman, Jill A; de Zwart, Dick; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-11-01

    While variable sensitivity of model species to common toxicants has been addressed in previous studies, a systematic analysis of inter-species variability for different test types, modes of action and species is as of yet lacking. Hence, the aim of the present study was to identify similarities and differences in contaminant levels affecting cold-blooded and warm-blooded species administered via different routes. To that end, data on lethal water concentrations LC50, tissue residues LR50 and oral doses LD50 were collected from databases, each representing the largest of its kind. LC50 data were multiplied by a bioconcentration factor (BCF) to convert them to internal concentrations that allow for comparison among species. For each endpoint data set, we calculated the mean and standard deviation of species' lethal level per compound. Next, the means and standard deviations were averaged by mode of action. Both the means and standard deviations calculated depended on the number of species tested, which is at odds with quality standard setting procedures. Means calculated from (BCF) LC50, LR50 and LD50 were largely similar, suggesting that different administration routes roughly yield similar internal levels. Levels for compounds interfering biochemically with elementary life processes were about one order of magnitude below that of narcotics disturbing membranes, and neurotoxic pesticides and dioxins induced death in even lower amounts. Standard deviations for LD50 data were similar across modes of action, while variability of LC50 values was lower for narcotics than for substances with a specific mode of action. The study indicates several directions to go for efficient use of available data in risk assessment and reduction of species testing. PMID:23932508

  5. Acute Stress-Induced Changes in Follicular Dermal Papilla Cells and Mobilization of Mast Cells: Implications for Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyoseung; Choi, Soon-Jin; Cho, A-Ri; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress is a known cause of hair loss in many species. Objective In this study, we investigated the role of acute stress on hair growth using a rat model. Methods Rats were immobilized for 24 hours and blood samples, and skin biopsies were taken. The effect of stress-serum on the in vitro proliferation of rat and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs), as well as serum cortisol and corticotropin-releasing hormone levels, were measured. Mast cell staining was performed on the biopsied tissue. In addition, Western blot and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction were used to assess mast cell tryptase and cytokine expression, respectively in rat skin biopsies. Results Stress-serum treatment reduced significantly the number of viable hDPCs and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase, compared to serum from unrestrained rats (p<0.05, respectively). Moreover, restrained rats had significantly higher levels of cortisol in serum than unrestrained rats (p<0.01). Acute stress serum increased mast cell numbers and mast cell tryptase expression, as well as inducing interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β up-regulation. Conclusion These results suggest that acute stress also has an inhibitory effect on hair growth via cortisol release in addition to substance P-mast cell pathway. PMID:27746640

  6. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of "Zapote" Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist.

    PubMed

    Dutok, Carlos M S; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M C

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, "Mamey or Zapote," in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  7. Acute Toxicity and Dermal and Eye Irritation of the Aqueous and Hydroalcoholic Extracts of the Seeds of “Zapote” Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist

    PubMed Central

    Dutok, Carlos M. S.; Berenguer-Rivas, Clara Azalea; Rodríguez-Leblanch, Elizabeth; Pérez-Jackson, Liliana; Chil-Nuñez, Idelsy; Escalona-Arranz, Julio César; Reyes-Tur, Bernardo; Queiroz, Margareth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The common use of Pouteria mammosa (L.) Cronquist, “Mamey or Zapote,” in food and ethnobotanic medicine shows its low or absent toxicity as fruit extracts prepared from seeds. However, it is essential to conduct security trials to scientifically support their use in drug therapy. This study evaluated the aqueous and hydroalcoholic extract (25%) Acute Oral Toxicity, obtained from the seeds of P. mammosa, in Sprague Dawley rats and dermal and eye irritability in New Zealand rabbits. The 404 and 405 acute dermal and eye irritation/corrosion guidelines were used, as well as the 423 Acute Oral Toxicity guideline, Acute Toxic Class Method of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The aqueous extract was located in the following category: not classified as toxic (CTA 5), while hydroalcoholic extract at 25% was classified as dangerous (CTA 4). Both extracts can be used without side reaction that irritates the skin which permitted classification as potentially not irritant. P. mammosa in the two extracts caused mild and reversible eye irritation, and it was classified as slightly irritating. PMID:26273696

  8. Dermal peels.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W P

    2001-07-01

    Dermal chemical peeling is a very satisfying procedure for patients and physicians alike. Although not providing the ablation of deep wrinkles and scars that dermabrasion and laser procedures may accomplish, trichloroacetic acid peels usually result in few complications and rapid recovery. Patients can usually expect photographic improvement in their skin. The results are usually long lasting, and most patients do not need to repeat dermal peels for at least 2 years. Of all resurfacing procedures, dermal peeling provides the best benefit-to-risk ratio. PMID:11599397

  9. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  10. Characterization of acute and long-term pathologies of superficial and deep dermal sulfur mustard skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Cohen, Maayan; Kamus-Elimeleh, Dikla; Fishbine, Eliezer; Sahar, Rita; Gez, Rellie; Brandeis, Rachel; Horwitz, Vered; Kadar, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard induces severe acute and prolonged damage to the skin and only partially effective treatments are available. We have previously validated the use of hairless guinea pigs as an experimental model for skin lesions. The present study aimed to characterize a model of a deep dermal lesion and to compare it with the previously described superficial lesion. Clinical evaluation of the lesions was conducted using reflectance colorimetry, trans-epidermal water loss and wound area measurements. Prostaglandin E(2) content, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activity, and histopathology were conducted up to 4 weeks post-exposure. Sulfur mustard skin injury, including erythema and edema, impairment of skin barrier and wounds developed in a dose-dependent manner. Prostaglandin E(2) content and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 9 activities were elevated during the wound development and the healing process. Histological evaluation revealed severe damage to the epidermis and deep dermis and vesications. At 4 weeks postexposure, healing was not completed: significantly impaired stratum corneum, absence of hair follicles, and epidermal hyperplasia were observed. These results confirm the use of the superficial and deep dermal skin injuries in the hairless guinea pigs as suitable models that can be utilized for the investigation of the pathological processes of acute as well as long-term injuries. These models will be further used to develop treatments to improve the healing process and prevent skin damage and long-term effects. PMID:23082902

  11. Acute toxicity of four anticholinesterase insecticides to American kestrels, eastern screech-owls and northern bobwhites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Sparling, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    American kestrels (Falco sparverius), eastern screech-owls (Otus asio), and northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were given single acute oral doses of four widely diverse anticholinesterase pesticides: EPN, fenthion, carbofuran, and monocrotophos. LD50s, based on birds that died within 5 d of dosage, were computed for each chemical in each species. Sex differences in the sensitivity of northern bobwhites in reproductive condition were examined. American kestrels were highly sensitive to all chemicals tested (LD50s 0.6--4.0 mg/kg). Eastern screech-owls were highly tolerant to EPN (LD50 274 mg/kg) but sensitive to the remaining chemicals (LD50s 1.5-3.9 mg/kg). Northern bobwhites were highly sensitive to monocrotophos (LD50 0.8 mg/kg) and less sensitive to the remaining chemicals (LD50s 4.6--31 mg/kg). Female bobwhites (LD50 3.1 mg/kg) were more sensitive to fenthion than males (LD50 7.0 mg/kg). Mean percent depression of brain cho[inesterase (ChE) of birds that died on the day of dosing exceeded 65% for all chemicals in all species. The response of one species to a given pesticide should not be used to predict the sensitivity of other species to the same pesticide. The need for research on several topics is discussed

  12. The ability of filgrastim to mitigate mortality following LD50/60 total-body irradiation is administration time-dependent.

    PubMed

    Farese, Ann M; Brown, Cassandra R; Smith, Cassandra P; Gibbs, Allison M; Katz, Barry P; Johnson, Cynthia S; Prado, Karl L; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the optimal administration schedule for an effective medical countermeasure is critical for the effective treatment of individuals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. The efficacy of filgrastim (Neupogen®), a potential medical countermeasure, to improve survival when initiated at 48 h following total body irradiation in a non-human primate model of the hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome was investigated. Animals were exposed to total body irradiation, antero-posterior exposure, total midline tissue dose of 7.5 Gy, (target lethal dose 50/60) delivered at 0.80 Gy min, using linear accelerator-derived 6 MV photons. All animals were administered medical management. Following irradiation on day 0, filgrastim (10 μg kg d) or the control (5% dextrose in water) was administered subcutaneously daily through effect (absolute neutrophil count ≥ 1,000 cells μL for three consecutive days). The study (n = 80) was powered to demonstrate a 25% improvement in survival following the administration of filgrastim or control beginning at 48 ± 4 h post-irradiation. Survival analysis was conducted on the intention-to-treat population using a two-tailed null hypothesis at a 5% significance level. Filgrastim, initiated 48 h after irradiation, did not improve survival (2.5% increase, p = 0.8230). These data demonstrate that efficacy of a countermeasure to mitigate lethality in the hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome can be dependent on the interval between irradiation and administration of the medical countermeasure.

  13. Inadequate Processing of Decellularized Dermal Matrix Reduces Cell Viability In Vitro and Increases Apoptosis and Acute Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Aaron H.; Chang, Julie; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Decellularized tissue scaffolds are commonly used in the clinic because they can be used as substitutes for more traditional biomaterials, while imparting additional physiological effects. Nevertheless, reports of complications associated with their use are widespread and poorly understood. This study probes possible causes of these complications by examining cell viability and apoptosis in response to eluents from decellularized dermis. Using multiple sources of decellularized dermis, this study shows that typical decellularized scaffolds (prepared with commonly used laboratory techniques, as well as purchased from commercial sources) contain soluble components that are cytotoxic and that these components can be removed by extensive washes in cell culture media. In addition, this study demonstrates that these observed in vitro phenotypes correlate with increased apoptosis and acute inflammation when implanted subcutaneously in mice. PMID:27500014

  14. Skin substitute-assisted repair shows reduced dermal fibrosis in acute human wounds validated simultaneously by histology and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Hodgkinson, Tom; Morris, Julie; Benatar, Brian; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Skin substitutes are heterogeneous biomaterials designed to accelerate wound healing through provision of replacement extracellular matrix. Despite growing evidence for their use in chronic wounds, the role of skin substitutes in acute wound management and their influence on fibrogenesis remains unclear. Skin substitute characteristics including biocompatibility, porosity, and elasticity strongly influence cellular behavior during wound healing. Thus, we hypothesize that structural and biomechanical variation between biomaterials may induce differential scar formation after cutaneous injury. The following human prospective cohort study was designed to investigate this premise. Four 5-mm full thickness punch biopsies were harvested from 50 volunteers. In all cases, site 1 healed by secondary intention, site 2 was treated with collagen-GAG scaffold (CG), and decellularised dermis (DCD) was applied to site 3 while tissue extracted from site 4 was replaced (autograft). Healing tissue was assessed weekly with optical coherence tomography (OCT), before being excised on days 7, 14, 21, or 28 depending on study group allocation for later histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Extracted RNA was used in microarray analysis and polymerase chain reaction of highlighted genes. Autograft treatment resulted in minimal fibrosis confirmed immunohistochemically and with OCT through significantly lower collagen I levels (p = 0.047 and 0.03) and reduced mean grayscale values (p = 0.038 and 0.015), respectively. DCD developed intermediate scar formation with partial rete ridge reformation and reduced fasiculonodular fibrosis. It was uniquely associated with late up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, oncostatin M, and interleukin-10 (p = 0.007, 0.04, 0.019, 0.019). Regenerated dermis was significantly thicker in DCD and autografts 28 days post-injury compared with control and CG samples (p = 0.003 and < 0.0001). In conclusion, variable fibrotic outcomes were

  15. Skin substitute-assisted repair shows reduced dermal fibrosis in acute human wounds validated simultaneously by histology and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Iqbal, Syed A; Hodgkinson, Tom; Morris, Julie; Benatar, Brian; Alonso-Rasgado, Teresa; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Skin substitutes are heterogeneous biomaterials designed to accelerate wound healing through provision of replacement extracellular matrix. Despite growing evidence for their use in chronic wounds, the role of skin substitutes in acute wound management and their influence on fibrogenesis remains unclear. Skin substitute characteristics including biocompatibility, porosity, and elasticity strongly influence cellular behavior during wound healing. Thus, we hypothesize that structural and biomechanical variation between biomaterials may induce differential scar formation after cutaneous injury. The following human prospective cohort study was designed to investigate this premise. Four 5-mm full thickness punch biopsies were harvested from 50 volunteers. In all cases, site 1 healed by secondary intention, site 2 was treated with collagen-GAG scaffold (CG), and decellularised dermis (DCD) was applied to site 3 while tissue extracted from site 4 was replaced (autograft). Healing tissue was assessed weekly with optical coherence tomography (OCT), before being excised on days 7, 14, 21, or 28 depending on study group allocation for later histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Extracted RNA was used in microarray analysis and polymerase chain reaction of highlighted genes. Autograft treatment resulted in minimal fibrosis confirmed immunohistochemically and with OCT through significantly lower collagen I levels (p = 0.047 and 0.03) and reduced mean grayscale values (p = 0.038 and 0.015), respectively. DCD developed intermediate scar formation with partial rete ridge reformation and reduced fasiculonodular fibrosis. It was uniquely associated with late up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3, oncostatin M, and interleukin-10 (p = 0.007, 0.04, 0.019, 0.019). Regenerated dermis was significantly thicker in DCD and autografts 28 days post-injury compared with control and CG samples (p = 0.003 and < 0.0001). In conclusion, variable fibrotic outcomes were

  16. Consensus Modeling of Oral Rat Acute Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acute toxicity dataset (oral rat LD50) with about 7400 compounds was compiled from the ChemIDplus database. This dataset was divided into a modeling set and a prediction set. The compounds in the prediction set were selected so that they were present in the modeling set used...

  17. Development of an Orientia tsutsugamushi Lc-1 Murine Intraperitoneal Challenge Model for Scrub Typhus: Determination of Murine Lethal Dose (MuLD50), Tissue Bacterial Loads, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lurchachaiwong, Woradee; McCardle, Wesley; Chan, Teik-Chye; Schuster, Anthony L; Richards, Allen L

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no vaccine has been developed to protect humans from naturally acquired heterologous Orientia tsutsugamushi infections. To enhance the validity of vaccine candidates, we are developing a murine chigger challenge model with the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected Leptotrombidium chiangraiensis Line-1. To this end, an intraperitoneal (i.p.) murine challenge model using an O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 isolate was developed for eventual validation of the chigger challenge model. We have determined that the murine lethal dose that kills 50% of the challenged mice (MuLD50) of a liver/spleen homogenate developed from O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1-infected ICR Swiss mice to be 10(-6.9). Employing different inoculum doses of this homogenate, the bacterial load using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was determined to range from 60 to 1.6 × 10(5) genome equivalent copies (GEC)/μL of liver and 33.4 to 2.2 × 10(5) GEC/μL of spleen tissue. The clinical outcomes relative to homogenate dose levels followed a dose-dependent pattern. The successful development and characterization of the O. tsutsugamushi Lc-1 i.p. challenge model will assist in the development and validation of a mouse chigger challenge scrub typhus model.

  18. Efficacy of topical phenol decontamination strategies on severity of acute phenol chemical burns and dermal absorption: in vitro and in vivo studies in pig skin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Inman, A O; Jackson, H; Dunn, B; Dimond, S

    2001-05-01

    Pure phenol is colorless and used in the manufacture of phenolic resins, plastics, explosives, fertilizers, paints, rubber, textiles, adhesives, pharmaceuticals, paper, soap, and wood preservatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of several phenol decontamination strategies following dermal exposure using the pig as a model for human exposure, and then assess the effect of the two best treatments on phenol absorption in the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF). Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were exposed to 89% aqueous phenol for 1 min using Hilltop chambers (10 skin sites/pig; 400 microl/site). Exposure to phenol was followed by one of 10 different decontamination procedures: 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min water wash; Ivory soap solution; polyethylene glycol (PEG 400); PEG 400/industrial methylated spirits (IMS); PEG 400/ethanol (EtOH); polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/70% isopropanol (IPA); and 70% IPA. For each of the last five strategies, 1-min treatment washes were repeatedly alternated with 1-min water washes for a total of 15 min. Evaluation was based on scoring of erythema, edema, and histological parameters such as intracellular and intercellular epidermal edema, papillary dermal edema, perivascular infiltrates, pyknotic stratum basale cells, and epidermal-dermal separation. It was concluded that PEG 400 and 70% IPA were superior to the other treatments investigated and equally efficacious in the reduction of phenol-induced skin damage. In addition, phenol absorption was assessed utilizing the two most effective in vivo treatments in the IPPSF. The assessment of percutaneous absorption of phenol found the PEG 400, 70% IPA, and 15-min water treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced phenol absorption relative to no treatment.

  19. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients.

  20. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. PMID:26256397

  1. Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and studies supporting the medical chemical defense program. Determination of the minimum effective pyridostigmine pretreatment dose in monkeys challenged with 5 x LD50 Soman and treated with atropine/2-PAM. Final report, 22 October 1992-31 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.T.; Menton, R.G.; Kiser, R.C.; Hayes, T.L.; Matthews, M.C.

    1995-08-01

    This task was conducted to determine the minimum dose of pyridostigmine (PYR), and the associated level of erythrocyte acetycholinesterase inhibition (AChE-I), that provides protection from 5 X 48-br GD LD50 of untreated monkeys. Monkeys were injected im with GD and treated with 0.4 mg atropine (ATR) free base and 25.7 mg pralidoxime (2-PAM) per kg BW.

  2. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. PMID:23161399

  3. [Analysis on the dermal irritation caused by imported cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Xing, S; Yuan, L; Song, R; Xu, F

    2001-11-01

    Dermal irritation tests on 902 kinds of cosmetics were conducted. The acute dermal irritation/corrosion tests for 175 samples showed no irritation in 65.1% of them, and 34.9% of them were considered as slight irritation. The chronic dermal irritation/corrosion tests for another 727 samples showed no irritation for 32.2% of them, and 67.8% of them were considered as slight irritation, most of which are lipsticks, eye shadows, fluid powder foundations and powder foundations.

  4. Saving two birds with one stone: using active substance avian acute toxicity data to predict formulated plant protection product toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Samuel K; Edwards, Peter; Wheeler, James R

    2014-07-01

    Environmental safety assessments for exposure of birds require the provision of acute avian toxicity data for both the pesticidal active substance and formulated products. As an example, testing on the formulated product is waived in Europe using an assessment of data for the constituent active substance(s). This is often not the case globally, because some countries require acute toxicity tests with every formulated product, thereby triggering animal welfare concerns through unnecessary testing. A database of 383 formulated products was compiled from acute toxicity studies conducted with northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) or Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) (unpublished regulatory literature). Of the 383 formulated products studied, 159 contained only active substances considered functionally nontoxic (median lethal dose [LD50] > highest dose tested). Of these, 97% had formulated product LD50 values of >2000 mg formulated product/kg (limit dose), indicating that no new information was obtained in the formulated product study. Furthermore, defined (point estimated) LD50 values for formulated products were compared with LD50 values predicted from toxicity of the active substance(s). This demonstrated that predicted LD50 values were within 2-fold and 5-fold of the measured formulated product LD50 values in 90% and 98% of cases, respectively. This analysis demonstrates that avian acute toxicity testing of formulated products is largely unnecessary and should not be routinely required to assess avian acute toxicity. In particular, when active substances are known to be functionally nontoxic, further formulated product testing adds no further information and unnecessarily increases bird usage in testing. A further analysis highlights the fact that significant reductions (61% in this dataset) could be achieved by using a sequential testing design (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development test guideline 223), as opposed to established single

  5. Laboratory Evaluation of Acute Toxicity of the Essential Oil of Allium tuberosum Leaves and Its Selected Major Constituents Against Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jizhe; Liu, Xinchao; Li, Zhen; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingwen; Liu, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate acute toxicity of the essential oil of leaves of Chinese chives, Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Spreng (Asparagales: Alliaceae) and its major constituents against Apolygus lucorum Meyer-Dür (Hemiptera: Miridae). The essential oil of A. tuberosum leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituents of the oil were sulfur-containing compounds, including allyl methyl trisulfide (36.24%), diallyl disulfide (27.26%), diallyl trisulfide (18.68%), and dimethyl trisulfide (9.23%). The essential oil of A. tuberosum leaves exhibited acute toxicity against Ap. lucorum with an LD50 value of 20.03 μg per adult. Among the main compounds, diallyl trisulfide (LD50 = 10.13 μg per adult) showed stronger acute toxicity than allyl methyl trisulfide (LD50 = 21.10 μg per adult) and dimethyl trisulfide (LD50 = 21.65 μg per adult). The LD50 value of diallyl disulfide against Ap. lucorum was 28.10 μg per adult. The results indicated that the essential oil of A. tuberosum and its major constituents may have a potential to be developed as botanical insecticides against Ap. lucorum. PMID:26254289

  6. Quantitative comparisons of acute toxicity of organic chemicals to rat and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan, S.K.; Olson, C.S.; Schaeffer, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    Relationships between the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish (LC50) and rat (LD50) were analyzed using a Model II regression analysis after logarithmic transformation. (Model II regression assumes errors in both variables.) Significant correlations were found among bluegill and fathead minnow LC50S and rat LD50 values for the priority pollutants. Fathead minnow and bluegill LC50S for 48 pesticides were highly correlated. No correlations were found between fishes and rats for carbamate plus organophosphate pesticides. Correlations were obtained among all species for the combined priority pollutant plus pesticide data and for chlorinated pesticides.

  7. Multivariate correlations between properties of metal ions and their acute toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.; Williams, M.W.; Hingerty, B.E.; Hayden, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper extends our earlier study of correlations of acute metal-ion toxicity (14-day LD50) in mice and physicochemical properties of the ions. Here we put metal ions into two main groups as defined by Kaiser. Using most of the metals in the periodic system, we find the least redundant linear combinations W/sub i/ of the ionic radius, sum of ionization potentials, atomic weight, Williams softness parameter, and electronegativity for each of Kaiser's two groups. Information is provided so that the W/sub i/ can be evaluated for any metal from these five quantities. For the two groups of metals we then tested for multivariate correlations between the S/sub i/ having the highest sample variance and our mouse LD50. For our LD50 involving the five metal ions in Kaiser's group (1) the correlation is poor, whereas a good correlation is found for the 14 ions in group (2). 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. WEB-BASED INTERSPECIES CORRELATION ESTIMATION (WEB-ICE) FOR ACUTE TOXICITY: USER MANUAL V2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to environmental risk Assessment where data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ...

  9. Improvement of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (VCG 0124/5) through induced mutagenesis: Determination of LD50 specific to mutagen, explants, toxins and in vitro and in vivo screening for Fusarium wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, M S; Kannan, G; Uma, S; Thangavelu, R; Backiyarani, S

    2016-05-01

    Shoot tips and in vitro grown proliferating buds of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) were treated with various concentrations and durations of chemical mutagens viz., EMS, NaN3 and DES. LD50 for shoot tips based on 50% reduction in fresh weight was determined as 2% for 3 h, 0.02% for 5 h and 0.15% for 5 h, while for proliferating buds, they were 0.6% for 30 min, 0.01% for 2 h and 0.06% for 2 h for the mutagens EMS, NaN3 and DES, respectively. Subsequently, the mutated explants were screened in vitro against fusarium wilt using selection agents like fusaric acid and culture filtrate. LD50 for in vitro selection agents calculated based on 50% survival of explants was 0.050 mM and 7% for fusaric acid and culture filtrate, respectively and beyond which a rapid decline in growth was observed. This was followed by pot screening which led to the identification of three putative resistant mutants with an internal disease score of 1 (corm completely clean, no vascular discolouration). The putative mutants identified in the present study have also been mass multiplied in vitro.

  10. Improvement of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (VCG 0124/5) through induced mutagenesis: Determination of LD50 specific to mutagen, explants, toxins and in vitro and in vivo screening for Fusarium wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, M S; Kannan, G; Uma, S; Thangavelu, R; Backiyarani, S

    2016-05-01

    Shoot tips and in vitro grown proliferating buds of banana cv. Rasthali (Silk, AAB) were treated with various concentrations and durations of chemical mutagens viz., EMS, NaN3 and DES. LD50 for shoot tips based on 50% reduction in fresh weight was determined as 2% for 3 h, 0.02% for 5 h and 0.15% for 5 h, while for proliferating buds, they were 0.6% for 30 min, 0.01% for 2 h and 0.06% for 2 h for the mutagens EMS, NaN3 and DES, respectively. Subsequently, the mutated explants were screened in vitro against fusarium wilt using selection agents like fusaric acid and culture filtrate. LD50 for in vitro selection agents calculated based on 50% survival of explants was 0.050 mM and 7% for fusaric acid and culture filtrate, respectively and beyond which a rapid decline in growth was observed. This was followed by pot screening which led to the identification of three putative resistant mutants with an internal disease score of 1 (corm completely clean, no vascular discolouration). The putative mutants identified in the present study have also been mass multiplied in vitro. PMID:27319054

  11. Comparative acute and subchronic toxicity of ethylene glycol monopropyl ether and ethylene glycol monopropyl ether acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, G V; Krasavage, W J; Terhaar, C J

    1984-01-01

    The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol monopropyl ether (EGPE) and ethylene glycol monopropyl ether acetate (EGPEA) was determined in a series of standardized tests. The oral LD50 in rats was 3089 and 9456 mg/kg EGPE and EGPEA, respectively. Skin irritation was slight following an occluded single dose application of either compound to the guinea pig abdomen. The dermal LD50 for guinea pigs was 1 to 5 mL/kg and greater than 20 mL/kg EGPE and EGPEA, respectively. EGPE produced a very weak positive sensitization response in one of five guinea pigs. No positive response was elicited when 10 guinea pigs were similarly challenged with EGPEA. EGPE produced transient moderate to severe eye irritation in rabbits while EGPEA produced slight eye irritation. Subchronic toxicity was determined in a series of oral and inhalation studies. Groups of 10 male rats were dosed with 15, 7.5, 3.75 or 1.88 mmole/kg EGPE and 30, 15 or 7.5 mmole/kg EGPEA by gavage 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Hemoglobinuria was seen at least once at all dose levels of both compounds. EGPE had little effect on feed consumption or body weight gain, while body weight gain was reduced in the two high dose groups exposed to EGPEA and feed consumption was reduced at all dose levels. Hematologic changes were seen at all dose levels of both compounds. Absolute and/or relative spleen weights were increased at all but the lowest EGPE dose level and at all EGPEA dose levels. Gross and histopathologic examinations revealed significant effects on the spleen of animals exposed to EGPE and on the spleen, liver, kidney and testes of animals exposed to EGPEA. The no-observed effect level (NOEL) for splenic changes was 1.88 mmole/kg EGPE. A NOEL for hematology was not established. The NOEL for liver and testicular changes were 15 and 7.5 mmole/kg EGPEA, respectively while a NOEL for hematologic, splenic and renal changes was not established. Groups of 10 rats (5M, 5F) were exposed to 800, 400, 200 or 100 ppm EGPE or EGPEA 6 hr

  12. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) for Acute Toxicity: User Manual Version 3.1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive toxicological models are integral to ecological risk assessment because data for most species are limited. Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (Web-ICE) models are least square regressions that predict acute toxicity (LC50/LD50) of a chemical to a species, ge...

  13. Estimation of acute oral toxicity in rat using local lazy learning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute toxicity means the ability of a substance to cause adverse effects within a short period following dosing or exposure, which is usually the first step in the toxicological investigations of unknown substances. The median lethal dose, LD50, is frequently used as a general indicator of a substance’s acute toxicity, and there is a high demand on developing non-animal-based prediction of LD50. Unfortunately, it is difficult to accurately predict compound LD50 using a single QSAR model, because the acute toxicity may involve complex mechanisms and multiple biochemical processes. Results In this study, we reported the use of local lazy learning (LLL) methods, which could capture subtle local structure-toxicity relationships around each query compound, to develop LD50 prediction models: (a) local lazy regression (LLR): a linear regression model built using k neighbors; (b) SA: the arithmetical mean of the activities of k nearest neighbors; (c) SR: the weighted mean of the activities of k nearest neighbors; (d) GP: the projection point of the compound on the line defined by its two nearest neighbors. We defined the applicability domain (AD) to decide to what an extent and under what circumstances the prediction is reliable. In the end, we developed a consensus model based on the predicted values of individual LLL models, yielding correlation coefficients R2 of 0.712 on a test set containing 2,896 compounds. Conclusion Encouraged by the promising results, we expect that our consensus LLL model of LD50 would become a useful tool for predicting acute toxicity. All models developed in this study are available via http://www.dddc.ac.cn/admetus. PMID:24959207

  14. Flexible Dermal Armor in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2012-04-01

    Many animals possess dermal armor, which acts primarily as protection against predators. We illustrate this through examples from both our research and the literature: alligator, fish (alligator gar, arapaima, and Senegal bichir), armadillo, leatherback turtle, and a lizard, the Gila monster. The dermal armor in these animals is flexible and has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining mineralized units (scales, tiles, or plates). This combination significantly increases the strength and flexibility in comparison with a simple monolithic mineral composite or rigid dermal armor. This dermal armor is being studied for future bioinspired armor applications providing increased mobility.

  15. Malignant dermal cylindroma in a patient with multiple dermal cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas, and bilateral dermal analogue tumors of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Rockerbie, N; Solomon, A R; Woo, T Y; Beals, T F; Ellis, C N

    1989-08-01

    A malignant dermal cylindroma of the scalp arose from one of multiple long-standing dermal cylindromas in a 76-year-old man with coexisting trichoepitheliomas and bilateral dermal analogue tumors of the parotid gland. The histologic transition from a benign dermal cylindroma to an anaplastic keratinocytic neoplasm was readily apparent. The malignant dermal cylindroma is a rare neoplasm. To our knowledge, the constellation of benign and malignant dermal cylindromas, multiple trichoepitheliomas, and salivary gland neoplasms has not been previously reported.

  16. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nimish B; Spann, James W; Hill, Elwood F

    2009-03-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex and Phos-Chek WD881) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881 and Silv-Ex were above the predetermined 2000mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R, Phos-Chek D-75F, and Fire-Trol LCG-R because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  17. Acute oral toxicities of wildland fire control chemicals to birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hill, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Wildland fire control chemicals are released into the environment by aerial and ground applications to manage rangeland, grassland, and forest fires. Acute oral 24 h median lethal dosages (LD50) for three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R?) and two Class A fire suppressant foams (Silv-Ex? and Phos-Chek WD881?) were estimated for northern bobwhites, Colinus virginianus, American kestrels, Falco sparverius, and red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus. The LD50s of all chemicals for the bobwhites and red-winged blackbirds and for kestrels dosed with Phos-Chek WD881? and Silv-Ex? were above the predetermined 2000 mg chemical/kg body mass regulatory limit criteria for acute oral toxicity. The LD50s were not quantifiable for kestrels dosed with Fire-Trol GTS-R?, Phos-Chek D-75F?, and Fire-Trol LCG-R? because of the number of birds which regurgitated the dosage. These chemicals appear to be of comparatively low order of acute oral toxicity to the avian species tested.

  18. Carbofuran occupational dermal toxicity, exposure and risk assessment†

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Derek W; Liu, Zhiwei; Becker, John M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbofuran is a carbamate insecticide that inhibits AChE. Although toxic by ingestion in mammals, it has low dermal toxicity, with relatively few confirmed worker illnesses. This risk assessment describes its time of onset, time to peak effect and time to recovery in rats using brain AChE inhibition in acute and 21 day dermal studies; in vitro rat/human relative dermal absorption for granular (5G) and liquid (4F) formulations; occupational exposure estimates using the Pesticide Handlers' Exposure Database and Agricultural Handlers' Exposure Database (PHED/AHED). RESULTS The point of departure for acute risk calculation (BMDL10) was 6.7 mg kg−1 day−1 for brain AChE inhibition after 6 h exposure. In a 21 day study, the BMDL10 was 6.8 mg kg−1 day−1, indicating reversibility. At 75 mg kg−1 day−1, time of onset was ≤30 min and time to peak effect was 6–12 h. Rat skin had ca tenfold greater dermal absorption of carbofuran (Furadan® 5G or 4F) than human skin. Exposure estimates for 5G in rice and 4F in ten crops had adequate margins of exposure (>100). CONCLUSION Rat dermal carbofuran toxicity was assessed in terms of dose and time-related inhibition of AChE. Comparative dermal absorption in rats was greater than in humans. Worker exposure estimates indicated acceptable risk for granular and liquid formulations of carbofuran. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:21834090

  19. Methylisothiazolinone: dermal and respiratory immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Pollaris, Lore; Van Den Broucke, Sofie; Seys, Sven; Goossens, An; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2015-06-15

    Methylisothiazolinone (MI), a widely used chemical preservative in industrial and household products, and cosmetics, has been associated with allergic contact dermatitis. However, the asthmogenic capacity of MI is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the capacity of MI to elicit asthma-like responses in a validated mouse model. On days 1 and 8, mice (C57Bl/6 and BALB/c) were dermally treated with MI or vehicle on each ear. On day 15, mice received a single intranasal challenge with MI or vehicle. Immediately after the challenge, the early ventilatory response was measured using a double chamber plethysmograph. One day later, airway hyperreactivity, pulmonary inflammation and immune-related parameters were assessed. Dermal treatment with MI in both C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice induced increased T- and B-cell proliferation in the auricular lymph nodes, along with IFN-γ production and limited increases in total serum IgE, confirming dermal sensitization. An airway challenge with MI led to an early ventilatory response (decreased breathing frequency), indicative for acute sensory irritation. However, 24h later no allergic respiratory response (no airway hyperreactivity (AHR) nor pulmonary inflammation) was found in either mouse strains. Our study indicates that MI can be classified as a strong dermal sensitizer and irritant, but not an asthmogen after initial dermal sensitization, followed by an airway challenge. PMID:25907379

  20. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 − 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  1. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kue, Chin Siang; Tan, Kae Yi; Lam, May Lynn; Lee, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD(50)) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD(50) values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson's correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r(2)=0.42 - 0.68, P<0.005-0.05) between the ideal LD(50) values obtained using the CAM model with LD(50) values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  2. The Acute Toxicity of Tannic Acid Administered Intragastrically

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eldon M.

    1965-01-01

    The LD50 ± S.E. of tannic acid given orally to albino rats was found to be 2.26±0.083 g. per kg. body weight, which is higher than its apparent LD50 when given per rectum. The immediate cause of death was respiratory failure preceded by convulsions when death occurred early and by hypothermic cachexia when death was delayed. Death was associated with a progressively developing hepatic necrosis and nephritis and a temporary acute gastroenteritis. It was accompanied by loss of weight and edema in many organs, evidence of stimulation of the spleen, adrenal cortex and testes, and atrophy of the thymus. Recovery in survivors was associated with a temporary increase in weight of the spleen and testes and persistence of loss of weight in the adrenal, pyloric stomach, and skin. PMID:14291458

  3. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA. PMID:21309017

  4. Use of butterflies as nontarget insect test species and the acute toxicity and hazard of mosquito control insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Pryor, Rachel L; Rand, Gary M; Frakes, Robert A

    2011-04-01

    Honeybees are the standard insect test species used for toxicity testing of pesticides on nontarget insects for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). Butterflies are another important insect order and a valued ecological resource in pollination. The current study conducted acute toxicity tests with naled, permethrin, and dichlorvos on fifth larval instar (caterpillars) and adults of different native Florida, USA, butterfly species to determine median lethal doses (24-h LD50), because limited acute toxicity data are available with this major insect group. Thorax- and wing-only applications of each insecticide were conducted. Based on LD50s, thorax and wing application exposures were acutely toxic to both caterpillars and adults. Permethrin was the most acutely toxic insecticide after thorax exposure to fifth instars and adult butterflies. However, no generalization on acute toxicity (sensitivity) of the insecticides could be concluded based on exposures to fifth instars versus adult butterflies or on thorax versus wing exposures of adult butterflies. A comparison of LD50s of the butterflies from this study (caterpillars and adults) with honeybee LD50s for the adult mosquito insecticides on a µg/organism or µg/g basis indicates that several butterfly species are more sensitive to these insecticides than are honeybees. A comparison of species sensitivity distributions for all three insecticides shows that permethrin had the lowest 10th percentile. Using a hazard quotient approach indicates that both permethrin and naled applications in the field may present potential acute hazards to butterflies, whereas no acute hazard of dichlorvos is apparent in butterflies. Butterflies should be considered as potential test organisms when nontarget insect testing of pesticides is suggested under FIFRA.

  5. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  6. [Alteration of the acute toxicity and various pharmacologic effects of streptomycin sulfate by calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Korablev, M V; Kopelevich, V M

    1983-10-01

    The effect of calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP) on acute toxicity of streptomycin and the decrease by the antibiotic of the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex, body temperature and oxygen intake was studied on 258 albino mice weighing 22-26 g. Medical calcium pantothenate (CPA) was used for control purposes. CPP is an antagonist of streptomycin sulfate. In a dose of 1/10 or 1/5 of the LD50 injected intraperitoneally CPP lowered acute toxicity of streptomycin and prevented its effect in a dose of 0.11--1.1 g/kg injected subcutaneously on the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex and body temperature. The spectrum index of the CPP antitoxic effect was equal to 22.5. By its acute toxicity CPP (LD50 1.18 +/- 0.07 g/kg) did not differ from CPA (LD50 1.25 +/- 0.08 g/kg). The efficacy of CPP, by its antitoxic spectrum, was 1.8 times higher than that of CPA. CPA lowered the streptomycin effect on the "holes" reflex and body temperature, while CPP prevented it. Both the drugs did not influence the decrease in the oxygen consumption induced by streptomycin. PMID:6651265

  7. Dermal uptake of petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Jakasa, Ivone; Kezic, Sanja; Boogaard, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Petroleum products are complex substances comprising varying amounts of linear and branched alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics which may penetrate the skin at different rates. For proper interpretation of toxic hazard data, understanding their percutaneous absorption is of paramount importance. The extent and significance of dermal absorption of eight petroleum substances, representing different classes of hydrocarbons, was evaluated. Literature data on the steady-state flux and permeability coefficient of these substances were evaluated and compared to those predicted by mathematical models. Reported results spanned over 5-6 orders of magnitude and were largely dependent on experimental conditions in particular on the type of the vehicle used. In general, aromatic hydrocarbons showed higher dermal absorption than more lipophilic aliphatics with similar molecular weight. The results showed high variation and were largely influenced by experimental conditions emphasizing the need of performing the experiments under "in use" scenario. The predictive models overestimated experimental absorption. The overall conclusion is that, based on the observed percutaneous penetration data, dermal exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons, even of aromatics with highest dermal absorption is limited and highly unlikely to be associated with health risks under real use scenarios.

  8. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  9. Comparative acute systemic toxicity of several quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Gil, Ana Gloria; García-Rodríguez, Alba; García-Jalón, Jose Antonio; Cia, Felipe; Zarranz, Belén; Monge, Antonio; de Cerain, Adela López

    2007-01-01

    The acute toxicity of six quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides has been evaluated in an attempt to determine: a) the feasibility of testing systemic toxicity of these compounds in a very preliminary phase without an adequate formulation for in vivo administration, b) the LD50 range and the toxic target organ of these compounds in order to have an approximation of the structure-activity relationship. Quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides have shown a great variety of biological activities with potential therapeutic application in cancer, malaria, etc. Problems of toxicity hinder the progression of these compounds to clinical phases. The compounds dissolved in DMSO at their solubility limit were administered i.v. to female Wistar rats (8 weeks, 160 g), using an infusion pump (300 microL; 20 microl/min). Animals were observed for a period of 14 days. This dose of the vehicle (1.7 ml/kg) was well tolerated by the animals. The LD50 could not be determined, but a marked hypoactivity was induced by the treatment. The same compounds were also injected intraperitoneally, suspended in 0.01% Tween 80/0.09 % saline, and the animals that did not die were observed for a period of 14 days. The LD50 could be estimated to be in a range between 30 and 120 mg/kg, except for one of the compounds. A decrease in the evolution of body weight and hypoactivity were the principal symptoms induced by the treatment. In both assays, histopathologic study of heart, liver, kidney, lung, spleen and ovaries indicated that the target organs may be heart and spleen. In conclusion, the i.v. route is not adequate for estimating the LD50 of these compounds due to solubility problems; by i.p. route, the LD50 interval is between 30 and 120 mg/kg. The data did not permit the deduction of any specific structure-activity relationship.

  10. Acute and sub-acute toxicological assessment of the aqueous seed extract of Persea americana mill (Lauraceae) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozolua, Raymond I; Anaka, Ogochukwu N; Okpo, Stephen O; Idogun, Sylvester E

    2009-07-03

    The aqueous seed extract of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) is used by herbalists in Nigeria for the management of hypertension. As part of our on-going scientific evaluation of the extract, we designed the present study to assess its acute and sub-acute toxicity profiles in rats. Experiments were conducted to determine the oral median lethal dose (LD(50)) and other gross toxicological manifestations on acute basis. In the sub-acute experiments, the animals were administered 2.5 g/kg (p.o) per day of the extract for 28 consecutive days. Animal weight and fluid intake were recorded during the 28 days period. Terminally, kidneys, hearts, blood/sera were obtained for weight, haematological and biochemical markers of toxicity. Results show that the LD(50) could not be determined after a maximum dose of 10 g/kg. Sub-acute treatment with the extract neither affected whole body weight nor organ-to-body weight ratios but significantly increased the fluid intake (P < 0.0001). Haematological parameters and the levels of ALT, AST, albumin and creatinine were not significantly altered. However, the concentration of total proteins was significantly increased in the treated group. In conclusion, the aqueous seed extract of P. americana is safe on sub-acute basis but extremely high doses may not be advisable.

  11. [The effect of immunofan on the immunity system characteristics and lipid peroxidation parameters upon acute chemical poisoning].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskiĭ, P F; Germanchuk, V G; Nodel', M L; Vasilenko, O A; Aredakov, A N

    2004-01-01

    The results of experiments on Wistar rats under conditions of acute poisoning with 0.75 LD50 of zarin (isopropylmethyl fluorophosphonate), luisite (beta-chlorovinyl dichloroarsine), arsenic chloride, and dichloroethane showed that a four-day treatment with immunofan in a dose of 10 microg/kg restored the immune status characteristics (antibody formation to T-dependent antigen, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, natural killer cell activity, and delayed type hypersensitivity) and the related LPO parameters.

  12. Acute toxicity of diazinon is similar for eight stocks of bobwhite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Camardese, M.B.; Heinz, G.H.; Spann, J.W.; DeBevec, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nine-week-old bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) from eight different game farms were tested for their sensitivity to an acute oral exposure of technical-grade diazinon (phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl-O-[6-methyl- 2-(1 -methylethy 1)-4-pyrimidinyl]ester). Extraneous variables associated with interlaboratory differences in husbandry were eliminated by incubating eggs and rearing chicks to test age for all stocks simultaneously in the same facilities at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Under this single set of conditions, the responses of the eight stocks of bobwhite to diazinon were statistically inseparable, with LD50 values varying from 13 mg/kg (95% confidence interval, 8-21 mg/kg) to 17 mg/kg (95% confidence interval, 11-25 mg/kg). The pooled LD50 for the eight stocks was 14.7 mg/kg (95% confidence interval,13.1-16.5 mg/kg).

  13. The acute toxicity of coal liquefaction-derived materials.

    PubMed

    McKee, R H; Biles, R W; Kapp, R W; Hinz, J P

    1984-08-01

    The acute toxicity of a series of potential streams from the EDS coal liquefaction process have been assessed in animal bioassays. In general, the materials present minimal acute toxic hazards. However, there was some evidence of ocular and dermal irritation. These results indicate that eye and dermal contact should be minimized, particularly when the process streams contain high concentrations of phenolic materials.

  14. [Cutaneous myxoma (focal dermal mucinosis)].

    PubMed

    Senff, H; Kuhlwein, A; Jänner, M; Schäfer, R

    1988-09-01

    Two cases of cutaneous myxoma are presented. In case 1 the cutaneous myxoma was localized on the left thumb and clinically resembled a pyogenic granuloma. In case 2 it was found at the left nipple. The benign cutaneous tumor may herald a cardiac myxoma and other conditions. Thus, a cutaneous myxoma should be accepted as an indication for thorough investigation of the whole body at regular intervals. As there are neither clinically nor histologically adequate criteria for differentiation, cutaneous myxoma and focal dermal mucinosis can be considered as variants of a single entity.

  15. Dermal fillers: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Dermal fillers have been used for decades in soft tissue augmentation. Currently, filler implementation is among the most common minimally invasive procedures for rejuvenation and body sculpturing. There is a broad variety of filler materials and products. Despite immense experience, a number of controversies in this topic exist. Some of these controversies are addressed in this review, for example, who should perform filler injections, the difference between permanent and nonpermanent fillers, the off-label use of liquid silicone, and the role of pain reduction. Implementation of guidelines and restriction of filler use by trained physicians can improve safety for patients.

  16. Patient safety considerations regarding dermal filler injections.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jill K

    2006-01-01

    Today's population is seeking procedures that enhance or improve its appearance, that require little or no downtime, and that provide immediate results. Dermal filler injections are among the top five procedures performed for this purpose. Patient safety must remain the ultimate goal of any practitioner delivering such procedures. This column will examine pertinent safety considerations in relation to the delivery of dermal filler injections.

  17. Acute and Cytotoxicity Studies of Aqueous and Ethanolic Leaf Extracts of Chromolaena odorata.

    PubMed

    Asomugha, R N; Ezejiofor, A N; Okafor, P N; Ijeh, I I

    2015-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata, a commonly used traditional remedy for different ailments, believed to be quite safe in terms of toxicity was evaluated for acute toxicity and cytotoxic potentials. Acute toxicity was done on albino Wistar rats using the Lorke method while brine shrimps were used to test for cytotoxicity. The results showed that the estimated LD50 for the aqueous and ethanolic extracts was 2154 and > 5000 mg kg(-1) body weight, respectively. Cytotoxicity to brine shrimps showed LC50 values of 324 and 392 ppm for aqueous and ethanolic extracts, respectively. These results indicate the relative non toxic nature of Chromolaena odorata extracts.

  18. Acute and subacute toxicity of 10B-paraboronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Taniyama, K.; Fujiwara, H.; Kuno, T.; Saito, N.; Shuntoh, H.; Sakaue, M.; Tanaka, C. )

    1989-07-01

    The acute and subacute toxicities of 10B-paraboronophenylalanine (10B-BPA) were investigated in the rat, according to the Good Laboratory Practice Standard for safety studies on drugs in Japan. In the acute toxicity test of 10B-BPA, LD50 values of acidic 10B-BPA for intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections were 640 mg/kg for male and 710 mg/kg for female rats, and more than 1,000 mg/kg for male and female rats, respectively. The LD50 values of neutral 10B-BPA for intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections were more than 3,000 mg/kg for male and female rats. The difference in LD50 values between acidic and neutral 10B-BPA may be attributed to the acidity of material. From the subacute toxicity test, in which the rats were injected daily subcutaneously for 28 days, the following toxic effects of 10B-BPA were observed. Increase in ketone level in the urine was induced in all rats treated with 10B-BPA. High dose of 10B-BPA (1,500 mg/kg) induced increase in spleen weight and reticulocyte count, and decrease in hemoglobin count, thereby suggesting that 10B-BPA causes hemolysis. Increases in the leukocyte count and the ratio of neutrophils and lymphocytes were also observed in rats treated with a high dose of 10B-BPA. This may be attributed to local reactions at the injection site. There were no significant differences in the findings between control rats and rats treated with a low dose of 10B-BPA (300 mg/kg). Thus, low doses of neutral 10B-BPA may be available for use as a drug.

  19. Species Typing in Dermal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leishmania is an infectious protozoan parasite related to African and American trypanosomes. All Leishmania species that are pathogenic to humans can cause dermal disease. When one is confronted with cutaneous leishmaniasis, identification of the causative species is relevant in both clinical and epidemiological studies, case management, and control. This review gives an overview of the currently existing and most used assays for species discrimination, with a critical appraisal of the limitations of each technique. The consensus taxonomy for the genus is outlined, including debatable species designations. Finally, a numerical literature analysis is presented that describes which methods are most used in various countries and regions in the world, and for which purposes. PMID:25672782

  20. 49 CFR 173.132 - Class 6, Division 6.1-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... it falls within any one of the following categories when tested on laboratory animals (whenever possible, animal test data that has been reported in the chemical literature should be used): (i) Oral... substance per mass of test animal (mg/kg). (2) LD50 for acute dermal toxicity means that dose of...

  1. Toxicity of Pesticides. Agrichemical Fact Sheet 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Winand K.

    This fact sheet gives the acute oral and dermal toxicity (LD 50) of over 250 pesticides in lab animals. The chemicals are categorized as fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, or miscellaneous compounds. One or more trade names are given for each pesticide. In addition, a brief explanation of toxicity determination is given. (BB)

  2. 49 CFR 173.132 - Class 6, Division 6.1-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Toxicity. A liquid or solid with an LD50 for acute oral toxicity of not more than 300 mg/kg. (ii) Dermal... inhalation of vapors of not more than 5000 mL/m3; or (2) Is an irritating material, with properties similar... aerodynamic diameter of that particle-fraction is 10 microns or less. A liquid substance should be tested if...

  3. 49 CFR 173.132 - Class 6, Division 6.1-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Toxicity. A liquid or solid with an LD50 for acute oral toxicity of not more than 300 mg/kg. (ii) Dermal... inhalation of vapors of not more than 5000 mL/m3; or (2) Is an irritating material, with properties similar... aerodynamic diameter of that particle-fraction is 10 microns or less. A liquid substance should be tested if...

  4. 49 CFR 173.132 - Class 6, Division 6.1-Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Toxicity. A liquid or solid with an LD50 for acute oral toxicity of not more than 300 mg/kg. (ii) Dermal... inhalation of vapors of not more than 5000 mL/m3; or (2) Is an irritating material, with properties similar... aerodynamic diameter of that particle-fraction is 10 microns or less. A liquid substance should be tested if...

  5. Acute systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botham, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Use of the test that aimed to identify the single lethal dose of a substance that kills half the animals in a test group (the LD50 test) should finally be discontinued by the end of 2002, after many years of controversy and debate. In its stead are three recently developed alternative animal tests that significantly improve animal welfare: the fixed dose procedure, the acute toxic class method, and the up and down procedure. These tests have already undergone revision, both to improve their scientific performance and, importantly, to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy of acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used (perhaps by mid-2002) as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests to improve dose level selection and reduce (at least modestly) the number of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, which will require at least 10 yr.

  6. Dermal fillers for facial soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Sarosh F; Misch, Carl E; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, patients are demanding not only enhancement to their dental (micro) esthetics, but also their overall facial (macro) esthetics. Soft tissue augmentation via dermal filling agents may be used to correct facial defects such as wrinkles caused by age, gravity, and trauma; thin lips; asymmetrical facial appearances; buccal fold depressions; and others. This article will review the pathogenesis of facial wrinkles, history, techniques, materials, complications, and clinical controversies regarding dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation.

  7. Acute Toxicity-Supported Chronic Toxicity Prediction: A k-Nearest Neighbor Coupled Read-Across Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Friedman, Ran; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification model was constructed for 118 RDT NEDO (Repeated Dose Toxicity New Energy and industrial technology Development Organization; currently known as the Hazard Evaluation Support System (HESS)) database chemicals, employing two acute toxicity (LD50)-based classes as a response and using a series of eight PaDEL software-derived fingerprints as predictor variables. A model developed using Estate type fingerprints correctly predicted the LD50 classes for 70 of 94 training set chemicals and 19 of 24 test set chemicals. An individual category was formed for each of the chemicals by extracting its corresponding k-analogs that were identified by k-NN classification. These categories were used to perform the read-across study for prediction of the chronic toxicity, i.e., Lowest Observed Effect Levels (LOEL). We have successfully predicted the LOELs of 54 of 70 training set chemicals (77%) and 14 of 19 test set chemicals (74%) to within an order of magnitude from their experimental LOEL values. Given the success thus far, we conclude that if the k-NN model predicts LD50 classes correctly for a certain chemical, then the k-analogs of such a chemical can be successfully used for data gap filling for the LOEL. This model should support the in silico prediction of repeated dose toxicity. PMID:26006240

  8. Acute toxicity of some synthetic cyanogens in rats and their response to oral treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Satpute, R M; Hariharakrishnan, J; Tripathi, H; Saxena, P B

    2009-09-01

    Oral toxicity of several cyanogens and their reversal by alpha-ketoglutarate (A-KG; oral) were studied in rats. LD(50) of acetonitrile (ATCN), acrylonitrile (ACN), malononitrile (MCN), propionitrile (PCN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and succinonitrile (SCN) was 4891, 143.3, 69.8, 122.9, 69.8 and 488.7 mg/kg, respectively while the protection index of A-KG (ratio of LD(50) of cyanogens in the presence or absence of A-KG) was>2.0 against MCN (7.6), PCN (2.7) and SNP (3.6) only. We further studied the efficacy of A-KG against acute toxicity of these three cyanogens (0.75 LD(50)) on various hematological and biochemical variables in blood and soft tissues 24h post-exposure. We observed increase in white blood cells (SNP), plasma alanine (PCN, SNP) and aspartate (PCN) aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase (MCN, PCN, SNP), Na(+) (MCN, PCN) and cyanide (PCN), and decrease in K(+) (MCN, SNP) accompanied by an increase in brain, kidney and liver malondialdehyde (PCN), decrease in brain glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase (PCN, SNP), reduced glutathione (MCN, PCN, SNP) and cytochrome oxidase (PCN), liver rhodanese (PCN, SNP), and kidney cytochrome oxidase (PCN). The study indicates that (i) PCN was most toxic among all the cyanogens and (ii) beside cyanide, A-KG could be considered as an effective antidote for cyanogens.

  9. Interim report on the genetic and animal toxicity testing of SRC-I products, intermediates, and waste materials. Appendix D. Acute animal studies reports

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdowicz, B.Z.; Kelly, C.M.

    1983-09-01

    Appendix D is a collection of 25 individual reports on the toxicity of SRC-I products, intermediates and residues to rabbits, rats and guinea pigs with acute oral, dermal and inhalation exposure. It includes also eye and dermal irritation tests in rabbits and guinea pigs and dermal sensitization studies in albino guinea pigs. (LTN)

  10. Comparative acute toxicity and primary irritancy of the ethylidene and vinyl isomers of norbornene.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Myers, R C; Klonne, D R

    1997-01-01

    The acute toxicity and primary irritancy of the industrial chemicals 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (ENB) and 5-vinyl-2-norbornene (VNB) were studied. They are of moderate acute peroral toxicity in the rat, with LD50 values for ENB of 2.54 (male) and 5.66 (female) ml kg(-1), and for VNB of 5.90 (male) and 11.9 (female) ml kg(-1). Percutaneous toxicity is slight in the rabbit by 24-h occluded contact, with no mortalities for ENB up to 8.0 ml kg(-1) and only one mortality (male) at 16.0 ml kg(-1) VNB. Dynamically generated saturated vapor atmosphere LT50 values for ENB in the rat were 75 (male) and 125 (female) min, and for VNB they were 28 (male) and 37 (female) min. The 4-h LC50 values for ENB were 2717 (male) and 3015 (female) ppm, and for VNB they were 2231 (male) and 2518 (female) ppm. Intravenously, the ENB LD50 ranged from 0.09 (male rabbit) to 0.11 ml kg(-1) (female); corresponding LD50 values for VNB were 0.10-0.05 mg kg(-1). Acute neurotoxic signs were seen by the intravenous and inhalation routes of exposure, including tremors, ataxia and convulsions; the latter were sufficient to cause vertebral column luxation or fracture, producing spinal cord compression and resultant hindlimb paralysis. Both ENB and VNB are moderately irritating to the skin (rabbit), causing erythema and edema, but not necrosis. Both materials cause slight conjunctival hyperemia and chemosis in rabbits, but not corneal injury. PMID:9285533

  11. Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla, and modulate hair type.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Waleed; Abbasi, Sepideh; Hagner, Andrew; Raharjo, Eko; Kumar, Ranjan; Hotta, Akitsu; Magness, Scott; Metzger, Daniel; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) provide instructive signals required to activate epithelial progenitors and initiate hair follicle regeneration. DP cell numbers fluctuate over the hair cycle, and hair loss is associated with gradual depletion/atrophy of DP cells. How DP cell numbers are maintained in healthy follicles remains unclear. We performed in vivo fate mapping of adult hair follicle dermal sheath (DS) cells to determine their lineage relationship with DP and found that a subset of DS cells are retained following each hair cycle, exhibit self-renewal, and repopulate the DS and the DP with new cells. Ablating these hair follicle dermal stem cells and their progeny retarded hair regrowth and altered hair type specification, suggesting that they function to modulate normal DP function. This work identifies a bipotent stem cell within the adult hair follicle mesenchyme and has important implications toward restoration of hair growth after injury, disease, and aging.

  12. Effects of continuous wave and fractionated diode laser on human fibroblast cancer and dermal normal cells by zinc phthalocyanine in photodynamic therapy: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Navaeipour, Farzaneh; Afsharan, Hadi; Tajalli, Habib; Mollabashi, Mahmood; Ranjbari, Farideh; Montaseri, Azadeh; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    In this experimental study, cancer and normal cells behavior during an in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT) under exposure of continuous wave (CW) and fractionated mode of laser with different irradiation power and time intervals was compared and investigated. At the first, human fibroblast cancer cell line (SW 872) and human dermal normal (HFFF2) cell line were incubated with different concentrations of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), as a PDT drug. The cells, then, were irradiated with a 675nm diode laser and the cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Under optimized conditions, the viability of the cancer cells was eventually reduced to 3.23% and 13.17%, and that of normal cells was decreased to 20.83% and 36.23% using CW and fractionated diode lasers, respectively. In general, the ratio of ZnPc LD50 values for the normal cells to the cancer cells with CW laser was much higher than that of the fractionated laser. Subsequently, cancer cells in comparison with normal ones were found to be more sensitive toward the photodynamic damage induced by ZnPc. In addition, treatment with CW laser was found to be more effective against the cancer cells with a lower toxicity to the normal cells compared with the fractionated diode laser. PMID:27318602

  13. Effects of continuous wave and fractionated diode laser on human fibroblast cancer and dermal normal cells by zinc phthalocyanine in photodynamic therapy: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Navaeipour, Farzaneh; Afsharan, Hadi; Tajalli, Habib; Mollabashi, Mahmood; Ranjbari, Farideh; Montaseri, Azadeh; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-08-01

    In this experimental study, cancer and normal cells behavior during an in vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT) under exposure of continuous wave (CW) and fractionated mode of laser with different irradiation power and time intervals was compared and investigated. At the first, human fibroblast cancer cell line (SW 872) and human dermal normal (HFFF2) cell line were incubated with different concentrations of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), as a PDT drug. The cells, then, were irradiated with a 675nm diode laser and the cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Under optimized conditions, the viability of the cancer cells was eventually reduced to 3.23% and 13.17%, and that of normal cells was decreased to 20.83% and 36.23% using CW and fractionated diode lasers, respectively. In general, the ratio of ZnPc LD50 values for the normal cells to the cancer cells with CW laser was much higher than that of the fractionated laser. Subsequently, cancer cells in comparison with normal ones were found to be more sensitive toward the photodynamic damage induced by ZnPc. In addition, treatment with CW laser was found to be more effective against the cancer cells with a lower toxicity to the normal cells compared with the fractionated diode laser.

  14. Site-specific rectocele repair with dermal graft augmentation: comparison of porcine dermal xenograft (Pelvicol) and human dermal allograft.

    PubMed

    Biehl, Roger C; Moore, Robert D; Miklos, John R; Kohli, Neeraj; Anand, Indu S; Mattox, T Fleming

    2008-01-01

    This study is a retrospective chart review comparing 195 women who underwent rectocele repair with either a porcine dermal xenograft or human allogenic cadaveric dermal graft augmentation over a two year period. A site-specific defect repair was completed prior to augmentation with the graft. Examinations were performed preoperatively and postoperatively using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system. Questionnaires were used to assess constipation and dyspareunia. De novo dyspareunia and cure rates for constipation and dyspareunia were not statistically different between the two groups. Site-specific fascial rectocele repairs with xenograft or allograft augmentation were found to have similar complication rates as well as objective and subjective cure rates.

  15. Thymosin β4 Promotes Dermal Healing.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, H K; Sosne, G

    2016-01-01

    No agent has been identified that significantly accelerates the repair of chronic dermal wounds in humans. Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a small, abundant, naturally occurring regenerative protein that is found in body fluids and inside cells. It was found to have angiogenic and antiinflammatory activity and to be high in platelets that aggregate at the wound site. Thus we used Tβ4 initially in dermal healing. It has since been shown to have many activities important in tissue protection, repair, and regeneration. Tβ4 increases the rate of dermal healing in various preclinical animal models, including diabetic and aged animals, and is active for burns as well. Tβ4 also accelerated the rate of repair in phase 2 trials with patients having pressure ulcers, stasis ulcers, and epidermolysis bullosa wounds. It is safe and well tolerated and will likely have additional uses in the skin and in injured organs for tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:27450738

  16. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  17. The science and art of dermal fillers for soft-tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Jean; Cohen, Steven R; Joseph, John H; Narins, Rhoda S; Rubin, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Our expanding understanding of the physiological and immunological conditions of the skin and, in particular, the aging face, has prompted a growing field of aesthetic technology. Restorative procedures are taking advantage of improved and refined biotechnology, which continues to evolve at a rapid pace. Whereas surgical correction of skin laxity was the norm in years past, there are now many topical options available to encourage healthy, youthful skin, and an ever-growing, increasingly perfected depot of minimally invasive, injectable dermal volumizers and stimulators, collectively referred to as dermal fillers. The growth indicators for this market are as striking as the science. However, successful use of dermal fillers is not only a function of the quality of science leading to improved biocompatibility but also the "art" of client selection, filler application and vigilant follow up. Even the "ideal" filler is subject to unique interactions with both the practitioner and the patient. This article presents a review of the safety and efficacy of the most commonly used dermal fillers with emphasis on those approved for facial aesthetics. The subtleties of improved filler technologies that impact tissue acceptance and reaction, measures of effectiveness and a comparison of wrinkle-reduction outcomes, the nature and incidence of acute and chronic tissue reaction, and a discussion of recommended or preferred filler applications are presented.

  18. A critical role of acute bronchoconstriction in the mortality associated with high-dose sarin inhalation: effects of epinephrine and oxygen therapies.

    PubMed

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Zhuang, Jianguo; Barrett, Edward G; Xu, Fadi; Russell, Robert G; Sopori, Mohan L

    2014-01-15

    Sarin is an organophosphate nerve agent that is among the most lethal chemical toxins known to mankind. Because of its vaporization properties and ease and low cost of production, sarin is the nerve agent with a strong potential for use by terrorists and rouge nations. The primary route of sarin exposure is through inhalation and, depending on the dose, sarin leads to acute respiratory failure and death. The mechanism(s) of sarin-induced respiratory failure is poorly understood. Sarin irreversibly inhibits acetylcholine esterase, leading to excessive synaptic levels of acetylcholine and, we have previously shown that sarin causes marked ventilatory changes including weakened response to hypoxia. We now show that LD50 sarin inhalation causes severe bronchoconstriction in rats, leading to airway resistance, increased hypoxia-induced factor-1α, and severe lung epithelium injury. Transferring animals into 60% oxygen chambers after sarin exposure improved the survival from about 50% to 75% at 24h; however, many animals died within hours after removal from the oxygen chambers. On the other hand, if LD50 sarin-exposed animals were administered the bronchodilator epinephrine, >90% of the animals survived. Moreover, while both epinephrine and oxygen treatments moderated cardiorespiratory parameters, the proinflammatory cytokine surge, and elevated expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α, only epinephrine consistently reduced the sarin-induced bronchoconstriction. These data suggest that severe bronchoconstriction is a critical factor in the mortality induced by LD50 sarin inhalation, and epinephrine may limit the ventilatory, inflammatory, and lethal effects of sarin.

  19. Short-term toxicity studies of sanguinarine and of two alkaloid extracts of Sanguinaria canadensis L.

    PubMed

    Becci, P J; Schwartz, H; Barnes, H H; Southard, G L

    1987-01-01

    The short-term toxicity of sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid, and of two alkaloid extracts of Sanguinaria canadensis L. are presented. The acute oral LD50 in rats of sanguinarine was calculated to be 1658 mg/kg, and of the two alkaloid extracts, 1440 and 1250 mg/kg. The acute iv LD50 in rats of sanguinarine was found to be 29 mg/kg. No toxic effects were observed in rats fed up to 150 ppm sanguinarine in the diet for 14 d and in rats treated by gavage with up to 0.6 mg/kg body weight for 30 d. The acute dermal LD50 in rabbits was found to be greater than 200 mg/kg.

  20. Effectiveness of Donepezil, Rivastigmine, and (±)Huperzine A in Counteracting the Acute Toxicity of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents: Comparison with Galantamine

    PubMed Central

    Aracava, Yasco; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Akkerman, Miriam; Adler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Galantamine, a centrally acting cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor and a nicotinic allosteric potentiating ligand used to treat Alzheimer's disease, is an effective and safe antidote against poisoning with nerve agents, including soman. Here, the effectiveness of galantamine was compared with that of the centrally active ChE inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and (±)huperzine A as a pre- and/or post-treatment to counteract the acute toxicity of soman. In the first set of experiments, male prepubertal guinea pigs were treated intramuscularly with one of the test drugs and 30 min later challenged with 1.5 × LD50 soman (42 μg/kg s.c.). All animals that were pretreated with galantamine (6–8 mg/kg), 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A survived the soman challenge, provided that they were also post-treated with atropine (10 mg/kg i.m.). However, only galantamine was well tolerated. In subsequent experiments, the effectiveness of specific treatment regimens using 8 mg/kg galantamine, 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A was compared in guinea pigs challenged with soman. In the absence of atropine, only galantamine worked as an effective and safe pretreatment in animals challenged with 1.0 × LD50 soman. Galantamine was also the only drug to afford significant protection when given to guinea pigs after 1.0 × LD50 soman. Finally, all test drugs except galantamine reduced the survival of the animals when administered 1 or 3 h after the challenge with 0.6 or 0.7 × LD50 soman. Thus, galantamine emerges as a superior antidotal therapy against the toxicity of soman. PMID:19741148

  1. LINKING DERMAL MODELING AND LOADING DATA TO PREDICT LONG-TERM DOSES FROM INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assess dermal exposure and dose resulting from intermittent contact with residue-contaminated surfaces. These estimates require an understanding of (1) the quantitative relationship between exposure and absorbed dose; (2) the impact of intermittent exposure on ...

  2. Toxicity of white phosphorus to waterfowl: acute exposure in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Gustafson, M.; Klein, P.; Karouna-Renier, N.

    1997-01-01

    As part of an effort to understand extensive, white phosphorus (P4)-induced waterfowl mortality at Eagle River Flats, Fort Richardson, Alaska, we conducted a number of acute toxicity tests using penned mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in 1993 and 1994. The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) for P4 dissolved in oil was 6.46 mg/kg in adult males and 6.96 mg/kg in adult females. Although the median lethal doses were not statistically different, the female dose-response curve had a statistically shallower slope than that of males. The LD50 for the ecologically more relevant pelletized form of P4 in adult males was 4.05 mg/kg. In mallards, one mechanism of P4 toxicity caused rapid (3 to 10 hr) mortality and had signs consistent with anoxia. A second, slower acting mechanism resulted in hepatic and renal pathology including extensive fat deposition in the liver and cellular necrosis. White phosphorus accumulated in adipose tissues, but only for a few days.

  3. Acute and chronic toxicity of the aqueous extract of Artemisia afra in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mukinda, J T; Syce, J A

    2007-05-30

    Artemisia afra (Jacq. Ex. Willd), "African Wormwood" is widely used traditionally in South Africa with no literature evidence substantiating its safety. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of the aqueous extract of Artemisia afra by determining its pharmaco-toxicological effects after acute and chronic administration in mice and rats, respectively. The aqueous extract mimicked the traditional decoction dosage form of Artemisia afra. In mice, single intraperitoneal injections of Artemisia afra-extract (1.5-5.5g/kg) induced a regular dose-dependent increase in the death rate and incidence of general behaviour adverse effects, while with single oral doses (2-24g/kg) the increases in incidence of general behaviour adverse effects and mortality rate were dose-independent. The LD(50s) after acute intraperitoneal and oral doses were 2.45 and 8.96g/kg, respectively. Rats given oral doses of Artemisia afra-extract (0.1 or 1g/kg/day) survived the 3 months of dosing (i.e. LD(50) much higher than 1g/kg), experienced no significant changes in general behaviour and haematological and biochemical parameters, except for transient decrease in AST activity. No significant changes were observed in organ weights, and histopathological results showed normal profile suggesting no morphological alterations. Collectively, the results indicate that Artemisia afra-extract is non-toxic when given acutely, has low chronic toxicity potential and, in high doses, may have a hepatoprotective effect.

  4. The prolonged gastrointestinal syndrome in rhesus macaques: the relationship between gastrointestinal, hematopoietic, and delayed multi-organ sequelae following acute, potentially lethal, partial-body irradiation.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Bennett, Alexander; Booth, Catherine; Garofalo, Michael; Tudor, Gregory; Ward, Amanda; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Gelfond, Daniel; McFarland, Emylee; Jackson, William; Lu, Wei; Farese, Ann M

    2012-10-01

    The dose response relationship for the acute gastrointestinal syndrome following total-body irradiation prevents analysis of the full recovery and damage to the gastrointestinal system, since all animals succumb to the subsequent 100% lethal hematopoietic syndrome. A partial-body irradiation model with 5% bone marrow sparing was established to investigate the prolonged effects of high-dose radiation on the gastrointestinal system, as well as the concomitant hematopoietic syndrome and other multi-organ injury including the lung. Herein, cellular and clinical parameters link acute and delayed coincident sequelae to radiation dose and time course post-exposure. Male rhesus Macaca mulatta were exposed to partial-body irradiation with 5% bone marrow (tibiae, ankles, feet) sparing using 6 MV linear accelerator photons at a dose rate of 0.80 Gy min(-1) to midline tissue (thorax) doses in the exposure range of 9.0 to 12.5 Gy. Following irradiation, all animals were monitored for multiple organ-specific parameters for 180 d. Animals were administered medical management including administration of intravenous fluids, antiemetics, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, antidiarrheals, supplemental nutrition, and analgesics. The primary endpoint was survival at 15, 60, or 180 d post-exposure. Secondary endpoints included evaluation of dehydration, diarrhea, hematologic parameters, respiratory distress, histology of small and large intestine, lung radiographs, and mean survival time of decedents. Dose- and time-dependent mortality defined several organ-specific sequelae, with LD50/15 of 11.95 Gy, LD50/60 of 11.01 Gy, and LD50/180 of 9.73 Gy for respective acute gastrointestinal, combined hematopoietic and gastrointestinal, and multi-organ delayed injury to include the lung. This model allows analysis of concomitant multi-organ sequelae, thus providing a link between acute and delayed radiation effects. Specific and multi-organ medical countermeasures can be assessed for

  5. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... susceptible tissues. (c) Principle of the test method. The test substance is applied daily to the skin in... the vehicle on toxicity of and penetration of the skin by the test substance should be taken into... a life span. (2) Dose in a dermal test is the amount of test substance applied to the skin...

  6. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... susceptible tissues. (c) Principle of the test method. The test substance is applied daily to the skin in... the vehicle on toxicity of and penetration of the skin by the test substance should be taken into... a life span. (2) Dose in a dermal test is the amount of test substance applied to the skin...

  7. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  8. Dermal exudate macrophages. Induction in dermal chambers and response to lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Goihman-Yahr, M; Ulrich, M; Noya-León, A; Rojas, A; Convit, J

    1975-01-01

    Chambers were implanted in the dorsum of guinea-pigs at the dermal-subcutaneous junction. Exudates were induced and harvested. Macrophages obtained were able to migrate in vitro. If procured from sensitized donors, macrophage migration was inhibited by the corresponding antigen. Dermal exudate macrophages are therefore subject to the effect of lymphokines. The chamber model may be useful for in vivo studies of cell to cell and cell-parasite interactions. PMID:1212821

  9. Acute systemic toxicity--prospects for tiered testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Botham, P A

    2004-04-01

    After many years of controversy and debate, the LD50 test was finally deleted by the end of 2002. Three alternative animal tests, the Fixed Dose Procedure, the Acute Toxic Class Method and the Up and Down Procedure have been developed which give rise to significant improvements in animal welfare. They have recently undergone revision to improve their scientific performance but more importantly to increase their regulatory acceptance. They can now be used within a strategy for acute toxicity testing for all types of test substances and for all regulatory and in-house purposes. In vitro cytotoxicity tests could be used as adjuncts to these alternative animal tests within the next year or so to improve dose level selection and thus give further modest improvements in the numbers of animals used. However, the total replacement of animal tests requires a considerable amount of further test development, followed by validation, and is at least 10 years away.

  10. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i...)(2)(ii) of this section. (C) Vehicle. Solids should be pulverized when possible. The test substance... requirements specified under EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J,...

  11. 40 CFR 799.9120 - TSCA acute dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fixed rigidly. It should be determined by the toxic reactions, rate of onset, and length of recovery... substances are discussed in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards. (3) Test procedures—(i... to produce test groups with a range of toxic effects and mortality rates. The data must be...

  12. Exploring waiving opportunities for mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Graepel, Rabea; Asturiol, David; Prieto, Pilar; Worth, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    A survey was carried out to explore opportunities for waiving mammalian acute systemic toxicity tests. We were interested in finding out whether data from a sub-acute toxicity test could be used to predict the outcome of an acute systemic toxicity test. The survey was directed at experts in the field of toxicity testing, and was carried out in the context of the upcoming 2018 final registration deadline for chemicals under the EU REACH Regulation. In addition to the survey, a retrospective data analysis of chemicals that had already been registered with the European Chemicals Agency, and for which both acute and sub-acute toxicity data were available, was carried out. This data analysis was focused on chemicals that were administered via the oral route. The answers to the questionnaire showed a willingness to adopt waiving opportunities. In addition, the responses showed that data from a sub-acute toxicity test or dose-range finding study might be useful for predicting chemicals that do not require classification for acute oral toxicity (LD50 > 2000mg/kg body weight). However, with the exception of substances that fall into the non-classified category, it is difficult to predict current acute oral toxicity categories. PMID:27494626

  13. A method for measuring dermal exposure to solvents and fumigants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a method for evaluating dermal exposure to deposits of volatile liquids. Telone II, a fumigant containing 1,3-dichloropropene (DCP), was used as an example. The approach included direct monitoring of dermal deposits and estimating the dermal absorbed dose. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters were developed for retaining the volatile deposits. Estimates are given for the retention efficiencies to be expected in various field conditions. The dermally absorbed dose is affected by the evaporation rate from the skin and by the percutaneous absorption rate (flux). Both factors were studied by the dermal dosing of ras with Telone, and monitoring evaporation and urine metabolites of cis-DCP. While relatively high flux values were calculated for rat and estimated for man, due to fast evaporation, the estimated absorbed fraction from a localized dermal deposit was less than 0.2%. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters and charcoal tubes were used in ten studies to monitor dermal and respiratory exposure of field applicators to Telone. The charcoal cloth dosimeter method is applicable for monitoring dermal exposure to other volatile chemicals also. However, evaluation of the exposure could be associated with relatively large variability, rendering the method semiquantitative.

  14. Dermal mass aspirate from a Persian cat.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Kurt; Feldman, Bernard; Robertson, John; Herring, Erin S; Manning, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    A 1-year-old spayed female Persian cat with alopecia and weight loss had numerous variably ulcerated dermal nodules. Cytologic examination of an aspirate of one of the nodules revealed pyogranulomatous inflammation along with septate hyphae and basophilic round bodies, 0.5-1.0 microm in diameter, surrounded by a thin clear halo (arthrospores). The cytologic diagnosis was dermatophytic pseudomycetoma. Histologically, there were dermal granulomas containing poorly staining, septate hyphae with bulbous spores embedded within abundant amorphous eosinophilic material (Splendore-Hoeppli reaction), and the histologic diagnosis was pseudomycetoma-associated chronic multifocal severe granulomatous dermatitis with lymphocytic perifolliculitis and furunculosis. Microsporum canis was cultured from the lesion. Pseudomycetomas are distinguished from fungal mycetomas, or eumycotic mycetomas, by the findings of multiple lesions, lack of a history of skin trauma, an association with dermatophytes, most commonly Microsporum canis, and, histologically, lack of true cement material and a more abundant Splendore-Hoeppli reaction in pseudomycetomas. Additionally, pseudomycetomas differ from dermatophytosis, in which lesions are restricted to epidermal structures. Persian cats have a high incidence of pseudomycetoma formation, suggesting a heritable predisposition. The prognosis is fair with systemic antifungal therapy. When examining cytologic specimens from Persian cats with single or multiple dermal nodules, especially if pyogranulomatous inflammation is present, a diagnosis of pseudomycetoma should be suspected and is warranted if arthrospores and refractile septate hyphae are present.

  15. Conceptual model for assessment of dermal exposure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, T.; Vermeulen, R.; Brouwer, D. H.; Cherrie, J. W.; Kromhout, H.; Fogh, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    Dermal exposure, primarily to pesticides, has been measured for almost half a century. Compared with exposure by inhalation, limited progress has been made towards standardisation of methods of measurement and development of biologically relevant exposure measures. It is suggested that the absence of a consistent terminology and a theoretical model has been an important cause of this lack of progress. Therefore, a consistent terminology based on a multicompartment model for assessment of dermal exposure is proposed that describes the transport of contaminant mass from the source of the hazardous substance to the surface of the skin. Six compartments and two barriers together with eight mass transport processes are described. With the model structure, examples are given of what some existing methods actually measure and where there are limited, or no, methods for measuring the relevant mass in a compartment or transport of mass. The importance of measuring the concentration of contaminant and not mass per area in the skin contaminant layer is stressed, as it is the concentration difference between the skin contamination layer and the perfused tissue that drives uptake. Methods for measuring uptake are currently not available. Measurement of mass, concentration, and the transport processes must be based on a theoretical model. Standardisation of methods of measurement of dermal exposure is strongly recommended.   PMID:10658563

  16. Towards Global QSAR Model Building for Acute Toxicity: Munro Database Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Nicholls, Ian A.; Karlsson, Björn C. G.; Rosengren, Annika M.; Ballabio, Davide; Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A series of 436 Munro database chemicals were studied with respect to their corresponding experimental LD50 values to investigate the possibility of establishing a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. Dragon molecular descriptors were used for the QSAR model development and genetic algorithms were used to select descriptors better correlated with toxicity data. Toxic values were discretized in a qualitative class on the basis of the Globally Harmonized Scheme: the 436 chemicals were divided into 3 classes based on their experimental LD50 values: highly toxic, intermediate toxic and low to non-toxic. The k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method was calibrated on 25 molecular descriptors and gave a non-error rate (NER) equal to 0.66 and 0.57 for internal and external prediction sets, respectively. Even if the classification performances are not optimal, the subsequent analysis of the selected descriptors and their relationship with toxicity levels constitute a step towards the development of a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. PMID:25302621

  17. Evaluation of electric arc furnace-processed steel slag for dermal corrosion, irritation, and sensitization from dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Troese, Matthew J; Hall, Debra A; Yasso, Blair; Yzenas, John J; Proctor, Debora M

    2014-12-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag is alkaline (pH of ~11-12) and contains metals, most notably chromium and nickel, and thus has potential to cause dermal irritation and sensitization at sufficient dose. Dermal contact with EAF slag occurs in many occupational and environmental settings because it is used widely in construction and other industrial sectors for various applications including asphaltic paving, road bases, construction fill, and as feed for cement kilns construction. However, no published study has characterized the potential for dermal effects associated with EAF slag. To assess dermal irritation, corrosion and sensitizing potential of EAF slag, in vitro and in vivo dermal toxicity assays were conducted based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. In vitro dermal corrosion and irritation testing (OECD 431 and 439) of EAF slag was conducted using the reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) tissue model. In vivo dermal toxicity and delayed contact sensitization testing (OECD 404 and 406) were conducted in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. EAF slag was not corrosive and not irritating in any tests. The results of the delayed contact dermal sensitization test indicate that EAF slag is not a dermal sensitizer. These findings are supported by the observation that metals in EAF slag occur as oxides of low solubility with leachates that are well below toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits. Based on these results and in accordance to the OECD guidelines, EAF slag is not considered a dermal sensitizer, corrosive or irritant.

  18. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  19. Acute toxicity of pinnatoxins E, F and G to mice.

    PubMed

    Munday, Rex; Selwood, Andrew I; Rhodes, Lesley

    2012-11-01

    The acute toxicities to mice of pinnatoxins E, F and G, members of the cyclic imine group of phycotoxins, by intraperitoneal injection and/or oral administration, have been determined. These substances were all very toxic by intraperitoneal injection, with LD(50) values between 12.7 and 57 μg/kg. Pinnatoxin E was much less toxic by oral administration than by intraperitoneal injection, but this was not the case for pinnatoxin F. The median lethal doses of the latter substance by gavage and by voluntary intake were only 2 and 4 times higher than that by injection. The high oral toxicity of pinnatoxin F raises concerns as to the possibility of adverse effects of this substance in shellfish consumers, although it should be noted that no toxic effects in humans have been recorded with pinnatoxins or with any other compound of the cyclic imine group. PMID:22813782

  20. Dermal vacuoles in two biopsies of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Ayva, Sebnem; Erkek, Emel; Atasoy, Pinar

    2008-11-01

    Two patients presented with cutaneous lesions clinically typical of psoriasis. The first case was a 38-year-old man and the second was a 51-year-old woman. To confirm the diagnosis, 4-mm punch biopsy samples were obtained from both patients from the lesions on the knees. Histology in both cases was in favour of psoriasis and also revealed empty vacuoles in the papillary dermis, concentrated at sites of intense lymphocyte infiltration. The empty vacuoles resembled true fat cells or fat globules. They did not reveal positive immunostaining with CD34 antigen, suggesting that they were not lined by endothelial cells. Final histological diagnosis was psoriasis associated with dermal vacuolization.

  1. Evaluation of lymphangiogenesis in acellular dermal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Pellegatta, Igor; Tamborini, Federico; Cerati, Michele; Sessa, Fausto; Valdatta, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Much attention has been directed towards understanding the phenomena of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in wound healing. Thanks to the manifold dermal substitute available nowadays, wound treatment has improved greatly. Many studies have been published about angiogenesis and cell invasion in INTEGRA®. On the other hand, the development of the lymphatic network in acellular dermal matrix (ADM) is a more obscure matter. In this article, we aim to characterize the different phases of host cell invasion in ADM. Special attention was given to lymphangiogenic aspects. Materials and Methods: Among 57 rats selected to analyse the role of ADM in lymphangiogenesis, we created four groups. We performed an excision procedure on both thighs of these rats: On the left one we did not perform any action except repairing the borders of the wound; while on the right one we used INTEGRA® implant. The excision biopsy was performed at four different times: First group after 7 days, second after 14 days, third after 21 days and fourth after 28 days. For our microscopic evaluation, we used the classical staining technique of haematoxylin and eosin and a semi-quantitative method in order to evaluate cellularity counts. To assess angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis development we employed PROX-1 Ab and CD31/PECAM for immunohistochemical analysis. Results: We found remarkable wound contraction in defects that healed by secondary intention while minor wound contraction was observed in defects treated with ADM. At day 7, optical microscopy revealed a more plentiful cellularity in the granulation tissue compared with the dermal regeneration matrix. The immunohistochemical process highlighted vascular and lymphatic cells in both groups. After 14 days a high grade of fibrosis was noticeable in the non-treated group. At day 21, both lymphatic and vascular endothelial cells were better developed in the group with a dermal matrix application. At day 28, lymphatic endothelial

  2. Acellular dermal matrix in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald P

    2011-09-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction is a complex and challenging surgical undertaking. While permanent prosthetic mesh is considered the gold standard for minimizing hernia recurrence, placement of synthetic mesh is sometimes imprudent due to contamination or risk of infection. Acellular dermal matrices (ADM) offer an exciting biologic alternative. This article provides a historical perspective on the evolution of complex ventral hernia repair leading up to and including the placement of ADM, an explanation of the biology of ADM as it relates to ventral hernia repair, and a description of the current indications, techniques, benefits, and shortcomings of its use in the abdominal wall.

  3. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposures of firefighters during suppression of structural burns.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Fent, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposures over a working lifetime, in particular about low-level exposures that might serve as initiating events for adverse outcome pathways (AOP) leading to cancer. As part of a larger US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study of dermal exposure protection from safety gear used by the City of Chicago firefighters, we collected pre- and post-fire fighting breath samples and analyzed for single-ring and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as bioindicators of occupational exposure to gas-phase toxicants. Under the assumption that SCBA protects completely against inhalation exposures, any changes in the exhaled profile of combustion products were attributed to dermal exposures from gas and particle penetration through the protective clothing. Two separate rounds of firefighting activity were performed each with 15 firefighters per round. Exhaled breath samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analyzed with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a targeted approach using selective ion monitoring. We found that single ring aromatics and some PAHs were statistically elevated in post-firefighting samples of some individuals, suggesting that fire protective gear may allow for dermal exposures to airborne contaminants. However, in comparison to a previous occupational study of Air Force maintenance personnel where similar compounds were measured, these exposures are much lower suggesting that firefighters' gear is very effective. This study suggests that exhaled breath sampling and analysis for specific targeted compounds is a suitable method for assessing systemic dermal exposure in a simple and non-invasive manner.

  4. Exploratory breath analyses for assessing toxic dermal exposures of firefighters during suppression of structural burns.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Fent, Kenneth W

    2014-09-01

    Firefighters wear fireproof clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during rescue and fire suppression activities to protect against acute effects from heat and toxic chemicals. Fire services are also concerned about long-term health outcomes from chemical exposures over a working lifetime, in particular about low-level exposures that might serve as initiating events for adverse outcome pathways (AOP) leading to cancer. As part of a larger US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) study of dermal exposure protection from safety gear used by the City of Chicago firefighters, we collected pre- and post-fire fighting breath samples and analyzed for single-ring and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as bioindicators of occupational exposure to gas-phase toxicants. Under the assumption that SCBA protects completely against inhalation exposures, any changes in the exhaled profile of combustion products were attributed to dermal exposures from gas and particle penetration through the protective clothing. Two separate rounds of firefighting activity were performed each with 15 firefighters per round. Exhaled breath samples were collected onto adsorbent tubes and analyzed with gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with a targeted approach using selective ion monitoring. We found that single ring aromatics and some PAHs were statistically elevated in post-firefighting samples of some individuals, suggesting that fire protective gear may allow for dermal exposures to airborne contaminants. However, in comparison to a previous occupational study of Air Force maintenance personnel where similar compounds were measured, these exposures are much lower suggesting that firefighters' gear is very effective. This study suggests that exhaled breath sampling and analysis for specific targeted compounds is a suitable method for assessing systemic dermal exposure in a simple and non-invasive manner. PMID:25190461

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  6. Case report: pseudotail with dermal sinus tract and tethered cord.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul; Davidson, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    A pseudotail is a very rare, dermal appendage arising from the lumbosacral region with an association with spinal dysraphism. We report a case of a pseudotail in a healthy newborn female with sonographic imaging of a tethered cord and dermal sinus tract with MRI and surgical correlation. PMID:27635168

  7. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  8. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andria N; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T; Muffley, Lara A; Isik, F Frank; Gibran, Nicole S; Hocking, Anne M

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  10. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  11. Lipid nanoparticles for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kakadia, Pratibha G; Conway, Barbara R

    2015-01-01

    Lipid based drug delivery systems have been widely studied and reported over the past decade and offer a useful alternative to other colloidal drug delivery systems. Skin is a popular route of drug delivery for locally and systemically acting drugs and nanoparticles are reported as a potential formulation strategy for dermal delivery. Although the skin acts as a natural physical barrier against penetration of foreign materials, including particulates, opportunities exist for the delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles, especially in diseased and damaged skin and via appendageal routes such as the openings of hair follicles. The extent and ability of nanoparticles to penetrate into the underlying viable tissue is still the subject of debate although recent studies have identified the follicular route as the most likely route of entry; this influences the potential applications of these dosage forms as a drug delivery strategy. This paper reviews present state of art of lipid-based nanocarriers focussing on solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and nanoemulsions, their production methods, potential advantages and applications in dermal drug delivery. PMID:25925115

  12. In vitro cytotoxicity testing of 30 reference chemicals to predict acute human and animal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barile, F.A.; Arjun, S.; Borges, L. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted in cooperation with the Scandinavian Society of Cell Toxicology, as part of the Multicenter Evaluation for In Vitro Cytotoxicity (MEIC), and was designed to develop an in vitro model for predicting acute human and animal toxicity. The technique relies on the ability of cultured transformed rat lung epithelial cells (L2) to incorporate radiolabled amino acids into newly synthesized proteins in the absence or presence of increasing doses of the test chemical, during a 24-hr incubation. IC50 values were extrapolated from the dose-response curves after linear regression analysis. Human toxic blood concentrations estimated from rodent LD50 values suggest that our experimental IC50's are in close correlation with the former. Validation of the data by the MEIC committee shows that our IC50 values predicted human lethal dosage as efficient as rodent LD50's. It is anticipated that this and related procedures may supplement or replace currently used animal protocols for predicting human toxicity.

  13. Evaluation of Caenorhabditis elegans as an acute lethality and a neurotoxicity screening model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This investigation evaluated C. elegans as a lethality and neurotoxicity screening model. The lethality experiments were performed in both agar and an aquatic medium. The salts of 8 metals (Hg, Be, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and Sr) were used in the agar studies and the salts of 14 metals (Ag, Hg, Cu, Be, Al, Pb, Cr, As, Tl, Zn, Cd, Ni, Sr, and Sb) were used in the aquatic tests. In each of these tests an LC50 value was determined. The data from the agar plates were compared to the published mammalian oral LD50 values for salts of the same metals. Within this set of chemicals C. elegans was found to be a predictor of mammalian acute lethality, generating LC50 values parallel to the rat and mouse LD50 values. The aquatic data were compared to data from EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria documents. C. elegans was found to be less sensitive than Daphnia but generally more sensitive than the other invertebrate organisms that are presently used. The neurotoxicity testing also was performed in both agar and an aquatic media. The testing in agar was conducted with the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg) and 2 organophosphate pesticides (malathion and vapona). The studies in an aquatic medium tested the salts of 4 metals (Cu, Be, Pb, and Hg).

  14. Sprague-Dawley rats display metabolism-mediated sex differences in the acute toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)

    SciTech Connect

    Fonsart, Julien ||; Menet, Marie-Claude |; Decleves, Xavier ||; Galons, Herve |; Crete, Dominique; Debray, Marcel; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel ||; Noble, Florence ||

    2008-07-01

    The use of the amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has been associated with unexplained deaths. Male humans and rodents are more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females, including a potentially lethal hyperthermia. MDMA is highly metabolized to five main metabolites, by the enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP2D. The major metabolite in rats, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), also causes hyperthermia. We postulated that the reported sex difference in rats is due to a sexual dimorphism(s). We therefore determined (1) the LD50 of MDMA and MDA, (2) their hyperthermic effects, (3) the activities of liver CYP1A2 and CYP2D, (4) the liver microsomal metabolism of MDMA and MDA, (5) and the plasma concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites 3 h after giving male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats MDMA (5 mg.kg{sup -1} sc). The LD50 of MDMA was 2.4-times lower in males than in females. MDMA induced greater hyperthermia (0.9 deg. C) in males. The plasma MDA concentration was 1.3-fold higher in males, as were CYP1A2 activity (twice) and N-demethylation to MDA (3.3-fold), but the plasma MDMA concentration (1.4-fold) and CYP2D activity (1.3-fold) were higher in females. These results suggest that male SD rats are more sensitive to MDMA acute toxicity than are females, probably because their CYP1A2 is more active, leading to higher N-demethylation and plasma MDA concentration. This metabolic pathway could be responsible for the lethality of MDMA, as the LD50 of MDA is the same in both sexes. These data strongly suggest that the toxicity of amphetamine-related drugs largely depends on metabolic differences.

  15. Toxicological evaluation of neem (Azadirachta indica) oil: acute and subacute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun-xia; Cao, Mei; Shi, Dong-xia; Yin, Zhong-qiong; Jia, Ren-yong; Xu, Jiao; Wang, Chuan; Lv, Cheng; Liang, Xiao-xia; He, Chang-liang; Yang, Zhi-rong; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica), popularly known as traditional medicine is a native plant in India. Neem oil is a vegetable oil derived from seeds or fruits of the neem tree through pressing or solvent extraction, and largely used in popular medicine to have antifungal, antibacterial, antimalarial, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, as well as immunemodulatory properties in different animal species. In the present study, acute and 28-day subacute toxicity tests were carried out. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of neem oil were found to be 31.95g/kg. The subacute treatment with neem oil failed to change body weight gain, food and water consumption. Serum biochemistry analysis showed no significant differences in any of the parameters examined under the dose of 1600mg/kg/day. Histopathological exams showed that the target organs of neem oil were testicle, liver and kidneys up to the dose of 1600mg/kg/day.

  16. Toxicological evaluation of neem (Azadirachta indica) oil: acute and subacute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun-xia; Cao, Mei; Shi, Dong-xia; Yin, Zhong-qiong; Jia, Ren-yong; Xu, Jiao; Wang, Chuan; Lv, Cheng; Liang, Xiao-xia; He, Chang-liang; Yang, Zhi-rong; Zhao, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica), popularly known as traditional medicine is a native plant in India. Neem oil is a vegetable oil derived from seeds or fruits of the neem tree through pressing or solvent extraction, and largely used in popular medicine to have antifungal, antibacterial, antimalarial, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, as well as immunemodulatory properties in different animal species. In the present study, acute and 28-day subacute toxicity tests were carried out. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of neem oil were found to be 31.95g/kg. The subacute treatment with neem oil failed to change body weight gain, food and water consumption. Serum biochemistry analysis showed no significant differences in any of the parameters examined under the dose of 1600mg/kg/day. Histopathological exams showed that the target organs of neem oil were testicle, liver and kidneys up to the dose of 1600mg/kg/day. PMID:23353547

  17. Acute and oral subchronic toxicity of D-003 in rats.

    PubMed

    Gámez, R; Mas, R; Noa, M; Menéndez, R; Alemán, C; Acosta, P; García, H; Hernández, C; Amor, A; Pérez, J; Goicochea, E

    2000-12-20

    D-003 is a mixture of higher aliphatic primary acids purified from sugar cane wax (Saccharum officinarum) with cholesterol-lowering and antiplatelet effects experimentally proven. The present work reports the results of two studies investigating the acute and subchronic oral toxicity of D-003 in rats. Oral acute toxicity of D-003 (2000 mg/kg) was investigated according to the Acute Toxic Class (ATC) method (an alternative for the classical LD(50) test), which was performed in Wistar rats. The results obtained in this study defined D-003 oral acute toxicity as unclassified. In the subchronic study, rats of both sexes were orally treated with D-003 at 50, 200 and 1250 mg/kg for 90 days. At this time, animals were sacrificed. No evidence of treatment-related toxicity was detected during the study. Thus, data analysis of body weight gain, food consumption, clinical observations, blood biochemical, haematology, organ weight ratios and histopathological findings did not show significant differences between control and treated groups. It is concluded that D-003 orally administered to rats was safe and that no drug-related toxicity was detected even at the highest doses investigated in both acute (2000 mg/kg) and subchronic (1250 mg/kg) studies.

  18. Efficacy and safety of catnip (Nepeta cataria) as a novel filth fly repellent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J J; Zeng, X-P; Berkebile, D; DU, H-J; Tong, Y; Qian, K

    2009-09-01

    Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is known for its pseudo-narcotic effects on cats. Recently, it has been reported as an effective mosquito repellent against several Aedes and Culex species, both topically and spatially. Our laboratory bioassays showed that catnip essential oil (at a dosage of 20 mg) resulted in average repellency rates of 96% against stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) and 79% against houseflies, Musca domestica (L.), respectively. This finding suggested that the application of repellent could be used as part of filth fly management. Further evaluations of catnip oil toxicity were conducted to provide a broad-spectrum safety profile of catnip oil use as a potential biting and nuisance insect repellent in urban settings. Acute oral, dermal, inhalation, primary dermal and eye irritation toxicity tests were performed. The acute oral LD(50) of catnip oil was found to be 3160 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 2710 mg/kg BW in female and male rats, respectively. The acute dermal LD50 was > 5000 mg/kg BW. The acute inhalation LD50 was observed to be > 10,000 mg/m3. Primary skin irritation tested on New Zealand white rabbits showed that catnip oil is a moderate irritant. Catnip oil was classified as practically non-irritating to the eye. In comparison with other U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved mosquito repellents (DEET, picaridin and p-menthane-3,8-diol), catnip oil can be considered as a relatively safe repellent, which may cause minor skin irritation.

  19. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Brouwer, Derk H; Vermeulen, Roel; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others, resulting in a ranking of tasks and subsequently jobs. DREAM consists of an inventory and evaluation part. Two examples of dermal exposure of workers of a car-construction company show that DREAM characterizes tasks and gives insight into exposure mechanisms, forming a basis for systematic exposure reduction. DREAM supplies estimates for exposure levels on the outside clothing layer as well as on skin, and provides insight into the distribution of dermal exposure over the body. Together with the ranking of tasks and people, this provides information for measurement strategies and helps to determine who, where and what to measure. In addition to dermal exposure assessment, the systematic description of dermal exposure pathways helps to prioritize and determine most adequate measurement strategies and methods. DREAM could be a promising approach for structured, semi-quantitative, dermal exposure assessment. PMID:12505908

  20. Dermal exposure to environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, R P; Chu, I

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature to determine the importance of the dermal route of exposure for swimmers and bathers using Great Lakes waters and summarizes the chemical water contaminants of concern in the Great Lakes along with relevant dermal absorption data. We detail in vivo and in vitro methods of quantifying the degree of dermal absorption and discuss a preference for infinite dose data as opposed to finite dose data. The basic mechanisms of the dermal absorption process, routes of chemical entry, and the environmental and physiological factors affecting this process are also reviewed, and we discuss the concepts of surface slick exposure to lipophilic compounds and the adsorption of contaminants to water sediment. After presenting mathematical constructs for calculating the degree of exposure, we present in vitro data concerning skin absorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed to Great Lakes water sediment to show that in a worst-case scenario exposure via the dermal route can be equally important to the oral route. We have concluded that prolonged exposure of the skin, especially under conditions that may enhance dermal absorption (e.g., sunburn) may result in toxicologically significant amounts of certain water contaminants being absorbed. It is recommended that swimming should be confined to public beaches, people should refrain from swimming if they are sunburned, and skin should be washed with soap as soon as possible following exposure. Future studies should be conducted to investigate the importance of the dermal exposure route to swimmers and bathers. PMID:8635434

  1. Evaluation of systemic and dermal toxicity and dermal photoprotection by sour cherry kernels.

    PubMed

    Bak, Istvan; Czompa, Attila; Csepanyi, Evelin; Juhasz, Bela; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Najm, Khadija; Aghel, Nasreen; Varga, Balazs; Haines, David D; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-11-01

    The present report describes outcomes of animal studies conducted to determine the systemic and dermal toxicity of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) seed kernel contents; and a separate evaluation of the photoprotective capacity of the kernel oil fraction. B6 mice and Hartley guinea-pigs were used for these experiments. Dosage groups of 6-8 animals were administered whole kernel meal in a dose range of 0-3000 mg/kg by gavage for 8 days, following which they were killed. The liver and kidney weights were recorded and histological examination performed on sections of these organs. Kidney function was assessed as blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and liver function by measurement of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. Dermal toxicity was evaluated in a Hartley guinea-pig model by comparing UVB-irradiated shaved skin to which the kernel oil had been applied with distilled water controls. In conclusion, no evidence of toxicity was observed to result from the consumption or dermal application of sour cherry seed kernel in the dose range at which it is likely to be used in foods or healthcare. Moreover, it was shown to have a powerful capacity to protect skin from UV damage. These results suggest it will prove to be a highly safe and effective addition to a wide range of products for general use. PMID:21751269

  2. [Complications after dermal fillers and their treatment].

    PubMed

    Lemperle, G; Gauthier-Hazan, N; Wolters, M

    2006-12-01

    All dermal fillers are associated with the risk of both early and late complications. Early side effects such as swelling, redness, and bruising occur after intradermal or subdermal injections. The patient has to be aware of these risks and be prepared to accept them. Adverse events that last longer than 2 weeks can be attributable to technical shortcomings (e.g., the implantation of a long-lasting filler substance was too superficial). Such adverse events can be treated with intradermal 5-fluorouracil and steroid injections, vascular lasers, or intense pulsed light, and later with dermabrasion or shaving. Late adverse events also include immunological phenomena such as late-onset allergy and non-allergic foreign body granulomas. Both react well to intralesional steroid injections, which often have to be repeated to establish the right dose. Surgical excisions should remain the last option and are indicated for hard lumps in the lips and visible hard nodules or hard granulomas in the subcutaneous fat.

  3. Dermal and Ophthalmic Findings in Pseudohypoaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Sabriye; Gökalp, Emir; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Demirtaş, Şafak; Gül, Ülkü; Baştuğ, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA) is defined as a state of resistance to aldosterone, a hormone crucial for electrolyte equilibrium. The genetically transmitted type of PHA is primary hypoaldosteronism. Secondary hypoaldosteronism develops as a result of hydronephrosis or hydroureter. PHA patients suffer from severe hyponatremia and a severe clinical condition due to severe loss of salt can be encountered in the neonatal period. Dermal findings in the form of miliaria rubra can also develop in these patients. With the loss of salt, abnormal accumulation of sebum in the eye due to a defect in the sodium channels can also occur. In this paper, a case of PHA in a newborn showing typical dermatological and ophthalmological findings is presented. PMID:26316441

  4. [Generalized granuloma annulare or diffuse dermal histiocytosis?].

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, L; Biel, K; Luger, T A; Goerdt, S

    1995-08-01

    Generalized granuloma annulare is a rare variant of granuloma annulare affecting the trunk and extremities with a multitude of lesions. In contrast to localized granuloma annulare, generalized granuloma annulare occurs in older patients, shows a stronger association with diabetes, and is characteristically chronic. Like our 55-year-old patient, most patients present with papules and annular plaques; less often, macular or non-annular lesions may be encountered. Histology often fails to show necrobiotic or necrotic connective tissue changes demarcated by a palisading granuloma. Instead, there are diffuse dermal, band-like or nodular aggregations of histiocytes intermingled with some multinucleated giant cells and a predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate in the periphery. Because of its special characteristics, it has been suggested that generalized granuloma annulare might constitute a separate disease entity and that it should be classed among the primary cutaneous histiocytoses as a diffuse dermal histiocytosis. Using immunohistochemistry to determine the macrophage phenotype of the lesional histiocytes, we have shown that generalized granuloma annulare is not a cutaneous histiocytosis. Neither MS-1 high-molecular-weight protein, a new specific marker for cutaneous non-Langerhans cell histiocytoses, nor CD1a, the well-known marker for Langerhans cells and Langerhans cell histiocytoses, is expressed by the lesional histiocytes of our patient. In contrast, the antigen expression pattern was diagnostic for non-infectious granulomas and was highly similar to that in localized granuloma annulare. In contrast to the successful treatment of localized granuloma annulare reported with intralesional interferon beta-1, systemic treatment with interferon alpha-2b (9 x 10(6) units three times a week) was ineffective.

  5. Responses of dermal mast cells to injury.

    PubMed Central

    el Sayed, S O; Dyson, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect on dermal mast cell numbers and degranulation of making a partial thickness skin wound on the right flank of Wistar rats was studied immediately after operation and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 72 h postoperatively. An equivalent area of intact dermis on the left flank was used as a control. In the injured dermis the mean number of detectable mast cells in the experimental group immediately after making the partial thickness wound was not significantly different from the control side (P > 0.25) but it later decreased, reaching its lowest value after 2 h and increasing from 16 h to 72 h postoperatively when the final assessment was made. The possibility that the reduction in mast cell number per unit area might be an artefact resulting from increased tissue volume due to oedema was investigated and disproved. The total number of dermal mast cells in equivalent areas of the intact left flank remained unchanged throughout this period. The percentage of degranulating mast cells started rising 0.5 h postoperatively, increased gradually to reach its highest value after 2 h, remained high up to 8 h postoperatively and then decreased to reach its lowest value after 72 h. The percentage of degranulating mast cells of the intact dermis of the left flank did not alter during this period. The lack of a significant change in the control groups shows either the absence of any systemic effect or that the technique used was not sensitive enough to detect it. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8226292

  6. Brain abscess as a manifestation of spinal dermal sinus

    PubMed Central

    Emami-Naeini, Parisa; Mahdavi, Ali; Ahmadi, Hamed; Baradaran, Nima; Nejat, Farideh

    2008-01-01

    Dermal sinuses have been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic to drainage of purulent material from the sinus tract, inclusion tumors, meningitis, and spinal abscess. To date, there has been no documented report of brain abscess as a complication of spinal dermal sinus. Here, we report an 8-month-old girl who was presented initially with a brain abscess at early infancy but lumbar dermal sinus and associated spinal abscess were discovered afterwards. The probable mechanisms of this rare association have been discussed. PMID:19209295

  7. The influence of vapor pressure of chemicals on dermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dermal exposure is an important route of entry for chemicals in occupational and consumer settings. Key to this exposure is the penetration of the skin's barrier, and key to this penetration is a chemical's vapor pressure. Until now, vapor pressure and its effects on the skin have yet to be widely studied. This review aims to provide some historical background on early work on dermal penetration for volatile materials, which has helped form later research into the effects of vapor pressure on chemical risk assessment for dermal exposures. This review should be the start of an investigation into more in-depth coverage of vapor pressure and current prediction models.

  8. Dermal reflectivity determined by optical coherence tomography is an indicator of epidermal hyperplasia and dermal edema within inflamed skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Levitz, David; Choudhury, Niloy; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of inflammation in psoriasis remain unclear. We undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to noninvasively document cutaneous alterations in mouse skin treated topically with Imiquimod (IMQ), an established model of a psoriasis-like disease. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a two parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(x, y, z) = ρ(x, y)exp [ - μ(x, y)z]. Ensemble averaging over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed no significant changes in the average dermal attenuation rate, <μ>, however the average local dermal reflectivity <ρ>, decreased significantly following 1, 3, and 6 days of IMQ treatment (p < 0.001) in comparison to vehicle-treated control mice. In contrast, epidermal and dermal thickness changes were only significant when comparing controls and 6-day IMQ treated mice. This suggests that dermal alterations, attributed to collagen fiber bundle enlargement, occur prior to epidermal thickness changes due to hyperplasia and dermal thickness changes due to edema. Dermal reflectivity positively correlated with epidermal hyperplasia (repi2 = 0.78) and dermal edema (rderm2 = 0.86). Our results suggest that dermal reflectivity as measured by OCT can be utilized to quantify a psoriasis-like disease in mice, and thus has the potential to aid in the quantitative assessment of psoriasis in humans.

  9. Dermal scarification versus intramuscular diclofenac sodium injection for the treatment of renal colic: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Stavros; Kampantais, Spyridon; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Gkagkalidis, Konstantinos; Vakalopoulos, Ioannis; Toutziaris, Chrysovalantis; Patsialas, Christos; Laskaridis, Leonidas; Dimopoulos, Panagiotis; Dimitriadis, Georgios

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study is to determine whether dermal scarification is equally effective for treating acute renal colic compared to diclofenac sodium intramuscular therapy. A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted with methodologic rigor based on CONSORT criteria. A total of 291 patients, aged ≥ 18 years, suffering from acute renal colic were included in this trial and randomly assigned in two groups. Patients in the first group (A) received endodermal injection (dermal scarification) of 1 ml normal saline at the area of intensity of pain. The second group (B) received 75 mg diclofenac sodium by intramuscular injection. The success of each method defined the primary end point. Pain intensity before and after treatment was assessed using a visual analog scale. The time onset and the duration of analgesia were also recorded. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding hematuria (p = 0.158), stone identification at KUB (p = 0.751) and mean pain intensity (p = 0.609) before treatment initiation. The method was successful in 75.5 % of patients in group A and 74.3 % of patients in group B (p = 0.812). Mean pain reduction was comparable, 5.65 ± 3.05 in group A and 5.34 ± 2.99 in group B (p = 0.379), with dermal scarification eliciting its effect considerably faster, whereas the duration of analgesia was longer in the diclofenac group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, dermal scarification could constitute an alternative method for treating renal colic as it is equally effective compared to the standard treatment of diclofenac sodium.

  10. Dermal exposure and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among asphalt roofing workers

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, M.D.; Rinehart, R.D.; Sapkota, A.; Cavallari, J.M.; Herrick, R.F.

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify significant determinants of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among asphalt roofing workers and use urinary 1-hydroxyprene (1-OHP) measurements to evaluate the effect of dermal exposure on total absorbed dose. The study population included 26 asphalt roofing workers who performed three primary tasks: tearing off old roofs, putting down new roofs, and operating the kettle at ground level. During multiple consecutive work shifts, dermal patch samples were collected from the underside of each worker's wrists and were analyzed for PACs, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BAP). During the same work week, urine samples were collected at pre-shift, post-shift, and bedtime each day and were analyzed for 1-OHP (205 urine samples). Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the dermal measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of exposure, and to evaluate urinary 1-OHP measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of total absorbed dose. Dermal exposures to PAC, pyrene, and BAP were found to vary significantly by roofing task and by the presence of an old coal tar pitch roof. For each of the three analytes, the adjusted mean dermal exposures associated with tear-off were approximately four times higher than exposures associated with operating the kettle. Exposure to coal tar pitch was associated with a 6-fold increase in PAC exposure, an 8-fold increase in pyrene exposure and a 35-fold increase in BAP exposure. The presence of coal tar pitch was the primary determinant of dermal exposure, particularly for exposure to BAP. However, the task-based differences that were observed while controlling for pitch suggest that exposure to asphalt also contributes to dermal exposures.

  11. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand.

  12. Morphological and physiological characteristics of dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Takigami, Satoshi; Sunada, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Tetsuro; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Dermal photoreceptors located in the mantle of Lymnaea stagnalis were histologically and physiologically characterized. Our previous study demonstrated that the shadow response from dermal photoreceptors induces the whole-body withdrawal response. Through the interneuron, RPeD11, we detected that the light-off response indirectly originated from a dermal photoreceptor. Previous observations, based on behavioral pharmacology, revealed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate acts as a second messenger in the dermal photoreceptor. Furthermore, gastropods possess dermal photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, as a photopigment, and another photo-sensitive protein, arrestin, responsible for terminating the light response. Thus, we chose three antibodies, anti-cGMP, anti-rhodopsin, and anti-β-arrestin, to identify the dermal photoreceptor molecules in Lymnaea mantle. Extracellular recording, using a suction electrode on the mantle, revealed a light off-response from the right parietal nerve. Overlapping structures, positive against each of the antibodies, were also observed. Numerous round, granular particles of 3–47 μm in diameter with one nucleus were distributed around pneumostome and/or inside the mantle. The cells surrounding the pneumostome area, located 10 μm beneath the surface, tended to have smaller cell soma ranging from 3 to 25 μm in diameter, while cells located in other areas were distributed uniformly inside the mantle, with a larger diameter ranging from 12 to 47 μm. The histological examination using back-filing Lucifer Yellow staining of the right parietal nerve with the three dermal photoreceptor antibodies confirmed that these overlapping-stained structures were dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea. PMID:27493502

  13. Under-dermal emulator of vascular identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Joseph; Blake, Robert; Rich, Alex; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper and research effort is to develop a simple and clear apparatus and approach to quantify the effectiveness of sensor systems as it relates to their ability to penetrate camouflage and resolve skin depth. Over the last decade, several attempts have been made to leverage advances in Infrared (IR) imaging, made by the military, into medical sensing [1]. Several promising technologies have been evaluated and thus far determined to be lacking when compared to the current standards of care based on x-ray imaging [2]. While progress has been made this general class of technology has not generated wide spread interest from the medical community. This lack of interest is discouraging, especially when considering the great potential for good that would result in successfully demonstrating a truly passive tumor detection system based on thermal signatures. Recently, this team participated as part of a larger group in the development and testing of a novel class of algorithms using images from two separate IR spectra. This area of spectral fusing algorithms is called the Single Pixel-Blind Source Separation (SP-BSS). While the goal of experiment is not new, our results showed this approach provided potential improvements over more traditional thermography, particularly in the area of overcoming environmental noise. These promising results have motivated us to develop a method for running controlled experiments so that the equipment and algorithms can be optimized and the significant engineering challenges of frame registration, data standardization, and sensor optimization for wellness screening can be accomplished. Conducting these efforts using data from human subjects is both impractical and unwarranted at this time. We have developed a physics-physiological under-dermal model of internal vascular circulation that approximates not only a healthy human body (angiogenesis effect) but also a human body developing a tumor (neo-angiogenesis effect). This

  14. Dermal sensitization quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for fragrance ingredients.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David A; Cadby, Peter A; Cano, Marie-France; Ellis, Graham; Gerberick, G Frank; Griem, Peter; McNamee, Pauline M; Ryan, Cindy A; Safford, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Based on chemical, cellular, and molecular understanding of dermal sensitization, an exposure-based quantitative risk assessment (QRA) can be conducted to determine safe use levels of fragrance ingredients in different consumer product types. The key steps are: (1) determination of benchmarks (no expected sensitization induction level (NESIL)); (2) application of sensitization assessment factors (SAF); and (3) consumer exposure (CEL) calculation through product use. Using these parameters, an acceptable exposure level (AEL) can be calculated and compared with the CEL. The ratio of AEL to CEL must be favorable to support safe use of the potential skin sensitizer. This ratio must be calculated for the fragrance ingredient in each product type. Based on the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, Inc. (RIFM) Expert Panel's recommendation, RIFM and the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) have adopted the dermal sensitization QRA approach described in this review for fragrance ingredients identified as potential dermal sensitizers. This now forms the fragrance industry's core strategy for primary prevention of dermal sensitization to these materials in consumer products. This methodology is used to determine global fragrance industry product management practices (IFRA Standards) for fragrance ingredients that are potential dermal sensitizers. This paper describes the principles of the recommended approach, provides detailed review of all the information used in the dermal sensitization QRA approach for fragrance ingredients and presents key conclusions for its use now and refinement in the future.

  15. Estimation of maximum tolerated dose for long-term bioassays from acute lethal dose and structure by QSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Gombar, V.K.; Enslein, K.; Hart, J.B.; Blake, B.W.; Borgstedt, H.H.

    1991-09-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been developed to estimate maximum tolerated doses (MTD) from structural features of chemicals and the corresponding oral acute lethal doses (LD50) as determined in male rats. The model is based on a set of 269 diverse chemicals which have been tested under the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) protocols. The rat oral LD50 value was the strongest predictor. Additionally, 22 structural descriptors comprising nine substructural MOLSTAC(c) keys, three molecular connectivity indices, and sigma charges on 10 molecular fragments were identified as endpoint predictors. The model explains 76% of the variance and is significant (F = 35.7) at p less than 0.0001 with a standard error of the estimate of 0.40 in the log (1/mol) units used in Hansch-type equations. Cross-validation showed that the difference between the average deleted residual square (0.179) and the model residual square (0.160) was not significant (t = 0.98).

  16. Toxicological evaluation of ferrous N-carbamylglycinate chelate: Acute, Sub-acute toxicity and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dan; Zhou, Xihong; Xie, Chunyan; Shu, Xugang; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2015-11-01

    Iron is an essential trace element that is vital important in various biological process. A deficiency in iron could induce public health problem e.g. anaemia, while an overload could induce ROS production, lipid peroxidation and DNA bases modifications. In the present study, a new iron fortifier was synthesized, and its acute/sub-acute toxicity was investigated. According to the improved Karber's method, the median lethal dose (LD50) of the ferrous N-carbamylglycinate in SD rat was 3.02 g/kg and the 95% confidence intervals were between 2.78 and 3.31 g/kg. No biologically significant or test substance-related differences were observed in body weights, feed consumption, clinical signs, organ weights, histopathology, ophthalmology, hematology, and clinical chemistry parameters in any of the treatment groups of ferrous N-carbamylglycinate at target concentrations corresponding to 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for ferrous N-carbamylglycinate was at least 600 mg/kg b.w. day in rats. In addition, no evidence of mutagenicity was found, either in vitro in bacterial reverse mutation assay or in vivo in mice bone marrow micronucleus assay and sperm shape abnormality assay. On the basis of our findings, we conclude that ferrous N-carbamylglycinate is a low-toxic substance with no genotoxicity.

  17. Dermal absorption of inorganic germanium in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Kawaai, Takae; Konomi, Aki; Uchida, Yuka

    2008-11-01

    So-called germanium 'health' products including dietary supplements, cosmetics, accessories, and warm bath service containing germanium compounds and metalloid are popular in Japan. Subchronic and chronic oral exposure of germanium dioxide (GeO(2)), popular chemical form of inorganic germanium causes severe germanium toxicosis including death and kidney dysfunction in humans and experimental animals. Intestinal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate is almost complete in humans and animals. However, it is not known whether germanium is cutaneously absorbed. We tested dermal absorption of neutralized GeO(2) or germanate using male F344/N rats. Three groups of rats were treated with a 3-h topical application of hydrophilic ointment containing graded level of neutralized GeO(2) (pH 7.4): 0, 0.21 and 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g. Germanium concentration in blood and tissues sampled from rats after topical application of inorganic germanium was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Animals topically applied 0.42 mg GeO(2)/g ointment had significantly higher germanium concentrations in plasma, liver, and kidney than those of rats that received no topical germanium. The results indicate that skin is permeable to inorganic germanium ion or germanate and recurrent exposure of germanium compounds may pose a potential health hazard.

  18. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  19. [Complications after dermal fillers and their treatment].

    PubMed

    Lemperle, G; Gauthier-Hazan, N; Wolters, M

    2006-12-01

    All dermal fillers are associated with the risk of both early and late complications. Early side effects such as swelling, redness, and bruising occur after intradermal or subdermal injections. The patient has to be aware of these risks and be prepared to accept them. Adverse events that last longer than 2 weeks can be attributable to technical shortcomings (e.g., the implantation of a long-lasting filler substance was too superficial). Such adverse events can be treated with intradermal 5-fluorouracil and steroid injections, vascular lasers, or intense pulsed light, and later with dermabrasion or shaving. Late adverse events also include immunological phenomena such as late-onset allergy and non-allergic foreign body granulomas. Both react well to intralesional steroid injections, which often have to be repeated to establish the right dose. Surgical excisions should remain the last option and are indicated for hard lumps in the lips and visible hard nodules or hard granulomas in the subcutaneous fat. PMID:17219319

  20. Human Dermal Stem/Progenitor Cell-Derived Conditioned Medium Improves Senescent Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Shim, Joong Hyun; Choi, Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2015-08-13

    Adult skin stem cells are recognized as potential therapeutics to rejuvenate aged skin. We previously demonstrated that human dermal stem/progenitor cells (hDSPCs) with multipotent capacity could be enriched from human dermal fibroblasts using collagen type IV. However, the effects of hDSPCs on cellular senescence remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether conditioned medium (CM) collected from hDSPC cultures (hDSPC-CM) exhibits beneficial effects on senescent fibroblasts. We found that hDSPC-CM promoted proliferation and decreased the expression level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase in senescent fibroblasts. In addition, p53 phosphorylation and p21 expression were significantly reduced in senescent fibroblasts treated with hDSPC-CM. hDSPC-CM restored the expression levels of collagen type I, collagen type III, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, and antagonized the increase of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that hDSPC-CM significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels by specifically up-regulating the expression level of superoxide dismutase 2. Taken together, these data suggest that hDSPC-CM can be applied as a potential therapeutic agent for improving human aged skin.

  1. A case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Basora, Jose F.; Fernandez, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Modesto; Adorno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage Symptoms: Cough dry • short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Hyaluronic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the human body, especially in joints and eyes. Hyaluronic acid injectable gels have been available for the general market since 2003 as cosmetic dermal fillers and skin boosters. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an acute event that threatens the life of the patient and can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Alveolar hemorrhage associated with hyaluronic acid dermal fillers is an entity that to the best of our knowledge has never been described in the medical literature. Case Report: We describe a patient who presented with dyspnea and cough after a subcutaneous injection of hyaluronic acid, with radiographic abnormalities including ground glass opacities and consolidation. The patient underwent flexible bronchoscopy and was diagnosed with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Conclusions: This case emphasizes that this life threatening condition may occur with the use of this medication and physicians must be aware of this disorder, as early recognition and management can reduce morbidity. PMID:24826208

  2. Antibacterial and dermal toxicological profiles of ethyl acetate extract from Crassocephalum bauchiense (Hutch.) Milne-Redh (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence in recent years of numerous resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria to a range of formerly efficient antibiotics constitutes a serious threat to public health. Crassocephalum bauchiense, a medicinal herb found in the West Region of Cameroon is used to treat gastrointestinal infections as well as liver disorders. The ethyl acetate extract from the leaves of C. bauchiense was evaluated for its antibacterial activity as well as acute and sub-acute toxicities. Methods The plant extract was prepared by maceration in ethyl acetate. Its phytochemical screening was done by standard methods. The broth microdilution method was used to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity. The in vivo antibacterial activity of a gel formulation (0.05, 1 and 2% w/v) of this extract was evaluated using a Staphylococcus aureus-induced dermatitis in a murine model. Selected haematological and biochemical parameters were used to evaluate the dermal sub-acute toxicity of the extract in rats. Results Phytochemical screening of the C. bauchiense extract revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, tannins and sterols. In vitro antibacterial activities were observed against all the tested microorganisms (MIC = 0.04-6.25 mg/ml). Formulated extract-gel (2% w/v) and gentamycin (reference drug) eradicated the microbial infection after five days of treatment. A single dermal dose of this extract up to 32 g/kg body weight (bw) did not produce any visible sign of toxicity. Also, daily dermal application of the C. bauchiense extract gel formulation for 28 days did not show any negative effect, instead some biochemical parameters such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT and AST), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglycerides were significantly (p < 0.05) affected positively. Conclusion These results indicate that the C. bauchiense ethyl acetate extract can be used safely for the treatment of some bacterial infections. PMID:21615960

  3. Evaluation of calcium magnesium acetate and road salt for contact hypersensitivity potential and dermal irritancy in humans.

    PubMed

    Cushman, J R; Duff, V A; Buteau, G H; Aust, L B; Caldwell, N; Lazer, W

    1991-04-01

    Calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) and road salt are both de-icing agents to which workers may be dermally exposed. A commercial formulation of CMA (Chevron Ice-B-Gon Deicer) and road salt were tested in a human repeat insult patch test to evaluate the contact hypersensitivity potential of these materials and to evaluate irritation following single or multiple applications. 72 of the initial 82 panelists completed the study. CMA and road salt (each at 10% and 30% w/w in distilled water; 0.3 ml) were administered under occlusive patches on the forearm for 14 h 3 x per week for 3 weeks. The panelists were challenged 2 weeks later; 2 panelists who had mild reactions were subsequently rechallenged 6 weeks later. Neither CMA nor road salt produced contact hypersensitivity in any panelists. Following the first application, moderate acute irritation was observed only at 1 skin site exposed to 30% road salt. Repeated exposure to CMA or road salt produced mild to moderate irritation. The highest incidence of moderate irritation was observed with 30% road salt. Thus, neither material is expected to cause significant dermal effects in exposed workers. CMA is expected to cause dermal irritation equivalent to or less than that caused by road salt.

  4. Dermal injection of immunocytes induces psoriasis.

    PubMed Central

    Wrone-Smith, T; Nickoloff, B J

    1996-01-01

    Establishing direct and causal relationships among the confederacy of activated cell types present in psoriasis has been hampered by lack of an animal model. Within psoriatic plaques there are hyperplastic keratinocytes, infiltrating immunocytes, and activated endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if psoriasis is primarily a disorder of keratinocytes or the immune system. Using a newly developed experimental system in which full-thickness human skin is orthotopically transferred onto severe combined immunodeficient mice, autologous immunocytes were injected into dermis, and the resultant phenotype characterized by clinical, histologic, and immunophenotypic analyses. Engraftment of samples included both uninvolved/ symptomless (PN) skin removed from patients with psoriasis elsewhere, or from healthy individuals with no skin disease (NN skin). In 10 different experiments involving 6 different psoriasis patients, every PN skin was converted to a full-fledged psoriatic plaque skin by injection of autologous blood-derived immunocytes. In all but one psoriatic patient, the immunocytes required preactivation with IL-2 and superantigens to convert PN skin into psoriatic plaque skin. In every case, resultant plaques were characterized by visible presence of flaking and thickened skin, loss of the granular cell layer, prominent elongation of rete pegs with a dermal angiogenic tissue reaction, and infiltration within the epidermis by T cells. Lesional skin displayed 20 different antigenic determinants of the psoriatic phenotype. None of the four NN skin samples injected with autologous immunocytes converted to psoriatic plaques. We conclude that psoriasis is caused primarily by the ability of pathogenetic blood-derived immunocytes to induce secondary activation and disordered growth of endogenous cutaneous cells including keratinocytes and vascular endothelium. PMID:8878440

  5. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  6. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells.

  7. Acute toxicity study of the oil from Azadirachta indica seed (neem oil).

    PubMed

    Gandhi, M; Lal, R; Sankaranarayanan, A; Banerjee, C K; Sharma, P L

    1988-01-01

    The seed oil of Azadirachta indica (neem oil) is well known for its medicinal properties in the indigenous Indian system of medicine. Its acute toxicity was documented in rats and rabbits by the oral route. Dose-related pharmacotoxic symptoms were noted along with a number of biochemical and histopathological indices of toxicity. The 24-h LD50 was established as 14 ml/kg in rats and 24 ml/kg in rabbits. Prior to death, animals of both species exhibited comparable pharmacotoxic symptoms in order and severity, with lungs and central nervous system as the target organs of toxicity. Edible mustard seed oil (80 ml/kg) was tested in the same manner to document the degree to which the physical characteristics of an oil could contribute to the oral toxicity of neem oil. PMID:3419203

  8. Acute toxicity of T2 mycotoxin to the guinea-pig by inhalation and subcutaneous routes.

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, T. C.; Edginton, J. A.; Price, P. N.; Upshall, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    The acute inhalation and subcutaneous toxicity of T2 mycotoxin has been investigated in guinea-pigs. The toxicity by the two routes was quantitatively and qualitatively similar. The LCt50 was 5749 mg min m-3 and the subcutaneous LD50 1-2 mg kg-1. Histological changes in the decedents which were similar by both routes of administration were most marked in the lymphoreticular system but also occurred in the gut. Lymphocytolysis and phagocytosis occurred in both the cortex of the thymus and of the lymph nodes. Lymph nodes were more severely affected in the decedents among the animals dosed with T2 by the subcutaneous route. The small intestine exhibited dead and dying cells throughout the lamina propria after T2 by either route. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3707855

  9. Actions and interactions of cholinolytics and cholinesterase reactivators in the treatment of acute organophosphorus toxicity.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, S; Ghosh, A K; Chowdhri, B L; Asthana, S N; Batra, B S

    1991-01-01

    Different drug combinations consisting of cholinolytic and a cholinesterase (ChE) reactivator provide greater therapeutic efficacy in acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning in mice than when used alone. Maximum protection, as determined by a shift of the LD50 for the two OP agents, was observed with the cholinolytic benactyzine. A protection index (P.I.) of 42 was obtained when benactyzine was given along with obidoxime in diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) intoxication. With the more toxic OP agent soman (o-pinacolylmethylphosphonofluoridate), the same cholinolytic only offered a maximum P.I. of 3.2 when administered with HS-6, another bispyridinium ChE reactivator. This beneficial effect of benactyzine is possibly due to its greater antimuscarinic effect in the central nervous system than atropine or dexetimide. PMID:1935707

  10. Determination of acute oral toxicity of flumethrin in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Oruc, H H; Hranitz, J M; Sorucu, A; Duell, M; Cakmak, I; Aydin, L; Orman, A

    2012-12-01

    Flumethrin is one of many pesticides used for the control and treatment of varroatosis in honey bees and for the control of mosquitoes and ticks in the environment. For the control of varroatosis, flumethrin is applied to hives formulated as a plastic strip for several weeks. During this time, honey bees are treated topically with flumethrin, and hive products may accumulate the pesticide. Honey bees may indirectly ingest flumethrin through hygienic behaviors during the application period and receive low doses of flumethrin through comb wax remodeling after the application period. The goal of our study was to determine the acute oral toxicity of flumethrin and observe the acute effects on motor coordination in honey bees (Apis mellifera anatoliaca). Six doses (between 0.125 and 4.000 microg per bee) in a geometric series were studied. The acute oral LD50 of flumethrin was determined to be 0.527 and 0.178 microg per bee (n = 210, 95% CI) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Orally administered flumethrin is highly toxic to honey bees. Oral flumethrin disrupted the motor coordination of honey bees. Honey bees that ingested flumethrin exhibited convulsions in the antennae, legs, and wings at low doses. At higher doses, partial and total paralysis in the antennae, legs, wings, proboscises, bodies, and twitches in the antennae and legs were observed.

  11. Genistein protects dermal fibrosis in bleomycin-induced experimental scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Süleyman Serdar; Dağlı, Adile Ferda; Yolbaş, Servet; Gözel, Nevzat; Işık, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the protective effect of genistein in bleomycin (BLM)-induced dermal fibrosis. Material and Methods This study involved four groups of Balb/c mice (n=10 per group). Mice in three groups were administered BLM [100 μg/day in 100 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)] subcutaneously for 4 weeks; the remaining (control) group received only 100 μL/day of PBS subcutaneously. PBS or BLM was injected into the shaved upper back. Two of the BLM-treated groups also received genistein (1 or 3 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously, to the dorsal front of neck). At the end of the fourth week, all mice were sacrificed and blood and tissue samples were obtained. Results The BLM applications increased the dermal thicknesses, tissue hydroxyproline contents, α-smooth muscle actin-positive cell counts, and led to histopathologically prominent dermal fibrosis. The genistein treatments decreased the tissue hydroxyproline contents and dermal thicknesses, in the BLM-injected mice. Conclusion Genistein has antifibrotic potential in BLM-induced dermal fibrosis model. However, its therapeutic potentials on human scleroderma require evaluation in future studies.

  12. Crosslinked hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: a comparison of rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Samuel J; Berg, Richard A

    2008-10-01

    Temporary dermal fillers composed of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) are space filling gels that are readily available in the United States and Europe. Several families of dermal fillers based on XLHA are now available and here we compare the physical and rheological properties of these fillers to the clinical effectiveness. The XLHA fillers are prepared with different crosslinkers, using HA isolated from different sources, have different particle sizes, and differ substantially in rheological properties. For these fillers, the magnitude of the complex viscosity, |eta*|, varies by a factor of 20, the magnitude of the complex rigidity modulus, |G*|, and the magnitude of the complex compliance, |J*| vary by a factor of 10, the percent elasticity varies from 58% to 89.9%, and the tan delta varies from 0.11 to 0.70. The available clinical data cannot be correlated with either the oscillatory dynamic or steady flow rotational rheological properties of the various fillers. However, the clinical data appear to correlate strongly with the total concentration of XLHA in the products and to a lesser extent with percent elasticity. Hence, our data suggest the following correlation: dermal filler persistence = [polymer] x [% elasticity] and the clinical persistence of a dermal filler composed of XLHA is dominated by the mass and elasticity of the material implanted. This work predicts that the development of future XLHA dermal filler formulations should focus on increasing the polymer concentration and elasticity to improve the clinical persistence.

  13. Ciprofloxacin Improves the Stemness of Human Dermal Papilla Cells.

    PubMed

    Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Tengamnuay, Parkpoom; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in the expansion method of adult stem cells may augment their use in regenerative therapy. Using human dermal papilla cell line as well as primary dermal papilla cells as model systems, the present study demonstrated that ciprofloxacin treatment could prevent the loss of stemness during culture. Clonogenicity and stem cell markers of dermal papilla cells were shown to gradually decrease in the culture in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of the cells with nontoxic concentrations of ciprofloxacin could maintain both stem cell morphology and clonogenicity, as well as all stem cells markers. We found that ciprofloxacin exerted its effect through ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase/glycogen synthase kinase3β dependent mechanism which in turn upregulated β-catenin. Besides, ciprofloxacin was shown to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in DPCs as the transcription factors ZEB1 and Snail were significantly increased. Furthermore, the self-renewal proteins of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, Nanog and Oct-4 were significantly upregulated in the ciprofloxacin-treated cells. The effects of ciprofloxacin in preserving stem cell features were confirmed in the primary dermal papilla cells directly obtained from human hair follicles. Together, these results revealed a novel application of ciprofloxacin for stem cell maintenance and provided the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for the stemness in dermal papilla cells.

  14. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices. PMID:24828202

  15. THE PROLONGED GASTROINTESTINAL SYNDROME IN RHESUS MACAQUES: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GASTROINTESTINAL, HEMATOPOIETIC, AND DELAYED MULTI-ORGAN SEQUELAE FOLLOWING ACUTE, POTENTIALLY LETHAL, PARTIAL-BODY IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    MacVittie, Thomas J.; Bennett, Alexander; Booth, Catherine; Garofalo, Michael; Tudor, Gregory; Ward, Amanda; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Gelfond, Daniel; McFarland, Emylee; Jackson, William; Lu, Wei; Farese, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The dose response relationship for the acute gastrointestinal syndrome following total-body irradiation prevents analysis of the full recovery and damage to the gastrointestinal system, since all animals succumb to the subsequent 100% lethal hematopoietic syndrome. A partial-body irradiation model with 5% bone marrow sparing was established to investigate the prolonged effects of high-dose radiation on the gastrointestinal system, as well as the concomitant hematopoietic syndrome and other multi-organ injury including the lung. Herein, cellular and clinical parameters link acute and delayed coincident sequelae to radiation dose and time course post-exposure. Male rhesus Macaca mulatta were exposed to partial-body irradiation with 5% bone marrow (tibiae, ankles, feet) sparing using 6 MV linear accelerator photons at a dose rate of 0.80 Gy min−1 to midline tissue (thorax) doses in the exposure range of 9.0 to 12.5 Gy. Following irradiation, all animals were monitored for multiple organ-specific parameters for 180 d. Animals were administered medical management including administration of intravenous fluids, antiemetics, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, antidiarrheals, supplemental nutrition, and analgesics. The primary endpoint was survival at 15, 60, or 180 d post-exposure. Secondary endpoints included evaluation of dehydration, diarrhea, hematologic parameters, respiratory distress, histology of small and large intestine, lung radiographs, and mean survival time of decedents. Dose- and time-dependent mortality defined several organ-specific sequelae, with LD50/15 of 11.95 Gy, LD50/60 of 11.01 Gy, and LD50/180 of 9.73 Gy for respective acute gastrointestinal, combined hematopoietic and gastrointestinal, and multi-organ delayed injury to include the lung. This model allows analysis of concomitant multi-organ sequelae, thus providing a link between acute and delayed radiation effects. Specific and multi-organ medical countermeasures can be assessed for

  16. Dose Titration of Walleye Dermal Sarcoma (WDS) Tumor Filtrate.

    PubMed

    Getchell, R G; Wooster, G A; Sutton, C A; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

    2006-12-01

    Walleyes Stizostedion vitreum were challenged with a topical application of a dilution series of cell-free dermal sarcoma tumor filtrates to determine the minimum dose of virus needed to induce these walleye tumors. A series of six 10-fold dilutions of the filtrate were applied to the side of the fish, which were allowed to develop grossly visible tumors at 15°C for 20 weeks. Quantification of the virus in the filtrates was accomplished by quantitative (real-time) reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We determined that there are approximately 10(10) viral RNA copies in 100 μL of walleye dermal sarcoma inoculum. The minimum dose of walleye dermal sarcoma virus that could induce tumors by the topical challenge method was the 1,000-fold dilution of this 10(10) inoculum, or approximately 10(7) viral RNA copies.

  17. Juvéderm: a hyaluronic acid dermal filler.

    PubMed

    Monheit, Gary D; Prather, Chad L

    2007-11-01

    Over the past decade, the use of nonsurgical products and devices to correct facial contour defects and signs of skin aging has exploded with new lasers, toxins for muscle relaxation, and dermal fillers revolutionizing aesthetic medicine. Of all the nonsurgical modalities employed during this period, the dermal filler industry has seen the most growth in demand. In 2006, the worldwide market for dermal fillers increased by 19%; and the US market is expected to increase a further 20% to 25%. This is due in large part to new products, particularly the hyaluronic acids such as Juvéderm, which now promise greater longevity, fewer side effects, a more natural appearance, and easier administration.

  18. [Occipital dermal sinus associated to a cerebellar abscess. Case].

    PubMed

    Costa, J M; de Reina, L; Guillén, A; Claramunt, E

    2004-10-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses are tubular tracts which communicate the skin with deeper structures. It is a manifestation of defective separation of the ectoderm and neuroderm. The incidence is 1/2500-3000 births alive. Almost 10 % of congenital dermal sinuses are localized in the occipitocervical region. They are usually asymptomatic, unless an infectious process is concurrent (meningitis, abscess). We are presenting the case of a 12 months girl with unnoticed cutaneous stigmata in the occipital region, who was admitted with a meningeal syndrome and secondary neurological impairment. She had a cerebellar abscess and was treated with decompression by puncture of the abscess and antibiotics. When infection was resolved, congenital dermal sinus was excised. Process solves without morbidity. We reviewed the clinical and therapeutic features in cases reported previously in the literature.

  19. SKPs derive from hair follicle precursors and exhibit properties of adult dermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Biernaskie, Jeffrey; Paris, Maryline; Morozova, Olena; Fagan, B Matthew; Marra, Marco; Pevny, Larysa; Miller, Freda D

    2009-12-01

    Despite the remarkable regenerative capacity of mammalian skin, an adult dermal stem cell has not yet been identified. Here, we investigated whether skin-derived precursors (SKPs) might fulfill such a role. We show that SKPs derive from Sox2(+) hair follicle dermal cells and that these two cell populations are similar with regard to their transcriptome and functional properties. Both clonal SKPs and endogenous Sox2(+) cells induce hair morphogenesis, differentiate into dermal cell types, and home to a hair follicle niche upon transplantation. Moreover, hair follicle-derived SKPs self-renew, maintain their multipotency, and serially reconstitute hair follicles. Finally, grafting experiments show that follicle-associated dermal cells move out of their niche to contribute cells for dermal maintenance and wound-healing. Thus, SKPs derive from Sox2(+) follicle-associated dermal precursors and display functional properties predicted of a dermal stem cell, contributing to dermal maintenance, wound-healing, and hair follicle morphogenesis.

  20. Evaluation of acute and sub-acute toxicity of Pinus eldarica bark extract in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghadirkhomi, Akram; Safaeian, Leila; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Agha Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pinus eldarica (P. eldarica) is one of the most common pines in Iran which has various bioactive constituents and different uses in traditional medicine. Since there is no documented evidence for P. eldarica safety, the acute and sub-acute oral toxicities of hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark were investigated in male and female Wistar rats in this study. Materials and Methods: In the acute study, a single dose of extract (2000 mg/kg) was orally administered and animals were monitored for 7 days. In the sub-acute study, repeated doses (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day) of the extract were administered for 28 days and biochemical, hematological and histopathological parameters were evaluated. Results: Our results showed no sign of toxicity and no mortality after single or repeated administration of P. eldarica. The median lethal dose (LD50) of P. eldarica was determined to be higher than 2000 mg/kg. The mean body weight and most of the biochemical and hematological parameters showed normal levels. There were only significant decreases in serum triglyceride levels at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg of the extract in male rats (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and in monocyte counts at the highest dose of the extract in both male and female rats (p<0.05). Mild inflammation was also found in histological examination of kidney and liver tissues at the highest dose of extract. Conclusion: Oral administration of the hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark may be considered as relatively non-toxic particularly at the doses of 125 and 250 mg/kg. PMID:27761426

  1. Accuracy of a semiquantitative method for Dermal Exposure Assessment (DREAM)

    PubMed Central

    van Wendel, de Joo... B; Vermeulen, R; van Hemmen, J J; Fransman, W; Kromhout, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: The authors recently developed a Dermal Exposure Assessment Method (DREAM), an observational semiquantitative method to assess dermal exposures by systematically evaluating exposure determinants using pre-assigned default values. Aim: To explore the accuracy of the DREAM method by comparing its estimates with quantitative dermal exposure measurements in several occupational settings. Methods: Occupational hygienists observed workers performing a certain task, whose exposure to chemical agents on skin or clothing was measured quantitatively simultaneously, and filled in the DREAM questionnaire. DREAM estimates were compared with measurement data by estimating Spearman correlation coefficients for each task and for individual observations. In addition, mixed linear regression models were used to study the effect of DREAM estimates on the variability in measured exposures between tasks, between workers, and from day to day. Results: For skin exposures, spearman correlation coefficients for individual observations ranged from 0.19 to 0.82. DREAM estimates for exposure levels on hands and forearms showed a fixed effect between and within surveys, explaining mainly between-task variance. In general, exposure levels on clothing layer were only predicted in a meaningful way by detailed DREAM estimates, which comprised detailed information on the concentration of the agent in the formulation to which exposure occurred. Conclusions: The authors expect that the DREAM method can be successfully applied for semiquantitative dermal exposure assessment in epidemiological and occupational hygiene surveys of groups of workers with considerable contrast in dermal exposure levels (variability between groups >1.0). For surveys with less contrasting exposure levels, quantitative dermal exposure measurements are preferable. PMID:16109819

  2. Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (heparinoid) in human and minipig.

    PubMed

    Kumokawa, Tadao; Hirata, Kazumasa; Sato, Keiichi; Kano, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (MPS, the active ingredient of Hirudoid") in human and minipig was investigated by using 14C-labeled MPS. Three types of human and minipig skin samples were used: intact, dried and tape-stripped. At 24 h after application of 14C-MPS to intact human skin on a Franz cell in vitro, the radioactivity was detected in 0.98, 1.34, and 0.08% of the applied dose in stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal skin, and receptor fluid, respectively. In dried human skin, the amount of radioactivity detected was similar to that in intact human skin. By contrast, in tape-stripped human skin, higher radioactivity was detected in epidermal-dermal skin and receptor fluid (2.85 and 0.33% of the applied dose, respectively) than in intact or dried skin. Minipig skin showed 1.5 to 4.5 times greater dermal absorption of 14C-MPS, as compared with human skin. In an in vivo study with minipig, radioactivity was detected at the dosing skin site after dermal administration of 14C-MPS. The stability of 14C-MPS in human skin after dermal application was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography. It was suggested that 14C-MPS absorbed into human skin would be stable because the chromatogram behaviors of the radioactivity on the two types of method were not shifted. Microautoradiography of human and minipig skins after 14C-MPS dosing showed that radioactivity was widely distributed in the epidermis in the area near hair follicles. The present results clearly demonstrate that MPS is stable and that a small fraction of it is percutaneously absorbed by human and minipig skin.

  3. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  4. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  5. Acute, reproductive toxicity and two-generation teratology studies of a standardized quassinoid-rich extract of Eurycoma longifolia Jack in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Low, Bin-Seng; Das, Prashanta Kumar; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2014-07-01

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia Jack are popularly sought as herbal medicinal supplements to improve libido and general health amongst the local ethnic population. The major quassinoids of E. longifolia improved spermatogenesis and fertility but toxicity studies have not been well documented. The reproductive toxicity, two generation of foetus teratology and the up-and-down acute toxicity were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats orally treated with quassinoid-rich E. longifolia extract (TAF273). The results showed that the median lethal dose (LD50 ) of TAF273 for female and male rats was 1293 and >2000 mg/kg, respectively. Fertility index and litter size of the TAF273 treated were significantly increased when compared with those of the non-treated animals. The TAF273-treated dams decreased in percentage of pre-implantation loss, post-implantation loss and late resorption. No toxic symptoms were observed on the TAF273-treated pregnant female rats and their foetuses were normal. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from reproductive toxicity and teratology studies of TAF273 in rats was 100 mg/kg body weight/day, being more than 10-fold lower than the LD50 value. Thus, any human dose derived from converting the rat doses of 100 mg/kg and below may be considered as safe for further clinical studies. PMID:24318772

  6. Acute oral toxicity and liver oxidant/antioxidant stress of halogenated benzene, phenol, and diphenyl ether in mice: a comparative and mechanism exploration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqi; Feng, Mingbao; Zhang, Xuesheng; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zunyao

    2013-09-01

    The lethal doses (LD50s) of fluorinated, chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated benzene, phenol, and diphenyl ether in mice were ascertained respectively under the consistent condition. The acute toxicity of four benzenes orders in fluorobenzene (FB) < iodobenzene < chlorobenzene≈bromobenzene, that of four phenols orders in 4-iodophenol≈4-bromophenol < 4-chlorophenol (4-MCP) < 4-fluorophenol (4-MFP), and that of four diphenyl ethers orders in 4,4'-iododiphenyl ether < 4,4'-difluorodiphenyl ether < 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl ether≈4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether. General behavior adverse effects were observed, and poisoned mouse were dissected to observe visceral lesions. FB, 4-MCP, and 4-MFP produced toxic faster than other halogenated benzenes and phenols, as they had lower octanol-water partition coefficients. Pathological changes in liver and liver/kidney weight changes were also observed. Hepatic superoxide dismutase, catalase activities, and malondialdehyde level were tested after a 28-day exposure, which reflects a toxicity order basically consistent with that reflected by the LD50s. By theoretical calculation and building models, the toxicity of benzene, phenol, and diphenyl ether were influenced by different structural properties.

  7. Acute, reproductive toxicity and two-generation teratology studies of a standardized quassinoid-rich extract of Eurycoma longifolia Jack in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Low, Bin-Seng; Das, Prashanta Kumar; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2014-07-01

    The roots of Eurycoma longifolia Jack are popularly sought as herbal medicinal supplements to improve libido and general health amongst the local ethnic population. The major quassinoids of E. longifolia improved spermatogenesis and fertility but toxicity studies have not been well documented. The reproductive toxicity, two generation of foetus teratology and the up-and-down acute toxicity were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats orally treated with quassinoid-rich E. longifolia extract (TAF273). The results showed that the median lethal dose (LD50 ) of TAF273 for female and male rats was 1293 and >2000 mg/kg, respectively. Fertility index and litter size of the TAF273 treated were significantly increased when compared with those of the non-treated animals. The TAF273-treated dams decreased in percentage of pre-implantation loss, post-implantation loss and late resorption. No toxic symptoms were observed on the TAF273-treated pregnant female rats and their foetuses were normal. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from reproductive toxicity and teratology studies of TAF273 in rats was 100 mg/kg body weight/day, being more than 10-fold lower than the LD50 value. Thus, any human dose derived from converting the rat doses of 100 mg/kg and below may be considered as safe for further clinical studies.

  8. [EFFECT OF 4-METHYLPYRAZOLE ON IMMUNE RESPONSE, FUNCTION OF Th1 AND Th2 LYMPHOCYTES, AND CYTOKINE CONCENTRATION IN RAT BLOOD AFTER ACUTE METHANOL POISONING].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskii, P F; Maslyakov, V V; Gromov, M S

    2016-01-01

    It was established in experiments on noninbred albino rats that the acute intoxication with methanol (1.0 LD50) decreased cellular and humoral immune responses, Th2-lymphocyte activity (to a greater extent as compared to the function of Th1 cells), reduced the blood concentration of immunoregulatory (IFN-g, IL-2, IL-4) and proinflammatory (TNF, IL-1b, IL-6) cytokines on the average by 36.5% (p < 0.05), and did not affect the content of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13). Methanol antidote 4-methylpyrazole (non-competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) administered upon acute intoxication with methanol at a dose of 1.0 DL50 partially reduces the intoxication-induced suppression of humoral and cellular immune response, activity of T-helper cells, and production of IL-4 and restores blood levels of TNF, IL-1b, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-2, IL-6 to the control values.

  9. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg(-1). In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg(-1)). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered.

  10. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of an Aqueous Fraction of the Stem Bark of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Barbatimão) in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marco Antonio; Palazzo de Mello, João Carlos; Kaneshima, Edílson Nobuyoshi; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Stryphnodendron adstringens has a high tannin content and is used as an antiseptic and antimicrobial and in the treatment of leucorrhea, gonorrhea, wound healing, and gastritis. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of the heptamer prodelphinidin (F2) from the stem bark of S. adstringens in rodents. In the acute toxicity test, the mice that received oral doses exhibited reversible effects, with an LD50 of 3.015 mg · kg−1. In the chronic toxicity test at 90 days, Wistar rats were treated with different doses of F2 (10, 100, and 200 mg · kg−1). In the biochemical, hematological, and histopathological examinations and open-field test, the different dose groups did not exhibit significant differences compared with controls. The present results indicate that F2 from the stem bark of S. adstringens caused no toxicity with acute and chronic oral treatment in rodents at the doses administered. PMID:23970938

  11. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  12. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  13. PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    PULMONARY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO SELECTED DIISOCYANATES

    M.J.K. Selgrade, E.H. Boykin, N.H. Coates, D.L. Doerfler, S.H. Gavett
    Experimental Toxicology Div., National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  14. CONTROLLED, SHORT-TERM DERMAL AND INHALATION EXPOSURE TO CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake by humans of chloroform as a result of controlled short-term dermal and inhalation exposures. The approach used continuous real-time breath analysis to determine exhaled-breath profiles and evaluate chloroform kinetics in the huma...

  15. Dermal grafts to bony defects in irradiated and nonirradiated tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P.M.; Patel, M.; Gutman, E.; Campana, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    Coverage of intraoral ablative defects presents many different problems. Free dermal grafts have been used to cover exposed mandibular bone in dogs. Grafts were placed in animals both before and after irradiation. Grafts were uniformly successful in animals not previously irradiated but failed when placed after irradiation.

  16. DERMAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: A SUMMARY OF EPA APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report presents a concise description and evaluation of the approaches used in the Agency for dermal exposure assessment including a discussion about harmonization and research needs in this area. The report is intended to be used by EPA program offices in their effort...

  17. Nanosized particulate systems for dermal and transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amany O Kamel; Elshafeey, Ahmed H

    2010-12-01

    Nanosized particles have received much attention in industry, biology, and medicine. Today nanotechnology is finding growing applications in pharmaceutical formulation for skin delivery. This review surveys some of the approaches in the field of nanosized particulate systems for both dermal and transdermal delivery, highlighting the nanosized microemulsion, vesicular systems, solid lipid nanoaprticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and polymeric nanoparticles. PMID:21361126

  18. Autologous cell therapy: will it replace dermal fillers?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robert A

    2013-05-01

    This article discusses autologous cell therapy for wrinkles in the face. Autologous fibroblast therapy is compared with dermal fillers. Study outcomes of LaViv are detailed, including a summary of adverse events. The technique for injection of autologous cells is described in addition to the duration of effect of treatment.

  19. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  20. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  1. IN VIVO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased agricultural and residential use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin in the rat. Hair on...

  2. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  3. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  4. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  5. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  6. DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DISPOSITION OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE IN HUMANS FOLLOWING ORAL AND DERMAL EXPOSURE. TL Leavens1, MW Case1, RA Pegram1, BC Blount2, DM DeMarini1, MC Madden1, and JL Valentine3. 1NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3RTI, RTP, NC, USA.
    The disinfection byproduct ...

  7. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS. M F Hughes1, B C Edwards1, C T Mitchell1, and B Bhooshan2. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 2US CPSC, LSC, Rockville, MD.
    Two flame retardant chemicals that are candidates for treating furniture fabrics were evaluated for ...

  8. Acute contact toxicity test of insecticides (Cipermetrina 25, Lorsban 48E, Thionex 35) on honeybees in the southwestern zone of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Branchiccela, María Belén

    2012-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivation is expanding rapidly in Uruguay, with its land area having increased by 95 times during the past 10 years. Because of the region's Neotropical conditions, insecticide use is required to ensure adequate soybean productivity. However, in areas shared by soybean crops and beekeepers - such as the southwestern zone of Uruguay (SWZU) - the use of insecticides can increase the risks of honeybee death and honey contamination. Uruguayan commercial and legal guidelines set out practices and field doses designed to prevent acute intoxication with insecticides. However, honeybees in the SWZU are predominantly a polyhybrid subspecies different from that used to set international reference values, and hence they may have a different acute toxicity response, thus rendering such precautions ineffective. The aim of this work was to assess the acute toxicity response of polyhybrid honeybees in the SWZU to cypermethrin (commercial formulation: Cipermetrina 25 Agrin®), chlorpyrifos (commercial formulation: Lorsban 48E®), and endosulfan (commercial formulation: Thionex 35®). Acute toxicity bioassays were conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of each insecticide for the honeybees. The results indicate that, compared with EU reference values, SWZU honeybees have a higher toxicological sensitivity to chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, and a lower toxicological sensitivity to cypermethrin, based on the commercial formulations tested. However, when these results were adjusted according to their field dose equivalents, only chlorpyrifos emerged as a potential problem for beekeeping, as the maximum recommended field dose of Lorsban 48E® for soybean crops in Uruguay is 23 times the corresponding LD(50) for honeybees in the SWZU. PMID:22440636

  9. Acute contact toxicity test of insecticides (Cipermetrina 25, Lorsban 48E, Thionex 35) on honeybees in the southwestern zone of Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Letelier, Leonidas; Mendoza-Spina, Yamandú; Branchiccela, María Belén

    2012-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant soybean cultivation is expanding rapidly in Uruguay, with its land area having increased by 95 times during the past 10 years. Because of the region's Neotropical conditions, insecticide use is required to ensure adequate soybean productivity. However, in areas shared by soybean crops and beekeepers - such as the southwestern zone of Uruguay (SWZU) - the use of insecticides can increase the risks of honeybee death and honey contamination. Uruguayan commercial and legal guidelines set out practices and field doses designed to prevent acute intoxication with insecticides. However, honeybees in the SWZU are predominantly a polyhybrid subspecies different from that used to set international reference values, and hence they may have a different acute toxicity response, thus rendering such precautions ineffective. The aim of this work was to assess the acute toxicity response of polyhybrid honeybees in the SWZU to cypermethrin (commercial formulation: Cipermetrina 25 Agrin®), chlorpyrifos (commercial formulation: Lorsban 48E®), and endosulfan (commercial formulation: Thionex 35®). Acute toxicity bioassays were conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD(50)) of each insecticide for the honeybees. The results indicate that, compared with EU reference values, SWZU honeybees have a higher toxicological sensitivity to chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, and a lower toxicological sensitivity to cypermethrin, based on the commercial formulations tested. However, when these results were adjusted according to their field dose equivalents, only chlorpyrifos emerged as a potential problem for beekeeping, as the maximum recommended field dose of Lorsban 48E® for soybean crops in Uruguay is 23 times the corresponding LD(50) for honeybees in the SWZU.

  10. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  11. Enhanced dermal delivery of acyclovir using solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Mistry, Meghal A; Swarnakar, Nitin K

    2011-10-01

    The present investigation was enthused by the possibility to develop solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of hydrophilic drug acyclovir (ACV) and evaluate their potential as the carrier for dermal delivery. ACV-loaded SLNs (ACV-SLNs) were prepared by the optimized double emulsion process using Compritol 888 ATO as solid lipid. The prepared SLNs were smooth and spherical in shape with average diameter, polydispersity index, and entrapment efficiency of 262 ± 13 nm, 0.280 ± 0.01, and 40.08 ± 4.39% at 10% (w/w) theoretical drug loading with respect to Compritol 888 ATO content. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that ACV was present in the amorphous state inside the SLNs. In vitro skin permeation studies on human cadaver and Sprague-Dawley rat skin revealed 17.65 and 15.17 times higher accumulation of ACV-SLNs in the dermal tissues in comparison to commercially available ACV cream after 24 h. Mechanism of topical permeation and dermal distribution was studied qualitatively using confocal laser scanning microscopy. While free dye (calcein) failed to penetrate skin barrier, the same encapsulated in SLNs penetrated deeply into the dermal tissue suggesting that pilosebaceous route was followed by SLNs for skin penetration. Histological examination and transdermal epidermal water loss measurement suggested that no major morphological changes occurred on rat skin surface due to the application of SLNs. Overall, it was concluded that ACV-loaded SLNs might be beneficial in improving dermal delivery of antiviral agent(s) for the treatment of topical herpes simplex infection.

  12. Calcium pantothenate modulates gene expression in proliferating human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Tonio; Heise, Ruth; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Joussen, Sylvia; Erdmann, Kati; Schröder, Henning; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2009-11-01

    Topical application of pantothenate is widely used in clinical practice for wound healing. Previous studies identified a positive effect of pantothenate on migration and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, these studies were mainly descriptive with no molecular data supporting a possible model of its action. In this study, we first established conditions for an in vitro model of pantothenate wound healing and then analysed the molecular effects of pantothenate. To test the functional effect of pantothenate on dermal fibroblasts, cells were cultured and in vitro proliferation tests were performed using a standardized scratch test procedure. For all three donors analysed, a strong stimulatory effect of pantothenate at a concentration of 20 microg/ml on the proliferation of cultivated dermal fibroblasts was observed. To study the molecular mechanisms resulting in the proliferative effect of pantothenate, gene expression was analysed in dermal fibroblasts cultivated with 20 microg/ml of pantothenate compared with untreated cells using the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A number of significantly regulated genes were identified including genes coding for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Id1, HMOX-1, HspB7, CYP1B1 and MARCH-II. Regulation of these genes was subsequently verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Induction of HMOX-1 expression by pantothenol and pantothenic acid in dermal cells was confirmed on the protein level using immunoblots. Functional studies revealed the enhanced suppression of free radical formation in skin fibroblasts cultured with panthenol. In conclusion, these studies provided new insight in the molecular mechanisms linked to the stimulatory effect of pantothenate and panthenol on the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. PMID:19397697

  13. [Immune homeostasis impairment in acute carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats corrected by administration of tocopherol acetate and unithiol].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskiĭ, P F; Gromov, M S; Masliakov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The results of experiments on noninbred albino rats showed that the acute intoxication with carbon tetrachloride (CT) at a dose of 1 LD50 reduced the parameters of cellular immune response and function of Th1 cells more significantly than the levels of humoral immune response and Th2-lymphocyte function, decreases the blood content of immunoregulatory cytokines IFN-g, IL-2, IL-4 and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-13, while not changing the concentration of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and increasing the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. The application of unithiol, tocopherol acetate, and combinations partially restores the parameters examined. The combined effects of drugs during intoxication with CT does not exceed their separate action.

  14. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  15. Age-related disruption of autophagy in dermal fibroblasts modulates extracellular matrix components

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Kanae; Shishido, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Keiko; Hirota, Yuko; Yo, Kazuyuki; Gomi, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Autophagosomes accumulate in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagic degradation is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagy disruption affects extracellular matrix components in dermal fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system that is believed to be involved in the aging process. The contribution of autophagy to age-related changes in the human skin is unclear. In this study, we examined the relationship between autophagy and skin aging. Transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of skin tissue and cultured dermal fibroblasts derived from women of different ages revealed an increase in the number of nascent double-membrane autophagosomes with age. Western blot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II, a form associated with autophagic vacuolar membranes, was significantly increased in aged dermal fibroblasts compared with that in young dermal fibroblasts. Aged dermal fibroblasts were minimally affected by inhibition of autophagic activity. Although lipofuscin autofluorescence was elevated in aged dermal fibroblasts, the expression of Beclin-1 and Atg5—genes essential for autophagosome formation—was similar between young and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the increase of autophagosomes in aged dermal fibroblasts was due to impaired autophagic flux rather than an increase in autophagosome formation. Treatment of young dermal fibroblasts with lysosomal protease inhibitors, which mimic the condition of aged dermal fibroblasts with reduced autophagic activity, altered the fibroblast content of type I procollagen, hyaluronan and elastin, and caused a breakdown of collagen fibrils. Collectively, these findings suggest that the autophagy pathway is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts, which leads to deterioration of dermal integrity and skin fragility.

  16. Analgesic activity and acute toxicity study of Semecarpus anacardium stem bark extracts using mice

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraju, G. M.; Hoskeri, H. Joy; Krishna, V.; Babu, P. Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The analgesic activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of Semecarpus anacardium was investigated by tail flicking and writhing method using acetyl salicylic acid as the standard reference. Materials and Methods: The staircase method was adopted for the determination of the acute toxicity. LD50 of the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract was 700 mg/kg; however, the LD50 for the methanol extract was 500 mg/kg. After 1 h of oral administration of the extracts, 0.6% acetic acid was administered intraperitoneally and the analgesic activity was evaluated. Results: The number of writhing observed in the control group was 73.33 writhes. The methanol extract showed a significant analgesic activity, with 28.33 writhes, than the petroleum ether extract and the chloroform extract. But, all the extracts showed proved to be less potent than the standard drug which showed 2.33 writhes. Animals pretreated with saline did not show a signify cant effect on the latent period of tail-flick response. The analgesic effect of the petroleum ether extract was comparatively less evident. The maximum possible analgesia (MPA) increased up to 9.1% which remained elevated above the basal levels throughout the observation period. The MPA calculated for the chloroform extract increased to 14.03%. However, the analgesic effect of the methanol extract was also observed at 0.5 h following oral administration and the effect remained significant throughout the 3 h observation period, and was increased to 20.43%. Conclusion: Consistent analgesic activity of all the three S. anacardium extracts was observed by both the methods. The methanol extract was more potent than the petroleum ether and chloroform extracts but was less effective than the standard drug. This investigation supported the ethnomedicinal claims of S. anacardium. PMID:21731397

  17. Mitigation of the Hematopoietic and Gastrointestinal Acute Radiation Syndrome by Octadecenyl Thiophosphate, a Small Molecule Mimic of Lysophosphatidic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenlin; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Gududuru, Veeresh; Wu, Wenjie; Balogh, Andrea; Szabo, Erzsebet; Thompson, Karin Emmons; Yates, C. Ryan; Balazs, Louisa; Johnson, Leonard R.; Miller, Duane D.; Strobos, Jur; McCool, W. Shannon; Tigyi, Gabor J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the small molecule octadecenyl thiophosphate (OTP), a synthetic mimic of the growth factor-like mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), showed radioprotective activity in a mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) when given orally or intraperitoneally 30 min before exposure to 9 Gy γ radiation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of OTP, delivered subcutaneously, for radioprotection or radiomitigation from −24 h before to up to +72 h postirradiation using a mouse TBI model with therapeutic doses at around 1 mg/kg. OTP was injected at 10 mg/kg without observable toxic side effects in mice, providing a comfortable safety margin. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a single dose of OTP over the time period from −12 h before to +26 h after a lethal dose of TBI reduced mortality by 50%. When administered at +48 h to +72 h postirradiation (LD50/30 to LD100/30), OTP reduced mortality by ≥34%. OTP administered at +24 h postirradiation significantly elevated peripheral white blood cell and platelet counts, increased crypt survival in the jejunum, enhanced intestinal glucose absorption and reduced endotoxin seepage into the blood. In the 6.4–8.6 Gy TBI range using LD50/10 as the end point, OTP yielded a dose modification factor of 1.2. The current data indicate that OTP is a potent radioprotector and radiomitigator ameliorating the mortality and tissue injury of acute hematopoietic as well as acute gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. PMID:25807318

  18. Enhancing dermal and bone regeneration in calvarial defect surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti, Bruno; Zingaretti, Nicola; Almesberger, Daria; Verlicchi, Angela; Stefini, Roberto; Ragonese, Mauro; Guarneri, Gianni Franco; Parodi, Pier Camillo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To optimize the functional and esthetic result of cranioplasty, it is necessary to choose appropriate materials and take steps to preserve and support tissue vitality. As far as materials are concerned, custom-made porous hydroxyapatite implants are biomimetic, and therefore, provide good biological interaction and biointegration. However, before it is fully integrated, this material has relatively low mechanical resistance. Therefore, to reduce the risk of postoperative implant fracture, it would be desirable to accelerate regeneration of the tissues around and within the graft. Objectives: The objective was to determine whether integrating growth-factor-rich platelet gel or supportive dermal matrix into hydroxyapatite implant cranioplasty can accelerate bone remodeling and promote soft tissue regeneration, respectively. Materials and Methods: The investigation was performed on cranioplasty patients fitted with hydroxyapatite cranial implants between 2004 and 2010. In 7 patients, platelet gel was applied to the bone/prosthesis interface during surgery, and in a further 5 patients, characterized by thin, hypotrophic skin coverage of the cranial lacuna, a sheet of dermal matrix was applied between the prosthesis and the overlying soft tissue. In several of the former groups, platelet gel mixed with hydroxyapatite granules was used to fill small gaps between the skull and the implant. To confirm osteointegration, cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were taken at 3-6 month intervals for 1-year, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm dermal integrity. Results: Clinical examination performed a few weeks after surgery revealed good dermal regeneration, with thicker, healthier skin, apparently with a better blood supply, which was confirmed by MRI at 3-6 months. Furthermore, at 3-6 months, CT showed good biomimetism of the porous hydroxyapatite scaffold. Locations at which platelet gel and hydroxyapatite granules were used to fill gaps

  19. Inhalational and dermal exposures during spray application of biocides.

    PubMed

    Berger-Preiss, Edith; Boehncke, Andrea; Könnecker, Gustav; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Holthenrich, Dagmar; Koch, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Data on inhalational and potential dermal exposures during spray application of liquid biocidal products were generated. On the one hand, model experiments with different spraying devices using fluorescent tracers were carried out to investigate the influence of parameters relevant to the exposure (e.g. spraying equipment, nozzle size, direction of application). On the other hand, measurements were performed at selected workplaces (during disinfection operations in food and feed areas; pest control operations for private, public and veterinary hygiene; wood protection and antifouling applications) after application of biocidal products such as Empire 20, Responsar SC, Omexan-forte, Actellic, Perma-forte; Fendona SC, Pyrethrum mist; CBM 8, Aldekol Des 03, TAD CID, Basileum, Basilit. The measurements taken in the model rooms demonstrated dependence of the inhalation exposure on the type of spraying device used, in the following order: "spraying with low pressure" < "airless spraying" < "fogging" indicating that the particle diameter of the released spray droplets is the most important parameter. In addition inhalation exposure was lowest when the spraying direction was downward. Also for the potential dermal exposure, the spraying direction was of particular importance: overhead spraying caused the highest contamination of body surfaces. The data of inhalational and potential dermal exposures gained through workplace measurements showed considerable variation. During spraying procedures with low-pressure equipments, dose rates of active substances inhaled by the operators ranged from 7 to 230 microg active substance (a.s.)/h. An increase in inhaled dose rates (6-33 mg a.s./h) was observed after use of high application volumes/time unit during wood protection applications indoors. Spraying in the veterinary sector using medium-pressure sprayers led to inhaled dose rates between 2 and 24mga.s./h. The highest inhaled dose rates were measured during fogging (114 mg a

  20. Genetic and acute toxicological evaluation of an algal oil containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Collins, M L; Lynch, B; Barfield, W; Bull, A; Ryan, A S; Astwood, J D

    2014-10-01

    Algal strains of Nannochloropsis sp. were developed, optimized, cultivated and harvested to produce a unique composition of algal oil ethyl esters (Algal-EE) that are naturally high in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 23-30%) and palmitoleic acid (20-25%), and contain no docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Algal-EE was evaluated for mutagenic activity (Ames bacterial reverse mutation, in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration, in vivo micronucleus test) and for acute oral toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, rats received a single oral gavaged dose of Algal-EE (2000 mg/kg body weight). Clinical observations were made for 14 days before sacrifice on Day 15. Macroscopic evaluation involved the examination of all organs in the cranial, thoracic, and abdominal cavities. Algal-EE showed no evidence of mutagenicity, did not produce an increase in the frequency of structural chromosome aberrations, and did not cause an increase in the induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. There were no macroscopic abnormalities. Algal-EE up to 2000 mg/kg body weight did not affect body weight, organ appearance or produce any toxic-related signs of morbidity. The acute median lethal dose (LD50) of Algal-EE was >2000 mg/kg body weight. Based on these assays, Algal-EE does not appear to have any genetic or acute oral toxicity. PMID:25057807

  1. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  2. Lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC) in cosmetic and pharmaceutical dermal products.

    PubMed

    Pardeike, Jana; Hommoss, Aiman; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-01-21

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) are distinguishable from nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) by the composition of the solid particle matrix. Both are an alternative carrier system to liposomes and emulsions. This review paper focuses on lipid nanoparticles for dermal application. Production of lipid nanoparticles and final products containing lipid nanoparticles is feasible by well-established production methods. SLN and NLC exhibit many features for dermal application of cosmetics and pharmaceutics, i.e. controlled release of actives, drug targeting, occlusion and associated with it penetration enhancement and increase of skin hydration. Due to the production of lipid nanoparticles from physiological and/or biodegradable lipids, this carrier system exhibits an excellent tolerability. The lipid nanoparticles are a "nanosafe" carrier. Furthermore, an overview of the cosmetic products currently on the market is given and the improvement of the benefit/risk ratio of the topical therapy is shown. PMID:18992314

  3. [Granulomatous reactions from aesthetic dermal micro-implants].

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F

    2008-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation is a rare but possible late complication occurring both with permanent (more frequent) and biodegradable or resorbable products. Predictions cannot be made for possible late reactions, sometimes occurring even after 18 years. Although clinical diagnosis seems to be an easy task, the issue is sometimes challenging if cosmetic intervention is denied or not mentioned by the patient or by the referring physician. Identifying the filler is therefore difficult and experts may be called in trials to solve the problem. Histopathology is the best means to obtain the correct diagnosis and to identify the type of filler particles. In fact, the particular configuration of the vacuoles and cystic structures inside the granulomas reflects the shape of the injected implants particles. The clinical and microscopic features, the pathogenesis and the treatment of the granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation will be presented and discussed.

  4. Focal dermal hypoplasia: ultrastructural abnormalities of the connective tissue.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Boente, María; Asial, Raúl A; Winik, Beatriz C

    2007-02-01

    We followed over 10 years three girls with focal dermal hypoplasia syndrome. The histopathological changes demonstrated at the optical level an hypoplastic dermis with thin and scarce collagen bundles and a marked diminution of elastic fibers. Mature adipose tissue was found scattered within the papillary and reticular dermis. No alterations in the basal membrane were observed by immunocytochemical or ultrastructural techniques. Ultrastructurally, in the skin-affected areas, loosely arranged collagen bundles composed of few fibrils were seen scattered in the extracellular matrix. Scarce elastic fibers of normal morphology were also observed. Fibroblasts were smaller, oval-shaped, and diminished in number with a poorly developed cytoplasm. In these fibroblasts, the most conspicuous feature was a remarkable and irregular thickening of the nuclear fibrous lamina. Taking into account that a common link between all laminopaties may be a failure of stem cells to regenerate mesenchymal tissue, this failure would induce the dermal hypoplasia observed in our patients presenting Goltz syndrome.

  5. Mathematical analysis of dermal absorption rate of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Batkin, Izmail; Bolic, Miodrag

    2015-08-01

    Presently 90 - 95% of children in the US wear disposable diapers before completing their toilet training at average age of 30 months. The diaper absorbs urine and liquid component from feces contaminated with excreted toxicants. In this initial study, we posit that the long contact between the diaper and the skin leads to increased dermal reabsorption of excreted body toxicants, mainly heavy metals, which are statistically associated with autism and neurodevelopmental disorder. We developed a mathematical model to analyse the increase of the level of toxicants due to dermal reabsorption after excretion. This simple kinetic model gives us the average reabsorbtion factor in the range of 1.6 to 5. The limitation of this work is that only mathematical model has been considered and it has not been verified experimentally.

  6. Dermal versus total uptake of benzene from mineral spirits solvent during parts washing.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Sheehan, Patrick J

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative approaches to assessing exposure to, and associated risk from, benzene in mineral spirits solvent (MSS), used widely in parts washing and degreasing operations, have focused primarily on the respiratory pathway. The dermal contribution to total benzene uptake from such operations remains uncertain because measuring in vivo experimental dermal uptake of this volatile human carcinogen is difficult. Unprotected dermal uptake involves simultaneous sustained immersion events and transient splash/wipe events, each yielding residues subject to evaporation as well as dermal uptake. A two-process dermal exposure framework to assess dermal uptake to normal and damaged skin was applied to estimate potential daily dermal benzene dose (Dskin ) to workers who used historical or current formulations of recycled MSS in manual parts washers. Measures of evaporation and absorption of MSS dermally applied to human subjects were modeled to estimate in vivo dermal uptake of benzene in MSS. Uncertainty and interindividual variability in Dskin was characterized by Monte Carlo simulation, conditioned on uncertainty and/or variability estimated for each model input. Dermal exposures are estimated to average 33% of total (inhalation + dermal) benzene parts washing dose, with approximately equal predicted portions of dermal dose due to splash/wipe and to continuous contact with MSS. The estimated median (95th percentile) dermal and total daily benzene doses from parts washing are: 0.0069 (0.024) and 0.025 (0.18) mg/day using current, and 0.027 (0.085) and 0.098 (0.69) mg/day using historical, MSS solvents, respectively.

  7. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible.

  8. Long-term complications associated with permanent dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Kunjur, Jayanth; Witherow, Helen

    2013-12-01

    We report a case series of patients with serious long-term complications associated with the injection of permanent dermal fillers. Although such complications are relatively rare, the consequences are potentially life-long, and the psychological and medical effects can often have a profound impact on the patient. The continued routine offering of these treatments will require doctors to communicate effectively with patients about the nature of the complications and the probability of risk compared with alternative treatments. PMID:23962591

  9. Long-term complications associated with permanent dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Kunjur, Jayanth; Witherow, Helen

    2013-12-01

    We report a case series of patients with serious long-term complications associated with the injection of permanent dermal fillers. Although such complications are relatively rare, the consequences are potentially life-long, and the psychological and medical effects can often have a profound impact on the patient. The continued routine offering of these treatments will require doctors to communicate effectively with patients about the nature of the complications and the probability of risk compared with alternative treatments.

  10. The value of selected in vitro and in silico methods to predict acute oral toxicity in a regulatory context: results from the European Project ACuteTox.

    PubMed

    Prieto, P; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, A; Stanzel, S; Albella, B; Artursson, P; Campillo, N; Cecchelli, R; Cerrato, L; Díaz, L; Di Consiglio, E; Guerra, A; Gombau, L; Herrera, G; Honegger, P; Landry, C; O'Connor, J E; Páez, J A; Quintas, G; Svensson, R; Turco, L; Zurich, M G; Zurbano, M J; Kopp-Schneider, A

    2013-06-01

    ACuteTox is a project within the 6th European Framework Programme which had as one of its goals to develop, optimise and prevalidate a non-animal testing strategy for predicting human acute oral toxicity. In its last 6 months, a challenging exercise was conducted to assess the predictive capacity of the developed testing strategies and final identification of the most promising ones. Thirty-two chemicals were tested blind in the battery of in vitro and in silico methods selected during the first phase of the project. This paper describes the classification approaches studied: single step procedures and two step tiered testing strategies. In summary, four in vitro testing strategies were proposed as best performing in terms of predictive capacity with respect to the European acute oral toxicity classification. In addition, a heuristic testing strategy is suggested that combines the prediction results gained from the neutral red uptake assay performed in 3T3 cells, with information on neurotoxicity alerts identified by the primary rat brain aggregates test method. Octanol-water partition coefficients and in silico prediction of intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier passage are also considered. This approach allows to reduce the number of chemicals wrongly predicted as not classified (LD50>2000 mg/kg b.w.).

  11. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM. PMID:24283346

  12. Genetic Predisposition for Dermal Problems in Hexavalent Chromium Exposed Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priti; Bihari, Vipin; Agarwal, Sudhir K.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of genetic susceptibility on hexavalent chromium induced dermal adversities. The health status of population was examined from the areas of Kanpur (India) having the elevated hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater. Blood samples were collected for DNA isolation to conduct polymorphic determination of genes, namely: NQO1 (C609T), hOGG1 (C1245G), GSTT1, and GSTM1 (deletion). Symptomatic exposed subjects (n = 38) were compared with asymptomatic exposed subjects (n = 108) along with asymptomatic controls (n = 148) from a non contaminated reference community. Exposed symptomatic group consisted of 36.8% subjects who were GSTM1 null genotyped as compared to asymptomatic where only 19.4% subjects were null. The exposed subjects with GSTM1 null genotype were more susceptible to dermal adversities in comparison with wild genotyped subjects (OR = 2.42; 95% CI = 1.071–5.451). Age, smoking, gender or duration of residence were not found to have any confounding effect towards this association. Association with other genes was not statistically significant, nonetheless, possible contribution by these genes cannot be ruled out. In conclusion, variation in the polymorphic status of GSTM1 gene may influence dermal outcomes among residents from Cr(VI) contaminated areas. Further studies are therefore, needed to examine these observations among different population groups. PMID:22919465

  13. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  14. Dermal insecticide residues from birds inhabiting an orchard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, N.B.; Spann, J.W.; Hulse, C.S.; Gentry, S.; Borges, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency conducts risk assessments of insecticide applications to wild birds using a model that is limited to the dietary route of exposure. However, free-flying birds are also exposed to insecticides via the inhalation and dermal routes. We measured azinphos-methyl residues on the skin plus feathers and the feet of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in order to quantify dermal exposure to songbirds that entered and inhabited an apple (Malus x domestica) orchard following an insecticide application. Exposure to azinphos-methyl was measured by sampling birds from an aviary that was built around an apple tree. Birds sampled at 36 h and 7-day post-application were placed in the aviary within 1 h after the application whereas birds exposed for 3 days were released into the aviary 4-day post-application. Residues on vegetation and soil were also measured. Azinphos-methyl residues were detected from the skin plus feathers and the feet from all exposure periods. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating dermal exposure into avian pesticide risk assessments.

  15. Citral: identifying a threshold for induction of dermal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Lalko, Jon; Api, Anne Marie

    2008-10-01

    Citral [CAS# 5392-40-5; EINECS# 226-394-6; RIFM # 116; cis- and trans-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-Octadienal] is an important fragrance ingredient appreciated for its powerful lemon-aroma. It is widely used in fragrance formulations and incorporated into numerous consumer products. A comprehensive review of the dermal sensitization data available for citral was undertaken with the goal of identifying a threshold for the induction of dermal sensitization. In 2007, a complete literature search was conducted. On-line databases that were surveyed included Chemical Abstract Services and the National Library of Medicine. In addition, the toxicologic database of the Research Institute for Fragrance materials, Inc. (RIFM) was searched, which includes numerous unpublished reports. Based on a weight of evidence approach, the data from this survey demonstrate that the human NOEL (No Observed Effect Level) for induction of dermal sensitization to citral is 1400 microg/cm(2). The identification of this induction threshold will allow for risk assessments to focus on primary prevention of contact allergy to citral based on a new Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) paradigm. This subsequent assessment will form the basis of a risk management approach; specifically a new IFRA (International Fragrance Association) standard on the use of citral in consumer products.

  16. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use.

  17. Potential health effects associated with dermal exposure to occupational chemicals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual's health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical-skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  18. Potentials of new nanocarriers for dermal and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2011-01-01

    Nanocarriers (NCs) are colloidal systems having structures below a particle or droplet size of 500 nm. In the previous years, the focus for the application of NCs was primarily placed on the parenteral and oral application. However, NCs applied to the skin are in the center of attention and are expected to be increasingly applied as the skin offers a lot of advantages for the administration of such systems. For the use of NCs to the skin, one has to differentiate between the desired effects: the local effect within the skin (dermal drug delivery) or a systemic effect accompanied by the permeation through the skin (transdermal drug delivery). Both for dermal and transdermal drug delivery, the stratum corneum (SC), the main barrier of the skin, has to be overcome. SC is one of the tightest barriers of the human body. Therefore, it is the primary goal of new NC to overcome this protective and effective barrier. For that purpose, new NCs such as microemulsions, vesicular (liposomes) and nanoparticular NCs are developed and investigated. This article evaluates the potentials of these NCs for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. PMID:21111043

  19. Dermal insecticide residues from birds inhabiting an orchard.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nimish B; Spann, James W; Hulse, Craig S; Gentry, Sallie; Borges, Shannon L

    2007-10-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency conducts risk assessments of insecticide applications to wild birds using a model that is limited to the dietary route of exposure. However, free-flying birds are also exposed to insecticides via the inhalation and dermal routes. We measured azinphos-methyl residues on the skin plus feathers and the feet of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in order to quantify dermal exposure to songbirds that entered and inhabited an apple (Malus x domestica) orchard following an insecticide application. Exposure to azinphos-methyl was measured by sampling birds from an aviary that was built around an apple tree. Birds sampled at 36 h and 7-day post-application were placed in the aviary within 1 h after the application whereas birds exposed for 3 days were released into the aviary 4-day post-application. Residues on vegetation and soil were also measured. Azinphos-methyl residues were detected from the skin plus feathers and the feet from all exposure periods. Our results underscore the importance of incorporating dermal exposure into avian pesticide risk assessments.

  20. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use. PMID:26894006

  1. Potential Health Effects Associated with Dermal Exposure to Occupational Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of workers in the United States, spanning a variety of occupational industries and sectors, who are potentially exposed to chemicals that can be absorbed through the skin. Occupational skin exposures can result in numerous diseases that can adversely affect an individual’s health and capacity to perform at work. In general, there are three types of chemical–skin interactions of concern: direct skin effects, immune-mediated skin effects, and systemic effects. While hundreds of chemicals (metals, epoxy and acrylic resins, rubber additives, and chemical intermediates) present in virtually every industry have been identified to cause direct and immune-mediated effects such as contact dermatitis or urticaria, less is known about the number and types of chemicals contributing to systemic effects. In an attempt to raise awareness, skin notation assignments communicate the potential for dermal absorption; however, there is a need for standardization among agencies to communicate an accurate description of occupational hazards. Studies have suggested that exposure to complex mixtures, excessive hand washing, use of hand sanitizers, high frequency of wet work, and environmental or other factors may enhance penetration and stimulate other biological responses altering the outcomes of dermal chemical exposure. Understanding the hazards of dermal exposure is essential for the proper implementation of protective measures to ensure worker safety and health. PMID:25574139

  2. Toxicity of dermally applied alpha-cypermethrin in rats.

    PubMed

    Luty, S; Latuszyńska, J; Halliop, J; Tochman, A; Obuchowska, D; Przylepa, E; Korczak, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the immunotoxic effect of dermally applied alpha-cypermethrin in rats based on phagocytic and bactericidal activity of neutrophils of peripheral blood, and the general toxic effect based on histological and ultrastructural examination of internal organs. The preparation was dermally applied in doses of 50 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg. It was administered to the tail skin of female Wistar rats, 4 hours daily for 28 days. After the experiment, the animals were anaesthetized and heart blood was taken in order to evaluate the activity of granulocyte system. The following organs were taken for histological examinations: brain, lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, thymus and lymphatic nodes. Lung, liver, kidney and heart were used for ultrastructural studies. The results of the study showed that bactericidal and phagocytic activity of neutrophils was stimulated after administration of 50 mg/kg alpha-cypermethrin. Dermal application of the preparation resulted in slight histological changes in liver, kidney, lung and brain. Pathological changes in heart were observed only on the level of ultrastructure.

  3. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Robin J; Glinski, Donna A; Hong, Tao; Cyterski, Mike; Henderson, W Matthew; Purucker, S Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active ingredients through contact with contaminated soil: imidacloprid (logKow = 0.57), atrazine (logKow = 2.5), triadimefon (logKow = 3.0), fipronil (logKow = 4.11) or pendimethalin (logKow = 5.18). All amphibians had measurable body burdens at the end of the exposure in concentrations ranging from 0.019 to 14.562 μg/g across the pesticides tested. Atrazine produced the greatest body burdens and bioconcentration factors, but fipronil was more permeable to amphibian skin when application rate was considered. Soil partition coefficient and water solubility were much better predictors of pesticide body burden, bioconcentration factor, and skin permeability than logKow. Dermal uptake data can be used to improve risk estimates of pesticide exposure among amphibians as non-target organisms.

  4. Monitoring contractile dermal lymphatic activity following uniaxial mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Worsley, P R; Voegeli, D; Bader, D L

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that direct mechanical loading can impair dermal lymphatic function, contributing to the causal pathway of pressure ulcers. The present study aims to investigate the effects of loading on human dermal lymphatic vessels. Ten participants were recruited with ages ranging from 24 to 61 years. Participants had intradermal Indocyanine Green injections administrated between left finger digits. Fluorescence was imaged for 5min sequences with an infra-red camera prior to lymph vessel loading, immediately after axial loading (60mmHg) and following a recovery period. Image processing was employed to defined transient lymph packets and compare lymph function between each test phase. The results revealed that between 1-8 transient events (median=4) occurred at baseline, with a median velocity of 8.1mm/sec (range 4.1-20.1mm/sec). Immediately post-loading, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in velocity (median=6.4, range 2.2-13.5mm/sec), although the number of transient lymph packages varied between participants. During the recovery period the number (range 1-7) and velocity (recovery median=9.6mm/sec) of transient packets were largely restored to basal values. The present study revealed that some individuals present with impaired dermal lymphatic function immediately after uniaxial mechanical loading. More research is needed to investigate the effects of pressure and shear on lymphatic vessel patency. PMID:27245749

  5. Dermal cells distribution on laser-structured ormosils.

    PubMed

    Sima, L E; Buruiana, E C; Buruiana, T; Matei, A; Epurescu, G; Zamfirescu, M; Moldovan, A; Petrescu, S M; Dinescu, M

    2013-02-01

    Several dermal substitutes for skin grafting are now commercially available, although their performance still needs improvement. Most artificial dermises have a lower take rate than autologous grafts and require more time for sufficient vascular ingrowth to overlay the skin graft. Herein we characterize new two-dimensional scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications, which were fabricated by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of ormosils hybrid materials. For the 2PP experiments, a Ti:sapphire laser was used to induce the photopolymerization. In this study we showed that the polymeric structures with controlled architectures produced via 2PP could be used as scaffolds for the in vitro culture and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the fibroblasts' orientation was guided by the scaffold geometry, consisting of ormosils lines or grids. This 'dermal equivalent' was investigated for its ability to accommodate epidermal cells. To evaluate this interaction, two experimental approaches were hence used: (a) fibroblast-melanocyte co-cultures; and (b) fibroblast-keratinocyte organotypic cultures. During their growth on ormosil scaffolds, productive interaction of fibroblasts with both epidermal cell types was found. Moreover, this pseudo-dermis was shown to support the growth of keratinocytes for up to 8 days after their seeding.

  6. Human acellular dermal wound matrix: evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Kirsner, Robert S; Bohn, Greg; Driver, Vickie R; Mills, Joseph L; Nanney, Lillian B; Williams, Marie L; Wu, Stephanie C

    2015-12-01

    A chronic wound fails to complete an orderly and timely reparative process and places patients at increased risk for wound complications that negatively impact quality of life and require greater health care expenditure. The role of extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in normal and chronic wound repair. Not only is ECM the largest component of the dermal skin layer, but also ECM proteins provide structure and cell signalling that are necessary for successful tissue repair. Chronic wounds are characterised by their inflammatory and proteolytic environment, which degrades the ECM. Human acellular dermal matrices, which provide an ECM scaffold, therefore, are being used to treat chronic wounds. The ideal human acellular dermal wound matrix (HADWM) would support regenerative healing, providing a structure that could be repopulated by the body's cells. Experienced wound care investigators and clinicians discussed the function of ECM, the evidence related to a specific HADWM (Graftjacket(®) regenerative tissue matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., licensed by KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX), and their clinical experience with this scaffold. This article distills these discussions into an evidence-based and practical overview for treating chronic lower extremity wounds with this HADWM.

  7. Human dermal stem cells differentiate into functional epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Yu, Hong; Xu, Xiaowei; Kong, Jun; Lee, John T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-03-15

    Melanocytes sustain a lifelong proliferative potential, but a stem cell reservoir in glabrous skin has not yet been found. Here, we show that multipotent dermal stem cells isolated from human foreskins lacking hair follicles are able to home to the epidermis to differentiate into melanocytes. These dermal stem cells, grown as three-dimensional spheres, displayed a capacity for self-renewal and expressed NGFRp75, nestin and OCT4, but not melanocyte markers. In addition, cells derived from single-cell clones were able to differentiate into multiple lineages including melanocytes. In a three-dimensional skin equivalent model, sphere-forming cells differentiated into HMB45-positive melanocytes, which migrated from the dermis to the epidermis and aligned singly among the basal layer keratinocytes in a similar fashion to pigmented melanocytes isolated from the epidermis. The dermal stem cells were negative for E-cadherin and N-cadherin, whereas they acquired E-cadherin expression and lost NGFRp75 expression upon contact with epidermal keratinocytes. These results demonstrate that stem cells in the dermis of human skin with neural-crest-like characteristics can become mature epidermal melanocytes. This finding could significantly change our understanding of the etiological factors in melanocyte transformation and pigmentation disorders; specifically, that early epigenetic or genetic alterations leading to transformation may take place in the dermis rather than in the epidermis.

  8. Dermal stem cells can differentiate down an endothelial lineage.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emma; Richardson, Gavin D; Jahoda, Colin A; Gledhill, Karl; Phillips, Helen M; Henderson, Deborah; Owens, W Andrew; Hole, Nicholas

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we have demonstrated that cells of neural crest origin located in the dermal papilla (DP) exhibit endothelial marker expression and a functional activity. When grown in endothelial growth media, DP primary cultures upregulate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (FLT1) mRNA and downregulate expression of the dermal stem cell marker α-smooth muscle actin. DP cells have demonstrated functional characteristics of endothelial cells, including the ability to form capillary-like structures on Matrigel, increase uptake of low-density lipoprotein and upregulate ICAM1 (CD54) in response to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulation. We confirmed that these observations were not due to contaminating endothelial cells, by using DP clones. We have also used the WNT1cre/ROSA26R and WNT1cre/YFP lineage-tracing mouse models to identify a population of neural crest-derived cells in DP cultures that express the endothelial marker PECAM (CD31); these cells also form capillary-like structures on Matrigel. Importantly, cells of neural crest origin that express markers of endothelial and mesenchymal lineages exist within the dermal sheath of the vibrissae follicle.

  9. A Hydrogel Derived From Decellularized Dermal Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew T.; Daly, Kerry A.; Brennan-Pierce, Ellen P.; Johnson, Scott A.; Carruthers, Christopher; D’Amore, Antonio; Nagarkar, Shailesh P.; Velankar, Sachin S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    The ECM of mammalian tissues has been used as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Such scaffolds are prepared in many forms including sheets, powders, and hydrogels. ECM hydrogels provide advantages such as injectability, the ability to fill an irregularly shaped space, and the inherent bioactivity of native matrix. However, material properties of ECM hydrogels and the effect of these properties upon cell behavior are neither well understood nor controlled. The objective of this study was to prepare and determine the structure, mechanics, and the cell response in vitro and in vivo of ECM hydrogels prepared from decellularized porcine dermis and urinary bladder tissues. Dermal ECM hydrogels were characterized by a more dense fiber architecture and greater mechanical integrity than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels, and showed a dose dependent increase in mechanical properties with ECM concentration. In vitro, dermal ECM hydrogels supported greater C2C12 myoblast fusion, and less fibroblast infiltration and less fibroblast mediated hydrogel contraction than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels. Both hydrogels were rapidly infiltrated by host cells, primarily macrophages, when implanted in a rat abdominal wall defect. Both ECM hydrogels degraded by 35 days in vivo, but UBM hydrogels degraded more quickly, and with greater amounts of myogenesis than dermal ECM. These results show that ECM hydrogel properties can be varied and partially controlled by the scaffold tissue source, and that these properties can markedly affect cell behavior. PMID:22789723

  10. Clinical application of cultured epithelial autografts on acellular dermal matrices in the treatment of extended burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Lineaweaver, William C; Sailes, Frederick C; Kisner, Carson; Zhang, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Achieving permanent replacement of skin in extensive full-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn injuries and chronic wounds remains one of the fundamental surgical problems. Presently, split-thickness skin grafts are still considered the best material for surgical repair of an excised burn wound. However, in burns that affect greater than 50% of total body surface area, the patient has insufficient areas of unaffected skin from which split-thickness skin grafts can be harvested. The use of cultured epithelial (or epidermal) autografts (CEAs) has achieved satisfactory results. But the take rate of CEAs is poor in full-thickness bed or in chronically infected area. Providing temporary cover with allograft skin, or a more permanent allodermis, may increase clinical take. This review aims to (1) describe the use of CEAs in the regeneration of the epidermis, (2) introduce the application of the acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in the clinics, and (3) enhance understanding of the CEAs applied with ADM as an appropriate strategy to treat the extended burn injuries. The current evidence regarding the cultured epithelial cell or keratinocyte autograft and dermal grafts applied in the treatment of burn injuries was investigated with an extensive electronic and manual search (MEDLINE and EMBASE). The included literature (N=136 publications) was critically evaluated focusing on the efficacy and safety of this technique in improving the healing of the deep dermal and full-thickness burn injuries. This review concluded that the use of ADM with CEAs is becoming increasingly routine, particularly as a life-saving tool after acute thermal trauma.

  11. Acute toxicity and risk assessment of permethrin, naled, and dichlorvos to larval butterflies via ingestion of contaminated foliage.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M

    2015-02-01

    Three Florida native larval butterflies (Junonia coenia, Anartia jatrophae, Eumaeus atala) were used in the present study to determine the acute toxicity, hazard, and risk of a 24h ingestion of leaves contaminated with the adult mosquito control insecticides permethrin, naled, and dichlorvos to late 4th and early 5th in-star caterpillars. Based on 24-h LD50s for ingestion, naled was more acutely toxic than permethrin and dichlorvos to caterpillars. Hazard quotients using the ratio of the highest doses and the 90th percentile doses from field measurements in host plant foliage following actual mosquito control applications to the toxicological benchmarks from laboratory toxicity tests indicate potential high acute hazard for naled compared to permethrin and dichlorvos. Based on probabilistic ecological risk methods, naled exposure doses in the environment also presented a higher acute risk to caterpillars than permethrin and dichlorvos. The acute toxicity laboratory results and ecological risk assessment are based only on dietary ingestion and single chemical doses. It does not include other typical exposure scenarios that may occur in the environment. It is thus plausible to state that the ecological risk assessment presented here underestimates the potential risks in the field to caterpillars. However, one assumption that is scientifically feasible and certainly real from the results - if the environmental exposure doses of mosquito control operations are similar or higher to those presented here in leaves from the field, after applications, there will likely be significant mortalities and other adverse effects on caterpillar populations. PMID:25462317

  12. Acute toxicity of vipoxin and its components: is the acidic component an "inhibitor" of PLA2 toxicity?

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Vasil N; Stoykova, Silviya; Goranova, Yana; Mitewa, Mariana; Petrova, Svetla

    2012-12-01

    Vipoxin is a heterodimeric neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the Bulgarian long-nosed viper Vipera ammodytes meridionalis. Vipoxin represents a noncovalent association of two subunits - a basic and toxic phospholipase A2 enzyme, and an acidic non-enzymatic component (vipoxin's acidic component). It was postulated that the phospholipase A2 subunit was more toxic than the whole vipoxin complex and the function of the acidic component was to reduce the enzymatic and toxic activities of the basic phospholipase A2. In the present study, we report new data on the acute toxicity (LD50) of vipoxin and its individual separated components. Vipoxin LD50 (mice, i.p. and i.v.) values were found to be 0.7-1.2 mg/kg b.w. (i.p.) and 0.9-1.3 mg/kg b.w. (i.v.). The established LD50 values for the separated pure phospholipase A2 subunit are higher - 10.0-13.0 mg/kg b.w (i.p.) and 2.2-3.0 mg/kg b.w. (i.v.), i.e. the individual phospholipase A2 subunit displays less toxic activity than vipoxin, contrary to the data published in the literature. The reconstituted vipoxin complex (obtained after preliminary incubation of pure separated phospholipase A2 and acidic component showed enzyme activity and toxicity comparable to that of the native vipoxin complex. Addition of acidic component to the phospholipase A2 subunit showed a positive effect on the enzymatic activity, reaching maximal enzyme reaction rate of acidic component to phospholipase A2 molar ratio of 0.8:1 on using 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxy-benzoic acid as substrate. For the first time we showed that the acidic subunit was absolutely required for the toxic activity of vipoxin. Based on the obtained results, we assume that the function of the acidic component is to stabilize the neurotoxin's quaternary structure, required for its toxic and enzymatic activities, similarly to the role of the acidic component of crotoxin. PMID:23554559

  13. Significant chemical burns associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod detergent.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jason L; Wiles, Devin A; Kenney, Brian; Spiller, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Concentrated laundry pods have been reported to cause significant clinical effects including oropharyngeal burns and respiratory distress requiring intubation. Dermal burns have been reported, but no incidents of serious isolated dermal injury have been published. We report a case of significant, isolated dermal injury as a result of dermal exposure to a concentrated laundry detergent pod. Total body surface area partial thickness burns in this case were estimated at approximately 2 % with an additional 4-5 % of total body surface area (TBSA) displaying superficial burns/chemical dermatitis. Health-care providers should be aware of this complication and should perform thorough dermal decontamination in the event of an exposure. Parents should be educated regarding the dangers associated with dermal exposure to laundry pod compounds and the need to secure these items away from children as well as proper decontamination techniques should an exposure occur.

  14. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part II: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Meehan, Shane; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with a minimal side-effect profile. It should be biocompatible and stable within the injection site, with the risk of only transient undesirable effects from injection alone. However, all dermal fillers can induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects. In Part II of this paper, we review the most common adverse effects related to dermal filler use.

  15. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of human dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sueki, H; Telegan, B; Murphy, G F

    1995-11-01

    We attempted to characterize the three-dimensional structure of dermal dendrocytes and to clarify the spatial relationships between dermal dendrocytes and mast cells, macrophages, and nerves. Normal human adult skin (breast, n = 2) was routinely processed for electron microscopy. Every other section (about 50 per data set) was collected at 80-nm intervals traversing about 8 microns of tissue. Grids showing the same cells were photographed by electron microscopy at a magnification of 4000x. Based on the 10-20 photographs per data set, cell outlines were digitized into the reconstruction program at appropriate layers and aligned. Thin, elongated cytoplasmic "dendrites" of dermal dendrocytes in two-dimensional micrographs proved to be thin, membrane-bound flaps in three-dimensional reconstruction. For dermal dendrocytes concentrated about superficial vessels (perivascular dendrocytes), the flaps enshrouded the vessel wall, and for dermal dendrocytes directly beneath the epidermis (subepidermal dendrocytes), these flaps were aligned parallel to the dermal-epidermal junction. The three-dimensional feature of dermal dendrocytes (perivascular and subepidermal) is quite similar to that of perivascular adventitial veil cells, suggesting ultrastructurally identified perivascular dendrocytes and veil cells must be identical cells. In conventional ultrathin sections, 20-40% of perivascular dendrocytes and occasional subepidermal dendrocytes were closely associated with mast cells. When viewed by computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction, membrane flaps of dermal dendrocytes consistently shrouded mast cell membranes for 50-90% of their perimeter; mast cells resembled a ball in a baseball glove (dermal dendrocytes). Occasional dermal dendrocytes surrounded non-myelinated nerves in the superficial dermis. Membrane flaps also enabled dermal dendrocytes to present extensive areas to the plasma membranes of adjacent monocyte/macrophages. These findings indicate that dermal

  16. The neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid, affects Bombus impatiens (bumblebee) sonication behavior when consumed at doses below the LD50.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Callin M; Combes, Stacey A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated changes in sonication (or buzz-pollination) behavior of Bombus impatiens bumblebees, after consumption of the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid. We measured sonication frequency, sonication length, and flight (wing beat) frequency of marked bees collecting pollen from Solanum lycopsersicum (tomato), and then randomly assigned bees to consume 0, 0.0515, 0.515, or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid. We recorded the number of bees in each treatment group that resumed sonication behavior after consuming imidacloprid, and re-measured sonication and flight behavior for these bees. We did not find evidence that consuming 0.0515 ng imidacloprid affected the sonication length, sonication frequency, or flight frequency for bees that sonicated after consuming imidacloprid; we were unable to test changes in these variables for bees that consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng because we did not observe enough of these bees sonicating after treatment. We performed Cox proportional hazard regression to determine whether consuming imidacloprid affected the probability of engaging in further sonication behavior on S. lycopersicum and found that bumblebees who consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid were significantly less likely to sonicate after treatment than bees who consumed no imidacloprid. At the end of the experiment, we classified bees as dead or alive; our data suggest a trend of increasing mortality with higher doses of imidacloprid. Our results show that even modest doses of imidacloprid can significantly affect the likelihood of bumblebees engaging in sonication, a behavior critical for the pollination of a variety of crops and other plants.

  17. Comparison of brain mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity with cyanide LD(50) yields insight into the efficacy of prophylactics.

    PubMed

    Marziaz, Mandy L; Frazier, Kathryn; Guidry, Paul B; Ruiz, Robyn A; Petrikovics, Ilona; Haines, Donovan C

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, therefore inhibiting the cell oxygen utilization and resulting in the condition of histotoxic anoxia. The enzyme rhodanese detoxifies cyanide by utilizing sulfur donors to convert cyanide to thiocyanate, and new and improved sulfur donors are actively sought as researchers seek to improve cyanide prophylactics. We have determined brain cytochrome c oxidase activity as a marker for cyanide exposure for mice pre-treated with various cyanide poisoning prophylactics, including sulfur donors thiosulfate (TS) and thiotaurine (TT3). Brain mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation, the outer mitochondrial membrane was disrupted by a maltoside detergent, and the decrease in absorbance at 550 nm as horse heart ferrocytochrome c (generated by the dithiothreitol reduction of ferricytochrome c) was oxidized was monitored. Overall, the TS control prophylactic treatment provided significant protection of the cytochrome c oxidase activity. The TT3-treated mice showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity even in the absence of cyanide. In both treatment series, addition of exogenous Rh did not significantly enhance the prevention of cytochrome c oxidase inhibition, but the addition of sodium nitrite did. These findings can lead to a better understanding of the protection mechanism by various cyanide antidotal systems.

  18. A functional dual-coated (FDC) microtiter plate method to replace the botulinum toxin LD50 test.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yvonne Y B; Rigsby, Peter; Sesardic, Dorothea; Marks, James D; Jones, Russell G A

    2012-06-01

    Conventional capture ("Sandwich") ELISAs equally detect denatured inactive and native active botulinum type A toxin. Light chain endoprotease activity assays also fail to distinguish between various inactive molecules including partially denatured and fragmented material still retaining this protease activity. By co-coating microtiter plates with SNAP25 substrate and a monoclonal antibody specific for a conformational epitope of the toxin's Hc domain, it was possible to develop a highly sensitive (130 aM LoD), precise (1.4% GCV) new assay specific for the biologically active toxin molecule. Capture was performed in phosphate buffer with a fixed optimal concentration of chaotropic agent (e.g., 1.2 M urea) to differentially isolate functional toxin molecules. Addition of enzymatically favorable buffer containing zinc and DTT reduced the interchain disulfide bond releasing and activating the captured L-chain with subsequent specific cleavage of the SNAP25(1-206) substrate. A neoepitope antibody specific for the newly exposed Q(197) epitope was used to quantify the cleaved SNAP25(1-197). The assay's requirement for the intact toxin molecule was demonstrated with pre-reduced toxin (heavy and light chains), recombinant LHn fragments, and stressed samples containing partially or fully denatured material. This is the first known immunobiochemical assay that correlates with in vivo potency and provides a realistic alternative. PMID:22406430

  19. The neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid, affects Bombus impatiens (bumblebee) sonication behavior when consumed at doses below the LD50.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Callin M; Combes, Stacey A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated changes in sonication (or buzz-pollination) behavior of Bombus impatiens bumblebees, after consumption of the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid. We measured sonication frequency, sonication length, and flight (wing beat) frequency of marked bees collecting pollen from Solanum lycopsersicum (tomato), and then randomly assigned bees to consume 0, 0.0515, 0.515, or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid. We recorded the number of bees in each treatment group that resumed sonication behavior after consuming imidacloprid, and re-measured sonication and flight behavior for these bees. We did not find evidence that consuming 0.0515 ng imidacloprid affected the sonication length, sonication frequency, or flight frequency for bees that sonicated after consuming imidacloprid; we were unable to test changes in these variables for bees that consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng because we did not observe enough of these bees sonicating after treatment. We performed Cox proportional hazard regression to determine whether consuming imidacloprid affected the probability of engaging in further sonication behavior on S. lycopersicum and found that bumblebees who consumed 0.515 or 5.15 ng of imidacloprid were significantly less likely to sonicate after treatment than bees who consumed no imidacloprid. At the end of the experiment, we classified bees as dead or alive; our data suggest a trend of increasing mortality with higher doses of imidacloprid. Our results show that even modest doses of imidacloprid can significantly affect the likelihood of bumblebees engaging in sonication, a behavior critical for the pollination of a variety of crops and other plants. PMID:27189613

  20. Relationship between dermal birefringence and the skin surface roughness of photoaged human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shingo; Nakagawa, Noriaki; Yamanari, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Arata; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    The dermal degeneration accompanying photoaging is considered to promote skin roughness features such as wrinkles. Our previous study demonstrated that polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography (PS-SD-OCT) enabled noninvasive three-dimensional evaluation of the dermal degeneration of photoaged skin as a change in dermal birefringence, mainly due to collagenous structures. Our purpose is to examine the relationship between dermal birefringence and elasticity and the skin morphology in the eye corner area using PS-SD-OCT. Nineteen healthy male subjects in their seventees were recruited as subjects. A transverse dermal birefringence map, automatically produced by the algorithm, did not show localized changes in the dermal birefringence in the part of the main horizontal wrinkle. The averaged upper dermal birefringence, however, showed depth-dependent correlation with the parameters of skin roughness significantly, suggesting that solar elastosis is a major factor for the progress of wrinkles. Age-dependent parameters of skin elasticity measured with Cutometer did not correlate with the parameters. These results suggest that the analysis of dermal birefringence using PS-SD-OCT enables the evaluation of photoaging-dependent upper dermal degeneration related to the change of skin roughness.

  1. BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF ACELLULAR DERMAL MATRIX GRAFT EVALUATED IN CULTURE OF MURINE MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Vendramini, Ana Paula; Melo, Rafaela Fernanda; Marcantonio, Rosemary Adriana Chiérici; Carlos, Iracilda Zepone

    2006-01-01

    The acellular dermal matrix allograft has been used as an alternative to autogenous palatal mucosal graft. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the biocompatibility of an acellular dermal matrix (AlloDerm®) in culture of macrophages. For hydrogen peroxidase determination we used the method of Pick & Kesari, and the Griess method for nitric oxide determination,. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (p ≤ 0,05) in the release of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide by the macrophages exposed to acellular dermal matrix and the negative control. The results suggest that acellular dermal matrix did not activate the cell inflammatory response. PMID:19089033

  2. Acute and subchronic toxicity of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil in mallards and ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, W.A.; Hancock, G.A.; Ford, W.H.; Ringer, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The toxic properties of naturally weathered Exxon Valdez crude oil (WEVC) were assessed in a battery of acute and subchronic toxicity tests using mallards, Anas platyrhynchos, and European ferrets, Mustela putorius. Adult mallard acute oral toxicity study results indicated no mortalities or signs o toxicity, i.e., no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) and median lethal dose (LD50) > 5,000 mg/kg. Acute oral feeding and food avoidance tests with ducklings also indicated no toxicity (NOAEL and LC50 > 50,000 mg/kg diet) with no evidence of food avoidance (FAC50 > 20,000 mg/kg diet). No mortalities or toxic signs were noted in a 14-d feeding study with adult birds at dietary concentrations up to 100,000 mg WEVC/kg diet. Among clinical and physiological end points evaluated, the only significant difference noted was an increase in liver: body weight ratios in the 100,000-mg WEVC/kg diet dose group. No differences in clinical chemistry or hematological parameters were noted, and there were no consistent differences in histological evaluations of organ tissues. Daily oral doses of up to 5,000 mg/kg of WEVC over 5 d resulted in minimal effects on ferrets. Increased serum albumin concentrations were observed in the 5,000-mg/kg dose group females and decreased spleen weights were noted in females of all WEVC treatment groups. No other significant observations were noted.

  3. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  4. Toxicological assessment of combined lead and cadmium: acute and sub-chronic toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guiping; Dai, Shujun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Lu, Hongke; Jia, Renyong; Xu, Jiao; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Shu, Yang; Zhao, Xinghong

    2014-03-01

    The exposure to chemical mixtures is a common and important determinant of toxicity and receives concern for their introduction by inhalation and ingestion. However, few in vivo mixture studies have been conducted to understand the health effects of chemical mixtures compared with single chemicals. In this study, the acute and 90day sub-chronic toxicity tests of combined Pb and Cd were conducted. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 value of Pb(NO3)2 and CdCl2 mixture by the oral route was 2696.54mg/kg by Bliss method. The sub-chronic treatment revealed that the low-dose combination of Pb and Cd exposures can significantly change the physiological and biochemical parameters of the blood of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with dose-response relationship and causes microcytic hypochromic anemia and the damages of liver and kidney of the SD rats to various degrees. Histopathological exams showed that the target organs of Pb and Cd were testicle, liver, and kidneys. These observations suggest that Pb and Cd are practically additive-toxic for the SD rats in oral acute toxicity studies. The lowest observed adverse-effect level in rats may be lower than a dose of 29.96mg/(kgbwday) when administered orally for 90 consecutive days.

  5. Research on acute toxicity and the behavioral effects of methanolic extract from psilocybin mushrooms and psilocin in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuk, Olga; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Poliwoda, Anna; Kazakova, Anastasia; Godovan, Vladlena V; Halama, Marek; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2015-04-01

    The pharmacological activities and acute toxicity of the psilocin (PC) and dried residues of the crude extracts of psychotropic mushrooms were investigated in mice. The hallucinogenic substances were effectively isolated, by using methanol, from the species of Psilocybe semilanceata and Pholiotina cyanopus, that were collected in the north-east region of Poland. The chemical analysis of these extracts, which was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS), indicated the presence of psilocin and other hallucinogenic substances, including indolealkylamines and their phosphorylated analogues. When the pure psilocin or fungal extracts were used, slight differences in determined LD50 values were observed. However, the application of PC evoked the highest level of toxicity (293.07 mg/kg) compared to the activity of extracts from Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata, where the level of LD50 was 316.87 mg/kg and 324.37 mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the behavioral test, which considered the head-twitching response (HTR), was used to assess the effects of the studied psychotropic factors on the serotonergic system. Both, the fungal extracts and psilocin evoked characteristic serotoninergic effects depending on the dose administered to mice, acting as an agonist/partial agonist on the serotonergic system. A dose of 200 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced spontaneous head-twitching in mice (100% effect), as a result of the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. Compared to the activity of 5-HTP, the intraperitoneal administration of 1mg/kg of psilocin or hallucinogenic extracts of studied mushrooms (Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata) reduced the number of head-twitch responses of about 46% and 30%, respectively. In contrast, the administration of PC exhibited a reduction of about 60% in HTR numbers. PMID:25826052

  6. Research on acute toxicity and the behavioral effects of methanolic extract from psilocybin mushrooms and psilocin in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuk, Olga; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Poliwoda, Anna; Kazakova, Anastasia; Godovan, Vladlena V; Halama, Marek; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2015-03-27

    The pharmacological activities and acute toxicity of the psilocin (PC) and dried residues of the crude extracts of psychotropic mushrooms were investigated in mice. The hallucinogenic substances were effectively isolated, by using methanol, from the species of Psilocybe semilanceata and Pholiotina cyanopus, that were collected in the north-east region of Poland. The chemical analysis of these extracts, which was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS), indicated the presence of psilocin and other hallucinogenic substances, including indolealkylamines and their phosphorylated analogues. When the pure psilocin or fungal extracts were used, slight differences in determined LD50 values were observed. However, the application of PC evoked the highest level of toxicity (293.07 mg/kg) compared to the activity of extracts from Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata, where the level of LD50 was 316.87 mg/kg and 324.37 mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the behavioral test, which considered the head-twitching response (HTR), was used to assess the effects of the studied psychotropic factors on the serotonergic system. Both, the fungal extracts and psilocin evoked characteristic serotoninergic effects depending on the dose administered to mice, acting as an agonist/partial agonist on the serotonergic system. A dose of 200 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced spontaneous head-twitching in mice (100% effect), as a result of the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. Compared to the activity of 5-HTP, the intraperitoneal administration of 1mg/kg of psilocin or hallucinogenic extracts of studied mushrooms (Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata) reduced the number of head-twitch responses of about 46% and 30%, respectively. In contrast, the administration of PC exhibited a reduction of about 60% in HTR numbers.

  7. Research on Acute Toxicity and the Behavioral Effects of Methanolic Extract from Psilocybin Mushrooms and Psilocin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuk, Olga; Jasicka-Misiak, Izabela; Poliwoda, Anna; Kazakova, Anastasia; Godovan, Vladlena V.; Halama, Marek; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological activities and acute toxicity of the psilocin (PC) and dried residues of the crude extracts of psychotropic mushrooms were investigated in mice. The hallucinogenic substances were effectively isolated, by using methanol, from the species of Psilocybe semilanceata and Pholiotina cyanopus, that were collected in the north-east region of Poland. The chemical analysis of these extracts, which was performed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS), indicated the presence of psilocin and other hallucinogenic substances, including indolealkylamines and their phosphorylated analogues. When the pure psilocin or fungal extracts were used, slight differences in determined LD50 values were observed. However, the application of PC evoked the highest level of toxicity (293.07 mg/kg) compared to the activity of extracts from Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata, where the level of LD50 was 316.87 mg/kg and 324.37 mg/kg, respectively. Furthermore, the behavioral test, which considered the head-twitching response (HTR), was used to assess the effects of the studied psychotropic factors on the serotonergic system. Both, the fungal extracts and psilocin evoked characteristic serotoninergic effects depending on the dose administered to mice, acting as an agonist/partial agonist on the serotonergic system. A dose of 200 mg/kg 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced spontaneous head-twitching in mice (100% effect), as a result of the formation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the brain. Compared to the activity of 5-HTP, the intraperitoneal administration of 1mg/kg of psilocin or hallucinogenic extracts of studied mushrooms (Ph. cyanopus and P. semilanceata) reduced the number of head-twitch responses of about 46% and 30%, respectively. In contrast, the administration of PC exhibited a reduction of about 60% in HTR numbers. PMID:25826052

  8. Biochemical and histopathological effects on liver due to acute oral toxicity of aqueous leaf extract of Ecliptaalba on female Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tanuja; Sinha, Nivedita; Singh, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Limited data is available about the toxicity of herbal remedies used for self-medication. Since a popular medicinal plant Ecliptaalba contains various bioactive molecules, the present study aimed to observe the biochemical and histological changes in liver associated with acute oral toxicity (LD50) of aqueous extract of E. alba (L.) Hassk. in female Swiss albino mice. Materials and Methods: For the acute oral toxicity study, the animals were divided into six groups of 6 mice each. Group– I was normal control and the treatment groups were administered aqueous leaf extract of E. alba orally at different doses of 500 mg (group – I),1750 mg (group–III), 2000 mg (group- IV), 2500 mg (group- V) and 3000 mg/ kg/b.wt.(group- VI) for seven consecutive days. The mice were sacrificed on the eighth day and blood was collected for the analysis of ALP (alkaline phosphatase), SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transferase), total protein and albumin. The liver was dissected, weighed, and processed for histopathological analysis. Results: The LD50 was found to be 2316.626 mg/kg /body weight in female mice. Serum SGPT, total protein and albumin increased in treated group- IV (P < 0.05), V (P < 0.01), and VI (P < 0.01) as compared to the control (group- I). ALP level significantly decreased in the treated group- IV (P < 0.05), V (P < 0.01) and VI (P < 0.01). Histopathological changes were observed at dose of 2000 mg (group- IV), 2500 mg (group- V) and 3000 mg (group- VI). Conclusion: It was concluded that oral administration of aqueous leaf extract of E. alba had detrimental effects on biochemical parameters and induced histopathological alterations in liver of female Swiss albino mice at doses higher than 2000 mg/kg/day indicating that its indiscriminate use should be avoided. PMID:23543876

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  10. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  11. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  12. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients.

  13. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h), with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain. PMID:20807444

  14. Dermal Toxicity of Flake-Like α-Alumina Pigments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Seo, HyunJeong; Jang, Seongwan; Lee, Sang-Geun; Park, Sungkyun; Park, Kang Hyun; Youn, BuHyun

    2015-02-01

    Aluminum is one of the most widely used nonferrous metals and an important industrial material, especially for automotive coatings. However, potential toxicity caused by aluminum in humans limits the used of this metal. α-alumina is the most stable form of aluminum in various phases. Although the results of studies evaluating the dermal toxicity of α-alumina remained unclear, this compound can still be used as a pigment in cosmetics for humans. In the current study, we further evaluated the dermal cytotoxic effects of α-alumina on human skin cells and an in vivo mouse model. We also measured the in vitro penetration profile of flake-like α-alumina in porcine skin and assessed the degree of cellular metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrated that treatment with flake-like α-alumina did not significantly affect cell viability up to 24 h. This compound was found to have a non-penetration profile based on a Franz modified diffusion cell assay. In addition, flake-like α-alumina was not found to induce dermal inflammation as assessed by histology of epidermal architecture, hyperplasia, and the expression of Interleukin-1β and Cyclooxygenase-2. Results of the cellular metabolic disorder assay indicated that flake-like α-alumina does not exert a direct effect on human skin cells. Taken together, our findings provided not only evidence that flake-like α-alumina may serve as a pearlescent pigment in cosmetics but also experimental basis utilizing α-alumina for human application. Our results also obviously provide new insight of the further toxicity study to aluminum based nanoparticles for skin. PMID:26353706

  15. Survey of dermal protection in Washington State collision repair industry.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Fent, Kenneth W; Whittaker, Stephen G; Gaines, Linda G T; Thomasen, Jennifer M; Flack, Sheila L; Nylander-French, Leena A; Yost, Michael G; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn K

    2011-09-01

    Substantial exposure to isocyanates may occur during spray painting in autobody shops, yet information is lacking on the efficacy of the protective clothing used during spray painting. We investigated the personal and workplace factors associated with painters' dermal protection use during a large-scale exposure assessment study. Survey data indicated that 69% of painters always used gloves, with latex gloves (47%) and nitrile gloves (34%) used most frequently. Among latex glove users, 53% used thin latex (0.05-0.13 mm), 6% used medium latex (0.15-0.20 mm), and 12% used thick latex (> 0.20 mm). Among nitrile glove users, 27% used thin nitrile and 45% used medium nitrile. Sixty-three percent of painters always used coveralls, 44% preferring one particular brand. Although overspray presents an opportunity for dermal exposure to the neck and face, only 19% of painters protected these areas with personal protective equipment. Painters who always used coveralls were more likely to use gloves (odds ratio = 7.9, p = 0.061). Painters who reported ever having smoked cigarettes used gloves (p = 0.05) and coveralls (p = 0.04) more frequently. Painters who sprayed more than 34 clear coat jobs per month used coveralls most frequently (p = 0.038). Exact logistic regressions along with random sample calculations indicated that the survey results were independent of the shops. Because of the small sample size in this study, future research is warranted to corroborate these results. Studying the effectiveness of gloves and coveralls against polyurethane paints and understanding the underlying motivators and preferences for painters and business owners is needed for the development of best practices for the selection and use of dermal protection. PMID:21830873

  16. Dermal exposure from transfer of lubricants and fuels by consumers.

    PubMed

    Galea, Karen S; Davis, Alice; Todd, Davis; MacCalman, Laura; McGonagle, Carolyn; Cherrie, John W

    2014-11-01

    Consumer uses of fuels and lubricants in Europe are subject to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of CHemicals (REACH) legislation. Ten volunteers completed a series of exposure situations to simulate filling a vehicle fuel tank with diesel (ES1 Diesel), adding lubricant to a car engine (two situations, one filling point easier to reach (ES2 Easy) than the other (ES3 Hard)) and lubricating a bicycle chain (ES4 Bike). Dermal exposure to the hands and forearms was assessed using a wipe sampling method. A high proportion of samples was less than the limit of detection (ES1=38%, ES3=60%, ES2 and 4, both 78%). In ES1 Diesel, dermal exposure to the hands and forearms ranged from <0.25 μg/cm(2) to 96.21 μg/cm(2). Significantly higher dermal exposure was observed when a lower level of care was taken to complete the task. In ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard, the hand and forearm results ranged from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.33 μg/cm(2) and from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.54 μg/cm(2), respectively. In ES4 Bike, the hand and forearm exposures ranged from <0.35 μg/cm(2) to 5.25 μg/cm(2). Not all volunteers fully complied with the ES4 instructions, thus highlighting that this situation may have more variability in consumer behaviour. The ratio of the amount measured on the hands and forearms to the amount of product handled for ES1 Diesel, ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard was less than 0.0001%, for ES4 Bike it was 0.04%. Mixed effect models showed that the between and within volunteer variations are small for all except ES1 Diesel, where the within volunteer variation was relatively large (likely due to the few high measurements). This study reports dermal exposure measurement data, which will be of value when updating REACH and other exposure assessments for these, and similar, petroleum products. PMID:24938510

  17. Polarized Microscopy in Lesions With Altered Dermal Collagen.

    PubMed

    Elbendary, Amira; Valdebran, Manuel; Parikh, Kruti; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dermal collagen are noted in dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, hypertrophic scars, and keloids. The authors sought to determine whether variations in birefringence of collagen by polarized microscopy could be of help in diagnosing such conditions. Representative hematoxylin and eosin sections of 400 cases, including dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, hypertrophic scars, keloid, morphea, and lichen sclerosus, were examined under polarized microscopy. Distinct patterns of birefringence of collagen for each disease were noted under polarized microscopy. This study highlights the use of polarized microscopy as adjunctive tool in differentiating different diseases with collagen alteration. PMID:26959692

  18. Effect of microemulsions on cell viability of human dermal fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juyi; Mironava, Tatsiana; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam; Garti, Nissim

    Microemulsions are optically clear, thermostable and isotropic mixture consisting of water, oil and surfactants. Their advantages of ease preparation, spontaneous formation, long-term stability and enhanced solubility of bioactive materials make them great potentials as vehicles in food and pharmaceutical applications. In this study, comparative in vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed to select a best formulation of microemulsion with the least toxicity for human dermal fibroblasts. Three different kinds of oils and six different kinds of surfactants were used to form microemulsions by different ratios. The effect of oil type and surfactant type as well as their proportions on cell proliferation and viability were tested.

  19. Chronic dermal sinuses as a manifestation of histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, S H; Hall, I; Ragge, N; Pritchard, J

    1986-01-01

    Two young patients presented with generalised lymphadenopathy, otorrhoea, otitis, and rash. Over the next few years chronically discharging sinuses began to form over enlarged nodes and histological appearances were typical of histiocytosis X. In neither case were micro-organisms isolated from the lesions, and in both patients healing occurred with immunosuppressive agents. Chronic dermal sinus formation secondary to lymph node disease has never before been recorded as a manifestation of histiocytosis X. Histiocytosis X should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of "suppurative" lymphadenopathy so that appropriate treatment may be given without delay. Images Case 1 PMID:3084014

  20. Dermal exposure from transfer of lubricants and fuels by consumers.

    PubMed

    Galea, Karen S; Davis, Alice; Todd, Davis; MacCalman, Laura; McGonagle, Carolyn; Cherrie, John W

    2014-11-01

    Consumer uses of fuels and lubricants in Europe are subject to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of CHemicals (REACH) legislation. Ten volunteers completed a series of exposure situations to simulate filling a vehicle fuel tank with diesel (ES1 Diesel), adding lubricant to a car engine (two situations, one filling point easier to reach (ES2 Easy) than the other (ES3 Hard)) and lubricating a bicycle chain (ES4 Bike). Dermal exposure to the hands and forearms was assessed using a wipe sampling method. A high proportion of samples was less than the limit of detection (ES1=38%, ES3=60%, ES2 and 4, both 78%). In ES1 Diesel, dermal exposure to the hands and forearms ranged from <0.25 μg/cm(2) to 96.21 μg/cm(2). Significantly higher dermal exposure was observed when a lower level of care was taken to complete the task. In ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard, the hand and forearm results ranged from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.33 μg/cm(2) and from <0.1 μg/cm(2) to 3.54 μg/cm(2), respectively. In ES4 Bike, the hand and forearm exposures ranged from <0.35 μg/cm(2) to 5.25 μg/cm(2). Not all volunteers fully complied with the ES4 instructions, thus highlighting that this situation may have more variability in consumer behaviour. The ratio of the amount measured on the hands and forearms to the amount of product handled for ES1 Diesel, ES2 Easy and ES3 Hard was less than 0.0001%, for ES4 Bike it was 0.04%. Mixed effect models showed that the between and within volunteer variations are small for all except ES1 Diesel, where the within volunteer variation was relatively large (likely due to the few high measurements). This study reports dermal exposure measurement data, which will be of value when updating REACH and other exposure assessments for these, and similar, petroleum products.

  1. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Toxicity of Aqueous Extract of Leaves of Conocarpus erectus Linnaeus in Swiss Albino Mice.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Dayane K D; Souza, Ivone A DE; Oliveira, Antônio F M DE; Barbosa, Mariana O; Santana, Marllon A N; Pereira, Daniel F; Lira, Eduardo C; Vieira, Jeymesson R C

    2016-09-01

    Mangroves represent areas of high biological productivity and it is a region rich in bioactive substances used in medicine production. Conocarpus erectus (Combretaceae) known as button mangrove is one of the species found in mangroves and it is used in folk medicine in the treatment of anemia, catarrh, conjunctivitis, diabetes, diarrhea, fever, gonorrhea, headache, hemorrhage, orchitis, rash, bumps and syphilis. The present study aimed to investigate the acute toxicity of aqueous extract of leaves of C. erectus in Swiss albino mice. The plant material was collected in Vila Velha mangroves, located in Itamaracá (PE). The material was subjected to a phytochemical screening where extractive protocols to identify majority molecules present in leaves were used. The evaluation of acute toxicity of aqueous extract of C. erectus followed the model of Acute Toxicity Class based on OECD 423 Guideline, 2001. The majority molecules were identified: flavonoids, tannins and saponins. The LD50 was estimated at 2,000 mg/kg bw. Therefore, the aqueous extract showed low acute toxicity classified in category 5.

  2. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Toxicity of Aqueous Extract of Leaves of Conocarpus erectus Linnaeus in Swiss Albino Mice.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Dayane K D; Souza, Ivone A DE; Oliveira, Antônio F M DE; Barbosa, Mariana O; Santana, Marllon A N; Pereira, Daniel F; Lira, Eduardo C; Vieira, Jeymesson R C

    2016-09-01

    Mangroves represent areas of high biological productivity and it is a region rich in bioactive substances used in medicine production. Conocarpus erectus (Combretaceae) known as button mangrove is one of the species found in mangroves and it is used in folk medicine in the treatment of anemia, catarrh, conjunctivitis, diabetes, diarrhea, fever, gonorrhea, headache, hemorrhage, orchitis, rash, bumps and syphilis. The present study aimed to investigate the acute toxicity of aqueous extract of leaves of C. erectus in Swiss albino mice. The plant material was collected in Vila Velha mangroves, located in Itamaracá (PE). The material was subjected to a phytochemical screening where extractive protocols to identify majority molecules present in leaves were used. The evaluation of acute toxicity of aqueous extract of C. erectus followed the model of Acute Toxicity Class based on OECD 423 Guideline, 2001. The majority molecules were identified: flavonoids, tannins and saponins. The LD50 was estimated at 2,000 mg/kg bw. Therefore, the aqueous extract showed low acute toxicity classified in category 5. PMID:27508993

  3. Peroxide-based oxygen generating topical wound dressing for enhancing healing of dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Prafulla K; Ross, Christina L; Smith, Leona C; Jeong, Seon S; Kim, Jaehyun; Yoo, James J; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen generating biomaterials represent a new trend in regenerative medicine that aims to generate and supply oxygen at the site of requirement, to support tissue healing and regeneration. To enhance the healing of dermal wounds, we have developed a highly portable, in situ oxygen generating wound dressings that uses sodium percarbonate (SPO) and calcium peroxide (CPO) as chemical oxygen sources. The dressing continuously generated oxygen for more than 3 days, after which it was replaced. In the in vivo testing on porcine full-thickness porcine wound model, the SPO/CPO dressing showed enhanced wound healing during the 8 week study period. Quantitative measurements of wound healing related parameters, such as wound closure, reepithelialization, epidermal thickness and collagen content of dermis showed that supplying oxygen topically using the SPO/CPO dressing significantly accelerated the wound healing. An increase in neovascularization, as determined using Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31 staining, was also observed in the presence of SPO/CPO dressing. This novel design for a wound dressing that contains oxygen generating biomaterials (SPO/CPO) for supplying topical oxygen, may find utility in treating various types of acute to chronic wounds.

  4. In vitro investigations on the effect of dermal fibroblasts on keratinocyte responses to ultraviolet B radiation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Tara L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Derek R; Dawson, Rebecca A; Kimlin, Michael G; Upton, Zee

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is closely linked to the development of skin cancers in humans. The ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation wavelength (280-320 nm), in particular, causes DNA damage in epidermal keratinocytes, which are linked to the generation of signature premalignant mutations. Interactions between dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes play a role in epidermal repair and regeneration after UVB-induced damage. To investigate these processes, established two and three-dimensional culture models were utilized to study the impact of fibroblast-keratinocyte crosstalk during the acute UVB response. Using a coculture system it was observed that fibroblasts enhanced keratinocyte survival and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) after UVB radiation exposure. These findings were also mirrored in irradiated human skin coculture models employed in this study. Fibroblast coculture was shown to play a role in the expression and activation of members of the apoptotic cascade, including caspase-3 and Bad. Interestingly, the expression and phosphorylation of p53, a key player in the regulation of keratinocyte cell fate postirradiation, was also shown to be influenced by fibroblast-produced factors. This study highlights the importance of synergistic interactions between fibroblasts and keratinocytes in maintaining a functional epidermis while promoting repair and regeneration following UVB radiation-induced damage.

  5. Development of anti-migraine therapeutics using the capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Buntinx, Linde; Vermeersch, Steve; de Hoon, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide (receptor) (CGRP-(R)) blocking therapeutics in the treatment of acute migraine headache provided proof-of-concept for the involvement of CGRP in the pathophysiology of this disorder. One of the major hurdles for the development of any class of drugs, including CGRP blocking therapeutics, is the early clinical development process during which toxic and inefficacious compounds need to be eliminated as early as possible in order to focus on the most promising molecules. At this stage, human models providing proof of target engagement, combined with safety and tolerability studies, are extremely valuable in focusing on those therapeutics that have the highest engagement from the lowest exposure. They guide the go/no-go decision making, establish confidence in the candidate molecule by de-risking toxicity and safety issues and thereby speed up the early clinical development. In this review the focus is on the so called 'capsaicin model' as a typical example of a target engagement biomarker used as a human model for the development of CGRP blocking therapeutics. By applying capsaicin onto the skin, TRPV1 channels are activated and a CGRP-mediated increase in dermal blood flow can be quantified with laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Effective CGRP blocking therapeutics in turn, display blockade of this response. The translation of this biomarker model from animals to humans is discussed as well as the limitations of the assay in predicting the efficacy of anti-migraine drugs.

  6. Contribution of dermal-derived mesenchymal cells during liver repair in two different experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Dai, Tingyu; Liu, Dengqun; Chen, Zelin; Wu, Liao; Gao, Li; Wang, Yu; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-01-01

    Progressive liver disease is a major health issue for which no effective treatment is available, leading to cirrhosis and orthotopic liver transplantation. However, the lack of availability of donor organs and other adverse factors including rejection limit its extensive clinical application. Cell-based therapy using mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) may represent an attractive therapeutic option. Dermal-derived mesenchymal cells (DMCs) are attractive as one of the abundant sources from which to isolate mesenchymal cells for therapeutic applications and can be easily accessed with minimal harm to the donor. In this study, we used two different animal models to investigate potential therapeutic effect of DMCs transplantation in liver injury. We found that DMCs administration alleviated liver fibrosis and restored the liver function in fibrotic mice induced by CCl4. Furthermore, in an acute irradiation induced damage model, a unique population of DMCs could engraft into the liver tissue for a long period, exhibiting the phenotype of both mesenchymal cells and macrophage cells, and improve the survival of mice exposed to 8 Gy lethally total-body irradiation. These discoveries provide important evidence that DMCs therapy has a beneficial effect on liver injury, and provide new insight into liver injury therapy depending on the alternative cells. PMID:27126764

  7. ISSUES IN UNDERSTANDING DERMAL EXPOSURES RESULTING FROM CONTACT WITH CONTAMINATED SURFACES, MEASURING SURFACE CONTAMINATION, AND CHARACTERIZING TRANSFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although monitoring for surface contamination in work with radioactive materials and dermal monitoring of pesticide exposure to agricultural workers have been standard practice for 50 years, regular surface sampling and dermal monitoring methods have only been applied to indust...

  8. Liposome-containing Hibiscus sabdariffa calyx extract formulations with increased antioxidant activity, improved dermal penetration and reduced dermal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pinsuwan, Sirirat; Amnuaikit, Thanaporn; Ungphaiboon, Suwipa; Itharat, Arunporn

    2010-12-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn, or Roselle, is a medicinal plant used extensively in traditional Thai medicine since ancient times. The extracts of Roselle calyces possess antioxidant activity and have potential for development as active ingredients in cosmetic products. However the limitations of using Roselle extracts in cosmetics are its low skin permeation and dermal irritation. Liposome technology is an obvious approach that might overcome these problems. Liposome formulations of standardized Roselle extracts were developed with various lipid components. The formulation showing the highest entrapment efficiency was selected for stability, skin permeation and dermal irritability studies. The liposome formulation with the highest entrapment efficiency (83%) and smalôlest particle size (332 mm) was formulated with phosphatidylcholine from soybean (SPC): Tween 80: deoxycholic acid (DA); 84:16:2.5 weight ratio, total lipid of 200 g/mL and 10% w/v Roselle extract in final liposomal preparation. This liposome formulation was found to be stable after storage at 4 degrees C, protected from light, for 2 months. The in vitro skin permeation studies, using freshly excised pig skin and modified Franz-diffusion cells, showed that the liposome formulation was able to considerably increased the rate of permeation of active compounds in Roselle extracts compared to the Roselle extract solution. The in vivo dermal irritability testing on rabbit skin showed that the liposome formulation dramatically decreased skin irritability compared to the unformulated extract. These results showed that the liposomes containing Roselle extracts had good stability, high entrapment efficacy, increased skin permeation and low skin irritation. PMID:21294418

  9. Engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro with human dermal fibroblasts under static mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Feng; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-12-01

    Proper cell source is one of the key issues for tendon engineering. Our previous study showed that dermal fibroblasts could be used to successfully engineer tendon in vivo and tenocytes could engineer neo-tendon in vitro with static strain. This study further investigated the possibility of engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro using dermal fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers pre-fixed on a U-shape as a mechanical loading group, or simply cultured in a dish as a tension-free group. In addition, human tenocytes were also seeded on PGA fibers with tension as a comparison to human dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that human neo-tendon tissue could be generated using dermal fibroblasts during in vitro culture under static strain and the tissue structure became more mature with the increase of culture time. Longitudinally aligned collagen fibers and spindle shape cells were observed histologically and collagen fibril diameter and tensile strength increased with time and reached a peak at 14 weeks. In contrast, the dermal fibroblast-PGA constructs failed to form neo-tendon, but formed disorganized fibrous tissue in tension-free condition with significantly weaker strength and poor collagen fiber formation. Interestingly, neo-tendon tissues generated with human dermal fibroblasts were indistinguishable from the counterpart engineered with human tenocytes, which supports the viewpoint that human dermal fibroblasts is likely to replace tenocytes for future tendon graft development in vitro with dynamic mechanical loading in a bioreactor system.

  10. High matrix metalloproteinase levels are associated with dermal graft failure in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of our study is to analyze factors, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels, that could influence the integration of dermal grafts in diabetic foot ulcers. From September 2012 to September 2013, 35 diabetic patients with IIA lesion (Texas Wound Classification) and an extensive foot tissue loss were considered suitable for dermal graft. Before the enrollment we ensured the best local conditions: adequate blood supply, control of infection, and offloading. The MMP level of each lesion was evaluated blindly before the application of dermal substitutes. At 1-month follow-up, we analyzed the correlation between clinical patient characteristics, local wound features including MMP levels, dermal substitute applied, and the outcome expressed in terms of dermal graft integration. We observed dermal graft integration in 28/35 patients (80% of our population). In multivariate analysis high MMP level was the only negative predictor for dermal graft integration (P < .0007). In addition, we divided the patients into 2 groups according to MMP levels: group 1 with low protease activity (24 patients) and group 2 with elevated protease activity (11 patients). The integration of the dermal graft was 100% in group 1 (n = 24 patients) and 36.4% in group 2 (n = 4patients), P < .0001. According to our data, the evaluation of MMP levels may be useful to choose the right strategy to get the best results in terms of clinical success and cost saving. However, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  11. In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flowthrough diffusi...

  12. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN RAT AND HUMAN SKIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethriods are a class of neurotoxic pesticides and their use may lead to dermal exposure. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids in rat and human skin. Dorsal skin removed from adult male LD rats (hair clipped 24 h previously) was dermatomed and mou...

  13. DERMAL, ORAL AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors, has contaminated drinking water and can lead to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhal...

  14. DERMAL, ORAL, AND INHALATION PHARMACOKINETICS OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive, used to increase octane and reduce carbon monoxide emissions and ozone precursors has contaminated drinking water leading to exposure by oral, inhalation, and dermal routes. To determine its dermal, oral, and inhalation ki...

  15. Comparative characterization of hair follicle dermal stem cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, Martin J; Gorjup, Erwin; Genever, Paul G

    2006-02-01

    We compared the growth and differentiation characteristics of hair follicle-derived dermal stem cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Follicular dermal cells were isolated from whisker hairs of Wistar rats and bone marrow MSCs were isolated from femora of the same animals. The adherent hair follicle dermal cells showed a fibroblastic morphology in serum-containing culture medium, were CD44(+), CD73(+), CD90(+), and CD34(), and had a population doubling time of 27 h. MSCs isolated from the bone marrow showed a similar morphology and population doubling time and expressed the same cell-surface markers. Following exposure to appropriate induction stimuli, both cell populations had the capacity to differentiate into various mesenchymal lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and myocytes and expressed neuroprogenitor cell markers. The rate and extent of differentiation were remarkably similar for both hair follicleand bone marrow-derived cells, whereas interfollicular dermal cells failed to differentiate. We identified telomerase activity in follicle dermal stem cells and marrow MSCs and demonstrated that they were capable of clonal expansion. In ex vivo analyses, we identified the presence of putative dermal stem cells in the dermal sheath and dermal papillae of the hair follicle. Consequently, the hair follicle may represent a suitable, accessible source for MSCs.

  16. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  17. Collagen-based dermal fillers: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Cockerham, Kimberly; Hsu, Victoria J

    2009-05-01

    The demand for dermal fillers and the variety of dermal fillers available have evolved dramatically during the past 2 decades. Collagen was the first material to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for injection into facial scars, furrows, and lines. Bovine collagen (95% type I and 5% type III collagen) was approved in 1981; buffered collagen Zyderm I and Zyderm II followed by Zyplast were FDA approved and released shortly thereafter. This article will focus on the historical benefits and risks of collagen injections and the typical outcomes. With the advent of hyaluronic acid products and other options, the risks of collagen and limited benefit have caused a marked loss of market share. Specifically, allergy is a major concern. As a result, two rounds of skin testing are required adding inconvenience and delay for both the practitioner and patient. Furthermore, a negative skin test does not guarantee allergic reactions or other more serious side effects will not occur. Finally, the perceived clinical efficacy is often short lived despite histopathologic assessments showing that collagen persists at best 9 months.

  18. Permethrin 5% dermal cream: a new treatment for scabies.

    PubMed

    Taplin, D; Meinking, T L; Porcelain, S L; Castillero, P M; Chen, J A

    1986-11-01

    Permethrin 5% dermal cream (Burroughs Wellcome Co.) was compared in an investigator-blinded, randomized study against lindane 1% lotion (Kwell) for the treatment of microscopically confirmed scabies. Eleven of twenty-three patients treated with permethrin cream were cured in 2 weeks (48%). Only two patients had scabies 1 month following a single treatment with this product, giving a cure rate of 91%. One of these two patients was considered to have a reinfestation. Only three of twenty-three (13%) patients treated with 1% lindane lotion (Kwell) were free of scabies 2 weeks after a single treatment and fifteen of twenty-three (65%) were cured at 1 month. The unusually high percentage of treatment failures (35%) following lindane therapy may have been related to extensive use of this agent for head lice and scabies in this village during the preceding 5 years. The higher cure rate at 1 month seen with permethrin cream was significant (p less than 0.025). Permethrin 5% dermal cream offers a new, cosmetically elegant alternative to lindane therapy and was effective in a community in which lindane demonstrated an unacceptable level of treatment failures.

  19. A study of uniaxial tension on the superficial dermal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, R L; Bader, D L; Ryan, T J

    1984-05-01

    A spring-loaded apparatus was designed to apply uniaxial tension to forearm skin in 17 human subjects--10 normals, 6 psoriatics, and 1 patient with scleroderma. Simultaneously, the effects of stretching on the upper dermal vasculature were observed stereomicroscopically. Progressive changes (collapse) in the superficial microvasculature--vertical capillary loops and horizontal subpapillary plexus--with increasing tension were photographed. Force and strains were recorded at the points of disappearance of virtually all vessels. An average force of 11.9 newtons (N), accompanied by a mean strain of 10.3%, resulted in occlusion of all vessels. A much higher force (18.5 N) was necessary to occlude blood flow in the 1 patient with scleroderma. In summary, we have described a new technique for the study of mechanical forces on the blood supply of the epidermis. The data have shown that uniaxial tension has important effects on the superficial dermal microvasculature, resulting in impedance and obliteration of blood flow at relatively low magnitudes.

  20. Multilayered implantation using acellular dermal matrix into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Myung Chul; Roh, Hyun; Lee, Won Jai

    2014-12-01

    Soft tissue augmentation using acellular dermal matrix has gained popularity to overcome the shortcomings of autogenous and alloplastic materials. Sometimes it needs multilayered stacking to obtain enough volume. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of multilayered implantation using acellular dermal matrix (MatriDerm(®)) for soft tissue augmentation. MatriDerm was implanted subdermally on each side of the dorsum of nude mice (n = 20), stacked two layers thick in the control group and three layers thick in the experimental group. Alterations of thickness, degree of angiogenesis, and collagen and elastin fiber syntheses were observed over 40 days. Three-layered implantation with MatriDerm maintained its volume similarly as in two-layered implantation, although the thickness decreased after 30 days in both groups. At the early stage of implantation, angiogenesis and collagen and elastin fiber syntheses occurred fluently on the central portion, which is the farthest away from the surface in contact with the host tissue. Collagen and elastin fibers became more concentrated over time, and the original structure of MatriDerm could not be maintained due to being replaced with newly formed collagen and elastin fibers 40 days after implantation. Multilayered implantation with MatriDerm is considered appropriate for tissue ingrowth and can be used as a substitute for soft tissue augmentation.

  1. Effect of Arctium lappa (burdock) extract on canine dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pomari, Elena; Stefanon, Bruno; Colitti, Monica

    2013-12-15

    Although the biological activities of Arctium lappa (burdock) have been already investigated in human and other species, data evaluating the molecular mechanisms have not been reported in the dog. In this study we analyzed for the first time the effect of a root extract of burdock on molecular responses in canine dermal fibroblasts with H2O2 stimulation (H group), with burdock treatment (B group) and with H2O2 stimulation and burdock treatment (BH group), using RNAseq technology. Differentially expressed genes (P<0.05) of H, B and BH groups in comparison to the untreated sample (negative control, C group) were identified with MeV software and were functional annotated and monitored for signaling pathways and candidate biomarkers using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). The expression profile of canine dermal fibroblasts treated with burdock extract with or without H2O2 stimulation, showed an up-regulation of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disheveled 3 (DVL3) and chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (CSGALNACT2). The data suggested that burdock has implications in cell adhesion and gene expression with the modulation of Wnt/β catenin signaling and Chondroitin Sulphate Biosynthesis that are particularly important for the wound healing process.

  2. Effect of Arctium lappa (burdock) extract on canine dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pomari, Elena; Stefanon, Bruno; Colitti, Monica

    2013-12-15

    Although the biological activities of Arctium lappa (burdock) have been already investigated in human and other species, data evaluating the molecular mechanisms have not been reported in the dog. In this study we analyzed for the first time the effect of a root extract of burdock on molecular responses in canine dermal fibroblasts with H2O2 stimulation (H group), with burdock treatment (B group) and with H2O2 stimulation and burdock treatment (BH group), using RNAseq technology. Differentially expressed genes (P<0.05) of H, B and BH groups in comparison to the untreated sample (negative control, C group) were identified with MeV software and were functional annotated and monitored for signaling pathways and candidate biomarkers using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). The expression profile of canine dermal fibroblasts treated with burdock extract with or without H2O2 stimulation, showed an up-regulation of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disheveled 3 (DVL3) and chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (CSGALNACT2). The data suggested that burdock has implications in cell adhesion and gene expression with the modulation of Wnt/β catenin signaling and Chondroitin Sulphate Biosynthesis that are particularly important for the wound healing process. PMID:24192279

  3. Acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstructions - a literature review.

    PubMed

    Skovsted Yde, Simon; Brunbjerg, Mette Eline; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2016-08-01

    During the last two decades, acellular dermal matrices (ADM) have been more widely used in reconstructive procedures i.e. breast reconstructions. Several, both synthetic and biologic products derived from human, porcine and bovine tissue, have been introduced. Until this point postoperative complications for the acellular dermal matrices, as a group, have been the main focus. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge on the each biologic product used in breast reconstructions, including product specific complication frequencies. A systematic search of the literature was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases, identifying 55 relevant articles, mainly evidence level III. AlloDerm seems to be associated with severe complicating matters in the reconstructive process compared to other products. This could be due to the higher number of investigating studies relative to the others. The surgical area faces certain challenges comparing results, due to surgical variance, the data collection and follow-up. More well-defined guidelines and more high-evidence randomized studies could increase the overall level of evidence in this area. PMID:26881927

  4. Hanford Tank Ventilation System Condensates and Headspace Vapors: An Assessment of Potential Dermal Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.; Springer, David L.

    2006-04-24

    This study considers the question of whether potential dermal exposures to Hanford high-level radioactive waste tank headspace vapors and their condensates could result in significant exposure to workers. Three types of potential exposures were evaluated; dermal contact with aqueous condensate, organic condensate, and direct contact with head space vapors. The dermal absorption rates from aqueous and organic condensates were estimated for selected chemicals using a model described by EPA (1992) with a modified correlation for dermal permeability suggested by Wilschut et al. (1995). Dermal absorption rates of vapors were estimated using a model given by AIHA (2000). Results were compared to an ''equivalent inhalation dose'' calculated by multiplying the inhalation occupational exposure limit by a nominal daily inhalation rate. The results should provide guidance for industrial hygienists to prepare specific recommendations based on specific scenarios.

  5. Dermal irritation of petrolatum in rabbits but not in mice, rats or minipigs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S A; Peterson, R A; Melich, D; Merrill, C M; Bailey, D; Mellon-Kusibab, K; Adler, R

    2014-08-01

    Petrolatum is widely used in cosmetics, topical pharmaceuticals and also as a vehicle in dermal toxicity studies. New Zealand white rabbits treated with white petrolatum (vehicle control) in a 2-week dermal irritation study exhibited moderate to severe erythema starting on Day 7 that subsided towards the end of the study. Histological examination of abraded and non-abraded petrolatum-treated skin obtained at termination (Day 15) revealed mild acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, dermal edema with mixed inflammatory cells in the dermis. Macroscopic and microscopic features noted in rabbits were consistent with dermal irritation to petrolatum. Wistar-Han rats, CD1 mice, C57/Bl/6J mice and Göttingen minipigs treated topically with white petrolatum did not exhibit clinical or histologic evidence of dermal irritation. Therapeutic agents developed for topical application are generally tested in rabbits during some point in development. Interpretation of skin irritation data from a single species can impact risk assessment for humans and on product labeling.

  6. Isolation and cultivation of dermal stem cells that differentiate into functional epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2012-01-01

    Human melanocytes have been extensively studied, but a melanocyte stem cell reservoir in glabrous skin has not yet been found. Human dermis contains cells that are nonpigmented but can differentiate to several different cell types. We have recently shown that multipotent dermal stem cells isolated from human neonatal foreskins are able to differentiate to multiple cell lineages, including pigmented melanocytes. The dermal stem cells grow as three-dimensional spheres in human embryonic stem cell medium and express some neural crest stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers. Melanocytes derived from dermal stem cells express melanocytic markers and act the same way as mature epidermal melanocytes. Dermal spheres, embedded in the reconstructed dermis consisting of collagen with fibroblasts, can migrate to the basement membrane, where they become pigmented in the same way as epidermal melanocytes suggesting that dermal stem cells can give rise to epidermal melanocytes.

  7. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.

    PubMed Central

    Reese, E; Kimbrough, R D

    1993-01-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. PMID:8020435

  8. Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, E.; Kimbrough, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    The acute toxicity of gasoline; its components benzene, toluene, and xylene; and the additives ethanol, methanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether are reviewed. All of these chemicals are only moderately to mildly toxic at acute doses. Because of their volatility, these compounds are not extensively absorbed dermally unless the exposed skin is occluded. Absorption through the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract is quite efficient. After ingestion, the principal danger for a number of these chemicals, particularly gasoline, is aspiration pneumonia, which occurs mainly in children. It is currently not clear whether aspiration pneumonia would still be a problem if gasoline were diluted with ethanol or methanol. During the normal use of gasoline or mixtures of gasoline and the other solvents as a fuel, exposures would be much lower than the doses that have resulted in poisoning. No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course of using automotive fuels. 128 refs., 7 tabs.

  9. Chitosan-glycolipid nanogels loaded with anti-obese marine carotenoid fucoxanthin: Acute and sub-acute toxicity evaluation in rodent model.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Hindupur; Arunkumar, Ranganathan; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2015-10-01

    Fucoxanthin (FUCO) is a light- and heat-sensitive marine xanthophyll carotenoid, present in brown algae that render physiological properties as anti-oxidants. In this study, nanoencapsulation is an approach adopted to improve bioavailability of FUCO by using ionic-gelation method with polymeric chitosan (CS) dispersed in glycolipid (GL), as a carrier. Further, the aim was to investigate adverse effect of acute and sub-acute toxicity of chitosan nanogels (CS-NGs) loaded with FUCO+GL in rats. In the acute toxicity study, FUCO was fed to rats at doses of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight (BW). In the sub-acute toxicity study, FUCO was fed at doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg BW for 28 days. In both the studies, no mortality and abnormalities in gross morphology were observed. Acute toxicity study revealed that the LD50 of FUCO in CS-NGs is higher than 100 mg/kg BW. No postprandial plasma levels of FUCO were detected. However, fucoxanthinol (FUOH), a hydrolytic metabolite of FUCO was detected in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). Compared to the control group(s), no dose-related toxic effects of CS-NGs with FUCO + GL were found in haematological, histopathological, plasma biochemical indices, etc. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for CS-NGs with FUCO + GL in rats was 10 mg/kg/day. To conclude, no apparent adverse effect of CS-NGs with FUCO + GL demonstrating CS could be a promising polymer matrix for safe delivery of FUCO. This is the first study to demonstrate the safety assessment of CS-NGs with FUCO + GL.

  10. Refinement and reduction of acute oral toxicity testing: a critical review of the use of cytotoxicity data.

    PubMed

    Schrage, Arnhild; Hempel, Katja; Schulz, Markus; Kolle, Susanne N; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Acute oral toxicity testing is still required for the classification and labelling of chemicals, agrochemicals and related formulations. There have been increasing efforts over the last two decades to reduce the number of animals needed for this testing, according to the Three Rs concept. To evaluate the utility of an in vitro cytotoxicity test in our routine testing for acute oral toxicity, we have implemented in our laboratory the neutral red uptake (NRU) method, with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts after a 48-hour exposure, which was recommended in ICCVAM Report 07-4519, 2006. Initially, we tested 16 substances that had existing in vivo and in vitro data available, to prove our technical proficiency with the in vitro test. Then, testing was performed with 187 test substances, including a broad variety of chemicals, agrochemicals and formulations. The starting dose for acute oral systemic toxicity assays in rats (LD50) was estimated by using the prediction model presented in the ICCVAM validation study, and subsequently compared to the results obtained by in vivo testing performed according to, or similar to, OECD Test Guideline 423. Comparison of all of the 203 predicted LD50 values that were deduced from the in vitro IC50 values, with the in vivo results from oral toxicity studies in rats, resulted in a low overall concordance of 35%. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay achieved a good concordance of 74%, only for the weakly toxic substances (EU-GHS Cat. 4). However, it must be noted that 71% of the substances tested (i.e. 145/203) were classified as being weakly toxic in vitro. We further analysed the utility of the in vitro test for predicting the starting dose for an in vivo study, and the potential reduction in animal usage that this would engender. In this regard, the prediction by the cytotoxicity test was useful for 59% of the substances. However, the use of a standard starting dose of 300 mg/kg bw by default (without previous cytotoxicity testing) would have been

  11. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. PMID:27539747

  12. Photoprotective effect and acute oral systemic toxicity evaluation of the novel heterocyclic compound LQFM048.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Daniela C; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Vieira, Marcelo S; Luzin, Rangel M; Quintino, Michelle P; Nunes, Liliane M; Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos Chaves; de Camargo, Henrique Santiago; Pinto, Angelo C; Dos Santos Júnior, Helvécio M; Chiari, Bruna G; Isaac, Vera; Valadares, Marize C; Martins, Tatiana Duque; Lião, Luciano M; de S Gil, Eric; Menegatti, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    The new heterocyclic derivative LQFM048 (3) (2,4,6-tris ((E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate)-1,3,5-triazine) was originally designed through the molecular hybridization strategy from Uvinul® T 150 (1) and (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (2) sunscreens, using green chemistry approach. This compound was obtained in global yields (80%) and showed an interesting redox potential. In addition, it is thermally stable up to temperatures around 250°C. It was observed that LQFM048 (3) showed a low degradation after 150min of sunlight exposure at 39°C, whereas the extreme radiation conditions induced a considerable photodegradation of the LQFM048 (3), especially when irradiated by VIS and VIS+UVA. During the determination of sun protection factor, LQFM048 (3) showed interesting results, specially as in association with other photoprotective compounds and commercial sunscreen. Additionally, the compound (3) did not promote cytotoxicity for 3T3 fibroblasts. Moreover, it was not able to trigger acute oral systemic toxicity in mice, being classified as a compound with low acute toxicity hazard (2.000mg/kg>LD50<5.000mg/kg). Therefore, this compound synthesized using green chemistry approach is promising showing potential to development of a new sunscreen product with advantage of presenting redox potential, indicating antioxidant properties.

  13. Chemical composition, protoscolicidal effects and acute toxicity of Pistacia atlantica Desf. fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Kheirandish, Farnaz; Ghasemi Kia, Mehdi; Tavakoli Kareshk, Amir; Yarahmadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the chemical composition and scolicidal effects of Pistacia atlantica Desf. extract against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts and its acute toxicity in mice model. Various concentrations of the methanolic extract (5-50 mg/mL) were used for 10-60 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed using eosin exclusion test (0.1%). Acute toxicity was also determined in mice model. The main components were β-myrcene (41.4%), α-pinene (32.48%) and limonene (4.66%). Findings demonstrated that P. atlantica extract at the concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/mL after 20 and 10 min of exposure killed 100% protoscoleces. The LD50 of the intraperitoneal injection of the P. atlantica methanolic extract was 2.43 g/kg and the maximum non-fatal dose was 1.66 g/kg. Obtained results showed the potential of P. atlantica extract as a natural source with no significant toxicity for the production of new scolicidal agent to use in hydatid cyst surgery. PMID:26252652

  14. Hypoglycemic activity and acute oral toxicity of chromium methionine complexes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-yan; Xiao, Qing-gui; Xu, Hong-bin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The hypoglycemic activity of chromium methionine (CrMet) in alloxan-induced diabetic (AID) mice was investigated and compared with those of chromium trichloride hexahydrate (CrCl3·6H2O) and chromium nicotinate (CrNic) through a 15-day feeding experiment. The acute oral toxicity of CrMet was also investigated in ICR (Institute for Cancer Research) mice by a single oral gavage. The anti-diabetic activity of CrMet was explored in detail from the aspects of body weight (BW), blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, liver glycogen levels, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels. The obtained results showed that CrMet had beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, and might possess hepatoprotective efficacy for diabetes. Daily treatment with 500 and 1000μg Cr/kg BW of CrMet in AID mice for 15 days indicated that this low-molecular-weight organic chromium complex had better bioavailability and more beneficial effects on diabetics than CrCl3·6H2O. CrMet also had advantage over CrNic in the control of AST and ALT activities. Acute toxicity studies revealed that CrMet had low toxicity potential and relatively high safety margins in mice with the LD50 value higher than 10.0g/kg BW. These findings suggest that CrMet might be of potential value in the therapy and protection of diabetes.

  15. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems.

  16. Interactions between methaqualone and ethanol in rats and mice during acute and chronic states.

    PubMed

    Ho, C C; Ho, A K

    1978-01-01

    1. The effects of acute and chronic treatment of methaqualone on ethanol preference, the rate of disappearance of ethanol and on toxicity were studied in mice and rats. 2. Acute treatment with methaqualone showed a dose-dependent suppression in the voluntary intake of ethanol in C57Bl/6J mice in rats. No significant change in ethanol intake was observed during chronic methaqualone treatment and withdrawal. 3. Methaqualone pretreatment significantly (P less than 0.005) delayed the disappearance of ethanol in the blood and brain over a period of 50 and 200 min after a loading dose of 2.0 g/kg, i.p., of ethanol. 4. Methaqualone pretreatment at doses of 140 and 200 mg/kg significantly increased ethanol toxicity by 11% and 28%, respectively. Co-administration of ethanol using 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0 g/kg also reduced the LD50 of methaqualone by 19%, 24% and 40%, respectively. 5. Chronic administration with ethanol decreased the toxicity due to methaqualone. Potentiation of ethanol toxicity by methaqualone may be of clinical importance in view of the narrow range of safety margin of ethanol.

  17. Acute and subacute toxicity assessment of lutein in lutein-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2013-10-01

    Dietary lutein consumption is lower than the actual recommended allowances to prevent macular degeneration; thus dietary lutein supplements have been recommended. This study aimed to investigate potential adverse effect of lutein from Tagetes erecta in lutein-deficient (LD) male mice. Preliminary acute toxicity study revealed that the LD50 exceeded the highest dose of 10000 mg/kg BW. In a subacute study, male mice were gavaged with 0, 100, 1000 mg/kg BW/day for a period of 4 wk. Plasma lutein levels increased dose dependently (P < 0.01) after acute and subacute feeding of lutein in LD mice. Compared to the control (peanut oil without lutein) group, no treatment-related toxicologically significant effects of lutein were prominent in clinical observation, ophthalmic examinations, body, and organ weights. Further, no toxicologically significant findings were eminent in hematological, histopathological, and other clinical chemistry parameters. In the oral subacute toxicity study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for lutein in LD mice was determined as 1000 mg/kg/day, the highest dose tested.

  18. Acute toxicity and in vivo biodistribution of monodispersed mesoporous bioactive glass spheres in intravenously exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Cong; Chen, Xiaofeng; Hu, Qing; Miao, Guohou; Lin, Cai

    2016-01-01

    The use of biomaterials from laboratories to clinics requires exhaustive and elaborate studies involving the biodistribution, clearance, and biocompatibility of biomaterials for in vivo biomedical applications. This study aimed to evaluate the acute toxicity and biodistribution of intravenously administrated sub-micrometer mesoporous bioactive glass spheres (SMBGs) in mice. The lethal dose 50 (LD50) of SMBGs was higher than 250 mg/kg. The acute toxicity was evaluated at 14 days after intravenous injection of SMBGs at 20, 100 and 180 mg/kg in ICR mice. The mortality, coefficients of major organs, hematology data and blood biochemical indexes revealed the low in vivo toxicity of SMBGs at all doses. However, the histological examination showed lymphocytic infiltration and granuloma formation in hepatocyte and megakaryocyte hyperplasia in the spleen at high dose. The silicon content analysis using ICP-OES and TEM results indicated that SMBGs mainly distributed in the resident macrophages of the liver and spleen, and could be cleared from the body more than 2 weeks. These findings can be important for the toxicity assessment of sub-micrometer particles and the development of bioactive glass based drug delivery system for biomedical applications.

  19. Photoprotective effect and acute oral systemic toxicity evaluation of the novel heterocyclic compound LQFM048.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Daniela C; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Vieira, Marcelo S; Luzin, Rangel M; Quintino, Michelle P; Nunes, Liliane M; Ribeiro, Antonio Carlos Chaves; de Camargo, Henrique Santiago; Pinto, Angelo C; Dos Santos Júnior, Helvécio M; Chiari, Bruna G; Isaac, Vera; Valadares, Marize C; Martins, Tatiana Duque; Lião, Luciano M; de S Gil, Eric; Menegatti, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    The new heterocyclic derivative LQFM048 (3) (2,4,6-tris ((E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate)-1,3,5-triazine) was originally designed through the molecular hybridization strategy from Uvinul® T 150 (1) and (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(4hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acrylate (2) sunscreens, using green chemistry approach. This compound was obtained in global yields (80%) and showed an interesting redox potential. In addition, it is thermally stable up to temperatures around 250°C. It was observed that LQFM048 (3) showed a low degradation after 150min of sunlight exposure at 39°C, whereas the extreme radiation conditions induced a considerable photodegradation of the LQFM048 (3), especially when irradiated by VIS and VIS+UVA. During the determination of sun protection factor, LQFM048 (3) showed interesting results, specially as in association with other photoprotective compounds and commercial sunscreen. Additionally, the compound (3) did not promote cytotoxicity for 3T3 fibroblasts. Moreover, it was not able to trigger acute oral systemic toxicity in mice, being classified as a compound with low acute toxicity hazard (2.000mg/kg>LD50<5.000mg/kg). Therefore, this compound synthesized using green chemistry approach is promising showing potential to development of a new sunscreen product with advantage of presenting redox potential, indicating antioxidant properties. PMID:27208746

  20. Acute Oral Toxicity and Histopathological Study of Combination of Endosulfan and Cypermethrin in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Jaya; Mohineesh; Ray, Ruma; Dogra, T. D.; Raina, Anupuma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endosulfan, a neurotoxic organochlorine insecticide and cypermethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control pests in domestic, industrial, and agricultural situations. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out to investigate the acute oral toxicity, behavioral and histopathological changes of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin in albino rats. According to Miller and Tainter analysis method, at 48 h, LD50 value of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin (ratio 1:1) in rats was found to be 691.83 mg/kg bw by oral gavage. Results: When combination of both these pesticides was administered orally at concentration of 103.72 mg/kg bw, 172.95 mg/kg bw and 207.50 mg/kg bw, respectively, as a single dose, no significant changes in behavior of rats was observed, neither in dosed nor in control group of rats. Combination of endosulfan- and cypermethrin-treated rats showed mild histopathological changes in liver and kidney in group IV (207.50 mg/kg BW) as compared to the control. However, no significant changes were observed in brain and small intestine at either dose of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin with respect to control. Conclusion: Thus, the present study, first of its kind in India, demonstrated the oral toxicity, behavioral, and histo-architectual alterations after induction of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin at acute doses in Wistar rats. PMID:23833440

  1. Skin and dermal appendages stem cells exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Kolanko, Emanuel; Czekaj, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are thought to persist throughout human life possessing enormous capacity for proliferation and differentiation. These cells and their microenvironment are potential targets for environmental pollutions, for example tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of substances which can disturb stem cell homeostasis by evoking, in particular, oxidative stress and hypoxia. It causes also deep, irreversible changes in the affected tissues. It is strongly linked with carcinogenesis. Skin is one of the most exposed tissues to tobacco smoke. Self-renewal dermal tissues, such as epidermis and its appendages, are composed of various stem cell populations. The tissue of the skin that is richest in SC is the hair follicle. In wound healing are involved: epidermal KSC population and stem populations from hair follicle, such as CD34+ and Lrig6+ cells. Some skin cancers, i.e., squamous cell carcinoma, originate from skin stem cells and are considered to be most associated with long-term smoking. Dermal stem cells can be affected by tobacco smoke components in two ways: internal, where xenobiotics are delivered with blood stream, and external, where the tissues are directly exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, as well as to third-hand smoke. Assessment of the dose- and time-response of the skin and dermal appendages to tobacco smoke exposure can allow to estimate the adverse health effects risk. Usually, to assess tobacco smoke exposure time, hairs and toenails are used. This is because they have a unique ability to store xenobiotics for longer periods of time in respect to their temporal appearance in the blood. Current scientific and medical problem is searching for more adequate biomarkers for TS exposure assessment. The unresolved question is, if stem cells isolated from the skin and its appendages might be good biomarkers for tobacco smoke exposure. We should take into consideration stem cell biology (proliferation vs. differentiation), expression of

  2. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of eucalyptus oil-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Ruizhang; Xiang, Fa; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xinghong; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Li; Yin, Lizi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Shu, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil has performed a variety of indirect services used as insect/pest repellent. The present study investigated the acute and subchronic toxicity of eucalyptus oil emulsion in water (EOE). In addition, we conduct safety pharmacology evaluation of EOE to supplement the toxicity tests and provide a basis for a comprehensive understanding of the toxicity of EOE. Acute administration of EOE was done as single dose from 2772 mg to 5742 mg of EOE per kg/bodyweight (b.wt.) and subchronic toxicity study for thirty days was done by daily oral administration of EOE at doses of 396, 792 and 1188 mg/kg b.wt. In SPF SD rats. The acute toxicity study showed the LD50 of EOE was 3811.5 mg/kg. The subchronic toxicity study suggested the high-dose and middle-dose EOE slowed down the growth of male rats. The clinical pathology showed the high-dose and middle-dose EOE could cause damage to liver and kidney. The safety pharmacology indicated that EOE had no side effects on rats. These results suggest that EOE is a safe veterinary medicine for external use.

  3. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of eucalyptus oil-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Ruizhang; Xiang, Fa; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xinghong; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Li; Yin, Lizi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Shu, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil has performed a variety of indirect services used as insect/pest repellent. The present study investigated the acute and subchronic toxicity of eucalyptus oil emulsion in water (EOE). In addition, we conduct safety pharmacology evaluation of EOE to supplement the toxicity tests and provide a basis for a comprehensive understanding of the toxicity of EOE. Acute administration of EOE was done as single dose from 2772 mg to 5742 mg of EOE per kg/bodyweight (b.wt.) and subchronic toxicity study for thirty days was done by daily oral administration of EOE at doses of 396, 792 and 1188 mg/kg b.wt. In SPF SD rats. The acute toxicity study showed the LD50 of EOE was 3811.5 mg/kg. The subchronic toxicity study suggested the high-dose and middle-dose EOE slowed down the growth of male rats. The clinical pathology showed the high-dose and middle-dose EOE could cause damage to liver and kidney. The safety pharmacology indicated that EOE had no side effects on rats. These results suggest that EOE is a safe veterinary medicine for external use. PMID:25663980

  4. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as evaluation of safety pharmacology of eucalyptus oil-water emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Ruizhang; Xiang, Fa; Song, Xu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Xinghong; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Zhenzhen; Li, Li; Yin, Lizi; Liang, Xiaoxia; He, Changliang; Shu, Gang; Lv, Cheng; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Gang; Shi, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil has performed a variety of indirect services used as insect/pest repellent. The present study investigated the acute and subchronic toxicity of eucalyptus oil emulsion in water (EOE). In addition, we conduct safety pharmacology evaluation of EOE to supplement the toxicity tests and provide a basis for a comprehensive understanding of the toxicity of EOE. Acute administration of EOE was done as single dose from 2772 mg to 5742 mg of EOE per kg/bodyweight (b.wt.) and subchronic toxicity study for thirty days was done by daily oral administration of EOE at doses of 396, 792 and 1188 mg/kg b.wt. In SPF SD rats. The acute toxicity study showed the LD50 of EOE was 3811.5 mg/kg. The subchronic toxicity study suggested the high-dose and middle-dose EOE slowed down the growth of male rats. The clinical pathology showed the high-dose and middle-dose EOE could cause damage to liver and kidney. The safety pharmacology indicated that EOE had no side effects on rats. These results suggest that EOE is a safe veterinary medicine for external use. PMID:25663980

  5. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity of glucose-cysteine Maillard reaction products in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Su, Linliang; Li, Fenfang; Wang, Chaozheng; Yuan, Debao; Chen, Jiao; Tan, Lin; Jin, Zhiqiang; Ma, Weihong

    2015-06-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from glucose-cysteine reactions have excellent anti-browning ability. However, there is a lack of information about their acute and sub-chronic toxicities. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate the acute and sub-chronic toxicities of MRPs in experimental animals. Acute toxicity testing and analysis by Horn's method showed that the median lethal oral dose (LD50) of MRPs in rats was 6.81 g/kg body weight. The sub-chronic toxicity test involved feeding rats with diet containing 0, 0.43, 0.85, or 1.70% (w/w) MRPs for 90 days. These treatments did not affect mortality, gross pathology, histology, hematology, or blood chemistry, and there were no dose-dependent changes in feed consumption. Based on these results, the dietary no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for 90-day exposure was 1.29 and 1.51 g MRPs/kg body weight/day for male and female rats, respectively. PMID:25817020

  6. The Acute Toxicity and Hematological Characterization of the Effects of Tentacle-Only Extract from the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liang; Liu, Sihua; He, Qian; Wang, Qianqian; Ye, Xuting; Liu, Guoyan; Nie, Fei; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liming

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the hematologic changes and the activities of jellyfish venoms other than hemolytic and cardiovascular toxicities, the acute toxicity of tentacle-only extract (TOE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata was observed in mice, and hematological indexes were examined in rats. The median lethal dose (LD50) of TOE was 4.25 mg/kg, and the acute toxicity involved both heart- and nervous system-related symptoms. Arterial blood gas indexes, including pH, PCO2, HCO3−, HCO3std, TCO2, BEecf and BE (B), decreased significantly. PO2 showed a slight increase, while SO2c (%) had no change at any time. Na+ and Ca2+ decreased, but K+ increased. Biochemical indexes, including LDH, CK, CK-MB, ALT, AST and sCr, significantly increased. Other biochemical indexes, including BUN and hemodiastase, remained normal. Lactic acid significantly increased, while glucose, Hct% and THbc showed slight temporary increases and then returned to normal. These results on the acute toxicity and hematological changes should improve our understanding of the in vivo pathophysiological effects of TOE from C. capillata and indicate that it may also have neurotoxicity, liver toxicity and muscular toxicity in addition to hemolytic and cardiovascular toxicities, but no kidney or pancreatic toxicity. PMID:21731547

  7. Androgen receptor accelerates premature senescence of human dermal papilla cells in association with DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Chien; Fu, Hung-Chun; Wu, Ching-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Ting; Huang, Ko-En; Kang, Hong-Yo

    2013-01-01

    The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a), and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature senescence of dermal papilla cells, we first compared frontal scalp dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients with matched normal controls and observed that premature senescence is more prominent in the dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients. Exposure of androgen induced premature senescence in dermal papilla cells from non-balding frontal and transitional zone of balding scalp follicles but not in beard follicles. Overexpression of the AR promoted androgen-induced premature senescence in association with p16(INK4a) upregulation, whereas knockdown of the androgen receptor diminished the effects of androgen. An analysis of γ-H2AX expression in response to androgen/androgen receptor signaling suggested that DNA damage contributes to androgen/androgen receptor-accelerated premature senescence. These results define androgen/androgen receptor signaling as an accelerator of premature senescence in dermal papilla cells and suggest that the androgen/androgen receptor-mediated DNA damage-p16(INK4a) axis is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

  8. Formation of dermal skeletal and dental tissues in fish: a comparative and evolutionary approach.

    PubMed

    Sire, Jean-Yves; Huysseune, Ann

    2003-05-01

    Osteichthyan and chondrichthyan fish present an astonishing diversity of skeletal and dental tissues that are often difficult to classify into the standard textbook categories of bone, cartilage, dentine and enamel. To address the question of how the tissues of the dermal skeleton evolved from the ancestral situation and gave rise to the diversity actually encountered, we review previous data on the development of a number of dermal skeletal elements (odontodes, teeth and dermal denticles, cranial dermal bones, postcranial dermal plates and scutes, elasmoid and ganoid scales, and fin rays). A comparison of developmental stages at the tissue level usually allows us to identify skeletogenic cell populations as either odontogenic or osteogenic on the basis of the place of formation of their dermal papillae and of the way of deposition of their tissues. Our studies support the evolutionary affinities (1) between odontodes, teeth and denticles, (2) between the ganoid scales of polypterids and the elasmoid scales of teleosts, and (3) to a lesser degree between the different bony elements. There is now ample evidence to ascertain that the tissues of the elasmoid scale are derived from dental and not from bony tissues. This review demonstrates the advantage that can be taken from developmental studies, at the tissue level, to infer evolutionary relationships within the dermal skeleton in chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. PMID:12803422

  9. Comparison of dermal and inhalation routes of entry for organic chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepson, Gary W.; Mcdougal, James N.; Clewell, Harvey J., III

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of the chemical concentration inside the body as the result of a dermal exposure versus an inhalation exposure is useful for assessing human health risks and deciding on an appropriate protective posture. In order to describe the relationship between dermal and inhalation routes of exposure, a variety of organic chemicals were evaluated. The types of chemicals chosen for the study were halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, non-polar hydrocarbons and inhalation anesthetics. Both dermal and inhalation exposures were conducted in rats and the chemicals were in the form of vapors. Prior to the dermal exposure, rat fur was closely clipped and during the exposure rats were provided fresh breathing air through latex masks. Blood samples were taken during 4-hour exposures and analyzed for the chemical of interest. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to predict permeability constants (cm/hr) consistent with the observed blood concentrations of the chemical. The ratio of dermal exposure to inhalation exposure required to achieve the same internal dose of chemical was calculated for each test chemical. The calculated ratio in humans ranged from 18 for styrene to 1180 for isoflurane. This methodology can be used to estimate the dermal exposure required to reach the internal dose achieved by a specific inhalation exposure. Such extrapolation is important since allowable exposure standards are often set for inhalation exposures, but occupational exposures may be dermal.

  10. Deep dermal fibroblast profibrotic characteristics are enhanced by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Shankowsky, Heather A; Medina, Abelardo; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are a significant fibroproliferative disorder complicating deep injuries to the skin. We hypothesize that activated deep dermal fibroblasts are subject to regulation by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), which leads to the development of excessive fibrosis following deep dermal injury. We found that the expression of fibrotic factors was higher in deep burn wounds compared with superficial burn wounds collected from burn patients with varying depth of skin injury. We characterized deep and superficial dermal fibroblasts, which were cultured from the deep and superficial dermal layers of normal uninjured skin obtained from abdominoplasty patients, and examined the paracrine effects of BM-MSCs on the fibrotic activities of the cells. In vitro, deep dermal fibroblasts were found higher in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of type 1 collagen, alpha smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor beta, stromal cell-derived factor 1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, an inhibitor of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1). As well, deep dermal fibroblasts had low matrix metalloproteinase 1 mRNA, produced more collagen, and contracted collagen lattices significantly greater than superficial fibroblasts. By co-culturing layered fibroblasts with BM-MSCs in a transwell insert system, BM-MSCs enhanced the fibrotic behavior of deep dermal fibroblasts, which suggests a possible involvement of BM-MSCs in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring.

  11. Effects of glucocorticoid on human dermal papilla cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Jin; Cho, A-Ri; Jo, Seong-Jin; Hwang, Sungjoo Tommy; Kim, Kyu Han; Kwon, Oh Sang

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) is synthesized mostly in the adrenal gland and is secreted in response to stressful conditions. The stress-induced increase in systemic GC may mediate diverse types of cellular damage. However, the specific effects of GC on the dermal papilla cells (DPCs) of hair follicles remain unknown, although stress-related hair loss has increased significantly in recent years. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a synthetic GC, dexamethasone (Dex), on human DPCs in vitro. We evaluated the effects of Dex on cell proliferation, survival, and the expression of growth factors in DPCs. Dex treatment (1μM) significantly reduced the number of viable cells and the expression of the Ki-67 protein, VEGF and HGF were downregulated following treatment of DPCs with Dex. Taken together, we concluded that Dex inhibits human hair growth by inhibiting both the proliferation of, and growth factors expression by, DPCs.

  12. Fatality after a single dermal application of lindane lotion.

    PubMed

    Sudakin, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    Lindane lotion, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of scabies and lice, poses risks of serious adverse effects on the nervous system. In 2003, the FDA issued a public health advisory for lindane products, emphasizing the importance of compliance with labeling instructions. The author presents a case in which a fatal outcome followed a single dermal application of lindane. The product was not applied according to the labeling instructions, and the 66-year-old man rapidly developed hypoxemia, seizures, respiratory acidosis, and hypotension. The final diagnosis at autopsy was hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy from lindane. This case is consistent with other reports of severe neurological outcomes from pharmaceutical use of lindane. These factors suggest a need for the FDA to reassess whether the risks of lindane have been effectively communicated to healthcare providers.

  13. Dermal fillers and combinations of fillers for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Beer, Kenneth

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, the use of dermal fillers was limited in the United States by the small number of products approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The products now approved for use in the United States have opened up the range of possibilities for combinations of products that are synergistic in their effects. Combinations of products may be discussed in temporal or anatomic relationships. Temporal combinations refer to the use of different fillers at different times, whereas anatomic combinations refer to the use of different fillers in different parts of the face. Before discussing how the various fillers may be used in combination, it is worthwhile to consider their use in isolation. Soft-tissue augmentation products under consideration in the present article include the hyaluronic acids (HA), poly L lactic acid (PLLA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CAHA), porcine collagen, and silicone.

  14. Estrogen Depletion Results in Nanoscale Morphology Changes in Dermal Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Liroff, Kaitlin G.; Turner, A. Simon; Les, Clifford M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2012-01-01

    Tissue cryo-sectioning combined with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging reveals that the nanoscale morphology of dermis collagen fibrils, quantified using the metric of D-periodic spacing, changes under the condition of estrogen depletion. Specifically, a new subpopulation of fibrils with D-spacings in the region between 56 and 59 nm is present two years following ovariectomy in ovine dermal samples. In addition, the overall width of the distribution, both values above and below the mean, has increased. The change in width due to an increase in lower values of D-spacings was previously reported for ovine bone; however, this report demonstrates that the effect is also present in non-mineralized collagen fibrils. A non-parametric Kolmogrov-Smirnov test of the cumulative density function indicates a statistical difference in the sham and OVX D-spacing distributions (p < 0.01). PMID:22437310

  15. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human multipotent dermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Skin, as the body's largest organ, has been extensively used to study adult stem cells. Most previous skin-related studies have focused on stem cells isolated from hair follicles and from keratinocytes. Here we present a protocol to isolate multipotent neural crest stem-like dermis-derived stem cells (termed dermal stem cells or DSCs) from human neonatal foreskins. DSCs grow like neural spheres in human embryonic stem cell medium and gain the ability to self-renew and differentiate into several cell lineages including melanocytes, neuronal cells, Schwann cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. These cells express neural crest stem cell markers (NGFRp75 and nestin) as well as an embryonic stem cell marker (OCT4).

  16. Primary cutaneous dermal mucinosis on herpes zoster scars.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Diana; Feltes, Federico; Machán, Salma; Pielasinski, Úrsula; Fariña, María C; Gavin, Eduardo; Requena, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The term isotopic response refers to the appearance of a new skin disease at the site of another unrelated and already healed skin disorder. Often, the first disease is herpes zoster (HZ). Several cutaneous reactions have been described in a dermatome recently affected by HZ. We present the case of a 33-year-old man who developed whitish papules with a zosteriform distribution on HZ scars. Histopathologic study with hematoxylin and eosin and Alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining demonstrated abundant deposits of mucin interstitially arranged between collagen bundles of the papillary dermis. Cutaneous dermal mucinosis as a postherpetic isotopic response is rare, but it should be added to the list of cutaneous reactions arising in HZ scars. PMID:27529717

  17. Formulation of microemulsion systems for dermal delivery of silymarin.

    PubMed

    Panapisal, Vipaporn; Charoensri, Sawitree; Tantituvanont, Angkana

    2012-06-01

    Silymarin is a standardized extract from Silybum marianum seeds, known for its many skin benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties. In this study, the potential of several microemulsion formulations for dermal delivery of silymarin was evaluated. The pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed for the various microemulsion formulations which were prepared using glyceryl monooleate, oleic acid, ethyl oleate, or isopropyl myristate as the oily phase; a mixture of Tween 20®, Labrasol®, or Span 20® with HCO-40® (1:1 ratio) as surfactants; and Transcutol® as a cosurfactant. Oil-in-water microemulsions were selected to incorporate 2% w/w silymarin. After six heating-cooling cycles, physical appearances of all microemulsions were unchanged and no drug precipitation occurred. Chemical stability studies showed that microemulsion containing Labrasol® and isopropyl myristate stored at 40°C for 6 months showed the highest silybin remaining among others. The silybin remainings depended on the type of surfactant and were sequenced in the order of: Labrasol® > Tween 20® > Span 20®. In vitro release studies showed prolonged release for microemulsions when compared to silymarin solution. All release profiles showed the best fits with Higuchi kinetics. Non-occlusive in vitro skin permeation studies showed absence of transdermal delivery of silybin. The percentages of silybin in skin extracts were not significantly different among the different formulations (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, some silybin was detected in the receiver fluid when performing occlusive experiments. Microemulsions containing Labrasol® also were found to enhance silymarin solubility. Other drug delivery systems with occlusive effect could be further developed for dermal delivery of silymarin.

  18. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations – telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines – epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 – were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines – interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin – being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile. PMID:26414534

  19. Toxicokinetics of captan and folpet biomarkers in dermally exposed volunteers.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Aurélie; Bouchard, Michèle; Vernez, David

    2012-03-01

    To better assess biomonitoring data in workers exposed to captan and folpet, the kinetics of ring metabolites [tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI), phthalimide (PI) and phthalic acid] were determined in urine and plasma of dermally exposed volunteers. A 10  mg kg(-1) dose of each fungicide was applied on 80  cm(2) of the forearm and left without occlusion or washing for 24  h. Blood samples were withdrawn at fixed time periods over the 72  h following application and complete urine voids were collected over 96  h post-dosing, for metabolite analysis. In the hours following treatment, a progressive increase in plasma levels of THPI and PI was observed, with peak levels being reached at 24  h for THPI and 10  h for PI. The ensuing elimination phase appeared monophasic with a mean elimination half-life (t(½) ) of 24.7 and 29.7 h for THPI and PI, respectively. In urine, time courses PI and phthalic acid excretion rate rapidly evolved in parallel, and a mean elimination t(½) of 28.8 and 29.6  h, respectively, was calculated from these curves. THPI was eliminated slightly faster, with a mean t(½) of 18.7  h. Over the 96  h period post-application, metabolites were almost completely excreted, and on average 0.02% of captan dose was recovered in urine as THPI while 1.8% of the folpet dose was excreted as phthalic acid and 0.002% as PI, suggesting a low dermal absorption fraction for both fungicides. This study showed the potential use of THPI, PI and phthalic acid as key biomarkers of exposure to captan and folpet.

  20. Effect of water temperature on dermal exposure to chloroform.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S M; Wallace, L A; Callahan, P J; Kenny, D V; Brinkman, M C

    1998-01-01

    We have developed and applied a new measurement methodology to investigate dermal absorption of chloroform while bathing. Ten subjects bathed in chlorinated water while breathing pure air through a face mask. Their exhaled breath was delivered to a glow discharge source/ion trap mass spectrometer for continuous real-time measurement of chloroform in the breath. This new method provides abundant data compared to previous discrete time-integrated breath sampling methods. The method is particularly well suited to studying dermal exposure because the full face mask eliminates exposure to contaminated air. Seven of the 10 subjects bathed in water at two or three different temperatures between 30 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Subjects at the highest temperatures exhaled about 30 times more chloroform than the same subjects at the lowest temperatures. This probably results from a decline in blood flow to the skin at the lower temperatures as the body seeks to conserve heat forcing the chloroform to diffuse over a much greater path length before encountering the blood. These results suggest that pharmacokinetic models need to employ temperature-dependent parameters. Two existing models predict quite different times of about 12 min and 29 min for chloroform flux through the stratum corneum to reach equilibrium. At 40 degrees C, the time for the flux to reach a near steady-state value is 6-9 min. Although uptake and decay processes involve several body compartments, the complicating effect of the stratum corneum lag time made it difficult to fit multiexponential curves to the data; however, a single-compartment model gave a satisfactory fit. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9618350

  1. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Edwards, Brenda C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to pyrethroid pesticides is a potential cause for concern. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin, and permethrin in the rat. Dorsal hair on adult male Long-Evans rats was removed. The next day, the skin was dosed with 1750 nmol (312.5 nmol/cm(2)) of radiolabeled (5 µCi) bifenthrin, deltamethrin, or permethrin in acetone. A nonoccluding plastic cover was glued over the dosing site. The animals were placed in metabolism cages to collect excreta. At 24 h postdosing, the skin was washed with soap and water, and rats in one group were euthanized and their tissues were collected. The skin was removed and tape stripped. The remaining animals were returned to the metabolism cages after the wash for 4 d. These rats were then euthanized and handled as already described. Excreta, wash, tape strips, tissues, and carcass were analyzed for pyrethroid-derived radioactivity. The wash and tape strips removed >50% of the dose and skin retained 9-24%. Cumulative radioactivity in excreta was 0.5-7% at 24 h and 3-26% at 120 h. Radioactivity in tissues was <0.3% of the dose, while carcass retained 2 to 5%. Assuming absorption equals cumulative recovery in skin (washed and tape stripped), excreta, tissues, and carcass, absorption was permethrin ~ bifenthrin > deltamethrin at 24 h and permethrin > deltamethrin > bifenthrin at 120 h. Using the parallelogram approach with published in vitro data, human dermal absorption of these pyrethroids was estimated to be <10% of the dose. PMID:26817658

  2. Skin telocytes versus fibroblasts: two distinct dermal cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuli; Zhu, Zaihua; Zheng, Yonghua; Wan, Weiguo; Manole, Catalin G; Zhang, Qiangqiang

    2015-11-01

    It is already accepted that telocytes (TCs) represent a new type of interstitial cells in human dermis. In normal skin, TCs have particular spatial relations with different dermal structures such as blood vessels, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles or segments of sebaceous and/or eccrine sweat glands. The distribution and the density of TCs is affected in various skin pathological conditions. Previous studies mentioned the particular (ultra)structure of TCs and also their immunophenotype, miR imprint or proteome, genome or secretome features. As fibroblast is the most common intersitital cell (also in human dermis), a dedicated comparison between human skin TCs and fibroblasts (Fbs) was required to be performed. In this study, using different techniques, we document several points of difference between human dermis TCs and Fbs. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we demonstrated TCs with their hallmark cellular prolongations - telopodes. Thus, we showed their ultrastructural distinctiveness from Fbs. By RayBio Human Cytokine Antibody Array V analyses performed on the supernatant from separately cultured TCs and Fbs, we detected the cytokine profile of both cell types, individually. Two of 79 detected cytokines - epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating peptide 78 and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 - were 1.5 times higher in the supernatant of TCs (comparing with Fbs). On the other hand, 37 cytokines were at least 1.5 higher in Fbs supernatant (comparing with TCs), and among them six cytokines - interleukin 5, monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3), MCP-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-3, angiogenin, thrombopoietin - being 9.5 times higher (results also confirmed by ELISA testing). In summary, using different techniques, we showed that human dermal TCs and Fbs are different in terms of ultrastructure and cytokine profile.

  3. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism. Recent Advances: Advances in tissue culture, tissue engineering, and ex vivo models have made the examination and precise measurements of ECM components in wound healing possible. Likewise, the development of specific transgenic animal models has created the opportunity to characterize the role of various ECM molecules in healing wounds. In addition, the recent characterization of new ECM molecules, including matricellular proteins, dermatopontin, and FACIT collagens (Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices), further demonstrates our cursory knowledge of the ECM in coordinated wound healing. Critical Issues: The manipulation and augmentation of ECM components in the healing wound is emerging in patient care, as demonstrated by the use of acellular dermal matrices, tissue scaffolds, and wound dressings or topical products bearing ECM proteins such as collagen, hyaluronan (HA), or elastin. Once thought of as neutral structural proteins, these molecules are now known to directly influence many aspects of cellular wound healing. Future Directions: The role that ECM molecules, such as CCN2, osteopontin, and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine, play in signaling homing of fibroblast progenitor cells to sites of injury invites future research as we continue investigating the heterotopic origin of certain populations of fibroblasts in a healing wound. Likewise, research into differently sized fragments of the same polymeric ECM molecule is warranted as we learn that fragments of molecules such as HA and tenascin-C can have opposing effects on dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26989578

  4. Biomonitoring as a tool in the human health risk characterization of dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, P J

    2008-04-01

    Dermal exposure is an important factor in risk characterization. In occupational settings it becomes relatively more important because of the continuous reduction in inhalation exposure. In the public health arena, dermal exposure may also form a significant contribution to the total exposure. Dermal exposure, however, is difficult to assess directly because it is determined by a host of factors, which are difficult to quantify. As a consequence, dermal exposure is often estimated by application of models for external exposure. In combination with modeled or measured data for percutaneous penetration, these provide an estimate for the internal exposure that is directly related to the systemic effects. The advantages and drawbacks of EASE (Estimation and Assessment of Substance Exposure) and RISKOFDERM (Risk Assessment of Occupational Dermal Exposure), two models for external exposure that are mentioned in the Technical Guidance Document for the European Union risk assessments performed under the Existing Substances Regulation (EEC/793/93), are discussed. Although new chemicals regulation (REACh, 1907/2006/EC) is now in place in the European Union, the principles applied under the previous legislation do not change and the same models will continue to be used. The results obtained with these models for styrene, 2-butoxyethanol, and 1-methoxy-2-propanol in specific exposure scenarios are compared with an alternative method that uses biomonitoring data to assess dermal exposure. Actual external exposure measurements combined with measured or modeled percutaneous penetration data give acceptable results in risk assessment of dermal exposure, but modeled data of external dermal exposure should only be used if no other data are available. However, if available, biomonitoring should be considered the method of choice to assess (dermal) exposure. PMID:18684800

  5. Biomonitoring as a tool in the human health risk characterization of dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, P J

    2008-04-01

    Dermal exposure is an important factor in risk characterization. In occupational settings it becomes relatively more important because of the continuous reduction in inhalation exposure. In the public health arena, dermal exposure may also form a significant contribution to the total exposure. Dermal exposure, however, is difficult to assess directly because it is determined by a host of factors, which are difficult to quantify. As a consequence, dermal exposure is often estimated by application of models for external exposure. In combination with modeled or measured data for percutaneous penetration, these provide an estimate for the internal exposure that is directly related to the systemic effects. The advantages and drawbacks of EASE (Estimation and Assessment of Substance Exposure) and RISKOFDERM (Risk Assessment of Occupational Dermal Exposure), two models for external exposure that are mentioned in the Technical Guidance Document for the European Union risk assessments performed under the Existing Substances Regulation (EEC/793/93), are discussed. Although new chemicals regulation (REACh, 1907/2006/EC) is now in place in the European Union, the principles applied under the previous legislation do not change and the same models will continue to be used. The results obtained with these models for styrene, 2-butoxyethanol, and 1-methoxy-2-propanol in specific exposure scenarios are compared with an alternative method that uses biomonitoring data to assess dermal exposure. Actual external exposure measurements combined with measured or modeled percutaneous penetration data give acceptable results in risk assessment of dermal exposure, but modeled data of external dermal exposure should only be used if no other data are available. However, if available, biomonitoring should be considered the method of choice to assess (dermal) exposure.

  6. Seizure caused by dermal application of over-the-counter eucalyptus oil head lice preparation.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Neil

    2011-10-01

    Natural plant oils such as eucalyptus are common worldwide in non-prescription natural health products. Oral ingestion of eucalyptus oil is well known to produce neurological symptoms and seizures; however, its dermal use is presumed to be safe. We describe a brief, self-limited, tonic-clonic seizure in a healthy 4-year-old girl following dermal exposure to eucalyptus oil as directed for treatment of head lice. Initial symptoms were vomiting, lethargy, and ataxia followed by a grand mal seizure. Recovery occurred rapidly after the skin was washed. Health care providers should be aware that eucalyptus oil toxicity may occur with dermal exposure and should report additional cases.

  7. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part I: background and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    Dermal fillers have provided a safe and effective means for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation, and have experienced a dramatic increase in popularity during the past 10 years. Much focus has been placed upon filler technique and patient outcomes. However, there is a relative lack of literature reviewing the basic science of dermal fillers, which is vital to a physician's understanding of how each product behaves in vivo. Part I of this article reviews the basic science and evolution of both historical and contemporary dermal fillers; Part II examines their adverse effects. We endeavor to provide the physician with a practical approach to choosing products that maximize both aesthetic outcome and safety.

  8. Orthopedic applications of acellular human dermal allograft for shoulder and elbow surgery.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Daniel C; Shore, Brett; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2015-07-01

    Shoulder and elbow tendon injuries are some of the most challenging problems to treat surgically. Tendon repairs in the upper extremity can be complicated by poor tendon quality and, often times, poor healing. Extracellular matrices, such as human dermal allografts, have been used to augment tendon repairs in shoulder and elbow surgery. The indications and surgical techniques regarding the use of human dermal allograft continue to evolve. This article reviews the basic science, rationale for use, and surgical applications of human dermal allograft in shoulder and elbow tendon injuries.

  9. Blaschko Linear Enamel Defects – A Marker for Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: Case Report of Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stefan; Itin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic skin disorder. The inheritance of FDH or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is X-linked dominant and the disease is associated with a PORCN gene mutation. This gene plays a key role in the Wnt pathway, which has an impact on embryonic development. Every tissue derived from meso- and ectoderm can be affected. Patients suffer from cutaneous, ocular, osseous, oral and dental defects. The skin and dental alterations manifest along the Blaschko lines. We present a woman (born in 1962) suffering from FDH with congenital skin changes and Blaschko linear enamel defects. Typical symptoms (e.g. fat herniations, scoliosis, syndactyly, microphthalmia, caries and alopecia) plus vertical grooving of all teeth gave a first indication. Molecular genetic testing confirmed the definitive diagnosis of FDH. We hypothesize that, in the context of typical skin changes, visible Blaschko lines on the teeth in the form of vertical grooves are almost pathognomonic for FDH. PMID:26078738

  10. USE OF THE MACROACTIVITY APPROACH TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S DERMAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES IN RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients (TC) to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing scr...

  11. BREATH MEASUREMENT AND MODELS TO ASSESS VOC DERMAL ABSORPTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water results from environmental contamination of surface, ground-, and drinking waters. This exposure occurs both in occupational and residential settings. Compartmental models incorporating body burden measurements have ...

  12. Assessment of dermal glyceryl trinitrate and isosorbide dinitrate for patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, P J; Jones, P R; Galer, I A

    1985-01-01

    Dermal nitrate preparations are claimed to be useful in the treatment of angina, as their slow absorption by-passing the liver leads to a sustained action. Ten patients with angina were exercised on a treadmill after dermal application of 16.64 mg glyceryl trinitrate or 100 mg isosorbide dinitrate or placebo. Exercise duration was significantly increased at one and three hours for both nitrate preparations but not at six hours after application. The calculated workload achieved was significantly increased (p less than 0.01) at one and three hours for both preparations and at six hours (p less than 0.05) for isosorbide dinitrate. Headaches were common with glyceryl trinitrate cream. The dermal nitrate preparations studied had a duration of antianginal action similar to that of oral nitrate tablets. Aside from their value when the oral route cannot be used or absorption may be delayed, dermal nitrate preparations have no advantage over oral preparations for angina pectoris. PMID:3918653

  13. ESTIMATING CONTAMINANT DOSE FOR INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT: MODEL DEVELOPMENT, TESTING, AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of aggregate exposure to pesticides and other surface contamination in residential environments are often driven by assumptions about dermal contacts. Accurately predicting cumulative doses from realistic skin contact scenarios requires characterization of exposure sc...

  14. STUDY TO TEST THE FEASIBILITY OF USING THE MACROACTIVITY APPROACH TO ASSESS DERMAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing screenin...

  15. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption.

  16. Advective and diffusive dermal processes for estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Historically, evaluation of pesticide risk to both amphibians and reptiles has been achieved by comparing ingestion and inhalat...

  17. FEASIBILITY OF USING THE MACROACTIVITY APPROACH TO ASSESS CHILDREN'S DERMAL EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results derived from an initial assessment of critical exposure pathways for children indicate that dermal contact may result in high residential exposures to pesticides. However, data on children's exposures and activities are insufficient to support quantitative assessments ...

  18. LPS-Stimulated Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells Enhance Neo-Vascularization during Dermal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Tobias; Weber, Caroline; Rapoport, Daniel H; Kruse, Charli; Schumann, Sandra; Stang, Felix H; Siemers, Frank; Matthießen, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    High numbers of adult stem cells are still required to improve the formation of new vessels in scaffolds to accelerate dermal regeneration. Recent data indicate a benefit for vascularization capacity by stimulating stem cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, stem cells derived from human skin (SDSC) were activated with LPS and seeded in a commercially available dermal substitute to examine vascularization in vivo. Besides, in vitro assays were performed to evaluate angiogenic factor release and tube formation ability. Results showed that LPS-activated SDSC significantly enhanced vascularization of the scaffolds, compared to unstimulated stem cells in vivo. Further, in vitro assays confirmed higher secretion rates of proangiogenic as well as proinflammatoric factors in the presence of LPS-activated SDSC. Our results suggest that combining activated stem cells and a dermal substitute is a promising option to enhance vascularization in scaffold-mediated dermal regeneration.

  19. Visceral kala-azar associated with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Agrawal, S K; Jha, T K

    1989-02-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis associated with post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is very rare. We are reporting one such case which incidentally is the seventh case so far reported from Indian sub-continent. PMID:2808294

  20. Living skin substitutes: survival and function of fibroblasts seeded in a dermal substitute in experimental wounds.

    PubMed

    Lamme, E N; van Leeuwen, R T; Jonker, A; van Marle, J; Middelkoop, E

    1998-12-01

    The healing of full-thickness skin defects requires extensive synthesis and remodeling of dermal and epidermal components. Fibroblasts play an important role in this process and are being incorporated in the latest generation of artificial dermal substitutes. We studied the fate of fibroblasts seeded in our artificial elastin/collagen dermal substitute and the influence of the seeded fibroblasts on cell migration and dermal substitute degradation after transplantation to experimental full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wounds were treated with either dermal substitutes seeded with autologous fibroblasts or acellular substitutes. Seeded fibroblasts, labeled with a PKH-26 fluorescent cell marker, were detected in the wounds with fluorescence microscopy and quantitated with flow cytofluorometric analysis of single-cell suspensions of wound tissue. The cellular infiltrate was characterized for the presence of mesenchymal cells (vimentin), monocytes/macrophages, and vascular cells. Dermal substitute degradation was quantitated by image analysis of wound sections stained with Herovici's staining. In the wounds treated with the seeded dermal substitute, fluorescent PKH-26-labeled cells were detectable up to 6 d and were positive for vimentin but not for the macrophage antibody. After 5 d, flow cytofluorometry showed the presence of 3.1 (+/-0.9) x 10(6) (mean +/- SD, n = 7) PKH-26-positive cells in these wounds, whereas initially only 1 x 10(6) fluorescent fibroblasts had been seeded. In total, the percentage of mesenchymal cells minus the macrophages was similar after 5 d between wounds treated with the seeded and the acellular substitutes. In the wounds treated with the seeded substitute, however, 19.5% of the mesenchymal cells were of seeded origin. Furthermore, the rate of substitute degradation in the seeded wounds was significantly lower at 2-4 wk after wounding than in wounds treated with the acellular substitute. Vascular in-growth and the number of infiltrated

  1. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantash, Basil M.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K.; Herron, G. Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-07-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 µm or 140 µm 1/e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  2. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in dermal condensates is required for hair follicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Rezza, Amélie; Clavel, Carlos; Grisanti, Laura; Zemla, Roland; Najam, Sara; Rendl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Broad dermal Wnt signaling is required for patterned induction of hair follicle placodes and subsequent Wnt signaling in placode stem cells is essential for induction of dermal condensates, cell clusters of precursors for the hair follicle dermal papilla (DP). Progression of hair follicle formation then requires coordinated signal exchange between dermal condensates and placode stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether continued Wnt signaling in DP precursor cells plays a role in this process, largely due to the long-standing inability to specifically target dermal condensates for gene ablation. Here we use the Tbx18Cre knockin mouse line to ablate the Wnt-responsive transcription factor β-catenin specifically in these cells at E14.5 during the first wave of guard hair follicle formation. In the absence of β-catenin, canonical Wnt signaling is effectively abolished in these cells. Sox2+ dermal condensates initiate normally, however by E16.5 guard hair follicle numbers are strongly reduced and by E18.5 most whiskers and guard hair follicles are absent, suggesting that active Wnt signaling in dermal condensates is important for hair follicle formation to proceed after induction. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling in dermal condensates regulates hair follicle formation, we analyze genome-wide the gene expression changes in embryonic β-catenin null DP precursor cells. We find altered expression of several signaling pathway genes, including Fgfs and Activin, both previously implicated in hair follicle formation. In summary, these data reveal a functional role of Wnt signaling in DP precursors for embryonic hair follicle formation and identify Fgf and Activin signaling as potential effectors of Wnt signaling-regulated events. PMID:24309208

  3. Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis in visceral leishmaniasis-endemic communities in Bihar, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rudra Pratap; Picado, Albert; Alam, Shahnawaz; Hasker, Epco; Singh, Shri Prakash; Ostyn, Bart; Chappuis, François; Sundar, Shyam; Boelaert, Marleen

    2012-11-01

    We assessed the prevalence of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL), a late cutaneous manifestation of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), in 16 VL-endemic communities in Bihar, India. The prevalence of confirmed PKDL cases was 4.4 per 10 000 individuals and 7.8 if probable cases were also considered. The clinical history and treatment of the post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis cases are discussed.

  4. Dermal melanin concentration of yellow perch Perca flavescens in relation to water transparency.

    PubMed

    Rheault, G; Langevin, M; Cabana, G; Glémet, H

    2015-11-01

    A positive relationship was observed between Secchi disc depth and dermal melanin concentration in yellow perch Perca flavescens sampled from 11 humic lakes located on the Canadian Shield in southern Quebec (Canada). Secchi disc depth explained 23% of the variations of dermal melanin concentration. Secchi disc depth and thus water transparency appear to have a positive influence on melanin production in the dermis of P. flavescens. PMID:26399476

  5. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in dermal condensates is required for hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Rezza, Amélie; Clavel, Carlos; Grisanti, Laura; Zemla, Roland; Najam, Sara; Rendl, Michael

    2014-01-15

    Broad dermal Wnt signaling is required for patterned induction of hair follicle placodes and subsequent Wnt signaling in placode stem cells is essential for induction of dermal condensates, cell clusters of precursors for the hair follicle dermal papilla (DP). Progression of hair follicle formation then requires coordinated signal exchange between dermal condensates and placode stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether continued Wnt signaling in DP precursor cells plays a role in this process, largely due to the long-standing inability to specifically target dermal condensates for gene ablation. Here we use the Tbx18(Cre) knockin mouse line to ablate the Wnt-responsive transcription factor β-catenin specifically in these cells at E14.5 during the first wave of guard hair follicle formation. In the absence of β-catenin, canonical Wnt signaling is effectively abolished in these cells. Sox2(+) dermal condensates initiate normally; however by E16.5 guard hair follicle numbers are strongly reduced and by E18.5 most whiskers and guard hair follicles are absent, suggesting that active Wnt signaling in dermal condensates is important for hair follicle formation to proceed after induction. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling in dermal condensates regulates hair follicle formation, we analyze genome-wide the gene expression changes in embryonic β-catenin null DP precursor cells. We find altered expression of several signaling pathway genes, including Fgfs and Activin, both previously implicated in hair follicle formation. In summary, these data reveal a functional role of Wnt signaling in DP precursors for embryonic hair follicle formation and identify Fgf and Activin signaling as potential effectors of Wnt signaling-regulated events.

  6. Dermal melanin concentration of yellow perch Perca flavescens in relation to water transparency.

    PubMed

    Rheault, G; Langevin, M; Cabana, G; Glémet, H

    2015-11-01

    A positive relationship was observed between Secchi disc depth and dermal melanin concentration in yellow perch Perca flavescens sampled from 11 humic lakes located on the Canadian Shield in southern Quebec (Canada). Secchi disc depth explained 23% of the variations of dermal melanin concentration. Secchi disc depth and thus water transparency appear to have a positive influence on melanin production in the dermis of P. flavescens.

  7. Benign dermal eccrine cylindroma. A pitfall in the cytologic diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bondeson, L; Lindholm, K; Thorstenson, S

    1983-01-01

    Aspiration cytology from four benign dermal eccrine cylindromas and five adenoid cystic carcinomas were compared. These two lesions were found to have so much in common morphologically that they may be indistinguishable on a purely cytologic basis. Accordingly, we recommend a restricted excision to obtain a histopathologic diagnosis before more extensive surgery is performed whenever a lesion is cytologically consistent with adenoid cystic carcinoma but clinically shows a picture that does not exclude dermal eccrine cylindroma.

  8. Laser-induced transepidermal elimination of dermal content by fractional photothermolysis.

    PubMed

    Hantash, Basil M; Bedi, Vikramaditya P; Sudireddy, Vasanthi; Struck, Steven K; Herron, G Scott; Chan, Kin Foong

    2006-01-01

    The wound healing process in skin is studied in human subjects treated with fractional photothermolysis. In-vivo histological evaluation of vacuoles formed over microthermal zones (MTZs) and their content is undertaken. A 30-W, 1550-nm single-mode fiber laser system delivers an array of 60 microm or 140 microm 1e2 incidence microbeam spot size at variable pulse energy and density. Treatments span from 6 to 20 mJ with skin excisions performed 1-day post-treatment. Staining with hematoxylin and eosin demonstrates an intact stratum corneum with vacuolar formation within the epidermis. The re-epithelialization process with repopulation of melanocytes and keratinocytes at the basal layer is apparent by 1-day post-treatment. The dermal-epidermal (DE) junction is weakened and separated just above zones of dermal coagulation. Complete loss of dermal cell viability is noted within the confines of the MTZs 1-day post-treatment, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase. All cells falling outside the irradiation field remain viable. Content within the epidermal vacuoles stain positively with Gomori trichrome, suggesting a dermal origin. However, the positive staining could be due to loss of specificity after thermal alteration. Nevertheless, this dermal extrusion hypothesis is supported by very specific positive staining with an antihuman elastin antibody. Fractional photothermolysis creates microthermal lesions that allow transport and extrusion of dermal content through a compromised DE junction. Some dermal material is incorporated into the microepidermal necrotic debris and shuttled up the epidermis to eventually be exfoliated through the stratum corneum. This is the first report of a nonablative laser-induced transport mechanism by which dermal content can be predictably extruded biologically through the epidermis. Thus, treatment with the 1550-nm fiber laser may provide the first therapeutic option for clinical indications, including pigmentary disorders such as medically

  9. Human dermal exposure to galaxolide from personal care products.

    PubMed

    Correia, P; Cruz, A; Santos, L; Alves, A

    2013-06-01

    Musks are synthetic fragrances applied on personal care and household products as fixatives, by retarding the release of other fragrances with higher volatility. Galaxolide is the most used polycyclic musk since the 90th decade, and it has been detected in several environmental and biological matrices, particularly in human tissues and fluids. For exposure assessment purposes, large-monitoring data need to be obtained and rapid but reliable analytical techniques are requested. The main objective of this study is to develop and validate a new and fast analytical methodology to quantify galaxolide in personal care products and to apply this method to real matrices like skin care products (creams and lotions), shower products (soap bar), hair care products (shampoo and hair conditioner) and oral care products (toothpaste), to evaluate the human dermal exposure risk. A dispersive solid-phase extraction is proposed, using QuEChERS methodology, followed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Some extraction parameters were studied, like the ratio of sample/solvent amounts, the homogenization time, the salt addition effect and the used sorbents. The validation parameters of the developed method were the following: a linearity range of 0.005-1.002 mg kg⁻¹ sample, a limit of detection of 0.001 mg kg⁻¹ sample, repeatability between 0.7% and 11.3% (variation coefficient of six standard injections), an intermediate precision of 2.5% (variation coefficient of six independent analysis of the same sample), mean recoveries ranging from 65% (soap bar) to 95% (body cream) and 3% of global uncertainty in most of the working range. The time of analysis, including the extraction steps, is 60 min, allowing a throughput of 4 samples h⁻¹ . Galaxolide was detected in all of the seven analysed products in concentrations ranging from 0.04 ± 0.01 mg kg⁻¹ sample (toothpaste) to 280.78 ± 8.19 mg kg⁻¹ sample (perfumed body cream), which may correspond to a significant estimated

  10. The effect of chlorine substitution on the disposition of polychlorinated biphenyls following dermal administration.

    PubMed

    Garner, C Edwin; Demeter, Jennifer; Matthews, H B

    2006-10-01

    The fate of selected polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) was investigated following single dermal administration (0.4 mg/kg) to determine the effects of chlorine content and position on the disposition of PCBs following dermal absorption. Single dermal doses of (14)C-labeled mono-, di-, tetra- and hexachlorobiphenyls were administered to 1 cm(2) areas on the backs of F-344 male rats. Distribution of radioactivity in selected tissues and excreta was determined by serial sacrifice at time points up to 2 weeks. Unabsorbed radioactivity was removed from the dose site at either sacrifice or 48 h post-dose. The time course of radioactivity in the tissues showed a dependence on rate and extent of absorption. The most rapidly absorbed PCBs reached peak tissue concentrations at early times and were cleared from the tissues rapidly. The higher chlorinated PCBs were slowly absorbed and tended to accumulate in the adipose and skin after removal of unabsorbed dose. Excretion of absorbed radioactivity varied with chlorine content ranging from 27% to ca. 100% at 2 weeks post-dose. Excretion profiles following dermal doses tended to differ from profiles following equivalent IV doses, as did the metabolite profiles in excreta. Skin slice incubation experiments suggested that first pass metabolism in the dermal dose site was responsible for metabolism and disposition differences between routes of administration. The data further suggest that the rate of absorption, and therefore the disposition of PCBs following dermal administration may be mediated, either in part or fully, by transdermal metabolism.

  11. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  12. CTRP6 inhibits fibrogenesis in TGF-β1-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong-Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Mei; Sun, Yao-Wen; Peng, Hui-Zi; Wu, Hang-Li; Gao, Wen-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Skin fibrosis is characterized by excessive proliferation of fibroblasts and overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM). C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 6 (CTRP6), a member of CTRPs, has been involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of CTRP6 in skin fibrosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CTRP6 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that CTRP6 was lowly expressed in scar tissues and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated dermal fibroblasts. CTRP6 overexpression significantly inhibited the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as well as suppressed the expression of ECM in TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, CTRP6 overexpression markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, the data reported here demonstrate that CTRP6 is able to inhibit the proliferation and ECM expression in human dermal fibroblasts through suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that CTRP6 may be a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of skin fibrosis. PMID:27155158

  13. The application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology by in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, W. Z.; Xu, A. E.; Xu, J.; Bi, Z. G.; Shang, Y. B.; Ren, Q. S.

    2010-08-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) allows noninvasive visualization of human skin in vivo, without needing to fix or section the tissue. Melanocytes and pigmented keratinocytes at the level of the basal layer form bright dermal papillary rings which are readily amenable to identify in confocal images. Our purpose was to explore the role of dermal papillary rings in assessment of lesion location, the diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. Seventy-one patients were imaged with the VivaScope 1500 reflectance confocal microscope provided by Lucid, Inc. The results indicate that dermal papillary rings can assess the location of lesion; the application of dermal papillary rings can provide diagnostic support and differential diagnosis for vitiligo, nevus depigmentosus, tinea versicolor, halo nevus, common nevi, and assess the therapeutic efficacy of NBUVB phototherapy plus topical 0.1 percent tacrolimus ointment for vitiligo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the dermal papillary rings play an important role in the assessment the location of lesion, diagnosis, differential diagnosis of lesions and assessment of therapeutic efficacy by in vivo CLSM. CLSM may be a promising tool for noninvasive examination in dermatology. However, larger studies are needed to expand the application of dermal papillary rings in dermatology.

  14. Biological monitoring to assess dermal exposure to ethylene oxide vapours during an incidental release.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Peter J; van Puijvelde, Mathieu J P; Urbanus, Jan H

    2014-12-15

    During a short incident in an ethylene oxide (EO) producing plant, EO vapour was released under high pressure. Operators wore full respiratory protection during repairs to fix the leak. To check the adequacy of the applied personal protective equipment and to address concerns about potential dermal exposure and subsequent uptake of EO, biological monitoring was applied by determination of the haemoglobin adducts of EO in blood. Based on the results of the biomonitoring, a risk assessment of dermal exposure to EO vapour was made. Calculations to estimate dermal exposure, based on two recently published models and using the relevant physical-chemical properties of EO, indicate that the dermal contribution to total exposure is expected to be negligible under normal operating circumstances. However, the models indicate that under accidental circumstances of product spillage, when high air concentrations can build up quickly and where incident response is conducted under respiratory protection with independently supplied air, the systemic exposure resulting from dermal absorption may reach levels of concern. The model estimates were compared to the actual biomonitoring data in the operators involved in the accidental release of EO vapour. The results suggest that when incidental exposures to high EO vapour concentrations (several thousand ppm) occur during periods in excess of 20-30 min, additional risk management measures, such as wearing chemical impervious suits, should be considered to control dermal uptake of EO.

  15. Sexual Dimorphisms in the Dermal Denticles of the Lesser-Spotted Catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Neil; Babey, Lucy; Haddon, William J.; Love, Adrian C.; Waring, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The dermal layers of several elasmobranch species have been shown to be sexually dimorphic. Generally, when this occurs the females have thicker dermal layers compared to those of males. This sexual dimorphism has been suggested to occur as a response to male biting during mating. Although male biting as a copulatory behaviour in Scyliorhinus canicula has been widely speculated to occur, only relatively recently has this behaviour been observed. Male S. canicula use their mouths to bite the female’s pectoral and caudal fins as part of their pre-copulatory behaviour and to grasp females during copulation. Previous work has shown that female S. canicula have a thicker epidermis compared to that of males. The structure of the dermal denticles in females may also differ from that of males in order to protect against male biting or to provide a greater degree of friction in order to allow the male more purchase. This study reveals that the length, width and density of the dermal denticles of mature male and female S. canicula are sexually dimorphic across the integument in areas where males have been observed to bite and wrap themselves around females (pectoral fin, area posterior to the pectoral fin, caudal fin, and pelvic girdle). No significant differences in the dermal denticle dimensions were found in other body areas examined (head, dorsal skin and caudal peduncle). Sexually dimorphic dermal denticles in mature S. canicula could be a response to male biting/wrapping as part of the copulatory process. PMID:24116179

  16. Acute and 28-day sub-acute oral toxicity evaluation of two dietary bamboo charcoal powders in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhen-chao; Luo, Sha; Zhong, Yu-ting; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jin-yao; Zhang, Li-shi

    2015-04-01

    No data were available on the acute oral toxicity, short-term oral toxicity of vegetable carbon in animals. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of two commercially available dietary bamboo charcoal powders (BCP1 and BCP2). The size distribution of the two powders was determined by a Mastersizer 2000 laser particle size analyzer prior to the in vivo safety studies. For the acute toxicity study, a single dose of 11.24 g/kg body weight of BCP1 and BCP2 was given once orally to healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Mortality and clinical symptoms were observed and recorded for the first 30 min after treatment, at 4 h post-administration, and then at least once daily for 14 days after administration. In the repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study, BCP1 and BCP2 were administered orally at doses of 2.81, 5.62, and 11.24 g/kg body weight for 28 days to SD rats. Animals were sacrificed and organs and blood samples were analyzed. Results showed that both BCP1 and BCP2 were micro-sized and various in size. In the acute toxicity and the repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity studies, BCP caused neither mortality nor visible signs of toxicity in rats. No significant differences were found in the relative organ weights or in biochemical parameters in BCP treated groups compared to a control group. No treatment-related histological changes were observed in the organs of these animals. Based on these data, it is concluded that the median lethal dose (LD50) of BCP for both male and female rats is more than 11.24 g/kg body weight and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is >11.24 g/kg body weight for 28 days.

  17. Nanoparticles and their interactions with the dermal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Stracke, Frank; Hansen, Steffi; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2009-01-01

    The dermal application of drugs is promising due to the ease of application. In this context nano-scale carrier systems were already evaluated in several studies with respect to the skin interaction and the impact on drug penetration. At the same time the upcoming production of engineered nano-scale materials requires a thorough safety evaluation. Drug delivery as well as risk assessment depends crucially on the ability of such carriers to overcome the skin barrier and reach deeper tissue layers. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and especially skin models is an intriguing field. However, the data obtained do not show a clear image on the effect of nano-carriers. Especially the penetration of such particles is an open and controversially discussed topic. The literature reports different results mainly on pig or murine skin showing strong penetration (pig and mouse) or the opposite. Looking only at the sizes of the particles also no conclusive picture can be obtained. Nevertheless, size is regarded to play an important role for skin penetration. Furthermore, the state of the skin influences penetration (hydration) and the mechanical stress is of outmost importance. PMID:20592791

  18. Dkk2/Frzb in the dermal papillae regulates feather regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qiqi; Cai, Linyan; Fu, Yu; Chen, Xi; Yan, Zhipeng; Lin, Xiang; Zhou, Guixuan; Han, Hao; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-ming; Wu, Wei; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-03-15

    Avian feathers have robust growth and regeneration capability. To evaluate the contribution of signaling molecules and pathways in these processes, we profiled gene expression in the feather follicle using an absolute quantification approach. We identified hundreds of genes that mark specific components of the feather follicle: the dermal papillae (DP) which controls feather regeneration and axis formation, the pulp mesenchyme (Pp) which is derived from DP cells and nourishes the feather follicle, and the ramogenic zone epithelium (Erz) where a feather starts to branch. The feather DP is enriched in BMP/TGF-β signaling molecules and inhibitors for Wnt signaling including Dkk2/Frzb. Wnt ligands are mainly expressed in the feather epithelium and pulp. We find that while Wnt signaling is required for the maintenance of DP marker gene expression and feather regeneration, excessive Wnt signaling delays regeneration and reduces pulp formation. Manipulating Dkk2/Frzb expression by lentiviral-mediated overexpression, shRNA-knockdown, or by antibody neutralization resulted in dual feather axes formation. Our results suggest that the Wnt signaling in the proximal feather follicle is fine-tuned to accommodate feather regeneration and axis formation.

  19. Solid lipid microparticles for enhanced dermal delivery of tetracycline HCl.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Yahya; Javadzadeh, Yousef; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Acne vulgaris (commonly called acne) is a most common skin disease during adolescence, afflicting more than 85% of teenagers. Topical tetracycline (Tc) is used for mild inflammatory acne and as an adjunct to systemic treatment in more severe forms. Solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) are useful tool for topical delivery because of their biodegradable, biocompatible and low toxic characteristic accompanying with excellent skin hydration, occlusiveness and controlled release properties. The purpose of this study was to prepare Tc-loaded SLMs were produced by the spray drying technique and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry and differential scanning calorimetry. In vitro and ex vivo release characteristics of Tc through SLMs and control formulations (aqueous carbopol gel) were evaluated over 24h using a vertical Franz diffusion cell through cellulose acetate membranes and exercised rat skin, respectively. SLM formulations present high encapsulation values above 97% without significant different among formulations (p<0.05). The sustained release pattern of Tc through SLMs was illustrated by in vitro release study. The ex vivo drug skin permeation study revealed that Tc dermal deposition of optimum SLMs formulation was about 7 times that of the control formulations. The enhanced skin penetration and accumulation of Tc observed for Tc-loaded SLMs may increase the efficiency of acne therapy and decrease the associated Tc side effects. PMID:27131093

  20. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  1. Evaluation of dermal symptoms in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Razi, Ahad; Golforoushan, Farideh; Nejad, Amir Bahrami Shahla Babaee; Goldust, Mohamad

    2013-06-01

    Many symptoms arise in thyroid diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermal symptoms in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. In this cross sectional study, 120 patients with hyperthyroidism and 50 patients suffering from hypothyroidism were studied. Cutaneous, hair and nail clinical symptoms were studied and registered in a special questionnaire. Mean age of patients suffering from hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were 38.24 +/- 14.45 and 25.86 +/- 14.69 years old. Dry and Coarse/rough skin were the most prevalent manifestations in the skin involvement in hypothyroidism since softness was the most prevalent ones in hyperthyroidism. Fragileness was the most prevalent symptom in patients with nail involvement in hypothyroidism since soft skin was the most prevalent ones in hyperthyroidism. Coarse/rough skin was observed more in patients with hair involvement in hypothyroidism since the most prevalent ones was separation of nail from its bed in hyperthyroidism. High prevalence of skin, hair and nail symptoms in thyroid patients, early diagnosis of the signs may be helpful in premature diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. PMID:24498824

  2. Lycopene from tomatoes: vesicular nanocarrier formulations for dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ascenso, Andreia; Pinho, Sónia; Eleutério, Carla; Praça, Fabíola Garcia; Bentley, Maria Vitória Lopes Badra; Oliveira, Helena; Santos, Conceição; Silva, Olga; Simões, Sandra

    2013-07-31

    This experimental work aimed to develop a simple, fast, economic, and environmentally friendly process for the extraction of lycopene from tomato and incorporate this lycopene-rich extract into ultradeformable vesicular nanocarriers suitable for topical application. Lycopene extraction was conducted without a cosolvent for 30 min. The extracts were analyzed and incorporated in transfersomes and ethosomes. These formulations were characterized, and the cellular uptake was observed by confocal microscopy. Dermal delivery of lycopene formulations was tested under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Lycopene extraction proved to be quite safe and selective. The vesicular formulation was taken up by the cells, being more concentrated around the nucleus. Epicutaneous application of lycopene formulations decreased the level of anthralin-induced ear swelling by 97 and 87%, in a manner nonstatistically different from the positive control. These results support the idea that the lycopene-rich extract may be a good alternative to the expensive commercial lycopene for incorporation into advanced topical delivery systems. PMID:23826819

  3. Acquired dermal melanocytosis of the face and extremities.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, T; Ishii, K; Nishikawa, T; Ishiko, A

    2016-08-01

    Acquired dermal melanocytosis (ADM) is a relatively rare, but well-described disease among adolescent to middle-aged East Asian women, particularly those of Japanese and Chinese descent. Clinically, ADM manifests as multiple punctate and greyish-brown pigmented areas 1-3 mm in diameter occurring on both sides of the forehead and zygomatic region. The subtype of ADM affecting the face and extremities is extremely rare even in East Asian women. We describe three patients with ADM of the face and extremities (ADMFE) and their characteristic clinical features. All patients were Japanese women, and showed multiple greyish-brown pigmentations on both nasal wings and on the extensor surface of the extremities. We found that the clinical features were strikingly uniform, and that a pigmented lesion on the nasal wing can be an important clue to distinguish ADMFE from other hyperpigmented diseases of the hands and feet. One patient was treated with Q-switched ruby laser with excellent outcome. Increased awareness of ADMFE can lead to earlier diagnosis and potential treatment. PMID:27338120

  4. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26960166

  6. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  7. A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship for acute oral toxicity of pesticides on rats: Validation, domain of application and prediction.

    PubMed

    Hamadache, Mabrouk; Benkortbi, Othmane; Hanini, Salah; Amrane, Abdeltif; Khaouane, Latifa; Si Moussa, Cherif

    2016-02-13

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models are expected to play an important role in the risk assessment of chemicals on humans and the environment. In this study, we developed a validated QSAR model to predict acute oral toxicity of 329 pesticides to rats because a few QSAR models have been devoted to predict the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) of pesticides on rats. This QSAR model is based on 17 molecular descriptors, and is robust, externally predictive and characterized by a good applicability domain. The best results were obtained with a 17/9/1 Artificial Neural Network model trained with the Quasi Newton back propagation (BFGS) algorithm. The prediction accuracy for the external validation set was estimated by the Q(2)ext and the root mean square error (RMS) which are equal to 0.948 and 0.201, respectively. 98.6% of external validation set is correctly predicted and the present model proved to be superior to models previously published. Accordingly, the model developed in this study provides excellent predictions and can be used to predict the acute oral toxicity of pesticides, particularly for those that have not been tested as well as new pesticides.

  8. Toxicological assessment of enzyme-treated asparagus extract in rat acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies and genotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomoko; Sato, Atsuya; Goto, Kazunori; Miura, Takehito; Wakame, Koji; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Maeda, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    The safety of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) developed as a novel anti-stress functional material was assessed in acute and subchronic studies and genotoxicity assays. In the acute oral dose toxicity study, all rats survived during the test period and ETAS did not influence clinical appearance, body weight gain and necropsy findings at a dosage of 2000mg/kg body weight. Thus, the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ETAS was determined to be greater than 2000mg/kg. The 90-day subchronic study (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg body weight, delivered by gavage) in rats reported no significant adverse effects in food consumption, body weight, mortality, urinalysis, hematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. In the micronucleus test of mice, the incidence of micronuclei in ETAS-administered groups (500, 1000 and 2000mg/kg/day, injected twice) was equivalent to that of the negative control group, while the positive control group receiving mitomycin C showed a high incidence. The potential of ETAS to induce gene mutation was tested using four Salmonella typhimurium strains and Escherichia coli WP2uvrA. The test sample was not mutagenic to the test strains. These results support the safety of ETAS as food and dietary supplement.

  9. Acute and Subchronic Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Aqueous Root Extract of Dicoma anomala Sond. in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Fatai Oladunni; Tom Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the safety of aqueous root extract of Dicoma anomala (AQRED) through acute and subchronic toxicity studies. Single oral dose of AQRED at the concentration of 0, 5, 300, and 2000 mg/kg as well as 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg/day was administered to rats for 14-day acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies. The results revealed no mortalities or observed clinical signs of toxicity in all the rats during both investigation periods. In subchronic toxicity testing, administration of AQRED also did not cause any changes in body weight as well as food and water consumption patterns. The haematological parameters and blood chemistry revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the treatment and the control except in platelet count, alkaline phosphatase, and sodium levels where there was a significant increase (p < 0.05), although there was also a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and creatinine when compared to control. However, these changes were not reflecting the results from histology. Conclusively, the obtained results suggested that the LD50 of AQRED is in excess of 2000 mg/kg and its oral administration for 90 days revealed that it is unlikely to be toxic, hence, safe. PMID:27200099

  10. Acute and subchronic toxicological evaluation of the semipurified extract of seeds of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) in rodents.

    PubMed

    Antonelli-Ushirobira, T M; Kaneshima, E N; Gabriel, M; Audi, E A; Marques, L C; Mello, J C P

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated the toxicity of a semipurified extract (EPA fraction, containing caffeine and several flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins) of seeds of the native Amazon plant Paullinia cupana (guaraná) in rodents. Acute toxicity was tested in male Swiss mice, which received different doses orally (OR) and intraperitoneally (ip); control groups received water. These tests produced acute mortality, with LD(50) of 1.825 g/kg (OR) and 0.827 g/kg (ip), and a significant weight decrease in lungs of mice receiving a dose of 0.1g/kg. In the repeated-dose toxicity test, the EPA was administered OR daily to male and female Wistar rats at doses of 30, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day/90 days. Their behavior, mortality, weight changes, laboratory tests, and the weights and histopathology of organs were evaluated. No rats died during the tests. Males dosed at 150 or 300 mg/kg gained weight more slowly and lost kidney weight (absolute and relative weights, compared to the control group). Hematological and biochemical tests showed few changes, differing somewhat between males and females; the histopathological evaluation indicated no significant changes. These results indicate that the EPA fraction of guaraná caused no toxicity in rats at the smallest dose evaluated (30 mg/kg). No other species was evaluated.

  11. Bone marrow-derived cells participate in stromal remodeling of the lung following acute bacterial pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Serikov, Vladimir B; Mikhaylov, Viatcheslav M; Krasnodembskay, Anna D; Matthay, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been shown to graft injured tissues, differentiate in specialized cells, and participate in repair. The importance of these processes in acute lung bacterial inflammation and development of fibrosis is unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the temporal sequence and lineage commitment of BMDC in mouse lungs injured by bacterial pneumonia. We transplanted GFP-tagged BMDC into 5-Gy-irradiated C57BL/6 mice. After 3 months of recovery, mice were subjected to LD(50) intratracheal instillation of live E. coli (controls received saline) which produced pneumonia and subsequent areas of fibrosis. Lungs were investigated by immunohistology for up to 6 months. At the peak of lung inflammation, the predominant influx of BMDC were GFP(+) leukocytes. Postinflammatory foci of lung fibrosis were evident after 1-2 months. The fibrotic foci in lung stroma contained clusters of GFP(+) CD45(+) cells, GFP(+) vimentin-positive cells, and GFP(+) collagen I-positive fibroblasts. GFP(+) endothelial or epithelial cells were not identified. These data suggest that following 5-Gy irradiation and acute bacterial pneumonia, BMDC may temporarily participate in lung postinflammatory repair and stromal remodeling without long-term engraftment as specialized endothelial or epithelial cells.

  12. Summary of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) workshop on carcinogenesis bioassay via the dermal route. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-29

    Traditionally, the oral route has been the most common route of administration in bioassays which tested the potential carcinogenicity of chemicals. Regulatory agencies, however, prefer to have test chemicals applied by the same route as expected human exposure, whenever possible. Since human exposure to industrial chemicals is frequently via the dermal route, this has become a route of choice for animal testing of certain chemicals. However, protocol design for dermal bioassays presents many unique problems which must be addressed before guidelines for bioassays by the dermal route can be formulated. Furthermore, it may be feasible to develop a limited dermal protocol to screen certain classes of chemicals such as acrylates/methacrylates. Recognizing the need for this workshop, it was designed in two distinct parts; to address the problems inherent in the development of a generic protocol for dermal bioassays and, a specific limited dermal bioassay protocol for acrylates/methacrylates.

  13. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of Euphorbia hirta L. Methanol Extract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuet Ping, Kwan; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Sreeramanan, Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Despite Euphorbia hirta L. ethnomedicinal benefits, very few studies have described the potential toxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo toxicity of methanolic extracts of E. hirta. The acute and subchronic oral toxicity of E. hirta was evaluated in Sprague Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the LD 50 of this plant was estimated to be more than 5000 mg/kg. In the repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study, the administration of 50 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg/day of E. hirta extract per body weight revealed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in food and water consumptions, body weight change, haematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and gross findings compared to the control group. Macropathology and histopathology examinations of all organs including the liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Analyses of these results with the information of signs, behaviour, and health monitoring could lead to the conclusion that the long-term oral administration of E. hirta extract for 90 days does not cause sub-chronic toxicity. PMID:24386634

  14. Assessment of Antioxidant Potential and Acute Toxicity Studies of Whole Plant Extract of Pergularia Daemia (Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Vaithiyanathan, Veluchamy; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pergularia daemia (Asclepiadacea) is a fetid- smelling perennial herb growing well along the river bang and road sides of India. Naturally the plant has powerful antioxidants including polyphenols, flavanoids, steroids and terpenoids. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential and to determine the median lethal dose (LD50) of crude ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Pergularia daemia. The plant Pergularia daemia possess effective scavenging activity against 2, 2' azino bis (3 ethylbenzothiazoline 6 sulfonic acid (ABTS), nitric oxide and reducing power radicals at different concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 & 500 µg/mL) of both extracts. Results: From the above in vitro assay we have exposed that the methanolic extract exert higher antioxidant activity at 400 µg/mL than ethyl acetate extract. Acute toxicity study revealed that the extracts showed no signs of toxicity upto a dose level of 2500 mg/kg b.wt. Conclusion: Thus our findings provide that both extracts of Pergularia daemia possess a strong antioxidant capacity and are relatively has high margin of safety. PMID:26862261

  15. Clinical & pathological features of acute toxicity due to Cassia occidentalis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, V M; John, T J; Kumar, Amod

    2009-07-01

    Cassia occidentalis is an annual shrub found in many countries including India. Although bovines and ovines do not eat it, parts of the plant are used in some traditional herbal medicines. Several animal studies have documented that fresh or dried beans are toxic. Ingestion of large amounts by grazing animals has caused serious illness and death. The toxic effects in large animals, rodents and chicken are on skeletal muscles, liver, kidney and heart. The predominant systems involved depend upon the animal species and the dose of the beans consumed. Brain functions are often affected. Gross lesions at necropsy consist of necrosis of skeletal muscle fibres and hepatic centrilobular necrosis; renal tubular necrosis is less frequent. Muscle and liver cell necrosis is reflected in biochemical abnormalities. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) is 1 g/kg for mice and rats. Toxicity is attributed to various anthraquinones and their derivatives and alkaloids, but the specific toxins have not been identified. Data on human toxicity are extremely scarce. This review summarizes information available on Cassia toxicity in animals and compares it with toxic features reported in children. The clinical spectrum and histopathology of C. occidentalis poisoning in children resemble those of animal toxicity, affecting mainly hepatic, skeletal muscle and brain tissues. The case-fatality rate in acute severe poisoning is 75-80 per cent in children. PMID:19700797

  16. [Acute diazepam poisoning in experimental animals and the effect of centrophenoxine on it].

    PubMed

    Mirchev, N

    1976-01-01

    The author carried out studies on 20 white rats (weight of 150 gm) and 40 white mice (weight of 20 gm), equal number of both sexes administering oraly respective doses of diazepam in a dose of 650 mg/body weight and 620 mg/body weight, having in mind the LD50 determined by him (730 mg/body weight for rats and 535 mg/body weight for mice). In this way he induced acute intoxication especially gravely manifested in mice. After two hours, when the rats were in a comatous state, he introduced oraly centrophenoxine in a dose of 50 mg/body weight in half of the animals, but the other animals remained as controls. Mice succumed to coma after two and a half hours. In half of them he administered oraly centrophenoxine in a boose of 50 mg/body weight, which dose was repeated after two hours, but the remaining animals remained as controls. All rats, treated with centrophenoxine, remained alive and recovered quickly from the intoxication while four of the control animals died, but in the remaining alive animals the recovery was very slow. Only four of the mice treated with centrophenoxine died, but in the remaining alive mice the signs of intoxication disappeared quickly. Twelve of the control animals died, but the remaining animals recovered very quickly. The obtained results corresponded to the favourable effect of centophenoxine, observed by us, in treatment of persons, intoxicated by diazepam.

  17. Acute Toxicity Study of Zerumbone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier on BALB/c Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Rasedee, Abdullah; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Namvar, Farideh; Abdul Samad, Nozlena; Andas, Reena Joys; Ng, Kuan Beng; How, Chee Wun

    2014-01-01

    Zerumbone- (ZER-) loaded nanostructure lipid carrier (NLC) (ZER-NLC) prepared for its antileukemia effect in vitro was evaluated for its toxicological effects by observing changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow stem cells. The acute toxicity study for ZER-NLC was conducted by orally treating BALB/c mice with a single dose with either water, olive oil, ZER, NLC, or ZER-NLC for 14 days. The animals were observed for clinical and behavioral abnormalities, toxicological symptoms, feed consumption, and gross appearance. The liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and brain tissues were assessed histologically. Total haemogram was counted by hemocytometry and microhematocrit reader. Bone marrow examination in terms of cellular morphology was done by Wright staining with bone marrow smear. Furthermore, serum biochemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Grossly all treated mice, their investigated tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow were normal. At oral doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg ZER-NLC there was no sign of toxicity or mortality in BALB/c mice. This study suggests that the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ZER-NLC is higher than 200 mg/kg, thus, safe by oral administration. PMID:25276798

  18. Acute, mutagenicity, teratogenicity and subchronic oral toxicity studies of diaveridine in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Sun, Feifei; Tang, Shusheng; Zhang, Suxia; Cao, Xingyuan

    2015-09-01

    Diaveridine (DVD) is a member of the 2,4-pyrimidinediamine class of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. It is used in combination with sulfaquinoxaline as an antiprotozoal agent in animals for the prophylaxis and treatment of coccidiosis and leucocytozoonosis. Herein, we report a complete toxicological safety assessment of DVD for clinical use. The study of toxicity, genetic toxicity (mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, mice sperm abnormality test and in vivo chromosome aberration test of mammalian bone marrow), 90-day sub-chronic toxicity and teratogenicity test were performed. In the acute oral toxicity tests, median lethal dose, LD50, was more than 2378mg/kg body weight in Sprague Dawley rats (1025mg/kg body weight in ICR mice). The testing results for three terms of mutagenicity toxicity (mouse chromosome aberration, erythrocyte micronucleus and sperm abnormality) were all negative at 128-512mg/kg body weight. For 90-day feeding of DVD at the dosage of 10mg/kg body weight in both male and female SD rats, no signs of toxicological effects were detected. Meanwhile, for teratogenicity test in female SD rats at the dosage of 37mg/kg body weight, there were no toxicological signs observed. Thus, our results suggested that the DVD is safe when administered orally in rats at 10mg/kg body weight per day. PMID:26397222

  19. Antidiarrheal activity and acute oral toxicity of Mentha longifolia L. essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Maham, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Mentha longifolia L. (Lamiaceae) is an annual herb that is used in the Iranian traditional medicine for treating stomach and intestinal disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effect of M. longifolia on experimental diarrhea in a rat model. Materials and Methods: The antidiarrheal activity of essential oil of M. longifolia (20-80 mg/kg) was investigated against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats using loperamide as the standard reference drug. In acute toxicity evaluation, rats were orally administrated with single dose of EOML at doses ranging from 10 to 1000 mg/kg. Results: EOML caused a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease of gastrointestinal transit, nevertheless, it could not block the inhibitory effect of atropine (0.1 mg/kg). EOML at oral doses of 20 and 80 mg/kg protected the animals against castor oil-induced diarrhea significantly (p<0.05). EOML decreased the intestinal fluid accumulation as indicated by the significantly (p<0.05 to p<0.001) decrease compared to control. The oral LD50 of EOML was found to be 470 mg/kg in rat. Conclusion: Since the inhibition of intestinal hyperactivity and hypersecretory are the bases of the treatment of diarrhea, results obtained in the present study suggest that EOML is endowed with antidiarrheal activity. EOML is moderately toxic for oral medication. PMID:25949954

  20. Citrus peel extract attenuates acute cyanide poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The primary aimed of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of methanolic extract of citrus peel (MECP) on acute cyanide (KCN) poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats. The intraperitoneal LD50 value of KCN (6.3 mg/Kg bwt), based on 24 hrs mortality, was significantly increased by 9, 52 or 113% by oral administration of MECP (500 mg/Kg bwt) pre-administered for 1, 2 and 3 days, respectively, in rats in a time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of the sublethal dose of KCN (3 mg/Kg bwt) into rats increased, 24 hrs later, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), glutamate levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. KCN also decreased brain glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in these animals. Pre-treatment of rats with MECP inhibited KCN-induced increases in LPO, NO, and glutamate levels and AChE activity as well as decreases in brain GSH level and SOD and CAT activities. In addition, KCN significantly decreased norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin levels in different brain regions which were resolved by MECP. From the present results, it can be concluded that the neuroprotective effects of MECP against KCN-induced seizures and oxidative stress may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress overproduction and maintenance of antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  1. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general.

  2. Significant correlations of dermal total carotenoids and dermal lycopene with their respective plasma levels in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Scarmo, Stephanie; Cartmel, Brenda; Lin, Haiqun; Leffell, David J.; Welch, Erin; Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S.; Mayne, Susan T.

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids in skin have been known to play a role in photoprotection against UV radiation. We performed dermal biopsies of healthy humans (N=27) and collected blood samples for pair-wise correlation analyses of total and individual carotenoid content by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The hydrocarbon carotenoids (lycopene and beta-carotene) made up the majority of carotenoids in both skin and plasma, and skin was somewhat enriched in these carotenoids relative to plasma. Beta-cryptoxanthin, a monohydroxycarotenoid, was found in similar proportions in skin as in plasma. In contrast, the dihydroxycarotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, were relatively lacking in human skin in absolute and relative levels as compared to plasma. Total carotenoids were significantly correlated in skin and plasma (r = 0.53, p<0.01). Our findings suggest that human skin is relatively enriched in lycopene and beta-carotene, compared to lutein and zeaxanthin, possibly reflecting a specific function of hydrocarbon carotenoids in human skin photoprotection. PMID:20637178

  3. Dermal penetration of [14C]captan in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fisher, H L; Hall, L L; Sumler, M R; Shah, P V

    1992-07-01

    Age dependence in dermal absorption has been a major concern in risk assessment. Captan, a chloroalkyl thio heterocyclic fungicide, was selected for study of age dependence as representative of this class of pesticides. Dermal penetration of [14C]captan applied at 0.286 mumol/cm2 was determined in young (33-d-old) and adult (82-d-old) female Fischer 344 rats in vivo and by two in vitro methods. Dermal penetration in vivo at 72 h was about 9% of the recovered dose in both young and adult rats. The percentage penetration was found to increase as dosage (0.1, 0.5, 2.7 mumol/cm2) decreased. Two in vitro methods gave variable dermal penetration values compared with in vivo results. A static system yielded twofold higher dermal penetration values compared with in vivo results for both young and adult rats. A flow system yielded higher dermal penetration values in young rats and lower penetration values in adults compared with in vivo results. Concentration in body, kidney, and liver was less in young than in adult rats given the same absorbed dosage. A physiological pharmacokinetic model was developed having a dual compartment for the treated skin and appeared to describe dermal absorption and disposition well. From this model, tissue/blood ratios of captan-derived radioactivity for organs were found to range from 0.35 to 3.4, indicating no large uptake or binding preferences by any organ. This preliminary pharmacokinetic model summarizes the experimental findings and could provide impetus for more complex and realistic models.

  4. Development and application of quantitative methods for monitoring dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Flack, Sheila; Goktepe, Ipek; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative methods to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to the fungicide propiconazole were developed in the laboratory and applied in the occupational exposure setting for monitoring five farm workers' exposure during pesticide preparation and application to peach crops. Dermal exposure was measured with tape-strips applied to the skin, and the amount of propiconazole was normalized to keratin content in the tape-strip. Inhalation exposure was measured with an OVS tube placed in the worker's breathing-zone during pesticide handling. Samples were analyzed by GC-MS in EI+ mode (limit of detection 6 pg microl(-1)). Dermal exposure ranged from non-detectable to 32.1 +/- 22.6 ng per microg keratin while breathing-zone concentrations varied from 0.2 to 2.2 microg m(-3). A positive correlation was observed between breathing-zone concentrations and ambient air temperature (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.01). Breathing-zone concentrations did not correlate with dermal exposure levels (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.52). Propiconazole levels were below limit of detection when rubber gloves, coveralls, and full-face mask were used. The total-body propiconazole dose, determined for each worker by summing the estimated dermal dose and inhalation dose, ranged from 0.01 to 12 microg per kg body weight per day. Our results show that tape-stripping of the skin and the OVS can be effectively utilized to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole, respectively, and that the dermal route of exposure contributed substantially more to the total dose than the inhalation route.

  5. A Prospective Study Assessing Complication Rates and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Breast Reconstructions Using a Novel, Deep Dermal Human Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael M.; De Oliveira, Gildasio S.; Mayer, Kristen E.; Blough, Jordan T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The value proposition of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) taken from the deep dermis is that the allograft may be more porous, allowing for enhanced integration and revascularization. In turn, this characteristic may attenuate complications related to foreign body reactions, seromas, and infection. However, this is juxtaposed against the potential loss of allograft structural integrity, with subsequent risk of malposition and extrusion. Despite the active use of novel, deep dermal ADMs, the clinical outcomes of this new technology has not been well studied. Methods: This is a prospective study to evaluate surgical and patient-reported outcomes using a deep dermal ADM, FlexHD Pliable. Surgical outcomes and BREAST-Q patient-reported outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at 2- and 6-month time points. Results: Seventy-two breasts (41 patients) underwent reconstruction. Complication rate was 12.5%, including 2 hematomas and 7 flap necroses. One case of flap necrosis led to reconstructive failure. Notably, there were no cases of infection, seroma, or implant extrusion or malposition. Average BREAST-Q scores were satisfaction with outcome (70.13 ± 23.87), satisfaction with breasts (58.53 ± 20.00), psychosocial well being (67.97 ± 20.93), sexual well being (54.11 ± 27.72), and physical well being (70.45 ± 15.44). Two-month postoperative BREAST-Q scores decreased compared with baseline and returned to baseline by 6 months. Postoperative radiation therapy had a negative effect on satisfaction with breasts (P = 0.004) and sexual well being (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Deep dermal ADM is a novel modification of traditional allograft technology. Use of the deep dermal ADM yielded acceptably low complication rates and satisfactory patient-reported outcomes. PMID:26894010

  6. The immunology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL).

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Eduard E

    2016-01-01

    Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a common complication of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. Because of its possible role in transmission it is considered a public health problem in VL endemic areas. The clinical features include a skin rash consisting of macules, papules or nodules in an otherwise healthy individual; this presentation is determined by the immune response towards parasites in the skin that probably persisted from the previous VL episode. The immune response in VL, cured VL and PKDL is the result of changes in the cytokine profile that only in part can be captured under the Th1 and Th2 dichotomy. Regulatory T cells and Th 17 cells also play a role. VL is characterized by an absent immune response to Leishmania with a predominantly Th2 type of response with high levels of IL-10; after successful treatment the patient will be immune with in vitro features of a Th1 type of response and in vivo a positive leishmanin skin test. PKDL takes an intermediate position with a dissociation of the immune response between the skin and the viscera, with a Th2 and Th1 type of response, respectively. It is likely that immune responses determine the different epidemiological and clinical characteristics of PKDL in Asia and Africa; various risk factors for PKDL may influence this, such as incomplete and inadequate treatment of VL, parasite resistance and genetic factors. It should be noted that PKDL is a heterogeneous and dynamic condition and patients differ with regard to time of onset after visceral leishmaniasis (VL), chronicity, extent and appearance of the rash including related immune responses, all of which may vary over time. Better understanding of these immune responses may offer opportunities for manipulation including combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy for VL to prevent PKDL from occurring and similarly in the treatment of chronic or treatment resistant PKDL cases. PMID:27553063

  7. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    PubMed

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  8. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    PubMed

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  9. [Pediatric Patient with anaerobic Bacterial Meningitis Who was Infected through a Spinal Congenital Dermal Sinus Route].

    PubMed

    Okui, Hideyuki; Fukasawa, Chie; Tokutake, Shoko; Takei, Haruka; Sato, Junichi; Hoshino, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a pediatric patient in whom a spinal congenital dermal sinus was detected after the onset of anaerobic bacterial meningitis. The patient was a 4-month-old boy. He had a recurrent fever for 2 weeks before admission. On admission, he presented with a convulsive status and a bulging anterior fontanel. The previously consulted physician had made a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Spinal fluid cultures tested positive for Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a spinal subdural abscess and cranial subdural hydrops; therefore, the patient was transported to our hospital for surgical treatment. A sacral dimple was noted on his lower back, and an MRI showed a spinal congenital dermal sinus. Antimicrobial therapy, cranial subdural aspiration, dermal sinus excision, and drainage were performed. He was discharged on the 60th hospital day. When pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. or anaerobic bacteria invade through a dermal sinus, it can result in meningitis. Involvement of a dermal sinus should be suspected when meningitis is caused by these pathogens or when recurrent meningitis occurs. PMID:27529968

  10. Urinary excretion of tetrahydrophtalimide in fruit growers with dermal exposure to captan.

    PubMed

    de Cock, J; Heederik, D; Hoek, F; Boleij, J; Kromhout, H

    1995-08-01

    The relation between dermal and respiratory exposure and uptake into the body of captan, measured as 24 hr cumulative tetrahydrophtalimide (THPI) dose, was studied among 14 male fruit growers applying pesticides in orchards in the Netherlands. No contribution of respiratory exposure was observed on THPI in the urine. Dermal exposure, measured with skin pads, showed a clear relation with THPI in urine when exposure was estimated from exposure on skin pads of ankles and neck. No relation was found for total dermal exposure, calculated from measured exposure on skin pads of representative skin areas according to models described in the literature. Determinants of exposure such as use of a cabin on the tractor, use of gloves during mixing and loading, and use of rubber boots also explained THPI in urine very well. This finding corroborated the findings on measured dermal exposure. Results indicate that more attention should be paid to skin areas which are suspected to be most permeable for a chemical under study. It was concluded that dermal exposure data can be linked better to biological monitoring based on empirical findings as gathered in a pilot study on exposure of specific body areas than on estimations of total skin dose.

  11. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  12. The fate of dermally applied [14C]d-limonene in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Ritacco, Gretchen; Hawkins, David R

    2013-01-01

    The fate of dermally applied [(14)C]d-limonene was evaluated in humans and Long-Evans rats. In rats, 5 mg/kg body weight of [(14)C]d-limonene applied dermally to the shaved back under occlusion, resulted in the absorption of approximately 12% of the dose. The absorbed d-limonene was completely metabolized and excreted rapidly, primarily from the urine (80%) with a small fraction (20%) excreted in the feces. There was no long-term retention of the test material in body tissues. In humans, following dermal application of 12 mg of [(14)C]d-limonene in ethanol (1 mL) to the back under nonocclusive conditions (for 1 h after application to allow the material to dry, thereafter under occlusion), only 0.16% of the dose was absorbed and the radioactivity was recovered from the urine. Radioactivity in human feces was below the limit of detection. These results indicate that under conditions of simulated use of fragrances and cosmetics, d-limonene has a low potential for dermal absorption and tissue accumulation, and the d-limonene that is absorbed is rapidly excreted in the urine. Based upon these findings and the knowledge that d-limonene possesses a low-systemic toxicity profile, it is reasonable to conclude that dermal exposure to d-limonene from fragrance and cosmetic applications is highly unlikely to result in any clinically significant human toxicity.

  13. A new technique to assess dermal absorption of volatile chemicals in vitro by thermal gravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rauma, Matias; Isaksson, Tina S; Johanson, Gunnar

    2006-10-01

    Potential health hazards of dermal exposure, variability in reported dermal absorption rates and potential losses from the skin by evaporation indicate a need for a simple, inexpensive and standardized procedure to measure dermal absorption and desorption of chemical substances. The aim of this study was to explore the possibility to measure dermal absorption and desorption of volatile chemicals using a new gravimetric technique, namely thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and trypsinated stratum corneum from pig. Changes in skin weight were readily detected before, during and after exposure to vapours of water, 2-propanol, methanol and toluene. The shape and height of the weight curves differed between the four chemicals, reflecting differences in diffusivity and partial pressure and skin:air partitioning, respectively. As the skin weight is highly sensitive to the partial pressure of volatile chemicals, including water, this technique requires carefully controlled conditions with respect to air flow, temperature, chemical vapour generation and humidity. This new technique may help in the assessment of dermal uptake of volatile chemicals. Only a small piece of skin is needed and skin integrity is not necessary, facilitating the use of human samples. The high resolution weight-time curves obtained may also help to elucidate the characteristics of absorption, desorption and diffusion of chemicals in skin.

  14. Role of clothing in both accelerating and impeding dermal absorption of airborne SVOCs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Glenn C; Weschler, Charles J; Bekö, Gabriel; Koch, Holger M; Salthammer, Tunga; Schripp, Tobias; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of clothing on dermal uptake of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), we measured uptake of selected airborne phthalates for an individual wearing clean clothes or air-exposed clothes and compared these results with dermal uptake for bare-skinned individuals under otherwise identical experimental conditions. Using a breathing hood to isolate dermal from inhalation uptake, we measured urinary metabolites of diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) from an individual exposed to known concentrations of these compounds for 6 h in an experimental chamber. The individual wore either clean (fresh) cotton clothes or cotton clothes that had been exposed to the same chamber air concentrations for 9 days. For a 6-h exposure, the net amounts of DEP and DnBP absorbed when wearing fresh clothes were, respectively, 0.017 and 0.007 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)); for exposed clothes the results were 0.178 and 0.261 μg/kg/(μg/m(3)), respectively (values normalized by air concentration and body mass). When compared against the average results for bare-skinned participants, clean clothes were protective, whereas exposed clothes increased dermal uptake for DEP and DnBP by factors of 3.3 and 6.5, respectively. Even for non-occupational environments, wearing clothing that has adsorbed/absorbed indoor air pollutants can increase dermal uptake of SVOCs by substantial amounts relative to bare skin.

  15. A dermal model for spray painters. Part I: subjective exposure modelling of spray paint deposition.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, D H; Semple, S; Marquart, J; Cherrie, J W

    2001-01-01

    The discriminative power of existing dermal exposure models is limited. Most models only allow occupational hygienists to rank workers between and within workplaces according to broad bands of dermal exposure. No allowance is made for the work practices of different individuals. In this study a process-based, structured approach has been used to estimate dermal exposure from overspray generated by a spray painting process. Factors for spray technique, object shape and workers' individual work practices involved in the processes of droplet formation and deposition were incorporated into the model. The model was applied to predict dermal exposure of airless spray painters and the results were compared with exposure data. The predicted levels of exposure showed reasonable rank correlation with the measured exposure, although the model tended to over-predict the actual level of exposure. It was concluded that a structured, process-based approach has the potential to produce reliable estimates of dermal exposure. The reliability of exposure models of this type should be explored further and the relationship between the determinants of exposure should be validated by additional field studies. PMID:11137695

  16. The use of human sweat gland-derived stem cells for enhancing vascularization during dermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Danner, Sandra; Kremer, Mathias; Petschnik, Anna Emilia; Nagel, Sabine; Zhang, Ziyang; Hopfner, Ursula; Reckhenrich, Ann K; Weber, Caroline; Schenck, Thilo L; Becker, Tim; Kruse, Charli; Machens, Hans-Günther; Egaña, José T

    2012-06-01

    Vascularization is a key process in tissue engineering and regeneration and represents one of the most important issues in the field of regenerative medicine. Thus, several strategies to improve vascularization are currently under clinical evaluation. In this study, stem cells derived from human sweat glands were isolated, characterized, seeded in collagen scaffolds, and engrafted in a mouse full skin defect model for dermal regeneration. Results showed that these cells exhibit high proliferation rates and express stem cell and differentiation markers. Moreover, cells responded to angiogenic environments by increasing their migration (P<0.001) and proliferation (P<0.05) capacity and forming capillary-like structures. After seeding in the scaffolds, cells distributed homogeneously, interacting directly with the scaffold, and released bioactive molecules involved in angiogenesis, immune response, and tissue remodeling. In vivo, scaffolds containing cells were used to induce dermal regeneration. Here we have found that the presence of the cells significantly improved vascularization (P<0.001). As autologous sweat gland-derived stem cells are easy to obtain, exhibit a good proliferation capacity, and improve vascularization during dermal regeneration, we suggest that the combined use of sweat gland-derived stem cells and scaffolds for dermal regeneration might improve dermal regeneration in future clinical settings.

  17. Derivation of a No-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Kirman, C R; Hughes, B; Becker, R A; Hays, S M

    2016-04-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) has been found to produce liver and kidney tumors in mice following lifetime dermal exposures. Data regarding the mode of action by which DEA produces these tumors were used to support a dose-response assessment that resulted in a no-significant-risk-level (NSRL) for dermal exposures to DEA. DEA and its metabolites are structural analogs to endogenous agents important to choline homeostasis. Sufficient information is available to support an epigenetic MOA involving the perturbation of choline homeostasis and hepatic methylation reactions in the formation of mouse liver tumors. This MOA may also apply to mouse kidney tumors, but direct measurements for key events in kidney are lacking. For both tumor types, dose-response data were pooled across four cancer bioassays conducted for DEA and DEA-containing condensates in order to provide a more robust characterization of the dose-response relationships. Doses were expressed in terms of dermally absorbed dose so that the dose-dependency and species differences in the dermal absorption of DEA were addressed. The resulting NSRL value of 3400 ug/day for dermal exposures to DEA is considered to be protective of human health for both tumor endpoints.

  18. Safety and toxicological evaluation of a novel anti-obesity formulation LI85008F in animals.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraju, A V; Sundararaju, D; Srinivas, P; Rao, C V; Sengupta, K; Trimurtulu, G

    2010-02-01

    LI85008F is a novel synergistic composition of Moringa oleifera, Murraya koenigi, and Curcuma longa. These herbs are well recognized and widely used in ayurvedic system of medicine for treating a variety of diseases and are also have been used for culinary purposes for thousands of years. LI85008F inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and potentiates lipid breakdown in mature adipocytes. In diet-induced obese rats, LI85008F significantly reduced weight gain and improved serum adiponectin levels. These findings motivated the authors to determine the broad-spectrum safety of LI85008F. Acute oral toxicity, acute dermal toxicity, primary skin irritation, primary eye irritation, and dose-dependent 28-day sub-acute toxicity studies were conducted. The acute oral LD50 of LI85008F was greater than 5000 mg/kg in female SD rats and no changes in body weight or adverse effects were observed following necropsy. Acute dermal LD50 of LI85008F was greater than 2000 mg/kg. LI85008F was classified as non-irritating to skin in a primary dermal irritation study conducted using New Zealand Albino rabbits. LI85008F caused minimal irritation to eyes in a primary eye irritation test conducted on New Zealand Albino rabbits. A dose-dependent 28-day sub-acute toxicity study demonstrated no significant changes in selected organ weights. Evaluations on hematology, clinical chemistry, and histopathology did not show any significant adverse changes. The NOAEL of LI85008F was found to be greater than 2500 mg/kg body weight. These results demonstrate the broad spectrum safety of LI85008F in animal models. PMID:20158386

  19. Proposal for the assessment of quantitative dermal exposure limits in occupational environments: Part 1. Development of a concept to derive a quantitative dermal occupational exposure limit

    PubMed Central

    Bos, P. M.; Brouwer, D. H.; Stevenson, H.; Boogaard, P. J.; de Kort, W. L.; van Hemmen, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    Dermal uptake of chemicals at the workplace may contribute considerably to the total internal exposure and so needs to be regulated. At present only qualitative warning signs--the "skin notations"--are available as instruments. An attempt was made to develop a quantitative dermal occupational exposure limit (DOEL) complementary to respiratory occupational exposure limits (OELs). The DOEL refers to the total dose deposited on the skin during a working shift. Based on available data and experience a theoretical procedure for the assessment of a DOEL was developed. A DOEL was derived for cyclophosphamide and 4,4-methylene dianiline (MDA) according to this procedure. The DOEL for MDA was tested for applicability in an actual occupational exposure scenario. An integrated approach is recommended for situations in which both dermal and respiratory exposures contribute considerably to the internal exposure of the worker. The starting point should be an internal health based occupational exposure limit--that is, the maximum dose to be absorbed without leading to adverse systemic effects. The proposed assessment of an external DOEL is then either based on absorption rate or absorption percentage. The estimation of skin penetration seems to be of crucial importance in this concept. If for a specific substance a maximal absorption rate can be estimated a maximal skin surface area to be exposed can be assessed which may then serve the purpose of a DOEL. As long as the actual skin surface exposed is smaller than this maximal skin surface area the internal OEL will not be exceeded, and therefore, no systemic health problems would be expected, independent of the dermal dose/unit area. If not, the DOEL may be interpreted as the product of dermal dose/unit area (mg/cm2) and exposed skin surface area (cm2). The proposed concept for a DOEL is relevant and can be made applicable for health surveillance in the occupational situation where dermal exposure contributes notably to the

  20. Acute-toxicity evaluation of nitroaromatic compounds. Final report, 29 Sep 89-29 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    FitzGerald, G.B.; Austin, A.; DiGuilio, N.

    1991-03-01

    The nitroaromatics 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB), 1,2,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and N-methyl-n,2,4,6-tetranitroaniline (tetryl) have been detected as environmental contaminants of water and soil near production waste sites and at military test grounds. Acute toxicity evaluations were carried out with these compounds to develop environmental and health effects criteria. Dermal and eye irritation tests and acute dermal sensitization (Buehler) tests in guinea pigs were conducted according to EPA standard protocols. The sensitization tests showed that DNB and tetryl are not skin sensitizers while TNB caused a mild allergic reaction. None of these compounds produced skin irritation but positive (DNB) to severe (TNB, tetryl) eye irritation potentials were observed.

  1. Electrospun synthetic human elastin:collagen composite scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Wise, Steven G; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K M; Young, Cara J; Wang, Yiwei; Weiss, Anthony S

    2012-10-01

    We present an electrospun synthetic human elastin:collagen composite scaffold aimed at dermal tissue engineering. The panel of electrospun human tropoelastin and ovine type I collagen blends comprised 80% tropoelastin+20% collagen, 60% tropoelastin+40% collagen and 50% tropoelastin+50% collagen. Electrospinning efficiency decreased with increasing collagen content under the conditions used. Physical and mechanical characterization encompassed fiber morphology, porosity, pore size and modulus, which were prioritized to identify the optimal candidate for dermal tissue regeneration. Scaffolds containing 80% tropoelastin and 20% collagen (80T20C) were selected on this basis for further cell interaction and animal implantation studies. 80T20C enhanced proliferation and migration rates of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and were well tolerated in a mouse subcutaneous implantation study where they persisted over 6 weeks. The 80T20C scaffolds supported fibroblast infiltration, de novo collagen deposition and new capillary formation.

  2. Insights into reptile dermal contaminant exposure: Reptile skin permeability to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Talent, Larry G; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    There is growing interest in improving ecological risk assessment exposure estimation, specifically by incorporating dermal exposure. At the same time, there is a growing interest in amphibians and reptiles as receptors in ecological risk assessment, despite generally receiving less research than more traditional receptors. Previous research has suggested that dermal exposure may be more important than previously considered for reptiles. We measured reptile skin permeability to four pesticides (thiamethoxam, malathion, tebuthiuron, trifluralin) using ventral skin samples. All four pesticides penetrated the skin but generally had low permeability. There was no apparent relationship between physicochemical properties and permeability coefficients. Malathion had a significantly greater permeability rate at all time points compared to the other pesticides. Tebuthiuron had a greater permeability than thiamethoxam. Reptiles and mammals appear to have similar skin permeability suggesting that dermal exposure estimates for mammals may be representative of reptiles.

  3. Insights into reptile dermal contaminant exposure: Reptile skin permeability to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Talent, Larry G; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    There is growing interest in improving ecological risk assessment exposure estimation, specifically by incorporating dermal exposure. At the same time, there is a growing interest in amphibians and reptiles as receptors in ecological risk assessment, despite generally receiving less research than more traditional receptors. Previous research has suggested that dermal exposure may be more important than previously considered for reptiles. We measured reptile skin permeability to four pesticides (thiamethoxam, malathion, tebuthiuron, trifluralin) using ventral skin samples. All four pesticides penetrated the skin but generally had low permeability. There was no apparent relationship between physicochemical properties and permeability coefficients. Malathion had a significantly greater permeability rate at all time points compared to the other pesticides. Tebuthiuron had a greater permeability than thiamethoxam. Reptiles and mammals appear to have similar skin permeability suggesting that dermal exposure estimates for mammals may be representative of reptiles. PMID:27037770

  4. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  5. Measuring the strength of dermal fibroblast attachment to functionalized titanium alloys in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pendegrass, Catherine J; Middleton, Claire A; Gordon, David; Jacob, Josh; Blunn, Gordon W

    2010-03-01

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on soft tissue attachment to prevent infection which leads to implant failure. Fibronectin (Fn) has been shown to enhance dermal fibroblast attachment in vitro, however measurement of cell attachment strength has been indirect; using cell area and immunolocalization of focal adhesion components. In this study, we have developed a flow apparatus to assess the biophysical strength of cell attachment to biomaterials used in ITAP. We have demonstrated that dermal fibroblast attachment strength increases significantly up to 96 h and that data from direct and indirect methods of assessing cell attachment strength have a significant positive correlation. Additionally, we have used direct and indirect assessment methods to demonstrate that dermal fibroblast attachment strength is significantly greater on fibronectin-coated titanium alloy compared with uncoated controls at 1, 4, and 24 hours.

  6. Correction of tear trough deformity with novel porcine collagen dermal filler (Dermicol-P35).

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2009-01-01

    Deformity of the tear trough region, which can occur during the aging process, can result in dark shadows under the eyes and a fatigued appearance. Augmentation of the tear trough is challenging because of the thin skin and lack of fat in the region. Adding volume to the tear trough region with a dermal filler is a nonsurgical procedure with minimal discomfort to the patient. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence; Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ) is a new, ribose crosslinked, highly purified, porcine-based collagen filler that does not require prior skin testing and has shown improved persistence compared with bovine collagen-based dermal fillers. In this article, we present the clinical outcomes of patients who have received treatment with a novel ribose crosslinked porcine collagen dermal filler for the correction of tear trough deformity.

  7. Breakthroughs in US dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2009-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, developments in injectable dermal fillers have led to a revolution in facial soft-tissue augmentation. The demand for dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation procedures has increased due in part to the less invasive nature of these products compared with surgical procedures. Available options in the United States have expanded from autologous tissues and animal-derived collagens to bacterially fermented biopolymers and synthetic implants. Beyond their physical composition, currently available products are further differentiated by their recommended depth of injection, suitability for different facial areas, and duration of aesthetic improvement. While older dermal fillers rely on the integrity of the injected material to achieve their clinical effects, some newer products are postulated to act by stimulating the patient's own biological and cellular processes. This article examines breakthroughs in facial soft-tissue augmentation that have expanded the palette of options available to physicians.

  8. Seizure caused by dermal application of over-the-counter eucalyptus oil head lice preparation.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Neil

    2011-10-01

    Natural plant oils such as eucalyptus are common worldwide in non-prescription natural health products. Oral ingestion of eucalyptus oil is well known to produce neurological symptoms and seizures; however, its dermal use is presumed to be safe. We describe a brief, self-limited, tonic-clonic seizure in a healthy 4-year-old girl following dermal exposure to eucalyptus oil as directed for treatment of head lice. Initial symptoms were vomiting, lethargy, and ataxia followed by a grand mal seizure. Recovery occurred rapidly after the skin was washed. Health care providers should be aware that eucalyptus oil toxicity may occur with dermal exposure and should report additional cases. PMID:21867365

  9. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process.

  10. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  11. Surgical management of a dermal lymphatic malformation of the lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lisa F; Chen, Constance M; Zurada, Joanna M; Walther, Robert; Grant, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Dermal lymphatic malformations are rare congenital hamartomas of superficial lymphatics characterized by high recurrence rates after excision. The standard therapy for a single lesion is surgical excision with wide margins, which reduces recurrence but can have a potentially unacceptable aesthetic outcome. A case of a 24-year-old woman with a 6 cm × 5 cm dermal lymphatic malformation on her right thigh, diagnosed by clinical history, physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings, is reported. The patient underwent wide local excision with split-thickness skin grafting. After pathological examination revealed negative margins, the patient underwent tissue expander placement and excision of the skin graft with primary closure. The lesion did not recur, and the patient achieved a satisfactory aesthetic result. The present case represents the first report of the use of tissue expanders to treat dermal lymphatic malformations in the lower extremity and demonstrates a safe, staged approach to successful treatment. PMID:19949506

  12. “A two-component pre-seeded dermal-epidermal scaffold”

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, I.P.; Gabriel, D.; Timko, B.P.; Hashimoto, M.; Karajanagi, S.; Tong, R.; Marques, A.P.; Reis, R.L.; Kohane, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a bilayered dermal-epidermal scaffold for application in the treatment of full thickness skin defects. The dermal component gels in situ and adapts to the lesion shape, delivering human dermal fibroblasts in a matrix of fibrin and cross-linked hyaluronic acid modified with a cell adhesion-promoting peptide. Fibroblasts were able to form a tridimensional matrix due to material features such as tailored mechanical properties, presence of protease degradable elements and cell binding ligands. The epidermal component is a robust membrane containing cross-linked hyaluronic acid and poly-L-lysine, on which keratinocytes were able to attach and to form a monolayer. Amine-aldehyde bonding at the interface between the two components allows the formation of a tightly bound composite scaffold. Both parts of the scaffold were designed to provide cell type specific cues to allow for cell proliferation and form a construct that mimics the skin environment. PMID:25192821

  13. Systemic toxicity of coal liquefaction products: results of a 14-day dermal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Yagminas, A.; De Vries, P.A.; Villeneuve, D.C.

    1988-03-01

    Increasing energy demands, coupled with rising prices and an unstable world oil market have stimulated international interest in developing alternative sources of fuel. Direct coal liquefaction processes (CLP) hold great potential for Canada because of its large coal reserves. The conversion of coal to liquefied fuels results in many fractions of differing hydrocarbon content and includes many toxic substances such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Since the major route of occupational exposure would be via the dermal route and since studies of systemic toxicity following dermal exposure are lacking, preliminary studies were conducted on the toxicity of SRC-II process coal liquefaction products applied dermally to the rat. Samples of the light (L), intermediate (I), and heavy, (H) fractions produced during the SRC-II coal liquefaction process, were kindly provided by the Sandwell Beak Research Group (Mississauga, Ontario, Canada). Diesel Fuel (D) was purchased from an Esso Gasoline Station. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 +/- 25 grams were used.

  14. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  15. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  16. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four‐layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel‐fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel‐fibred bone, showing osteon‐like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we

  17. Histology of the heterostracan dermal skeleton: Insight into the origin of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joseph N; Marquart, Chloe L; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2015-06-01

    Living vertebrates are divided into those that possess a fully formed and fully mineralised skeleton (gnathostomes) versus those that possess only unmineralised cartilaginous rudiments (cyclostomes). As such, extinct phylogenetic intermediates of these living lineages afford unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the vertebrate mineralised skeleton and its canonical tissue types. Extinct jawless and jawed fishes assigned to the gnathostome stem evidence the piecemeal assembly of skeletal systems, revealing that the dermal skeleton is the earliest manifestation of a homologous mineralised skeleton. Yet the nature of the primitive dermal skeleton, itself, is poorly understood. This is principally because previous histological studies of early vertebrates lacked a phylogenetic framework required to derive evolutionary hypotheses. Nowhere is this more apparent than within Heterostraci, a diverse clade of primitive jawless vertebrates. To this end, we surveyed the dermal skeletal histology of heterostracans, inferred the plesiomorphic heterostracan skeleton and, through histological comparison to other skeletonising vertebrate clades, deduced the ancestral nature of the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Heterostracans primitively possess a four-layered skeleton, comprising a superficial layer of odontodes composed of dentine and enameloid; a compact layer of acellular parallel-fibred bone containing a network of vascular canals that supply the pulp canals (L1); a trabecular layer consisting of intersecting radial walls composed of acellular parallel-fibred bone, showing osteon-like development (L2); and a basal layer of isopedin (L3). A three layered skeleton, equivalent to the superficial layer L2 and L3 and composed of enameloid, dentine and acellular bone, is possessed by the ancestor of heterostracans + jawed vertebrates. We conclude that an osteogenic component is plesiomorphic with respect to the vertebrate dermal skeleton. Consequently, we interpret the

  18. Cell therapy for full-thickness wounds: are fetal dermal cells a potential source?

    PubMed

    Akershoek, J J; Vlig, M; Talhout, W; Boekema, B K H L; Richters, C D; Beelen, R H J; Brouwer, K M; Middelkoop, E; Ulrich, M M W

    2016-04-01

    The application of autologous dermal fibroblasts has been shown to improve burn wound healing. However, a major hurdle is the availability of sufficient healthy skin as a cell source. We investigated fetal dermal cells as an alternative source for cell-based therapy for skin regeneration. Human (hFF), porcine fetal (pFF) or autologous dermal fibroblasts (AF) were seeded in a collagen-elastin substitute (Novomaix, NVM), which was applied in combination with an autologous split thickness skin graft (STSG) to evaluate the effects of these cells on wound healing in a porcine excisional wound model. Transplantation of wounds with NVM+hFF showed an increased influx of inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages, CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes) compared to STSG, acellular NVM (Acell-NVM) and NVM+AF at post-surgery days 7 and/or 14. Wounds treated with NVM+pFF presented only an increase in CD8(+) lymphocyte influx. Furthermore, reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) expression in wound areas and reduced contraction of the wounds was observed with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM. Xenogeneic transplantation of NVM+hFF increased αSMA expression in wounds compared to NVM+AF. An improved scar quality was observed for wounds treated with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM, NVM+hFF and NVM+pFF at day 56. In conclusion, application of autologous fibroblasts improved the overall outcome of wound healing in comparison to fetal dermal cells and Acell-NVM, whereas application of fetal dermal fibroblasts in NVM did not improve wound healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine model. Although human fetal dermal cells demonstrated an increased immune response, this did not seem to affect scar quality.

  19. In vitro dermal absorption of flame retardant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, M F; Edwards, B C; Mitchell, C T; Bhooshan, B

    2001-12-01

    Flame retardant chemicals may be used in furniture fabric in the future to reduce the flammability of the fabric. As a part of the process to evaluate the potential for exposure to these chemicals, this study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals. The chemicals were [14C]decabromodiphenyl oxide (DBDPO) and [14C]tris-(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCP). Skin from the adult hairless female mouse (SKH1) was removed and mounted in flow-through diffusion cells. The chemicals, at three dose levels (DBDPO: 6, 30 and 60 nmol; TDCP: 20, 100 and 200 pmol), were applied in a volatile vehicle (tetrahydrofuran for DBDPO; acetone for TDCP) to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid, pumped below the skin, were collected over a 24-h period. The skin was washed with solvent (tetrahydrofuran for DBDPO; ethanol for TDCP) to remove unabsorbed chemical 24 h after application. The receptor fluid, skin wash and skin were analyzed for chemical-derived radioactivity. The skin from the high-dose group of both chemicals, and the receptor fluid from TDCP high-dose samples, were analyzed for parent compound and metabolites by HPLC. The 24-h cumulative percent of the dose of DBDPO in the receptor fluid was very low (0.07-0.34%). The applied dose of DBDPO detected in the skin ranged from 2 to 20%. The lowest dose of DBDPO had the highest percentage of the dose (20%) in the skin. The major portion of the applied dose was removed by washing the skin 24 h after application of DBDPO, and ranged from 77 to 92%. HPLC analysis of homogenate extract prepared from the high-dose of DBDPO-treated skin showed the presence of DBDPO and a minor unknown peak. TDCP was readily detected in the receptor fluid; 39-57% of the applied dose of TDCP was in the receptor fluid by 24 h. The solvent wash removed 11-25% of the dose from the skin and 28-35% remained in it. HPLC analysis of the skin homogenate extract and receptor fluid extract from the TDCP high-dose treated samples

  20. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sandeep R.; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O.; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L. M. Sharath; Prakash, N. S.; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body’s vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  1. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L M Sharath; Prakash, N S; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body's vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  2. Simple analytical test and a formula to predict the potential for dermal carcinogenicity from petroleum oils

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.M.; Dimeler, G.R.; Basil, E.W.; Wilkins, G.W.; Nutter, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    A correlation for predicting dermal carcinogenicity of petroleum oils in laboratory animals has been developed using two simple analytical tests. The tests are the Food and Drug Administration test (FDA) commonly used to measure white oil purity, and a viscosity test. In the correlation, FDA is a measure of aromaticity, and viscosity is used to account for molecular weight. The FDA test alone appears to be comparable to other predictors now in use, but incorporating viscosity significantly increases the accuracy of predicting dermal carcinogenicity. A formula is proposed, using both the FDA test results and viscosity, that predicts the percentage of mice which will develop neoplastic skin tumors.

  3. Repeat mild heat shock increases dermal fibroblast activity and collagen production.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Andrew E; Holyoak, Caroline D

    2008-04-01

    Repeat mild heat shock (RMHS) has been shown to have anti-aging effects on cellular and biological processes within human dermal fibroblasts. We have investigated the potential of an abridged mild heat shock regime to impact upon the functional properties of human dermal fibroblasts derived from three donors (male, 12 years; female, 22 years; female, 65 years). For each donor mild heat shock increased the rate of contraction of fibroblast-containing collagen gels and increased the de novo synthesis of collagen. Thus, hormetic mechanisms are proposed to provide functional anti-aging benefits to skin cells.

  4. New nanosized technologies for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. A review.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Engelbrecht, Tanja; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Goebel, Alexandra S B

    2010-10-01

    Nanocarriers are promising dermal and transdermal drug delivery systems. The review recapitulates the most prominent nanocarriers such as microemulsions, liposomes and micro- and nanoparticles for the dermal and transdermal application. Microemulsions have a high solubilization capacity even for poorly soluble drugs and combined with their permeation enhancing effect high flux rates can be obtained. Liposomal carrier systems exhibit a high flexibility and mobility, whereas the follicular penetration of micro- and nanoparticular systems show an increase in the penetration depth. However, it is necessary to understand the particular mechanism of each transport system in order to limit undesired effects. PMID:21329045

  5. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  6. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  7. Acute toxicity and synergistic and antagonistic effects of the aromatic compounds of some essential oils against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae.

    PubMed

    Pavela, Roman

    2015-10-01

    The efficacy of 30 aromatic compounds and their mutual binary combinations was assessed for acute toxicity against the larvae Culex quinquefasciatus. Based on comparison of the lethal doses, thymol and p-cymene were selected as the most effective (LD50 = 18 and 21 mg L(-1), respectively, and LD90 = 25 and 30 mg L(-1), respectively). Although the LD50 for terpinolene and trans-anethole was also estimated at 21 mg L(-1), their LD90 was significantly higher compared to the substances above (245 and 34 mg L(-1), respectively). In total, 435 binary combinations were tested, of which 249 combinations showed a significant synergistic effect, while 74 combinations showed a significant antagonistic effect on mortality. Only nine substances were identified as being able to create a synergistic effect with more than 20 substances: limonene, trans-anethole, 4-allylanisole, carvacrol, isoeugenol, menthone, carvone, borneol, and camphor. The highest synergistic effect on larval mortality was achieved for the combinations: eugenol and isoeugenol, carvone and carvacrol, carvone and 4-allylanisole, carvone and α-terpineol, carvone and menthone, limonene and trans-anethole, limonene and menthone, α-pinene and menthone, β-citronellol and menthone, carvacrol and 4-allylanisole, carvacrol and terpineol, α-terpinene and trans-anethole, camphor and menthone, camphene and menthone, and 4-allylanisole and menthone. Significant differences between achieved mortality and the mutual mixing ratio were found for the five selected binary mixtures that had shown the most significant synergistic effect in the previous tests. The mixture of limonene and trans-anethole showed the highest mortality, with the mixing ratio 1:1; the mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol caused 90.2% mortality, with the mixing ratio 1:3. One hundred percent mortality was achieved if carvacrol was contained in a mixture with carvone in a ratio >2. After a comparison of all our results, based on our experiments, we

  8. [EFFECT OF 4-METHYLPYRAZOLE ON IMMUNE RESPONSE, FUNCTION OF Th1 AND Th2 LYMPHOCYTES, AND CYTOKINE CONCENTRATION IN RAT BLOOD AFTER ACUTE METHANOL POISONING].

    PubMed

    Zabrodskii, P F; Maslyakov, V V; Gromov, M S

    2016-01-01

    It was established in experiments on noninbred albino rats that the acute intoxication with methanol (1.0 LD50) decreased cellular and humoral immune responses, Th2-lymphocyte activity (to a greater extent as compared to the function of Th1 cells), reduced the blood concentration of immunoregulatory (IFN-g, IL-2, IL-4) and proinflammatory (TNF, IL-1b, IL-6) cytokines on the average by 36.5% (p < 0.05), and did not affect the content of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-13). Methanol antidote 4-methylpyrazole (non-competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) administered upon acute intoxication with methanol at a dose of 1.0 DL50 partially reduces the intoxication-induced suppression of humoral and cellular immune response, activity of T-helper cells, and production of IL-4 and restores blood levels of TNF, IL-1b, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-2, IL-6 to the control values. PMID:27455577

  9. Biochemical, oxidative and histological changes caused by sub-acute oral exposure of some synthetic cyanogens in rats: ameliorative effect of α-ketoglutarate.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rahul; Rao, Pooja; Singh, Poonam; Yadav, Shiv Kumar; Upadhyay, Preeti; Malla, Sandhya; Gujar, Niranjan Laxman; Lomash, Vinay; Pant, Satish Chandra

    2014-05-01

    Time-dependent cyanide generation and acute toxicity of six different cyanogens were reported earlier, out of which malononitrile (MCN), propionitrile (PCN), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were found to be very toxic. We report here 14 d sub-acute toxicity of MCN, PCN, and SNP (oral; 1/10 LD50 daily) in female rats, and its amelioration by α-ketoglutarate (α-KG; oral; 5.26 mmol/kg; +5 min), a potential cyanide antidote. Significant decrease in white blood cells (PCN, SNP), platelets count (PCN), and blood glucose levels (MCN, PCN, SNP) was accompanied by elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase (MCN, PCN, SNP), and aspartate aminotransferase (PCN, SNP). Oxidative damage was evidenced by diminished total antioxidant status in plasma and enhanced malondialdehyde levels in liver and kidney. This was accompanied by diminished levels of reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in the brain, liver and kidney. We also observed increased levels of blood cyanide and thiocyanate, together with inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and thiosulfate-sulfur transferase activities in total brain and liver homogenate, respectively. Cyanogens also produced several histological changes in all the organs studied. Post-treatment with α-KG significantly abrogated the toxicity of cyanogens, indicating its utility as an antidote for long-term cyanogen exposure.

  10. Recombinant expression of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin components of Indian isolate in Escherichia coli and determination of its acute toxicity level in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, Suryanarayana; Vanlalhmuaka; Verma, Sarika; Tuteja, Urmil; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LeTx) is the principle factor responsible for toxaemia and anthrax related death. Lethal toxin consist of two proteins viz protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor which combines in a typical fashion similar to other toxins belonging to A-B toxin super family. The amount of LeTx required to kill a particular organism generally differs among strains owing to their geographical distributions and genetic variation. In the present study, we have cloned PA and LF genes from B. anthracis clinical isolate of Indian origin and expressed them in soluble form employing Escherichia coli expression system. Both the proteins were purified to near homogeneity level using Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further we have used equal ratio of both the proteins to form LeTx and determined its acute toxicity level in Balb/c mice by graphical method of Miller and Tainter. The LD50 value of LeTx by intravenous (i.v) route was found to be 0.97 ± 0.634 mg kg(-1) Balb/c mice. This study highlights the expression of recombinant LeTx from E. coli and assessing its acute toxicity level in experimental mouse model.

  11. Evaluation of Acute 13-Week Subchronic Toxicity and Genotoxicity of the Powdered Root of Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia Jack)

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Liao, Po-Lin; Huang, Wei-Kuang; Tse, Ling-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) is an indigenous traditional herb in Southern Asia. Its powdered root has been processed to produce health supplements, but no detailed toxicology report is available. In this study, neither mutagenicity nor clastogenicity was noted, and acute oral LD50 was more than 6 g/kg b.w. After 4-week subacute and 13-week subchronic exposure paradigms (0, 0.6, 1.2, and 2 g/kg b.w./day), adverse effects attributable to test compound were not observed with respect to body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, macropathology, or histopathology. However, the treatment significantly reduced prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and cholesterol levels, especially in males (P < 0.05). These changes were judged as pharmacological effects, and they are beneficial to health. The calculated acceptable daily intake (ADI) was up to 1.2 g/adult/day. This information will be useful for product development and safety management. PMID:24062779

  12. Evaluation of Acute 13-Week Subchronic Toxicity and Genotoxicity of the Powdered Root of Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia Jack).

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Liao, Po-Lin; Huang, Wei-Kuang; Tse, Ling-Shan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia) is an indigenous traditional herb in Southern Asia. Its powdered root has been processed to produce health supplements, but no detailed toxicology report is available. In this study, neither mutagenicity nor clastogenicity was noted, and acute oral LD50 was more than 6 g/kg b.w. After 4-week subacute and 13-week subchronic exposure paradigms (0, 0.6, 1.2, and 2 g/kg b.w./day), adverse effects attributable to test compound were not observed with respect to body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis, macropathology, or histopathology. However, the treatment significantly reduced prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and cholesterol levels, especially in males (P < 0.05). These changes were judged as pharmacological effects, and they are beneficial to health. The calculated acceptable daily intake (ADI) was up to 1.2 g/adult/day. This information will be useful for product development and safety management. PMID:24062779

  13. Assessment of antidiabetic activity and acute toxicity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. in guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Kasali, Félicien Mushagalusa; Kadima, Justin Ntokamunda; Mpiana, Pius Tshimankinda; Ngbolua, Koto-te-Nyiwa; Tshibangu, Damien Sha-Tshibey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the antidiabetic activity of leaf extracts from Physalis peruviana L. popularly used in the Eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and to point out the possible toxicity. Method Aqueous decoctions prepared from dried leaves powder were administrated to guinea pigs at the dose range of 100 mg/kg to 3.2 g/kg of body weight. The hypoglycemic activity was evaluated by glucose tolerance test, loading animals with glucose 4 g/kg and measuring blood glucose concentrations at various times. The effect was compared to the control and glibenclamide as antidiabetic reference drug. Acute toxicity was evaluated by recording mortality rate, changes on blood biomarkers and damage caused to vital organs. Results At a dose of 100 mg/kg, the aqueous extract induced a significant reduction of peak concentration at 30 min after glucose loading as compared with control or reference (P<0.05). At doses greater than 400 mg, some alterations on blood, kidney and liver markers were observed. Upper 800 mg/kg, mortality was observed with LD50 estimated at about 1 280 mg/kg. At the autopsy, vital organs were in haemorrhage and swelling state. Conclusion The crude aqueous extracts from the leaves of Physalis peruviana L. present hypoglycemic activity in animal model, but at high doses the plant may cause severe intoxication.

  14. Comparative analysis of toxicological evaluations for dermal exposure performed under two different EU regulatory frameworks.

    PubMed

    Westerholm, Emma; Schenk, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Dermal exposure to chemicals is highly relevant in relation to the use of cosmetic products, both in consumers and in individuals exposed occupationally. Regulatory frameworks exist within the EU to limit the dermal exposure of the general population and workers to chemicals in general, as well as to limit the use of certain substances in cosmetic products. The objective of the study was to investigate and compare toxicological evaluations of dermal exposure performed under current regulatory frameworks. The publicly disseminated hazard information under the respective regulatory frameworks was compiled and compared for the five substances resorcinol, p-phenylenediamine, p-aminophenol, N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine, and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether. A low consistency between evaluations was observed in respect to data coverage and cited dose descriptors. No systematic differences over all five substances were identified from the viewpoint of dermal hazard assessment. The critical effect and corresponding systemic effect dose descriptor was identical for two substances, differed somewhat for two other (a factor of 2-2.5). For N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine a critical effect was only identified under REACH.

  15. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

  16. A novel device to create consistent deep dermal burns in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Bertinetti, Monique; Harvey, John G; Hei, Erik R La; Holland, Andrew JA

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this study to evaluate a novel device to create a consistent and reproducible deep partial thickness burn in a porcine model. A thermostatically controlled, heated aluminium disc device was fashioned by the Biomedical Department of our institution. Contact burns were made on the flank of two Great White pigs by applying the device heated to 92°C at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 seconds to four separate test areas area of skin. Biopsies for histological analysis of burn depth were taken on day 0 at 10 minutes post burn and on day 8. Biopsies taken at day 0 revealed superficial to mid-dermal burns, with minimal dermal edema and necrosis. Those from day 8 showed mid to deep dermal edema and necrosis in all four test areas following a 20 second contact duration burn. The new contact burn device was able to create a consistent deep dermal burn after 20 seconds of contact. We anticipate that this new device could be used to investigate the development of hypertrophic scarring in a porcine model. PMID:27335694

  17. β-catenin signalling in dermal papilla cells leads to a hairy situation.

    PubMed

    Gemayel, Rita; Chenette, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Dermal papilla (DP) are specialised mesenchymal cells that activate the formation of new hair follicles. In this issue of The FEBS Journal, Zhang and colleagues show that enhancing the β-catenin signalling pathway in DP cells allows faster and denser hair growth, providing a potential target for hair loss treatments and for improving hair regeneration techniques. PMID:27450439

  18. A COMPARISON OF CYTOKINE MESSAGE AND PROTEIN PROFILES OBTAINED FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO DIISOCYANATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to certain low molecular weight chemicals is associated with asthma. A simple method to identify this hazard is needed. Increased expression of Th2 cytokine mRNA in draining lymph nodes following dermal exposure and increased production of Th2 cytokines by cultured cell...

  19. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN MICE AFTER DERMAL AND INTRATRACHAEL (IT) EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT for 2001 DMS213

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE (TMA) HYPERSENSITIVITY IN
    MICE AFTER DERMAL AND INTRATRACHEAL (IT) EXPOSURES. E Boykin, M Ward, MJ Selgrade, and D Sailstad. NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    TMA causes respiratory hypersensitivity (RH) responses. W...

  20. Repair of a Gingival Fenestration Using an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Breault, Lawrence G; Brentson, Raquel C; Fowler, Edward B; Bisch, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    A case report illustrating the successful treatment of a gingival fenestration with an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) allograft. After 2½ months of healing, the ADM was completely integrated into the soft tissues of the mandibular anterior gingiva with complete resolution of the gingival fenestration, resulting in excellent gingival esthetics. PMID:26874103

  1. Distinct fibroblast lineages determine dermal architecture in skin development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Simons, Ben D.; Charalambous, Marika; Ferron, Sacri R.; Herault, Yann; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts are the major mesenchymal cell type in connective tissue and deposit the collagen and elastic fibers of the extracellular matrix (ECM)1. Even within a single tissue fibroblasts exhibit remarkable functional diversity, but it is not known whether this reflects the existence of a differentiation hierarchy or is a response to different environmental factors. Here we show, using transplantation assays and lineage tracing, that the fibroblasts of skin connective tissue arise from two distinct lineages. One forms the upper dermis, including the dermal papilla that regulates hair growth and the arrector pili muscle (APM), which controls piloerection. The other forms the lower dermis, including the reticular fibroblasts that synthesise the bulk of the fibrillar ECM, and the pre-adipocytes and adipocytes of the hypodermis. The upper lineage is required for hair follicle formation. In wounded adult skin, the initial wave of dermal repair is mediated by the lower lineage and upper dermal fibroblasts are recruited only during re-epithelialisation. Epidermal beta-catenin activation stimulates expansion of the upper dermal lineage, rendering wounds permissive for hair follicle formation. Our findings explain why wounding is linked to formation of ECM-rich scar tissue that lacks hair follicles2-4. They also form a platform for discovering fibroblast lineages in other tissues and for examining fibroblast changes in ageing and disease. PMID:24336287

  2. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  3. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  4. DERMAL AND MOUTHING TRANSFERS OF SURFACE RESIDUES MEASURED USING FLUORESCENCE IMAGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    To reduce the uncertainty associated with current estimates of children's exposure to pesticides by dermal contact and non-dietary ingestion, residue transfer data are required. Prior to conducting exhaustive studies, a screening study to develop and test methods for measuring...

  5. Fgf20 governs formation of primary and secondary dermal condensations in developing hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Sung-Ho; Närhi, Katja; Lindfors, Päivi H.; Häärä, Otso; Yang, Lu; Ornitz, David M.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2013-01-01

    In hair follicle development, a placode-derived signal is believed to induce formation of the dermal condensation, an essential component of ectodermal organs. However, the identity of this signal is unknown. Furthermore, although induction and patterning of hair follicles are intimately linked, it is not known whether the mesenchymal condensation is necessary for inducing the initial epithelial pattern. Here, we show that fibroblast growth factor 20 (Fgf20) is expressed in hair placodes and is induced by and functions downstream from epithelial ectodysplasin (Eda)/Edar and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling to initiate formation of the underlying dermal condensation. Fgf20 governs formation of primary and secondary dermal condensations in developing hair follicles and subsequent formation of guard, awl, and auchene hairs. Although primary dermal condensations are absent in Fgf20 mutant mice, a regular array of hair placodes is formed, demonstrating that the epithelial patterning process is independent of known histological and molecular markers of underlying mesenchymal patterns during the initial stages of hair follicle development. PMID:23431057

  6. Determination of potential dermal exposure during application of crop protection products by boom spraying.

    PubMed

    Senior, P L; Lavers, A

    1992-12-01

    The margin of safety is an increasingly important index relating to crop protection products. It relates the available toxicological evidence for the chemical to exposure when the material is used. Determination of potential dermal exposure is an essential element in the calculation of the margin of safety. In the early 1980s a considerable amount of work was done by the British Agrochemicals Association Limited (B.A.A.) on potential dermal exposure. Since that research was undertaken the results obtained have often been used as a model to estimate potential dermal exposure for other crop protection products. This paper presents the findings of a study of potential dermal exposure during boom spraying of an oil-seed rape crop. The conclusions of this study are two-fold. For the application technique studied, the data for mixing and loading generated in the 1980s are inappropriate for prediction of operator exposure and consequent calculation of margin of safety for a product. Also, in future exercises, exposure data should be collected during equipment washing after spraying.

  7. Cytotoxic evaluation of biomechanically improved crosslinked ovine collagen on human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Awang, M A; Firdaus, M A B; Busra, M B; Chowdhury, S R; Fadilah, N R; Wan Hamirul, W K; Reusmaazran, M Y; Aminuddin, M Y; Ruszymah, B H I

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies in our laboratory demonstrated that collagen extracted from ovine tendon is biocompatible towards human dermal fibroblast. To be able to use this collagen as a scaffold in skin tissue engineering, a mechanically stronger scaffold is required that can withstand manipulation before transplantation. This study was conducted to improve the mechanical strength of this collagen sponge using chemical crosslinkers, and evaluate their effect on physical, chemical and biocompatible properties. Collagen sponge was crosslinked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and glutaraldehyde (GA). Tensile test, FTIR study and mercury porosimetry were used to evaluate mechanical properties, chemical property and porosity, respectively. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of crosslinked collagen sponge on human dermal fibroblasts. The FTIR study confirmed the successful crosslinking of collagen sponge. Crosslinking with EDC and GA significantly increased the mechanical strength of collagen sponge, with GA being more superior. Crosslinking of collagen sponge significantly reduced the porosity and the effect was predominant in GA-crosslinked collagen sponge. The GA-crosslinked collagen showed significantly lower, 60% cell viability towards human dermal fibroblasts compared to that of EDC-crosslinked collagen, 80% and non-crosslinked collagen, 100%. Although the mechanical strength was better when using GA but the more toxic effect on dermal fibroblast makes EDC a more suitable crosslinker for future skin tissue engineering.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can infect wounds and produce difficult-to- treat biofilms. To determine the extent that MRSA biofilms can deplete oxygen, change pH and damage host tissue, we developed a porcine dermal explant model on which we cultured GFP-labeled MRSA biofilms. ...

  9. Silk fibroin/chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronic acid ternary scaffolds for dermal tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuqin; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Jiannan; Liu, Yu; Lu, Shenzhou; Li, Mingzhong; Kaplan, David L

    2013-06-01

    The fabrication of new dermal substitutes providing mechanical support and cellular cues is urgently needed in dermal reconstruction. Silk fibroin (SF)/chondroitin sulfate (CS)/hyaluronic acid (HA) ternary scaffolds (95-248μm in pore diameter, 88-93% in porosity) were prepared by freeze-drying. By the incorporation of CS and HA with the SF solution, the chemical potential and quantity of free water around ice crystals could be controlled to form smaller pores in the SF/CS/HA ternary scaffold main pores and improve scaffold equilibrium swelling. This feature offers benefits for cell adhesion, survival and proliferation. In vivo SF, SF/HA and SF/CS/HA (80/5/15) scaffolds as dermal equivalents were implanted onto dorsal full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley rats to evaluate wound healing. Compared to SF and SF/HA scaffolds, the SF/CS/HA (80/5/15) scaffolds promoted dermis regeneration, related to improved angiogenesis and collagen deposition. Further, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) expression in the SF/CS/HA (80/5/15) groups were investigated by immunohistochemistry to assess the mechanisms involved in the stimulation of secretion of VEGF, PDGF and bFGF and accumulation of these growth factors related to accelerated wound process. These new three-dimensional ternary scaffolds offer potential for dermal tissue regeneration.

  10. Imaging dermal blood flow through the intact rat skin with an optical clearing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wang, Jing; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wen, Xiang; Luo, Qingming

    2010-03-01

    Noninvasive detection of skin microcirculation is very significant for clinical diagnosis and therapy of peripheral vascular disease. In this study, an optical clearing method enables a laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique to image dermal blood flow through intact rat skin. The optical clearing effect of rat skin in vitro caused by a mixture of PEG-400 and Thiazone is evaluated by a commercially available spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. A LSCI system is applied to image the dermal blood flow of in vivo rat skin after topical treatment of the agents. The results show that the reduced scattering coefficient (630 nm) is down to 60% of the initial value after 40 min of topical treatment of the mixture on skin in vitro. In vivo experimental results show that a 12-min treatment of the mixture on the epidermis can make the skin transparent and dermal vessels can be observed, while treatment with pure PEG-400 cannot. The process of skin optical clearing lasts, and the skin can be recovered by treatment of saline solution. Because optical clearing decreases the temporal contrast, dermal blood flow can be obtained by the laser speckle contrast imaging technique.

  11. [Dermal and inhalation poisoning. Rare guests in our intensive care units?].

    PubMed

    Sagoschen, I

    2013-09-01

    Patients with dermal and inhalation poisoning are uncommon in intensive care treatment. We describe the diagnostics and specific toxicological treatment of patients with hydrofluoric acid burns. For inhalation poisoning, we focus on smoke inhalation, especially the management of cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning. Special attention is given to the use of hyperbaric oxygenation for the treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning.

  12. Red blood cell lysate modulates the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Amir; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-11-01

    During the early stage of wound healing process, blood clots can be served as a temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) to let skin cell migration and proliferation. The red blood cells are generally thought as inert bystanders in the early and inflammatory phase of wound healing. Here, we provide evidence that red blood cells (RBC) also play an important role in modulation of key ECM components such as type-I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we used western blot analysis and showed a significant increase in the level of MMP-1, 2, 3. Furthermore, we found that RBC lysate significantly down-regulates type-I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin while up-regulates fibronectin expression in dermal fibroblasts. To further explore the mechanism by which RBC lysate modulates MMP-1 expression, the effect of inhibitors for three MAPK signaling pathways on RBC inducing MMP-1 expression by dermal fibroblasts were tested. The result showed that the inhibitor of ERK1/2 could abrogate the stimulatory effect of RBC lysate on MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Consistently, RBC treatment results in an increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in dermal fibroblast. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RBC lysate can modulate the expression of MMPs and key ECM components which are important in healing process.

  13. Race Does Not Predict Melanocyte Heterogeneous Responses to Dermal Fibroblast-Derived Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sirimahachaiyakul, Pornthep; Sood, Ravi F.; Muffley, Lara A.; Seaton, Max; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Qiao, Liang; Armaly, Jeffrey S.; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Abnormal pigmentation following cutaneous injury causes significant patient distress and represents a barrier to recovery. Wound depth and patient characteristics influence scar pigmentation. However, we know little about the pathophysiology leading to hyperpigmentation in healed shallow wounds and hypopigmentation in deep dermal wound scars. We sought to determine whether dermal fibroblast signaling influences melanocyte responses. Methods and Materials Epidermal melanocytes from three Caucasians and three African-Americans were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the entire genome. Melanocyte genetic profiles were determined using principal component analysis. We assessed melanocyte phenotype and gene expression in response to dermal fibroblast-conditioned medium and determined potential mesenchymal mediators by proteome profiling the fibroblast-conditioned medium. Results Six melanocyte samples demonstrated significant variability in phenotype and gene expression at baseline and in response to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Genetic profiling for SNPs in receptors for 13 identified soluble fibroblast-secreted mediators demonstrated considerable heterogeneity, potentially explaining the variable melanocyte responses to fibroblast-conditioned medium. Discussion Our data suggest that melanocytes respond to dermal fibroblast-derived mediators independent of keratinocytes and raise the possibility that mesenchymal-epidermal interactions influence skin pigmentation during cutaneous scarring. PMID:26418010

  14. CYTOKINE PROFILES DO NOT PREDICT ANTIBODY RESPONSES AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses following dermal exposure has been proposed as a test to identify chemicals that pose a risk of occupational asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that relative differences in cytokine profiles for dini...

  15. Reconstruction after skin cancer excision through a dermal induction template: our experience.

    PubMed

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Fioramonti, Paolo; Amorosi, Vittoria; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-04-01

    Dermal substitutes offer alternative approaches for wounds of all thicknesses where sufficient donation sites are not available for self-grafts. Several dermal substitutes are described in literature. This study included 20 patients treated with a dermal induction template after the removal of malignant skin cancers situated in various parts of the body. The participants were especially aged patients with multiple skin cancers, and complex clinical conditions, often affected by pathologies such as cardiopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolaemia, and receiving pharmacological multi-therapies, particularly antiplatelets and anticoagulants. In many of these patients, the general complex clinical picture provided significant contraindication for complex reconstructive surgery because of the high risk involved. All patients achieved complete healing about 8 weeks after the first surgery. By using a dermal induction template, it was possible to cover substantial loss of substances without the need of autologous tissue, with smoother and less apparent scar, minor occurrence of hypertrophic and retracted scars, better flexibility of healed skin and therefore a better result from an aesthetic point of view. PMID:24684743

  16. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  17. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures.

  18. Multiple dermal lipomas in farmed striped seabream Lithognathus mormyrus on the Spanish Mediterranean coast.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Serafín

    2009-05-27

    Two cases of multiple dermal lipomas were found in cultured striped seabream Lithognathus mormyrus (L.) from the southeast coast of Spain. A histopathological study suggests that pigmented cells may correspond to melanomacrophage aggregates. The presence of these aggregations is likely related to the occurrence of a pathological process of tumoral nature.

  19. Teratogenicity study of N-methylpyrrolidone after dermal application to Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Becci, P J; Knickerbocker, M J; Reagan, E L; Parent, R A; Burnette, L W

    1982-01-01

    Teratogenicity studies were performed in rats given N-methylpyrrolidone, a solvent used in chemical processing. Dosages of 75,237 and 750 mg of N-methylpyrrolidone/kg body weight/day were administered dermally to groups of 25 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats on days 6 through 15 of gestation. Additionally, the study used a positive dermal control. Hexafluoroacetone, was chosen based on its dermal teratogenic activity. An oral positive control, aspirin, was included in order to add significance to the data generated in the experimental positive dermal control group. All animals were killed and subjected to uterine examination on day 20 of gestation. Maternal toxicity was indicated at 750 mg of N-methylpyrrolidone/kg by reduced body weight gain during gestation. Treatment with N-methylpyrrolidone resulted in dose-dependent brightly colored yellow urine and dry skin. Treatment at the high dosage level resulted in fewer live fetuses per dam, an increase in the percentage of resorption sites and skeletal abnormalities. These effects could be the result of maternal toxicity. There was no evidence of teratogenic effects nor effects on the dams at 75 and 237 mg/kg of body weight.

  20. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  1. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Ludeña, Dolores; López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering.

  2. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G

    2012-11-23

    The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  3. Genotoxicity and acute and subchronic toxicity studies of a standardized methanolic extract of Ficus deltoidea leaves

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Elham; Shafaei, Armaghan; Hor, Sook Yee; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Yam, Mun Fei; Asmawi, Mohd Z.; Ismail, Zhari

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ficus deltoidea leaves have been used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia to treat diabetes, inflammation, diarrhea, and infections. The present study was conducted to assess the genotoxicity and acute and subchronic toxicity of a standardized methanol extract of F. deltoidea leaves. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were orally treated with five different single doses of the extract and screened for signs of toxicity for two weeks after administration. In the subchronic study, three different doses of the extract were administered for 28 days. Mortality, clinical signs, body weight changes, hematological and biochemical parameters, gross findings, organ weights, and histological parameters were monitored during the study. Genotoxicity was assessed using the Ames test with the TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains. Phytochemical standardization was performed using a colorimeter and high-performance liquid chromatography. Heavy metal detection was performed using an atomic absorption spectrometer. RESULTS: The acute toxicity study showed that the LD50 of the extract was greater than 5000 mg/kg. In the subchronic toxicity study, there were no significant adverse effects on food consumption, body weight, organ weights, mortality, clinical chemistry, hematology, gross pathology, or histopathology. However, a dose-dependent increase in the serum urea level was observed. The Ames test revealed that the extract did not have any potential to induce gene mutations in S. typhimurium, either in the presence or absence of S9 activation. Phytochemical analysis of the extract revealed high contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and tannins. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed high levels of vitexin and isovitexin in the extract, and the levels of heavy metals were below the toxic levels. CONCLUSION: The no-observed adverse effect level of F. deltoidea in rats was determined to be 2500 mg/kg. PMID:23778480

  4. Acute oral toxicity of chemicals in terrestrial life stages of amphibians: Comparisons to birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Crane, Mark; Finnegan, Meaghean; Weltje, Lennart; Kosmala-Grzechnik, Sylwia; Gross, Melanie; Wheeler, James R

    2016-10-01

    Amphibians are currently the most threatened and rapidly declining group of vertebrates and this has raised concerns about their potential sensitivity and exposure to plant protection products and other chemicals. Current environmental risk assessment procedures rely on surrogate species (e.g. fish and birds) to cover the risk to aquatic and terrestrial life stages of amphibians, respectively. Whilst a recent meta-analysis has shown that in most cases amphibian aquatic life stages are less sensitive to chemicals than fish, little research has been conducted on the comparative sensitivity of terrestrial amphibian life stages. Therefore, in this paper we address the questions "What is the relative sensitivity of terrestrial amphibian life stages to acute chemical oral exposure when compared with mammals and birds?" and "Are there correlations between oral toxicity data for amphibians and data for mammals or birds?" Identifying a relationship between these data may help to avoid additional vertebrate testing. Acute oral amphibian toxicity data collected from the scientific literature and ecotoxicological databases were compared with toxicity data for mammals and birds. Toxicity data for terrestrial amphibian life stages are generally sparse, as noted in previous reviews. Single-dose oral toxicity data for terrestrial amphibian life stages were available for 26 chemicals and these were positively correlated with LD50 values for mammals, while no correlation was found for birds. Further, the data suggest that oral toxicity to terrestrial amphibian life stages is similar to or lower than that for mammals and birds, with a few exceptions. Thus, mammals or birds are considered adequate toxicity surrogates for use in the assessment of the oral exposure route in amphibians. However, there is a need for further data on a wider range of chemicals to explore the wider applicability of the current analyses and recommendations.

  5. Kinetics of 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)camphor in rats and humans after dermal application

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, Ute M.D.; Voelkel, Wolfgang; Heusener, Alexander; Colnot, Thomas; Broschard, Thomas H.; Landenberg, Friedrich von; Dekant, Wolfgang . E-mail: dekant@toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-10-15

    The toxicokinetics of 4-MBC after dermal administration were investigated in human subjects and in rats. Humans (3 male and 3 female subjects) were exposed to 4-MBC by topical application of a commercial sunscreen formulation containing 4% 4-MBC (w/w), covering 90% of the body surface and resulting in a mean dermal 4-MBC dose of 22 mg/kg bw. In rats, dermal 4-MBC doses of 400 and 2000 mg/kg bw were applied in a formulation using an occlusive patch for 24 h. Concentrations of 4-MBC and its metabolites were monitored over 96 h in plasma (rats and humans) and urine (humans). In human subjects, plasma levels of 4-MBC peaked at 200 pmol/ml in males and 100 pmol/ml in females 6 h after application and then decreased to reach the limit of detection after 24 h (females), respectively, 36 h (males). After dermal application of 4-MBC, peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 50-80 pmol/ml at 12 h and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 100-200 pmol/ml at 24 h. In male and female rats, peak plasma levels of 4-MBC were 200 (dose of 400 mg/kg bw) and 1 200 pmol/ml (dose of 2000 mg/kg bw). These levels remained constant for up to 24-48 h after dermal application. Peak plasma concentrations of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)-6-hydroxycamphor were 18,000 pmol/ml (males) and of 3-(4-carboxybenzylidene)camphor were 55,000 pmol/ml (females) between 48 and 72 h after application of the high dose of 4-MBC. In human subjects, only a small percentage of the dermally applied dose of 4-MBC was recovered in the form of metabolites in urine, partly as glucuronides. The obtained results suggest a more intensive biotransformation of 4-MBC in rats as compared to humans after dermal application and a poor absorption of 4-MBC through human skin.

  6. Clinical Performance of a Dermal Filler Containing Natural Glycolic Acid and a Polylactic Acid Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Macchetto, Pedro Cervantes; Durán Páramo, Rosa Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a condition that affects certain individuals, most commonly those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.1–3 Injectable fillers are used for the treatment of these dermal contour deformities to smooth dermal depressions formed by the loss of volume. These dermal fillers (also known as soft tissue augmentation devices) can correct contour deformities caused by lipoatrophy in patients who are human immunodeficiency virus positive or negative. The product used in this study is a patented, second-generation, injectable, dermal collagen stimulator that combines glycolic acid and polylactic acid. The glycolic acid used is not a polymer, but rather an acid derived from sugar cane. Its chemical structure corresponds to that of an alpha-hydroxy acid. Glycolic acid is a well-characterized agent that is present in a number of cosmetic products. Polylactic acid is a synthetic, biocompatible, biodegradable, inert, synthetic polymer from the poly a-hydroxy-acid family that is believed to stimulate fibroblasts to produce more collagen, thus increasing facial volume. Together, polylactic acid and glycolic acid act in concert to 1) stimulate collagen production and 2) hydrate the outer layers of the skin. A multicenter, clinical investigation authorized by the Mexican Secretariat of Health was conducted between September 20, 2002, and September 19, 2004. This clinical study was conducted in male patients between 32 and 60 years of age with lipoatrophy as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The study objective was to measure the improvement of contour deformities after the injection of a dermal collagen stimulator containing glycolic acid and polylactic acid. In addition to safety, this dermal filler was assessed when used to correct volume deformities caused by lipoatrophy in subjects who are human immunodeficiency virus positive. Thirty male subjects participated and were treated as follows

  7. Human Dermal Fibroblasts Demonstrate Positive Immunostaining for Neuron- and Glia- Specific Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Janmaat, C. J.; de Rooij, K. E; Locher, H; de Groot, S. C.; de Groot, J. C. M. J.; Frijns, J. H. M.; Huisman, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    In stem cell cultures from adult human tissue, undesirable contamination with fibroblasts is frequently present. The presence of fibroblasts obscures the actual number of stem cells and may result in extracellular matrix production after transplantation. Identification of fibroblasts is difficult because of the lack of specific fibroblast markers. In our laboratory, we isolate and expand neural-crest-derived stem cells from human hair follicle bulges and investigate their potential to differentiate into neural cells. To establish cellular identities, we perform immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for glial and neuronal markers, and use fibroblasts as negative control. We frequently observe that human adult dermal fibroblasts also express some glial and neuronal markers. In this study, we have sought to determine whether our observations represent actual expression of these markers or result from cross-reactivity. Immunohistochemistry was performed on human adult dermal fibroblasts using acknowledged glial and neuronal antibodies followed by verification of the data using RT-qPCR. Human adult dermal fibroblasts showed expression of the glia-specific markers SOX9, glial fibrillary acidic protein and EGR2 (KROX20) as well as for the neuron-specific marker class III β-tubulin, both at the protein and mRNA level. Furthermore, human adult dermal fibroblasts showed false-positive immunostaining for S100β and GAP43 and to a lower extent for OCT6. Our results indicate that immunophenotyping as a tool to determine cellular identity is not as reliable as generally assumed, especially since human adult dermal fibroblasts may be mistaken for neural cells, indicating that the ultimate proof of glial or neuronal identity can only be provided by their functionality. PMID:26678612

  8. Patterns of dermal exposure to hazardous substances in European union workplaces.

    PubMed

    Rajan-Sithamparanadarajah, R; Roff, M; Delgado, P; Eriksson, K; Fransman, W; Gijsbers, J H J; Hughson, G; Mäkinen, M; van Hemmen, J J

    2004-04-01

    Workplace dermal exposure assessment is a complex task that aims to understand the dynamic interaction between the skin and the hazardous substances present in the surrounding environment. A European project known as RISKOFDERM gathered dermal exposure data in 85 workplaces (industrial and other types) in five countries in Europe. In order to optimize data collection and to develop a representative picture of dermal exposure, scenarios (tasks made up of a series of activities) were grouped together into dermal exposure operation units (DEOs). The allocation of scenarios to relevant DEOs was achieved on the basis of similarities of exposure routes, tasks and professional judgement. Sampling and quantification procedures were based on the approaches recommended by the OECD protocol. The laboratories involved in the analysis of the samples participated in quality assurance programmes. This exercise resulted in 419 body measurements and 437 measurements on hands expressed in terms of formulation (product) in use. Exposures for a given scenario varied by several orders of magnitude. The extent and patterns of exposure were found to be dependent on various exposure determinants, including inter- and intra-scenario variations. Hands were found to be the most contaminated parts of the body. Exposure patterns for liquid and solid contaminants were different. On the basis of the analysis of the data presented here, the averaged results (median and 95th percentile) for a given DEO unit should not be used as a representative measure of dermal exposure for all scenarios within that DEO without taking the exposure determinants into account. However, the data could be used to develop an exposure matrix (indicative exposure distributions) for different types of scenario and workplace, using determinants of exposure and a Bayesian approach to integrating expert opinion.

  9. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  10. Evaluation of potential dermal exposure of pesticide spray operators in greenhouses by use of visible tracers.

    PubMed

    Machera, Kyriaki; Kapetanakis, Evangelos; Charistou, Agathi; Goumenaki, Eleni; Glass, Richard Christer

    2002-03-01

    In the present study, the potential dermal and inhalation exposure of the operator was measured, following simulation of insecticide application with the dye tracer Sunset Yellow in greenhouse cucumbers and tomatoes. For the monitoring of operator exposure, the whole body technique was used. The potential inhalation exposure was measured with a personal air sampler equipped with a glass fiber filter. The potential dermal operator exposure ranged from 84.4 to 526.7 ml of spray solution (s.s.)/h for the whole body and from 18.5 to 62.5 ml s.s./h for hands in the case of greenhouse cucumbers. The respective inhalation exposure was between 0.17 and 1.0 ml s.s./h. For greenhouse tomatoes, the potential body exposure was in the range of 22.4 to 62.1 ml s.s./h. The hand exposure varied from 5.5 to 6.1 ml s.s./h. The potential inhalation exposure was in the range of 0.33 to 0.43 ml s.s./h. The potential dermal operator exposure is a highly variable parameter, with a variation factor higher than 100% in many cases. One of the most critical factors for the determination of both potential dermal and inhalation exposure is the application pressure. Other field and operational conditions, including unpredictable factors, are also important for the determination of operator exposure levels. The measured potential dermal operator exposure values were above the levels of exposure estimated with mathematical models. PMID:11990365

  11. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants.

    PubMed

    Lone, Abdul G; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Call, Douglas R

    2015-06-01

    We developed a porcine dermal explant model to determine the extent to which Staphylococcus aureus biofilm communities deplete oxygen, change pH, and produce damage in underlying tissue. Microelectrode measurements demonstrated that dissolved oxygen (DO) in biofilm-free dermal tissue was 4.45 ± 1.17 mg/liter, while DO levels for biofilm-infected tissue declined sharply from the surface, with no measurable oxygen detectable in the underlying dermal tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that biofilm-free dermal tissue had a significantly lower relative effective diffusion coefficient (0.26 ± 0.09 to 0.30 ± 0.12) than biofilm-infected dermal tissue (0.40 ± 0.12 to 0.48 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001). Thus, the difference in DO level was attributable to biofilm-induced oxygen demand rather than changes in oxygen diffusivity. Microelectrode measures showed that pH within biofilm-infected explants was more alkaline than in biofilm-free explants (8.0 ± 0.17 versus 7.5 ± 0.15, respectively; P < 0.002). Cellular and nuclear details were lost in the infected explants, consistent with cell death. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics demonstrated that both proapoptotic programmed cell death protein 5 and antiapoptotic macrophage migration inhibitory factor accumulated in the infected-explant spent medium, compared with uninfected-explant spent media (1,351-fold and 58-fold, respectively), consistent with the cooccurrence of apoptosis and necrosis in the explants. Biofilm-origin proteins reflected an extracellular matrix-adapted lifestyle of S. aureus. S. aureus biofilms deplete oxygen, increase pH, and induce cell death, all factors that contribute to impede wound healing.

  12. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, Pilar de la

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  13. Human dermal absorption of chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants; implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa Abdallah, Mohamed; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-01-15

    Tris-2-chloroethyl phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP) and tris-1,3-dichloropropyl phosphate (TDCIPP) are organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) widely applied in a plethora of consumer products despite their carcinogenic potential. Human dermal absorption of these PFRs is investigated for the first time using human ex vivo skin and EPISKIN™ models. Results of human ex vivo skin experiments revealed 28%, 25% and 13% absorption of the applied dose (500 ng/cm(2), finite dose) of TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP, respectively after 24h exposure. The EPISKIN™ model showed enhanced permeability values (i.e. weaker barrier), that were respectively 16%, 11% and 9% for TCEP, TCIPP and TDCIPP compared to human ex vivo skin. However, this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Estimated permeability constants (Kp, cm/h) showed a significant negative correlation with log Kow for the studied contaminants. The effect of hand-washing on dermal absorption of PFRs was investigated. Washing reduced overall dermal absorption, albeit to varying degrees depending on the physicochemical properties of the target PFRs. Moreover, slight variations of the absorbed dose were observed upon changing the dosing solution from acetone to 20% Tween 80 in water, indicating the potential influence of the dose vehicle on the dermal absorption of PFRs. Finally, estimated dermal uptake of the studied PFRs via contact with indoor dust was higher in UK toddlers (median ΣPFRs=36 ng/kg bw day) than adults (median ΣPFRs=4 ng/kg bw day). More research is required to fully elucidate the toxicological implications of such exposure.

  14. Fertilizer use and self-reported respiratory and dermal symptoms among tree planters.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; Stjernberg, Ernst; Koehoorn, Mieke; Demers, Paul A; Winters, Meghan; Davies, Hugh W

    2013-01-01

    In British Columbia, some tree planting operations require workers to fertilize planted seedlings with polymer-coated nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (NPK) fertilizers. This study examined respiratory and dermal health associated with fertilizer exposure among tree planters. We interviewed 223 tree planters using an adapted version of the American Thoracic Society questionnaire supplemented with questions on dermal health. Subjects were grouped by categories of increasing duration of exposure, with workers who had not worked with fertilizer as a reference group. The relationship between exposure and reported work-related symptoms was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, cumulative tobacco cigarettes smoked, marijuana smoking status, sex, and exposure to abrasive spruce needles. An elevated odds ratio was seen for work-related cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, nosebleed, and skin rash in the highest exposure group (>37 days of fertilizer use in the past 2 years) but was significant only for phlegm (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-11.70). Trends of increasing odds ratios with increasing exposure were seen for cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, and skin rash. The results suggest a weak association between respiratory and dermal irritation and work with fertilizer. Results highlight the need for further exposure monitoring within the tree planting industry, and larger studies to investigate the relationship between work with fertilizer and respiratory and dermal health symptoms. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a PDF file containing a respiratory and dermal health questionnaire.]. PMID:23194098

  15. Dermal permeation of biocides and aromatic chemicals in three generic formulations of metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vikrant; White, Eugene M; Kaminski, Michael D; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWF) are complex mixtures consisting of a variety of components and additives. A lack of scientific data exists regarding the dermal permeation of its components, particularly biocides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermal permeation of biocides and other aromatic chemicals in water and in three generic soluble oil, semi-synthetic, and synthetic MWF types in order to evaluate any differences in their permeation profiles. An in vitro flow-through diffusion cell study was performed to determine dermal permeation. An infinite dose of different groups of chemicals (6 biocides and 29 aromatic chemicals) was applied to porcine skin, with perfusate samples being collected over an 8-h period. Perfusate samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS), and permeability was calculated from the analysis of the permeated chemical concentration-time profile. In general, the permeation of chemicals was highest in aqueous solution, followed by synthetic, semi-synthetic, and soluble oil MWF. The absorption profiles of most of the chemicals including six biocides were statistically different among the synthetic and soluble oil MWF formulations, with reduced permeation occurring in oily formulations. Permeation of almost all chemicals was statistically different between aqueous and three MWF formulation types. Data from this study show that permeation of chemicals is higher in a generic synthetic MWF when compared to a soluble oil MWF. This indicates that a soluble oil MWF may be safer than a synthetic MWF in regard to dermal permeation of chemicals to allow for an increased potential of systemic toxicity. Therefore, one may conclude that a synthetic type of formulation has more potential to produce contact dermatitis and induce systemic toxicological effects. The dilution of these MWF formulations with water may increase dermal permeability of biocides

  16. Improved method for in vitro assessment of dermal toxicity for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, James V; McDougal, James N

    2002-09-01

    Cell culture methods are being developed to assess the dermal toxicity (irritancy and corrosion) of chemicals. These in vitro methods are being validated to categorize chemicals as irritating or non-irritating to humans. Currently, these cell culture tests are useful to assist in the ranking of chemicals for irritancy, but they are not useful for quantitative risk assessment for two reasons. First, for volatile chemicals the amount of chemical in the media that the cells are exposed to may decrease with exposure time. Also, effective concentrations such as EC(50) and IC(50) are reported as the concentrations in the media not the skin tissue/cells. We have developed an in vitro approach for dermal toxicity testing of volatile chemicals that avoids these problems. Using sealed vials lacking a headspace, dermal equivalents (dermal fibroblasts in a collagen matrix) were exposed to culture medium containing a test chemical (m-xylene) and compared to a traditional open well culture system. We found that about 90% of the m-xylene was lost from the open well plates and the viability was 4-6 times greater than in the closed system. Partition coefficients were measured and used to estimate the m-xylene concentration in the fibroblasts. The EC(50) for m-xylene in the dermal equivalents was 833.13+/-35.33 microg m-xylene per gram of fibroblasts. This method will provide an effective approach to relate target cell chemical concentration to cellular responses. Based on this method, a biologically-based mathematical model could be used to determine an equivalent external dose for a specific toxic end point.

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  18. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants.

    PubMed

    Lone, Abdul G; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Call, Douglas R

    2015-06-01

    We developed a porcine dermal explant model to determine the extent to which Staphylococcus aureus biofilm communities deplete oxygen, change pH, and produce damage in underlying tissue. Microelectrode measurements demonstrated that dissolved oxygen (DO) in biofilm-free dermal tissue was 4.45 ± 1.17 mg/liter, while DO levels for biofilm-infected tissue declined sharply from the surface, with no measurable oxygen detectable in the underlying dermal tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that biofilm-free dermal tissue had a significantly lower relative effective diffusion coefficient (0.26 ± 0.09 to 0.30 ± 0.12) than biofilm-infected dermal tissue (0.40 ± 0.12 to 0.48 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001). Thus, the difference in DO level was attributable to biofilm-induced oxygen demand rather than changes in oxygen diffusivity. Microelectrode measures showed that pH within biofilm-infected explants was more alkaline than in biofilm-free explants (8.0 ± 0.17 versus 7.5 ± 0.15, respectively; P < 0.002). Cellular and nuclear details were lost in the infected explants, consistent with cell death. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics demonstrated that both proapoptotic programmed cell death protein 5 and antiapoptotic macrophage migration inhibitory factor accumulated in the infected-explant spent medium, compared with uninfected-explant spent media (1,351-fold and 58-fold, respectively), consistent with the cooccurrence of apoptosis and necrosis in the explants. Biofilm-origin proteins reflected an extracellular matrix-adapted lifestyle of S. aureus. S. aureus biofilms deplete oxygen, increase pH, and induce cell death, all factors that contribute to impede wound healing. PMID:25847960

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Induces Hypoxia and Cellular Damage in Porcine Dermal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a porcine dermal explant model to determine the extent to which Staphylococcus aureus biofilm communities deplete oxygen, change pH, and produce damage in underlying tissue. Microelectrode measurements demonstrated that dissolved oxygen (DO) in biofilm-free dermal tissue was 4.45 ± 1.17 mg/liter, while DO levels for biofilm-infected tissue declined sharply from the surface, with no measurable oxygen detectable in the underlying dermal tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that biofilm-free dermal tissue had a significantly lower relative effective diffusion coefficient (0.26 ± 0.09 to 0.30 ± 0.12) than biofilm-infected dermal tissue (0.40 ± 0.12 to 0.48 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001). Thus, the difference in DO level was attributable to biofilm-induced oxygen demand rather than changes in oxygen diffusivity. Microelectrode measures showed that pH within biofilm-infected explants was more alkaline than in biofilm-free explants (8.0 ± 0.17 versus 7.5 ± 0.15, respectively; P < 0.002). Cellular and nuclear details were lost in the infected explants, consistent with cell death. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics demonstrated that both proapoptotic programmed cell death protein 5 and antiapoptotic macrophage migration inhibitory factor accumulated in the infected-explant spent medium, compared with uninfected-explant spent media (1,351-fold and 58-fold, respectively), consistent with the cooccurrence of apoptosis and necrosis in the explants. Biofilm-origin proteins reflected an extracellular matrix-adapted lifestyle of S. aureus. S. aureus biofilms deplete oxygen, increase pH, and induce cell death, all factors that contribute to impede wound healing. PMID:25847960

  20. Fertilizer use and self-reported respiratory and dermal symptoms among tree planters.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; Stjernberg, Ernst; Koehoorn, Mieke; Demers, Paul A; Winters, Meghan; Davies, Hugh W

    2013-01-01

    In British Columbia, some tree planting operations require workers to fertilize planted seedlings with polymer-coated nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (NPK) fertilizers. This study examined respiratory and dermal health associated with fertilizer exposure among tree planters. We interviewed 223 tree planters using an adapted version of the American Thoracic Society questionnaire supplemented with questions on dermal health. Subjects were grouped by categories of increasing duration of exposure, with workers who had not worked with fertilizer as a reference group. The relationship between exposure and reported work-related symptoms was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, cumulative tobacco cigarettes smoked, marijuana smoking status, sex, and exposure to abrasive spruce needles. An elevated odds ratio was seen for work-related cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, nosebleed, and skin rash in the highest exposure group (>37 days of fertilizer use in the past 2 years) but was significant only for phlegm (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-11.70). Trends of increasing odds ratios with increasing exposure were seen for cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, and skin rash. The results suggest a weak association between respiratory and dermal irritation and work with fertilizer. Results highlight the need for further exposure monitoring within the tree planting industry, and larger studies to investigate the relationship between work with fertilizer and respiratory and dermal health symptoms. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a PDF file containing a respiratory and dermal health questionnaire.].