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Sample records for acute disease severity

  1. Soluble CD163 is increased in patients with acute pancreatitis independent of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Thomas; Brünnler, Tanja; Hamer, Okka W; Schmid, Karin; Voelk, Markus; Herfarth, Hans; Buechler, Christa

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucially involved in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. Soluble CD163 (sCD163) is specifically released from macrophages and systemic levels are increased in inflammatory diseases. Here, sCD163 was measured in serum of 50 patients with acute pancreatitis to find out possible associations with disease activity. Admission levels of systemic sCD163 were nearly three-fold higher in patients with acute pancreatitis compared to controls. In patients sCD163 did not correlate with C-reactive protein and leukocyte count as established markers of inflammation. Levels were not associated with disease severity assessed by the Schroeder score, Balthazar score, Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation (Apache) II score and peripancreatic necrosis score. Soluble CD163 was not related to complications of acute pancreatitis. These data show that serum sCD163 is increased in acute pancreatitis indicating activation of macrophages but is not associated with disease severity and outcome.

  2. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  3. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  4. Inflammatory markers of disease severity in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2005-03-01

    To date, CRP remains the single standard biochemical marker for predicting the severity of AP. Because the combination of clinico-physiological scores and CRP provides good information at 48 hours, research has focused on the predictive ability of various markers when applied in the initial 24 hours after admission to the hospital. After detailed review of the literature, the authors conclude that there is no single tool that serves as the optimal predictor of severity. There are, however, data supporting the use of certain tests to improve upon the clinician's early predictive ability on the subsequent course of AP. These include an APACHE II score greater than seven, IL-6 at the time of admission, and urine TAP, urine trypsinogen-2,and serum PMN-elastase at 24 hours (Box 1). These markers will only be able to help the clinician's predictive ability if they can be performed locally and if the results can be available in a timely manner. Future research should focus on markers such as procalcitonin, IL-8, IL-I ra, sTNFR,CAPAP, PLA-2, novel markers, and the combined use of more than one marker. The conventional research approach in predicting severity used in the last15 years has limitations and appears to have reached its maximal potential. Novel conceptions and approaches, such as identification of genetic polymorphisms that predispose to severe course and complications of AP, are needed for a quantum step forward.

  5. Severe acute exacerbations and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Cataluna, J; Martinez-Garcia, M; Roman, S; Salcedo, E; Navarro, M; Ochando, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often present with severe acute exacerbations requiring hospital treatment. However, little is known about the prognostic consequences of these exacerbations. A study was undertaken to investigate whether severe acute exacerbations of COPD exert a direct effect on mortality. Methods: Multivariate techniques were used to analyse the prognostic influence of acute exacerbations of COPD treated in hospital (visits to the emergency service and admissions), patient age, smoking, body mass index, co-morbidity, long term oxygen therapy, forced spirometric parameters, and arterial blood gas tensions in a prospective cohort of 304 men with COPD followed up for 5 years. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 71 (9) years and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 46 (17)%. Results: Only older age (hazard ratio (HR) 5.28, 95% CI 1.75 to 15.93), arterial carbon dioxide tension (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.12), and acute exacerbations of COPD were found to be independent indicators of a poor prognosis. The patients with the greatest mortality risk were those with three or more acute COPD exacerbations (HR 4.13, 95% CI 1.80 to 9.41). Conclusions: This study shows for the first time that severe acute exacerbations of COPD have an independent negative impact on patient prognosis. Mortality increases with the frequency of severe exacerbations, particularly if these require admission to hospital. PMID:16055622

  6. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Sever's Disease KidsHealth > ...

  7. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Murray, Toby B. J.; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J.; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W.; Garden, O. James; Iredale, John P.; Uings, Iain J.; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L.; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P.; Mole, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27669975

  8. Ethical and legal challenges posed by severe acute respiratory syndrome: implications for the control of severe infectious disease threats.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Lawrence O; Bayer, Ronald; Fairchild, Amy L

    2003-12-24

    The appearance and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on a global level raised vital legal and ethical issues. National and international responses to SARS have profound implications for 3 important ethical values: privacy, liberty, and the duty to protect the public's health. This article examines, through legal and ethical lenses, various methods that countries used in reaction to the SARS outbreak: surveillance and contact tracing, isolation and quarantine, and travel restrictions. These responses, at least in some combination, succeeded in bringing the outbreak to an end. The article articulates a set of legal and ethical recommendations for responding to infectious disease threats, seeking to reconcile the tension between the public's health and individual rights to privacy, liberty, and freedom of movement. The ethical values that inform the recommendations include the precautionary principle, the least restrictive/intrusive alternative, justice, and transparency. Development of a set of legal and ethical recommendations becomes even more essential when, as was true with SARS and will undoubtedly be the case with future epidemics, scientific uncertainty is pervasive and urgent public health action is required.

  9. Brief communication: Legionnaire's disease successfully treated in acute myelocytic leukemia during severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H; Mahizhnan, P

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia developed progressive lung infiltrates and unremitting fevers during a profound neutropenic state. Legionnaire's disease was diagnosed by simple immunologic studies and successfully treated with erythromycin. This index case alerts physicians toward a treatable infection which would not normally be susceptible to the empiric antibiotic regimens given neutropenic patients with fevers.

  10. The severity of acute kidney injury predicts progression to chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Amodeo, Susan; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with progression to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether patients who survive AKI and are at higher risk for CKD progression can be identified during their hospital admission, thus providing opportunities to intervene. This was assessed in patients in the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System hospitalized with a primary diagnosis indicating AKI (ICD9 codes 584.xx). In the exploratory phase, three multivariate prediction models for progression to stage 4 CKD were developed. In the confirmatory phase, the models were validated in 11,589 patients admitted for myocardial infarction or pneumonia during the same time frame that had RIFLE codes R, I, or F and complete data for all predictor variables. Of the 5351 patients in the AKI group, 728 entered stage 4 CKD after hospitalization. Models 1, 2, and 3 were all significant with ‘c' statistics of 0.82, 0.81, and 0.77, respectively. In model validation, all three were highly significant when tested in the confirmatory patients, with moderate to large effect sizes and good predictive accuracy (‘c' 0.81–0.82). Patients with AKI who required dialysis and then recovered were at especially high risk for progression to CKD. Hence, the severity of AKI is a robust predictor of progression to CKD. PMID:21430640

  11. [Scoring of severity of patients' condition with acute surgical diseases and injuries of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Efimenko, N A; Lesik, P S; Kharisov, A M; Pashaev, A A

    2015-07-01

    Ten of the most frequent symptoms that do not require special methods of their determination except general clinical examinations established by any health care professional on pre-hospital stage were determined on the basis of analysis of more than one thousand records of patients with acute surgical abdominal diseases and clinical symptom load. The authors performed an assessment of each symptom depending on severity of patient's condition ranging from 1 point (satisfactory condition) till 5 points (critical condition). Information has been obtained: in case of satisfactory condition--up to 10 points, moderate--up to 20 points, heavy--up to 30 points, extremely heavy condition--up to 45 points and terminal condition--more than 45 points. Thus, conditional descriptive method of assessment of patient's condition during the clinical examination is combined with objective-scoring. The given method combines numeric expression with methods accepted in literature--"MFS-CA", "APACHE II" and allows to perform an objective assessment of the treatment process at different stages, to practice health care standards, to perform an analysis of outcomes. The article provides tables, which substantiate proposed method.

  12. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: the first transmissible disease of the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Petrosillo, Nicola; Macrì, Giulia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is the first severe and easily transmissible disease to emerge in the 21st century. It is caused by the infection with a coronavirus, a single strand RNA capsulated virus, recently found in a small mammalian, the masked palm civet. It is likely to represent the source of human infection. The first cases of SARS have been reported in the Chinese province of Guangdong and, since then, probable cases have been reported world wide. The clinical picture is characterized by nonspecific symptoms such as fever, cough or dyspnea in patients affected by air-space opacities (unifocal involvement in the 54.6% of cases) or distress respiratory syndrome and linked to a recent exposure to a SARS case or to a travel/residence in an affected area. The empirical therapy is based on broad-spectrum antibiotics, steroids and ribavirin, but susceptibility testing have failed to demonstrate direct anti-viral activity of ribavirin against SARS-related coronavirus in vitro. The exposure to respiratory droplets and the contact with biologic fluids (respiratory and gastrointestinal secretions) represent the most efficient transmission modality of the SARS-related coronavirus. Hand hygiene is the most simple and cost effective measure of infection control to prevent contagion, and the use of airborne, contact and droplet precaution is strictly recommended to all health care workers taking care of such patients. The spread of SARS, to less developed country with limited resource for public health programs, represent the emerging alarming threat in the new global scenario.

  13. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  14. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinases -7, -8 and -9 and TIMP -1 with Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Eija; Lindström, Outi; Kuuliala, Krista; Kylänpää, Leena; Pettilä, Ville; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kuuliala, Antti; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Repo, Heikki; Hästbacka, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Several biomarkers for early detection of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have been presented. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) are released early in inflammation. We aimed to assess levels of MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 in acute pancreatitis (AP) and explore their ability to detect disease severity. Our second aim was to find an association between MMPs, TIMP and creatinine. Methods We collected plasma samples for MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 analyses from 176 patients presenting within 96 h from onset of acute pancreatitis (AP) symptoms. We used samples from 32 control subjects as comparison. The revised Atlanta Classification was utilised to assess severity of disease. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Spearman´s Rho-test were utilised for statistical calculations. Results Compared with controls, patients showed higher levels of all studied markers. MMP-8 was higher in moderately severe AP than in mild AP (p = 0.005) and MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 were higher in severe than in mild AP (p<0.001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.019). MMP-8 detected SAP with an AUC of 0.939 [95% CI 0.894–0.984], LR+ 9.03 [5.30–15.39]. MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 failed to discern moderately severe AP from SAP. MMP-7 was not different between patient groups. MMP-7 and TIMP-1 correlated weakly with creatinine (Rho = 0.221 and 0.243). MMP-8 might be a useful biomarker in early detection of SAP. PMID:27561093

  15. Predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Bettina M

    2007-04-01

    Severity stratification is a critical issue in acute pancreatitis that strongly influences diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. According to the widely used Atlanta classification, "severe" disease comprises various local and systemic complications that are associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, results from recent clinical studies indicate that these complications vary in their effect on outcome, and many are not necessarily life threatening on their own. Therefore, "severe," as defined by Atlanta, must be distinguished from "prognostic," aiming at nonsurvival. In the first week after disease onset, pancreatitis-related organ failure is the preferred variable for predicting severity and prognosis because it outweighs morphologic complications. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI allow for accurate stratification of local severity beyond the first week after symptom onset. Among the biochemical markers, C-reactive protein is still the parameter of choice to assess attack severity, although prognostic estimation is not possible. Other markers, including pancreatic protease activation peptides, interleukins-6 and -8, and polymorphonuclear elastase are useful early indicators of severity. Procalcitonin is one of the most promising single markers for assessment of major complications and prognosis throughout the disease course.

  16. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  17. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses.

  18. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children <5 years of age with ALRI. In a prospective cohort study, we determined independent predictors of severe ALRI in a hospitalized population of children under 5 years old with ALRI during a 1-year period. We included both underlying disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P < 0.001) and a history of recurrent wheezing (RR 1.77; CI 95% 1.12-2.79; P = 0.015) were independent predictors of severe disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses. PMID:26403374

  19. Synthetic Reconstruction of Zoonotic and Early Human Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Isolates That Produce Fatal Disease in Aged Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Rockx, Barry; Sheahan, Timothy; Donaldson, Eric; Harkema, Jack; Sims, Amy; Heise, Mark; Pickles, Raymond; Cameron, Mark; Kelvin, David; Baric, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic was characterized by high mortality rates in the elderly. The molecular mechanisms that govern enhanced susceptibility of elderly populations are not known, and robust animal models are needed that recapitulate the increased pathogenic phenotype noted with increasing age. Using synthetic biology and reverse genetics, we describe the construction of a panel of isogenic SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) strains bearing variant spike glycoproteins that are representative of zoonotic strains found in palm civets and raccoon dogs, as well as isolates spanning the early, middle, and late phases of the SARS-CoV epidemic. The recombinant viruses replicated efficiently in cell culture and demonstrated variable sensitivities to neutralization with antibodies. The human but not the zoonotic variants replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cultures, supporting earlier hypotheses that zoonotic isolates are less pathogenic in humans but can evolve into highly pathogenic strains. All viruses replicated efficiently, but none produced clinical disease or death in young animals. In contrast, severe clinical disease, diffuse alveolar damage, hyaline membrane formation, alveolitis, and death were noted in 12-month-old mice inoculated with the palm civet HC/SZ/61/03 strain or early-human-phase GZ02 variants but not with related middle- and late-phase epidemic or raccoon dog strains. This panel of SARS-CoV recombinants bearing zoonotic and human epidemic spike glycoproteins will provide heterologous challenge models for testing vaccine efficacy against zoonotic reintroductions as well as provide the appropriate model system for elucidating the complex virus-host interactions that contribute to more-severe and fatal SARS-CoV disease and acute respiratory distress in the elderly. PMID:17507479

  20. Retrocrural Space Involvement on Computed Tomography as a Predictor of Mortality and Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haotong; Ebner, Lukas; Jiang, Shiming; Wu, Yi; Christe, Andreas; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Luo, Zhulin; Tian, Fuzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background Because computed tomography (CT) has advantages for visualizing the manifestation of necrosis and local complications, a series of scoring systems based on CT manifestations have been developed for assessing the clinical outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP), including the CT severity index (CTSI), modified CTSI, etc. Despite the internationally accepted CTSI having been successfully used to predict the overall mortality and disease severity of AP, recent literature has revealed the limitations of the CTSI. Using the Delphi method, we establish a new scoring system based on retrocrural space involvement (RCSI), and compared its effectiveness at evaluating the mortality and severity of AP with that of the CTSI. Methods We reviewed CT images of 257 patients with AP taken within 3–5 days of admission in 2012. The RCSI scoring system, which includes assessment of infectious conditions involving the retrocrural space and the adjacent pleural cavity, was established using the Delphi method. Two radiologists independently assessed the RCSI and CTSI scores. The predictive points of the RCSI and CTSI scoring systems in evaluating the mortality and severity of AP were estimated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Principal Findings The RCSI score can accurately predict the mortality and disease severity. The area under the ROC curve for the RCSI versus CTSI score was 0.962±0.011 versus 0.900±0.021 for predicting the mortality, and 0.888±0.025 versus 0.904±0.020 for predicting the severity of AP. Applying ROC analysis to our data showed that a RCSI score of 4 was the best cutoff value, above which mortality could be identified. Conclusion The Delphi method was innovatively adopted to establish a scoring system to predict the clinical outcome of AP. The RCSI scoring system can predict the mortality of AP better than the CTSI system, and the severity of AP equally as well. PMID:25222846

  1. Morphological changes in small pulmonary vessels are associated with severe acute exacerbation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Suzuki, Yuzo; Uto, Tomohiro; Sato, Jun; Imokawa, Shiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular remodeling is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The total cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels has been reported to correlate with the pulmonary artery pressure, and this technique has enabled the assessment of pulmonary vascular involvements. We investigated the contribution of morphological alterations in the pulmonary vessels to severe acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD). Methods This study enrolled 81 patients with COPD and 28 non-COPD subjects as control and assessed the percentage of CSA (%CSA) less than 5 mm2 (%CSA<5) and %CSA in the range of 5–10 mm2 (%CSA5–10) on high-resolution computed tomography images. Results Compared with the non-COPD subjects, the COPD patients had lower %CSA<5. %CSA<5 was positively correlated with airflow limitation and negatively correlated with the extent of emphysema. COPD patients with lower %CSA<5 showed significantly increased incidences of severe AE-COPD (Gray’s test; P=0.011). Furthermore, lower %CSA<5 was significantly associated with severe AE-COPD (hazard ratio, 2.668; 95% confidence interval, 1.225–5.636; P=0.010). Conclusion %CSA<5 was associated with an increased risk of severe AE-COPD. The distal pruning of the small pulmonary vessels is a part of the risk associated with AE-COPD, and %CSA<5 might be a surrogate marker for predicting AE-COPD. PMID:27418816

  2. Donor colonic CD103+ dendritic cells determine the severity of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Motoko; Cheong, Melody; Markey, Kate A; Gartlan, Kate H; Kuns, Rachel D; Locke, Kelly R; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Bunting, Mark D; Vuckovic, Slavica; Zhang, Ping; Teng, Michele W L; Varelias, Antiopi; Tey, Siok-Keen; Wockner, Leesa F; Engwerda, Christian R; Smyth, Mark J; Belz, Gabrielle T; McColl, Shaun R; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2015-07-27

    The primacy of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in dictating the outcome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is broadly accepted; however, the mechanisms controlling this effect are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GVHD markedly enhances alloantigen presentation within the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), mediated by donor CD103(+)CD11b(-) dendritic cells (DCs) that migrate from the colon under the influence of CCR7. Expansion and differentiation of donor T cells specifically within the mLNs is driven by profound levels of alloantigen, IL-12, and IL-6 promoted by Toll-like receptor (TLR) and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signals. Critically, alloantigen presentation in the mLNs imprints gut-homing integrin signatures on donor T cells, leading to their emigration into the GI tract where they mediate fulminant disease. These data identify a critical, anatomically distinct, donor DC subset that amplifies GVHD. We thus highlight multiple therapeutic targets and the ability of GVHD, once initiated by recipient antigen-presenting cells, to generate a profound, localized, and lethal feed-forward cascade of donor DC-mediated indirect alloantigen presentation and cytokine secretion within the GI tract.

  3. Donor colonic CD103+ dendritic cells determine the severity of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Melody; Markey, Kate A.; Gartlan, Kate H.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Locke, Kelly R.; Lineburg, Katie E.; Teal, Bianca E.; Leveque-El mouttie, Lucie; Bunting, Mark D.; Vuckovic, Slavica; Zhang, Ping; Teng, Michele W.L.; Varelias, Antiopi; Tey, Siok-Keen; Wockner, Leesa F.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Smyth, Mark J.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; McColl, Shaun R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The primacy of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in dictating the outcome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is broadly accepted; however, the mechanisms controlling this effect are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GVHD markedly enhances alloantigen presentation within the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), mediated by donor CD103+CD11b− dendritic cells (DCs) that migrate from the colon under the influence of CCR7. Expansion and differentiation of donor T cells specifically within the mLNs is driven by profound levels of alloantigen, IL-12, and IL-6 promoted by Toll-like receptor (TLR) and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) signals. Critically, alloantigen presentation in the mLNs imprints gut-homing integrin signatures on donor T cells, leading to their emigration into the GI tract where they mediate fulminant disease. These data identify a critical, anatomically distinct, donor DC subset that amplifies GVHD. We thus highlight multiple therapeutic targets and the ability of GVHD, once initiated by recipient antigen-presenting cells, to generate a profound, localized, and lethal feed-forward cascade of donor DC–mediated indirect alloantigen presentation and cytokine secretion within the GI tract. PMID:26169940

  4. Novel Paramyxovirus Associated with Severe Acute Febrile Disease, South Sudan and Uganda, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Albariño, César G.; Foltzer, Michael; Towner, Jonathan S.; Rowe, Lory A.; Campbell, Shelley; Jaramillo, Carlos M.; Bird, Brian H.; Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Rota, Paul; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Knust, Barbara; Vincent, Joel P.; Frace, Michael A.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a female wildlife biologist experienced fever, malaise, headache, generalized myalgia and arthralgia, neck stiffness, and a sore throat shortly after returning to the United States from a 6-week field expedition to South Sudan and Uganda. She was hospitalized, after which a maculopapular rash developed and became confluent. When the patient was discharged from the hospital on day 14, arthralgia and myalgia had improved, oropharynx ulcerations had healed, the rash had resolved without desquamation, and blood counts and hepatic enzyme levels were returning to reference levels. After several known suspect pathogens were ruled out as the cause of her illness, deep sequencing and metagenomics analysis revealed a novel paramyxovirus related to rubula-like viruses isolated from fruit bats. PMID:24447466

  5. [Tomodensitometry of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; Abanou, A; Viandier, A; Laval-Jeantet, M

    1983-01-01

    90 computed tomographic examinations were performed to 57 patients referred at Hospital Saint-Louis for an acute pancreatitis. 32 patients were operated or autopsied. Among these 32 patients, 19 patients had 21 examinations before surgery or autopsy; the other 13 patients had their computed tomographic examinations after one or more surgical procedures. During a severe acute pancreatitis the pancreas is always large either locally or diffusely. A pancreatic reaction is visible around and possibly at distance of the pancreas. When extraluminal gas is visible (3/5) it signifies gangrenous pancreatitis but it is necessary to eliminate a digestive fistulous tract and/or a communication between a pseudocyst and the digestive tract. Except gangrenous it is not possible to precise the nature of pancreatic reaction. The diagnosis of pseudocyst was easy 9/10, difficult 1/10; we did a false positive diagnosis of pseudocyst. Computed tomography and ultrasounds were compared in ten patients for the search of gallbladder lithiasis. Computed tomography can show large and small (2/4) biliary calculus in the gallbladder that cannot be shown by ultrasounds. A normal pancreas in a normal retroperitoneal space exclude the diagnosis of a severe acute pancreatitis. CT aspects of acute pancreatitis must be considered as a good diagnostic test of an acute pancreatitis.

  6. Severe acute pancreatitis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K W; Stewart, I S; Imrie, C W

    2006-01-01

    For most patients with pregnancy-associated pancreatitis there is little maternal survival threat and only occasionally are there foetal deaths. We describe 4 young women with pregnancy-associated severe acute pancreatitis who each had gallstones. Their ages were 17, 18, 20 and 24 years. Each was a tertiary referral to our unit in Glasgow and each pursued a life-threatening course with hospital stays ranging from 37 to 90 days. One patient required pancreatic necrosectomy for infected necrosis, another had percutaneous management of a pancreatic abscess and 2 had cystogastrostomy as treatment for pancreatic pseudocyst. All underwent early endoscopic sphincterotomy and later cholecystectomy. It is important to be aware that pregnancy-associated acute pancreatitis may be severe, posing a survival threat even in the youngest patients. Gallstones, as we reported almost 20 years ago, are the most common aetiological factor in such patients.

  7. Endotoxaemia and acute pancreatitis: correlation between the severity of the disease and the anti-enterobacterial common antigen antibody titre.

    PubMed Central

    Kivilaakso, E; Valtonen, V V; Malkamäki, M; Palmu, A; Schröder, T; Nikki, P; Mäkelä, P H; Lempinen, M

    1984-01-01

    Enterobacterial common antigen is a highly immunogenic component of the Gram negative bacterial cell wall that is common to all enteric bacteria. In the present study, the humoral antibody response against enteric bacteria was investigated by measuring antibodies to enterobacterial common antigen in paired serum samples in 38 patients with acute pancreatitis and in 31 healthy subjects. In mild pancreatitis (11 patients), no changes in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres were observed as compared with healthy controls. Nine of the 10 patients had a significant increase (greater than or equal to 8 times) in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres during the disease. Similarly, in patients with fulminant (haemorrhagic) pancreatitis who survived, a significant increase in anti-enterobacterial common antigen titres occurred during the course of the disease (in nine of the 11 patients). Paradoxically, only one of the six patients with fulminant pancreatitis with fatal outcome showed a significant increase in his anti-enterobacterial common antigen titre. The results suggest that Gram negative bacterial components escape into the systemic circulation in acute pancreatitis. This may have pathophysiologic significance in this disease. PMID:6479681

  8. Curcumin Attenuates Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Severity via In Vivo Regulations on Th1, Th17 and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Hee; Yang, Eun-Ji; Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Yang, Chul-Woo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we examined the in vivo and in vitro effects and mechanisms of action of curcumin on the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a murine model. Methodology/Principal Findings Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to determine the in vitro effects of curcumin. Treatment with curcumin attenuated alloreactive T cell proliferation and inhibited the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17. In a murine acute GVHD model, transplantation of curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes into irradiated recipient mice significantly reduced the clinical severity scores of acute GVHD manifested in the liver, skin, colon and lung as compared with animals receiving vehicle-treated splenocytes. c-Fos and c-Jun expression levels in the skin and intestine, which are major target organs, were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. Expression of both proteins was reduced in epithelial tissues of skin and intestine from curcumin-treated GVHD animals. The IFN-γ-expressing CD4+ splenocytes and IFN-γ-expressing lymph node cells were dramatically decreased in curcumin-treated mice. In contrast, CD4+Foxp3+ splenocytes were increased in the curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that animals transplanted with curcumin-treated allogeneic splenocytes showed increased populations of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as CD8+ Treg cells, compared to animals administered vehicle-treated splenocytes. Curcumin-treated acute GVHD animals could have a change in B cell subpopulations. Conclusion/Significance In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of curcumin treatment against acute GVHD. The acute GVHD mice administered with curcumin-treated splenocytes showed significantly reduced severity of acute GVHD. Curcumin exerted in vivo preventive effects on acute GVHD by reciprocal regulation of T helper 1 (Th1) and Treg (both CD4+ and CD8+ Treg) cell lineages as well as

  9. [Evaluation of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ji Kon

    2009-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a variable etiology and natural history, and some patients have severe complications with a significant risk of death. The prediction of severe disease should be achieved by careful ongoing clinical assessment coupled with the use of a multiple factor scoring system and imaging studies. Over the past 30 years several scoring systems have been developed to predict the severity of acute pancreatitis. However, there are no complete scoring index with high sensitivity and specificity till now. The interest in new biological markers and predictive models for identifying severe acute pancreatitis testifies to the continued clinical importance of early severity prediction. Among them, IL-6, IL-10, procalcitonin, and trypsinogen activation peptide are most likely to be used in clinical practice as predictors of severity. Even if contrast-enhanced CT has been considered the gold standard for diagnosing pancreatic necrosis, early scanning for the prediction of severity is limited because the full extent of pancreatic necrosis may not develop within the first 48 hour of presentation.

  10. Treating severe acute malnutrition seriously

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) affects approximately 13 million children under the age of 5 and is associated with 1–2 million preventable child deaths each year. In most developing countries, case fatality rates (CFRs) in hospitals treating SAM remain at 20–30% and few of those requiring care actually access treatment. Recently, community‐based therapeutic care (CTC) programmes treating most cases of SAM solely as outpatients have dramatically reduced CFRs and increased the numbers receiving care. CTC uses ready‐to‐use therapeutic foods and aims to increase access to services, promoting early presentation and compliance, thereby increasing coverage and recovery rates. Initial data indicate that this combination of centre‐based and community‐based care is cost effective and should be integrated into mainstream child survival programmes. PMID:17449529

  11. Clinical value of severity markers in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lempinen, M; Puolakkainen, P; Kemppainen, E

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common digestive disease of which the severity may vary from mild, edematous to severe, necrotizing disease. An improved outcome in the severe form of the disease is based on early identification of disease severity and subsequent focused management of these high-risk patients. However, the ability of clinicians to predict, upon presentation, which patient will have mild or severe acute pancreatitis is not accurate. Prospective systems using clinical criteria have been used to determine severity in patients with acute pancreatitis, such as the Ranson's prognostic signs, Glasgow score, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (APACHE II). Their application in clinical practise has been limited by the time delay of at least 48 h to judge all parameters in the former two and by being cumbersome and time-consuming in the latter. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is presently the most accurate non-invasive single method to evaluate the severity of acute pancreatitis. It cannot, however, be performed to all patients with acute pancreatitis. Therefore, considerable interest has grown in the development of reliable biochemical markers that reflect the severity of acute pancreatitis. In this article we critically appraise current and new severity markers of acute pancreatitis in their ability to distinguish between mild and severe disease and their clinical utility.

  12. Laboratory markers predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Staubli, Sebastian Manuel; Oertli, Daniel; Nebiker, Christian Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease of highly variable severity, ranging from mild cases with low mortality to severe cases with high mortality. Numerous biomarkers have been studied as potential early predictors of the severity of this disease so that treatment can be optimally tailored to prevent complications. We aim to present and discuss the most relevant biomarkers for early severity assessment in AP that have been studied to date. We review the current literature on biomarkers that have been used to predict the severity in AP. C-reactive protein (CRP) is still considered to be the gold standard, with a cut-off value of 150 mg/ml 48 h after disease onset. Other markers, including procalcitonin (PCT) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) have been implemented in some hospitals, but are not used on a routine basis. Most other markers, including acute phase proteins (LBP, SAA, PTX3), cytokines (Il-8, TNF-a, MIF), activation peptides of pancreatic proteases (TAP, CAPAP, PLAP), antiproteases (AAT, a2M), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, selectins, E-cadherin) and leukocyte-derived enzymes (PA2, PMN-E) have shown some promising results but have not been routinely implemented. Furthermore, new and interesting biomarkers (Copeptin, TRX-1, Ang-2, E-2) have shown good results, but more research is needed to determine if they could play a role in the future. Various reasons why new markers for disease severity have not been adopted in daily routine include low accuracy, cumbersome laboratory techniques and high cost. Despite these difficulties, research is still very active in finding new markers to predict the severity of AP.

  13. [Concept of SIRS and severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hirota, Masahiko; Sugita, Hiroki; Maeda, Keisuke; Ichibara, Atsushi; Ogawa, Michio

    2004-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease, the severity of which ranges from a mild edematous form to a severe necrotizing form. Most patients develop systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which is induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokine production can be induced by activation of Toll-like receptor. The breakdown products of the pancreatic and peripancreatic tissues by proteases might be the agonists. Cytokines are supposed to be produced as a biological defense system. However, cytokines may often evoke organ failure and/or immunosuppressive state, if they would be produced excessively. To express this complicated pathologic condition, Ogawa proposed a concept of LISIS(local inflammation-induced systemic immunosuppression syndrome). We have to pay attention to such aspects in the management of this disease. PMID:15552899

  14. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  15. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management.

    PubMed

    Beger, Hans G; Rau, Bettina M

    2007-10-14

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (>50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%.

  16. [Prediction and monitoring of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Maruna, P; Spicák, J

    2006-01-01

    Twenty to thirty percent patients with acute pancreatitis develop severe acute pancreatitis with high mortality and morbidity rate. Markers of severity of acute pancreatitis are clinically important for the early diagnosis of complications. We reviewed the literature for markers of acute pancreatitis. On their relevance for prediction of severe pancreatitis are given. Several markers can predict severe cases of acute pancreatitis with a different positive and negative predictive value. Useful predictors of severity may include serum procalcitonin and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide at the admission, serum interleukins-6 and -8 at 24 h, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in 48 hours interval. The valuable marker for daily monitoring appears to be serum procalcitonin.

  17. Severe acute interstitial lung disease in a patient with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with alectinib.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Okamoto, Isamu; Otsubo, Kohei; Iwama, Eiji; Hamada, Naoki; Harada, Taishi; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Alectinib, the second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, has significant potency in patients with ALK rearrangement positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and its toxicity is generally well tolerable. We report a patient who developed severe acute interstitial lung disease after alectinib treatment. An 86-year-old woman with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma positive for rearrangement of ALK gene was treated with alectinib. On the 215th day after initiation of alectinib administration, she was admitted to our hospital with the symptom of progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography (CT) revealed diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations in both lungs, and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed pronounced lymphocytosis. There was no evidence of infection or other specific causes of her condition, and she was therefore diagnosed with interstitial lung disease induced by alectinib. Her CT findings and respiratory condition improved after steroid pulse therapy. As far as we are aware, this is the first reported case of alectinib-induced severe interstitial lung disease (ILD). We should be aware of the possibility of such a severe adverse event and should therefore carefully monitor patients treated with this drug.

  18. MRL/lpr-->severe combined immunodeficiency mouse allografts produce autoantibodies, acute graft-versus-host disease or a wasting syndrome depending on the source of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ashany, D; Hines, J J; Gharavi, A E; Mouradian, J; Drappa, J; Elkon, K B

    1992-01-01

    MRL/lpr (lpr) mice spontaneously develop a lupus-like illness as well as massive lymphadenopathy. Attempts to transfer autoimmunity by adoptive transfer or radiation bone marrow chimeras have been unsuccessful. Since severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have been engrafted with human and rat xenografts without apparent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we subjected SCID mice to low-dose irradiation and reconstituted the mice with spleen cells from young or old lpr mice or with lpr bone marrow. Fourteen out of twenty (70%) of SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from old lpr mice produced autoantibodies (anti-DNA and anti-Sm) without evidence of the severe lymphoid atrophy previously described for lpr spleen-->+/+ chimeras. SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from young lpr mice developed acute GVHD and 5/6 (83%) died within 4 weeks post-transfer. Although 8/11 (73%) of lpr-->SCID bone marrow allografts survived for at least 4 months, these mice developed a wasting disease characterized by lymphoid atrophy and fibrosis without the production of autoantibodies. None of the lpr-->SCID grafts resulted in the transfer of double negative T cells or the lymphoproliferative syndrome characteristic of MRL/lpr mice. These findings indicate that SCID mice can be engrafted with splenocytes from old MRL/lpr mice and that B cells continue to secrete autoantibodies for several months in the SCID recipients. This study also demonstrates that, unlike i.p. transplant of xenogeneic cells, acute GVHD is a consistent feature of i.p. transplants of normal allogeneic mononuclear cells into SCID mice. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 7 PMID:1458684

  19. [Severe acute pancreatitis associated with gallbladder gangrene].

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification criteria and management of the pathways for acute pancreatitis and also we suggest some topics that could be investigated in the future.

  20. Mast cells and acute coronary syndromes: relationship between serum tryptase, clinical outcome and severity of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Nuccia; Farioli, Laura; Losappio, Laura Michelina; Colombo, Giulia; Nichelatti, Michele; Preziosi, Donatella; Micarelli, Gianluigi; Oliva, Fabrizio; Giannattasio, Cristina; Klugmann, Silvio; Pastorello, Elide Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between serum tryptase and the occurrence of major cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) at 2-year follow-up in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). To compare serum tryptase to other validated prognostic markers (maximum high-sensitivity troponin (hs-Tn), C reactive protein (CRP) levels at admission, Synergy between percutaneous coronary intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score). Methods We measured serum tryptase at admission in 140 consecutive patients with ACS and in 50 healthy controls. The patients’ follow-up was maintained for 2 years after discharge. The predictive accuracy of serum tryptase for 2-year MACCE was assessed and compared with hs-Tn, CRP and SYNTAX score. Results Serum tryptase levels at admission were significantly higher in patients with ACS compared with the control group (p=0.0351). 2 years after discharge, 28/140 patients (20%) experienced MACCE. Serum tryptase levels, maximum hs-Tn measurements and SYNTAX score were higher in patients who experienced MACCE compared with those without (p<0.0001). Conversely, we found no significant association between MACCE and CRP. The predictive accuracy of serum tryptase for MACCE was set at the cut-off point of 6.7 ng/mL (sensitivity 46%, specificity 84%). Conclusions In patients with ACS, serum tryptase measured during index admission is significantly correlated to the development of MACCE up to 2 years, demonstrating a possible long-term prognostic role of this biomarker. PMID:27752333

  1. Acute Pre-operative Infarcts and Poor Cerebrovascular Reserve are Independent Risk Factors for Severe Ischemic Complications Following Direct Extracranial-Intracranial Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pulling, T. Michael; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Marks, Michael P.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe ischemic changes are a rare but devastating complication following direct superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA MCA) bypass in Moyamoya patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether pre-operative MR imaging and/or cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) assessment using reference standard stable xenon enhanced computed tomography (xeCT) could predict such complications. Materials and Methods Among all adult patients receiving direct bypass at our institution between 2005 and 2010 who received a clinically interpretable xeCT examination, we identified index cases (patients with >15 ml post-operative infarcts) and control cases (patients without post-operative infarcts and without transient or permanent ischemic symptoms). Differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann Whitney test. Univariate and multivariate generalized linear model regression were employed to test predictors of post-operative infarct. Results Six index cases were identified and compared with 25 controls. Infarct size in the index cases was 95±55 ml. Four of six index cases (67%), but no control patients, had pre-operative acute infarcts. Baseline CBF was similar, but CVR was significantly lower in the index cases compared with control cases. For example, in the anterior circulation, median CVR was 0.4% (range: −38.0% to 16.6%) in index vs. 26.3% (range: −8.2% to 60.5%) in control patients (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a small pre-operative infarct (regardless of location) and impaired CVR were independent, significant predictors of severe post-operative ischemic injury. Conclusion Acute infarcts and impaired CVR on pre operative imaging are independent risk factors for severe ischemic complications following STA MCA bypass in Moyamoya disease. PMID:26564435

  2. Effect of Patient Sex on the Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Newly Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Admitted by an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Abad, Jorge; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Mediano, Olga; Cabriada, Valentín; Masdeu, María José; Terán, Joaquín; Masa, Juan Fernando; de la Peña, Mónica; Aldomá, Albina; Worner, Fernando; Valls, Joan; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background The cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) differ by sex. We hypothesized that sex influences the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with OSA. OSA was defined as an apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI)>15 events·h-1. We evaluated the severity of ACS according to the ejection fraction, Killip class, number of diseased vessels, number of stents implanted and plasma peak troponin level. Methods We included 663 men (mean±SD, AHI 37±18 events·h-1) and 133 women (AHI 35±18 events·h-1) with OSA. Results The men were younger than the women (59±11 versus 66±11 years, p<0.0001), exhibited a higher neck circumference (p<0.0001), and were more likely to be smokers and alcohol users than women (p<0.0001, p = 0.0005, respectively). Body mass index and percentage of hypertensive patients or diabetics were similar between sexes. We observed a slight tendency for a higher Killip classification in women, although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). For men, we observed that the number of diseased vessels and the number of stents implanted were higher (p = 0.02, p = 0.001, respectively), and a decrease in the ejection fraction (p = 0.002). Conclusions This study shows that sex in OSA influences the severity of ACS. Men show a lower ejection fraction and an increased number of diseased vessels and number of stents implanted. PMID:27416494

  3. T helper type 2-polarized invariant natural killer T cells reduce disease severity in acute intra-abdominal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, R V; Mazzuca, D M; Xu, S X; Porcelli, S A; Fraser, D D; Martin, C M; Welch, I; Mele, T; Haeryfar, S M M; McCormick, J K

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by a severe systemic inflammatory response to infection that is associated with high morbidity and mortality despite optimal care. Invariant natural killer T (iNK T) cells are potent regulatory lymphocytes that can produce pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus shaping the course and nature of immune responses; however, little is known about their role in sepsis. We demonstrate here that patients with sepsis/severe sepsis have significantly elevated proportions of iNK T cells in their peripheral blood (as a percentage of their circulating T cells) compared to non-septic patients. We therefore investigated the role of iNK T cells in a mouse model of intra-abdominal sepsis (IAS). Our data show that iNK T cells are pathogenic in IAS, and that T helper type 2 (Th2) polarization of iNK T cells using the synthetic glycolipid OCH significantly reduces mortality from IAS. This reduction in mortality is associated with the systemic elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 and reduction of several proinflammatory cytokines within the spleen, notably interleukin (IL)-17. Finally, we show that treatment of sepsis with OCH in mice is accompanied by significantly reduced apoptosis of splenic T and B lymphocytes and macrophages, but not natural killer cells. We propose that modulation of iNK T cell responses towards a Th2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy in early sepsis. PMID:24965554

  4. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. PMID:27600056

  5. Consensus guidelines on severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Zerbi, Alessandro; Campra, Donata; Capurso, Gabriele; Golfieri, Rita; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Billi, Paola; Butturini, Giovanni; Calculli, Lucia; Cannizzaro, Renato; Carrara, Silvia; Crippa, Stefano; De Gaudio, Raffaele; De Rai, Paolo; Frulloni, Luca; Mazza, Ernesto; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Pagano, Nico; Rabitti, Piergiorgio; Balzano, Gianpaolo

    2015-07-01

    This Position Paper contains clinically oriented guidelines by the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas (AISP) for the diagnosis and treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. The statements were formulated by three working groups of experts who searched and analysed the most recent literature; a consensus process was then performed using a modified Delphi procedure. The statements provide recommendations on the most appropriate definition of the complications of severe acute pancreatitis, the diagnostic approach and the timing of conservative as well as interventional endoscopic, radiological and surgical treatments.

  6. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  7. Retrotransposon insertion in the T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1) gene is associated with severe renal disease and patchy alopecia in Hairpatches (Hpt) mice.

    PubMed

    Hosur, Vishnu; Cox, Melissa L; Burzenski, Lisa M; Riding, Rebecca L; Alley, Lynn; Lyons, Bonnie L; Kavirayani, Anoop; Martin, Kimberly A; Cox, Gregory A; Johnson, Kenneth R; Shultz, Leonard D

    2013-01-01

    "Hairpatches" (Hpt) is a naturally occurring, autosomal semi-dominant mouse mutation. Hpt/Hpt homozygotes die in utero, while Hpt/+ heterozygotes exhibit progressive renal failure accompanied by patchy alopecia. This mutation is a model for the rare human disorder "glomerulonephritis with sparse hair and telangiectases" (OMIM 137940). Fine mapping localized the Hpt locus to a 6.7 Mb region of Chromosome 4 containing 62 known genes. Quantitative real time PCR revealed differential expression for only one gene in the interval, T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (Tal1), which was highly upregulated in the kidney and skin of Hpt/+ mice. Southern blot analysis of Hpt mutant DNA indicated a new EcoRI site in the Tal1 gene. High throughput sequencing identified an endogenous retroviral class II intracisternal A particle insertion in Tal1 intron 4. Our data suggests that the IAP insertion in Tal1 underlies the histopathological changes in the kidney by three weeks of age, and that glomerulosclerosis is a consequence of an initial developmental defect, progressing in severity over time. The Hairpatches mouse model allows an investigation into the effects of Tal1, a transcription factor characterized by complex regulation patterns, and its effects on renal disease.

  8. Pazopanib-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Hata, Hiroo; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Imafuku, Keisuke; Kitamura, Shinya; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and c-Kit approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and soft tissue sarcoma. Nonselective kinase inhibitors, such as sunitinib and sorafenib, are known to be associated with acute pancreatitis. There are few case reports of severe acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment. We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis caused by pazopanib treatment for cutaneous angiosarcoma. The patient was an 82-year-old female diagnosed with cutaneous angiosarcoma. She had been refractory to docetaxel treatment and began pazopanib therapy. Three months after pazopanib treatment, CT imaging of the abdomen showed the swelling of the pancreas and surrounding soft tissue inflammation without abdominal pain. After she continued pazopanib treatment for 2 months, she presented with nausea and appetite loss. Abdominal CT showed the worsening of the surrounding soft tissue inflammation of the pancreas. Serum amylase and lipase levels were 296 and 177 IU/l, respectively. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis induced by pazopanib treatment and was managed conservatively with discontinuation of pazopanib, but the symptoms did not improve. Subsequently, an abdominal CT scan demonstrated the appearance of a pancreatic pseudocyst. She underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided pseudocyst drainage using a flared-end fully covered self-expandable metallic stent. Then, the symptoms resolved without recurrence. Due to the remarkable progress of molecular targeted therapy, the oncologist should know that acute pancreatitis was recognized as a potential adverse event of pazopanib treatment and could proceed to severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26464570

  9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  10. Aggressive and acute periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are highly prevalent, although most of these diseases develop and progress slowly, often unnoticed by the affected individual. However, a subgroup of these diseases include aggressive and acute forms that have a relatively low prevalence but show a rapid-course, high rate of progression leading to severe destruction of the periodontal tissues, or cause systemic symptoms that often require urgent attention from healthcare providers. Aggressive periodontitis is an early-onset, destructive disease that shows a high rate of periodontal progression and distinctive clinical features. A contemporary case definition of this disease is presented. Population studies show that the disease is more prevalent in certain geographic regions and ethnic groups. Aggressive periodontitis is an infectious disease, and recent data show that in affected subjects the subgingival microbiota is composed of a mixed microbial infection, with a wide heterogeneity in the types and proportions of microorganisms recovered. Furthermore, there are significant differences in the microbiota of the disease among different geographic regions and ethnicities. There is also evidence that the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemycomitans-JP2 clone may play an important role in the development of the disease in certain populations. The host response plays an important role in the susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis, where the immune response may be complex and involve multiple mechanisms. Also, genetic factors seem to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease, but the mechanisms of increased susceptibility are complex and not yet fully understood. The available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations either in a few major genes or in multiple small-effect genes, and there is also evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Diagnostic methods for this disease, based on a specific microbiologic, immunologic or

  11. Association of HLA-G Low Expressor Genotype with Severe Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Sibling Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boukouaci, Wahid; Busson, Marc; Fortier, Catherine; Amokrane, Kahina; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Toubert, Antoine; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Tamouza, Ryad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules play a prominent role in immune tolerance. Structurally similar to their classical HLA homologs, they are distinct by having high rate of polymorphism in the non-coding regions including a functionally relevant 14-base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (Ins/Del) allele in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), rarely examined in a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting. Here, we analyzed the potential impact of HLA-G Ins/Del dimorphism on the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD), transplant-related mortality (TRM), overall survival (OS), and incidence of relapse after HSCT using bone marrow (BM) as stem cell source from HLA-matched donors. Methods: One hundred fifty-seven sibling pairs, who had undergone HSCT, were studied for the distribution of the HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del polymorphism using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique. Potential genetic association with the incidence of aGvHD, TRM, and OS was analyzed by monovariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Monovariate analysis showed that the homozygous state for the 14-bp Ins allele is a risk factor for severe aGvHD (grade III and IV; P = 0.008), confirmed subsequently by multivariate analysis [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.5; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.3–9.5; P = 0.012]. We did not find any association between HLA-G polymorphism and the other studied complications. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the HLA-G low expressor 14 bp Ins allele constitutes a risk factor for the incidence of severe aGvHD in patients who received BM as stem cell source. PMID:22566863

  12. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  13. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-07-27

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:25068005

  14. Acute respiratory failure following severe arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, C; Davies, S; McGowan, T; Schorer, A; Drage, C

    1979-11-01

    A 47-year-old man had an episode of severe respiratory failure after acute intoxication with arsenic. Features of the initial clinical presentation included nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, acute psychosis, diffuse skin rash, and marked pancytopenia. A peripheral neuropathy then developed which resulted in severe weakness of all muscles of the limbs, the shoulder and pelvis girdles, and the trunk. The neuropathy continued to progress despite treatment with dimercaprol (BAL in oil). Five weeks after the initial exposure, the patient was no longer able to maintain adquate ventilation and required mechanical ventilatory support. Improvement in the patient's neuromuscular status permitted successful weaning from the ventilator after one month of mechanical ventilation. Long-term follow-up revealed no further respiratory difficulty and slow improvement in the strength of the peripheral muscles.

  15. Tissue factor in predicted severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen; Axelsson, Jakob; Eckerwall, Gunilla; Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Roland

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study tissue factor (TF) in acute pancreatitis and evaluate the role of TF as a predictive marker of severity. METHODS: Forty-nine consecutive patients admitted to Lund University Hospital, fulfilling the criteria of predicted severe acute pancreatitis (AP), were recruited prospectively between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples for TF analyses were drawn at inclusion in the study and 12 h, 1 d and 3 d later. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients developed mild AP, and 22 patients severe AP. At inclusion in the study, the groups were comparable with respect to gender, aetiology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and duration of pain. At inclusion in the study and at 12 h, TF was higher in the severe AP group (P = 0.035 and P = 0.049, respectively). After 1 and 3 d, no differences in TF levels were noted. Interleukin (IL)-6 was significantly higher in the severe AP group at all of the studied time points. C-reactive protein (CRP) was significantly higher in the AP group at 1 and 3 d. In receiver operating characteristic-curves, the area under the curve (AUC) for TF was 0.679 (P = 0.035) at inclusion in the study, and a cut off level for TF of 40 pg/mL showed a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 67%, whereas corresponding AUC for IL-6 was 0.775, P = 0.001, and for CRP was 0.653. IL-6 showed better AUC-values than TF at all time points studied. CONCLUSION: TF-levels are raised early in severe AP. TF as an early predictive marker of severe AP is superior to CRP, but inferior to IL-6. PMID:21182229

  16. Early plasmapheresis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Alexander, George; Kulkarni, Amitabh; Juneja, Deven; Sehra, Sudhish; Agarwal, Rajesh; Koul, Kandy

    2015-08-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia can cause severe diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and coronary artery disease. The routine management of hypertriglyceridemia is dietary restriction of fat and lipid-lowering medications to manage the secondary or precipitating causes of hypertriglyceridemia. However, in cases of AP with severe hypertriglyceridemia (SHTG) (triglycerides [TG] >1000 mg/dl) rapid reduction of TG levels to well below 1000 mg/dl can improve outcome and prevent further episodes of pancreatitis. Plasmapheresis is a therapeutic option in such medical emergencies. We discussed 2 cases of severe AP with SHTG where we used early plsmapheresis along with other supportive management. PMID:26321811

  17. Therapeutic Strategies for Severe Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Janet. V.; Brower, Roy; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the management of patients with severe Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ALI/ARDS), clinicians are sometimes challenged to maintain acceptable gas exchange while avoiding harmful mechanical ventilation practices. In some of these patients, physicians may consider the use of “rescue therapies” to sustain life. Our goal is to provide a practical, evidence-based review to assist critical care physicians’ care for patients with severe ALI/ARDS. Data Sources and Study Selection We searched the Pub Med database for clinical trials examining the use of the following therapies in ALI/ARDS: recruitment maneuvers, high positive end expiratory pressure, prone position, high frequency oscillatory ventilation, glucocorticoids, inhaled nitric oxide, buffer therapy and extracorporeal life support. Study selection All clinical trials that included patients with severe ALI/ARDS were included in the review. Data Synthesis The primary author reviewed the aforementioned trials in depth and then disputed findings and conclusions with other authors until consensus was achieved. Conclusions This article is designed to: a) provide clinicians with a simple, bedside definition for the diagnosis of severe ARDS; b) describe several therapies that can be used in severe ARDS with an emphasis on the potential risks as well as the indications and benefits; and c) to offer practical guidelines for implementation of these therapies. PMID:20562704

  18. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  19. [Principles of intensive care in severe acute pancreatitis in 2008].

    PubMed

    Darvas, Katalin; Futó, Judit; Okrös, Ilona; Gondos, Tibor; Csomós, Akos; Kupcsulik, Péter

    2008-11-23

    Acute pancreatitis is a dynamic, often progressive disease; 14-20% require intensive care in its severe form due to multiorgan dysfunction and/or failure. This review was created using systematic literature review of articles published on this subject in the last 5 years. The outcome of severe acute pancreatitis is determined by the inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction - the prognostic scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, Glasgow Prognostic Index, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome Scale, Ranson Scale) can be used to determine outcome. Clinical signs (age, coexisting diseases, confusion, obesity) and biochemistry values (serum amylase, lipase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, creatinine, urea, calcium) have important prognostic roles as well. Early organ failure increases the risk of late abdominal complications and mortality. Intensive care can provide appropriate multi-function patient monitoring which helps in early recognition of complications and appropriate target-controlled treatment. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis aims at reducing systemic inflammatory response and multiorgan dysfunction and, on the other side, at increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Oral starvation for 24-48 hours is effective in reducing the exocrine activity of the pancreas; the efficacy of protease inhibitors is questionable. Early intravascular volume resuscitation and stable haemodynamics improve microcirculation. Early oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation provide adequate oxygenation. Electrolyte and acid-base control can be as important as tight glucose control. Adequate pain relief can be achieved by thoracic epidural catheterization. Early enteral nutrition with immunonutrition should be used. There is evidence that affecting the coagulation cascade by activated protein C can play a role in reducing the inflammatory response. The complex therapy of acute pancreatitis includes appropriate

  20. Chapter 14: Acute severe asthma (status asthmaticus).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rachna; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Acute severe asthma, formerly known as status asthmaticus, is defined as severe asthma unresponsive to repeated courses of beta-agonist therapy such as inhaled albuterol, levalbuterol, or subcutaneous epinephrine. It is a medical emergency that requires immediate recognition and treatment. Oral or parenteral corticosteroids should be administered to all patients with acute severe asthma as early as possible because clinical benefits may not occur for a minimum of 6-12 hours. Approximately 50% of episodes are attributable to upper respiratory infections, and other causes include medical nonadherence, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory exposure in aspirin-allergic patients, allergen exposure (especially pets) in severely atopic individuals, irritant inhalation (smoke, paint, etc.), exercise, and insufficient use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids. The patient history should be focused on acute severe asthma including current use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, number of hospitalizations, emergency room visits, intensive-care unit admissions and intubations, the frequency of albuterol use, the presence of nighttime symptoms, exercise intolerance, current medications or illicit drug use, exposure to allergens, and other significant medical conditions. Severe airflow obstruction may be predicted by accessory muscle use, pulsus paradoxus, refusal to recline below 30°, a pulse >120 beats/min, and decreased breath sounds. Physicians' subjective assessments of airway obstruction are often inaccurate. More objective measures of airway obstruction via peak flow (or forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and pulse oximetry before oxygen administration usually are helpful. Pulse oximetry values >90% are less commonly associated with problems although CO(2) retention and a low Pao(2) may be missed. PMID:22794687

  1. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T; Brody, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione-glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin-oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD(+)-NADH (and NADP-NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents.

  2. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Laursen, L C; Lervang, H H; Stjernebjerg, T; Weeke, B

    1987-02-01

    In a group comparative double blind pilot study six asthmatic patients with an acute exacerbation of their disease were randomly treated with either methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) (1000 mg daily for 3 days) (n = 2) followed by placebo tablets, or standard doses of methylprednisolone (MP) (50 mg daily gradually decreased to zero over 3 weeks) (n = 4). The results showed that the effect of MPPT did not differ from that of standard doses of MP. MPPT has, however, the potential of being preferable to standard treatment with MP, because of easy administration and optimal patient compliance. PMID:3296841

  3. Predictions in the face of clinical reality: HistoCheck versus high-risk HLA allele mismatch combinations responsible for severe acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Askar, Medhat; Sobecks, Ronald; Morishima, Yasuo; Kawase, Takakazu; Nowacki, Amy; Makishima, Hideki; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    HLA polymorphism remains a major hurdle for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In 2004, Elsner et al. proposed the HistoCheck Web-based tool to estimate the allogeneic potential between HLA-mismatched stem cell donor/recipient pairs expressed as a sequence similarity matching (SSM). SSM is based on the structure of HLA molecules and the functional similarity of amino acids. According to this algorithm, a high SSM score represents high dissimilarity between MHC molecules, resulting in a potentially more deleterious impact on stem cell transplant outcomes. We investigated the potential of SSM to predict high-risk HLA allele mismatch combinations responsible for severe acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD grades III and IV) published by Kawase et al., by comparing SSM in low- and high-risk combinations. SSM was calculated for allele mismatch combinations using the HistoCheck tool available on the Web (www.histocheck.org). We compared ranges and means of SSM among high-risk (15 combinations observed in 722 donor/recipient pairs) versus low-risk allele combinations (94 combinations in 3490 pairs). Simulation scenarios were created where the recipient's HLA allele was involved in multiple allele mismatch combinations with at least 1 high-risk and 1 low-risk mismatch combination. SSM values were then compared. The mean SSM for high- versus low-risk combinations were 2.39 and 2.90 at A, 1.06 and 2.53 at B, 16.60 and 14.99 at C, 4.02 and 3.81 at DRB1, and 7.47 and 6.94 at DPB1 loci, respectively. In simulation scenarios, no predictable SSM association with high- or low-risk combinations could be distinguished. No DQB1 combinations met the statistical criteria for our study. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates that mean SSM scores were not significantly different, and SSM distributions were overlapping among high- and low-risk allele combinations within loci HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, and DPB1. This analysis does not support selecting donors for HSCT recipients

  4. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. PMID:24503270

  5. Severe scurvy: an underestimated disease.

    PubMed

    Levavasseur, M; Becquart, C; Pape, E; Pigeyre, M; Rousseaux, J; Staumont-Sallé, D; Delaporte, E

    2015-09-01

    Scurvy is one of the oldest diseases in human history. Nowadays, although scurvy tends to become a forgotten disease in developed country, rare cases still occur, especially in people undergoing extreme diet, old people or children with poor diet and patients with malabsorption. We describe three cases of scurvy. The first case is a patient diagnosed with Crohn's disease, the second one is in a context of anorexia nervosa and drug addiction, and the third case is in a context of social isolation. Early recognition of scurvy can be difficult because symptoms may appear nonspecific and can mimic more common conditions. In any patient with spontaneous hematoma and purpura, in the context of nutritional disorder, scurvy should be systematically considered. As this disease can lead to severe complications, such as bone pain, heart failure or gastrointestinal symptoms, nothing should delay vitamin C supplementation, which is a simple and rapidly effective treatment. PMID:26081492

  6. Severe scurvy: an underestimated disease.

    PubMed

    Levavasseur, M; Becquart, C; Pape, E; Pigeyre, M; Rousseaux, J; Staumont-Sallé, D; Delaporte, E

    2015-09-01

    Scurvy is one of the oldest diseases in human history. Nowadays, although scurvy tends to become a forgotten disease in developed country, rare cases still occur, especially in people undergoing extreme diet, old people or children with poor diet and patients with malabsorption. We describe three cases of scurvy. The first case is a patient diagnosed with Crohn's disease, the second one is in a context of anorexia nervosa and drug addiction, and the third case is in a context of social isolation. Early recognition of scurvy can be difficult because symptoms may appear nonspecific and can mimic more common conditions. In any patient with spontaneous hematoma and purpura, in the context of nutritional disorder, scurvy should be systematically considered. As this disease can lead to severe complications, such as bone pain, heart failure or gastrointestinal symptoms, nothing should delay vitamin C supplementation, which is a simple and rapidly effective treatment.

  7. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  8. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  9. Medical emergencies: pulmonary embolism and acute severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Ball, J

    2013-01-01

    In this, the second of two articles covering specific medical emergencies, we discuss the definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute and chronic management of pulmonary embolus and acute severe asthma. PMID:23210560

  10. Pterostilbene as treatment for severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y J; Ding, Y; Wu, J; Ning, B T

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has a fast onset and progression, which lead to an unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, the development of novel drugs for its treatment is critical. As a homologous derivative of resveratrol, pterostilbene exerts a variety of effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor effects. This study investigated the potential of pterostilbene for treatment of severe AP (SAP) and related mechanisms. Effects of pterostilbene were evaluated in a Wistar rat model of AP. Serum levels of amylase (AMY), creatinine (Cr), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were quantified. Furthermore, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and interleukin (IL)-1b were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nuclear factor (NF)-kB expression in pancreatic tissues was quantified by real-time PCR and western blotting. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a spectrometer, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was assayed. In the AP rat model, the expression of inflammatory markers TNF-a and IL-1b, expression of NF-kB, and serum indices (AMY, Cr, and ALT) increased compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (P < 0.05). Pterostilbene reduced serum levels of TNF-a and IL-1b; decreased NF-kB gene expression, serum indices, and ROS generation; and increased SOD activity in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, pterostilbene can alleviate SAP-induced tissue damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and by promoting antioxidation leading to the protection of pancreatic tissues. PMID:27525946

  11. Severe acute ulcerative colitis: the pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Many features of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) are similar to adult-onset disease, but the rate of extensive disease is doubled in children. It is, therefore, not surprising that the admission rate for severe UC is higher in childhood-onset UC, reaching 28% by the age of 16 years. Approximately 30-40% of children will fail corticosteroids and require second-line medical therapy or colectomy. A pediatric UC activity index (PUCAI) score of >65 indicates severe disease and the index can assist in determining the need and timing of second-line medical therapy or colectomy early during the admission. A PUCAI score of >45 points on day 3 identify patients likely to fail corticosteroids (negative predictive value 90-95%), and a score >70 points on day 5 identify patients who will require short-term treatment escalation (positive predicting value 95-100%). Data in children are limited, but it seems that cyclosporine, tacrolimus and infliximab achieve a similar short-term response rate, in the range of 60-80%. Infliximab has the advantage that it may be given for a prolonged period of time while calcineurin inhibitors should not be used for more than 3-4 months, bridging to a thiopurine regimen. Colectomy is indicated in toxic megacolon or in cases refractory to one salvage therapy. The choice of colectomy in other cases should carefully consider its effect on the patient's quality of life, its impact on the physical and emotional development at a critical age of personality development, and its association with a high infertility rate in females undergoing pouch procedure before childbearing age.

  12. Severe hypophosphataemia during recovery from acute respiratory acidosis.

    PubMed

    Storm, T L

    1984-08-25

    Three elderly patients with established chronic obstructive airways disease were admitted with a short history of increasing dyspnoea and tiredness and (in two cases) a deterioration in mental state. Acute respiratory acidosis was diagnosed and mechanical ventilation instituted. Two hours after beginning mechanical ventilation the mean arterial pH had risen to 7.40, but all patients showed a dramatic fall in the serum phosphate concentration (lowest value 0.3 mmol/l (0.9 mg/100 ml] accompanied by a low urinary excretion of phosphate. No patient could tolerate withdrawal of mechanical ventilation until the serum and urinary concentrations of phosphate had returned to normal. Recovery from acute respiratory acidosis should be added to the list of conditions associated with severe hypophosphataemia.

  13. Severe acute pancreatitis: Pathogenetic aspects and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Mofleh, Ibrahim A Al

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis develop a severe disease associated with complications and high risk of mortality. The purpose of this study is to review pathogenesis and prognostic factors of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). An extensive medline search was undertaken with focusing on pathogenesis, complications and prognostic evaluation of SAP. Cytokines and other inflammatory markers play a major role in the pathogenesis and course of SAP and can be used as prognostic markers in its early phase. Other markers such as simple prognostic scores have been found to be as effective as multifactorial scoring systems (MFSS) at 48 h with the advantage of simplicity, efficacy, low cost, accuracy and early prediction of SAP. Recently, several laboratory markers including hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and serum amyloid A (SAA) have been used as early predictors of severity within the first 24 h. The last few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in understanding the pathogenesis and predicting the outcome of SAP. In this review we classified the prognostic markers into predictors of severity, pancreatic necrosis (PN), infected PN (IPN) and mortality. PMID:18205255

  14. Patterns, Trajectories, and Predictors of Functional Decline after Hospitalization for Acute Exacerbations in Men with Moderate to Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Valera Novella, Elisa; Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; García-Vidal, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization for acute exacerbations (AE) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common, but little is known about the impact of hospitalization on the development of disability. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and time course of functional changes 3 months after hospital discharge for AE-COPD compared with baseline levels 2 weeks before admission, and to identify predictors of functional decline. Methods This was a prospective study including 103 patients (age mean, 71 years; standard deviation, 9.1 years) who were hospitalized with AE-COPD. Number of dependencies in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) was measured at the preadmission baseline and at weeks 6 and 12 after discharge. Patterns of improvement, no change, and decline were defined over 3 consecutive intervals (baseline and weeks 6 and 12). Trajectories grouped patients with similar time courses of disability. Recovery was defined as returning to baseline function after functional decline. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regression was used to determine predictors of functional decline after week 12. Results Six trajectories of functional changes were found. From baseline to 12 weeks, 50% of patients continued to have the same function whereas 31% experienced functional decline after 6 weeks; 16.7% recovered over subsequent weeks. At week 12, as a consequence of all trajectories, 38% of patients showed functional declines compared with baseline function, 57% had not declined, and 6 improved. Length of stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.12;95% [confidence interval] CI 1.03–1.22), dyspnea (OR = 1.85; 95% CI 1.05–3.26), and frailty (OR = 3.97; 95% CI 1.13–13.92) were independent predictors of functional decline after 12 weeks. Conclusions Hospitalization for AE-COPD is a risk factor for the progression of disability. More than one third of patients hospitalized for AE-COPD declined during the 12 weeks following discharge, with most of this decline

  15. Smoking and periodontal disease severity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Canut, P; Lorca, A; Magán, R

    1995-10-01

    This study was performed to assess the influence of smoking on periodontal disease severity. Data concerning periodontal status and smoking habits were collected from 889 periodontal patients: 340 male and 549 female, 21 to 76 years of age, 47.4% being non smokers and 52.6% smokers. Periodontal parameters, recorded by the same examiner (PMC), were: gingival recession (GR), Pocket depth (PD), Probing attachment level (PAL), and mobility (M). The influence of age, sex and tobacco consumption on these periodontal parameters was statistically evaluated using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) with covariates. A non-linear effect model was also fitted by taking the natural logarithms of the response variables (GR, PD, PAL) closer to biomedical phenomena. Mobility was analyzed by a chi2-test. The effect of smoking on periodontitis showed no association with age or with sex. Smoking, age and sex were shown to be statistically significant for periodontitis, by performing both univariate (t-test for equal means) and multivariate tests. p-values for smoking and periodontitis were: GR (p=0.000), PD (p=0.000), PAL (p=0.000) and M (P=0.015). Smoking one cigarette per day, up to 10, and up to 20, increased PAL by 0.5%, 5% and 10%, respectively. The impact of tobacco is comparable to the impact resulting from the factor of age in this sample, increasing PAL by 0.7% for each year of life. Comparison between smokers of less than 10 cigarettes per day (PAL mean 3.72 mm +/-0.86) and non-smokers (PAL mean 3.84 +/- 0.89) showed no differences in PAL (p=0.216), while comparison for smokers from 11 to 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.36 +/- 1.23) and for more than 20 cigarettes (PAL mean 4.50 +/- 1.04) demonstrated significant differences (p=0.000). These findings suggest that: (1) tobacco increases periodontal disease severity; (2) this effect is clinically evident above consumption of a certain quantity of tobacco.

  16. THE PANC 3 SCORE PREDICTING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; MELLO, André Luiz Parizi; VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli

    2016-01-01

    Background : About 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis progress to a severe form, leading to high mortality rates. Several studies suggested methods to identify patients that will progress more severely. However, most studies present problems when used on daily practice. Objective : To assess the efficacy of the PANC 3 score to predict acute pancreatitis severity and its relation to clinical outcome. Methods : Acute pancreatitis patients were assessed as to sex, age, body mass index (BMI), etiology of pancreatitis, intensive care need, length of stay, length of stay in intensive care unit and mortality. The PANC 3 score was determined within the first 24 hours after diagnosis and compared to acute pancreatitis grade of the Revised Atlanta classification. Results : Out of 64 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, 58 met the inclusion criteria. The PANC 3 score was positive in five cases (8.6%), pancreatitis progressed to a severe form in 10 cases (17.2%) and five patients (8.6%) died. Patients with a positive score and severe pancreatitis required intensive care more often, and stayed for a longer period in intensive care units. The PANC 3 score showed sensitivity of 50%, specificity of 100%, accuracy of 91.4%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 90.6% in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. Conclusion : The PANC 3 score is useful to assess acute pancreatitis because it is easy and quick to use, has high specificity, high accuracy and high predictive value in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27120730

  17. Antibiotics as part of the management of severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition contributes to 1 million deaths among children annually. Adding routine antibiotic agents to nutritional therapy may increase recovery rates and decrease mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition treated in the community. In this randomized, double-blind, plac...

  18. [Clinical management of severe ocular surface disease].

    PubMed

    Stoiber, J; Grabner, G

    2005-07-01

    Severe ocular surface diseases, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid or severe ocular burns may result in a significant loss of corneal stem cells, eventually leading to vision impairment or even corneal blindness. In case of unilateral involvement, limbal autografting, by means of transplanting limbal stem cells from the healthy fellow eye, has proved to be an effective procedure for restoring the integrity of the ocular surface. Limbal allografts may be performed in patients with bilateral disease, however, systemic immunosuppression is mandatory in these cases, with a long-term outcome that is frequently reduced compared to limbal autografts due to acute or chronic graft rejection. In recent years, amniotic membrane transplantation has been successfully employed as an additional tool in ocular surface reconstruction. The AlphaCor synthetic cornea, which is made of flexible acrylic may be considered as an alternative in patients with repeated corneal graft failures. Both limbal transplantation and the AlphaCor have been shown to be effective in eyes with an adequate tear film, but are most likely to fail in severe dry eyes or in patients with cicatrising diseases. Such conditions are the domain of keratoprostheses (KPros) with rigid optics, which certainly can be considered as the 'last resort' to restore vision in patients with profound corneal blindness not amenable to conventional corneal and limbal grafting. The osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis according to Strampelli and modified by Falcinelli makes use of a "biological" support consisting of a longitudinal section of one of the patient's teeth that is also supported by the surrounding alveolar bone tissue. Compared to other devices favourable long-term results have been reported. In patients lacking any usable teeth, implantation of a keratoprosthesis with haptics made of Dacron (Pintucci-KPro) or tibial bone (Temprano-KPro) might be considered.

  19. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  20. Acute oxygenation changes on ischemic foot of a novel intermittent pneumatic compression device and of an existing sequential device in severe peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) improves haemodynamics in peripheral arterial disease (PAD), but its effects on foot perfusion were scarcely studied. In severe PAD patients we measured the foot oxygenation changes evoked by a novel intermittent IPC device (GP), haemodynamics and compliance to the treatment. Reference values were obtained by a sequential foot-calf device (SFC). Methods Twenty ischemic limbs (Ankle-Brachial Index = 0.5 ± 0.2) of 12 PAD patients (7 male, age: 74.5 ± 10.8 y) with an interval of 48 ± 2 hours received a 35 minute treatment in supine position with two IPC devices: i) a Gradient Pump (GP), which slowly inflates a single thigh special sleeve and ii) an SFC (ArtAssist®, ACI Medical, San Marcos, CA, USA), which rapidly inflates two foot-calf sleeves. Main outcome measure: changes of oxygenated haemoglobin at foot (HbO2foot) by continuous near-infrared spectroscopy recording and quantified as area-under-curve (AUC) for periods of 5 minutes. Other measures: haemodynamics by echo-colour Doppler (time average velocity (TAV) and blood flow (BF) in the popliteal artery and in the femoral vein), patient compliance by a properly developed form. Results All patients completed the treatment with GP, 9 with SFC. HbO2foot during the working phase, considered as average value of the 5 minutes periods, increased with GP (AUC 458 ± 600 to 1216 ± 280) and decreased with SFC (AUC 231 ± 946 to −1088 ± 346), significantly for most periods (P < 0.05). The GP treatment was associated to significant haemodynamic changes from baseline to end of the treatment (TAV = 10.2 ± 3.3 to 13.5 ± 5.5 cm/sec, P = 0.004; BF = 452.0 ± 187.2 to 607.9 ± 237.8 ml/sec, P = 0.0001), not observed with SFC (TAV = 11.2 ± 3.4 to 11.8 ± 4.3 cm/sec; BF = 513.8 ± 203.7 to 505.9 ± 166.5 ml/min, P = n.s.). GP obtained a higher score of patient

  1. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): epidemiology and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D; Chan, M; Wu, A; Ng, P

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache, and dyspnoea. Older subjects may present without the typical febrile response. Common laboratory features include lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, raised alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. The constellation of compatible clinical and laboratory findings, together with certain characteristic radiological features and lack of clinical response to broad spectrum antibiotics, should arouse suspicion of SARS. Measurement of serum RNA by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique has a detection rate of 75%–80% in the first week of the illness. PMID:15254300

  2. Infants born to mothers with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shek, Chi C; Ng, Pak C; Fung, Genevieve P G; Cheng, Frankie W T; Chan, Paul K S; Peiris, Malik J S; Lee, Kim H; Wong, Shell F; Cheung, Hon M; Li, Albert M; Hon, Ellis K L; Yeung, Chung K; Chow, Chun B; Tam, John S; Chiu, Man C; Fok, Tai F

    2003-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly discovered infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus. During the community outbreak in Hong Kong, 5 liveborn infants were born to pregnant women with SARS. A systematic search for perinatal transmission of the SARS-associated coronavirus, including serial reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays, viral cultures, and paired serologic titers, failed to detect the virus in any of the infants. In addition, none of the infants developed clinical, radiologic, hematologic, or biochemical evidence suggestive of SARS. One preterm infant developed jejunal perforation and another developed necrotizing enterocolitis with ileal perforation shortly after birth. This case series is the first report to describe the clinical course of the first cohort of liveborn infants born to pregnant women with SARS. PMID:14523207

  3. Severe Plasmodium falciparum infection mimicking acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Helmi; Ismail, Muhammad Dzafir; Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Atiya, Nadia; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela

    2014-08-30

    This case report describes a case of presumed acute myocardial infarction in a returned traveler who was later diagnosed to have severe malaria. Emergency coronary angiography was normal and subsequent peripheral blood film was positive for Plasmodium falciparum.

  4. Survival from acute renal failure after severe burns.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Momma, S; Takamizawa, A; Nishida, S

    1984-12-01

    We describe a patient with 50 per cent, third degree flame burns who had a history of paint thinner inhalation for over 10 years. Moreover, chlorpromazine had been administered for the treatment of insomnia caused by chronic thinner intoxication. He developed oliguric acute renal failure soon after the burn injury, although adequate resuscitation therapy was given, and survived following frequent haemodialysis. Although survival from acute renal failure after severe burns is rare, once the diagnosis of acute renal failure has been made, haemodialysis should be instituted as early as possible. Furthermore, in a severely burnt patient with episodes of chronic and acute intoxication from organic chemicals or drugs which may have caused renal damage, acute renal failure may occur, so that careful observation is advised. PMID:6525538

  5. [PREVENTION AND CORRECTION OF PULMONARY COMPLICATIONS FOR SEVERE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorkiv, M B

    2015-06-01

    Increased of proinflammatory cytokines levels, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on severe acute pancreatitis causes vasodilatation, increased permeability of the wall, accumulation of fluid in lung tissue and pleural sinuses. Transudate from acute parapancreatyc clusters of hot liquid and abdomen falls into the chest cavity through microscopic defects in the diaphragm due to the formation of pathological pleural-peritoneal connections or the relevant pressure gradient between the abdominal and pleural cavities. Remediation and removal of acute parapancreatyc clusters combined with the use of a multicomponent drug infusion therapy Cytoflavin provide a reduction in the frequency of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis from 48.3 to 31.0%. Use of the drug Cytoflavin reduces the severity of endogenous intoxication and mortality from acute lung injury from 12.9 to 6.1%. PMID:26521460

  6. [Exocrine function of the pancreas and pathological histology of the stomach in patients with stomach yin deficiency syndrome (SYDS) research on SYDS following abdominal operation or with severe acute abdominal diseases (Part 3)].

    PubMed

    Qi, Q H; Wu, X Z; Bai, J W

    1990-08-01

    Exocrine function of pancreas (BT-PABA test) in 13 patients with SYDS was examined and gastric membrane in 5 cases with SYDS other than gastric diseases was observed under light- and electro-microscopy. The results were as follows: urine rate of recovery of PABA in SYDS was 35. 42 +/- 14.33% and that in the control with same age was 64.70 +/- 10.55%. The rate in SYDS was decreased obviously (P less than 0.001). Under light microscopy gastric mucosa of patients with SYDS showed slight gland degenerative atrophy, smaller cytoplasm, eosinophilic decrease of parietal cells and infiltration of inflammatory cells in interstitial tissue. Under electro-microscopy, the main changes of the gastric mucosa with SYDS were severe mitochondria damage, inflating rough endoplasmic pools and large vacuole at which membrane major particles of ribosomes disappeared, degenerated secretory vessels and formation of myelin figure in parietal cells, decrease of secretory particles in main cells, degeneration in some degree and decrease of nervous secretory particles in G cells and damaged interstitial capillaries. The results in this study suggested that the exocrine function of pancreas in patients with SYDS after abdominal operation or with severe acute abdominal diseases was decreased and there were some damages in energy supply and protein manufacturing systems of the gastric mucosa and functional disturbances of main cells, parietal cells and G cells in patients with SYDS.

  7. Social support and response to AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arijit; Tracy, Melissa; Aiello, Allison; Des Jarlais, Don C; Galea, Sandro

    2008-05-01

    Negative public reactions to emerging infectious diseases can adversely affect population health. We assessed whether social support was associated with knowledge of, worry about, and attitudes towards AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome. Our findings suggest that social support may be central to our understanding of public responses to emerging infectious diseases.

  8. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  9. Acute GVHD results in a severe DC defect that prevents T-cell priming and leads to fulminant cytomegalovirus disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, Matthew E; Fleming, Peter; Kuns, Rachel D; Schuster, Iona S; Voigt, Valentina; Miller, Gregory; Clouston, Andrew D; Tey, Siok-Keen; Andoniou, Christopher E; Hill, Geoffrey R; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A

    2015-09-17

    Viral infection is a common, life-threatening complication after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), particularly in the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Using cytomegalovirus (CMV) as the prototypic pathogen, we have delineated the mechanisms responsible for the inability to mount protective antiviral responses in this setting. Although CMV infection was self-limiting after syngeneic BMT, in the presence of GVHD after allogeneic BMT, CMV induced a striking cytopathy resulting in universal mortality in conjunction with a fulminant necrotizing hepatitis. Critically, GVHD induced a profound dendritic cell (DC) defect that led to a failure in the generation of CMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This was accompanied by a defect in antiviral CD8(+) T cells. In combination, these defects dramatically limited antiviral T-cell responses. The transfer of virus-specific cells circumvented the DC defects and provided protective immunity, despite concurrent GVHD. These data demonstrate the importance of avoiding GVHD when reconstructing antiviral immunity after BMT, and highlight the mechanisms by which the adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells overcome the endogenous defects in priming invoked by GVHD.

  10. Methotrexate Reduces the Incidence of Severe Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease without Increasing the Risk of Relapse after Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation from Unrelated Donors.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Stéphane; Tabrizi, Reza; Melot, Cyril; Coiffard, Joelle; Lafarge, Xavier; Marit, Gérald; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Pigneux, Arnaud; Leguay, Thibaut; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Schmitt, Anna; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Milpied, Noël

    2011-01-01

    Optimized prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after unrelated reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation when preceded by a conditioning regimen utilizing antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is poorly defined. To investigate the effects of methotrexate (MTX) in this treatment setting, we conducted a retrospective analysis. Sixty-three patients were selected based on the administration of a total dose of 5 mg/kg of ATG in the conditioning regimen and then separated into either group M+ (n = 39), which received MTX or group M- (n = 24), which did not. All patients received cyclosporine. In the M- and M+ groups, cumulative incidences (CI) of grade III-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) were 43% and 10%, respectively (P = .002). Multivariate analysis indicated that grade III-IV aGVHD was favored by both the absence of MTX and the provision of a female donor for a male recipient. At 2 years, the M+ and M- groups exhibited, respectively: overall survival of 69% and 40% (P = .06), disease-free survival of 57% and 43% (P = .2), nonrelapse mortality of 20% and 44% (P = .1), and incidence of relapse of 27% and 35% (P = .6). These data suggest that MTX reduces the incidence of severe aGVHD without increasing the risk of relapse but with an accompanying trend toward improved survival after unrelated reduced-intensity transplantation with ATG in the conditioning regimen.

  11. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wu-Chun; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR) of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteonecrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nationwide internet-based disease reporting system was established. PMID:24470901

  12. Markers for predicting severity and progression of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Kerstin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Several tools have been developed for severity stratification in acute pancreatitis. They include single biochemical markers, imaging methods, and complex scoring systems, all of which aim at an early detection of severe acute pancreatitis to optimise monitoring and treatment of patients as early as possible. Among single biochemical markers, C-reactive protein (CRP) remains the most useful. Despite its delayed increase, peaking not earlier than 72 h after the onset of symptoms, it is accurate and widely available. Many other markers have been evaluated for their usefulness, and for some of them very promising data could be shown. Among them interleukin 6 seems to be the most promising parameter for use in clinical routine. For the detection of pancreatic infection, procalcitonin is the most sensitive, and can be used as an indicator for the need for fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic necrosis. Regarding imaging, contrast-enhanced computed tomography is still the reference method for the detection of necrotising acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-specific scoring systems have been shown to be of value for the prediction of severity and progression of acute pancreatitis, but cannot be applied any earlier than 48 h after admission to hospital. The APACHE-II score has not been developed specifically for acute pancreatitis and is rather complex to assess, but has been proven to be an early and reliable tool. Indication, timing and consequences of the methods applied need to be carefully considered and incorporated into clinical assessments to avoid costs and harm to the patient.

  13. Psychosocial Care and its Association with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anurag; Agarwal, Sheesham

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study compared 120 children having severe acute malnutrition with 120 healthy children for exposure to 40 behaviors, by measuring psychosocial care based on Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) inventory. The mean (SD) psychosocial care score of cases and controls significantly differed [18.2 (2.2) vs 23.5 (2.1); P<0.001]. A score of less than 14 was significantly associated with severe acute malnutrition (OR 23.2; 95% CI 8.2, 50). PMID:27254059

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  15. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-14

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances - including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life - give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty.

  16. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  17. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature.

  18. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-09-14

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  19. [Lactic acidosis in a child with acute severe asthma].

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Savy, N; Lang, M; Caron, N; Labbé, A

    2014-10-01

    Lactic acidosis is a recognized event in adult patients with acute severe asthma (ASA). Only a few cases have been reported in children. Hereinafter is reported the case of a 2-year-old girl hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit for ASA, which was treated with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous methylprednisolone and salbutamol. During hospitalization, she had metabolic acidosis with a 7.29 pH, a 26mmHg hypocapnia, and a decrease in bicarbonates to 12 mmol/L. The anion gap was increased to 20 mmol/L and lactates to 8 mmol/L. The work-up for a congenital metabolic disease was normal. Progression was propitious with spontaneous improvement of lactic acidosis, and the child was discharged from the intensive care unit after 72 h. The origin of lactic acidosis during ASA seems to be multifactorial. Although its recovery can be spontaneous, it is important to know how to identify it because it can worsen respiratory symptoms and can lead to incongruous therapeutic escalation.

  20. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  1. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. PMID:26955277

  2. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis (black esophagus) with secondary severe stenosis].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Álvaro A; Guerrero, Diego; Hani, Albis C; Cañadas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 67 years old patient with a history of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and chronic renal failure, who developed diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis, later presenting an acute necrotizing esophagitis, and then a esophageal stenosis requiring treatment with self-expanding esophageal prosthesis with good clinical results. PMID:26802889

  3. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  4. Meteorological parameters and severity of acute pulmonary embolism episodes.

    PubMed

    Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Przegaliński, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Marcin; Pachowicz, Marcin; Drop, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Frequency of acute pulmonary embolism episodes has been previously shown to correlate significantly with meteorological factors in the period preceding their occurrence. The purpose of the study was to analyze the relation of meteorological factors and the severity of acute pulmonary embolism, expressed by the CT-based pulmonary obstruction score. A retrospective analysis of medical data of 182 consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism diagnosed with CT pulmonary angiography was performed. Severity of pulmonary obstruction was assessed by analysis of CT pulmonary angiography examinations, and defined with pulmonary obstruction score by Qanadli et al. The study group was divided into low (L group, 95 patients) and high PE severity (H group, 87 patients), with a cutoff value of 50% of maximum pulmonary obstruction score. Meteorological data collected for the relevant time period were: air temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, visibility, wind speed and precipitation. No significant differences in seasonal distribution of pulmonary embolism episodes were observed. Episodes of more severe pulmonary embolism were preceded by periods of lower atmospheric pressure (1,016.35 hPA for group H, vs. 1,016.35 hPa for group L, p = 0.022). No significant relations between other meteorological factors and severity of PE were observed. The reported finding shows the need of further research on the nature of meteorological factors influence on the course of pulmonary embolism, which should be analyzed not ony regarding the frequency, but also severity of PE episodes.

  5. Acute cerebrovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Arboix, A; Oliveres, M; García-Eroles, L; Maragall, C; Massons, J; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    In 2,000 consecutive stroke patients collected in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 10-year period, we assessed whether stroke in men and women was different in respect to vascular risk factors, clinical features and natural history. The frequency of the different variable in men and women was analyzed by means of univariate analysis and logistic regression models. Women accounted for 48% of the study population (n = 967) and were older than men (mean age 75 vs. 69 years, p < 0.001). In the age group of 85 years or older, stroke was more frequent in women than in men (69.8 vs. 30.2%, p < 0.001). Women showed a higher frequency of cardioembolic infarction and a lower occurrence of lacunar infarction and stroke of undetermined cause than men. In-hospital mortality (17.4 vs. 13.3%) and length of hospital stay (19.6 vs. 16.7 days) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in women than in men. In the model based on demographic variables and cardiovascular risk factors, obesity, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and age were significant predictors of stroke in women, while intermittent claudication, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cigarette smoking and alcohol abuse were predictors in male sex. Hypertension and limb weakness were predictors for stroke in women, and absence of neurological deficit at hospital discharge, lacunar syndrome and ataxia were predictors in men in the models based on all variables. Women differ from men in the distribution of risk factors and stroke subtype, stroke severity and outcome. Differences in stroke pathology and/or differences in functional anatomy or plasticity of the brain between sexes may account for these findings.

  6. [Peripheral artery disease and acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. When presented in the context of an acute coronary syndrome a differential diagnosis with aorta dissection should be made, because peripheral arterial disease may be asymptomatic despite the absence or asymmetry of femoral pulses.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  8. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  9. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q < 0.05) between lesions in the right insular, right frontal and right parietal cortex as well as the right amygdala, basal ganglia and thalamus and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  10. Does concurrent renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade in (older) chronic kidney disease patients play a role in the acute renal failure epidemic in US hospitalized patients?--Three cases of severe acute renal failure encountered in a northwestern Wisconsin Nephrology practice.

    PubMed

    Onuigbo, Macaulay A C

    2009-10-01

    Following the publication of several large multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trials showing reno-protection with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) blockade, the last 2 decades have witnessed an escalating use of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the angiotensin receptor blockers. Simultaneously, we continue to experience an increasing epidemic of acute renal failure (ARF) both in community-based and in hospital-based studies. Even though other factors would be contributing to this ARF epidemic, recent published data have raised concerns of a plausible connection between increased use of the RAAS blocking agents and this ARF epidemic. In our 4-nephrologist northwestern practice, we have, in recent years, anecdotally encountered an increasing number and severity of ARF, often with hyperkalemia, sometimes requiring dialysis intervention, in patients concurrently on these agents. Over the 3-day Christmas weekend in 2007, we treated 3 cases of severe ARF (peak serum creatinine of 7.0 (3.3-9.2) mg/dL), all on RAAS blockade. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone blockade was promptly discontinued. All patients received intravenous fluid repletion. Kidney function rapidly normalized in 2 within 1 week. One patient required hemodialysis for 14 days before his serum creatinine returned to normal after 5 weeks. All 3 patients have continued to maintain baseline serum creatinine several months later, still off RAAS blockade. The mean baseline eGFR for the 3 patients was 46 (41-51) mL/min/1.73 m(2) body surface area. This phenomenon of ARF exacerbation, which may have implications for chronic kidney disease progression to ESRD especially in the elderly, merits further study. We support the recommendation that (older, >65 years old) chronic kidney disease patients on RAAS blocking agents should have the medications temporarily suspended during any acute illness, before major surgical procedures, and before iodinated contrast or oral phosphate sodium

  11. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  12. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome presenting as acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Gil

    2015-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is characterized by fever, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and altered consciousness, which may also involve multi-organ failure. Initially SFTS mortality was as high as 30%, when diagnosis remained unclear. We present a case of a 53-year- old man with SFTS presenting with acute hepatic failure. On admission, he presented with confusion, elevated serum liver enzyme and ammonia levels, whose serum markers were negative for acute viral hepatitis. He was diagnosed with SFTS based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identification of the SFTS virus M segment. Percutaneous liver biopsy was performed to identify the degree and extent of necroinflammation and patient prognosis. After recovery, he was followed-up for 12 months with no SFTS-related sequelae. A discordance in severity between biopsy findings and clinical course could explain the rapid clinical improvement. Atypical presentations with multi-organ failure can delay timely diagnosis and management of infected patients. PMID:27752587

  13. Mechanisms regulating immunity and disease severity following high and low virulence BVDV type 2 infection in neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection can result in a range of disease outcomes from subclinical in the case of low virulence (LV) strains, to anorexia, fever, bloody diarrhea, and death in cases of severe acute disease. Despite the significant range of clinical disease severity, it rem...

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome and its lesions in digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious atypical pneumonia that has recently been recognized in the patients in 32 countries and regions. This brief review summarizes some of the initial etiologic findings, pathological description, and its lesions of digestive system caused by SARS virus. It is an attempt to draw gastroenterologists and hepatologists' attention to this fatal illness, especially when it manifests itself initially as digestive symptoms. PMID:12800212

  15. Control Measures for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Chen, Chien-Jen; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lee, Long-Teng; Fisk, Tamara; Hsu, Kwo-Hsiung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Kow-Tong; Chiang, I-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Shyan

    2003-01-01

    As of April 14, 2003, Taiwan had had 23 probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), all imported. Taiwan isolated these first 23 patients with probable SARS in negative-pressure rooms; extensive personal protective equipment was used for healthcare workers and visitors. For the first 6 weeks of the SARS outbreak, recognized spread was limited to one healthcare worker and three household contacts. PMID:12781013

  16. Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-03-28

    CDC continues to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of unexplained atypical pneumonia referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report includes summaries of the epidemiologic investigations and public health responses in several affected locations where CDC is collaborating with international and national health authorities. This report also describes an unusual cluster of cases associated with a hotel in Hong Kong and identifies the potential etiologic agent of SARS. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of SAPS are ongoing. PMID:12680518

  17. Severe Raynaud's phenomenon-A streamlined approach to acute management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Regent; Lomas, Oliver; Handa, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is an exaggerated vasospastic response to cold or emotional stress which not only may cause the patient severe pain but also critical ischaemia and necrosis of the digits. We report the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with rest pain, impending ulceration and necrosis of finger tips due to an episode of left-sided Raynaud's phenomenon. Intravenous prostacyclin was administered successfully as a bridge to endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Vascular surgery units are ideally positioned for the acute management of severe Raynaud's phenomenon to provide continuity of care to patients with profound digital ischaemia and impending tissue loss.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SEVERE ULCERATIVE COLITIS: A CLINICAL UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    SOBRADO, Carlos Walter; SOBRADO, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Acute severe colitis is a potentially lethal medical emergency and, even today, its treatment remains a challenge for clinicians and surgeons. Intravenous corticoid therapy, which was introduced into the therapeutic arsenal in the 1950s, continues to be the first-line treatment and, for patients who are refractory to this, the rescue therapy may consist of clinical measures or emergency colectomy. Objective: To evaluate the indications for and results from drug rescue therapy (cyclosporine, infliximab and tacrolimus), and to suggest a practical guide for clinical approaches. Methods: The literature was reviewed using the Medline/PubMed, Cochrane library and SciELO databases, and additional information from institutional websites of interest, by cross-correlating the following keywords: acute severe colitis, fulminating colitis and treatment. Results: Treatments for acute severe colitis have avoided colectomy in 60-70% of the cases, provided that they have been started early on, with multidisciplinary follow-up. Despite the adverse effects of intravenous cyclosporine, this drug has been indicated in cases of greater severity with an imminent risk of colectomy, because of its fast action, short half-life and absence of increased risk of surgical complications. Therapy using infliximab has been reserved for less severe cases and those in which immunosuppressants are being or have been used (AZA/6-MP). Indication of biological agents has recently been favored because of their ease of therapeutic use, their good short and medium-term results, the possibility of maintenance therapy and also their action as a "bridge" for immunosuppressant action (AZA/6-MP). Colectomy has been reserved for cases in which there is still no response five to seven days after rescue therapy and in cases of complications (toxic megacolon, profuse hemorrhage and perforation). Conclusion: Patients with a good response to rescue therapy who do not undergo emergency

  19. Elucidating novel disease mechanisms in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Richard Y; Rae, Brittany; Neal, Rachel; Donovan, Chantal; Pinkerton, James; Balachandran, Lohis; Starkey, Malcolm R; Knight, Darryl A; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-07-01

    Corticosteroids are broadly active and potent anti-inflammatory agents that, despite the introduction of biologics, remain as the mainstay therapy for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Significantly, there are cohorts of these patients with poor sensitivity to steroid treatment even with high doses, which can lead to many iatrogenic side effects. The dose-limiting toxicity of corticosteroids, and the lack of effective therapeutic alternatives, leads to substantial excess morbidity and healthcare expenditure. We have developed novel murine models of respiratory infection-induced, severe, steroid-resistant asthma that recapitulate the hallmark features of the human disease. These models can be used to elucidate novel disease mechanisms and identify new therapeutic targets in severe asthma. Hypothesis-driven studies can elucidate the roles of specific factors and pathways. Alternatively, 'Omics approaches can be used to rapidly generate new targets. Similar approaches can be used in other diseases. PMID:27525064

  20. Elucidating novel disease mechanisms in severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Richard Y; Rae, Brittany; Neal, Rachel; Donovan, Chantal; Pinkerton, James; Balachandran, Lohis; Starkey, Malcolm R; Knight, Darryl A; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are broadly active and potent anti-inflammatory agents that, despite the introduction of biologics, remain as the mainstay therapy for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Significantly, there are cohorts of these patients with poor sensitivity to steroid treatment even with high doses, which can lead to many iatrogenic side effects. The dose-limiting toxicity of corticosteroids, and the lack of effective therapeutic alternatives, leads to substantial excess morbidity and healthcare expenditure. We have developed novel murine models of respiratory infection-induced, severe, steroid-resistant asthma that recapitulate the hallmark features of the human disease. These models can be used to elucidate novel disease mechanisms and identify new therapeutic targets in severe asthma. Hypothesis-driven studies can elucidate the roles of specific factors and pathways. Alternatively, 'Omics approaches can be used to rapidly generate new targets. Similar approaches can be used in other diseases. PMID:27525064

  1. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  2. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  3. A study of the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and its correlation with severity indices

    PubMed Central

    Vengadakrishnan, K.; Koushik, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with wide clinical variation and its incidence is increasing. Acute pancreatitis may vary in severity, from mild self-limiting pancreatic inflammation to pancreatic necrosis with life-threatening sequelae. Severity of acute pancreatitis is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis. Aim and objectives The present study was aimed to assess the clinical profile of acute pancreatitis and to assess the efficacy of various severity indices in predicting the outcome of patients. Methodology This was a prospective study done in Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Hospital from April 2012–September 2014. All patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were included in this study. Along with routine lab parameters, serum amylase, lipase, lipid profile, calcium, CRP, LDH, CT abdomen, CXR and 2D Echo was done for all patients. Results A total of 110 patients were analysed. 50 patients required Intensive care, among them 9 patients (18%) died. 20 patients (18.2%) had MODS, 15 patients (13.6%) had pleural effusion, 9 patients (8.2%) had pseudocyst, 2 patients(1.8%) had hypotension, 2 patients(1.8%) had ARDS and 2 patients(1.8%) had DKA. In relation to various severity indices, high score of CRP, LDH and CT severity index was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. 15 patients (13.6%) underwent open necrosectomy surgery, 3 patients (2.7%) underwent laparoscopic necrosectomy and 7 patients (6.4%) were tried step up approach but could not avoid surgery. Step up approach and surgery did not have a significant reduction in the mortality. Conclusion Initial assessment of severity by CRP, LDH and lipase could be reliable indicators of outcome in acute pancreatitis PMID:26715920

  4. [Protocol for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis with necrosis].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luis; Targarona, Javier; Rodriguez, César

    2005-01-01

    The Severe Acute Pancreatic Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital was officially created in the year 2000. Up to date, we have cared for more than 195 patients with Pancreatic Necrosis. All of them have been treated under a management protocol presented by us. This has helped us to standardize treatment and also to compare results with work groups around the world. This Protocol comes from our own experience and that of our colleagues abroad with a wide knowledge in this kind of pathology abroad, with whom we maintain close ties.

  5. Resveratrol: A Focus on Several Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tellone, Ester; Galtieri, Antonio; Russo, Annamaria; Giardina, Bruno; Ficarra, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Molecules of the plant world are proving their effectiveness in countering, slowing down, and regressing many diseases. The resveratrol for its intrinsic properties related to its stilbene structure has been proven to be a universal panacea, especially for a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper evaluates (in vivo and in vitro) the various molecular targets of this peculiar polyphenol and its ability to effectively counter several neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. What emerges is that, in the deep heterogeneity of the pathologies evaluated, resveratrol through a convergence on the protein targets is able to give therapeutic responses in neuronal cells deeply diversified not only in morphological structure but especially in their function performed in the anatomical district to which they belong. PMID:26180587

  6. COPD exacerbations by disease severity in England

    PubMed Central

    Merinopoulou, Evie; Raluy-Callado, Mireia; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; MacLachlan, Sharon; Khalid, Javaria Mona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with accelerated disease progression and are important drivers of health care resource utilization. The study aimed to quantify the rates of COPD exacerbations in England and assess health care resource utilization by severity categories according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2013. Methods Data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to Hospital Episode Statistics were used to identify patients with a COPD diagnosis aged ≥40 years. Those with complete spirometric, modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale information, and exacerbation history 12 months prior to January 1, 2011 (index date) were classified into GOLD severity groups. Study outcomes over follow-up (up to December 31, 2013) were exacerbation rates and resource utilization (general practitioner visits, hospital admissions). Results From the 44,201 patients in the study cohort, 83.5% were classified into severity levels GOLD A: 33.8%, GOLD B: 21.0%, GOLD C: 18.1%, and GOLD D: 27.0%. Mean age at diagnosis was 66 years and 52.0% were male. Annual exacerbation rates per person-year increased with severity, from 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81–0.85) for GOLD A to 2.51 (95% CI: 2.47–2.55) for GOLD D. General practitioner visit rates per person-year also increased with severity, from 4.82 (95% CI: 4.74–4.93) for GOLD A to 7.44 (95% CI: 7.31–7.61) for GOLD D. COPD-related hospitalization rates per person-year increased from less symptoms (GOLD A: 0.28, GOLD C: 0.39) to more symptoms (GOLD B: 0.52, GOLD D: 0.84). Conclusion Patients in the most severe category (GOLD D) experienced nearly three times the number of exacerbations and COPD-related hospitalizations as those in the least severe category (GOLD A), in addition to increased general practitioner visits. Better patient management to stabilize the disease progression could allow for an

  7. NIV-Helmet in Severe Hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Nunes, P.; Silvestre, C.; Abadesso, C.; Loureiro, H.; Almeida, H.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a method to be applied in acute respiratory failure, given the possibility of avoiding tracheal intubation and conventional ventilation. A previous healthy 5-month-old boy developed low-grade intermittent fever, flu-like symptoms, and dry cough for 3 days. On admission, he showed severe respiratory distress with SpO2/FiO2 ratio of 94. Subsequent evaluation identified an RSV infection complicated with an increase of inflammatory parameters (reactive C protein 15 mg/dL). Within the first hour after NIV-helmet CPAP SpO2/FiO2 ratio increased to 157. This sustained improvement allowed the continuing of this strategy. After 102 h, he was disconnected from the helmet CPAP device. The NIV use in severe hypoxemic acute respiratory failure should be carefully monitored as the absence of clinical improvement has a predictive value in the need to resume to intubation and mechanical ventilation. We emphasize that SpO2/FiO2 ratio is a valuable monitoring instrument. Helmet interface use represents a more comfortable alternative for providing ventilatory support, particularly to small infants, which constitute a sensitive group within pediatric patients. PMID:26000189

  8. Colonic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shohachi; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Oishi, Kosuke; Fukumoto, Kazuhiko; Ota, Shigeyasu; Inaba, Keisuke; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Uchiyama, Takashi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Colonic fistula is a rare and potentially critical sequela of severe acute pancreatitis, which requires surgical treatment. We report two cases that were successfully treated by a colectomy for colonic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Case 1 is a 71-year-old man infected with pseudocysts owing to severe acute pancreatitis that developed into a colonic fistula as an early complication with a resulting pancreatic abscess. This patient underwent a left hemicolectomy, a transverse colostomy, and drainage of the pancreatic abscess. He has done well without recurrent disease for 35 months following surgery. Case 2 is a 58-year-old woman who had a past history of drainage during a laparotomy for a pancreatic abscess induced by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography 10 years earlier. She was admitted to our hospital with left lateral abdominal pain and low-grade fever. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging showed a retroperitoneal abscess and fistula to the descending colon. She underwent a left hemicolectomy and drainage of the retroperitoneal abscess. She has remained symptom-free for 20 months following surgery. The colonic fistula should therefore be recognized as a late complication during long-term follow-up as well as an early sequela associated with severe acute pancreatitis.

  9. High-mobility group box 1 protein and its role in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Li, Wei-Qin

    2015-02-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which belongs to the subfamily of HMG-1/-2, is a highly conserved single peptide chain consisting of 215 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of approximately 24894 Da. HMGB1 is a ubiquitous nuclear protein in mammals and plays a vital role in inflammatory diseases. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain with a poor prognosis. Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas (duration of less than six months), for which the severe form is called severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). More and more studies have shown that HMGB1 has a bidirectional effect in the pathogenesis of SAP. Extracellular HMGB1 can aggravate the pancreatic inflammatory process, whereas intracellular HMGB1 has a protective effect against pancreatitis. The mechanism of HMGB1 is multiple, mainly through the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Receptors for advanced glycation end-products and toll-like receptors (TLR), especially TLR-2 and TLR-4, are two major types of receptors mediating the inflammatory process triggered by HMGB1 and may be also the main mediators in the pathogenesis of SAP. HMGB1 inhibitors, such as ethyl pyruvate, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, can decrease the level of extracellular HMGB1 and are the promising targets in the treatment of SAP.

  10. [Biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Petricusić, Lidija; Banić, Marko; Cabrijan, Zeljko; Urek-Crncević, Marija; Hulak-Karlak, Vanja; Grgurević, Ivica

    2009-01-01

    The authors reveal and discuss the role of novel biochemical parameters in early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and assessment of the severity of the disease. These biochemical parameters, beside routinely used amilase and lipase, might enable us to early identify those patients who are at risk of developing severe form of pancreatitis or complications. These parameters include trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP), C-reactive protein (CRP, tripsinogen-2, procalcitonin, phospholipase-A2 (PLA2), carboxypeptidase activation peptide (CAPAP) and interleukin-6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8). Although these markers are still not incorporated in routine clinical practice, IL-6, IL-10, procalcitonin and trypsinogen activation peptide seem to have a good chance to be used as a new biochemical markers in assessment of severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis.

  11. [Severe hemolytic jaundice and Wilson's disease].

    PubMed

    Storck, D; Bareiss, P; Jesel, B; Warter, J

    1976-12-01

    The onset of spontaneous hemolytic jaundice in a young subject should lead to the search for Wilson's disease when clinical examination reveals cirrhosis. This hemolysis may evolve in the form of severe jaundice to a stage where the cirrhosis remains usually latent or well tolerated. The intervention of a toxic, allergic of infective factor liable to produce a hepatic lesion which frees a dose of copper sufficient to trigger off hemolysis, is discussed. The mechanism of the latter, that of the coagulation disorders observed, liver cell failure and widespread intravascular coagulation, are analysed in this paper and compared with data in the literature. The dramatic character of the case indicates that it is necessary to treat as a routine with penicillamine all homozygous forms of Wilson's disease.

  12. The Role of Peritoneal Lavage in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, John H. C.; Spencer, Frank C.

    1978-01-01

    Encouraged by reports of the therapeutic efficacy of peritoneal lavage in small series of five or six patients with acute pancreatitis, we have evaluated this treatment in 24 patients with “severe” pancreatitis. One hundred and three patients with “severe” pancreatitis (28% mortality) were separated from 347 with “mild” pancreatitis (0.9% mortality) by previously described early objective signs. Early treatment (Day 0-7) of “severe” pancreatitis included peritoneal lavage through catheters placed nonoperatively in 18 (Group A) and by catheters placed at laparotomy in six (Group C). Early treatment of nonlavaged patients with “severe” pancreatitis was by standard nonoperative measures in 61 (Group B) and included early operation in 18 (Group D). Lavage was continued for 48-96 hours, usually using 36-48 L/24 hours of balanced isotonic dialysate fluid, and was uncomplicated. Lavage led to striking immediate clinical improvement and no lavaged patient (Groups A and C) died during the first 10 days of treatment of pancreatitis. By contrast, 45% of deaths in nonlavaged patients (Group B and D) occurred during this early period, usually from cardiovascular or respiratory failure. Although lavage reduced mortality in subgroups of patients, ultimate overall survival was no affected (Group A, 83%; B, 84%; C, 33%; D,33%). Late peripancreatic abscesses caused most deaths in lavaged patients. These data show that peritoneal complications of severe acute pancreatitis and dramatically reduces early mortality. Lavage does not prevent the late local sequelae of peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:646497

  13. An indolent case of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lam, Man-Fai; Ooi, Gaik C; Lam, Bing; Ho, James C; Seto, Wing H; Ho, Pak L; Wong, Poon C; Liang, Raymond; Lam, Wah K; Tsang, Kenneth W

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious and typically rapidly progressive form of atypical pneumonia, which spread from Asia to many parts of the world in early 2003. Clinical diagnosis of SARS requires the presence of unremitting fever and progressive pneumonia despite antibiotic therapy, particularly in the presence of lymphopenia and raised transaminase levels. We report the case of a woman who had undergone a successful allogeneic bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. She presented initially with fever and a normal chest radiograph. Her indolent clinical course of SARS was punctuated by resolution of fever, but there was progressive radiologic deterioration and increasing serum antibody titer against SARS coronavirus. Treatment with oral prednisolone and ribavirin normalized her lymphopenia, altered transaminases, chest radiograph and high-resolution computed tomography appearances rapidly. Our experience should alert other clinicians in recognizing this atypical indolent presentation of SARS, to protect health care workers and the community at large and to ensure that these patients are properly treated.

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome diagnostics using a coronavirus protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Hu, Shaohui; Jona, Ghil; Zhu, Xiaowei; Kreiswirth, Nate; Willey, Barbara M; Mazzulli, Tony; Liu, Guozhen; Song, Qifeng; Chen, Peng; Cameron, Mark; Tyler, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wen, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Compton, Susan; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-14

    To monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection, a coronavirus protein microarray that harbors proteins from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and five additional coronaviruses was constructed. These microarrays were used to screen approximately 400 Canadian sera from the SARS outbreak, including samples from confirmed SARS-CoV cases, respiratory illness patients, and healthcare professionals. A computer algorithm that uses multiple classifiers to predict samples from SARS patients was developed and used to predict 206 sera from Chinese fever patients. The test assigned patients into two distinct groups: those with antibodies to SARS-CoV and those without. The microarray also identified patients with sera reactive against other coronavirus proteins. Our results correlated well with an indirect immunofluorescence test and demonstrated that viral infection can be monitored for many months after infection. We show that protein microarrays can serve as a rapid, sensitive, and simple tool for large-scale identification of viral-specific antibodies in sera.

  15. Severe acute kidney injury as presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    ter Haar, Eva; Labarque, Veerle; Tousseyn, Thomas; Mekahli, Djalila

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of acute kidney injury (AKI) at a very young age caused by primary lymphomatous renal infiltration due to Burkitt's lymphoma and analyse the literature on this rare condition. At presentation, clinical examination showed impressive bilateral nephromegaly and hypertension. Blood analysis indicated severe AKI, mild anaemia and normal serum electrolytes. There were no signs of tumour lysis syndrome. Urine sediment was normal, with neither haematuria nor proteinuria. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral renal enlargement (+12 SD), with increased corticomedullar differentiation. MRI demonstrated the presence of a homogenous renal enlargement with features of an infiltrative lesion. Ultimately, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of the renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma. Early and aggressive therapy is the key to ensure a good outcome. PMID:27118748

  16. Acute graft-vs-host disease: pathobiology and management.

    PubMed

    Goker, H; Haznedaroglu, I C; Chao, N J

    2001-03-01

    Acute graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to safe allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. GVHD occurs when transplanted donor T lymphocytes react to foreign host cells. It causes a wide variety of host tissue injuries. This review focuses on the pathobiological basis, clinical aspects, and current management strategies of acute GVHD. Afferent phase of acute GVHD starts with myeloablative conditioning, i.e., before the infusion of the graft. Total-body irradiation (TBI) or high-dose chemotherapy regimens cause extensive damage and activation in host tissues, which release inflammatory cytokines and enhance recipient major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. Recognition of the foreign host antigens by donor T cells and activation, stimulation, and proliferation of T cells is crucial in the afferent phase. Effector phase of acute GVHD results in direct and indirect damage to host cells. The skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver are major target organs of acute GVHD. Combination drug prophylaxis in GVHD is essential in all patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Steroids have remained the standard for the treatment of acute GVHD. Several clinical trials have evaluated monoclonal antibodies or receptor antagonist therapy for steroid-resistant acute GVHD, with different successes in a variety of settings. There are some newer promising agents like mycophenolate mofetil, glutamic acid-lysine-alanine-tyrosine (GLAT), rapamycin, and trimetrexate currently entering in the clinical studies, and other agents are in development. Future experimental and clinical studies on GVHD will shed further light on the better understanding of the disease pathobiology and generate the tools to treat malignant disorders with allogeneic HSCT with specific graft-vs-tumor effects devoid of GVHD. PMID:11274753

  17. Environmental determinants of severity in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Piel, Frédéric B.; Menzel, Stephan; Rees, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease causes acute and chronic illness, and median life expectancy is reduced by at least 30 years in all countries, with greater reductions in low-income countries. There is a wide spectrum of severity, with some patients having no symptoms and others suffering frequent, life-changing complications. Much of this variability is unexplained, despite increasingly sophisticated genetic studies. Environmental factors, including climate, air quality, socio-economics, exercise and infection, are likely to be important, as demonstrated by the stark differences in outcomes between patients in Africa and USA/Europe. The effects of weather vary with geography, although most studies show that exposure to cold or wind increases hospital attendance with acute pain. Most of the different air pollutants are closely intercorrelated, and increasing overall levels seem to correlate with increased hospital attendance, although higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon monoxide may offer some benefit for patients with sickle cell disease. Exercise causes some adverse physiological changes, although this may be off-set by improvements in cardiovascular health. Most sickle cell disease patients live in low-income countries and socioeconomic factors are undoubtedly important, but little studied beyond documenting that sickle cell disease is associated with decreases in some measures of social status. Infections cause many of the differences in outcomes seen across the world, but again these effects are relatively poorly understood. All the above factors are likely to account for much of the pathology and variability of sickle cell disease, and large prospective studies are needed to understand these effects better. PMID:26341524

  18. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention

  19. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention

  20. Anorexia during acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Plata-Salamán, C R

    1996-02-01

    Anorexia is associated with disorders of all systems. Anorexia represents a consistent clinical manifestation during acute and chronic pathophysiological processes (infection, inflammation, injury, toxins, immunological reactions, malignancy and necrosis). Anorexia during disease can be beneficial or deleterious depending on the timing and duration. Temporary anorexia during acute disease may be beneficial to an organism since a restriction in the intake of micro- and macro-nutrients will inhibit bacterial growth. Long-term anorexia during chronic disease, however, is deleterious to an organism and may be associated with cachexia, which can ultimately result in death. Various mechanisms participate in the anorexia observed during disease, including cytokine action. Anorexia induced by cytokines is proposed to involve modulation of hypothalamic-feeding associated sites, prostaglandin-dependent mechanisms, modifications of neurotransmitter systems, gastrointestinal, metabolic, and endocrine factors. In addition, the anorexia-cachexia syndrome is multifactorial and may involve chronic pain, depression or anxiety, hypogeusia and hyposmia, chronic nausea, early satiety, malfunction of the gastrointestinal system, metabolic alterations, cytokine action, production of other anorexigenic substances and/or iatrogenic causes (chemotherapy, radiotherapy). Cachexia may result not only from anorexia and a decreased caloric intake, but also from malabsorption and losses from the body (ulcers, hemorrhage, effusions), or a change in body metabolism. Research has focused on potential interventions to modify anorexia during disease and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Nutritional modifications and the use of specific steroids (such as megestrol acetate) are being tested in the clinical setting. Understanding the specific mechanisms responsible for anorexia during disease as well as their interactions is essential to develop interventions for the control of anorexia (during a critical

  1. [Principles of acute management of the severe diving accident].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L; Frey, G; Dietze, T; Bock, K H

    1989-10-01

    The basics of the acute management of severe diving accidents are outlined by means of 25 patients (20 patients presented with decompression sickness, 5 suffered from a barotrauma of the lungs with consecutive air embolism) treated at our facilities. Contrary to widespread notion, disturbed vital functions have to be treated by intensive care measures, prior to the definite recompression therapy. These are: (1) Treatment of generalized or localized tissue hypoxia secondary to bubble-generation; (2) puncture of a (valvular-) pneumothorax after a pulmonary barotrauma; (3) haemodynamic stabilization when cardiac or spinal shock is present; (4) improvement of the rheological situation. When vital functions are unstable or endangered, these patients must not be transported in a monoplace chamber. This type of chamber does not leave any access to the patient in case of a deteriorating status. Since the severe diving accident mostly turns out to be a problem of intensive care medicine in close combination with the recompression therapy, the continuous integration of the recompression protocol with a comprehensive intensive care therapy is considered crucial. PMID:2817326

  2. Induction of alternatively activated macrophages enhances pathogenesis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J; Hennighausen, Lothar; Frieman, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1(-/-) mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6(-/-) double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  3. Prospects for Emerging Infections in East and Southeast Asia 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades. PMID:23738977

  4. Prospects for emerging infections in East and southeast Asia 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horby, Peter W; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    It is 10 years since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged, and East and Southeast Asia retain a reputation as a hot spot of emerging infectious diseases. The region is certainly a hot spot of socioeconomic and environmental change, and although some changes (e.g., urbanization and agricultural intensification) may reduce the probability of emerging infectious diseases, the effect of any individual emergence event may be increased by the greater concentration and connectivity of livestock, persons, and products. The region is now better able to detect and respond to emerging infectious diseases than it was a decade ago, but the tools and methods to produce sufficiently refined assessments of the risks of disease emergence are still lacking. Given the continued scale and pace of change in East and Southeast Asia, it is vital that capabilities for predicting, identifying, and controlling biologic threats do not stagnate as the memory of SARS fades.

  5. Metabolomics and Its Application to Acute Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Kathleen A.; McKay, Ryan T.; Karnovsky, Alla; Quémerais, Bernadette; Lacy, Paige

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly expanding field of systems biology that is gaining significant attention in many areas of biomedical research. Also known as metabonomics, it comprises the analysis of all small molecules or metabolites that are present within an organism or a specific compartment of the body. Metabolite detection and quantification provide a valuable addition to genomics and proteomics and give unique insights into metabolic changes that occur in tangent to alterations in gene and protein activity that are associated with disease. As a novel approach to understanding disease, metabolomics provides a “snapshot” in time of all metabolites present in a biological sample such as whole blood, plasma, serum, urine, and many other specimens that may be obtained from either patients or experimental models. In this article, we review the burgeoning field of metabolomics in its application to acute lung diseases, specifically pneumonia and acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS). We also discuss the potential applications of metabolomics for monitoring exposure to aerosolized environmental toxins. Recent reports have suggested that metabolomics analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches may provide clinicians with the opportunity to identify new biomarkers that may predict progression to more severe disease, such as sepsis, which kills many patients each year. In addition, metabolomics may provide more detailed phenotyping of patient heterogeneity, which is needed to achieve the goal of precision medicine. However, although several experimental and clinical metabolomics studies have been conducted assessing the application of the science to acute lung diseases, only incremental progress has been made. Specifically, little is known about the metabolic phenotypes of these illnesses. These data are needed to substantiate metabolomics biomarker credentials so that clinicians can employ them for clinical decision

  6. Comorbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Related to disease severity?

    PubMed Central

    Echave-Sustaeta, Jose M; Comeche Casanova, Lorena; Cosio, Borja G; Soler-Cataluña, Juan Jose; Garcia-Lujan, Ricardo; Ribera, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Several diseases commonly co-exist with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in elderly patients. This study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between COPD severity and the frequency of comorbidities in stable COPD patients. Patients and methods In this multicenter, cross-sectional study, patients with spirometric diagnosis of COPD attended to by internal medicine departments throughout Spain were consecutively recruited by 225 internal medicine specialists. The severity of airflow obstruction was graded using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) and data on demographics, smoking history, comorbidities, and dyspnea were collected. The Charlson comorbidity score was calculated. Results Eight hundred and sixty-six patients were analyzed: male 93%, mean age 69.8 (standard deviation [SD] 9.7) years and forced vital capacity in 1 second 42.1 (SD 17.7)%. Even, the mean (SD) Charlson score was 2.2 (2.2) for stage I, 2.3 (1.5) for stage II, 2.5 (1.6) for stage III, and 2.7 (1.8) for stage IV (P=0.013 between stage I and IV groups), independent predictors of Charlson score in the multivariate analysis were age, smoking history (pack-years), the hemoglobin level, and dyspnea, but not GOLD stage. Conclusion COPD patients attended to in internal medicine departments show high scores of comorbidity. However, GOLD stage was not an independent predictor of comorbidity. PMID:25429213

  7. Blood pressure control in acute cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Owens, William B

    2011-03-01

    Acute cerebrovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) affect 780,000 Americans each year. Physicians who care for patients with these conditions must be able to recognize when acute hypertension requires treatment and should understand the principles of cerebral autoregulation and perfusion. Physicians should also be familiar with the various pharmacologic agents used in the treatment of cerebrovascular emergencies. Acute ischemic stroke frequently presents with hypertension, but the systemic blood pressure should not be treated unless the systolic pressure exceeds 220 mm Hg or the diastolic pressure exceeds 120 mm Hg. Overly aggressive treatment of hypertension can compromise collateral perfusion of the ischemic penumbra. Hypertension associated with intracerebral hemorrhage can be treated more aggressively to minimize hematoma expansion during the first 3 to 6 hours of illness. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is usually due to aneurysmal rupture; systolic blood pressure should be kept <150 mm Hg to prevent re-rupture of the aneurysm. Nicardipine and labetalol are recommended for rapidly treating hypertension during cerebrovascular emergencies. Sodium nitroprusside is not recommended due to its adverse effects on cerebral autoregulation and intracranial pressure. Hypoperfusion of the injured brain should be avoided at all costs.

  8. Severe Acute Axonal Neuropathy following Treatment with Arsenic Trioxide for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Marcus; Sammartin, Kety; Nabergoj, Mitja; Vianello, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of arsenic toxicity. Symptoms are usually mild and reversible following discontinuation of treatment. A more severe chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by distal axonal-loss neuropathy can be seen in chronic arsenic exposure. The clinical course of arsenic neurotoxicity in patients with coexistence of thiamine deficiency is only anecdotally known but this association may potentially lead to severe consequences. We describe a case of acute irreversible axonal neuropathy in a patient with hidden thiamine deficiency who was treated with a short course of arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thiamine replacement therapy and arsenic trioxide discontinuation were not followed by neurological recovery and severe polyneuropathy persisted at 12-month follow-up. Thiamine plasma levels should be measured in patients who are candidate to arsenic trioxide therapy. Prophylactic administration of vitamin B1 may be advisable. The appearance of polyneuropathy signs early during the administration of arsenic trioxide should prompt electrodiagnostic testing to rule out a pattern of axonal neuropathy which would need immediate discontinuation of arsenic trioxide. PMID:27158436

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): a year in review.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Astell, Caroline; Brunham, Robert C; Low, Donald E; Petric, Martin; Roper, Rachel L; Talbot, Pierre J; Tam, Theresa; Babiuk, Lorne

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged from China as an untreatable and rapidly spreading respiratory illness of unknown etiology. Following point source exposure in February 2003, more than a dozen guests infected at a Hong Kong hotel seeded multi-country outbreaks that persisted through the spring of 2003. The World Health Organization responded by invoking traditional public health measures and advanced technologies to control the illness and contain the cause. A novel coronavirus was implicated and its entire genome was sequenced by mid-April 2003. The urgency of responding to this threat focused scientific endeavor and stimulated global collaboration. Through real-time application of accumulating knowledge, the world proved capable of arresting the first pandemic threat of the twenty-first century, despite early respiratory-borne spread and global susceptibility. This review synthesizes lessons learned from this remarkable achievement. These lessons can be applied to re-emergence of SARS or to the next pandemic threat to arise. PMID:15660517

  10. Minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weil, S C

    2000-03-01

    In the last decade our understanding of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has advanced tremendously. The recognition of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as a powerful therapeutic agent paralleled the cloning of the t(15;17) breakpoint. RtPCR for the PML-RARA hybrid mRNA has become the hallmark of molecular diagnosis and molecular monitoring in APL. Current techniques are useful in predicting complete remission and a possible cure in many patients who repeatedly test negative by PCR. Standardizing techniques and improving the sensitivity of the assay are important. Doing this in a way so that clinically relevant minimal residual disease can be distinguished from "indolent disease" remains among the future challenges in APL. PMID:10702899

  11. [Hot issues on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis by Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine].

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Deng, Li-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is recognized as critical refractory disease. The case fatality rate of SAP is as high as 36%-50%. Although significant progress has been achieved on the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) by Integrated Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western Medicine (WM), there still exist some difficulties hindering the further improvement of therapeutic efficacy. The hot issues includes: unconfirmative curative effects and diverse treatment principles, complicated predictive scoring systems and inaccurate markers for the severity stratification, unproved new therapeutic tools and controversial methods waiting more high qualified evidence, unclarified mechanism of Integrated TCM and WM. In order to overcome the difficulties, we aim to launch the clinical pathway of Integrated TCM and WM, to strengthen the unity of multidisciplinary cooperation. We also need to keep the efforts on screening the markers for early evaluation and prediction of disease severity, improving the diagnosis and treatment, exploring the mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine in treating SAP with more high quality basic and clinical research. Based on these efforts, we could provide better treatments and prognosis for SAP patients.

  12. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a case with severe gingival hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Misirlioglu, M; Adisen, M Z; Yilmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are aggressive hematopoietic neoplasms that, if untreated, can lead to death within days. Owing to its high morbidity rate, early diagnosis and appropriate medical therapy is essential. Oral lesions may be the presenting feature of acute leukemias and are, therefore, important diagnostic indicators of the disease. Erythematous or cyanotic gingival hyperplasia with or without necrosis is reported to be the most consistent symptom leading to a diagnosis of acute leukemia that directs the patient to seek early dental consultation. This report refers to a patient with AML that was provisionally diagnosed in the dental hospital due to severe gingival enlargements.

  13. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  14. Resolution of primary severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus infection requires Stat1.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Robert J; Gao, Guangping; Rowe, Thomas; Bell, Peter; Flieder, Douglas; Paragas, Jason; Kobinger, Gary P; Wivel, Nelson A; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G; Wilson, James M

    2004-10-01

    Intranasal inhalation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV) in the immunocompetent mouse strain 129SvEv resulted in infection of conducting airway epithelial cells followed by rapid clearance of virus from the lungs and the development of self-limited bronchiolitis. Animals resistant to the effects of interferons by virtue of a deficiency in Stat1 demonstrated a markedly different course following intranasal inhalation of SARS CoV, one characterized by replication of virus in lungs and progressively worsening pulmonary disease with inflammation of small airways and alveoli and systemic spread of the virus to livers and spleens.

  15. Preparing to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome and other respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mei-Shang; Su, Ih-Jen

    2004-11-01

    Globalisation and its effect on human development has rendered an environment that is conducive for the rapid international spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and other new infectious diseases yet to emerge. After the unprecedented multi-country outbreak of avian influenza with human cases in the winter of 2003-2004, an influenza pandemic is a current threat. A critical review of problems and solutions encountered during the 2003-2004 SARS epidemics will serve as the basis for considering national preparedness steps that can be taken to facilitate the early detection of avian influenza, and a rapid response to an influenza pandemic should it occur.

  16. Respiratory autoresuscitation following severe acute hypoxemia in anesthetized adult rats.

    PubMed

    Krause, A; Nowak, Z; Srbu, R; Bell, H J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study we investigated the pattern and efficacy of respiratory autoresuscitation in spontaneously breathing adult male rats across three separate anesthetic backgrounds. Each animal was administered one of three injectable anesthetics to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia: ketamine-xylazine (KET, n=10), pentobarbital (PEN, n=10), or urethane (URE, n=10). Animals were tracheostomized and equipped with a femoral artery catheter to record airflow and arterial pressures. In response to a bout of breathing anoxic air, none of the 10 URE animals were able to mount a successful autoresuscitation response. In contrast, all KET and PEN animals survived all four consecutive anoxic exposures, restoring eupneic breathing in all cases. Moreover, only 4/10 URE animals expressed gasping breaths following the onset of respiratory arrest, and these were temporally delayed (p<0.001) and much smaller in volume (P≤0.012) compared to KET and PEN animals. URE animals showed no clear aberrations in their cardiovascular responses to anoxia, with the exception of lower arterial pulse pressures compared to either KET or PEN animals at specific points following RA. Ketamine-xylazine and pentobarbital anesthesia can be reliably and effectively used to create models for the study of autoresuscitation in adult rats. In contrast, urethane causes catastrophic failure of respiratory autoresuscitation, by delaying or outright preventing the elaboration of gasping breaths following anoxia-induced respiratory arrest. The neuronal and synaptic alterations accompanying urethane anesthesia may therefore provide a means of understanding potential pathological alterations in rhythm generation that can predispose the respiratory control system to failed autoresuscitation following an episode of acute severe hypoxemia. PMID:27378495

  17. [Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a global overview of the epidemic].

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Alvarez-Lucas, Carlos; Palacios-Zavala, Ethel; Nava-Frías, Margarita; Betancourt-Cravioto, Miguel; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    In early February 2003, the World Health Organization (WHO) began receiving reports of patients with a syndrome characterized by an atypical pneumonia with rapid progression to respiratory failure without an identified cause despite extensive diagnostic workups. Most of these reports pointed out that the outbreak started in Southern China, specifically in the Guandong Province. The initial outbreak in South East Asia has already spread to other Regions in Asia, Europe, North and South America, and South Africa. Many of these cases can be linked through chains of transmission to an index case from the Guandong Province who visited Hong Kong. Although the exact mode of transmission has not been clearly established, the etiology of this syndrome has already been identified. A novel Coronavirus has been identified by electron microscopy and molecular assays in multiple laboratories from respiratory specimens throughout the world. The syndrome has been defined as SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) by WHO, and is characterized by an incubation period between 1 and 10 days (average 5 days) and by a febrile phase that usually lasts approximately 3 days. During the respiratory phase that begins around day 3, patients start developing a dry cough, shortness of breath and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilatory support is required in about 10 to 40% of cases and the case-fatality rate ranges between 3 and 16%. The laboratory findings in SARS cases include leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a rise in transaminases and lactic dehydrogenase levels. Treatment of SARS includes supportive measures and the empiric use of ribavirin. Respiratory isolation, use of respiratory masks, and compulsory hand hygiene constitute the principal preventive measures. The confirmation of a case can be performed at reference laboratories by serologic and molecular assays. From the onset of this epidemic Mexico established a surveillance system as well as clinical guidelines and recommendations for

  18. Severe Spinal Injury in Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Quarracino, Cecilia; Aguirre, Florencia; Rugilo, Carlos A.; Negri, Luciana De

    2015-01-01

    Hirayama disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by an insidious progressive subacute unilateral or bilateral weakness of the hands and forearm muscles leading to a painless amyotrophy. The disease primarily affects young men in the second to third decades of life. It has always been described as a second motor neuron disease, thus sparing the pyramidal and sensitive pathways. It usually has a slow progression course of 3 to 5 years followed by stabilization. Since its initial description by Keyzo Hirayama in 1959, most cases have been reported in Asia, particularly Japan and India, although the disease reportedly has worldwide distribution. PMID:26435801

  19. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  20. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  1. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in acute severe asthma. A randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Engel, T; Dirksen, A; Frølund, L; Heinig, J H; Svendsen, U G; Pedersen, B K; Weeke, B

    1990-04-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) has been shown to possess a long-lasting effect in other immune-inflammatory diseases without the well-known side effects caused by long-term treatment with glucocorticosteroids. In an attempt to reduce the long-term use of oral steroids in asthmatics, we conducted this double-blind, double-dummy study to compare the use of MPPT (1 g of methylprednisolone intravenously) (8 patients) with a short course of oral prednisolone (10 patients) in asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma. Both treatments were effective in relieving the acute attack of asthma. The MPPT-treated patients did not show a faster resolution than did the orally treated group. No patients needed assisted ventilation, and no deaths occurred. One week after the treatment FEV1 tended to decrease in the methylprednisolone group compared with the oral prednisolone group (P = 0.06). The patients initially receiving MPPT needed supplementary prednisolone earlier and in higher doses than did the patients receiving oral prednisolone as initial treatment. At the end of the 12 weeks' study period, the groups reached identical FEV1. In conclusion, we did not find intravenous methylprednisolone superior to oral prednisolone in the treatment of acute attacks of severe asthma, but methylprednisolone pulse therapy had a shorter duration as regards protection against future asthma attacks. PMID:2183645

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    PubMed

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD?

  3. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  4. The origins of cachexia in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2006-02-01

    The term cachexia originates from the Greek root kakos hexis, which translates into "bad condition," recognized for centuries as a progressive deterioration of body habitus. Cachexia is commonly associated with a number of disease states, including acute inflammatory processes associated with critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Cachexia is responsible for the deaths of 10%-22% of all patients with cancer and approximately 15% of the trauma deaths that occur from sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and malnutrition days to weeks after the initial traumatic event. The abnormalities associated with cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, a preferential loss of somatic muscle and fat mass, altered hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, and anemia. Anorexia alone cannot fully explain the development of cachexia; metabolic alterations in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism contribute to the severe tissue losses. Despite significant advances in our understanding of specific disease processes, the mechanisms leading to cachexia remain unclear and multifactorial. Although complex, increasing evidence from both animal models and clinical studies suggests that an inflammatory response, mediated in part by a dysregulated production of proinflammatory cytokines, plays a role in the genesis of cachexia, associated with both critical illness and chronic inflammatory diseases. These cytokines are further thought to induce an acute phase protein response (APR) and produce the alterations in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism identified as crucial markers of acute inflammation in states of malignancy and critical illness. Although much is still unknown about the etiology of cachexia, there is growing appreciation that cachexia represents the endproduct of an inappropriate interplay between multiple cytokines, neuropeptides, classic stress

  5. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Narita, Ayuko; Takeda, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiromi; Tamura, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Wataru; Komatsu, Akira; Tamura, Hiroaki; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis that affects both small and medium-sized vessels including the coronary arteries in infants and children. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal glycoprotein that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide, a lipid, that functions as a second messenger in the regulation of cell functions. ASM activation has been implicated in numerous cellular stress responses and is associated with cellular ASM secretion, either through alternative trafficking of the ASM precursor protein or by means of an unidentified mechanism. Elevation of serum ASM activity has been described in several human diseases, suggesting that patients with diseases involving vascular endothelial cells may exhibit a preferential elevation of serum ASM activity. As acute KD is characterized by systemic vasculitis that could affect vascular endothelial cells, the elevation of serum ASM activity should be considered in these patients. In the present study, serum ASM activity in the sera of 15 patients with acute KD was determined both before and after treatment with infusion of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a first-line treatment for acute KD. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly elevated in KD patients when compared to the control group (3.85 ± 1.46 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h vs. 1.15 ± 0.10 nmol/0.1 ml/6 h, p < 0.001), suggesting that ASM activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of this condition. Serum ASM activity before IVIG was significantly correlated with levels of C-reactive protein (p < 0.05). These results suggest the involvement of sphingolipid metabolism in the pathophysiology of KD. PMID:26447086

  6. The Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol (AASAP) study: objectives and methods of a study to develop an acute asthma clinical prediction rule.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald H; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Abramo, Thomas J; Sheller, James R; Resha, Donald J; Hartert, Tina V

    2012-06-01

    Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most common reasons for paediatric emergency department visits and hospitalisations, and a relapse frequently necessitates repeat urgent care. While care plans exist, there are no acute asthma prediction rules (APRs) to assess severity and predict outcome. The primary objective of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study is to develop a multivariable APR for acute asthma exacerbations in paediatric patients. A prospective, convenience sample of paediatric patients aged 5-17 years with acute asthma exacerbations who present to an urban, academic, tertiary paediatric emergency department was enrolled. The study protocol and data analysis plan conform to accepted biostatistical and clinical standards for clinical prediction rule development. Modelling of the APR will be performed once the entire sample size of 1500 has accrued. It is anticipated that the APR will improve resource utilisation in the emergency department, aid in standardisation of disease assessment and allow physician and non-physician providers to participate in earlier objective decision making. The objective of this report is to describe the study objectives and detailed methodology of the Acute Asthma Severity Assessment Protocol study.

  7. Acute arthropathy in patients with rash diseases: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Bastos Camacho, Luiz Antonio; Fernandes Bruno, Letícia; de Gusmão, Rodrigo Coimbra; de Medeiros Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Coca Velarde, Luis Guillermo; Mendonça Siqueira, Marilda

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of acute arthropathy and selected clinical features in patients with acute rash diseases. Serum samples from 1,554 patients were tested for anti-measles, dengue, human parvovirus B19, and rubella virus IgM using enzyme immunoassay. Sera from children, in whom these infections were excluded, were studied for anti-human herpesvirus type 6 IgG antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence test. Joint complaints occurred in 31.2% of the 862 patients with an etiologic diagnosis and were more frequently seen in adults than in children (OR 8.5). Among the adults, arthropathy prevailed in women compared to men (OR 1.8). Arthropathy was most frequently reported in rubella (41.2%) and in dengue fever cases (41.1%) than in the other rash diseases studied (p < 0.0001). Joint complaints were more frequently seen in patients with fever (OR 1.6) and with five or more days of onset of the disease (OR 1.6), regardless of serological diagnosis. Arthropathy appeared as a frequent condition in rash diseases, typically with low severity and no specific pattern of joint involvement.

  8. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Per M.; De Fine Licht, Henrik H.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Understanding the underlying causes for the variation in case-fatality-ratios (CFR) is important for assessing the mechanism governing global disparity in the burden of infectious diseases. Variation in CFR is likely to be driven by factors such as population genetics, demography, transmission patterns and general health status. We present data here that support the hypothsis that changes in CFRs for specific diseases may be the result of serial passage through different hosts. For example passage through adults may lead to lower CFR, whereas passage through children may have the opposite effect. Accordingly changes in CFR may occur in parallel with demographic transitions. Methodology: We explored the predictability of CFR using data obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) disease databases for four human diseases: mumps, malaria, tuberculosis and leptospirosis and assessed these for association with a range of population characteristics, such as crude birth and death rates, median age of the population, mean body mass index, proportion living in urban areas and tuberculosis vaccine coverage. We then tested this predictive model on Danish historical demographic and population data. Results: Birth rates were the best predictor for mumps and malaria CFR. For tuberculosis CFR death rates were the best predictor and for leptospirosis population density was a significant predictor. Conclusions and implications: CFR predictors differed among diseases according to their biology. We suggest that the overall result reflects an interaction between the forces driving demographic change and the virulence of human-to-human transmitted diseases. PMID:26884415

  9. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Moesker, Fleur M.; van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. Objective The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Study Design Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (<18 year) with or without a medical history, admitted to our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI or to the medium care (MC) with an acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. Results We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Conclusion Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified. PMID:26964038

  10. Coexistence of sickle cell disease and severe congenital neutropenia: first impressions can be deceiving.

    PubMed

    Wali, Yasser; Beshlawi, Ismail; Fawaz, Naglaa; Alkhayat, Aisha; Zalabany, Mahmoud; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Al-Kindi, Salam; Al-Rawas, Abdul Hakim A; Klein, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    We report an Omani family in whom the propositus had a rare coexistence of sickle cell disease and severe congenital neutropenia associated with a mutation in ELANE. In contrast to his siblings with sickle cell disease, the severity of HbSS-associated complications such as painful crises and acute chest syndrome was significantly reduced. His course of the disease had markedly worsened after initiating G-CSF therapy. These clinical observations suggest that neutropenia may ameliorate inflammatory responses and thus display a modulating factor with respect to the clinical course of sickle cell disease.

  11. The long-term prognosis of acute kidney injury: acute renal failure as a cause of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    There is a widespread opinion that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rather harmless complication and that survival is determined not by renal dysfunction per se, but by the severity of the underlying disease. This opinion is in sharp contrast to evidence from several recent experimental and clinical investigations indicating that AKI is a condition which exerts a fundamental impact on the course of the disease, the evolution of associated complications and on prognosis, independently from the type and severity of the underlying condition. In conclusion, severe AKI in the critically ill patient is associated with high rates of morbidity, mortality and consumption of health care resources.

  12. Management of acute moderate and severe childhood malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute childhood malnutrition affects about a tenth of the world's children under 5 years of age, particularly those living in circumstances of extreme poverty in the developing world. Malnutrition is typically the result of an inadequate diet and is one of the most common diagnoses in children in he...

  13. Spatial dynamics of an epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome in an urban area.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfeng; McMichael, Anthony J.; Meng, Bin; Becker, Niels G.; Han, Weiguo; Glass, Kathryn; Wu, Jilei; Liu, Xuhua; Liu, Jiyuan; Li, Xiaowen; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To map risk of exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in an urban area and assess the ability of traditional interventions to control dispersion of the disease. METHODS: Data on the Beijing SARS epidemic were used to map spatial clusters of identified contacts and to estimate transmission of SARS using a model with a time-dependent transmission rate. RESULTS: The estimated transmission rate decreased dramatically from 20 to 30 April 2003. The total number of cases in the epidemic in Beijing was estimated to be 2521. Hierarchical clustering revealed that risk-exposures were widespread, but clustered in a pattern that is distinctly related to the Beijing urban ring roads. CONCLUSION: Traditional control measures can be very effective at reducing transmission of SARS. Spatial patterns of risk-exposures can inform disease surveillance, prediction and control by identifying spatial target areas on which interventions should be focused. PMID:17242832

  14. The causality quandary in a patient with stroke, Takotsubo syndrome and severe coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Winter, Reidar; Henareh, Loghman

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo-like left ventricular dysfunction syndrome (TLVDS) and acute coronary syndrome have almost always the same clinical presentation and ECG findings. Both diseases may become a potential cardioembolic source to the cerebrovascular system. Stroke has been linked to TLVDS either as the trigger or as a complication. We report on a 67-year-old female patient who presented with an acute ischemic stroke confirmed by computed tomographic scan of the brain. She also had electrocardiographic features and laboratory findings suggestive of both acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and TLVDS. Coronary angiography revealed severe coronary artery stenoses but the coronary lesions did not have any of the features suggestive of an acute pathology. Echocardiography and left ventriculography showed a striking apical ballooning of the left ventricle, which resolved completely within 1 week, a clinical picture and course typical for TLVDS. There were no signs of left ventricular thrombus. A few burning questions arose from this case: what was the acute cardiac disease - TLVDS or AMI? Which disease came first - the stroke or the acute cardiac illness? An intricate cause-effect relationship is discussed; and finally, does an obstructive coronary artery disease rule out TLVDS?

  15. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1β concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1β protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 ± 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 ± 13.89 μmol/L at 6 h, 23.53 ± 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 ± 17.67 μmol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 ± 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 ± 21.09 μmol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1β levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 ± 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 ± 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 ± 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all

  16. [Severe hereditary retinal diseases in childhood].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B

    1996-01-01

    In dependence on the various statistics, hereditary causes are identified in up to 50% of the visually handicapped and blind school children. Most common are retinal disorders, which account for 15 to 55%. The most important diseases are briefly reviewed: Leber's congenital amaurosis, rod monochromacy, blue cone monochromacy, congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndromes, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis Spielmeyer-Vogt, the various forms of albinism, exsudative vitreoretinopathies including Norrie's disease, as well as Stargardt's macular dystrophy, vitelliform macular dystrophy, and hereditary retinoblastoma. In addition to the clinical symptoms, general genetic principles are stressed, such as mode of inheritance, heterogeneity, expressivity, penetrance, age at manifestation, X-chromosomal gene inactivation, and variability. They all have to be taken into account to correctly establish the diagnosis, to identify family members at risk, and to provide adequate genetic counselling. An overview of the actual molecular genetics of the various retinal disorders is also given.

  17. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion.

    PubMed

    Tana, Marco; Tana, Claudio; Cocco, Giulio; Iannetti, Giovanni; Romano, Marcello; Schiavone, Cosima

    2015-12-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) can be defined as acute inflammatory disease of the gallbladder without evidence of gallstones. The first case was reported in 1844 by Duncan et al.; however, some cases may have been missed previously in view of the complexity of the diagnosis. Several risk factors have been identified, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in view of its multiple mechanisms of action, seems to play a key role. Atypical clinical onset, paucity of symptoms, overlap with comorbidities, and lack of robust, controlled trials result often in under or misdiagnosed cases. Moreover, laboratory results may be negative or not specific in the late stage of the disease, when a surgical treatment cannot be longer helpful if complications arise. A rapid diagnosis is therefore essential to achieve a prompt treatment and to avoid further clinical deterioration. In this short review, we would present the current evidence regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of the complex relation between AAC and CVD. Then, we fully emphasize the role of ultrasound to achieve an early diagnosis and an appropriate treatment in suspected cases, reducing mortality and complications rates.

  18. Severe Primary Raynaud's Disease Treated with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Almoallim, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon refers to reversible spasms of the peripheral arterioles that can be primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (SRP) to underlying connective tissue disease, both of which are characterized by a triphasic color response triggered by cold exposure or stress. PRP is typically a benign disease, whereas SRP may progress into digital ulcers and/or gangrene. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old female diagnosed with PRP 7 years ago. Treatment with first-line agents, including calcium channel blocker, aspirin, and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, did not control her symptoms, which progressed to digital ulceration and gangrene. There were no symptoms of underlying autoimmune disease or malignancy, and autoimmune, serology, and immunology test results were normal; a biopsy of her left little finger was negative for vasculitis. Development to critical digital ischemia necessitated treatment with intravenous iloprost and heparin infusion followed by angioplasty, which led to a partial improvement. Due to persistent symptoms, rituximab therapy was initiated and two cycles induced a complete resolution of symptoms.

  19. Severe Primary Raynaud's Disease Treated with Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Shabrawishi, Mohammed; Albeity, Abdurahman; Almoallim, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon refers to reversible spasms of the peripheral arterioles that can be primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (SRP) to underlying connective tissue disease, both of which are characterized by a triphasic color response triggered by cold exposure or stress. PRP is typically a benign disease, whereas SRP may progress into digital ulcers and/or gangrene. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old female diagnosed with PRP 7 years ago. Treatment with first-line agents, including calcium channel blocker, aspirin, and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, did not control her symptoms, which progressed to digital ulceration and gangrene. There were no symptoms of underlying autoimmune disease or malignancy, and autoimmune, serology, and immunology test results were normal; a biopsy of her left little finger was negative for vasculitis. Development to critical digital ischemia necessitated treatment with intravenous iloprost and heparin infusion followed by angioplasty, which led to a partial improvement. Due to persistent symptoms, rituximab therapy was initiated and two cycles induced a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:27651971

  20. Severe Primary Raynaud's Disease Treated with Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Almoallim, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon refers to reversible spasms of the peripheral arterioles that can be primary Raynaud's phenomenon (PRP) or secondary Raynaud's phenomenon (SRP) to underlying connective tissue disease, both of which are characterized by a triphasic color response triggered by cold exposure or stress. PRP is typically a benign disease, whereas SRP may progress into digital ulcers and/or gangrene. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old female diagnosed with PRP 7 years ago. Treatment with first-line agents, including calcium channel blocker, aspirin, and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, did not control her symptoms, which progressed to digital ulceration and gangrene. There were no symptoms of underlying autoimmune disease or malignancy, and autoimmune, serology, and immunology test results were normal; a biopsy of her left little finger was negative for vasculitis. Development to critical digital ischemia necessitated treatment with intravenous iloprost and heparin infusion followed by angioplasty, which led to a partial improvement. Due to persistent symptoms, rituximab therapy was initiated and two cycles induced a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:27651971

  1. Upregulation of PIAS1 protects against sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis associated with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Liya; Sun, Yunwei; Yuan, Yaozong

    2011-06-01

    The regulator of cytokine signaling known as protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) is increasingly understood to have diverse regulatory functions for inflammation, but its effect in inflammatory conditions such as severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upregulation of PIAS1 on SAP associated with acute lung injury (ALI), and its subsequent effect on disease severity. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IV injection of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)/F35-PIAS1, Ad5/F35-vector or saline before induction of SAP. The control group received only a sham operation. Lung and pancreas samples were harvested 16h after induction. The protein levels of PIAS1 in tissue were investigated. The severity of pancreatic injury was determined by a histological score of pancreatic injury, serum amylase, and pancreatic water content. The lung injury was evaluated by measurement of pulmonary microvascular permeability, lung myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde levels. The survival rates of rats were also analyzed. The results found that in Ad5/F35-PIAS1 treated rats, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels were decreased but showed no influence on the levels of IL-10, and the severity of pancreatic tissue injury was less compared with either untreated SAP or Ad5/F35-vector treated rats (P<0.01). The administration of Ad5/F35-PIAS1 in SAP-induced rats downregulated the activity of the signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) pathway and the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein in lung. Thus, compared with the untreated SAP rats, the inflammatory response and the severity of ALI decreased, and the survival rates increased (P<0.01). These findings suggest that PIAS1 could augment anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting STAT1, thus attenuating the severity of SAP associated with ALI.

  2. Applying Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Dosing of Anti-TNF Biologics in Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Minar, Philip; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC), the most aggressive presentation ulcerative colitis (UC), occurs in 15 percent of adults and children with UC. First line therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is ineffective in half of adults and one third of children. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against TNF (anti-TNF therapy) are emerging as a common treatment for ASUC due to their similar efficacy to calcineurin inhibitors and more favorable adverse effect profile. Aim To comprehensively review the evidence for anti-TNF therapy for ASUC in children and adults with regard to outcomes and pharmacokinetics. Methods PubMed and recent conference proceedings were searched using the terms “ulcerative colitis”, “acute severe ulcerative colitis”, “anti-TNF”, “pharmacokinetics”, and the generic names of specific anti-TNF agents. Results Outcomes after anti-TNF therapy for ASUC remain suboptimal with aboutone half of children and adults undergoing colectomy. While several randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for ambulatory patients with moderate to severely active UC, patients in these studies were less ill than those with ASUC. Patients with ASUC may exhibit more rapid clearance of anti-TNF biologics due pharmacokinetic mechanisms influenced by disease severity. Conclusions Conventional weight-based dosing effective in patients with moderately to severely active UC, may not be equally effective in those with ASUC. Personalized anti-TNF dosing strategies that integratepatient factors and early measures of pharmacokinetics and response hold promise for ensuring sustained drug exposure and maximizing early mucosal healing in patients with ASUC. PMID:25809869

  3. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) offers a way to precisely assess early treatment response and detect relapse. Established methods to study MRD are flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of antigen-receptor genes, and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts. The strong correlation between MRD levels and risk of relapse in childhood ALL is well established; studies in adult patients also support its prognostic value. Hence, results of MRD studies can be used to select treatment intensity and duration, and estimate the optimal timing for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Practical issues in the implementation of MRD assays in clinical studies include determining the most informative time point to study MRD, the levels of MRD that will trigger changes in treatment intensity, as well as the relative cost and informative power of different methodologies. The identification of new markers of leukemia and the use of increasingly refined assays should further facilitate routine monitoring of MRD and help clarifying the cellular and biologic features of leukemic cells that resist chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:19100372

  4. Interventional Treatment of Abdominal Compartment Syndrome during Severe Acute Pancreatitis: Current Status and Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dejan V.; Johnson, Colin D.; Milic, Natasa; Gregoric, Pavle; Ivancevic, Nenad; Bezmarevic, Mihailo; Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Cijan, Vladimir; Antic, Andrija; Bajec, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a marker of severe disease. It occurs as combination of inflammation of retroperitoneum, visceral edema, ascites, acute peripancreatic fluid collections, paralytic ileus, and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The frequency of ACS in SAP may be rising due to more aggressive fluid resuscitation, a trend towards conservative treatment, and attempts to use a minimally invasive approach. There remains uncertainty about the most appropriate surgical technique for the treatment of ACS in SAP. Some unresolved questions remain including medical treatment, indications, timing, and interventional techniques. This review will focus on interventional treatment of this serious condition. First line therapy is conservative treatment aiming to decrease IAP and to restore organ dysfunction. If nonoperative measures are not effective, early abdominal decompression is mandatory. Midline laparostomy seems to be method of choice. Since it carries significant morbidity we need randomized studies to establish firm advantages over other described techniques. After ACS resolves efforts should be made to achieve early primary fascia closure. Additional data are necessary to resolve uncertainties regarding ideal timing and indication for operative treatment. PMID:26839539

  5. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  6. Acute Otitis Media Severity: Association with Cytokine Gene polymorphisms and other Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, David P.; Grady, James J.; Diego, Alejandro; Matalon, Reuben; Revai, Krystal; Patel, Janak A.; Han, Yimei; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously shown an association between polymorphisms of proinflammatory cytokine genes and susceptibility to upper respiratory tract infection and acute otitis media. It has not been known whether polymorphisms or risk factors are associated with the severity of acute otitis media. Objective To evaluate the influences of proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and other risk factors on severity of acute otitis media following upper respiratory infection. Methods In a prospective, longitudinal study, children aged 6-35 months were followed for one year for occurrences of upper respiratory tract infection and acute otitis media. Children were studied for TNFα-308, interleukin (IL)- 6-174 and IL-1 ß+3953 polymorphisms, taking into account age, gender, race, family history of otitis, tobacco smoke exposure, breast feeding, day of upper respiratory tract infection at the time of diagnosis and pneumococcal vaccine status. Symptoms and signs of acute otitis media were graded according to a validated scale. The association between acute otitis media clinical severity, polymorphic genotypes, and risk factors was analyzed using statistical models that account for multiple episodes of acute otitis media per child. Results A total of 295 episodes of acute otitis media in 128 subjects were included. More severe acute otitis media symptoms were associated with young age (P=0.01), family history of acute otitis media (P=0.002), tobacco smoke exposure (P=0.008), and early diagnosis of otitis after onset of upper respiratory tract infection (P=0.02). Among children with a bulging or perforated tympanic membrane (206 episodes, 104 subjects), those who had the IL- 1 ß+3953 polymorphism, experienced higher symptom scores (P<0.02). Conclusion This is the first report of the association between risk factors and acute otitis media severity. Risk factors such as tobacco smoke exposure and a positive family history appear to be more significantly associated with

  7. Severe acute hepatitis in the DRESS syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lens, Sabela; Crespo, Gonzalo; Carrión, Jose A; Miquel, Rosa; Navasa, Miquel

    2010-01-01

    The DRESS (drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome, also known as DIHS (drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome), is a severe idiosyncratic reaction to several drugs, mainly antiepileptics and antibiotics, which can occasionally produce acute liver failure. In this article we present two cases of the DRESS syndrome presenting with severe acute hepatitis, including the first case of DRESS associated with levetiracetam. Although both cases finally resolved with good outcomes, DRESS can lead to acute liver failure and has a bad prognosis when liver damage is present. Rapid diagnosis is crucial since withdrawal of the offending drug is the key of treatment, while the potential role of corticosteroids is discussed. PMID:20526017

  8. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: a curable disease.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, F; Nervi, C; Avvisati, G; Mandelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The Second International Symposium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) was held in Rome in 12-14 November 1997. Clinical and basic investigators had the opportunity to discuss in this meeting the important advances in the biology and treatment of this disease achieved in the last 4 years, since the First Roman Symposium was held in 1993. The first part of the meeting was dedicated to relevant aspects of laboratory research, and included the following topics: molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis and of response/resistance to retinoids, biologic and therapeutic effects of new agents such as arsenicals and novel synthetic retinoids; characterization of APL heterogeneity at the morphological, cytogenetic and immunophenotypic level. The updated results of large cooperative clinical trials using variable combinations of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy were presented by the respective group chairmen, and formed the 'core' part of the meeting. These studies, which in most cases integrated the molecular assessment of response to treatment, provided a stimulating framework for an intense debate on the most appropriate frontline treatment options to be adopted in the future. The last day was dedicated to special entities such as APL in the elderly and in the child, as well as the role of bone marrow transplantation. The prognostic value of molecular monitoring studies was also discussed in the final session of the meeting. In this article, we review the major advances and controversial issues in APL biology and treatment discussed in this symposium and emerging from very recent publications. We would like to credit the successful outcome of this meeting to the active and generous input of all invited speakers and to participants from all over the world who provided constructive and fruitful discussions.

  9. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  10. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  11. Study progress on mechanism of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jie

    2007-04-01

    Study on the action mechanism of inflammatory mediators generated by the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in multiple organ injury is a hotspot in the surgical field. In clinical practice, the main complicated organ dysfunctions are shock, respiratory failure, renal failure, encephalopathy, with the rate of hepatic diseases being closely next to them. The hepatic injury caused by SAP cannot only aggravate the state of pancreatitis, but also develop into hepatic failure and cause patient death. Its complicated pathogenic mechanism is an obstacle in clinical treatment. Among many pathogenic factors, the changes of vasoactive substances, participation of inflammatory mediators as well as OFR (oxygen free radical), endotoxin, etc. may play important roles in its progression.

  12. From Moderately Severe to Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Acute Pancreatitis: Circulating MiRNAs Play Role as Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Min; Jiang, Lisha; Lu, Guoming; Huang, Mindan; Guo, Jizhong; Liu, Side

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis (HTAP) continues to rise in China. It has systemic complications and high mortality, making the early assessment of the severity of this disease even more important. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could be novel, non-invasive biomarkers for disease progression judgment. This study aimed to identify the potential role of serum miRNAs as novel biomarkers of HTAP progression. HTAP patients were divided into two groups: moderately severe (HTMSAP) and severe (HTSAP), healthy people were used as control group. The serum miRNA expression profiles of these three groups were determined by microarray and verified by qRT-PCR. The functions and pathways of the targeted genes of deregulated miRNAs were predicted, using bioinformatics analysis; miRNA-mRNA network was generated. Moreover, the correlation between miR-181a-5p and pancreatitis metabolism related substances were studied and the serum concentration of inflammatory cytokines and miRNAs at different time points during the MSAP and SAP were investigated, respectively. Finally, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of miRNAs was studied. Significant changes in the serum concentration of the following miRNAs of HTAP patients (P<0.05) were discovered: miR24-3p, 361-5p, 1246, and 222-3p (constantly upregulated), and 181a-5p (constantly downregulated) (P<0.05). Bioinformatics analysis predicted that 13 GOs and 36 pathways regulated by overlap miRNAs were involved in glucose, fat, calcium (Ca++), and insulin metabolism (P<0.001). miRNA-mRNA network revealed that the overlap miRNAs targeted genes participating in pancreas metabolism and miR-181a-5p, the only downregulated miRNA, had good negative correlation with triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and fast blood glucose (FBG), but a positive correlation with Ca++. When compared with inflammatory cytokines, the changes of all five overlap miRNAs were more stable. It was found that when used for

  13. Predictors of severity and necrosis in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2004-12-01

    C-reactive protein remains the single standard biochemical marker for predicting the severity of AP. Because the combination of clinical-physiological scores and CRP provide good information at 48 hours, research has focused on the predictive ability of various markers when applied in the initial 24 hours after admission to the hospital. After detailed review of the literature, the authors conclude that there is no single tool that serves as the optimal predictor of severity. There are, however, data that support the use of certain tests to improve upon the clinician's early predictive ability on the subsequent course of AP. These include an APACHE II score greater than 7 and IL-6 at the time of admission, and urine TAP, urine trypsinogen-2, and serum PMN elastase at 24 hours (Table 4). These markers only will be able to help the clinician's predictive ability if they can be performed locally and if the results can be available ina timely manner. Future research should focus on promising markers such as procalcitonin, IL-8, IL-I ra, sTNFR, CAPAP, PLA-2, novel markers, and the combined use of more than one marker. The conventional research approach in predicting severity used in the last 15 years has limitations and appears to have reached its maximal potential. Novel conceptions and approaches, such as identification of genetic polymorphisms that predispose to severe course and complications of AP or other approaches are needed for a quantum step forward.

  14. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Remolina, Yuly Andrea; Ulloa, María Mercedes; Vargas, Hernán; Díaz, Liliana; Gómez, Sandra Liliana; Saavedra, Alfredo; Sánchez, Edgar; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained. Setting Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia. Participants Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female). Measurements Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality. Results Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%). Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients. Conclusions The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality. PMID:26576054

  15. Differential acute effects of selenomethionine and sodium selenite on the severity of colitis.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Franziska; Oldorff, Lisa; Besselt, Karolin; Kipp, Anna Patricia

    2015-04-01

    The European population is only suboptimally supplied with the essential trace element selenium. Such a selenium status is supposed to worsen colitis while colitis-suppressive effects were observed with adequate or supplemented amounts of both organic selenomethionine (SeMet) and inorganic sodium selenite. In order to better understand the effect of these selenocompounds on colitis development we examined colonic phenotypes of mice fed supplemented diets before the onset of colitis or during the acute phase. Colitis was induced by treating mice with 1% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for seven days. The selenium-enriched diets were either provided directly after weaning (long-term) or were given to mice with a suboptimal selenium status after DSS withdrawal (short-term). While long-term selenium supplementation had no effect on colitis development, short-term selenite supplementation, however, resulted in a more severe colitis. Colonic selenoprotein expression was maximized in all selenium-supplemented groups independent of the selenocompound or intervention time. This indicates that the short-term selenite effect appears to be independent from colonic selenoprotein expression. In conclusion, a selenite supplementation during acute colitis has no health benefits but may even aggravate the course of disease. PMID:25867950

  16. CT appearance of acute inflammatory disease of the renal interstitium

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.P.; McClennan, B.L.; Rottenberg, R.R.

    1983-08-01

    Today, infection remains the most common disease of the urinary tract and constitutes almost 75% of patient problems requiring urologic evaluation. There have been several major factors responsible for our better understanding of the nature and pathophysiology of urinary tract infection. One has been quantitated urine bacteriology and another, the discovery that a significant part of the apparently healthy adult female population has asymptomatic bacteriuria. Abnormal conditions such as neurogenic bladder, bladder malignancy, prolonged catheter drainage and reflux, altered host resistance, diabetes mellitus, and urinary tract obstruction, as well as pregnancy, may either predispose to or be implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. There is a wide range of conditions that result in acute renal inflammation and those under discussion affect primarily the interstitium. This term refers to the connective tissue elements separating the tubules in the cortex and medulla. Hence, the interstitial nephritides are to be distinguished from the glomerulonephritides and fall into two general etiologic categories: infectious and noninfectious.

  17. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. METHODS: AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m2 (Obese, class I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity. PMID:25386084

  18. The significance of tubular and glomerular proteinuria in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Christopher Thiam Seong; Tan, Han Khim; Lau, Yeow Kok

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently need acute renal replacement therapy (aRRT). We evaluated an inexpensive, rapid quantitative and qualitative analysis of proteinuria on the course of AKI patients requiring aRRT in intensive care. Method: This was a prospective, observational study of critically ill patients with severe established AKI or Acute on Chronic Kidney Injury (AoCKI) requiring aRRT. Urine samples were analyzed using Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulphate-Polyacryamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: A total of 30 critically ill patients were studied. Those who died have higher APACHE II (29 ± 6 vs. 20 ± 5, p<0.001), multi-organ failure (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.02) and Tubular/Glomerular ratio (114 ± 60 vs. 75± 37, p < 0.05).The renal non-recoverers have higher baseline creatinine (415 ± 328 vs. 125± 19 umol/l, p < 0.01), urinary Dipstick value (1.8±0.8 vs. 0.5±0, p <0.05) and Glomerular score (3.0 ± 1.8 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.02).Heavy tubular proteinuria also predicts a longer duration of interim dialysis support and mortality whereas glomerular proteinuria correlates with development of chronicity and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Conclusions: The dominant presence of tubular proteinuria is associated with poor survival in patients who have high APACHE II score and multi-organ failure. It also correlates with a longer duration of dialysis support in survivals. Renal Non-recoverers had heavy dominant presence of glomerular proteinuria. SDS-PAGE proteinuria analysis offers a reliable and inexpensive method to prognosticate proteinuria in this group of critically ill patients. PMID:25674105

  19. Acute myocardial infarction following scorpion sting in a case with obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Patra, Soumya; Satish, K; Singla, Vivek; Ravindranath, K S

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) following a scorpion sting has been very rarely reported in the previous literature. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms include severe hypotension due to hypovolaemic shock and coronary spasm with subsequent thrombosis of coronary vessels developed after the release of vasoactive, inflammatory and thrombogenic substances contained in the scorpion venom. All of the previously reported cases had normal coronary angiogram. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with severe scorpion sting and was treated with prazosin. But a few hours later, she developed acute anterior wall MI. Coronary angiogram revealed the presence of significant stenosis in coronary arteries. As acute MI owing to significant coronary artery disease can be evident after severe scorpion envenomation, so every case of acute coronary syndrome following scorpion sting needs early diagnosis, thorough cardiovascular evaluation and appropriate treatment. PMID:23715842

  20. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  1. Relationship of the serum procalcitonin level with the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuhiro; Endo, Shigeatsu; Kasai, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Imai, Satoko; Takahashi, Gaku; Miyata, Michiko; Kitamura, Michihiko; Wakabayashi, Go

    2004-01-01

    The procalcitonin (PCT) level in the blood was determined in cases of acute pancreatitis. The PCT level was found to show a significant correlation with the severity of acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, the PCT level was significantly higher in the cases which developed MODS than in those which did not. The PCT level was significantly higher in the patients who eventually died than in those who survived. A significant correlation was observed between the serum PCT level and the serum tumor necrosis factor alpha level. Thus, PCT level was found to be a reliable indicator of the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  2. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lawler, James V; Endy, Timothy P; Hensley, Lisa E; Garrison, Aura; Fritz, Elizabeth A; Lesar, May; Baric, Ralph S; Kulesh, David A; Norwood, David A; Wasieloski, Leonard P; Ulrich, Melanie P; Slezak, Tom R; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Huggins, John W; Jahrling, Peter B; Paragas, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Background The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs) infected with SARS-CoV. Methods and Findings In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain. Conclusions SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children. PMID:16605302

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Illness (SARI) Surveillance in Louisiana, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Hand, Julie P; Serrano, Jose; Johnson, Jenna I; Jespersen, Megan; Ratard, Raoult C

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) surveillance implemented in Louisiana during the 2013-2014 influenza season, present the epidemiology of reported SARI cases, and identify ways to improve this system by incorporating formal SARI surveillance into the influenza surveillance program. Of the 212 SARI cases, 181 (85%) had at least one underlying medical condition, 54 (25.7%) had two conditions, 43 (20.3%) had three conditions, and 25 (11.8%) reported four or more. The most common four underlying conditions were: obesity (43.4%), chronic cardiac conditions (39.6%), diabetes (29.7%), and chronic pulmonary conditions (26.9%). While obesity was the most reported underlying condition, it was three times more likely to be reported in less than 65 years old rather than those >65. Continuation of SARI data collection in future seasons will allow comparisons regarding severity, populations affected, and identify risk factors most commonly associated with severe illness. Reporting of SARI cases also increased influenza-associated adult mortality reporting to the Office of Public Health's Office of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology (ID Epi). Though all influenza-associated mortality is reportable in Louisiana, adult mortality was reported rarely prior to the 2013-2014 season. PMID:27159455

  5. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  6. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively. PMID:14582331

  7. [Risk factors for severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in Bogota, 2001].

    PubMed

    Jaimes, María Belén; Cáceres, Diana C; de la Hoz, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Camilo; Herrera, Diana; Pinilla, Jairo; Porras, Alexandra; Rodríguez, Fabio; Velandia, Martha

    2003-09-01

    Severity of acute respiratory infection is higher in developing countries, especially among the socioeconomically underprivileged. Viral pneumonias are more common, especially among children. A prospective hospital-based case control study was undertaken in Bogota between November 2000 and August 2001, aimed to identify factors related to severe low acute respiratory infection (SLARI). Cases were limited to children aged between 2 months and 5 years who filled WHO criteria for SLARI. Controls were children at the same hospital with ARI in a similar age range, but without symptoms of chest drawing. A total of 638 children (277 cases and 361 controls) were included. The most important risk factors included the following: living in borrowed houses (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.06-7.07), sharing the bed (OR = 1.88, CI: 1.0-3.7), living with more than 9 people (OR = 1.82, CI: 1.0-3.51), and living with smokers (OR = 1.4, CI: 1.0-2.05). Of the 114 samples collected (from children at third day after beginning of symptoms), 98 had viruses, sincitial respiratory virus was the most frequently identified virus (41.8%), followed by influenza A virus (3.1%) and influenza B virus (1%). All positive isolates for influenza A and B were sent to the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, where they were classified as influenza A/PANAMA/2007/99-like and influenza B/SICHUAN/379/99-like, respectively.

  8. Early and Late Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Klimm, Wojciech; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated factors influencing early and late occurrence of AKI in severely burned patients and assessed the relationship between time of occurrence of AKI and mortality of AKI patients. Material/Methods Renal function was evaluated at 3 time points: at admission, at the critical point or middle point of hospitalization, and at the endpoint for which death or a discharge from the center was considered. AKI criteria were: decrease in GFR of less than 60 ml/min at admission, decrease in GFR of more than 75% compared to baseline, and decrease in the daily diuresis of less than 500 ml/24 h. Results At admission, 15.1% of the patients had eGFR <60 ml/min. AKI occurred in 38.5% of cases. The occurrence of AKI was associated with: elderly age (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.017), overweight and obesity (p=0.055); extent and depth of burns, respiratory failure, low protein concentration (for all p<0.001), low blood pressure (p=0.014), and high WBC (p=0.010). Early AKI was detected in 28% of patients. Mortality was 100% with the initial GFR ≥60, 100% with the initial GFR <60 and early deterioration of renal function, 80% with the initial GFR <60 and late worsening, and 60% with the initial GFR <60 and no worsening. Late AKI was observed in 10% of patients and mortality in this group was 79.2%. Mortality in the entire group with AKI was 88.0% versus 24.5%. Conclusions The frequent occurrence of AKI, especially early, worsens the prognosis for survival. Assessment of renal function should be included in the prognostic scales for burned patients. PMID:27746455

  9. Comorbidity as a contributor to frequent severe acute exacerbation in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Lee, Hyun; Carriere, KC; Shin, Sun Hye; Moon, Seong Mi; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Comorbidities have a serious impact on the frequent severe acute exacerbations (AEs) in patients with COPD. Previous studies have used the Charlson comorbidity index to represent a conglomerate of comorbidities; however, the respective contribution of each coexisting disease to the frequent severe AEs remains unclear. Methods A retrospective, observational study was performed in 77 COPD patients who experienced severe AE between January 2012 and December 2014 and had at least 1-year follow-up period from the date of admission for severe AE. We explored the incidence of frequent severe AEs (≥2 severe AEs during 1-year period) in these patients and investigated COPD-related factors and comorbidities as potential risk factors of these exacerbations. Results Out of 77 patients, 61 patients (79.2%) had at least one comorbidity. During a 1-year follow-up period, 29 patients (37.7%) experienced frequent severe AEs, approximately two-thirds (n=19) of which occurred within the first 90 days after admission. Compared with patients not experiencing frequent severe AEs, these patients were more likely to have poor lung function and receive home oxygen therapy and long-term oral steroids. In multiple logistic regression analysis, coexisting asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =4.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.30–12.46, P=0.016), home oxygen therapy (adjusted OR =9.39, 95% CI =1.60–55.30, P=0.013), and C-reactive protein (adjusted OR =1.09, 95% CI =1.01–1.19, P=0.036) were associated with frequent severe AEs. In addition, poor lung function, as measured by forced expiratory volume in 1 second (adjusted OR =0.16, 95% CI =0.04–0.70, P=0.015), was inversely associated with early (ie, within 90 days of admission) frequent severe AEs. Conclusion Based on our study, among COPD-related comorbidities, coexisting asthma has a significant impact on the frequent severe AEs in COPD patients. PMID:27536097

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): lessons learnt in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare workers were infected while looking after the SARS patients on the medical wards in 2003. The high infectivity of the SARS coronavirus with peak viral load on day 10 of illness when patients were ill, overcrowding of the old medical wards with low air changes/hr (ACH), and aerosol-generating procedures while resuscitating the patients were the major factors. Procedures reported to present an increased risk of SARS transmission include tracheal intubation, non-invasive ventilation, tracheotomy and manual ventilation before intubation whereas oxygen therapy and bed distance <1 m were also implicated. Studies based on laser visualization technique with smoke particles as smokers in the human patient simulator has shown that oxygen therapy via Hudson mask and nasal cannula could disperse exhaled air of patients to 0.4 and 1 m respectively whereas jet nebulizer could disperse exhaled air >0.8 m from the patient. Bigger isolation rooms with 16 ACH are more effective than smaller isolation rooms with 12 ACH in removing exhaled air and preventing room contamination but at the expense of more noise and electricity consumption. Non-invasive ventilation via face masks and single circuit can disperse exhaled air from 0.4 to 1 m. Both higher inspiratory pressures and use of whisper swivel device (to facilitate carbon dioxide removal) could increase the exhaled air leakage and isolation room contamination during on-invasive ventilation. Addition of a viral-bacterial filter during manual ventilation by bagging may reduce the exhaled air leakage forward and yet increase the sideway leakage. N95 mask was more effective than surgical mask in preventing expelled air leakage during patient’s coughing but there was still significant sideway leakage to 15 cm. Clinicians should be aware of air leakage from the various face masks and adopt strict infection control measures during resuscitation of patients with severe respiratory infections. Carefully designed clinical

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: a challenge for public health practice in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A; Abdullah, A

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is now a global challenge affecting more than 8000 patients in different continents. The dictum of public health practice especially for infectious disease is "prevention better than cure". It is especially true for SARS as the treatment strategies remain diverse and experimental. Maintaining a healthy and hygienic environment can be one of the effective public health measures to combat infectious disease. The major challenge is that some of the most important public health measures are to be taken outside the health sector. The community also needs to be strengthened and equipped with the health skills to promote better health and hygiene. There is also the need to create a supportive environment conducive to health for long term sustainability. The WHO approach of promoting health through setting approach would be one possible solution to face the challenge. This paper will describe some of the public health initiatives in Hong Kong through "setting approach" and "community development model" in helping the society fight against SARS. With the emergence of SARS, this might be the time to globalise public health medicine as an important component of medical practice. PMID:12933766

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus as an Agent of Emerging and Reemerging Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vincent C. C.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok Yung

    2007-01-01

    Before the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, only 12 other animal or human coronaviruses were known. The discovery of this virus was soon followed by the discovery of the civet and bat SARS-CoV and the human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1. Surveillance of coronaviruses in many animal species has increased the number on the list of coronaviruses to at least 36. The explosive nature of the first SARS epidemic, the high mortality, its transient reemergence a year later, and economic disruptions led to a rush on research of the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the virus and the disease. This research resulted in over 4,000 publications, only some of the most representative works of which could be reviewed in this article. The marked increase in the understanding of the virus and the disease within such a short time has allowed the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, antivirals, vaccines, and epidemiological and infection control measures, which could prove to be useful in randomized control trials if SARS should return. The findings that horseshoe bats are the natural reservoir for SARS-CoV-like virus and that civets are the amplification host highlight the importance of wildlife and biosecurity in farms and wet markets, which can serve as the source and amplification centers for emerging infections. PMID:17934078

  13. Comparison of two simplified severity scores (SAPS and APACHE II) for patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Moreau, R; Soupison, T; Vauquelin, P; Derrida, S; Beaucour, H; Sicot, C

    1989-05-01

    The Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), the Acute Physiology Score (APS), and the Coronary Prognostic Index (CPI), calculated within the first 24 h of ICU admission, were compared in 76 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Sixteen (21%) patients subsequently died in the ICU. The nonsurvivors had significantly higher SAPS, APACHE II, and CPI scores than the survivors. ROC curves drawn for each severity index were in a discriminating position. There were no significant differences either between the areas under the ROC curves drawn for SAPS, APACHE II, and CPI, or between the overall accuracies of these indices. APS provided less homogeneous information. We conclude that SAPS and APACHE II, two severity indices which are easy to use, assess accurately the short-term prognosis, i.e., the ICU outcome, of patients with AMI. PMID:2707010

  14. Two cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Abe, Yoshinobu; Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a life-threatening complication in trauma patients. Not only regional neuromuscular disability, but also systemic organ disorders can result from prolonged tissue ischemia. In this report, we describe 2 cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke. In both cases, emergency fasciotomy was rapidly performed after recognition of the syndrome, but serious regional neuromuscular disabilities remained. Microvascular endothelial injury is an important mechanism of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome. Thrombi diffusely formed in the compartmental space hinder establishment of reperfusion even after fasciotomy. Furthermore, disruption of fibrinolysis due to heat stroke could enhance this damage.

  15. Family history of autoimmune thyroid disease and childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Perillat-Menegaux, Florence; Clavel, Jacqueline; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Nelken, Brigitte; Philippe, Noël; Sommelet, Danièle; Vilmer, Etienne; Hémon, Denis

    2003-01-01

    The association between a familial history of autoimmune disease and childhood acute leukemia was investigated in a French case-control study that, overall, was designed to assess the role of perinatal, infectious, environmental, and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. Familial histories of autoimmune disease in first- and second-degree relatives were compared in 279 incident cases, 240 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 39 cases of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 285 controls. Recruitment was frequency matched by age, gender, hospital, and ethnic origin. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using an unconditional regression model taking into account the stratification variables, socioeconomic status, and familial structure. A statistically significant association between a history of autoimmune disease in first- or second-degree relatives and ALL (OR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.8) was found. A relationship between thyroid diseases overall and ALL (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.9) was observed. This association was more pronounced for potentially autoimmune thyroid diseases (Grave's disease and/or hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease and/or hypothyroidism) (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1-10.7 and OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.0-31.1, respectively for ALL and ANLL), whereas it was not statistically significant for the other thyroid diseases (thyroid goiter, thyroid nodule, and unspecified thyroid disorders) (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.5 and OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.2-7.0, respectively, for ALL and ANLL). The results suggest that a familial history of autoimmune thyroid disease may be associated with childhood acute leukemia.

  16. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  17. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  18. Severe pancytopenia due to acute folate deficiency despite normal folate erythrocyte level.

    PubMed

    Huguenin, Antoine; Barraud, Sara; Daliphard, Sylvie; Marot, Didier; Garnotel, Roselyne; Bani-Sadr, Firouzé

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of an alcoholic patient with severe pancytopenia with low plasma folate level but normal erythrocyte folates and cobalamin levels. The bone marrow smear concluded to a pancytopenia due to folates and/or cobalamin deficiency. Severe pancytopenia due to acute plasma folate deficiency can be observed despite normal erythrocyte folates level which reflects the organism's folates store. PMID:27108778

  19. A case of severe acute exacerbation of Yokkaichi asthma treated with a vibrating mesh nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Yano, Takeshi; Yonaha, Tetsu; Hidaka, Koutaro; Nagahama, Masumi; Koshida, Tomohiro; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Tsuneyoshi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Yokkaichi asthma was one of the most common environmental pollution diseases in Japan in the 1960s and 1970s. The problem of air pollution in Yokkaichi was solved in the 1970s. However, mortality and life expectancy were still affected by the late effects of air pollution in patients with Yokkaichi asthma even in the 2000s. In this case report, we described the experience of successful treatment of a patient with severe asthmatic status due to Yokkaichi asthma. A 40s-year-old man, who was officially certified as a patient with Yokkaichi asthma from his infancy, was admitted to hospital due to acute exacerbation of asthma. Mechanical ventilation, intravenous administration of aminophylline and dexamethasone, enteral administration of montelukast, and a transdermal patch of tulobuterol were started. However, because of the lack of improvement in clinical status, inhalation of procaterol using vibrating mesh nebulizer systems was started. Inhalation of procaterol was used three times a day. After using the vibrating mesh nebulizer, respiratory system compliance and hypercapnia rapidly improved. Bilateral expiratory wheezing was diminished. Weaning from mechanical ventilation was initiated, and on the eighth day of mechanical ventilation, the patient was extubated. Although intractable respiratory failure with decreased respiratory system compliance resulting from the late effects of air pollution and a long-time asthmatic inflammatory condition was observed, the use of a vibrating mesh nebulizer for the inhaled administration of procaterol was useful to relieve severe bronchospasm due to Yokkaichi asthma. PMID:27547723

  20. Effects of acute alcohol withdrawal on nest building in mice selectively bred for alcohol withdrawal severity.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gian D; Phillips, Tamara J; Crabbe, John C

    2016-10-15

    Nest building has been used to assess thermoregulatory behavior and positive motivational states in mice. There are known genetic influences on ethanol withdrawal severity as well as individual/thermoregulatory nest building. Withdrawal Seizure-Prone (WSP-1, WSP-2) and Withdrawal Seizure-Resistant (WSR-1, WSR-2) mice were selectively bred for high vs low handling-induced convulsion (HIC) severity, respectively, during withdrawal from chronic ethanol vapor inhalation. They also differ in HIC severity during withdrawal from an acute, 4g/kg ethanol injection. In our initial study, withdrawal from an acute dose of ethanol dose-dependently impaired nest building over the initial 24h of withdrawal in genetically segregating Withdrawal Seizure Control (WSC) mice. In two further studies, acute ethanol withdrawal suppressed nest building for up to two days in WSP-1 females. Deficits in nest building from ethanol were limited to the initial 10h of withdrawal in WSR-1 females and to the initial 24h of withdrawal in WSP-1 and WSR-1 males. Effects of ethanol on nest building for up to two days were found in WSP-2 and WSR-2 mice of both sexes. Nest building deficits in female mice from the first replicate could not be explained by a general decrease in locomotor behavior. These results suggest that nest building is a novel behavioral phenotype for indexing the severity of acute ethanol withdrawal, and that genes contributing to this trait differ from those affecting acute withdrawal HIC severity. PMID:27503811

  1. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare.

  2. Soluble P-selectin promotes acute myocardial infarction onset but not severity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Sun, Guizhi; Wang, Guoyu; Ning, Wenhu; Zhao, Kan

    2015-03-01

    P‑selectin, an integral membrane glycoprotein of platelets and endothelial cells, and the soluble form of P‑selectin are hypothesized to play a role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, limited data are available with which to evaluate the main role of soluble P‑selectin (sP‑selectin) in the onset or the severity of AMI. In the present study, we investigated 15 patients who suffered from angina, 10 patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy and 10 patients who underwent thrombolysis therapy, compared with 15 volunteers with no cardiovascular disease. We confirmed that the plasma sP‑selectin levels were increased in patients with obesity (particularly pericardial obesity) and hyperlipidemia, positively correlated with plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and strongly negatively correlated with adiponectin in all patients regardless of AMI status. Furthermore, sP‑selectin levels were significantly higher in PCI and thrombolysis patients compared with angina patients and the control cohort. However, we observed that sP‑selectin levels did not change following PCI and thrombolysis therapy. In addition, there was no correlation between sP‑selectin levels and the severity of AMI in the cohort which received PCI or thrombolysis therapy. Therefore, we deduced that sP‑selectin only induced the onset of AMI but did not promote its severity. To confirm this hypothesis, a P‑selectin inhibitor was administered to an atherosclerosis formation model, plaque rapture model and neointimal hyperplasia model. We revealed that atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture, neointimal formation and neointimal bleeding were suppressed by the sP‑selectin inhibitor. We concluded that sP‑selectin, induced by systemic inflammation in conditions including obesity and hyperlipidemia, promoted atherosclerotic plaque and neointimal formation, plaque rapture and neointimal bleeding, further

  3. Remission of severe aphthous stomatitis of celiac disease with etanercept

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease triggered by gluten-containing foods (wheat, barley and rye) in genetically predisposed individuals. We present a patient with celiac disease complicated by severe aphthous stomatitis resulting in impairing swallowing, chewing and speaking. This led to weight loss, psychosocial problems as well as inability to perform her work. A variety of topical and systemic medications used resulted in either no improvement or only partial alleviation of the patient’s symptoms. After informed consent, etanercept was initiated and resulted in complete remission of aphthous stomatitis, decrease in arthralgia and fatigue and considerable improvement in her quality of life. The use of newer biological agents for selected and severe manifestations of celiac disease may lead to improved morbidity in these patients, but more studies are needed to determine long-term efficacy as well as safety of these drugs in the mucosal and/or systemic complications of this disease. PMID:24365222

  4. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  5. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Francois; Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu; Liu, Geoffrey

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help

  6. Defining Disease Severity in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Current and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Panés, Julián; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Danese, Silvio; Feagan, Brian G; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Hanauer, Stephen B; Rycroft, Beth

    2016-03-01

    Although most treatment algorithms in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) begin with classifying patients according to disease severity, no formal validated or consensus definitions of mild, moderate, or severe IBD currently exist. There are 3 main domains relevant to the evaluation of disease severity in IBD: impact of the disease on the patient, disease burden, and disease course. These measures are not mutually exclusive and the correlations and interactions between them are not necessarily proportionate. A comprehensive literature search was performed regarding current definitions of disease severity in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and the ability to categorize disease severity in a particular patient. Although numerous assessment tools for symptoms, quality of life, patient-reported outcomes, fatigue, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging, and histology (in ulcerative colitis) were identified, few have validated thresholds for categorizing disease activity or severity. Moving forward, we propose a preliminary set of criteria that could be used to classify IBD disease severity. These are grouped by the 3 domains of disease severity: impact of the disease on the patient (clinical symptoms, quality of life, fatigue, and disability); measurable inflammatory burden (C-reactive protein, mucosal lesions, upper gastrointestinal involvement, and disease extent), and disease course (including structural damage, history/extension of intestinal resection, perianal disease, number of flares, and extraintestinal manifestations). We further suggest that a disease severity classification should be developed and validated by an international group to develop a pragmatic means of identifying patients with severe disease. This is increasingly important to guide current therapeutic strategies for IBD and to develop treatment algorithms for clinical practice. PMID:26071941

  7. Percutaneous mechanical assist for severe cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Ryan; Raval, Amish N

    2015-05-01

    Acute right ventricular failure can lead to severe cardiogenic shock and death. Recovery may be achieved with early supportive measures. In many patients, intravenous fluid and inotropic resuscitation is inadequate to improve cardiac output. In these cases, percutaneous mechanical assist may provide a non-surgical bridge to recovery. Herein, we describe a case series of patients with severe, refractory cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure who received a continuous flow percutaneous ventricular device primarily utilizing the right internal jugular vein for out flow cannula placement.

  8. Acute diarrhoeal disease in less developed countries

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John E.; Guzmán, Miguel A.; Ascoli, Werner; Scrimshaw, Nevin S.

    1964-01-01

    A number of primary epidemiological characteristics are recognized as common to members of a syndrome designated “acute undifferentiated diarrhoeal disease”. This syndrome includes both specific and non-specific diarrhoeal disorders. Within the existing knowledge and with the facilities available in less developed countries, an epidemiological basis for control, directed against the syndrome as a whole, is presented as the practical approach to community management. Clinical and microbiological distinctions do not extend to the main bulk of the problem. Individual epidemiological patterns exist according to age and varying social and ecological conditions. Field study by periodic home visits over four years has defined these patterns in highland rural villages in Guatemala. The chief problem was weanling diarrhoea. PMID:14230899

  9. Use of heliox delivered via high-flow nasal cannula to treat an infant with coronavirus-related respiratory infection and severe acute air-flow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sherwin E; Vukin, Kirissa; Mosakowski, Steve; Solano, Patti; Stanton, Lolita; Lester, Lucille; Lavani, Romeen; Hall, Jesse B; Tung, Avery

    2014-11-01

    Heliox, a helium-oxygen gas mixture, has been used for many decades to treat obstructive pulmonary disease. The lower density and higher viscosity of heliox relative to nitrogen-oxygen mixtures can significantly reduce airway resistance when an anatomic upper air-flow obstruction is present and gas flow is turbulent. Clinically, heliox can decrease airway resistance in acute asthma in adults and children and in COPD. Heliox may also enhance the bronchodilating effects of β-agonist administration for acute asthma. Respiratory syndromes caused by coronavirus infections in humans range in severity from the common cold to severe acute respiratory syndrome associated with human coronavirus OC43 and other viral strains. In infants, coronavirus infection can cause bronchitis, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia in variable combinations and can produce enough air-flow obstruction to cause respiratory failure. We describe a case of coronavirus OC43 infection in an infant with severe acute respiratory distress treated with heliox inhalation to avoid intubation.

  10. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats.

  11. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  12. Pathogenesis of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Chiao; Ng, Tze Hann; Ando, Masahiro; Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Chuang, Jie-Cheng; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Yeh, Mi-De; Chiang, Yi-An; Takeyama, Haruko; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Lo, Chu-Fang; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), also called early mortality syndrome (EMS), is a recently emergent shrimp bacterial disease that has resulted in substantial economic losses since 2009. AHPND is known to be caused by strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus that contain a unique virulence plasmid, but the pathology of the disease is still unclear. In this study, we show that AHPND-causing strains of V. parahaemolyticus secrete the plasmid-encoded binary toxin PirAB(vp) into the culture medium. We further determined that, after shrimp were challenged with AHPND-causing bacteria, the bacteria initially colonized the stomach, where they started to produce PirAB(vp) toxin. At the same early time point (6 hpi), PirB(vp) toxin, but not PirA(vp) toxin, was detected in the hepatopancreas, and the characteristic histopathological signs of AHPND, including sloughing of the epithelial cells of the hepatopancreatic tubules, were also seen. Although some previous studies have found that both components of the binary PirAB(vp) toxin are necessary to induce a toxic effect, our present results are consistent with other studies which have suggested that PirB(vp) alone may be sufficient to cause cellular damage. At later time points, the bacteria and PirA(vp) and PirB(vp) toxins were all detected in the hepatopancreas. We also show that Raman spectroscopy "Whole organism fingerprints" were unable to distinguish between AHPND-causing and non-AHPND causing strains. Lastly, by using minimum inhibitory concentrations, we found that both virulent and non-virulent V. parahaemolyticus strains were resistant to several antibiotics, suggesting that the use of antibiotics in shrimp culture should be more strictly regulated. PMID:26549178

  13. Transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome in dynamical small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-03-01

    The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is still threatening the world because of a possible resurgence. In the current situation that effective medical treatments such as antiviral drugs are not discovered yet, dynamical features of the epidemics should be clarified for establishing strategies for tracing, quarantine, isolation, and regulating social behavior of the public at appropriate costs. Here we propose a network model for SARS epidemics and discuss why superspreaders emerged and why SARS spread especially in hospitals, which were key factors of the recent outbreak. We suggest that superspreaders are biologically contagious patients, and they may amplify the spreads by going to potentially contagious places such as hospitals. To avoid mass transmission in hospitals, it may be a good measure to treat suspected cases without hospitalizing them. Finally, we indicate that SARS probably propagates in small-world networks associated with human contacts and that the biological nature of individuals and social group properties are factors more important than the heterogeneous rates of social contacts among individuals. This is in marked contrast with epidemics of sexually transmitted diseases or computer viruses to which scale-free network models often apply.

  14. Coronavirus Pathogenesis and the Emerging Pathogen Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Susan R.; Navas-Martin, Sonia

    2005-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a family of enveloped, single-stranded, positive-strand RNA viruses classified within the Nidovirales order. This coronavirus family consists of pathogens of many animal species and of humans, including the recently isolated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). This review is divided into two main parts; the first concerns the animal coronaviruses and their pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the functions of individual viral genes, and the second discusses the newly described human emerging pathogen, SARS-CoV. The coronavirus part covers (i) a description of a group of coronaviruses and the diseases they cause, including the prototype coronavirus, murine hepatitis virus, which is one of the recognized animal models for multiple sclerosis, as well as viruses of veterinary importance that infect the pig, chicken, and cat and a summary of the human viruses; (ii) a short summary of the replication cycle of coronaviruses in cell culture; (iii) the development and application of reverse genetics systems; and (iv) the roles of individual coronavirus proteins in replication and pathogenesis. The SARS-CoV part covers the pathogenesis of SARS, the developing animal models for infection, and the progress in vaccine development and antiviral therapies. The data gathered on the animal coronaviruses continue to be helpful in understanding SARS-CoV. PMID:16339739

  15. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuates Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dandan; Gao, Jun; Gong, Yanfang; Wu, Hongyu; Xu, Aifang

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains a high-mortality disease. Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have plasticity of transdifferentiation and to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we assessed the roles of MSCs in SAP and the therapeutic effects of MSC on SAP after transplantation. Methods. A pancreatitis rat model was induced by the injection of taurocholic acid (TCA) into the pancreatic duct. After isolation and characterization of MSC from BM, MSC transplantation was conducted 24 hrs after SAP induction by tail vein injection. The survival rate was observed and MSCs were traced after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was also analyzed. Results. The survival rate of the transplantation group was significantly higher compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Infused MSCs were detected in the pancreas and BM 3 days after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was significantly lower than in the control group in both the pancreas and the lungs (p < 0.05). Conclusions. MSC transplantation could improve the prognosis of SAP rats. Engrafted MSCs have the capacity of homing, migration, and planting during the treatment of SAP. PMID:27721836

  16. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus E protein transports calcium ions and activates the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) protein is a viroporin involved in virulence. E protein ion channel (IC) activity is specifically correlated with enhanced pulmonary damage, edema accumulation and death. IL-1β driven proinflammation is associated with those pathological signatures, however its link to IC activity remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV E protein forms protein-lipid channels in ERGIC/Golgi membranes that are permeable to calcium ions, a highly relevant feature never reported before. Calcium ions together with pH modulated E protein pore charge and selectivity. Interestingly, E protein IC activity boosted the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β overproduction. Calcium transport through the E protein IC was the main trigger of this process. These findings strikingly link SARS-CoV E protein IC induced ionic disturbances at the cell level to immunopathological consequences and disease worsening in the infected organism.

  17. Acute kidney injury in a shepherd with severe malaria: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Boushab, Boushab Mohamed; Fall-Malick, Fatim-Zahra; Savadogo, Mamoudou; Basco, Leonardo Kishi

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main reasons for outpatient consultation and hospitalization in Mauritania. Although four Plasmodium species, ie, Plasmodium (P.) falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale, cause malaria in Mauritania, recent data on their frequency is lacking. Since infections with P. falciparum generally result in serious disease, their identification is important. We report a case of oliguric renal injury associated with malaria in a 65-year-old shepherd. Clinical manifestations included anemia, oliguria, and elevated creatinine and urea. The rapid diagnostic test for malaria and microscopic examination of blood smears were positive for P. falciparum. On the basis of this, the patient was diagnosed as having acute kidney injury as a complication of severe malaria. The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for 4 days, followed by 3 days of oral treatment. Volume expansion, antipyretic treatment, and diuretics were administered. He also had two rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered renal function. This outcome is not always the rule. Prognosis depends much on early diagnosis and appropriate supportive treatment. PMID:27785088

  18. Protecting healthcare staff from severe acute respiratory syndrome: filtration capacity of multiple surgical masks.

    PubMed

    Derrick, J L; Gomersall, C D

    2005-04-01

    Guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organisation state that healthcare workers should wear N95 masks or higher-level protection during all contact with suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). In areas where N95 masks are not available, multiple layers of surgical masks have been tried to prevent transmission of SARS. The in vivo filtration capacity of a single surgical mask is known to be poor. However, the filtration capacity of a combination of masks is unknown. This was a crossover trial of one, two, three and five surgical masks in six volunteers to determine the in vivo filtration efficiency of wearing more than one surgical mask. We used a Portacount to measure the difference in ambient particle counts inside and outside the masks. The best combination of five surgical masks scored a fit factor of 13.7, which is well below the minimum level of 100 required for a half face respirator. Multiple surgical masks filter ambient particles poorly. They should not be used as a substitute for N95 masks unless there is no alternative. PMID:15749326

  19. Acute aortic syndrome: A systems approach to a time-critical disease.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masashi; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic syndrome represents a group of potentially lethal aortic diseases, including classic acute aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer. Among these conditions, type A aortic dissection is the most common acute presentation. Only surgical interventions are recommended in guidelines as lifesaving procedures for type A dissection. Despite new diagnostic imaging methods, advanced surgical strategy, and improved postoperative management in the over 250-year history of aortic dissection, in-hospital mortality and morbidity rates still remain high. Recently, several new system-based approaches, such as implementation of multidisciplinary experienced high-volume centers and establishment of regional systematic management flow have been reported to improve the outcome. Here, we will describe the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment as well as the new systematic approach to treat acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27650339

  20. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  1. Abdominal compartment syndrome in severe acute pancreatitis treated with percutaneous catheter drainage.

    PubMed

    Park, Soonyoung; Lee, Seungho; Lee, Hyo Deok; Kim, Min; Kim, Kyeongmin; Jeong, Yusook; Park, Seon Mee

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the main causes of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). IAH contributes to multiple physiologic alterations and leads to the development of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) that induces multiorgan failure. We report a case of ACS in a patient with severe acute pancreatitis. A 44-year-old man who was admitted in a drunk state was found to have severe acute pancreatitis. During management with fluid resuscitation in an intensive care unit, drowsy mentality, respiratory acidosis, shock requiring inotropes, and oliguria developed in the patient, with his abdomen tensely distended. With a presumptive diagnosis of ACS, abdominal decompression through percutaneous catheter drainage was performed immediately. The intraperitoneal pressure measured with a drainage catheter was 31 mm Hg. After abdominal decompression, the multiorgan failure was reversed. We present a case of ACS managed with percutaneous catheter decompression. PMID:25325011

  2. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  3. [Acute atrioventricular block in chronic Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vince; Zima, Endre; Gellér, László; Merkely, Béla

    2010-09-26

    The tick bite transmitted Lyme disease is one of the most common antropozoonosis, about 10 000 new infections are reported in Hungary each year. The progress and clinical presentation can vary, and carditis can occur in later stages. A serologically verified Lyme disease caused third degree atrioventricular block in young male presenting with presyncope. Based on the tick-bites mentioned a few weeks prior to hospital admission, Lyme carditis was considered with the administration of antibiotics and monitor observation. Typical skin lesions were not recognized and laboratory findings showed no pathology. An electrophysiological study recorded a predominant supra-His atrioventricular block. Total regression of conduction could be detected later and the serological tests established an underlying Lyme disease. Currently no definite treatment recommendation is available for the potentially reversible Lyme carditis. The tick bite seemed to be the key on our way to diagnosis; however, serological tests proved the disease to be older than one year. A detailed medical history and serological tests are essential in identifying the cause and pacemaker implantation can be avoided.

  4. HLA and other gene associations with dengue disease severity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, H A F

    2010-01-01

    Large case control gene association studies have been performed on cohorts of dengue virus (DENV) infected patients identified in mainland Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Caribbean. Candidate genes that have shown statistically significant associations with DENV disease severity encode HLA molecules, cell receptors for IgG (FcGII), vitamin D and ICAM3 (DCSIGN or CD209), pathogen recognition molecules such as mannose binding lectin (MBL), blood related antigens including ABO and human platelet antigens (HPA1 and HPA2). In ethnic Thais with secondary infections a variety of HLA class I alleles (HLA-A 0203, 0207, A11, B 15, B 44, B 46, B 48, B 51, B 52), DCSIGN promoter polymorphisms and the AB blood group, independently associate with either susceptibility or resistance to dengue fever (DF) and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is also evidence that some HLA associations with disease severity correlate with the DENV serotype inducing secondary infections. Taken together, there is now evidence that allelic variants of multiple gene loci involved in both acquired and innate immune responses contribute significantly to DENV disease outcome and severity. Further analysis of the genetic basis of severe DENV disease in different at risk populations may contribute to the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions.

  5. Different effects of tianeptine pretreatment in rats exposed to acute stress and repeated severe stress.

    PubMed

    Kasar, M; Mengi, M; Yildirim, E A; Yurdakos, E

    2009-04-01

    In this study we aim to discuss the relationship between stress and learning and emotionality in an experimental model using two different stress conditions: acute stress (single restraint stress for 20 min) and repeated severe stress (6-h daily restraint for 21 days). We studied the effects of tianeptine, which has been suggested to have anxiolytic and cognition-enhancing effects under stressful conditions. After acute stress, the increase in the duration of immobility (F = 5.753 and 3.664) in the open field and holeboard tests and the decrease in rearing (F = 3.891) in the holeboard test were significant when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Results for repeated severe stress showed that in both the open field and holeboard tests the decrease in rearing (F = 4.494 and 4.530, respectively), increase in the duration of immobility (F = 6.069 and 4.742, respectively) and decrease in head dips (F = 4.938) in the holeboard test were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The group pretreated with tianeptine showed no significant difference from controls for either acute or repeated severe stress conditions. In the Morris water maze test, acute stress led to a prolongation of average escape latency, which indicated a spatial learning deficit. Treatment with tianeptine prior to acute stress prevented this spatial deficit. Repeated severe stress also led to spatial learning deficits in rats, but this deficit was not prevented by treatment with tianeptine. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment with tianeptine had different effects on stress-induced spatial learning deficits under acute and repeated stress conditions, while the effects on emotionality and anxiety-like behavior were similar. The mechanisms implicated in stress-induced emotional and memory deficits will be discussed.

  6. Acute thyroid eye disease (TED): principles of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Verity, D H; Rose, G E

    2013-03-01

    The active inflammatory phase of thyroid eye disease (TED) is mediated by the innate immune system, and management is aimed at aborting this self-limited period of autoimmune activity. In most patients with TED, ocular and adnexal changes are mild and management involves controlling thyroid dysfunction, cessation of smoking, and addressing ocular surface inflammation and exposure. In patients with acute moderate disease, this being sufficient to impair orbital functions, immunosuppression reduces the long-term sequelae of acute inflammation, and adjunctive fractionated low-dose orbital radiotherapy is used as a steroid-sparing measure. Elective surgery is often required following moderate TED, be it for proptosis, diplopia, lid retraction, or to debulk the eyelid, and this should be delayed until the disease is quiescent, with the patient stable and weaned off all immunosuppression. Thus, surgical intervention during the active phase of moderate disease is rarely indicated, although clinical experience suggests that, where there is significant orbital congestion, early orbital decompression can limit progression to more severe disease. Acute severe TED poses a major risk of irreversible loss of vision due to marked exposure keratopathy, 'hydraulic' orbital congestion, or compressive optic neuropathy. If performed promptly, retractor recession with or without a suture tarsorrhaphy protects the ocular surface from severe exposure and, in patients not responding to high-dose corticosteroid treatment, decompression of the deep medial orbital wall and floor can rapidly relieve compressive optic neuropathy, as well as alleviate the inflammatory and congestive features of raised orbital pressure.

  7. A randomised, double blind, multicentre trial of octreotide in moderate to severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, W; Buchler, M; Malfertheiner, P; Beger, H; Adler, G; Gaus, W; the, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The pharmacological inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion with the somatostatin analogue octreotide has been advocated as a specific treatment of acute pancreatitis.
AIM—To investigate the efficacy of octreotide in acute pancreatitis in a randomised, placebo controlled trial.
METHODS—302 patients from 32 hospitals, fulfilling the criteria for moderate to severe acute pancreatitis within 96 hours of the onset of symptoms, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: group P (n=103) received placebo, while groups O1 (n=98) and O2 (n=101) received 100 and 200 µg of octreotide, respectively, by subcutaneous injection three times daily for seven days. The primary outcome variable was a score composed of mortality and 15 typical complications of acute pancreatitis.
RESULTS—The three groups were well matched with respect to pretreatment characteristics. An intent to treat analysis of all 302 patients revealed no significant differences among treatment groups with respect to mortality (P: 16%; O1: 15%; O2: 12%), the rate of newly developed complications, the duration of pain, surgical interventions, or the length of the hospital stay. A valid for efficacy analysis (251 patients) also revealed no significant differences.
CONCLUSIONS—This trial shows no benefit of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis.


Keywords: acute pancreatitis; somatostatin; octreotide; randomised controlled multicentre trial PMID:10369711

  8. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  9. Fear of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) among Health Care Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Samuel M. Y.; Kwong-Lo, Rosalie S. Y.; Mak, Christine W. Y.; Wong, Joe S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined fear related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among 2 samples of hospital staff in Hong Kong. Sample 1 included health care workers (n = 82) and was assessed during the peak of the SARS epidemic. Sample 2 included hospital staff who recovered from SARS (n = 97). The results show that participants in…

  10. Management of severe acute malnutrition in low-income and middle-income countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kwashiorkor and marasmus, collectively termed severe acute malnutrition (SAM), account for at least 10% of all deaths among children under 5 years of age worldwide, virtually all of them in low-income and middle-income countries. A number of risk factors, including seasonal food insecurity, environm...

  11. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with...

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Epidemic and Change of People's Health Behavior in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Xiaodong; Li, Shiyue; Wang, Chunhong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wu, Xiaomin

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) has become a new worldwide epidemic whose origin was until recently unknown. It is the unpredictable nature of this epidemic that makes people want answers to some important questions about what they can do to protect themselves. This study presents an inquiry into peoples knowledge and self-reported…

  13. Toward an Improved Scale for Assessing Symptom Severity in Children With Acute Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Rockette, Howard E; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Paradise, Jack L

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether changes in the previously developed 7-item Acute Otitis Media Severity of Symptoms scale could improve its responsiveness and its longitudinal construct validity. The items "diminished activity" and "diminished appetite" had low or borderline levels of responsiveness and longitudinal construct validity. Dropping these items seems to be potentially advantageous.

  14. Prevalence of celiac disease in patients with severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Pillon, R; Ziberna, F; Badina, L; Ventura, A; Longo, G; Quaglia, S; De Leo, L; Vatta, S; Martelossi, S; Patano, G; Not, T; Berti, I

    2015-10-01

    The association between food allergy and celiac disease (CD) is still to be clarified. We screened for CD 319 patients with severe food allergy (IgE > 85 kU/l against food proteins and a history of severe allergic reactions) who underwent specific food oral immunotherapy (OIT), together with 128 children with mild allergy who recovered without OIT, and compared the prevalence data with our historical data regarding healthy schoolchildren. Sixteen patients (5%) with severe allergy and one (0.8%) with mild allergy tested positive for both genetic and serological CD markers, while the prevalence among the schoolchildren was 1%. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in 13/16 patients with severe allergy and in the one with mild allergy, confirming the diagnosis of CD. Sufferers from severe food allergy seem to be at a fivefold increased risk of CD. Our findings suggest that routine screening for CD should be recommended in patients with severe food allergy.

  15. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  16. Acute severe asthma. A prospective study of the precipitating factors in 40 children.

    PubMed

    Potter, P C; Weinberg, E; Shore, S C

    1984-09-15

    A prospective study was undertaken to determine the factors precipitating acute severe asthma in children attending the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town. A comparison in terms of recent exposure to possible precipitating factors was made between 40 known asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma and 40 known asthmatics who were clinically well. Exposure to known allergens had occurred in 7 cases. The time of onset of symptoms bore no relationship to meteorological changes in temperature, humidity or average pressure. Drug compliance in both groups was of the order of 50%. The majority of severe asthma attacks were associated with infection of the respiratory tract. The importance of infection as a precipitating factor in a severe asthma attack is discussed with reference to the cholinergic, adrenergic and immunological mechanisms.

  17. The Impact of Climatic Risk Factors on the Prevalence, Distribution, and Severity of Acute and Chronic Trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Anita; Kovats, Sari; Haslam, Dominic; Schmidt, Elena; Gilbert, Clare E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Trachoma is the most common cause of infectious blindness. Hot, dry climates, dust and water scarcity are thought to be associated with the distribution of trachoma but the evidence is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological evidence regarding the extent to which climatic factors explain the current prevalence, distribution, and severity of acute and chronic trachoma. Understanding the present relationship between climate and trachoma could help inform current and future disease elimination. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature was conducted to identify observational studies which quantified an association between climate factors and acute or chronic trachoma and which met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies that assessed the association between climate types and trachoma prevalence were also reviewed. Results Only eight of the 1751 papers retrieved met the inclusion criteria, all undertaken in Africa. Several papers reported an association between trachoma prevalence and altitude in highly endemic areas, providing some evidence of a role for temperature in the transmission of acute disease. A robust mapping study found strong evidence of an association between low rainfall and active trachoma. There is also consistent but weak evidence that the prevalence of trachoma is higher in savannah-type ecological zones. There were no studies on the effect of climate in low endemic areas, nor on the effect of dust on trachoma. Conclusion Current evidence on the potential role of climate on trachoma distribution is limited, despite a wealth of anecdotal evidence. Temperature and rainfall appear to play a role in the transmission of acute trachoma, possibly mediated through reduced activity of flies at lower temperatures. Further research is needed on climate and other environmental and behavioural factors, particularly in arid and savannah areas. Many studies did not adequately control for

  18. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease. PMID:26602584

  19. Validation of the Cutaneous Dermatomyositis Disease Area and Severity Index (CDASI): characterizing disease severity and assessing responsiveness to clinical change

    PubMed Central

    Anyanwu, C.O.; Fiorentino, D.; Chung, L.; Dzuong, C.; Wang, Y.; Okawa, J.; Carr, K.; Propert, K.J.; Werth, V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The Cutaneous Dermatomyositis Disease Area and Severity Index (CDASI) was developed for use in clinical trials and longitudinal patient assessment. Objectives To characterize disease severity using the CDASI and assess responsiveness of this instrument to clinically meaningful changes in disease activity. Methods Patients with cutaneous dermatomyositis at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn, n = 93) and Stanford University (Stanford, n = 106) were prospectively evaluated using the CDASI, physician global assessment (PGA) Likert scales, and visual analog scale (VAS). Data was analyzed using logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic curves to select cut-offs. Results Baseline CDASI activity scores for the patients evaluated at UPenn ranged from 0 to 47 (median 17), and baseline PGA VAS scores ranged from 0 to 9.6 (median 1.1). At UPenn a CDASI activity score of 19 differentiated mild from moderate and severe disease. At Stanford baseline CDASI scores ranged from 0 to 48 (median 21), baseline PGA VAS scores ranged from 0 to 9.7 (median 4.2) and CDASI activity scores of 14 or less characterized mild disease. When a 2 cm change in the PGA VAS was regarded as a clinically significant improvement, a 4-point (UPenn) or 5-point (Stanford) change in CDASI reflected a minimal clinically significant response. Conclusions The CDASI is a valid and responsive measure that can be used to characterize cutaneous dermatomyositis severity and detect improvement in disease activity. Variations in cutoffs may be due to differences in disease severity between the two populations or inter-rater variations in use of the external gold measures. PMID:25994337

  20. Comparison of laparoscopy and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis and its relative aftercare.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jiang, M X; Zheng, Y; Shu, M; Sun, S B

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects and compare laparoscopic intervention and open surgery in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and its relative aftercare, to improve the overall treatment of SAP. Ninety patients with SAP were enrolled from the 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University from 2008 to 2014 and divided into a laparoscopic intervention group (25 cases) and an open surgery group (65 cases). Patients were asked for clinical symptoms, general hospital information, laboratory inspection, imageological examination, local and systemic complications, treatment and outcome. SAP patients’ relevant clinical indicators were compared between the two groups before and after the operation. Results revealed that there was no statistical significance in lesion range and main scoring indexes for reflecting the severity of the disease. For both groups statistical significance was found in blood loss (285.3±79.8 mL vs 362±91.6 mL), intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring time (9.04±6.35 d vs 12.48±8.34 d) and service time of breathing machine (9.47±6.24 d vs 12.98±8.25 d), and the laparoscopic operation group was superior to the open surgery group (p < 0.05). Besides, the laparoscopic operation group was also superior to the open surgery group in demand for main analgesics one week after the operation, as well as for recovery rate and incidence of complications (p < 0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that patients undergoing laparoscopic intervention are less likely to develop pulmonary infection and more likely to be cured in comparison with patients who receive open surgery. In addition, laparoscopic intervention results in less damage, lighter pain and fewer complications compared with open surgery. PMID:27049091

  1. Severe acute otitis media caused by mucoid Streptococcus pyogenes in a previously healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Hiromitsu; Irimada, Mihoko; Oda, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kazuaki; Ozawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Takashi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Katori, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pyogenes is well recognized as the most common pathogen causing pharyngotonsillitis in school-age children. In Japan, mucoid Streptococcus pneumoniae is well known as a causative agent of severe acute otitis media (AOM); however, mucoid S. pyogenes has rarely been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an AOM patient caused by mucoid S. pyogenes in Japan. A 36-year-old previously healthy female was referred to our hospital with suspicion of cerebrospinal otorrhea due to increasing otalgia accompanied by headache following myringotomy. Bacterial cultures of middle ear secretions were performed, and mucoid-form colonies surrounded by zones of complete β-hemolysis were produced on sheep's blood agar. Antigen-agglutination test results were positive for S. pyogenes, and thus the patient received treatment with panipenem-betamipron 2.0 g/day for 10 days, which resolved nearly all symptoms. The bacteriological features of this strain were then investigated. The M-protein genotype encoded by the emm gene, the major virulence factor of S. pyogenes, was determined to be emm75. Generally, S. pyogenes forms colonies having non-mucoid matt appearances based on β-hemolysis of sheep's blood agar. The mucoid phenotype results from abundant production of hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, a key virulence determinant. emm75 is common in noninvasive, but less common in invasive disease. In conclusion, mucoid S. pyogenes can cause severe infection even in previously healthy persons. Emergence of mucoid S. pyogenes and drug resistance trends should be monitored in the future. PMID:24727832

  2. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  3. Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the…

  4. Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Imran; Ahmed, Waleed A.; Dada, Ashraf M.; Bayumi, Daniyah T.; Malic, Laut S.; Althawadi, Sahar; Ignacio, Kim; Alsalmi, Hanadi S.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Wali, Ghassan Y.; Qushmaq, Ismael A.; Alraddadi, Basem M.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    We studied antibody response in 9 healthcare workers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who survived Middle East respiratory syndrome, by using serial ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay testing. Among patients who had experienced severe pneumonia, antibody was detected for >18 months after infection. Antibody longevity was more variable in patients who had experienced milder disease. PMID:27192543

  5. Spotlight on memantine in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2010-02-01

    Memantine (Axura, Ebixa, Namenda) is an uncompetitive, moderate-affinity NMDA receptor antagonist that is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. In well designed trials in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, oral memantine monotherapy improved outcomes in the area of functional ability more than placebo in one trial, but in a second trial, treatment differences did not reach significance. Memantine has a distinct mode of action compared with that of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, and in a well designed study, combination therapy with memantine plus donepezil improved outcomes more than donepezil plus placebo in all four domains (function, cognition, behaviour and global change). Memantine is generally well tolerated, with adverse events occurring with a similar incidence to that reported with placebo. In modelled cost-effectiveness analyses, memantine was dominant to no therapy in regard to cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, and the combination of memantine plus donepezil was dominant to donepezil therapy alone in regard to QALYs gained when treatment periods exceeded 1 year in patients with moderate to severe disease. Thus, in the management of patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, memantine provides an effective treatment option. To date, clinical trial support is greater for memantine use in combination with an AChE inhibitor, while more data are needed to confirm its efficacy as monotherapy.

  6. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  7. Inhibition of catecholamine degradation ameliorates while chemical sympathectomy aggravates the severity of acute Friend retrovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Bloemker, Dominique; Mollerus, Sina; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dittmer, Ulf; del Rey, Adriana; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of retroviral infections. However, experimental data are scarce and findings inconsistent. Here, we investigated the role of the SNS during acute infection with Friend virus (FV), a pathogenic murine retrovirus that causes polyclonal proliferation of erythroid precursor cells and splenomegaly in adult mice. Experimental animals were infected with FV complex, and viral load, spleen weight, and splenic noradrenaline (NA) concentration was analyzed until 25 days post infection. Results show that FV infection caused a massive but transient depletion in splenic NA during the acute phase of the disease. At the peak of the virus-induced splenomegaly, splenic NA concentration was reduced by about 90% compared to naïve uninfected mice. Concurrently, expression of the catecholamine degrading enzymes monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) was significantly upregulated in immune cells of the spleen. Pharmacological inhibition of MAO-A and COMT by the selective inhibitors clorgyline and 3,5-dinitrocatechol, respectively, efficiently blocked NA degradation and significantly reduced viral load and virus-induced splenomegaly. In contrast, chemical sympathectomy prior to FV inoculation aggravated the acute infection and extended the duration of the disease. Together these findings demonstrate that catecholamine availability at the site of viral replication is an important factor affecting the course of retroviral infections. PMID:26880342

  8. Azathioprine-induced Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases—A Prospective Study on Incidence and Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Wolfgang; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bündgens, Burkhard; Büning, Jürgen; Miehlke, Stephan; Hüppe, Dietrich; Maaser, Christian; Klugmann, Tobias; Kruis, Wolfgang; Siegmund, Britta; Helwig, Ulf; Weismüller, Joseph; Drabik, Attyla; Stallmach, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Azathioprine [AZA] is recommended for maintenance of steroid-free remission in inflammatory bowel disease IBD. The aim of this study has been to establish the incidence and severity of AZA-induced pancreatitis, an idiosyncratic and major side effect, and to identify specific risk factors. Methods: We studied 510 IBD patients [338 Crohn’s disease, 157 ulcerative colitis, 15 indeterminate colitis] with initiation of AZA treatment in a prospective multicentre registry study. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in accordance with international guidelines. Results: AZA was continued by 324 [63.5%] and stopped by 186 [36.5%] patients. The most common cause of discontinuation was nausea [12.2%]. AZA-induced pancreatitis occurred in 37 patients [7.3%]. Of these: 43% were hospitalised with a median inpatient time period of 5 days; 10% had peripancreatic fluid collections; 24% had vomiting; and 14% had fever. No patient had to undergo nonsurgical or surgical interventions. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for AZA-induced acute pancreatitis [p < 0.0002] in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions: AZA-induced acute pancreatitis is a common adverse event in IBD patients, but in this study had a mild course in all patients. Smoking is the most important risk factor. PMID:26468141

  9. Influence of the Circadian System on Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Litinski, Mikhail; Scheer, Frank AJL; Shea, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The severity of many diseases varies across the day and night. For example, adverse cardiovascular incidents peak in the morning, asthma is often worse at night and temporal lobe epileptic seizures are most prevalent in the afternoon. These patterns may be due to the day/night rhythm in environment and behavior, and/or endogenous circadian rhythms in physiology. Furthermore, chronic misalignment between the endogenous circadian timing system and the behavioral cycles could be a cause of increased risk of diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and certain cancers in shift workers. Here we describe the magnitude, relevance and potential biological basis of such daily changes in disease severity and of circadian/behavioral misalignment, and present how these insights may help in the development of appropriate chronotherapy. PMID:20161149

  10. RISK FACTORS FOR SEVERE HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Owatanapanich, Somchai; Wutthanarungsan, Rochana; Jaksupa, Wipaporn; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2015-05-01

    We studied risk factors associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enteroviruses among patients aged less than 15 years admitted to King Narai Hospital, Lopburi, Thailand during 2011-2013. Cases were divided into either mild or severe. Severe cases were those with encephalitis, meningitis, myocarditis, pneumonia, pulmonary edema or respiratory failure. Risk factors for severe infection were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. One hundred eighteen patients met the case definition of HFMD. Of these, 95 (80.5%) were classified as mild cases, and 23 (19.5%) as severe cases; there were 5 deaths (4.2%). Of the 23 severe cases, 9 were infected with coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), 8 with enterovirus 71 (EV71) and 4 with both EV71 and CA16. The most common presentations among the severe caseswere: seizures (74%), pneumonia (39%), encephalitis (39%), and meningitis (13%). The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on univariate analysis were highest body temperature 39.00C, duration of fever 23 days, absence of skin lesions, diarrhea, dyspnea, seizures and hyperglycemia. The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on both univariate and multivariate analyses were age less than 1 year, absence of oral lesions and drowsiness/lethargy. Clinicians should be aware of these factors. Early recognition of severe cases is important to increase the rates of successful outcomes and reduce mortality.

  11. RISK FACTORS FOR SEVERE HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Owatanapanich, Somchai; Wutthanarungsan, Rochana; Jaksupa, Wipaporn; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2015-05-01

    We studied risk factors associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enteroviruses among patients aged less than 15 years admitted to King Narai Hospital, Lopburi, Thailand during 2011-2013. Cases were divided into either mild or severe. Severe cases were those with encephalitis, meningitis, myocarditis, pneumonia, pulmonary edema or respiratory failure. Risk factors for severe infection were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. One hundred eighteen patients met the case definition of HFMD. Of these, 95 (80.5%) were classified as mild cases, and 23 (19.5%) as severe cases; there were 5 deaths (4.2%). Of the 23 severe cases, 9 were infected with coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), 8 with enterovirus 71 (EV71) and 4 with both EV71 and CA16. The most common presentations among the severe caseswere: seizures (74%), pneumonia (39%), encephalitis (39%), and meningitis (13%). The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on univariate analysis were highest body temperature 39.00C, duration of fever 23 days, absence of skin lesions, diarrhea, dyspnea, seizures and hyperglycemia. The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on both univariate and multivariate analyses were age less than 1 year, absence of oral lesions and drowsiness/lethargy. Clinicians should be aware of these factors. Early recognition of severe cases is important to increase the rates of successful outcomes and reduce mortality. PMID:26521518

  12. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP).

  13. Dementia Increases Severe Sepsis and Mortality in Hospitalized Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Li, Chung-Yi; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao

    2015-06-01

    Dementia increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. However, information on the potential effects of dementia on the risks of acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis and in-hospital mortality, specifically among inpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is limited. The observational analytic study was inpatient claims during the period from 2000 to 2010 for 1 million people who were randomly selected from all of the beneficiaries of the Taiwan National Health Insurance in 2000. In total, 1406 patients with COPD and dementia were admitted during the study period. Hospitalized patients with COPD and free from a history of dementia were randomly selected and served as control subjects (n = 5334). The patient groups were matched according to age (±3 years), gender, and the year of admission, with a control/dementia ratio of 4. Only the first-time hospitalization data for each subject was analyzed. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of outcome measures (acute organ dysfunction, severe sepsis, and mortality), controlling for confounding factors (age, sex, comorbidity, infection site, hospital level, and length of stay). In COPD patients with dementia, the incidence rate of severe sepsis and hospital mortality was 17.1% and 4.8%, respectively, which were higher than the controls (10.6% and 2.3%). After controlling for potential confounding factors, dementia was found to significantly increase the odds of severe sepsis and hospital mortality with an adjusted OR (OR) of 1.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-1.72) and 1.69 (95% CI 1.18-2.43), respectively. Dementia was also significantly associated with an increased OR of acute respiratory dysfunction (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.09-1.77). In hospitalized COPD patients, the presence of dementia may increase the risks of acute respiratory dysfunction, severe sepsis, and hospital mortality, which warrants the attention of health care

  14. Acute pandysautonomia and severe sensory deficit with poor recovery. A clinical, neurophysiological and pathological case study.

    PubMed Central

    Fagius, J; Westerberg, C E; Olsson, Y

    1983-01-01

    A patient with acute loss of autonomic functions and virtually all afferent functions of peripheral nerves is described. The course was chronic and the outcome fatal. The clinical course was followed with measurements of sensory thresholds and conduction velocities, autonomic tests and microneurographic recordings. Neuropathological changes were severe and localised in the peripheral nervous system. Previously reported similar cases were reviewed. It was concluded that acute pandysautonomia is a disorder similar to the Guillain-Barré syndrome; the course is often protracted and residual neurological deficit common. Images PMID:6886716

  15. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency.

  16. On the Pathogenesis of Acute Exacerbations of Mucoobstructive Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mucoobstructive lung diseases have highlighted the importance of a proper description of the normal mucus clearance system. A useful description of the normal mucus clearance apparatus requires the presence of two gels on the airway surface (i.e., a mucus layer gel and a periciliary gel). Importantly, most mucoobstructive lung diseases are distributed heterogeneously in the lung, and exacerbations may reflect spread of the disease to previously normal areas. The spread may reflect disturbances in the balance of water between the two gel layers, producing heterogeneous mucus adhesion and infection within the lung. Ultimately, spread can produce losses of lung function that may be associated with acute exacerbation frequency. PMID:26595733

  17. Acute phase proteins increase with sarcoptic mange status and severity in Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica, Schinz 1838).

    PubMed

    Ráez-Bravo, Arián; Granados, José Enrique; Cerón, José Joaquín; Cano-Manuel, Francisco Javier; Fandos, Paulino; Pérez, Jesús María; Espinosa, José; Soriguer, Ramón Casimiro; López-Olvera, Jorge Ramón

    2015-11-01

    Sarcoptic mange is a contagious skin disease caused by Sarcoptes scabiei, affecting both domestic and wild mammals, including the Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica), a medium-sized mountain ungulate almost endemic to the Iberian Peninsula. Acute phase proteins (APPs) could be an indicator of sarcoptic mange disease and severity in Iberian ibex. Serum samples from 131 healthy and sarcoptic mange-affected Iberian ibexes were collected from 2005 to 2012 in Sierra Nevada Natural Space in southern Spain. Serum alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations were quantified, and statistically significant differences according to sarcoptic mange disease and severity were assessed. Both AGP and SAA were significantly higher in the sarcoptic mange-affected ibexes than in the healthy ones as well as in the severely affected ibexes as compared to those with less than 50 % of the body surface affected. For the first time, changes in APP are reported in relation to sarcoptic mange in Iberian ibex. It is also reported for the first time that the intensity of APP increase depends on the severity of sarcoptic mange, which could be related with the pathological secondary amyloidosis, leading to organ dysfunction in severely mange-affected animals. Species and population differences in the increase of APP in response to sarcoptic mange could indicate individual and population differences in the immune capability of each population to deal with mange, population prevalence and mortality being the last indicators of such sensitivity.

  18. Viral epidemiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, G; Lerikou, M; Tsiodras, S; Chranioti, Aik; Perros, E; Anagnostopoulou, U; Armaganidis, A; Karakitsos, P

    2012-02-01

    The role of viruses in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (AECOPD) needs further elucidation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of viral pathogens in AECOPD. Patients presenting to the Emergency Room with AECOPD needing hospitalization were recruited. Oropharyngeal and sputum samples were collected in order to perform microarrays-based viral testing for the detection of respiratory viruses. A total of 200 (100%) patients were analyzed and from them in 107 (53.5%) a virus was detected. The commonest identified viruses were the human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (subtypes A and B) (40.5%), influenza virus (subtypes A, B, C) (11%), rhinovirus (8%) and human Parainfluenza Virus (subtypes A and B) (7.5%). A bacterial pathogen was isolated in 27 (14%) patients and a dual infection due to a bacterial and a viral pathogen was recognised in 14/107 patients. Patients with AECOPD and a viral infection had a lengthier hospital stay (9.2 ± 4.6 vs 7.6 ± 4.3, p < 0.01) while the severity of the disease was no related with significant differences among the groups of the study population. In conclusion, the isolation of a virus was strongly associated with AECOPD in the examined population. The stage of COPD appeared to have no relation with the frequency of the isolated viruses while dual infection with a viral and a bacterial pathogen was not rare. PMID:21983132

  19. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment.

  20. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:176733

  1. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  2. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  3. Signal Intensity of Superb Microvascular Imaging Correlates with the Severity of Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis is critical for the management of this condition. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) enables the assessment of slow blood flow of small vessels without any contrast medium. An 84-year-old man visited our hospital with right upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography showed a slight thickening of the gallbladder. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein levels were elevated. He was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis and treated conservatively with antibiotics. Two days later, his condition worsened and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) was performed. The patient recovered and was discharged, and his drainage was withdrawn 7 days later. On admission, color-coded SMI (cSMI) showed pulsatory signals on the slightly thickened gallbladder wall. On the day of PTGBD, the intensity of the signal on cSMI had increased. Once the patient was cured, no further signal was observed on the gallbladder wall with either cSMI or mSMI. In conclusion, the strong pulsatory signal correlated with the severity of acute cholecystitis observed with cSMI and mSMI. Illustrating the signal intensity is useful for the evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis. PMID:27721732

  4. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W.; Slone, Denetta S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome. PMID:27642494

  5. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B; Rael, Leonard T; Levy, Stewart; Carrick, Matthew; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI). Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP) and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP). Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p ≤ 0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Antioxidant capacity (icORP) on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p < 0.05). An odds ratio of 4.08 was associated with poor acute outcome when icORP > 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p < 0.05). Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients' response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  6. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  7. Acute encephalomyelitis complicated with severe neurological sequelae after intrathecal administration of methotrexate in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Takuro; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Shinsuke; Tanabe, Takayuki; Kurauchi, Koichiro; Kodama, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2014-11-01

    A four-year-old girl on maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) complained of a headache and low back pain on the day she received her 21st intrathecal methotrexate (it-MTX) administration, and the next day experienced numbness and pain in her foot. This numbness gradually spread to her hand. She thereafter developed a fever and was hospitalized on day 8. After antibiotic therapy, the fever disappeared. However, her lower limbs became paralyzed, and she also developed urinary retention. On day 12, her paralysis progressed upwards, and she also developed paralysis of the upper limbs. Finally, she experienced convulsions with an impairment of consciousness. A magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain and spinal cord showed abnormal signals in the brain cortex and anterior horn. Accordingly, we diagnosed acute encephalomyelitis associated with it-MTX. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, steroid pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and dextromethorphan administration were initiated, while she received mechanical ventilation. Despite this intensive treatment, she suffered severe neurological damage and had to be maintained on mechanical ventilation due to persistent flaccid quadriplegia one year after the onset. When patients have symptoms of ascending paralysis during it-MTX treatment, clinicians should carefully consider the possibility of acute encephalomyelitis due to it-MTX. PMID:25501412

  8. Diagnostic challenges of Wilson's disease presenting as acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and jaundice.

    PubMed

    Nussinson, Elchanan; Shahbari, Azmi; Shibli, Fahmi; Chervinsky, Elena; Trougouboff, Philippe; Markel, Arie

    2013-11-27

    Wilson's disease is a rare disorder of copper transport in hepatic cells, and may present as cholestatic liver disease; pancreatitis and cholangitis are rarely associated with Wilsons's disease. Moreover, cases of Wilson's disease presenting as pigmented gallstone pancreatitis have not been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with jaundice and abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and obstructive jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones that were detected during retrograde cholangiopancreatography. However, because of his long-term jaundice and the presence of pigmented gallstones, the patient underwent further evaluation for Wilson's disease, which was subsequently confirmed. This patient's unique presentation exemplifies the overlap in the clinical and laboratory parameters of Wilson's disease and cholestasis, and the difficulties associated with their differentiation. It suggests that Wilson's disease should be considered in patients with pancreatitis, cholangitis, and severe protracted jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones.

  9. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  10. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent.

  11. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  12. [Legionnaires' disease complicated by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: about a case].

    PubMed

    Bac, Arnaud; Ramadan, Ahmed Sabry; Youatou, Pierre; Mols, Pierre; Cerf, Dominique; Ngatchou, William

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a bacterial disease of the respiratory system caused by a gram-negative germ whose clinical manifestation can be benign limiting to flu-like syndrome or can be more severe being characterized by pneumonia which may be complicated by multisystem disease that can lead to death. We report the case of a 48 year-old patient with rhabdomyolysis complicated by acute renal failure following Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. We here highlight the pathophysiological aspects and treatment of this rare complication during Legionella infection. PMID:27642464

  13. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  14. Alterations of acute phase reaction and cytokine production in patients following severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marius G; Sablotzki, Armin; Hoffmann, Andreas; Mühling, Jörg; Dietrich, Friedrich E; Hempelmann, Gunter

    2002-09-01

    To determine the acute immunologic reaction, mediated by cytokines, interleukines (ILs) and growth factors and the susceptibility to infections and sepsis after severe burn injury a prospective, single unit, longitudinal study of acute phase reactants and mediators who performed. After approval by the ethics committee of our hospital, we investigated the plasma concentrations of IL-2, -6, -8, -10, and -13, the soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), and the acute phase proteins procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission and every 3 days in 24 patients over a time course of 28 days after thermal injury and categorized by percent burn: < or =30% (group 1; n=12) and >30% (group 2; n=12). Shortly after burn injury we found higher concentrations of IL-2, -6, -10 and PCT in those patients >30% TBSA. During the study period, we found significant higher levels of acute phase proteins, IL-6 and -8 in patients >30% TBSA. The incidence of SIRS and MODS was three times increased in patients >30% TBSA. Our results show different patterns of cytokines and acute phase proteins in patients with different burned surface areas over a long time and continuous monitoring of a more distinct inflammatory response in these patients.

  15. Detection of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks by CUSUM-based overcrowd-severe-respiratory-disease-index model.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Macías, Alejandro E; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Villanueva-Martínez, Sebastián

    2013-01-01

    A severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreak correlates with a high demand of specific supplies and specialized personnel to hold it back in a wide region or set of regions; these supplies would be beds, storage areas, hemodynamic monitors, and mechanical ventilators, as well as physicians, respiratory technicians, and specialized nurses. We describe an online cumulative sum based model named Overcrowd-Severe-Respiratory-Disease-Index based on the Modified Overcrowd Index that simultaneously monitors and informs the demand of those supplies and personnel in a healthcare network generating early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks through the interpretation of such variables. A post hoc historical archive is generated, helping physicians in charge to improve the transit and future allocation of supplies in the entire hospital network during the outbreak. The model was thoroughly verified in a virtual scenario, generating multiple epidemic outbreaks in a 6-year span for a 13-hospital network. When it was superimposed over the H1N1 influenza outbreak census (2008-2010) taken by the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City, it showed that it is an effective algorithm to notify early warnings of severe respiratory disease epidemic outbreaks with a minimal rate of false alerts.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  17. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  18. The Level of Cholesterol in COPD Patients with Severe and Very Severe Stage of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafirova-Ivanovska, Beti; Stojkovikj, Jagoda; Dokikj, Dejan; Anastasova, Sasha; Debresliovska, Angela; Zejnel, Sead; Stojkovikj, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High blood cholesterol is part of metabolic syndrome and can be caused by medical conditions or bad dietary habits. AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia in privies diagnosed patients with the severe and very severe stage of COPD, which were stable. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated 100 subjects, all of them smokers, with smoking status >10 years, stratified into two groups: with severe and very severe stage of the disease. It was clinical, randomized, cross-sectional study. Besides demographic parameters and functional parameters, body mass index, cholesterol, LDL, and HDL were investigated. RESULTS: In the group of patients with very severe COPD were recorded significantly higher average values of cholesterol (6.16 ± 1.5 vs. 5.61 ± 1.1, p = 0.039). As independent significant factors influencing cholesterol in the group with a very severe COPD were confirmed the age of the patients (p = 0.005), LDL (p = 0.004) and HDL (p = 0.002). In the group with severe COPD, only LDL was confirmed as an independent significant factor that has an impact on cholesterol (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: The results of our survey demonstrated a high level of blood cholesterol and LDL, and low level of blood HDL in both investigated group’s patients with COPD. PMID:27335600

  19. Predicting the severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants: should we use a clinical score or a biomarker?

    PubMed

    Amat, Flore; Henquell, Cécile; Verdan, Matthieu; Roszyk, Laurence; Mulliez, Aurélien; Labbé, André

    2014-11-01

    Krebs von den Lungen 6 antigen (KL-6) has been shown to be a useful biomarker of the severity of Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. To assess the correlation between the clinical severity of acute bronchiolitis, serum KL-6, and the causative viruses, 222 infants with acute bronchiolitis presenting at the Pediatric Emergency Department of Estaing University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France, were prospectively enrolled from October 2011 to May 2012. Disease severity was assessed with a score calculated from oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, and respiratory effort. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was collected to screen for a panel of 20 respiratory viruses. Serum was assessed and compared with a control group of 38 bronchiolitis-free infants. No significant difference in KL-6 levels was found between the children with bronchiolitis (mean 231 IU/mL ± 106) and those without (230 IU/mL ± 102), or between children who were hospitalized or not, or between the types of virus. No correlation was found between serum KL-6 levels and the disease severity score. The absence of Human Rhinovirus was a predictive factor for hospitalization (OR 3.4 [1.4-7.9]; P = 0.006). Older age and a higher oxygen saturation were protective factors (OR 0.65[0.55-0.77]; P < 0.0001 and OR 0.67 [0.54-0.85] P < 0.001, respectively). These results suggest that in infants presenting with bronchiolitis for the first time, clinical outcome depends more on the adaptive capacities of the host than on epithelial dysfunction intensity. Many of the features of bronchiolitis are affected by underlying disease and by treatment.

  20. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  1. Geographic Access to High Capability Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Seymour, Christopher W.; Yealy, Donald M.; Carr, Brendan G.; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimal care of adults with severe acute respiratory failure requires specific resources and expertise. We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Design Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States. We defined high capability centers using two criteria: (1) provision of adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), based on either 2008–2013 Extracorporeal Life Support Organization reporting or provision of ECMO to 2010 Medicare beneficiaries; or (2) high annual hospital mechanical ventilation volume, based 2010 Medicare claims. Setting Nonfederal acute care hospitals in the United States. Measurements and Main Results We defined geographic access as the percentage of the state, region and national population with either direct or hospital-transferred access within one or two hours by air or ground transport. Of 4,822 acute care hospitals, 148 hospitals met our ECMO criteria and 447 hospitals met our mechanical ventilation criteria. Geographic access varied substantially across states and regions in the United States, depending on center criteria. Without interhospital transfer, an estimated 58.5% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 79.0% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. With interhospital transfer and under ideal circumstances, an estimated 96.4% of the national adult population had geographic access to hospitals performing ECMO and 98.6% had geographic access to hospitals performing a high annual volume of mechanical ventilation. However, this degree of geographic access required substantial interhospital transfer of patients, including up to two hours by air. Conclusions Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers varies widely across states and regions in the United States. Adequate

  2. Update on medical and surgical options for patients with acute severe ulcerative colitis: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Rachel E; Messaris, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Acute severe ulcerative colitis (UC) is a highly morbid condition that requires both medical and surgical management through the collaboration of gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons. First line treatment for patients presenting with acute severe UC consists of intravenous steroids, but those who do not respond require escalation of therapy or emergent colectomy. The mortality of emergent colectomy has declined significantly in recent decades, but due to the morbidity of this procedure, second line agents such as cyclosporine and infliximab have been used as salvage therapy in an attempt to avoid emergent surgery. Unfortunately, protracted medical therapy has led to patients presenting for surgery in a poorer state of health leading to poorer post-operative outcomes. In this era of multiple medical modalities available in the treatment of acute severe UC, physicians must consider the advantages and disadvantages of prolonged medical therapy in an attempt to avoid surgery. Colectomy remains a mainstay in the treatment of severe ulcerative colitis not responsive to corticosteroids and rescue therapy, and timely referral for surgery allows for improved post-operative outcomes with lower risk of sepsis and improved patient survival. Options for reconstructive surgery include three-stage ileal pouch-anal anastomosis or a modified two-stage procedure that can be performed either open or laparoscopically. The numerous avenues of medical and surgical therapy have allowed for great advances in the treatment of patients with UC. In this era of options, it is important to maintain a global view, utilize biologic therapy when indicated, and then maintain an appropriate threshold for surgery. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing number of medical and surgical options available in the treatment of acute, severe UC. PMID:27721922

  3. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alejandro; Blanton, Laura V; Cao, Song; Zhao, Guoyan; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Smith, Michelle I; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W; Rohwer, Forest; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-09-22

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with current ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) interventions, is causally related to disease pathogenesis. To further characterize gut microbial community development in healthy versus malnourished infants/children, we performed a time-series metagenomic study of DNA isolated from virus-like particles (VLPs) recovered from fecal samples collected during the first 30 mo of postnatal life from eight pairs of mono- and dizygotic Malawian twins concordant for healthy growth and 12 twin pairs discordant for SAM. Both members of discordant pairs were sampled just before, during, and after treatment with a peanut-based RUTF. Using Random Forests and a dataset of 17,676 viral contigs assembled from shotgun sequencing reads of VLP DNAs, we identified viruses that distinguish different stages in the assembly of the gut microbiota in the concordant healthy twin pairs. This developmental program is impaired in both members of SAM discordant pairs and not repaired with RUTF. Phage plus members of the Anelloviridae and Circoviridae families of eukaryotic viruses discriminate discordant from concordant healthy pairs. These results disclose that apparently healthy cotwins in discordant pairs have viromes associated with, although not necessarily mediators, of SAM; as such, they provide a human model for delineating normal versus perturbed postnatal acquisition and retention of the gut microbiota's viral component in populations at risk for malnutrition.

  4. Gut DNA viromes of Malawian twins discordant for severe acute malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Blanton, Laura V.; Cao, Song; Zhao, Guoyan; Manary, Mark; Trehan, Indi; Smith, Michelle I.; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W.; Rohwer, Forest; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial component of the human gut microbiota undergoes a definable program of postnatal development. Evidence is accumulating that this program is disrupted in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and that their persistent gut microbiota immaturity, which is not durably repaired with current ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) interventions, is causally related to disease pathogenesis. To further characterize gut microbial community development in healthy versus malnourished infants/children, we performed a time-series metagenomic study of DNA isolated from virus-like particles (VLPs) recovered from fecal samples collected during the first 30 mo of postnatal life from eight pairs of mono- and dizygotic Malawian twins concordant for healthy growth and 12 twin pairs discordant for SAM. Both members of discordant pairs were sampled just before, during, and after treatment with a peanut-based RUTF. Using Random Forests and a dataset of 17,676 viral contigs assembled from shotgun sequencing reads of VLP DNAs, we identified viruses that distinguish different stages in the assembly of the gut microbiota in the concordant healthy twin pairs. This developmental program is impaired in both members of SAM discordant pairs and not repaired with RUTF. Phage plus members of the Anelloviridae and Circoviridae families of eukaryotic viruses discriminate discordant from concordant healthy pairs. These results disclose that apparently healthy cotwins in discordant pairs have viromes associated with, although not necessarily mediators, of SAM; as such, they provide a human model for delineating normal versus perturbed postnatal acquisition and retention of the gut microbiota’s viral component in populations at risk for malnutrition. PMID:26351661

  5. Oral health of patients with severe rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Breminand; Vayej, Ahmed C

    2012-07-01

    In order to determine whether adequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis, we studied 44 black patients with severe rheumatic heart disease before they had cardiac surgery. Plaque and gingival index scores were calculated and panoramic radiographs were done in all patients. There were 17 males and 27 females (mean age: 30.6 years). The plaque and gingival index scores were classified as poor in 31.8 and 54.6% of patients, respectively. Panoramic radiographic findings included caries in 56.8% of patients, peri-apical pathology in 18.1% and retained roots in 22.7% of patients. This study demonstrates that inadequate attention is paid to the maintenance of good oral health in patients with severe rheumatic heart disease. The oral and dental care of patients at risk of developing infective endocarditis needs to be improved. PMID:22836156

  6. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  7. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time.

  8. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  9. Dengue viremia titer, antibody response pattern, and virus serotype correlate with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, D W; Green, S; Kalayanarooj, S; Innis, B L; Nimmannitya, S; Suntayakorn, S; Endy, T P; Raengsakulrach, B; Rothman, A L; Ennis, F A; Nisalak, A

    2000-01-01

    Viremia titers in serial plasma samples from 168 children with acute dengue virus infection who were enrolled in a prospective study at 2 hospitals in Thailand were examined to determine the role of virus load in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). The infecting virus serotype was identified for 165 patients (DEN-1, 46 patients; DEN-2, 47 patients; DEN-3, 47 patients, DEN-4, 25 patients). Patients with DEN-2 infections experienced more severe disease than those infected with other serotypes. Eighty-one percent of patients experienced a secondary dengue virus infection that was associated with more severe disease. Viremia titers were determined for 41 DEN-1 and 46 DEN-2 patients. Higher peak titers were associated with increased disease severity for the 31 patients with a peak titer identified (mean titer of 107.6 for those with dengue fever vs. 108.5 for patients with DHF, P=.01). Increased dengue disease severity correlated with high viremia titer, secondary dengue virus infection, and DEN-2 virus type.

  10. Decreased ADAMTS 13 Activity is Associated With Disease Severity and Outcome in Pediatric Severe Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Wang, Yu; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-04-01

    Decreased ADAMTS 13 activity has been reported in severe sepsis and in sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation. This study aimed to investigate the role of ADAMTS 13 in different pediatric sepsis syndromes and evaluate its relationship with disease severity and outcome. We prospectively collected cases of sepsis treated in a pediatric intensive care unit, between July 2012 and June 2014 in Chang Gung Children's Hospital in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Clinical characteristics and ADAMTS-13 activity were analyzed. All sepsis syndromes had decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 of admission compared to healthy controls. Patients with septic shock had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on days 1 and 3 compared to those with sepsis and severe sepsis. There was a significant negative correlation between ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 and day 1 PRISM-II, PELOD, P-MOD, and DIC scores. Patients with mortality had significantly decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 than survivors, but not on day 3. Different pediatric sepsis syndromes have varying degrees of decreased ADAMTS 13 activity. ADAMTS 13 activity is strongly negatively correlated with disease severity of pediatric sepsis syndrome, whereas decreased ADAMTS 13 activity on day 1 is associated with increased risk of mortality. PMID:27100422

  11. Noninvasive Measures of Liver Fibrosis and Severity of Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Catherine; Brown, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the degree of fibrosis is an important step in the assessment of disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. Liver biopsy has been the gold standard for estimating the extent of inflammation and fibrosis, although the procedure has limitations such as sampling error and variability. Noninvasive testing has been shown to be equally predictive in ruling out fibrosis or ruling in advanced fibrosis. Serum biomarkers and imaging-based tests have more limited predictive ability when classifying intermediate stages, but these tools can help identify which patients should receive antiviral treatment sooner and require ongoing cancer surveillance without the need for biopsy. Using a combination of serum markers and imaging tests may also be helpful in providing functional assessment of portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:27330502

  12. Noninvasive Measures of Liver Fibrosis and Severity of Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Catherine; Brown, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Determining the degree of fibrosis is an important step in the assessment of disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. Liver biopsy has been the gold standard for estimating the extent of inflammation and fibrosis, although the procedure has limitations such as sampling error and variability. Noninvasive testing has been shown to be equally predictive in ruling out fibrosis or ruling in advanced fibrosis. Serum biomarkers and imaging-based tests have more limited predictive ability when classifying intermediate stages, but these tools can help identify which patients should receive antiviral treatment sooner and require ongoing cancer surveillance without the need for biopsy. Using a combination of serum markers and imaging tests may also be helpful in providing functional assessment of portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:27330502

  13. Acute viral E hepatitis with chronic liver disease (autoimmune hepatitis).

    PubMed

    Desai, H G; Naik, A S

    2005-03-01

    A 36 years old male presented with anorexia, jaundice and ascites. He was suffering from acute viral E hepatitis. In view of ascites, he was investigated for associated asymptomatic chronic liver disease (CLD). The CLD was diagnosed as cirrhosis with autoimmune hepatitis and was treated with steroid with good response. He is maintaining good health with low dose steroid, on follow up for 1 year.

  14. CT Metrics of Airway Disease and Emphysema in Severe COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hoffman, Eric; Criner, Gerard J.; Mosenifar, Zab; Sciurba, Frank C.; Make, Barry J.; Carey, Vincent; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro; Reilly, John J.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Washko, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: CT scan measures of emphysema and airway disease have been correlated with lung function in cohorts of subjects with a range of COPD severity. The contribution of CT scan-assessed airway disease to objective measures of lung function and respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea in severe emphysema is less clear. Methods: Using data from 338 subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) Genetics Ancillary Study, densitometric measures of emphysema using a threshold of −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA-950) and airway wall phenotypes of the wall thickness (WT) and the square root of wall area (SRWA) of a 10-mm luminal perimeter airway were calculated for each subject. Linear regression analysis was performed for outcome variables FEV1 and percent predicted value of FEV1 with CT scan measures of emphysema and airway disease. Results: In univariate analysis, there were significant negative correlations between %LAA-950 and both the WT (r = −0.28, p = 0.0001) and SRWA (r = −0.19, p = 0.0008). Airway wall thickness was weakly but significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1% predicted (R = −0.12, p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed significant associations between either WT or SRWA (β = −5.2, p = 0.009; β = −2.6, p = 0.008, respectively) and %LAA-950 (β = −10.6, p = 0.03) with the postbronchodilator FEV1% predicted. Male subjects exhibited significantly thicker airway wall phenotypes (p = 0.007 for WT and p = 0.0006 for SRWA). Conclusions: Airway disease and emphysema detected by CT scanning are inversely related in patients with severe COPD. Airway wall phenotypes were influenced by gender and associated with lung function in subjects with severe emphysema. PMID:19411295

  15. Can Serum Ferritin Level Predict Disease Severity in Patients with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever?

    PubMed Central

    Metanat, Maliheh; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Tabatabaei, Mehdi; Sarraf-Shirazi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute viral disease. Several factors have already been suggested to explain the pathogenesis as well as predict the disease severity. In our study we aim to investigate the role of serum ferritin level as a possible predicting factor of disease severity in these patients. Materials and Methods: We evaluated all patients with laboratory confirmed diagnosis of CCHF who were admitted to Boo-Ali Hospital of Zahedan from May 2011 to June 2012. Confirmation of the disease determined using the presence of anti- CCHFV IgM in the serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or by polymerase chain reaction(PCR). After ethical approval, patients were categorized into two groups of mild and severe disease according to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) severity using the scoring system of International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH). Serum ferritin levels were evaluated and compared between these two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to assess the optimal cutoff value of serum ferritin for predicting the disease severity. Results: A total of 42 patients (36 men, 6 women, age range: 17–78 years) were included in this study, of whom 38% had Persian and 62% had Baloch ethnicity. According to DIC severity score, 54.7% of the patients had severe disease and 45.3% had mild disease. The area under the ROC curve was 0.896 and 95% CI was 0.801–0.991 (p<0.0001). A cut-off point of 1060 ng/dL, had a sensitivity of 78.9%, a specificity of 87%, a positive predictive value of 6% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Positive and negative likelihood ratios for this serum ferritin level were 6.05 and 0.24, respectively. Conclusion: Increased serum ferritin level has a significant positive correlation with disease severity in patients with CCHF and can evaluate the prognosis of these patients with a high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:25610262

  16. Dengue NS1 antigen contributes to disease severity by inducing interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Wickramasinghe, N; Salimi, M; Wijesiriwardana, N; Kamaladasa, A; Shyamali, N L A; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G N

    2016-04-01

    Both dengue NS1 antigen and serum interleukin (IL)-10 levels have been shown to associate with severe clinical disease in acute dengue infection, and IL-10 has also been shown to suppress dengue-specific T cell responses. Therefore, we proceeded to investigate the mechanisms by which dengue NS1 contributes to disease pathogenesis and if it is associated with altered IL-10 production. Serum IL-10 and dengue NS1 antigen levels were assessed serially in 36 adult Sri Lankan individuals with acute dengue infection. We found that the serum IL-10 levels correlated positively with dengue NS1 antigen levels (Spearman's r = 0·47, P < 0·0001), and NS1 also correlated with annexin V expression by T cells in acute dengue (Spearman's r = 0·63, P = 0·001). However, NS1 levels did not associate with the functionality of T cell responses or with expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Therefore, we further assessed the effect of dengue NS1 on monocytes and T cells by co-culturing primary monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), with varying concentrations of NS1 for up to 96 h. Monocytes co-cultured with NS1 produced high levels of IL-10, with the highest levels seen at 24 h, and then declined gradually. Therefore, our data show that dengue NS1 appears to contribute to pathogenesis of dengue infection by inducing IL-10 production by monocytes.

  17. Splicing biomarkers of disease severity in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Masayuki; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Puwanant, Araya; Welle, Steve; Eichinger, Katy; Pandya, Shree; Dekdebrun, Jeannne; Heatwole, Chad R.; McDermott, Michael P.; Chen, Tian; Cline, Melissa; Tawil, Rabi; Osborne, Robert J.; Wheeler, Thurman M.; Swanson, Maurice; Moxley, Richard T.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop RNA splicing biomarkers of disease severity and therapeutic response in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). Methods In a discovery cohort we used microarrays to perform global analysis of alternative splicing in DM1 and DM2. The newly identified splicing changes were combined with previous data to create a panel of 50 putative splicing defects. In a validation cohort of 50 DM1 subjects we measured the strength of ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) and then obtained a needle biopsy of tibialis anterior (TA) to analyze splice events in muscle RNA. The specificity of DM-associated splicing defects was assessed in disease controls. The CTG expansion size in muscle tissue was determined by Southern blot. The reversibility of splicing defects was assessed in transgenic mice by using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to reduce levels of toxic RNA. Results Forty-two splicing defects were confirmed in TA muscle in the validation cohort. Among these, 20 events showed graded changes that correlated with ADF weakness. Five other splice events were strongly affected in DM1 subjects with normal ADF strength. Comparison to disease controls and mouse models indicated that splicing changes were DM-specific, mainly attributable to MBNL1 sequestration, and reversible in mice by targeted knockdown of toxic RNA. Splicing defects and weakness were not correlated with CTG expansion size in muscle tissue. Interpretation Alternative splicing changes in skeletal muscle may serve as biomarkers of disease severity and therapeutic response in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:23929620

  18. Influence of age, previous health status, and severity of acute illness on outcome from intensive care.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, J R; Brun-Buisson, C; Trunet, P; Latournerie, J; Chantereau, S; Rapin, M

    1982-09-01

    Age, previous health status (HS), and severity of acute illness were assessed prospectively on 228 unselected patients admitted over 1 yr to the multidisciplinary ICU, to determine their influence on outcome. One hundred and fifty patients (66%) were discharged from the ICU, but the survival rate fell to 50% at 6 months, and was similar after 1 yr (49%). Over a 6-month period, there was improved HS in survivors which gradually leveled off. Compared to prior HS, the final HS was worsened in 37% of survivors. Three factors were important predictors of late survival: age under 50, good previous HS, and less than two visceral failures. We conclude that evaluation of ICU outcome should provide information on 6-month survival and HS and include important variables as age, previous HS, and severity of acute illness. PMID:7105766

  19. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  20. [Comments on treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome by integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Lu; Zhou, Yong-Hong

    2003-07-01

    There are obvious advantages of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Combining the ancient and present literature with the special epidemic patterns, pathological changes and clinical symptoms of SARS, the paper discussed the methods of application of the integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine on the treatment of SARS, and some matters needing attention in clinic.

  1. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome.

  2. Ethnic Differences in Presentation and Severity of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Halsted, Charles H.; Medici, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Background The frequency of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), including alcoholic steatosis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, varies significantly by ethnicity. Methods With the goal to assess the role of ethnicity in determining the age of onset and severity of ALD and to compare the risk factors for its progression among ethnic groups, we conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with ALD who were admitted or were followed as outpatients at University of California Davis Medical Center between 2002 and 2010. After excluding HBsAg and HIV positive subjects, we reviewed the charts of 791 ALD patients including 130 with alcoholic fatty liver, 154 with alcoholic hepatitis, and 507 with alcoholic cirrhosis. Results When controlling for all variables in the model, Hispanic patients presented at significantly 4-10 years younger ages than White/Caucasian patients, in each of the three disease severity categories and the results were confirmed after excluding HCV Ab/RNA positive subjects. There were more obese Hispanic patients than White/Caucasian patients, whereas the proportion of patients with hepatitis C was significantly greater in African/American subjects with alcoholic hepatitis and the proportion of patients with diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in White/Caucasian subjects than in Hispanic subjects with cirrhosis. The proportion of subjects with severe alcoholic hepatitis was similar in Hispanic and White/Caucasian patients, but lower in African/American subjects. Conclusion Ethnicity is a major factor affecting the age and severity of presentation of different subtypes of ALD. PMID:25702770

  3. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment of sports-related severe acute hamstring injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guillodo, Yannick; Madouas, Gwénaelle; Simon, Thomas; Le Dauphin, Hermine; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose hamstring injury is the most common musculoskeletal disorder and one of the main causes of missed sporting events. Shortening the time to return to play (TTRTP) is a priority for athletes and sports medicine practitioners. Hypothesis platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection at the site of severe acute hamstring injury increases the healing rate and shortens the TTRTP. Study design Cohort study. Methods all patients with ultrasonography and MRI evidence of severe acute hamstring injury between January 2012 and March 2014 were offered PRP treatment. Those who accepted received a single intramuscular PRP injection within 8 days post-injury; the other patients served as controls. The same standardized rehabilitation program was used in both groups. A physical examination and ultrasonography were performed 10 and 30 days post-injury, then a phone interview 120 days post-injury, to determine the TTRTP at the pre-injury level. Results of 34 patients, 15 received PRP and 19 did not. Mean TTRTP at the pre-injury level was 50.9±10.7 days in the PRP group and 52.8±15.7 days in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion a single intramuscular PRP injection did not shorten the TTRTP in sports people with severe acute hamstring injuries. PMID:26958537

  4. [Severe acute asthma in the emergency room: amelioration of decreased peak flow rate is interpreted with difficulty].

    PubMed

    Bouvard, E; Bellocq, A; Bernier, C; Meyniel, D

    1999-09-01

    We report a severe acute asthma case whose course was marked by persistent hypoxemia whereas proximal flows were normalized. This discordance reveals a ventilation/perfusion mismatch. This data suggests that care must be taken in interpreting the peak flow improvement during acute severe asthma management.

  5. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP. PMID:26823696

  6. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP.

  7. Markers of endothelial cell activation and immune activation are increased in patients with severe leptospirosis and associated with disease severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Previous studies concluded that haemorrhage is one of the most accurate prognostic factors of mortality in leptospirosis. Therefore, endothelial cell activation was investigated in relation to disease severity in severe leptospirosis. Methods: Prospective cohort study of severe leptospi...

  8. Parenting Stress Related to Behavioral Problems and Disease Severity in Children with Problematic Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Verkleij, Marieke; van de Griendt, Erik-Jonas; Colland, Vivian; van Loey, Nancy; Beelen, Anita; Geenen, Rinie

    2015-09-01

    Our study examined parenting stress and its association with behavioral problems and disease severity in children with problematic severe asthma. Research participants were 93 children (mean age 13.4 ± 2.7 years) and their parents (86 mothers, 59 fathers). As compared to reference groups analyzed in previous research, scores on the Parenting Stress Index in mothers and fathers of the children with problematic severe asthma were low. Higher parenting stress was associated with higher levels of internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems in children (Child Behavior Checklist). Higher parenting stress in mothers was also associated with higher airway inflammation (FeNO). Thus, although parenting stress was suggested to be low in this group, higher parenting stress, especially in the mother, is associated with more airway inflammation and greater child behavioral problems. This indicates the importance of focusing care in this group on all possible sources of problems, i.e., disease exacerbations and behavioral problems in the child as well as parenting stress.

  9. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  10. Melatonin prevents acute kidney injury in severely burned rats via the activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Zhi; He, Ting; Gao, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jia-Qi; Han, Shi-Chao; Li, Yan; Shi, Ji-Hong; Han, Jun-Tao; Tao, Ke; Xie, Song-Tao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Hu, Da-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after severe burns. Melatonin has been reported to protect against multiple organ injuries by increasing the expression of SIRT1, a silent information regulator that regulates stress responses, inflammation, cellular senescence and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin on renal tissues of burned rats and the role of SIRT1 involving the effects. Rat severely burned model was established, with or without the administration of melatonin and SIRT1 inhibitor. The renal function and histological manifestations were determined to evaluate the severity of kidney injury. The levels of acetylated-p53 (Ac-p53), acetylated-p65 (Ac-p65), NF-κB, acetylated-forkhead box O1 (Ac-FoxO1), Bcl-2 and Bax were analyzed to study the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggested that severe burns could induce acute kidney injury, which could be partially reversed by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis accompanied by the increased expression of SIRT1. The protective effects of melatonin were abrogated by the inhibition of SIRT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that melatonin improves severe burn-induced AKI via the activation of SIRT1 signaling. PMID:27599451

  11. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Hert, Marc De; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Wood, David; Kahl, Kai G; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors, obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and possibly other psychotropic medication like antidepressants can induce weight gain and further increase the risk of adverse metabolic effects which may result in further increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Patients have limited access to general healthcare with less opportunity for cardiovascular risk screening and prevention than would be expected in a non-psychiatric population. The European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published this statement aiming to improve the care of patients suffering from severe mental illness. The intention is to initiate co-operation and shared care between the different health care professionals and to increase the awareness of psychiatrists caring for patients suffering from severe mental illness to screen and treat increased cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes. PMID:23034198

  12. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  13. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  14. Bats as reservoirs of severe emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui-Ju; Wen, Hong-ling; Zhou, Chuan-Min; Chen, Fang-Fang; Luo, Li-Mei; Liu, Jian-wei; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2015-07-01

    In recent years severe infectious diseases have been constantly emerging, causing panic in the world. Now we know that many of these terrible diseases are caused by viruses originated from bats (Table 1), such as Ebola virus, Marburg, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). These viruses have co-evolved with bats due to bats' special social, biological and immunological features. Although bats are not in close contact with humans, spillover of viruses from bats to intermediate animal hosts, such as horses, pigs, civets, or non-human primates, is thought to be the most likely mode to cause human infection. Humans may also become infected with viruses through aerosol by intruding into bat roosting caves or via direct contact with bats, such as catching bats or been bitten by bats.

  15. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  16. Baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep in severe obstructive sleep apnoea: effects of acute CPAP.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, M R; Parati, G; Insalaco, G; Castiglioni, P; Marrone, O; Romano, S; Salvaggio, A; Mancia, G; Bonsignore, G; Di Rienzo, M

    2006-01-01

    Baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep (baroreflex sensitivity; BRS) has been shown to be depressed in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and improved after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Whether CPAP also acutely affects BRS during sleep in uncomplicated severe OSA is still debatable. Blood pressure was monitored during nocturnal polysomnography in 18 patients at baseline and during first-time CPAP application. Spontaneous BRS was analysed by the sequence method, and estimated as the mean sequence slope. CPAP did not acutely affect mean blood pressure or heart rate but decreased cardiovascular variability during sleep. Mean BRS increased slightly during CPAP application (from 6.5+/-2.4 to 7.5+/-2.9 ms x mmHg(-1)), mostly in response to decreasing blood pressure. The change in BRS did not correlate with changes in arterial oxygen saturation or apnoea/hypopnoea index. The small change in baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep at first application of continuous positive airway pressure in severe obstructive sleep apnoea was unrelated to the acute resolution of nocturnal hypoxaemia, and might reflect autonomic adjustments to positive intrathoracic pressure, and/or improved sleep architecture. The small increase in baroreflex control of heart rate during sleep may be of clinical relevance as it was accompanied by reduced cardiovascular variability, which is acknowledged as an independent cardiovascular risk factor.

  17. Severity of Spatial Neglect During Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Predicts Community Mobility After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Hung, Cynthia; Chen, Peii; Barrett, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether stroke survivors with more severe spatial neglect during their acute inpatient rehabilitation had poorer mobility after returning to their communities. Design A prospective observational study. Setting Acute inpatient rehabilitation and follow-up in the community. Participants Thirty-one consecutive stroke survivors with right-brain damage (women, n = 15 [48.4%]), with the mean (standard deviation) age of 60 ± 11.5 years, were included in the study if they demonstrated spatial neglect within 2 months after stroke. Methods Spatial neglect was assessed with the Behavioral Inattention Test (BIT) (range, 0-146 [a lower score indicates more severity]) and the Catherine Bergego Scale (range, 0-30 [a higher score indicates more severity]). A score of the Behavioral Inattention Test <129 or of the Catherine Bergego Scale >0 defined the presence of spatial neglect. Main Outcome Measurements The outcome measure is community mobility, defined by the extent and frequency of traveling within the home and in the community, and is assessed with the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment (range, 0-120 [a lower score indicates less mobile]). This measure was assessed after participants returned home ≥6 months after stroke. The covariates were age, gender, functional independence at baseline; follow-up interval; and depressed mood, which may affect the relationship between spatial neglect and community mobility. Results A lower Behavioral Inattention Test score was a significant predictor of a lower Life-Space Assessment score after controlling for all the covariates (β = 0.009 [95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.017]); P = .020). The proportion of participants unable to travel independently beyond their homes was 0%, 27.3%, and 72.7% for those with mild, moderate, and severe acute neglect, respectively (Catherine Bergego Scale range, 1-10, 11-20, and 21-30, respectively). Conclusions Our result indicates that acute

  18. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  19. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Simon J. S.; Lewis, Keir E.; Huws, Sharon A.; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Lewis, Paul D.; Mur, Luis A. J.; Pachebat, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten ‘healthy’ smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity. PMID:26872143

  20. Metagenomic Sequencing of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Upper Bronchial Tract Microbiome Reveals Functional Changes Associated with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Lewis, Keir E; Huws, Sharon A; Lin, Wanchang; Hegarty, Matthew J; Lewis, Paul D; Mur, Luis A J; Pachebat, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The microbiome associated with this disease may be an important component of the disease, though studies to date have been based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and have revealed unequivocal results. Here, we employed metagenomic sequencing of the upper bronchial tract (UBT) microbiome to allow for greater elucidation of its taxonomic composition, and revealing functional changes associated with the disease. The bacterial metagenomes within sputum samples from eight COPD patients and ten 'healthy' smokers (Controls) were sequenced, and suggested significant changes in the abundance of bacterial species, particularly within the Streptococcus genus. The functional capacity of the COPD UBT microbiome indicated an increased capacity for bacterial growth, which could be an important feature in bacterial-associated acute exacerbations. Regression analyses correlated COPD severity (FEV1% of predicted) with differences in the abundance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and functional classifications related to a reduced capacity for bacterial sialic acid metabolism. This study suggests that the COPD UBT microbiome could be used in patient risk stratification and in identifying novel monitoring and treatment methods, but study of a longitudinal cohort will be required to unequivocally relate these features of the microbiome with COPD severity.

  1. Successful use of extracorporeal life support after double traumatic tracheobronchial injury in a patient with severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Valette, Xavier; Desjouis, Aurélie; Massetti, Massimo; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Icard, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asthmatic patient with blunt trachea and left main bronchus injuries who developed acute severe asthma after surgical repair. Despite medical treatment and ventilatory support, asthma persisted with high airway pressures and severe respiratory acidosis. We proposed venovenous extracorporeal life support for CO(2) removal which allowed arterial blood gas normalization and airway pressures decrease. Extracorporeal life support was removed on day five after medical treatment of acute severe asthma. So we report the successful use of extracorporeal life support for operated double blunt tracheobronchial injury with acute severe asthma. PMID:22135742

  2. Severe hypercholesterolemia and liver disease in a 3-year old.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amol M; Brautbar, Ariel; Desai, Nirav K; Wilson, Don P

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein-X, which is composed of phospholipids and non-esterified cholesterol, is an abnormal lipoprotein with a density range similar to LDL-C. The two most common ways which lipoprotein-X accumulates is from reflux of bile salts into plasma or deficiency in lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase. This is a case of severe hypercholesterolemia and liver disease in a 3- year old male that presented with pruritus, pale stool, scleral ictus, and abdominal distention. He was diagnosed with primary sclerosing cholangitis which was confirmed by liver biopsy. Our patient was treated with steroids and immunomodulator therapy which was associated with significant reduction in cholestasis and LDL-C levels. Lipoprotein-X has several properties that make it anti-atherogenic, which raises the question if treatment for hypercholesterolemia should be initiated. PMID:27206954

  3. Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the participants were analyzed with the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) program. Three measures of linguistic complexity – the proportion of verbs, proportion of function words, and sentence length – were found to be affected by symptom asymmetry. Greater left-side motor severity (and hence greater right hemisphere dysfunction) was associated with the production of significantly fewer verbs, function words, and shorter sentences. Hence, the production of linguistic complexity in a natural language context was associated with relatively greater right hemisphere involvement. The potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying this effect are discussed. PMID:19751960

  4. Noninvasive imaging in acute coronary disease. A clinical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, B.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Numerous highly complex and sensitive noninvasive imaging techniques have enhanced the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Optimum use requires specific objectives to be defined in advance, including a review of the potential impact of the test on subsequent decisions. An additional issue that is subject to scrutiny in the current climate of cost containment relates to the incremental value of a specific examination. The imaging modality to be used will partially depend on other issues, including accessibility, cost, and interindividual or institutional expertise with a particular technique. Major applications in noninvasive imaging in the acute coronary syndromes include the following: (1) diagnosis, including identification of associated diseases and contraindications for acute reperfusion; (2) evaluation and management of complications ; (3) determination of prognosis (both early and late); (4) estimation of myocardial viability; (5) assessment of therapeutic efficacy; (6) investigational approaches, including 99mTc-sestamibi tomographic imaging, ultrafast cine computed tomographic scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Previous studies in the prethrombolytic era have documented the powerful impact of radionuclide stress testing on prognosis, but this needs to be reevaluated in the light of the changing current population undergoing stress testing. Preliminary data imply that the prognostic accuracy of stress testing after thrombolytic therapy is diminished. Moreover, the role of the open infarct-related artery in traditional estimates of prognosis requires further study. Noninvasive imaging has multiple applications in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary disease, but the decision to use a specific technology in a particular circumstance mandates good clinical judgment and selectivity. 82 references.

  5. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: the impact of urolithiasis on disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Frank; Chi, Thomas; Bagga, Herman S.; Taylor, Andrew G.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a severe infection of the kidney associated with formation of gas in the renal parenchyma and/or collecting system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes of patients with emphysematous pyelonephritis in a contemporary cohort and to evaluate the impact of urolithiasis on disease severity. Methods A search of all imaging reports at University of California San Francisco (UCSF) for the term “emphysematous pyelonephritis” was undertaken from 2003–2014. Patients were included if there was clinical evidence of infection, no recent urologic instrumentation, and computerized tomography (CT) demonstrating gas in the renal parenchyma or collecting system. Clinical and laboratory variables were obtained from medical records. Results A total of 14 cases were identified. The majority of patients (57%) had gas confined to the collecting system. Three patients (21%) had gas in the renal parenchyma and 3 patients (21%) had gas extending into perirenal tissues. A total of 8 patients (57%) had concomitant urolithiasis. Seven patients (50%) were managed with antibiotic therapy alone while 6 patients (43%) required percutaneous drainage. No patients required immediate nephrectomy. There were no deaths. Patients with urolithiasis had less severe emphysematous pyelonephritis than patients without urolithiasis (P<0.05). Conclusions The majority of patients in this study had gas contained within the collecting system and were treated successfully with antibiotics alone. Percutaneous drainage was successfully utilized in patients with more advanced disease. No patients required emergent nephrectomy. Emphysematous pyelonephritis in patients with urolithiasis was less severe than in patients without urolithiasis. PMID:27785435

  6. Allergies and Disease Severity in Childhood Narcolepsy: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Aydinoz, Secil; Huang, Yu-Shu; Gozal, David; Inocente, Clara O.; Franco, Patricia; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Narcolepsy frequently begins in childhood, and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, with the presence of cataplexy reflecting a more severe phenotype. Narcolepsy may result from genetic predisposition involving deregulation of immune pathways, particularly involving T helper 2 cells (Th2). Increased activation of Th2 cells is usually manifested as allergic conditions such as rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. We hypothesized that the presence of allergic conditions indicative of increased Th2 balance may dampen the severity of the phenotype in children with narcolepsy. Methods: A retrospective chart review of childhood narcolepsy patients was conducted at three major pediatric sleep centers. Patients were divided into those with narcolepsy without cataplexy (NC−) and narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC+). Demographics, polysomnographic and multiple sleep latency test data, and extraction of information on the presence of allergic diseases such allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma was performed. Results: There were 468 children identified, with 193 children in NC− group and 275 patients in the NC+ group. Overall, NC+ children were significantly younger, had higher body mass index, and had shorter mean sleep latencies and increased sleep onset rapid eye movement events. The frequency of allergic conditions, particularly asthma and allergic rhinitis, was markedly lower in NC+ (58/275) compared to NC− patients (94/193; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Involvement of the immune system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. Current findings further suggest that an increased shift toward T helper 2 cells, as indicated by the presence of allergic conditions, may modulate the severity of the phenotype in childhood narcolepsy, and reduce the prevalence of cataplexy in these patients. Citation: Aydinoz S, Huang YS, Gozal D, Inocente CO, Franco P, Kheirandish-Gozal L. Allergies and disease severity in childhood

  7. The association between periodontal disease parameters and severity of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ketabi, Mohammad; Meybodi, Fatemeh Rashidi; Asgari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. The aim of this research was to determine the possible association between chronic periodontal disease and severity of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two subjects that were referred to Chamran Heart Hospital in Isfahan for angiography were involved in this study. Fifty-nine subjects had coronary artery obstruction (CAO) and 23 showed no obstruction after angiography. The severity of CAO was assessed. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), gingival recession (R), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) of all subjects were recorded. The decayed-missing-filled (DMF) index of all subjects was also measured. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square, and independent t-test were used. Results: There were significant positive correlation between variables R, PD, CAL, decayed (D), missing (M), DMF, BOP, and degree of CAO. However, there were no significant differences between filling variable degree of CAO (left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery). Independent t-test showed that the mean of variables R, PD, AL, D, M, and DMF in patients with obstructed arteries were significantly higher than subjects without CAO. But there were no significant differences between variable F in two groups. Conclusion: The results of this cross-section analytical study showed an association between periodontal disease and dental parameters with the severity of CAO measured by angiography. However, this association must not interpret as a cause and effect relationship. PMID:27274346

  8. Acute Serum Hormone Levels: Characterization and Prognosis after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Emily H.; Niyonkuru, Christian; Ozawa, Haishin; Loucks, Tammy L.; Dobos, Julie A.; Brett, Christopher A.; Santarsieri, Martina; Dixon, C. Edward; Berga, Sarah L.; Fabio, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) studies report the neuroprotective effects of female sex steroids on multiple mechanisms of injury, with the clinical assumption that women have hormonally mediated neuroprotection because of the endogenous presence of these hormones. Other literature indicates that testosterone may exacerbate injury. Further, stress hormone abnormalities that accompany critical illness may both amplify or blunt sex steroid levels. To better understand the role of sex steroid exposure in mediating TBI, we 1) characterized temporal profiles of serum gonadal and stress hormones in a population with severe TBI during the acute phases of their injury; and 2) used a biological systems approach to evaluate these hormones as biomarkers predicting global outcome. The study population was 117 adults (28 women; 89 men) with severe TBI. Serum samples (n=536) were collected for 7 days post-TBI for cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Hormone data were linked with clinical data, including acute care mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6 months. Hormone levels after TBI were compared to those in healthy controls (n=14). Group based trajectory analysis (TRAJ) was used to develop temporal hormone profiles that delineate distinct subpopulations in the cohort. Structural equations models were used to determine inter-relationships between hormones and outcomes within a multivariate model. Compared to controls, acute serum hormone levels were significantly altered after severe TBI. Changes in the post-TBI adrenal response and peripheral aromatization influenced hormone TRAJ profiles and contributed to the abnormalities, including increased estradiol in men and increased testosterone in women. In addition to older age and greater injury severity, increased estradiol and testosterone levels over time were associated with increased mortality and worse global

  9. Inpatient management of children with severe acute malnutrition: a review of WHO guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Tickell, Kirkby D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) guidelines on the inpatient care of children with complicated severe acute malnutrition may be strengthened to improve outcomes. Methods In December 2015, we searched Google scholar and WHO’s website for WHO recommendations on severe acute malnutrition management and evaluated the history and cited evidence behind these recommendations. We systematically searched WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov and the Controlled Trials metaRegister until 10 August 2015 for recently completed, ongoing, or pending trials. Findings WHO’s guidelines provide 33 recommendations on the topic. However, 16 (48.5%) of these recommendations were based solely on expert opinion – unsupported by published evidence. Another 11 (33.3%) of the recommendations were supported by the results of directly relevant research – i.e. either randomized trials (8) or observational studies (3). The other six recommendations (18.2%) were based on studies that were not conducted among children with complicated severe malnutrition or studies of treatment that were not identical to the recommended intervention. Trials registries included 20 studies related to the topic, including nine trials of alternative feeding regimens. Acute medical management and follow-up care studies were minimally represented. Conclusion WHO’s guidelines on the topic have a weak evidence base and have undergone limited substantive adjustments over the past decades. More trials are needed to make that evidence base more robust. If the mortality associated with severe malnutrition is to be reduced, inpatient and post-discharge management trials, supported by studies on the causes of mortality, are needed. PMID:27708469

  10. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  11. Associations between pentraxin 3 and severity of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Guan, Shaofeng; Fang, Weiyi; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Min; Qu, Xinkai

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between plasma levels of pentraxins 3 (PTX3) and C reactive protein (CRP) and the severity of coronary artery lesions. Design and methods 60 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) in our hospital were included. Plasma was collected during CAG. The coronary Gensini score was used to evaluate the severity of coronary artery lesions. Associations between Gensini scores and plasma levels of PTX3 and CRP were analysed. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 were included in the chronic renal dysfunction subgroup. Results A linear correlation was observed between PTX3 and the Gensini score (r=0.513, p<0.001). One-way analysis of variance showed that PTX3 levels were significantly higher in patients with Gensini scores >90 compared with patients with scores of 46–90 or <45 (0–45:4.8±0.8, 46–90:6.7±1.2, >90:7.7±2.0, p<0.001). Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that PTX3 levels were significantly associated with Gensini score in patients with chronic renal dysfunction (p=0.012), while no significant association was found for CRP. Conclusions PTX3 levers were positively associated with the severity of coronary artery lesions. PTX3 is closely associated with the severity of coronary artery stenosis in patients with chronic renal dysfunction. PMID:25854969

  12. Acute Schistosomiasis in Brazilian Traveler: The Importance of Tourism in The Epidemiology of Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history. PMID:22844623

  13. Switching between Abstract Rules Reflects Disease Severity but Not Dopaminergic Status in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehagia, Angie A.; Cools, Roshan; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to disambiguate the impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) on cognitive control as indexed by task set switching, by addressing discrepancies in the literature pertaining to disease severity and paradigm heterogeneity. A task set is governed by a rule that determines how relevant stimuli (stimulus set) map onto specific responses…

  14. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  15. Parkinson's Disease Severity and Use of Dopaminergic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, John Y.; Pérez, Adriana; Christine, Chadwick W.; Leehey, Maureen; Aminoff, Michael J.; Boyd, James T.; Morgan, John C.; Dhall, Rohit; Nicholas, Anthony P; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Zweig, Richard M.; Goudreau, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can vary depending on the class of medication selected. Objective The aim of this post hoc study was to determine if the class of dopaminergic therapy correlated with disease severity in persons with early, treated PD. Methods A non-parametric global statistical test (GST) was used to assess the status of participants treated with dopamine agonist (DA) monotherapy, levodopa (LD) monotherapy or combined LD and DA therapy on multiple PD outcomes encompassing motor, cognitive, psychiatric and autonomic function, as well as disability and quality of life. Results The outcomes measured at the beginning of the study showed lower disease burden for participants on initial DA monotherapy compared to those taking combined LD and DA therapy after controlling for age, education, taking cogmeds and amantadine. Conclusion This observation suggests that clinicians treating early PD patients favor combined LD and DA therapy in patients with more disabling features over DA monotherapy. As such, studies of PD progression in treated PD patients may be affected by the class of symptomatic dopaminergic therapy. PMID:25541182

  16. Six month abstinence rule for liver transplantation in severe alcoholic liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Aiman; Stern, Steffen; Jarrad, Anwar; Lorf, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The recovery results of patients transplanted for ALD are often at least as good as those of patients transplanted for other diagnoses and better than those suffering from hepatitis C virus, cryptogenic cirrhosis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. In the case of medically non-responding patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis or acute-on chronic liver failure, the refusal of LT is often based on the lack of the required alcohol abstinence period of six months. The obligatory abidance of a period of abstinence as a transplant eligibility requirement for medically non-responding patients seems unfair and inhumane, since the majority of these patients will not survive the six-month abstinence period. Data from various studies have challenged the 6-mo rule, while excellent survival results of LT have been observed in selected patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis not responding to medical therapy. Patients with severe advanced ALD should have legal access to LT. The mere lack of pre-LT abstinence should not be an obstacle for being listed. PMID:25892898

  17. Lithium-Induced Minimal Change Disease and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Parul; Wong, Natalie; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lithium carbonate is a psychiatric medication commonly used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. It has been implicated in inducing nephrogenic diabetes inspidus, chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, and acute tubular necrosis. We describe a case of lithium-induced minimal change disease (MCD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Case Report: A 32-year-old female with a medical history of bipolar disorder treated with chronic lithium therapy presented with anasarca, fatigue, and tremors. Work-up revealed supra-therapeutic lithium levels, hypoalbuminemia, and significant proteinuria. The patient was treated conservatively with fluids and discontinuation of lithium therapy. Subsequently, she developed significant AKI and persistent proteinuria. She underwent a renal biopsy that demonstrated effacement of podocyte foot processes consistent with lithium-induced MCD. This was treated with corticosteroids, which decreased the proteinuria and resolved all the patient's symptoms. Conclusion: Lithium-induced MCD is a rare disease that affects patients of all ages. It is often associated with therapeutic lithium and is typically resolved with discontinuation of lithium. In some cases, concurrent AKI may result due to vascular obstruction from hyperalbuminuria and associated renal interstitial edema. Corticosteroids may be needed to reduce the proteinuria and prevent progression to chronic kidney disease. As such, patients on lithium therapy may benefit from monitoring of glomerular function via urinalysis to prevent the onset of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26258081

  18. Do Children with Uncomplicated Severe Acute Malnutrition Need Antibiotics? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alcoba, Gabriel; Kerac, Marko; Breysse, Serge; Salpeteur, Cécile; Galetto-Lacour, Annick; Briend, André; Gervaix, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Current (1999) World Health Organization guidelines recommend giving routine antibiotics (AB) for all children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM), even if they have uncomplicated disease with no clinically obvious infections. We examined the evidence behind this recommendation. Methods and Findings OVID-MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, GLOBAL-HEALTH, CINAHL, POPLINE, AFRICA-WIDE-NiPAD, and LILACS were searched for AB efficacy, bacterial resistance, and infection rates in SAM. Following PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Three randomised controlled trials (RCT), five Cochrane reviews, and 37 observational studies were identified. One cohort-study showed no increase in nutritional-cure and mortality in uncomplicated SAM where no AB were used. (p>0.05). However, an unpublished RCT in this setting did show mortality benefits. Another RCT did not show superiority of ceftriaxone over amoxicilllin for these same outcomes, but adressed SAM children with and without complications (p = 0.27). Another RCT showed no difference between amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole efficacies for pneumonia in underweight, but not SAM. Our meta-analysis of 12 pooled susceptibility-studies for all types of bacterial isolates, including 2767 stricly SAM children, favoured amoxicillin over cotrimoxazole for susceptibility medians: 42% (IQR 27–55%) vs 22% (IQR 17–23%) and population-weighted-means 52.9% (range 23–57%) vs 35.4% (range 6.7–42%). Susceptibilities to second-line AB were better, above 80%. Prevalence of serious infections in SAM, pooled from 24 studies, ranged from 17% to 35.2%. No study infered any association of infection prevalence with AB regimens in SAM. Conclusions The evidence underlying current antibiotic recommendations for uncomplicated SAM is weak. Susceptibility-studies favour amoxicillin over cotrimoxazole. However, given that these antibiotics have side-effects, costs, and risks as well as benefits, their routine use

  19. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity. PMID:21963176

  20. Multiplicity of Infection and Disease Severity in Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, M. Andreína; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Vallejo, Andrés F.; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiplicity of infection (MOI) refers to the average number of distinct parasite genotypes concurrently infecting a patient. Although several studies have reported on MOI and the frequency of multiclonal infections in Plasmodium falciparum, there is limited data on Plasmodium vivax. Here, MOI and the frequency of multiclonal infections were studied in areas from South America where P. vivax and P. falciparum can be compared. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of a passive surveillance study, 1,328 positive malaria patients were recruited between 2011 and 2013 in low transmission areas from Colombia. Of those, there were only 38 P. vivax and 24 P. falciparum clinically complicated cases scattered throughout the time of the study. Samples from uncomplicated cases were matched in time and location with the complicated cases in order to compare the circulating genotypes for these two categories. A total of 92 P. vivax and 57 P. falciparum uncomplicated cases were randomly subsampled. All samples were genotyped by using neutral microsatellites. Plasmodium vivax showed more multiclonal infections (47.7%) than P. falciparum (14.8%). Population genetics and haplotype network analyses did not detect differences in the circulating genotypes between complicated and uncomplicated cases in each parasite. However, a Fisher exact test yielded a significant association between having multiclonal P. vivax infections and complicated malaria. No association was found for P. falciparum infections. Conclusion The association between multiclonal infections and disease severity in P. vivax is consistent with previous observations made in rodent malaria. The contrasting pattern between P. vivax and P. falciparum could be explained, at least in part, by the fact that P. vivax infections have lineages that were more distantly related among them than in the case of the P. falciparum multiclonal infections. Future research should address the possible role that acquired

  1. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  2. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  3. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Leischik, Roman; Lucia, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the incidence, prevalence, trend in mortality, and general prognosis of coronary heart disease (CHD) and a related condition, acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although CHD mortality has gradually declined over the last decades in western countries, this condition still causes about one-third of all deaths in people older than 35 years. This evidence, along with the fact that mortality from CHD is expected to continue increasing in developing countries, illustrates the need for implementing effective primary prevention approaches worldwide and identifying risk groups and areas for possible improvement. PMID:27500157

  4. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  5. Managing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) intellectual property rights: the possible role of patent pooling.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, James H. M.; Claassen, Eric; Correa, Carmen E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Patent applications that incorporate the genomic sequence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, have been filed by a number of organizations. This is likely to result in a fragmentation of intellectual property (IP) rights which in turn may adversely affect the development of products, such as vaccines, to combat SARS. Placing these patent rights into a patent pool to be licensed on a non-exclusive basis may circumvent these difficulties and set a key precedent for the use of this form of mechanism in other areas of health care, leading to benefits to public health. PMID:16211163

  6. Difference of intensity and disparity in impact of climate on several vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Niwa, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported the correlation between regional weather patterns and various vascular diseases. However, each vascular disease has inherent characteristics, and the difference of meteorological correlation between these diseases is not well known. This study was aimed at investigating the disparity and intensity of the relationship between meteorological factors and various vascular diseases. A total of 1113 events within 2 years were included in this study. Daily meteorological parameters with and without events were, respectively, compared in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), cerebral infarction (CI), cerebral embolism (CE), cerebral hemorrhage (CH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), aortic dissection (AD), and aortic aneurysm rupture (AAR). Days with CI onset correlated with fewer sunshine hours, fewer solar radiation factors, greater amounts of precipitation factors, and more humidity factors, whereas CH and CE only showed lower correlation in temperature factors. However, there was no relation seen between ACS, SAH, AD, AAR, and climatic parameters. Our findings suggest that climate affects various cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases differently. This finding may help in understanding the mechanism of how vascular events are triggered.

  7. Advancing the Minimal Residual Disease Concept in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B; Mulé, Matthew P; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past 60 years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and preclinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (non-APL) AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption, including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients, and finally the need to involve patients in decision-making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  8. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  9. Applying a low-flow CO2 removal device in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay S; Weerwind, Patrick W; Strauch, Uli; van Belle, Arne; Maessen, Jos G; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-03-01

    A novel and portable extracorporeal CO2-removal device was evaluated to provide additional gas transfer, auxiliary to standard therapy in severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. A dual-lumen catheter was inserted percutaneously in five subjects (mean age 55 ± 0.4 years) and, subsequently, connected to the CO2-removal device. The median duration on support was 45 hours (interquartile range 26-156), with a blood flow rate of approximately 500 mL/min. The mean PaCO2 decreased from 95.8 ± 21.9 mmHg to 63.9 ± 19.6 mmHg with the pH improving from 7.11 ± 0.1 to 7.26 ± 0.1 in the initial 4 hours of support. Three subjects were directly weaned from the CO2-removal device and mechanical ventilation, one subject was converted to ECMO and one subject died following withdrawal of support. No systemic bleeding or device complications were observed. Low-flow CO2 removal adjuvant to standard therapy was effective in steadily removing CO2, limiting the progression of acidosis in subjects with severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  10. Crohnic Kidney Disease: Recurrent Acute Kidney Failure in a Patient With Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Zafer; Karakas, Emel Yigit; Ulas, Turgay; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Short bowel syndrome is a rare and devastating complication in chronic inflammatory bowel disease following functional or anatomic loss of extensive segments of the intestine. Case Report: A 60-year-old male patient with Crohn's disease had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and developed short bowel syndrome. Despite up to 4-5 liters of orally fluid, sufficient calcium and magnesium intake, he suffered from recurrent acute kidney injury due to profound volume depletion and those electrolyte deficiencies. Administration of intravenous fluid and electrolyte repleacement treatment at regular intervals prevented further kidney injuries. Conclusion: We present a case of recurrent acute kidney failure in a patient with Crohn's disease, and aimed to remark importance of receiving sufficient parenteral fluid and electrolyte support in those with short bowel syndrome. PMID:25599054

  11. Relative adrenal insufficiency as a predictor of disease severity and mortality in severe septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Dalegrave, Daniele; Silva, Rafael Lockshin; Becker, Maicon; Gehrke, Lísia Varella; Friedman, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if cortisol responses to 250 µg of intravenously administered adrenocorticotropic hormone are related to disease severity and, hence, mortality. Methods This is a retrospective study in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We studied 69 consecutive patients with septic shock over a 1-yr period; these patients underwent a short 250-µg adrenocorticotropic hormone test because they exhibited >6 hours of progressive hemodynamic instability requiring repeated fluid challenges and vasopressor treatment to maintain blood pressure. The test was performed by intravenously injecting 250 µg of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone and measuring cortisol immediately before injection, 30 minutes post-injection and 60 minutes post-injection. Results The mean APACHE II score was 22±7. The intensive care unit mortality rate at day 28 was 55%. Median baseline cortisol levels (19 [11-27] µg/dL versus 24 [18-34] µg/dL, p=0.047) and median baseline cortisol/albumin ratios (7.6 [4.6-12.3] versus 13.9 [8.8-18.5]; p=0.01) were lower in survivors than in non-survivors. Responders and non-responders had similar baseline clinical data and outcomes. The variables that were significantly correlated with outcome based on the area under the ROC curves (AUC) were APACHE II (AUC=0.67 [0.535 to 0.781]), baseline cortisol (µg/dl) (AUC=0.662 [0.536 to 0.773], peak cortisol (µg/dl) (AUC=0.642 [0.515 to 0.755]) and baseline cortisol/albumin (AUC=0.75 [0.621 to 0.849]). Conclusions Increased basal cortisol is associated with mortality and disease severity. Cortisol responses upon adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation were not related to outcome. The cortisol/albumin ratio does not predict unfavorable outcomes better than total cortisol levels or help to improve the accuracy of the adrenocorticotropic hormone test. PMID:23917934

  12. Release of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nuclear Import Block Enhances Host Transcription in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Susan C.; Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Chang, Jean; Luna, Maria L.; Long, Casey E.; Shukla, Anil K.; Bankhead, Armand R.; Burkett, Susan E.; Zornetzer, Gregory; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Metz, Thomas O.; Pickles, Raymond; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus accessory protein ORF6 antagonizes interferon signaling by blocking karyopherin-mediated nuclear import processes. Viral nuclear import antagonists, expressed by several highly pathogenic RNA viruses, likely mediate pleiotropic effects on host gene expression, presumably interfering with transcription factors, cytokines, hormones, and/or signaling cascades that occur in response to infection. By bioinformatic and systems biology approaches, we evaluated the impact of nuclear import antagonism on host expression networks by using human lung epithelial cells infected with either wild-type virus or a mutant that does not express ORF6 protein. Microarray analysis revealed significant changes in differential gene expression, with approximately twice as many upregulated genes in the mutant virus samples by 48 h postinfection, despite identical viral titers. Our data demonstrated that ORF6 protein expression attenuates the activity of numerous karyopherin-dependent host transcription factors (VDR, CREB1, SMAD4, p53, EpasI, and Oct3/4) that are critical for establishing antiviral responses and regulating key host responses during virus infection. Results were confirmed by proteomic and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay analyses and in parallel microarray studies using infected primary human airway epithelial cell cultures. The data strongly support the hypothesis that viral antagonists of nuclear import actively manipulate host responses in specific hierarchical patterns, contributing to the viral pathogenic potential in vivo. Importantly, these studies and modeling approaches not only provide templates for evaluating virus antagonism of nuclear import processes but also can reveal candidate cellular genes and pathways that may significantly influence disease outcomes following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in vivo. PMID:23365422

  13. MRI of diffuse liver disease: characteristics of acute and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Chundru, Surya; Kalb, Bobby; Arif-Tiwari, Hina; Sharma, Puneet; Costello, James; Martin, Diego R

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse liver disease, including chronic liver disease, affects tens of millions of people worldwide, and there is a growing need for diagnostic evaluation as treatments become more readily available, particularly for viral liver diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides unique capabilities for noninvasive characterization of the liver tissue that rival or surpass the diagnostic utility of liver biopsies. There has been incremental improvement in the use of standardized MRI sequences, acquired before and after administration of a contrast agent, for the evaluation of diffuse liver disease and the study of the liver parenchyma and blood supply. More recent developments have led to methods for quantifying important liver metabolites, including lipids and iron, and liver fibrosis, the hallmark of chronic liver disease. Here, we review the MRI techniques and diagnostic features associated with acute and chronic liver disease. PMID:24808418

  14. Genome Anatomy of Streptococcus parasanguinis Strain C1A, Isolated from a Patient with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Reveals Unusual Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kim Tien; Pang, Yong Kek; Chong, Teik Min; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis causes invasive diseases. However, the mechanism by which it causes disease remains unclear. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence of S. parasanguinis C1A, isolated from a patient diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Several genes that might be associated with pathogenesis are also described. PMID:26021924

  15. Detection of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Linda; Lightner, Donald; Pantoja, Carlos; Gomez-Jimenez, Silvia

    2014-08-21

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND), which has also been referred to as early mortality syndrome (EMS), initially emerged as a destructive disease of cultured shrimp species in Asia in 2009. The pathogen associated with the disease, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, subsequently spread to the Western Hemisphere and emerged in Mexico in early 2013. The spread to the Western Hemisphere is a major concern to shrimp producers in the region. To date, the only peer-reviewed published method for determining whether mortalities are due to AHPND is through histological examination. A novel PCR detection method was employed to assess samples from Mexico in order to confirm the presence of the pathogen in this country. This manuscript details the detection methods used to confirm the presence of AHPND in Mexico. Both immersion and per os challenge studies were used to expose the Penaeus vannamei to the bacteria in order to induce the disease. Histological analysis confirmed AHPND status following the challenge studies. Also provided are the details of the molecular test by PCR that was used for screening candidate V. parahaemolyticus isolates. A rapid PCR assay for detection of AHPND may help with early detection and help prevent the spread of AHPND to other countries.

  16. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase G894T Polymorphism Associates with Disease Severity in Puumala Hantavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koskela, Sirpa; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Pessi, Tanja; Tuomisto, Sari; Huhtala, Heini; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Pörsti, Ilkka; Mustonen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hantavirus infections are characterized by both activation and dysfunction of the endothelial cells. The underlying mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis whether the polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, eNOS G894T, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS G2087A, are associated with the severity of acute Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. Patients and Methods Hospitalized patients (n = 172) with serologically verified PUUV infection were examined. Clinical and laboratory variables reflecting disease severity were determined. The polymorphisms of eNOS G894T (Glu298Asp, rs1799983) and iNOS G2087A (Ser608Leu, rs2297518) were genotyped. Results The rare eNOS G894T genotype was associated with the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The non-carriers of G-allele (TT-homozygotes) had higher maximum level of serum creatinine than the carriers of G-allele (GT-heterozygotes and GG-homozygotes; median 326, range 102–1041 vs. median 175, range 51–1499 μmol/l; p = 0.018, respectively). The length of hospital stay was longer in the non-carriers of G-allele than in G-allele carriers (median 8, range 3–14 vs. median 6, range 2–15 days; p = 0.032). The rare A-allele carriers (i.e. AA-homozygotes and GA-heterozygotes) of iNOS G2087A had lower minimum systolic and diastolic blood pressure than the non-carriers of A-allele (median 110, range 74–170 vs.116, range 86–162 mmHg, p = 0.019, and median 68, range 40–90 vs. 72, range 48–100 mmHg; p = 0.003, respectively). Conclusions Patients with the TT-homozygous genotype of eNOS G894T had more severe PUUV-induced AKI than the other genotypes. The eNOS G894T polymorphism may play role in the endothelial dysfunction observed during acute PUUV infection. PMID:26561052

  17. Endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber as a treatment for septic shock-associated severe acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Gaku; Kojika, Masahiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2013-10-01

    The application of endotoxin adsorption therapy for severe acute cholangitis is controversial. We present a survival case of septic shock and multiple organ failure due to severe acute cholangitis. The patient was treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber because he continued to remain in shock even after successful endoscopic nasobiliary drainage. The patient was an 84-year-old male diagnosed with acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis who was transferred to our department because of shock and severe dyspnea. The patient had already developed acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We performed endoscopic nasobiliary drainage immediately, but the patient continued to remain in shock and plasma endotoxin level was markedly elevated at 133.6 pg/mL. Therefore, we performed direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber. On starting the hemoperfusion, blood pressure and urine volume increased, and the plasma endotoxin level reduced considerably. On the basis of our experience in this case, we think that direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber may be a useful modality in the management of severe acute cholangitis.

  18. [The role of jejunal feeding in the treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and in recurrence of chronic pancreatitis with severe necrosis].

    PubMed

    Hamvas, J; Pap, A

    1998-04-19

    Acute necrotising is the most serious form of pancreatic inflammatory diseases leading to multiorgan failure and high (15-20%) mortality. The poor nutritional and metabolic condition of the patient and secondary bacterial translocation further rise the mortality. A recently introduced method of continuous nasojejunal feeding putting the pancreas into rest with basal pattern of secretion resulted in lower mortality rate by using adequate nutrition into the second loop of jejunum bypassing duodenopancreatic stimulations via an endoscopically placed feeding tube. The better nutritional and immunological states of the patients, the restored absorption and intestinal motility promote the recovery of pancreatitis, prevent bacterial translocation, resulting in time and in financial spares. Although surgery is occasionally inevitable because of progression of pancreatitis, nasojejunal feeding improves the general condition of patients more efficiently than parenteral nutrition and makes the scheduling of the operation optimal. The authors retrospectively analyse the results of treatment in 56 patients suffering from acute necrotising pancreatitis, as well as in 30 patients with chronic pancreatitis accompanied with more than 20% of necrosis in the pancreas and admitted to their gastroenterological medical department during 5 years. The effect of parenteral nutrition were less beneficial than that of jejunal feeding regarding the mortality and the necessity of operative interventions. Chronic pancreatitis with severe necrosis behaved similarly to the acute necrotising pancreatitis. The continuous nasojejunal feeding seems to be a promising new method for acute necrotising pancreatitis preventing complications and severe catabolic state of the disease by a cost--effective manner.

  19. Severe acute syphilitic posterior placoid chorioretinitis with complete spontaneous resolution: The natural course

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Mónica; Nogueira, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report on a case of unilateral acute syphilitic posterior placoid chorioretinitis (ASPPC) with spontaneous resolution of the lesions, and discuss the role of an altered versus adequate immune response as the major pathogenic factor. Methods: We describe a case of acute loss of visual acuity (VA) in the left eye (LE) in a 55-year-old healthy man. Results: The patient presented with VA of 20/20 in the right eye (RE) and hand movements in the LE. Fundoscopy revealed a large yellowish placoid macular lesion with subretinal fluid in the LE, with no abnormalities detected in the RE. Fluorescein angiography showed early hypofluorescence with late staining in the affected area. The clinical findings progressed fast during the first week, with extension of the initial lesion outside the temporal retinal vascular arcades and the appearance of new lesions in the same eye. The patient abandoned the clinic for two weeks with no treatment. When observed again, VA of the LE had recovered to 20/20 and the lesions had completely resolved. Venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) tests results were positive and HIV antibody test titers negative. The diagnosis of ASPPC in the left eye was made. The patient accepted treatment with penicillin G only 45 days after the initial presentation. AV remained stable at 20/20 both eyes and no relapses of the lesions were observed during this period without therapy. The patient was followed for 3 months after treatment. He remained asymptomatic and the ophthalmic examination was unremarkable. Conclusions: The pathogenesis of ASPPC is still not understood. Our case showed a sequential pattern of the chorioretinal lesions, with initial aggravation and complete posterior spontaneous resolution, showing the natural course of the disease. These findings suggest the presence of an adequate ocular immune response in patients with ASPPC, not supporting the initially proposed

  20. Severe acute syphilitic posterior placoid chorioretinitis with complete spontaneous resolution: The natural course

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Mónica; Nogueira, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report on a case of unilateral acute syphilitic posterior placoid chorioretinitis (ASPPC) with spontaneous resolution of the lesions, and discuss the role of an altered versus adequate immune response as the major pathogenic factor. Methods: We describe a case of acute loss of visual acuity (VA) in the left eye (LE) in a 55-year-old healthy man. Results: The patient presented with VA of 20/20 in the right eye (RE) and hand movements in the LE. Fundoscopy revealed a large yellowish placoid macular lesion with subretinal fluid in the LE, with no abnormalities detected in the RE. Fluorescein angiography showed early hypofluorescence with late staining in the affected area. The clinical findings progressed fast during the first week, with extension of the initial lesion outside the temporal retinal vascular arcades and the appearance of new lesions in the same eye. The patient abandoned the clinic for two weeks with no treatment. When observed again, VA of the LE had recovered to 20/20 and the lesions had completely resolved. Venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL) and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) tests results were positive and HIV antibody test titers negative. The diagnosis of ASPPC in the left eye was made. The patient accepted treatment with penicillin G only 45 days after the initial presentation. AV remained stable at 20/20 both eyes and no relapses of the lesions were observed during this period without therapy. The patient was followed for 3 months after treatment. He remained asymptomatic and the ophthalmic examination was unremarkable. Conclusions: The pathogenesis of ASPPC is still not understood. Our case showed a sequential pattern of the chorioretinal lesions, with initial aggravation and complete posterior spontaneous resolution, showing the natural course of the disease. These findings suggest the presence of an adequate ocular immune response in patients with ASPPC, not supporting the initially proposed

  1. Modified Da Chengqi granules improvement in immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, D-L; Yang, J; Jiang, S-Y; Yuan, F-L; Gu, Y-L; Li, J-P; Pei, Z-J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of modified Da Chengqi granules in improving immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients. Early severe acute pancreatitis patients who agreed to receive combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group. All subjects received conventional therapy to support organ function. The experimental group also received modified Da Chengqi granules. Cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α) levels, immunological markers (HLA-DR, Treg, and Th1/Th2), urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and endotoxin levels were measured at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after hospital admission. The total mortality rate was 11.69% (9/77), which was significantly lower in the experimental group [4.88% (2/41)] than in the control group [19.44% (7/36); χ(2) = 3.940, P < 0.05]. Serum interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and endotoxin levels and the lactulose/mannitol ratio were significantly lower on day 7 and day 14 than on day 1 in experimental and control groups (P < 0.01). Immunological indices were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group on day 14 (all P < 0.01 or 0.05). HLA-DR-positive cell ratio gradually increased over 14 days in experimental and control groups (P < 0.01 vs day 1), but was higher in the experimental group than in the control group by day 14 (P < 0.05). Notably, Treg cell prevalence and Th1/Th2 cell ratio deteriorated within 7 days in both groups (P < 0.01 vs day 1), but then returned to day 1 levels (P < 0.01 or 0.05 vs day 1). Significant differences in Treg levels and Th1/Th2 cell ratio between experimental and control groups were observed on day 14 (P < 0.01). These results show that modified Da Chengqi granules can improve immune function in early severe acute pancreatitis patients.

  2. Astaxanthin Attenuates Early Acute Kidney Injury Following Severe Burns in Rats by Ameliorating Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial-Related Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song-Xue; Zhou, Han-Lei; Huang, Chun-Lan; You, Chuan-Gang; Fang, Quan; Wu, Pan; Wang, Xin-Gang; Han, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Early acute kidney injury (AKI) is a devastating complication in critical burn patients, and it is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of AKI is multifactorial. Astaxanthin (ATX) is a natural compound that is widely distributed in marine organisms; it is a strong antioxidant and exhibits other biological effects that have been well studied in various traumatic injuries and diseases. Hence, we attempted to explore the potential protection of ATX against early post burn AKI and its possible mechanisms of action. The classic severe burn rat model was utilized for the histological and biochemical assessments of the therapeutic value and mechanisms of action of ATX. Upon ATX treatment, renal tubular injury and the levels of serum creatinine and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were improved. Furthermore, relief of oxidative stress and tubular apoptosis in rat kidneys post burn was also observed. Additionally, ATX administration increased Akt and Bad phosphorylation and further down-regulated the expression of other downstream pro-apoptotic proteins (cytochrome c and caspase-3/9); these effects were reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the protective effect of ATX presents a dose-dependent enhancement. The data above suggested that ATX protects against early AKI following severe burns in rats, which was attributed to its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress and inhibit apoptosis by modulating the mitochondrial-apoptotic pathway, regarded as the Akt/Bad/Caspases signalling cascade. PMID:25871290

  3. Severe envenomation by Cerastes cerastes viper: an unusual mechanism of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, Houssam; Nejmi, Hicham; Abouelhassan, Taoufik; Hasni, Khadija; Samkaoui, Mohamed-Abdenasser

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral complications after snake bites--particularly ischemic complications--are rare. Very few cases of cerebral infarction resulting from a viper bite have been reported, and we call attention to this uncommon etiology. We discuss 3 authenticated reports of acute ischemic cerebrovascular accidents after 3 typical severe envenomations by Cerastes cerastes vipers. The 3 patients developed extensive local swelling and life-threatening systemic envenomation characterized by disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, increased fibrinolysis, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. This clinical picture involved atypical neurologic manifestations. These patients had either low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) or hemiparesis within hours to 4 days after being bitten, and they were found to have computed tomographic evidence of single or multiple ischemic (nonhemorrhagic) strokes of small- to large-vessel territories of the brain. One patient had good clinical recovery without neurologic deficits. Thrombotic complications occurred an average of 36 hours after being bitten, and their importance depends on the degree of envenomation. The possible mechanisms for cerebral infarction in these cases include generalized prothrombotic action of the venom (consumptive coagulopathy), toxin-induced vasculitis, and endothelial damage.

  4. The temporal patterns of disease severity and prevalence in schistosomiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ciddio, Manuela; Gatto, Marino Casagrandi, Renato

    2015-03-15

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. In this work, we introduce an eco-epidemiological model for its transmission and dynamics with the purpose of explaining both intra- and inter-annual fluctuations of disease severity and prevalence. The model takes the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations that incorporate biological complexity associated with schistosome's life cycle, including a prepatent period in snails (i.e., the time between initial infection and onset of infectiousness). Nonlinear analysis is used to explore the parametric conditions that produce different temporal patterns (stationary, endemic, periodic, and chaotic). For the time-invariant model, we identify a transcritical and a Hopf bifurcation in the space of the human and snail infection parameters. The first corresponds to the occurrence of an endemic equilibrium, while the latter marks the transition to interannual periodic oscillations. We then investigate a more realistic time-varying model in which fertility of the intermediate host population is assumed to seasonally vary. We show that seasonality can give rise to a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos for larger, though realistic, values of the amplitude of the seasonal variation of fertility.

  5. The temporal patterns of disease severity and prevalence in schistosomiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciddio, Manuela; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Casagrandi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread public health problems in the world. In this work, we introduce an eco-epidemiological model for its transmission and dynamics with the purpose of explaining both intra- and inter-annual fluctuations of disease severity and prevalence. The model takes the form of a system of nonlinear differential equations that incorporate biological complexity associated with schistosome's life cycle, including a prepatent period in snails (i.e., the time between initial infection and onset of infectiousness). Nonlinear analysis is used to explore the parametric conditions that produce different temporal patterns (stationary, endemic, periodic, and chaotic). For the time-invariant model, we identify a transcritical and a Hopf bifurcation in the space of the human and snail infection parameters. The first corresponds to the occurrence of an endemic equilibrium, while the latter marks the transition to interannual periodic oscillations. We then investigate a more realistic time-varying model in which fertility of the intermediate host population is assumed to seasonally vary. We show that seasonality can give rise to a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos for larger, though realistic, values of the amplitude of the seasonal variation of fertility.

  6. Cytotoxic immune responses in the lungs correlate to disease severity in patients with hantavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rasmuson, J; Pourazar, J; Mohamed, N; Lejon, K; Evander, M; Blomberg, A; Ahlm, C

    2016-04-01

    Hantavirus infections may cause severe and sometime life-threatening lung failure. The pathogenesis is not fully known and there is an urgent need for effective treatment. We aimed to investigate the association between pulmonary viral load and immune responses, and their relation to disease severity. Bronchoscopy with sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was performed in 17 patients with acute Puumala hantavirus infection and 16 healthy volunteers acting as controls. Lymphocyte subsets, granzyme concentrations, and viral load were determined by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Analyses of BAL fluid revealed significantly higher numbers of activated CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, as well as higher concentrations of the cytotoxins granzymes A and B in hantavirus-infected patients, compared to controls. In patients, Puumala hantavirus RNA was detected in 88 % of BAL cell samples and correlated inversely to the T cell response. The magnitude of the pulmonary cytotoxic lymphocyte response correlated to the severity of disease and systemic organ dysfunction, in terms of need for supplemental oxygen treatment, hypotension, and laboratory data indicating renal failure, cardiac dysfunction, vascular leakage, and cell damage. Regulatory T cell numbers were significantly lower in patients compared to controls, and may reflect inadequate immune regulation during hantavirus infection. Hantavirus infection elicits a pronounced cytotoxic lymphocyte response in the lungs. The magnitude of the immune response was associated with disease severity. These results give insights into the pathogenesis and possibilities for new treatments. PMID:26873376

  7. Quantitative assessment of relative roles of drivers of acute respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Prashant; Baruah, Jurismita

    2014-10-01

    Several thousands of people, including children, suffer from acute respiratory disease (ARD) every year worldwide. Pro-active planning and mitigation for these diseases require identification of the major drivers in a location-specific manner. While the importance of air pollutants in ARD has been extensively studied and emphasized, the role of weather variables has been less explored. With Delhi with its large population and pollution as a test case, we examine the relative roles of air pollution and weather (cold days) in ARD. It is shown that both the number of cold days and air pollution play important roles in ARD load; however, the number of cold days emerges as the major driver. These conclusions are consistent with analyses for several other states in India. The robust association between ARD load and cold days provides basis for estimating and predicting ARD load through dynamical model, as well as impact of climate change.

  8. [Acute conditions after kidney transplantation in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Bujdák, P; Pribylincová, V; Reznícek, J; Miklosi, M; Breza, J

    2003-05-01

    There is a high risk of severe complications after kidney transplantation. In patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (AD-PKD) the incidence of complications like ischaemic cardiac disease, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, perforation of colonic diverticulosis is especially higher. The authors want to indicate another specific complication, rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Within the group of 658 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between January 1981 and January 2000 there were 54 (8.2%) patients with AD-PKD. Four patients with severe retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to rupture of the cyst of own polycystic kidney we present in a short case reports. All cases were fatal. Expect morphologic and functional follow up of the graft it is necessary to follow up polycystic kidney and indicate urgent nephrectomy in the case of any change.

  9. Primary Epstein-Barr-virus infections in acute neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Grose, C; Henle, W; Henle, G; Feorino, P M

    1975-02-20

    Infectious mononucleosis has been associated with Guillain--Barré syndrome, Bell's palsy, meningoencephalitis and transverse myelitis. Since it is not known that many children with infectious mononucleosis do not develop heterophil antibodies, we looked for evidence of current or recent Epstein-Barr virus infection in young patients with these neurologic diseases by using serodiagnostic procedures for detection and titration of antibodies to various antigens related to Epstein-Barr virus. Seven of 24 cases with Guillain-Barre syndrome and three of 16 with facial palsy were definitely associated with primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus as were two cases each of the other two neurologic diseases. Only one of these patients had obvious clinical infectious mononucleosis, and only a few demonstrated heterophil agglutinins. It is evident that the virus must be considered in the diagnosis of various acute neurologic diseases affecting children and young adults, even in the absence of heterophil-antibody response or other signs of infectious mononucleosis.

  10. Monitoring minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukaemia: a review of the current evolving strategies.

    PubMed

    Ommen, Hans Beier

    2016-02-01

    Several disease-monitoring techniques are available for the physician treating acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Besides immunohistochemistry assisted light microscopy, the past 20 years have seen the development and preclinical perfection of a number of techniques, most notably quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multicolor flow cytometry. Late additions to the group of applicable assays include next generation sequencing and digital PCR. In this review the principles of use of these modalities at three different time points during the AML disease course are discussed, namely at the time of treatment evaluation, pretransplantation and postconsolidation. The drawbacks and pitfalls of each different technique are delineated. The evidence or lack of evidence for minimal residual disease guided treatment decisions is discussed. Lastly, future strategies in the MRD field are suggested and commented upon.

  11. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  12. Hyponatremia in acute brain disease: the cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Betjes, Michiel G.H.

    2002-02-01

    Hyponatremia in acute brain disease is a common occurrence, especially after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Originally, excessive natriuresis, called cerebral salt wasting, and later the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), were considered to be the causes of hyponatremia. In recent years, it has become clear that most of these patients are volume-depleted and have a negative sodium balance, consistent with the original description of cerebral salt wasting. Elevated plasma concentrations of atrial or brain natriuretic peptide have been identified as the putative natriuretic factor. Hyponatremia and volume depletion may aggravate neurological symptoms, and timely treatment with adequate replacement of water and NaCl is essential. The use of fludrocortisone to increase sodium reabsorption by the renal tubules may be an alternative approach.

  13. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  14. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  15. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Dowell, Scott F.; Jernigan, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  16. Progress in global surveillance and response capacity 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braden, Christopher R; Dowell, Scott F; Jernigan, Daniel B; Hughes, James M

    2013-06-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), <20% had achieved compliance with the core capacities required by the deadline in June 2012. Lessons learned from the global SARS outbreak highlight the need to avoid complacency, strengthen efforts to improve global capacity to address the next pandemic using all available 21st century tools, and support research to develop new treatment options, countermeasures, and insights while striving to address the global inequities that are the root cause of many of these challenges. PMID:23731871

  17. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian-lin; Li, Jie-xing; Li, Zhen-dong; Liu, Da-sheng; Lu, Su-hong; Liu, Kang-li; Duan, Hong-yan; Luo, Yu-hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  18. Protective Effect of Tetrandrine on Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Lin; Li, Jie-Xing; Li, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Da-Sheng; Lu, Su-Hong; Liu, Kang-Li; Duan, Hong-Yan; Luo, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tet is a type of alkaloid extracted from Stephania tetrandra, and it has recently been demonstrated that Tet can protect against inflammation and free radical injury and inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators. The present study was designed to observe the protective effect of Tet on sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The rat model of SAP was induced by retrograde bile duct injection of sodium taurocholate and then treated with Verapamil and Tet. The results showed that Tet can reduce NF-κB activation in pancreas issue, inhibit the SAP cascade, and improve SAP through inducing pancreas acinar cell apoptosis and stabilizing intracellular calcium in the pancreas, thus mitigating the damage to the pancreas. Our study revealed that Tet may reduce systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (MODS) to protect against damage, and these roles may be mediated through the NF-κB pathway to improve the proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory imbalance. PMID:26557854

  19. Acute Onset Peripartum Cardiomyopathy in a Woman with Severe Pre-eclamptia: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Sonela; Rudra, Pallab

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy that can present as acute life-threatening pulmonary oedema in late pregnancy or early puerperium, its diagnosis is mainly by exclusion of other causes. Morbidity is high due to the reduced physiological reserve in pregnancy. PPCM and severe pre-eclampsia can co-exist and their clinical presentation may overlap, making the diagnosis more difficult and often delayed, with potentially devastating consequences. Here, we would like to share our experience of such a case and present to the readers how we dealt with the challenge. As obstetricians we often do not resort to transthoracic echocardiography, which in our case prompted the diagnosis timely. Lateral thinking and a heightened suspicion does help. Proper diagnosis is extremely important not only for the immediate appropriate management but also for advising long-term lifestyle modifications to minimize risk and counselling for future pregnancy.

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Acute Clopidogrel Load in Patients with Moderate and Severe Ischemic Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Dominique J.; Rincon, Natalia; Tiu, Jonathan; Valmoria, Melisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the safety and efficacy of a clopidogrel loading dose in patients with moderate and severe acute ischemic strokes. Background. The safety of clopidogrel loading has been extensively investigated in patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks. Methods. Acute ischemic stroke patients presenting consecutively to our center from 07/01/08 to 07/31/13 were screened. Clopidogrel loading was defined as at least 300 mg dose (with or without aspirin) given within 6 hours of admission. We compared outcomes in patients with baseline NIHSS > 3 with and without clopidogrel loading. Results. Inclusion criteria were met for 1011 patients (43.6% females, 69.1% black, median age 63). Patients with clopidogrel loading had lower baseline NIHSS than patients who were not loaded (8 versus 9, p = 0.005). The two groups had similar risk for hemorrhagic transformation (p = 0.918) and symptomatic hemorrhage (p = 0.599). Patients who were loaded had a lower rate of neurological worsening (38.9% versus 48.3%, p = 0.031) and less in-hospital mortality (4.3% versus 13.4%, p = 0.001) compared to those who were not loaded. The likelihood of having a poor functional outcome did not differ between the two groups after adjusting for NIHSS on admission (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.4633–1.0906, p = 0.118). Conclusion. Clopidogrel loading dose was not associated with increased risk for hemorrhagic transformation or symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in our retrospective study and was associated with reduced rates of neuroworsening following moderate and severe stroke.

  1. Use of heliox delivered via high-flow nasal cannula to treat an infant with coronavirus-related respiratory infection and severe acute air-flow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sherwin E; Vukin, Kirissa; Mosakowski, Steve; Solano, Patti; Stanton, Lolita; Lester, Lucille; Lavani, Romeen; Hall, Jesse B; Tung, Avery

    2014-11-01

    Heliox, a helium-oxygen gas mixture, has been used for many decades to treat obstructive pulmonary disease. The lower density and higher viscosity of heliox relative to nitrogen-oxygen mixtures can significantly reduce airway resistance when an anatomic upper air-flow obstruction is present and gas flow is turbulent. Clinically, heliox can decrease airway resistance in acute asthma in adults and children and in COPD. Heliox may also enhance the bronchodilating effects of β-agonist administration for acute asthma. Respiratory syndromes caused by coronavirus infections in humans range in severity from the common cold to severe acute respiratory syndrome associated with human coronavirus OC43 and other viral strains. In infants, coronavirus infection can cause bronchitis, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia in variable combinations and can produce enough air-flow obstruction to cause respiratory failure. We describe a case of coronavirus OC43 infection in an infant with severe acute respiratory distress treated with heliox inhalation to avoid intubation. PMID:25118308

  2. Role of TNF in sickness behavior and allodynia during the acute phase of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, H; Thomas, L E; Castillo, E; Cárdenas, E; Mogollón, F; Mijares, A

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is associated with inflammation, discomfort and pain during the acute phase. The influence of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) in this disease outcome is controversial. In this way, the aim of this work was to determine the role of the TNF-α blocker etanercept in the pain, discomfort, and survival during the Chagas' acute phase of mice experimentally infected with a wild virulent strain of T. cruzi. The infection with this wild strain was responsible for a severe visceral inflammation and said parasite showed a tropism in peritoneal fluid cells. Etanercept was able to restore spontaneous vertical and horizontal activities during the second week after infection and to abolish mechanical allodynia during the first week after infection. Finally, etanercept delayed the mortality without any effect on the parasitemia rates. This is the first report that correlates sickness behavior and allodynia with TNF-α and suggests that this cytokine may play an important role in the physiopathology of the acute phase. PMID:23684908

  3. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders. PMID:24152019

  4. Biomarkers in the assessment of acute and chronic kidney diseases in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Cobrin, A R; Blois, S L; Kruth, S A; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Dewey, C

    2013-12-01

    In both human and veterinary medicine, diagnosing and staging renal disease can be difficult. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate is considered the gold standard for assessing renal function but methods for its assessment can be technically challenging and impractical. The main parameters used to diagnose acute and chronic kidney disease include circulating creatinine and urea concentrations, and urine-specific gravity. However, these parameters can be insensitive. Therefore, there is a need for better methods to diagnose and monitor patients with renal disease. The use of renal biomarkers is increasing in human and veterinary medicine for the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic kidney diseases. An ideal biomarker would identify site and severity of injury, and correlate with renal function, among other qualities. This article will review the advantages and limitations of renal biomarkers that have been used in dogs and cats, as well as some markers used in humans that may be adapted for veterinary use. In the future, measuring a combination of biomarkers will likely be a useful approach in the diagnosis of kidney disorders.

  5. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  6. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  7. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 mediates pain in mice with severe sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstein, Patrick C.; Vilceanu, Daniel; Barabas, Marie E.; Retherford, Dawn; Brandow, Amanda M.; Wandersee, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the leading cause of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and daily suffering in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD). The pathologic mechanisms leading to the perception of pain during acute RBC sickling episodes and development of chronic pain remain poorly understood and ineffectively treated. We provide the first study that explores nociceptor sensitization mechanisms that contribute to pain behavior in mice with severe SCD. Sickle mice exhibit robust behavioral hypersensitivity to mechanical, cold, and heat stimuli. Mechanical hypersensitivity is further exacerbated when hypoxia is used to induce acute sickling. Behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity is mediated in part by enhanced excitability to mechanical stimuli at both primary afferent peripheral terminal and sensory membrane levels. In the present study, inhibition of the capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) with the selective antagonist A-425619 reversed the mechanical sensitization at both primary afferent terminals and isolated somata, and markedly attenuated mechanical behavioral hypersensitivity. In contrast, inhibition of TRPA1 with HC-030031 had no effect on mechanical sensitivity. These results suggest that the TRPV1 receptor contributes to primary afferent mechanical sensitization and a substantial portion of behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity in SCD mice. Therefore, TRPV1-targeted compounds that lack thermoregulatory side effects may provide relief from pain in patients with SCD. PMID:21708890

  8. Predictors of Percutaneous Catheter Drainage (PCD) after Abdominal Paracentesis Drainage (APD) in Patients with Moderately Severe or Severe Acute Pancreatitis along with Fluid Collections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hui; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hong-tao; Chen, Tao; Xu, Chuan; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Zheng-cai; Tang, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although we previously demonstrated abdominal paracentesis drainage (APD) preceding percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) as the central step for treating patients with moderately severe (MSAP) or severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), the predictors leading to PCD after APD have not been studied. Methods Consecutive patients with MSAP or SAP were recruited between June 2011 and June 2013. As a step-up approach, all patients initially received medical management, later underwent ultrasound-guided APD before PCD, if necessary, followed by endoscopic necrosectomy through the path formed by PCD. APD primarily targeted fluid in the abdominal or pelvic cavities, whereas PCD aimed at (peri)pancreatic fluid. Results Of the 92 enrolled patients, 40 were managed with APD alone and 52 received PCD after APD (14 required necrosectomy after initial PCD). The overall mortality was 6.5%. Univariate analysis showed that among the 20 selected parameters, 13 factors significantly affected PCD intervention after APD. Multivariate analysis revealed that infected (peri)pancreatic collections (P = -0.001), maximum extent of necrosis of more than 30% of the pancreas (P = -0.024), size of the largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection (P = -0.007), and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD (P = -0.008) were all independent predictors of PCD. Conclusions Infected (peri)pancreatic collections, a largest necrotic peri(pancreatic) collection of more than 100 ml, and reduction of (peri)pancreatic fluid collections by <50% after APD could effectively predict the need for PCD in the early course of the disease. PMID:25659143

  9. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  10. Destabilized SMC5/6 complex leads to chromosome breakage syndrome with severe lung disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Hennus, Marije P.; McGregor, Grant A.; Ritter, Deborah I.; Nagamani, Sandesh C.S.; Wells, Owen S.; Harakalova, Magdalena; Chinn, Ivan K.; Alt, Aaron; Vondrova, Lucie; Hochstenbach, Ron; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne W.; van Lieshout, Stef; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Nijman, Isaac J.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Hennekam, Eric; van Hasselt, Peter M.; Wheeler, David A.; Palecek, Jan J.; Lehmann, Alan R.; Oliver, Antony W.; Pearl, Laurence H.; Plon, Sharon E.; Murray, Johanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family of proteins supports mitotic proliferation, meiosis, and DNA repair to control genomic stability. Impairments in chromosome maintenance are linked to rare chromosome breakage disorders. Here, we have identified a chromosome breakage syndrome associated with severe lung disease in early childhood. Four children from two unrelated kindreds died of severe pulmonary disease during infancy following viral pneumonia with evidence of combined T and B cell immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense mutations in the NSMCE3 (also known as NDNL2) gene, which encodes a subunit of the SMC5/6 complex that is essential for DNA damage response and chromosome segregation. The NSMCE3 mutations disrupted interactions within the SMC5/6 complex, leading to destabilization of the complex. Patient cells showed chromosome rearrangements, micronuclei, sensitivity to replication stress and DNA damage, and defective homologous recombination. This work associates missense mutations in NSMCE3 with an autosomal recessive chromosome breakage syndrome that leads to defective T and B cell function and acute respiratory distress syndrome in early childhood. PMID:27427983

  11. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-02-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32-0.41; P=0.0009-0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential role of

  12. The acute haemolytic syndrome in Wilson's disease--a review of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Walshe, J M

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of 321 case notes of patients with Wilson's disease seen between 1955 and 2000 and one case seen in 1949 has revealed that 22 patients presented with a haemolytic crisis. This study was not a specific research project but a retrospective analysis of 321 patients with Wilson's disease seen between 1949 and 2000. All investigations were carried out in the best interests of diagnosis and management of patients referred to my clinic. The delay in diagnosis in 18 cases resulted in progression to severe hepatic disease in 14 cases and to neurological disease in 4 cases. One patient had no symptoms at the time her sister's illness was diagnosed as Wilson's disease. In a second patient, with liver disease, the diagnosis was also made when a sister was found to have Wilson's disease. There was a female to male ratio of 15:7. The average age of onset was 12.6 years and the incidence 6.9%. Delay in diagnosis resulted in nine deaths. Three patients, late in the series, were admitted in the acute phase, two female and one male; of these two responded to chelation therapy, the third required liver transplantation. Haemolysis appeared to be extravascular, and possible mechanisms of the haemolysis are discussed.

  13. Diagnostic challenges of Wilson’s disease presenting as acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Nussinson, Elchanan; Shahbari, Azmi; Shibli, Fahmi; Chervinsky, Elena; Trougouboff, Philippe; Markel, Arie

    2013-01-01

    Wilson’s disease is a rare disorder of copper transport in hepatic cells, and may present as cholestatic liver disease; pancreatitis and cholangitis are rarely associated with Wilsons’s disease. Moreover, cases of Wilson’s disease presenting as pigmented gallstone pancreatitis have not been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe a case of a 37-year-old man who was admitted with jaundice and abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, cholangitis, and obstructive jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones that were detected during retrograde cholangiopancreatography. However, because of his long-term jaundice and the presence of pigmented gallstones, the patient underwent further evaluation for Wilson’s disease, which was subsequently confirmed. This patient’s unique presentation exemplifies the overlap in the clinical and laboratory parameters of Wilson’s disease and cholestasis, and the difficulties associated with their differentiation. It suggests that Wilson’s disease should be considered in patients with pancreatitis, cholangitis, and severe protracted jaundice caused by pigmented gallstones. PMID:24303094

  14. [Acute encephalic manifestations in Senegalese children with sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Diagne, I; Diagne-Guèye, N R; Fall, L; Ndiaye, O; Camara, B; Diouf, S; Signate-Sy, H; Kuakuvi, N

    2001-01-01

    The course of sickle cell disease (SCD) may be complicated by neurologic events, mainly bactérial meningitidis and stroke. We retrospectively studied all cases with acute encephalic manifestations (AEM) in a cohort of 461 children and adolescents with SCD followed at Albert Royer Children Hospital of Dakar (Senegal) from january 1991 to december 2000 (ten years). Among them 438 had sickle cell anemia (SCA), 19 SC disease and 4 S-beta thalassemia (3 S-beta+, 1 S-beta0). Seven patients, all with SCA, presented antecedents of AEM revealed by flacid and proportionnal hemiplegia evoking stroke. Prevalence of these AEM was 1.5 per cent among patients with SCD and 1.6 per cent among those with SCA. They were 4 girls and 3 boys (sex ratio = 0.75) aged 4 to 8.5 years when occurred the first accident. We observed no clinical or biological distinctive characteristic of SCA in these patients compared to those without crebrovascular accident. Recurrence was observed once in a boy after a 12 months interval and twice in a girl after 20 and 60 months intervals successively. No transfusionnal program was applied to prevent recurrent stroke because of insufficient conditions for long-term transfusion. Stroke appears to be rare in senegalese children with SCD. However it poses in our context the major problem of applicability of transfusionnal program which constitute the only therapy universally recognised to be effective to prevent recurrence. Nevertheless hydroxyurea could be a satisfactory alternative.

  15. Computer Models of Stress, Allostasis, and Acute and Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The past century has seen a profound shift in diseases of humankind. Acute, unifactorial diseases are being replaced increasingly by multifactorial disorders that arise from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities and treatments, and time. According to the concept of allostasis, there is no single, ideal set of steady-state conditions in life. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators “homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of a home temperature control system, the temperature can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states) by multiple means (effectors), regulated by a comparator thermostat (homeostat). Stress might exert adverse health consequences via allostatic load. This presentation describes models of homeostatic systems that incorporate negative feedback regulation, multiple effectors, effector sharing, environmental influences, intrinsic obsolescence, and destabilizing positive feedback loops. These models can be used to predict effects of environmental and genetic alterations on allostatic load and therefore on the development of multi-system disorders and failures. PMID:19120114

  16. MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE QUANTITATION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Shook, David; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is heterogeneous. A minority of patients has clinical and biologic features that are associated with a very high risk of relapse. For the remaining patients no clear prognostic factors can be identified at diagnosis. The degree of treatment response is likely to be an informative predictor of outcome for these patients. Modern assays to detect AML cells that are undetectable by conventional morphologic techniques, i.e. minimal residual disease (MRD), can potentially improve measurements of treatment response. It is plausible that modifications to treatment based on the results of these assays will improve clinical management and ultimately increase cure rates. Established MRD assays for AML are based on either polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genetic abnormalities or flow cytometric detection of abnormal immunophenotypes. Residual disease and treatment response can be measured by these assays in a manner that is much more sensitive and objective than that afforded by conventional morphologic examination. The expanding use of MRD testing is beginning to change the definition of treatment response and of remission. Other clinically informative uses of MRD testing include the detection of early relapse and the evaluation of the efficacy of new antileukemic agents. PMID:19778853

  17. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  18. Spectrum, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of bacterial infections complicating severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Israil, A M; Palade, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Vasile, D; Grigoriu, M; Voiculescu, D; Popa, D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary infection of pancreatic necrotic tissue and peripancreatic fluid is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out the spectrum of bacterial infections, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and virulence features in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 19 patients with acute pancreatitis were consecutively selected from 153 clinical cases of septic abdominal surgical emergencies (age 29-80, 12 males, 7 females) admitted during 2009-2011, in the First Surgical Clinic of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest. All 19 SAP cases were submitted to pre-operatory antibiotic empiric treatment. Ten cases were culture negative, in spite of the positive microscopy registered in eight of them. The rest of nine cases were culture positive, 17 different bacterial strains being isolated and identified as belonging to eight aerobic and four anaerobic species. Polymicrobial infection was seen in six patients and the etiology was dominated by Gram-negative bacilli, followed by gut anaerobic bacteria, attesting their colonic origin. The susceptibility testing of the isolated strains confirmed in vitro in all cases the efficiency of the antibiotics that had been used in the empiric pre-operatory treatment. Out of 19 cases submitted to pre-operatory empiric treatment, 14 proved a favorable evolution and five a lethal outcome. The host depending factors (sepsis and other co-morbidities), as well as the aggressivity of the isolated microbial strains (mediated by the presence of different factors implicated in adherence, toxicity and invasion) were found to contribute to the unfavorable, even lethal clinical outcome of SAP cases. In spite of all theoretical controversies, the antibiotic therapy remains at present a very important therapeutic mean for the SAP treatment; although it cannot solve the septic necrotizing pancreatitis in 100% of cases, however

  19. Severe hypocalcemia following bisphosphonate treatment in a patient with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Whitson, Heather E; Lobaugh, Bruce; Lyles, Kenneth W

    2006-10-01

    Bisphosphonate therapy is a common and effective treatment for Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy and cancer metastatic to bone. Clinically significant hypocalcemia has not been reported in patients with Paget's disease of bone and normal parathyroid function treated with an aminobisphosphonate. We treated a 52-year-old woman with polyostotic Paget's disease of bone (serum alkaline phosphatase level-1971 IU/L [normal 31-110 IU/L]), who had not previously received bisphosphonates, with daily oral 30 mg risedronate, oral 1000 mg elemental calcium and oral 400 IU cholecalciferol. After 10 days of treatment, she developed severe hypocalcemia (5.4 mg/dL [normal 8.7-10.2 mg/dL]), requiring hospitalization and support with 5 days of intravenous calcium gluconate. On the day risedronate treatment began, her PTH was low normal at 14 pg/mL (normal 12-72 pg/mL), consistent with a relatively suppressed PTH axis due to high bone turnover. Her vitamin D level was within normal limits (serum 25(OH)D 19 ng/mL [normal 8-38 ng/mL]), although possibly not optimally repleted. We hypothesize that this case represents an example of hungry bone syndrome in a patient with extensive Paget's disease of bone who received risedronate, causing acute suppression of bone resorption while elevated bone formation rates continued. In the year following her recovery, the patient was successfully treated with slowly titrated anti-resorptive therapy (subcutaneous calcitonin followed by titrated doses of risedronate), and is now clinically well. Physicians should be aware of the potential for hypocalcemia when patients with polyostotic Paget's disease and markedly elevated indicators of bone remodeling are initiated on powerful anti-resorptive therapy.

  20. Acute toxicity of zinc to several aquatic species native to the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Stephen F; Johnston, Walter D

    2012-02-01

    National water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life are based on toxicity tests, often using organisms that are easy to culture in the laboratory. Species native to the Rocky Mountains are poorly represented in data sets used to derive national water-quality criteria. To provide additional data on the toxicity of zinc, several laboratory acute-toxicity tests were conducted with a diverse assortment of fish, benthic invertebrates, and an amphibian native to the Rocky Mountains. Tests with fish were conducted using three subspecies of cutthroat trout (Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus, greenback cutthroat trout O. clarkii stomias, and Rio Grande cutthroat trout O. clarkii virginalis), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), and flathead chub (Platygobio gracilis). Aquatic invertebrate tests were conducted with mayflies (Baetis tricaudatus, Drunella doddsi, Cinygmula sp. and Ephemerella sp.), a stonefly (Chloroperlidae), and a caddis fly (Lepidostoma sp.). The amphibian test was conducted with tadpoles of the boreal toad (Bufo boreas). Median lethal concentrations (LC(50)s) ranged more than three orders of magnitude from 166 μg/L for Rio Grande cutthroat trout to >67,000 μg/L for several benthic invertebrates. Of the organisms tested, vertebrates were the most sensitive, and benthic invertebrates were the most tolerant. PMID:21811884

  1. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541-18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  2. Serum Levels of Substance P and Mortality in Patients with a Severe Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo; Martín, María M.; Almeida, Teresa; Pérez-Cejas, Antonia; Ramos, Luis; Argueso, Mónica; Riaño-Ruiz, Marta; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Hernández, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Substance P (SP), a member of tachykinin family, is involved in the inflammation of the central nervous system and in the appearance of cerebral edema. Higher serum levels of SP have been found in 18 patients with cerebral ischemia compared with healthy controls. The aim of our multi-center study was to analyze the possible association between serum levels of SP and mortality in ischemic stroke patients. We included patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI) and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) lower than 9. Non-surviving patients at 30 days (n = 31) had higher serum concentrations of SP levels at diagnosis of severe MMCAI than survivors (n = 30) (p < 0.001). We found in multiple regression an association between serum concentrations of SP higher than 362 pg/mL and mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 5.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.541–18.470; p = 0.008) after controlling for age and GCS. Thus, the major novel finding of our study was the association between serum levels of SP and mortality in patients suffering from severe acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27338372

  3. Increased Gut Redox and Depletion of Anaerobic and Methanogenic Prokaryotes in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Million, Matthieu; Tidjani Alou, Maryam; Khelaifia, Saber; Bachar, Dipankar; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Dione, Niokhor; Brah, Souleymane; Hugon, Perrine; Lombard, Vincent; Armougom, Fabrice; Fromonot, Julien; Robert, Catherine; Michelle, Caroline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Fabre, Alexandre; Guieu, Régis; Sokhna, Cheikh; Henrissat, Bernard; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with inadequate diet, low levels of plasma antioxidants and gut microbiota alterations. The link between gut redox and microbial alterations, however, remains unexplored. By sequencing the gut microbiomes of 79 children of varying nutritional status from three centers in Senegal and Niger, we found a dramatic depletion of obligate anaerobes in malnutrition. This was confirmed in an individual patient data meta-analysis including 107 cases and 77 controls from 5 different African and Asian countries. Specifically, several species of the Bacteroidaceae, Eubacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococceae families were consistently depleted while Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were consistently enriched. Further analyses on our samples revealed increased fecal redox potential, decreased total bacterial number and dramatic Methanobrevibacter smithii depletion. Indeed, M. smithii was detected in more than half of the controls but in none of the cases. No causality was demonstrated but, based on our results, we propose a unifying theory linking microbiota specificity, lacking anaerobes and archaea, to low antioxidant nutrients, and lower food conversion. PMID:27183876

  4. The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal on motor performance and dopaminergic receptor sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, N; Fernandez, W; Lees, A J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal were studied in nine patients with levodopa related on-off oscillations. One patient withdrew from the study due to off period confusion and hallucinations. A marked deterioration in motor disability occurred in all patients following overnight withdrawal of levodopa and a further mild delayed deterioration was present over a mean withdrawal period of 44 hours. Patients with more severe disease were able to tolerate levodopa withdrawal for a shorter period of time than those with milder disease severity. The minimum therapeutic dose of subcutaneous apomorphine needed to produce a similar improvement in patients' mobility, before and after several days of drug withdrawal, did not differ, thus providing no clinical evidence for alterations in striatal dopamine receptor sensitivity after acute levodopa withdrawal. PMID:8331352

  5. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups.

  6. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: An Italian position statement

    PubMed Central

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the “6-mo rule”. Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The “Group of Italian Regions” suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  7. Acute alcoholic hepatitis, end stage alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation: an Italian position statement.

    PubMed

    Testino, Gianni; Burra, Patrizia; Bonino, Ferruccio; Piani, Francesco; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Peressutti, Roberto; Giannelli Castiglione, Andrea; Patussi, Valentino; Fanucchi, Tiziana; Ancarani, Ornella; De Cerce, Giovanna; Iannini, Anna Teresa; Greco, Giovanni; Mosti, Antonio; Durante, Marilena; Babocci, Paola; Quartini, Mariano; Mioni, Davide; Aricò, Sarino; Baselice, Aniello; Leone, Silvia; Lozer, Fabiola; Scafato, Emanuele; Borro, Paolo

    2014-10-28

    Alcoholic liver disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases ranging from steatosis steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. Forty-four per cent of all deaths from cirrhosis are attributed to alcohol. Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The vast majority of transplant programmes (85%) require 6 mo of abstinence prior to transplantation; commonly referred to as the "6-mo rule". Both in the case of progressive end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and in the case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), not responding to medical therapy, there is a lack of evidence to support a 6-mo sobriety period. It is necessary to identify other risk factors that could be associated with the resumption of alcohol drinking. The "Group of Italian Regions" suggests that: in a case of ESLD with model for end-stage liver disease < 19 a 6-mo abstinence period is required; in a case of ESLD, a 3-mo sober period before LT may be more ideal than a 6-mo period, in selected patients; and in a case of severe AAH, not responding to medical therapies (up to 70% of patients die within 6 mo), LT is mandatory, even without achieving abstinence. The multidisciplinary transplant team must include an addiction specialist/hepato-alcohologist. Patients have to participate in self-help groups. PMID:25356027

  8. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis by inhibiting ROS and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce (•)OH and ONOO(-) selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  9. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically. PMID:25878401

  10. Review of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses and Acute Hemorrhagic Disease.

    PubMed

    Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Hayward, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 young captive and wild Asian elephants are known to have died from a rapid-onset, acute hemorrhagic disease caused primarily by multiple distinct strains of two closely related chimeric variants of a novel herpesvirus species designated elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV1A and EEHV1B). These and two other species of Probosciviruses (EEHV4 and EEHV5) are evidently ancient and likely nearly ubiquitous asymptomatic infections of adult Asian elephants worldwide that are occasionally shed in trunk wash secretions. Although only a handful of similar cases have been observed in African elephants, they also have proved to harbor their own multiple and distinct species of Probosciviruses-EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7-found in lung and skin nodules or saliva. For reasons that are not yet understood, approximately 20% of Asian elephant calves appear to be susceptible to the disease when primary infections are not controlled by normal innate cellular and humoral immune responses. Sensitive specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA blood tests have been developed, routine monitoring has been established, the complete large DNA genomes of each of the four Asian EEHV species have now been sequenced, and PCR gene subtyping has provided unambiguous evidence that this is a sporadic rather than epidemic disease that it is not being spread among zoos or other elephant housing facilities. Nevertheless, researchers have not yet been able to propagate EEHV in cell culture, determine whether or not human antiherpesvirus drugs are effective inhibitors, or develop serology assays that can distinguish between antibodies against the multiple different EEHV species. PMID:26912715

  11. Short report: Predictors of severe disease in melioidosis patients in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Roslani, Ardita Dewi Roslani; Tay, Sun Tee; Puthucheary, Savithri D; Rukumani, Devi V; Sam, I-Ching

    2014-12-01

    The predictors of severe disease or death were determined for 85 melioidosis patients in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Most of the patients were male, > 40 years old, and diabetic. Severe disease or death occurred in 28 (32.9%) cases. Lower lymphocyte counts and positive blood cultures were significant independent predictors of severe disease, but age, presentations with pneumonia, inappropriate empirical antibiotics, or flagellin types of the infecting isolates were not. Knowledge of local predictors of severe disease is useful for clinical management.

  12. Quantitative characterization of disease severity in diseases with complex symptom profiles.

    PubMed

    Kondraske, George V; Stewart, R Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    A number of clinical and research situations arise that require the integration of complex, multi-dimensional, performance-related information to determine a single quantity such as "disease severity" or "risk level" (for subsequent development of a disease). This process is generally carried out either by relying on a subjective gestalt approach or by using rating scales that combine scores for component measures using an additive process without justification. Concepts from general systems performance theory have provided insights into this problem, teaching that a fundamentally multiplicative method of integrating components is often appropriate. In this paper, concepts and previous supportive experimental work are reviewed in the context of the quantitative characterization of disease severity. A Parkinson's disease study (n=114) is presented that mimics the "two-condition" situation encountered in the clinical trial of a new drug or other therapy. Traditional and performance theory-based composite scores are computed for each condition ("on" and "off" medications) and compared, with emphasis on the different quantitative "pictures" conveyed by each approach. It is concluded that performance theory based composites are not only more sensitive to therapeutic agents experimentally, but also have superior conceptual validity compared to traditional forms of single-number composites. PMID:17946592

  13. Glutathione as a Biomarker in Parkinson's Disease: Associations with Aging and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mischley, Laurie K.; Standish, Leanna J.; Weiss, Noel S.; Padowski, Jeannie M.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; White, Collin C.; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Oxidative stress contributes to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathophysiology and progression. The objective was to describe central and peripheral metabolites of redox metabolism and to describe correlations between glutathione (Glu) status, age, and disease severity. Methods. 58 otherwise healthy individuals with PD were examined during a single study visit. Descriptive statistics and scatterplots were used to evaluate normality and distribution of this cross-sectional sample. Blood tests and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were used to collect biologic data. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the strength and direction of the association. The Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Patient-Reported Outcomes in PD (PRO-PD) were used to rate disease severity using regression analysis. Results. Blood measures of Glu decreased with age, although there was no age-related decline in MRS Glu. The lower the blood Glu concentration, the more severe the UPDRS (P = 0.02, 95% CI: −13.96, −1.14) and the PRO-PD (P = 0.01, 95% CI: −0.83, −0.11) scores. Discussion. These data suggest whole blood Glu may have utility as a biomarker in PD. Future studies should evaluate whether it is a modifiable risk factor for PD progression and whether Glu fortification improves PD outcomes.

  14. [Severe behavioral changes in a patient with Fahr's disease].

    PubMed

    Kümmer, Arthur; de Castro, Maila; Caramelli, Paulo; Cardoso, Francisco; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2006-09-01

    We report on a case of a 40 year-old man with Fahrs disease, defined by idiopathic bilateral basal ganglia calcification, who developed depressive disorder, motor and phonic tics, stereotyped behaviors such as punding and personality changes with significant social and familiar implications. We discuss about the psychopathology of Fahrs disease and the relevance of the basal ganglia in the determination of humans behavior. PMID:17119811

  15. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  16. Survival in acute and severe low o environment: use of a genetic model system.

    PubMed

    Azad, Priti; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2009-10-01

    Hypoxia whether present during physiologic states (e.g., embryogenesis) or during pathologic states (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea and sickle cell anemia), challenges the vertebrate or invertebrate organism. Clearly, hypoxia can lead to sublethal cell injury or death and consequently organ or systemic injury and failure, depending on severity. We discovered that the adult Drosophila melanogaster is tolerant to a low O(2) environment, withstanding approximately 3-4 hours of total O(2) deprivation or anoxia without showing any evidence of cell injury. This opened major avenues for us since the Drosophila has been used so effectively in so many relevant research areas. We investigated the changes in gene expression in D. melanogaster after severe (1% O(2)) intermittent or constant hypoxia treatment for 2.5 hours. Our microarray analysis has identified multiple gene families that are up- or downregulated in response to acute constant (CH) and intermittent hypoxia (IH). We observed that even for short-term the gene expression response to IH and CH varied not only in the number of genes but also type of gene families. Furthermore, by utilizing powerful Drosophila genetic tools we studied the role of single genes (up- or downregulated in arrays) in survival under either paradigm in adult flies. We observed significant increased adult survival (as compared to controls) of P-element lines for Hsp70 and Hsp23 genes during CH and Mdr49 and l (2)08717 genes during IH. This suggests that the increased transcript levels as observed in array data after either paradigm play an important role under severe hypoxia. Indeed, we found for example that over-expressing Hsp70 in vivo in specific fly organs (such as heart) significantly increased adult survival during CH as compared to controls. These data provide further clues about the mechanisms by which intermittent and constant hypoxia lead to cell injury and morbidity or adaptation and survival. PMID:19845605

  17. Muscle Activation During Exercise in Severe Acute Hypoxia: Role of Absolute and Relative Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; González-Izal, Miriam; Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Torres-Peralta, Rafael, José Losa-Reyna, Miriam González-Izal, Ismael Perez-Suarez, Jaime Calle-Herrero, Mikel Izquierdo, and José A.L. Calbet. Muscle activation during exercise in severe acute hypoxia: Role of absolute and relative intensity. High Alt Med Biol 15:472–482, 2014.—The aim of this study was to determine the influence of severe acute hypoxia on muscle activation during whole body dynamic exercise. Eleven young men performed four incremental cycle ergometer tests to exhaustion breathing normoxic (FIo2=0.21, two tests) or hypoxic gas (FIo2=0.108, two tests). Surface electromyography (EMG) activities of rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VL), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) were recorded. The two normoxic and the two hypoxic tests were averaged to reduce EMG variability. Peak Vo2 was 34% lower in hypoxia than in normoxia (p<0.05). The EMG root mean square (RMS) increased with exercise intensity in all muscles (p<0.05), with greater effect in hypoxia than in normoxia in the RF and VM (p<0.05), and a similar trend in VL (p=0.10). At the same relative intensity, the RMS was greater in normoxia than in hypoxia in RF, VL, and BF (p<0.05), with a similar trend in VM (p=0.08). Median frequency increased with exercise intensity (p<0.05), and was higher in hypoxia than in normoxia in VL (p<0.05). Muscle contraction burst duration increased with exercise intensity in VM and VL (p<0.05), without clear effects of FIo2. No significant FIo2 effects on frequency domain indices were observed when compared at the same relative intensity. In conclusion, muscle activation during whole body exercise increases almost linearly with exercise intensity, following a muscle-specific pattern, which is adjusted depending on the FIo2 and the relative intensity of exercise. Both VL and VM are increasingly involved in power output generation with the increase of intensity and the reduction in FIo2. PMID:25225839

  18. Acute compartment syndrome--presenting as severe pain in an extremity out of proportion with the injury.

    PubMed

    Khan, M; Hodkinson, S L

    1997-10-01

    A 24 year old combat medic was admitted to the field hospital at Tomislavgrad in Bosnia, with a suspected forearm, fracture. Radiographs did not show any bony injury. Clinical examination showed marked swelling and tenderness over the extensor compartment. The pain became more severe over the following 12 hours with the pain becoming most intensely felt in the extensors on passive extension. Fasciotomy for suspected acute compartment syndrome was carried out. Acute compartment syndrome is a common complication of extremity injury, and is a clinical diagnosis which should be suspected in all injuries with marked swelling and severe pain.

  19. Clinical and Virologic Characteristics May Aid Distinction of Acute Adenovirus Disease from Kawasaki Disease with Incidental Adenovirus Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunkyung; Kajon, Adriana E; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Texter, Karen; Ramilo, Octavio; Leber, Amy; Jaggi, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Incidental adenovirus detection in Kawasaki disease (KD) is important to differentiate from acute adenovirus disease. Twenty-four of 25 children with adenovirus disease and mimicking features of KD had <4 KD-like features, predominance of species B or E, and higher viral burden compared with those with KD and incidental adenovirus detection. PMID:26707621

  20. Pentraxin 3: an immune modulator of infection and useful marker for disease severity assessment in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Patrick; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Cap, Andrew P; Forsthuber, Thomas; Arulanandam, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The acute phase protein pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a pattern recognition receptor involved in regulation of the host immune response. This relatively newly discovered member of the pentraxin superfamily elicits both immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory functions preventing autoimmune pathology and orchestrated clearance of pathogens through opsonization of damage- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (DAMP/PAMP). Thus, PTX3 has been described as a possible evolutionary precursor to immunoglobulins. While shown to provide protection against specific bacterial and fungal pathogens, persistent elevation of PTX3 levels following initial onset of infection appear to predict poor patient outcome and may contribute to disease sequelae such as tissue damage and coagulopathy. Measurement of PTX3 following onset of sepsis may improve patient risk assessment and thus be useful in guiding subsequent therapeutic interventions including steroidal anti-inflammatory and altered antibiotic therapies. In this review, we summarize the role of PTX3 in inflammatory syndromes and its utility as a marker of sepsis disease severity.

  1. Cigarette smoke causes acute airway disease and exacerbates chronic obstructive lung disease in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie; Conlon, Thomas M; Ballester Lopez, Carolina; Seimetz, Michael; Bednorz, Mariola; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Weissmann, Norbert; Eickelberg, Oliver; Mall, Marcus A; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence demonstrates a strong link between postnatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and increased respiratory morbidity in young children. However, how CS induces early onset airway disease in young children, and how it interacts with endogenous risk factors, remains poorly understood. We, therefore, exposed 10-day-old neonatal wild-type and β-epithelial sodium ion channel (β-ENaC)-transgenic mice with cystic fibrosis-like lung disease to CS for 4 days. Neonatal wild-type mice exposed to CS demonstrated increased numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), which was accompanied by increased levels of Mmp12 and Cxcl1 BALF from β-ENaC-transgenic mice contained greater numbers of macrophages, which did not increase following acute CS exposure; however, there was significant increase in airway neutrophilia compared with filtered air transgenic and CS-exposed wild-type controls. Interestingly, wild-type and β-ENaC-transgenic mice demonstrated epithelial airway and vascular remodeling following CS exposure. Morphometric analysis of lung sections revealed that CS exposure caused increased mucus accumulation in the airway lumen of neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice compared with wild-type controls, which was accompanied by an increase in the number of goblet cells and Muc5ac upregulation. We conclude that short-term CS exposure 1) induces acute airway disease with airway epithelial and vascular remodeling in neonatal wild-type mice; and 2) exacerbates airway inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and mucus plugging in neonatal β-ENaC-transgenic mice with chronic lung disease. Our results in neonatal mice suggest that young children may be highly susceptible to develop airway disease in response to tobacco smoke exposure, and that adverse effects may be aggravated in children with underlying chronic lung diseases. PMID:27448665

  2. The relationship between electrovestibulography and Parkinson's disease severity.

    PubMed

    Shoushtarian, Mehrnaz; Lithgow, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second largest neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. This disease results from the loss of dopamine producing neurons in parts of the basal ganglia of the brain. Previous studies have shown the involvement of the dopamine system in the basal ganglia in balance control. Sensations of balance in the body are detected by the vestibular apparatus. In this project, electrovestibulography (EVestG) has been used to measure neuronal activity of the vestibular apparatus and nuclei from Parkinson's patients. A wavelet based signal processing technique, a Neural Event Extraction Routine, has been used to extract biomarkers from these EVestG recordings. These measurements appear to be correlated with scores from mobility tests which indicate disease progression and mobility impairment in Parkinson's patients. PMID:18002471

  3. Severe acute oxidant exposure: morphological damage and aerobic metabolism in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.R.; Teuscher, F.; LaSota, I.; Niewoehner, D.E.

    1986-09-01

    Groups of male rats were exposed to acute doses of oxygen, ozone, or paraquat which produced equivalent mortality (25-30%) over a 28 day post-exposure period. Quantitative evaluation of morphological changes indicated the primary response to be edema and inflammation with only slight fibrosis being apparent by the end of the observation period. Aerobic pulmonary metabolism was inhibited in lungs from animals exposed to oxygen and ozone as evidenced by decreased oxygen consumption; however, this was transient and O/sub 2/ consumption returned to normal within 24 hours after removal from the exposure chamber. Conversely, treatment with paraquat caused an immediate, transient stimulation of O/sub 2/ consumption. Glucose metabolism was unaltered by the gas exposures and, as previously reported, was initially stimulated by paraquat treatment. In vitro, only paraquat altered both O/sub 2/ consumption and glucose metabolism when added to lung slice preparations; ozone had no effect. Oxygen did not alter O/sub 2/ consumption but caused a slight biphasic response in glucose metabolism. Aerobic metabolism is relatively unchanged by these doses of oxygen and ozone which result in the death of 25-30% of all treated animals. Even though paraquat produces similar morphologic changes, it may represent a more severe metabolic insult than ''equivalent'' doses of oxygen or ozone. Also, if interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is a desired result of experimental exposure, rats may not be a suitable model for oxidant induced lung injury.

  4. Ulinastatin promotes T lymphocyte apoptosis in rats with severe acute pancreatitis via mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Li, N; Ma, T; Zhang, P; You, S Y

    2015-05-25

    We explored the influence of ulinastatin on apoptosis of T lymphocytes in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effect of ulinastatin on mitochondrial apoptosis pathways in spleen lymphocytes. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (N = 12): a sham operated group, a SAP group, and an ulinastatin-treated SAP group. The SAP model was established by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate into the intrapancreatobiliary duct. Study rats were sacrificed after 24 h, and splenic lymphocytes were then collected. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were labeled by direct immune fluorescence assays; the percentage of apoptotic cells, mitochondrial membrane potential levels, and mitochondria permeability transition pore opening levels were measured by flow cytometry. In the ulinastatin-treated SAP group, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes was significantly higher than that in the SAP group, and the apoptosis percentage of CD4(+) T lymphocytes was significantly decreased. The percentage of lymphocytes with an abnormal opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and lymphocytes with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the ulinastatin-treated SAP group were significantly lower than that in the SAP group. Ulinastatin can directly enhance immunological function and attenuate immune suppression in SAP rats through inhibiting the apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. These study findings demonstrate that therapeutic effects may occur through inhibiting the apoptosis induced by mitochondrial signaling pathways.

  5. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment.

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease: Structure of a viral deubiquitinating enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ratia, Kiira; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Barretto, Naina; Baker, Susan C.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    Replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) requires proteolytic processing of the replicase polyprotein by two viral cysteine proteases, a chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) and a papain-like protease (PLpro). These proteases are important targets for development of antiviral drugs that would inhibit viral replication and reduce mortality associated with outbreaks of SARS-CoV. In this work, we describe the 1.85-Å crystal structure of the catalytic core of SARS-CoV PLpro and show that the overall architecture adopts a fold closely resembling that of known deubiquitinating enzymes. Key features, however, distinguish PLpro from characterized deubiquitinating enzymes, including an intact zinc-binding motif, an unobstructed catalytically competent active site, and the presence of an intriguing, ubiquitin-like N-terminal domain. To gain insight into the active-site recognition of the C-terminal tail of ubiquitin and the related LXGG motif, we propose a model of PLpro in complex with ubiquitin–aldehyde that reveals well defined sites within the catalytic cleft that help to account for strict substrate-recognition motifs. PMID:16581910

  7. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  8. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Pu; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-Wei; Mei, Fang-Chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  9. Severe hypercalcemia as a form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentation in children

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Andreia Luís; Moniz, Marta; Nunes, Pedro Sampaio; Abadesso, Clara; Loureiro, Helena Cristina; Duarte, Ximo; Almeida, Helena Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is a rare metabolic disorder in children and is potentially fatal. It has a wide differential diagnosis, including cancer. Here, we report the case of a previously healthy 3-year-old who was admitted to the emergency room with fatigue, hyporeactivity, fever and limping gait that had evolved over 5 days and that was progressively worsening. On examination the patient was unconscious (Glasgow coma score: 8). Laboratory tests indicated severe hypercalcemia (total calcium 21.39mg/dL, ionized calcium 2.93mmol/L) and microcytic anemia. Hyperhydration was initiated, and the child was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with calcium-free solution was instituted, which brought progressive normalization of serum calcium and an improved state of consciousness. Zoledronate was administered, and metabolic and infectious causes and poisoning were excluded. The bone marrow smear revealed a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia associated with malignancy in children is rare and occurs as a form of cancer presentation or recurrence. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration should be considered in situations where there is imminent risk to life. PMID:26761480

  10. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  11. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  12. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  13. Emergency room assessment and adrenaline treatment of patients with acute asthma of different severity.

    PubMed

    Limthongkul, S

    1989-06-01

    The adequacy of emergency room assessment and treatment of patients with acute severe asthmatic attacks was evaluated by analyzing the course of 451 visits of 348 patients to Chulalongkorn hospital's Emergency Room. Eighty-five per cent of the patients had an initial index score of greater than or equal to 4 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 92.16 +/- 46.3 L/min. The discharge index score was 85 per cent with a score of less than or equal to 3 and an average peak expiratory flow rate of 192 +/- 40.3 L/min. Our study indicated that the predictive index proposed by Fischl et al correlated with the severity of airway obstruction; however, the initial index did not help with emergency room decision-making in predicting which patients might be hospitalized, have a relapse or be discharged. In fact, in our emergency room department, the index score to determine airway obstruction and the pattern of response to treatment were better predictors of the outcome, which was classified into three categories: non-responsive or minimally responsive, responsive, and partially responsive. By using conventional clinical criteria (i.e. recumbent position with elimination of laboured breathing, disappearance of dyspnea and reduction of wheezing), there was a 93 per cent accurate determination in the episodes of patients who responded sufficiently to the emergency room treatment to allow their discharge. The remaining 7 per cent of those seeking emergency treatment were hospitalized, which is a lower incidence than that of others series.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Over-the-scope clip placement is effective rescue therapy for severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Matthew; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Neumann, Helmut; Wilcox, C. Mel; Burski, Chad; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background and study aim: The novel over-the-scope clip (OTSC) allows for excellent apposition of tissue, potentially permitting hemostasis to be achieved in various types of gastrointestinal lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and safety of OTSCs for endoscopic hemostasis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in whom traditional endoscopic methods had failed. Patients and methods: A retrospective case series of all patients who underwent placement of an OTSC for severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 14-month period was studied. Outcome data for the procedure included achievement of primary hemostasis, episodes of recurrent bleeding, and complications. Results: Twelve consecutive patients (67 % men; mean age 59, range 29 – 86) with ongoing upper gastrointestinal bleeding despite previous endoscopic management were included. They had a mean ASA score of 3 (range 2 – 4), a mean hemoglobin of 7.2 g/dL (range 5.2 – 9.1), and shock was present in 75 % of patients. They had all received packed red blood cells (mean 5.1 units, range 2 – 12). The etiology of bleeding was: duodenal ulcer (n = 6), gastric ulcer (n = 2) Dieulafoy lesion (n = 2), anastomotic ulceration (n = 1), Mallory – Weiss tear (n = 1). Hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients 1 day and 7 days after OTSC placement. There were no complications associated with OTSC application. Conclusions: OTSC use represents an effective, easily performed, and safe endoscopic therapy for various causes of severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding when conventional endoscopic techniques have failed. This therapy should be added to the armamentarium of therapeutic endoscopists. PMID:26134611

  15. Gut Microbiota in Children Hospitalized with Oedematous and Non-Oedematous Severe Acute Malnutrition in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Kia Hee Schultz; Wiese, Maria; Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Özçam, Mustafa; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Namusoke, Hanifa; Friis, Henrik; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) among children remains a major health problem in many developing countries. SAM manifests in both an oedematous and a non-oedematous form, with oedematous malnutrition in its most severe form also known as kwashiorkor. The pathogenesis of both types of malnutrition in children remains largely unknown, but gut microbiota (GM) dysbiosis has recently been linked to oedematous malnutrition. In the present study we aimed to assess whether GM composition differed between Ugandan children suffering from either oedematous or non-oedematous malnutrition. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of an observational study among children hospitalized with SAM aged 6–24 months in Uganda, fecal samples were collected at admission. Total genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and PCR amplification was performed followed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and tag-encoded 16S rRNA gene-targeted high throughput amplicon sequencing. Alpha and beta diversity measures were determined along with ANOVA mean relative abundance and G-test of independence followed by comparisons between groups. Of the 87 SAM children included, 62% suffered from oedematous malnutrition, 66% were boys and the mean age was 16.1 months. GM composition was found to differ between the two groups of children as determined by DGGE (p = 0.0317) and by high-throughput sequencing, with non-oedematous children having lower GM alpha diversity (p = 0.036). However, beta diversity analysis did not reveal larger differences between the GM of children with oedematous and non-oedematous SAM (ANOSIM analysis, weighted UniFrac, R = -0.0085, p = 0.584; unweighted UniFrac, R = 0.0719, p = 0.011). Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that non-oedematous SAM children have lower GM diversity compared to oedematous SAM children, however no clear compositional differences were identified. PMID:26771456

  16. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  17. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  18. Atypical Pestivirus and Severe Respiratory Disease in Calves, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lucente, Maria Stella; Mari, Viviana; Cirone, Francesco; Cordioli, Paolo; Camero, Michele; Sciarretta, Rossana; Losurdo, Michele; Lorusso, Eleonora; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, a HoBi-like pestivirus was isolated from clinically affected calves in Italy. This European virus reproduced a milder form of disease under experimental conditions and was genetically related to previously reported HoBi-like strains. Isolation of this novel virus from a clinical outbreak may have implications for cattle health and prophylactic programs. PMID:21801648

  19. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  20. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  1. Parameters of a severe disease course in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Stallmach, Andreas; Nickel, Luisa; Lehmann, Thomas; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Bürger, Martin; Hüppe, Dietrich; Kruis, Wolfgang; Nikolaus, Susanna; Preiss, Jan C; Sturm, Andreas; Teich, Niels; Schmidt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To detect high risk patients with a progressive disease course of ulcerative colitis (UC) requiring immunosuppressive therapy (IT). METHODS: A retrospective, multicenter analysis of 262 UC patients from eight German tertiary inflammatory bowel disease centres was performed. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the patients need to initiate immunosuppressive therapy in the disease course. A comparison between the two groups was made with regard to demographics, clinical and laboratory parameters obtained within three months after UC diagnosis and the response to first medical therapy. Using this data, a prognostic model was established to predict the individual patients probability of requiring an immunosuppressive therapy. RESULTS: In 104 (39.7%) out of 262 patients, UC therapy required an immunosuppressive treatment. Patients in this group were significantly younger at time of diagnosis (HR = 0.981 ± 0.014 per year, P = 0.009), and required significantly more often a hospitalisation (HR = 2.5 ± 1.0, P < 0.001) and a systemic corticosteroid therapy at disease onset (HR = 2.4 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), respectively. Response to steroid treatment was significantly different between the two groups of patients (HR = 5.2 ± 3.9 to 50.8 ± 35.6 compared to no steroids, P = 0.016 to P < 0.001). Furthermore, in the IT group an extended disease (HR = 3.5 ± 2.4 to 6.1 ± 4.0 compared to proctitis, P = 0.007 to P = 0.001), anemia (HR = 2.2 ± 0.8, P < 0.001), thrombocytosis (HR = 1.9 ± 1.8, P = 0.009), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) (HR = 2.1 ± 0.9, P < 0.001), and extraintestinal manifestations in the course of disease (HR = 2.6 ± 1.1, P = 0.004) were observed. Six simple clinical items were used to establish a prognostic model to predict the individual risk requiring an IT. This probability ranges from less than 2% up to 100% after 5 years. Using this, the necessity of an immunosuppressive therapy can be predicted in 60% of patients. Our model can

  2. Effects of Gender on Severity, Management and Outcome in Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chin-Li; Li, Chung-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study to examine gender differences in severity, management, and outcome among patients with acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP) because available data are insufficient and conflicting. Methods We analyzed 13,110 patients (50.6% male) with first-attack ABP from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database between 2000 and 2009. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included the development of severe ABP and the provision of treatment measures. Gender difference was assessed using multivariable analyses with generalized estimating equations models. Results The odds of gastrointestinal bleeding (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–1.76) and local complication (aOR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05–1.82) were 44% and 38% higher in men than in women, respectively. Compared with women, men had 24% higher odds of receiving total parenteral nutrition (aOR 1.24, 95% CI 1.00–1.52), but had 18% and 41% lower odds of receiving cholecystectomy (aOR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72–0.93) and hemodialysis (aOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42–0.83), respectively. Hospital mortality was higher in men than in women (1.8% vs. 1.1%, p = 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, men had 81% higher odds of in-hospital death than women (aOR 1.81, 95% CI 1.15–2.86). Among patients with severe ABP, hospital mortality was 11.0% and 7.5% in men and women (p<0.001), respectively. The adjusted odds of death remained higher in men than in women with severe ABP (aOR 1.72, 95% CI 1.10–2.68). Conclusions Gender is an important determinant of outcome in patients with ABP and may affect their treatment measures. PMID:23469006

  3. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in <5-year-old children decreased by 29.1% in 2011 and by 25.2% in 2012 compared to the mean rate performed in the 3 years prior to the introduction of public funding. A total of 895 myringotomies were performed for 1-year-old infants. The rate of myringotomies per child-year performed for acute otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (p<0.000001). Our results suggest a benefit of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for acute otitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants. PMID:26348230

  4. Influence of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media with Severe Middle Ear Inflammation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Hirotoshi; Tsumura, Shigeru; Kunimoto, Masaru; Noda, Masuhiro; Chikuie, Daisuke; Noda, Chieko; Yamashita, Mariko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishii, Hidemasa; Tashiro, Toru; Iwata, Kazuhiro; Kono, Takashi; Tsumura, Kaoru; Sumiya, Takahiro; Takeno, Sachio; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for acute otitis media in children recommend classifying acute otitis media by age, manifestations and local findings, and also recommend myringotomy for moderate-grade cases with severe local findings, severe-grade cases, and treatment-resistant cases. The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was released in Japan in February 2010. In Hiroshima City, public funding allowing free inoculation with this vaccine was initiated from January 2011, and the number of vaccinated individuals has since increased dramatically. This study investigated changes in the number of myringotomies performed to treat acute otitis media during the 5-year period from January 2008 to December 2012 at two hospitals and five clinics in the Asa Area of Hiroshima City, Japan. A total of 3,165 myringotomies for acute otitis media were performed. The rate of procedures per child-year performed in <5-year-old children decreased by 29.1% in 2011 and by 25.2% in 2012 compared to the mean rate performed in the 3 years prior to the introduction of public funding. A total of 895 myringotomies were performed for 1-year-old infants. The rate of myringotomies per child-year performed for acute otitis media in 1-year-old infants decreased significantly in the 2 years after the introduction of public funding for heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine compared to all years before introduction (p<0.000001). Our results suggest a benefit of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for acute otitis media in reducing the financial burden of myringotomy. In addition, this vaccine may help prevent acute otitis media with severe middle ear inflammation in 1-year-old infants.

  5. Emerging infectious diseases: Focus on infection control issues for novel coronaviruses (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-CoV and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-CoV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa and Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9).

    PubMed

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Fischer, William A; Kanamori, Hajime; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E

    2016-05-01

    Over the past several decades, we have witnessed the emergence of many new infectious agents, some of which are major public threats. New and emerging infectious diseases which are both transmissible from patient-to-patient and virulent with a high mortality include novel coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CV), hemorrhagic fever viruses (Lassa, Ebola), and highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses, A(H5N1) and A(H7N9). All healthcare facilities need to have policies and plans in place for early identification of patients with a highly communicable diseases which are highly virulent, ability to immediately isolate such patients, and provide proper management (e.g., training and availability of personal protective equipment) to prevent transmission to healthcare personnel, other patients and visitors to the healthcare facility.

  6. Rewiring the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) transcription circuit: Engineering a recombination-resistant genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yount, Boyd; Roberts, Rhonda S.; Lindesmith, Lisa; Baric, Ralph S.

    2006-08-01

    Live virus vaccines provide significant protection against many detrimental human and animal diseases, but reversion to virulence by mutation and recombination has reduced appeal. Using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as a model, we engineered a different transcription regulatory circuit and isolated recombinant viruses. The transcription network allowed for efficient expression of the viral transcripts and proteins, and the recombinant viruses replicated to WT levels. Recombinant genomes were then constructed that contained mixtures of the WT and mutant regulatory circuits, reflecting recombinant viruses that might occur in nature. Although viable viruses could readily be isolated from WT and recombinant genomes containing homogeneous transcription circuits, chimeras that contained mixed regulatory networks were invariantly lethal, because viable chimeric viruses were not isolated. Mechanistically, mixed regulatory circuits promoted inefficient subgenomic transcription from inappropriate start sites, resulting in truncated ORFs and effectively minimize viral structural protein expression. Engineering regulatory transcription circuits of intercommunicating alleles successfully introduces genetic traps into a viral genome that are lethal in RNA recombinant progeny viruses. regulation | systems biology | vaccine design

  7. Comparison of Risk Factors and Disease Severity Between Old and Young Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lee, Teng-Yu; Lien, Han-Chung; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ko, Chung-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) tends to relapse and develop complications. The aim of the study was to compare the risk factors and disease severity of GERD in young and old patients. Methods Data from patients with GERD were collected between January and November 2009. The enrolled cases were assigned to the younger group if they were below 65 years, or the elderly group if 65 years or older. The general demographic data, lifestyle characteristics and endoscopic findings of the two groups were compared. Results Among all enrolled 111 patients, 78 and 33 patients were classified in the younger and elderly groups, respectively. The elderly group had significantly more men than the younger group did (72.7% vs 39.7%, P = 0.001). Lower rates of smoking (3% vs 6.4%, P = 0.029) and tea drinking (21.3% vs 34.6%, P = 0.001) were noted in the elderly patients, but similar rates of alcohol and coffee drinking. There were more severe esophagitis, esophagocardiac junction (ECJ) ulcers (21.2% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.003) and hiatal hernia (36.4% vs 16.9%, P = 0.025) in the elderly group. Conclusion Elderly GERD patients were more likely to be male, and having severe esophagitis, but lower rates of cigarette smoking and tea drinking, than those of younger patients.

  8. C-reactive protein in outpatients with acute exacerbation of COPD: its relationship with microbial etiology and severity

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Miguel; Pomares, Xavier; Capilla, Silvia; Marcos, Maria Angeles; Suárez, David; Monsó, Eduard; Montón, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement has proven valuable for detecting exacerbations, but its usefulness in predicting etiology remains controversial. Likewise, its potential value as a marker of severity, which is well established in patients with pneumonia, remains unproven in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Methods A cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD and acute infectious exacerbations were included and followed up over 1 year. Episodes of exacerbations meeting Anthonisen’s criteria type I–II were evaluated, analyzing the etiology and inflammatory response as measured by CRP in blood. Results A total of 380 episodes were recorded. Full microbiological analysis was available in 265 samples. Haemophilus influenzae was the most commonly isolated bacteria and rhinovirus the most common virus. Median CRP levels from the 265 episodes were higher in the cases with positive cultures for bacteria (58.30 mg/L, interquartile range [IQR] 21.0–28.2) than in episodes only positive for viruses (37.3 mg/L, IQR 18.6–79.1) and cases negative for any microorganism (36.4 mg/L, IQR 10.8–93.7) (P<0.014). H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae reached the highest CRP levels of 74.5 mg/L (IQR 23.9–167.9) and 74.1 mg/L (IQR 42.0–220.7), respectively. In the 380 exacerbations studied, 227 (~60%) were community-managed, while 153 (~40%) required hospital admission. In the multivariate analysis to assess the influence of inflammatory response on exacerbation severity, baseline hypercapnia (odds ratio [OR]: 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–4.9) and CRP levels >100 mg/L (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 2.12–8.44) were independent predictors after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Conclusion CRP level was higher in bacterial infections, especially when H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae were isolated. CRP values >100 mg/L were associated with a fourfold increased risk of hospital admission. Therefore, CRP blood levels may

  9. Community-based management of severe acute malnutrition in India: new evidence from Bihar123

    PubMed Central

    Burza, Sakib; Mahajan, Raman; Marino, Elisa; Sunyoto, Temmy; Shandilya, Chandra; Tabrez, Mohammad; Kumari, Kabita; Mathew, Prince; Jha, Amar; Salse, Nuria; Mishra, Kripa Nath

    2015-01-01

    Background: An estimated one-third of the world’s children who are wasted live in India. In Bihar state, of children <5 y old, 27.1% are wasted and 8.3% have severe acute malnutrition (SAM). In 2009, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) initiated a community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) program for children aged 6–59 mo with SAM. Objective: In this report, we describe the characteristics and outcomes of 8274 children treated between February 2009 and September 2011. Design: Between February 2009 and June 2010, the program admitted children with a weight-for-height z score (WHZ) <−3 SD and/or midupper arm circumference (MUAC) <110 mm and discharged those who reached a WHZ >−2 SDs and MUAC >110 mm. These variables changed in July 2010 to admission on the basis of an MUAC <115 mm and discharge at an MUAC ≥120 mm. Uncomplicated SAM cases were treated as outpatients in the community by using a WHO-standard, ready-to-use, therapeutic lipid-based paste produced in India; complicated cases were treated as inpatients by using F75/F100 WHO-standard milk until they could complete treatment in the community. Results: A total of 8274 children were admitted including 5149 girls (62.2%), 6613 children aged 6–23 mo (79.9%), and 87.3% children who belonged to Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, or Other Backward Caste families or households. Of 3873 children admitted under the old criteria, 41 children (1.1%) died, 2069 children (53.4%) were discharged as cured, and 1485 children (38.3%) defaulted. Of 4401 children admitted under the new criteria, 36 children (0.8%) died, 2526 children (57.4%) were discharged as cured, and 1591 children (36.2%) defaulted. For children discharged as cured, the mean (±SD) weight gain and length of stay were 4.7 ± 3.1 and 5.1 ± 3.7 g · kg−1 · d−1 and 8.7 ± 6.1 and 7.3 ± 5.6 wk under the old and new criteria, respectively (P < 0.01). After adjustment, significant risk factors for default were as follows: no community

  10. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children’s hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists. PMID:26936083

  11. Original Research: Acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Effect of genotype and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Kristy; Mullen, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is a severe hemoglobinopathy caused by mutations in the beta globin genes. The disorder has protean manifestations and leads to severe morbidity and early mortality. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and in the USA is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease. Care of patients with sickle cell disease is complex and typically involves both primary care physicians and hematology subspecialists. The purpose of this study was first to attempt to validate in a pediatric sickle cell patient cohort associations between ACS and sickle cell disease genotype and between ACS and asthma as a comorbidity. The second purpose of the study was to study in a typical community the frequency with which asthma associated with ACS was addressed in terms of electronic medical record integration, pulmonary subspecialty consultation for management of asthma, and completion of pulmonary function testing (PFTs). A retrospective study of the electronic medical record of a children's hospital that provides most of the medical care for children in a portion of western New York state was performed. We found that ACS was more common in the sickle cell disease genotypes SS and S/beta-thalassemia-null, and that ACS was more frequent in patients treated for asthma. We also found that despite the use of a comprehensive electronic medical record, there was poor documentation of ACS and asthma episodes in the problem lists of patients with sickle cell disease, and that most patients with sickle cell disease with ACS or asthma failed to receive formal consultation services from pediatric pulmonary subspecialists.

  12. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  13. Poisoning severity score, APACHE II and GCS: effective clinical indices for estimating severity and predicting outcome of acute organophosphorus and carbamate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sam, Kishore Gnana; Kondabolu, Krishnakanth; Pati, Dipanwita; Kamath, Asha; Pradeep Kumar, G; Rao, Padma G M

    2009-07-01

    Self-poisoning with organophosphorus (OP) compounds is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across South Asian countries. To develop uniform and effective management guidelines, the severity of acute OP poisoning should be assessed through scientific methods and a clinical database should be maintained. A prospective descriptive survey was carried out to assess the utility of severity scales in predicting the outcome of 71 organophosphate (OP) and carbamate poisoning patients admitted during a one year period at the Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India. The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, predicted mortality rate (PMR) and Poisoning severity score (PSS) were estimated within 24h of admission. Significant correlation (P<0.05) between PSS and GCS and APACHE II and PMR scores were observed with the PSS scores predicting mortality significantly (P< or =0.001). A total of 84.5% patients improved after treatment while 8.5% of the patients were discharged with severe morbidity. The mortality rate was 7.0%. Suicidal poisoning was observed to be the major cause (80.2%), while other reasons attributed were occupational (9.1%), accidental (6.6%), homicidal (1.6%) and unknown (2.5%) reasons. This study highlights the application of clinical indices like GCS, APACHE, PMR and severity scores in predicting mortality and may be considered for planning standard treatment guidelines.

  14. Unexpectedly Severe Acute Radiotherapy Side Effects Are Associated With Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Melanocortin-1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Gerald B.; Muddle, Rory; Sprung, Carl N.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) regulates melanin biogenesis. Deoxyribonucleic acid sequence variants in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of MC1R affect melanin expression and are linked to skin phenotype. We aimed to determine whether SNPs of MC1R were associated with unexpectedly severe ionizing radiation reactions. Methods and Materials: The MC1R genotype of a cohort of Australians with unexpectedly severe acute and/or late reactions (Common Terminology Criteria Version 3 (CTCv3) Grade 3 or 4) to radiotherapy (RT) for cancer (n = 30) was analyzed. The findings were compared wi