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Sample records for acute drug effects

  1. The effect of some drugs on acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamadto, H H; Rashed, S M; Marii, N E; Sobhy, M M; el-Ridi, A M; el-Fakahany, A F

    1989-12-01

    The effect of some chemotherapeutics, on the course of acute toxoplasmosis in experimentally infected mice was studied. Obtained results showed that, praziquantel, levamisole had no effect on acute toxoplasmosis, while trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and clindamycin showed some prophylactic effect on acute toxoplasmosis in mice. PMID:2788673

  2. Acute and chronic pretreatment with essential oil of peppermint (Mentha × piperita L., Lamiaceae) influences drug effects.

    PubMed

    Samojlik, Isidora; Petković, Stojan; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Božin, Biljana

    2012-06-01

    The appearance of common and self-initiative usage of various herbal preparations in everyday practice and life imposes the question of possible interactions with drugs. This survey examined the influence of acute and chronic peppermint oil (PO--Mentha × piperita L., Lamiaceae; prepared as emulsion for oral use) on pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time, analgesic effect of codeine and impairment of motor coordination caused by midazolam in mice. The chemical profile of essential oil was determined by GC-MS. Applied doses of PO were 0.1 and 0.2 mL/kg. Chronic PO intake (in both doses) led to significant decrease of analgesic effect of codeine, while acute intake of PO did not change this effect. Acute PO pretreatment in higher dose caused significant prolongation of pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time, while it was significantly shortened by chronic PO pretreatment at the same dose. Midazolam effect was enhanced and prolonged significantly by chronic PO intake at higher dose, while acute intake of PO did not change this effect. Gut motility was increased only by acute intake of higher PO dose. Regarding the fact that PO produces changes in tested drug effects, the interaction between drugs and phytopreparations containing PO should be additionally followed/confirmed in humans.

  3. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 -), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na+] and decreased [K+] and [Ca2+] (P<0.05). Blood [Na+] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  4. Effects of basic drugs on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liming; Ren, Junming; Zhang, Weiwei; Qi, Yuehong; Zheng, Lina; Guo, Yongqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basic drugs that alkalizes blood, on prognosis of acute lung injury in mice. Mice were randomized into three groups: Group normal saline, Group THAM, injected with 3.64% tri-(hydroxymethyl) methylamine (THAM), and Group NaHCO3, injected with 5% NaHCO3 (n=26, each group). The acute lung injury model was established by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 mg/kg), followed by infusion of varying concentrations of the above solution into tail vein at the rate of 0.5 ml/h (controlled by micro pump) for over 2 h. Thirty minutes later, 6 mice from each group were randomly selected for blood gas analysis; then, the mice were killed and their lung tissues were sampled for detection of relative indicators, and the remaining mice were observed for signs of mortality for 72 h. Arterial pH, bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), and BE and mortality of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly compared to the corresponding parameters of the group normal saline (P<0.05); compared to the group normal saline, group NaHCO3 had increased blood [Na(+)] and decreased [K(+)] and [Ca(2+)] (P<0.05). Blood [Na(+)] of group THAM decreased while the lactic acid concentration increased (P<0.05) compared to the corresponding values of the group normal saline. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) of group THAM and NaHCO3 increased significantly relative to group normal saline (P<0.05). Compared with the biopsy results of (A), pathological biopsy of (B) and (C) clearly revealed alveolar wall thickening, edema of alveolar epithelial cells, and infiltration of large neutrophils. Alkalizing blood could neither inhibit inflammatory reactions in LPS mouse model nor reduce the mortality rate of mice with acute lung injury, while excessive alkalization of blood could increase mice mortality. PMID:26770536

  5. Nitroheterocyclic drugs cure experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infections more effectively in the chronic stage than in the acute stage

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Jayawardhana, Shiromani; Lewis, Michael D.; White, Karen L.; Shackleford, David M.; Chen, Gong; Saunders, Jessica; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Read, Kevin D.; Charman, Susan A.; Chatelain, Eric; Kelly, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The insect-transmitted protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, and infects 5–8 million people in Latin America. Chagas disease is characterised by an acute phase, which is partially resolved by the immune system, but then develops as a chronic life-long infection. There is a consensus that the front-line drugs benznidazole and nifurtimox are more effective against the acute stage in both clinical and experimental settings. However, confirmative studies have been restricted by difficulties in demonstrating sterile parasitological cure. Here, we describe a systematic study of nitroheterocyclic drug efficacy using highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging of murine infections. Unexpectedly, we find both drugs are more effective at curing chronic infections, judged by treatment duration and therapeutic dose. This was not associated with factors that differentially influence plasma drug concentrations in the two disease stages. We also observed that fexinidazole and fexinidazole sulfone are more effective than benznidazole and nifurtimox as curative treatments, particularly for acute stage infections, most likely as a result of the higher and more prolonged exposure of the sulfone derivative. If these findings are translatable to human patients, they will have important implications for treatment strategies. PMID:27748443

  6. Growth hormone and drug metabolism. Acute effects on nuclear ribonucleic acid polymerase activity and chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Spelsberg, T C; Wilson, J T

    1976-01-01

    Adult male rats, subjected either to sham operation or to hypophysectomy and adrenalectomy were maintained for 10 days before treatment with growth hormone. Results of the acute effects of growth hormone on the rat liver nuclear RNA polymerase I (nucleolar) and II (nucleoplasmic) activities as well as the chromatin template capacity were then studied and compared with the growth-hormone effects on the drug metabolism described in the preceding paper (Wilson & Spelsberg, 1976). 2. Conditions for isolation and storage of nuclei for maintenance of optimal polymerase activities are described. It is verified that the assays for polymerase activities require a DNA template, all four nucleoside triphosphates, and a bivalent cation, and that the acid-insoluble radioactive product represents RNA. Proof is presented that under high-salt conditions DNA-like RNA (polymerase II) is synthesized, and that under low-salt conditions in the presence of alpha-amanitin, rRNA (polymerase I) is synthesized. 3. In the livers of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, growth hormone increases the activity of both RNA polymerase enzymes and the chromatin template capacity within 1h after treatment. The effects last for 12h in the case of polymerase II but for only 6h in the case of polymerase I. Sham-operated rats respond to growth hormone in a manner somewhat similar to that shown by hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats. These results, which demonstrate an enhancement of RNA polymerase I activity in response to growth hormone, support those from other laboratories. 4. Growth-hormone enhancement of the chromatin template capacity in the liver of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats contrasts with previous reports. The growth-hormone-induced de-repression of the chromatin DNA could represent the basis of the growth-hormone-induced enhancement of RNA polymerase II activity in the hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, although some effect of growth-hormone on the polymerase enzymes

  7. Effects of acute doses of prosocial drugs methamphetamine and alcohol on plasma oxytocin levels.

    PubMed

    Bershad, Anya K; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Seiden, Jacob A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    Many drugs, including alcohol and stimulants, demonstrably increase sociability and verbal interaction and are recreationally consumed in social settings. One drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), seems to produce its prosocial effects by increasing plasma oxytocin levels, and the oxytocin system has been implicated in responses to several other drugs of abuse. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of 2 other "social" drugs on plasma oxytocin levels--methamphetamine and alcohol. Based on their shared capacity to enhance sociability, we hypothesized that both methamphetamine and alcohol would increase plasma oxytocin levels. In study 1, 11 healthy adult volunteers attended 3 sessions during which they received methamphetamine (10 mg or 20 mg) or placebo under double-blind conditions. Subjective drug effects, cardiovascular effects, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals throughout the sessions. In study 2, 8 healthy adult volunteers attended a single session during which they received 1 beverage containing placebo, and then a beverage containing alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Subjective effects, breath alcohol levels, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals. Both methamphetamine and alcohol produced their expected physiological and subjective effects, but neither of these drugs increased plasma oxytocin levels. The neurobiological mechanisms mediating the prosocial effects of drugs such as alcohol and methamphetamine remain to be identified.

  8. Effect of drugs on the pulmonary changes in experimental acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Taylor, T V

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory complications of acute pancreatitis are well recognised and are closely related to a poor prognosis. Using an experimental model in the rat, a decrease in lung compliance and an increase in lung weight were produced in acute pancreatitis. The effects of dexamethasone, heparin, and aspirin on these changes were studied. The mean specific lung compliance was reduced by 16% in the pancreatitis group compared with the control group (p less than 0.05) and this change was abolished by dexamethasone (p less than 0.02), heparin (p less than 0.01), and aspirin (p less than 0.001). Percentage lung weight (as percentage of total body weight) was raised by 22% in the pancreatitis group compared with the sham operation group (p less than 0.01) and this change was abolished by heparin (p less than 0.01) and aspirin (p less than 0.05), but not affected by dexamethasone (p less than 0.5). The results indicate that 'stiff' and heavy lungs occur in experimental acute pancreatitis. The fact that these changes are abolished by heparin and improved by aspirin suggests that intrapulmonary fibrin deposition is a factor in the pathogenesis of the important respiratory complications of this condition. PMID:7076022

  9. Mephedrone, a new designer drug of abuse, produces acute hemodynamic effects in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meng, Harry; Cao, James; Kang, Jiesheng; Ying, Xiaoyou; Ji, Junzhi; Reynolds, William; Rampe, David

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a new and popular drug of abuse widely available on the Internet and still legal in some parts of the world. Clinical reports are now emerging suggesting that the drug displays sympathomimetic toxicity on the cardiovascular system but no studies have yet explored its cardiovascular effects. Therefore we examined the effects of mephedrone on the cardiovascular system using a combination of in vitro electrophysiology and in vivo hemodynamic and echocardiographic measurements. Patch clamp studies revealed that mephedrone, up to 30 μM, had little effect on the major voltage-dependent ion channels of the heart or on action potentials recorded in guinea pig myocytes. Subcutaneous administration of mephedrone (3 and 15 mg/kg) to conscious telemetry-implanted rats produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate and blood pressure which persisted after pre-treatment with reserpine. Echocardiographic analysis demonstrated that intravenous injection of mephedrone (0.3 and 1mg/kg) increased cardiac function, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and stroke volume, similar to methamphetamine (0.3mg/kg). We conclude that mephedrone is not directly pro-arrhythmic, but induces substantial increases in heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac contractility and this activity contributes to the cardiovascular toxicity in people who abuse the drug.

  10. Acute Effects of the Novel Psychoactive Drug 2C-B on Emotions

    PubMed Central

    González, Débora; Torrens, Marta; Farré, Magí

    2015-01-01

    Background. 2C-B (Nexus) is one of the most widespread novel psychoactive substances. There is limited information about its pharmacological properties, and few studies in humans concern its acute and chronic effects. 2C-B has been classified as a stimulant, hallucinogen, entactogen, and/or empathogen. Objectives. To evaluate the emotional, subjective, and cardiovascular effects of 2C-B. Methods. Twenty healthy recreational 2C-B users (12 women) self-administered a 20 mg dose of 2C-B. Evaluations included emotional (IAPS, FERT, and speech), subjective (visual analog scales, ARCI, VESSPA, HRS, and POMS questionnaires), and cardiovascular effects (blood pressure and heart rate). Results. Positive subjective effects predominated with a reduction of anger under the influence of 2C-B. It did, however, increase reactivity to negative emotional stimuli and decrease the ability to recognize expressions of happiness. Augmented emotionality in speech could be appreciated by others. 2C-B induced euphoria and well-being, changes in perceptions, and slight hallucinogenic states. Mild sympathetic actions were observed. Conclusions. The specific profile that 2C-B exerts on emotions suggests its classification as an entactogen with psychedelic properties. PMID:26543863

  11. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  12. Herbal drug BNO 1016 is safe and effective in the treatment of acute viral rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Rainer; Mondigler, Martin; Stammer, Holger; Stierna, Pontus; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Conclusion: Daily intake of 480 mg of BNO 1016 for 15 days is an effective treatment in acute viral rhinosinusitis. Objectives: The pooled efficacy data of two similar randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials were analyzed. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the individual trials. Methods: The efficacy analysis was based on 589 patients. Treatment was performed orally with either 3 × 160 mg BNO 1016 (n = 294) or 3 × placebo (n = 295) for 15 days. In both trials patients underwent five visits to the investigational sites. Symptoms were evaluated according to the EPOS 2012 guideline. Ultrasonography was used to confirm the diagnosis at onset of treatment and the remission of symptoms at the last visit. Efficacy was evaluated by the investigator as the mean major symptom score (MSS) at the end of treatment (visit 5, day 14). Patients reported symptoms and social/emotional consequences of rhinosinusitis using a quality of life questionnaire (SNOT-20 GAV). Results: MSS improved during the treatment period by a mean of 10.02 ± 1.61 score points to 2.47 ± 2.55 for BNO 1016 and of 9.87 ± 1.52 to 3.63 ± 3.63 for placebo. Differences between treatment groups at end of therapy (1.16 ± 3.14 score points; p < 0.0001) and patient-assessed quality of life (p = 0.0015) were statistically significant in favor of BNO 1016. PMID:25496178

  13. Protective effect of Zingiber officinale roscoe against anticancer drug doxorubicin-induced acute nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Aswathy, M S; Hema, U

    2008-09-01

    Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the nephrotoxicity induced by a commonly used anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin (DXN). The nephroprotective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o) was evaluated against doxorubicin-induced (15mg/kg, i.p) acute renal damage in rat. Serum urea and creatinine levels were evaluated as the markers of renal failure. Renal antioxidant status such as activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and level of reduced glutathione (GSH) were determined. Level of lipid peroxidation as equivalents of malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity were determined in the kidneys. Serum urea and creatinine levels were reduced in the Z. officinale (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o) plus DXN treated groups. The renal antioxidant enzymes activities such as SOD, CAT GPx, levels of GSH and GST activity were restored and that of MDA declined significantly (p<0.001) in the Z. officinale (400mg/kg) plus DXN treated group. The nephroprotection is mediated by preventing the DXN-induced decline of renal antioxidant status, and also by increasing the activity of GST. PMID:18680783

  14. Nifuroxazide-induced acute pancreatitis: a new side-effect for an old drug?

    PubMed

    Shindano, Akilimali; Marot, Liliane; Geubel, André P

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a middle-aged woman who developed a typical picture of acute pancreatitis together with systemic features of immunoallergy after the intake of two capsules (200 mg) of nifuroxazide. Even if acute pancreatitis is a rare adverse event of nitrofuran derivative therapy, nifuroxazide-induced pancreatitis as not been previously described. As suggested by associated systemic features, the disease is likely of immunoallergic origin. PMID:17619536

  15. Acute Neuropsychological Effects of Methylphenidate in Stimulant Drug-Naive Boys with ADHD II--Broader Executive and Non-Executive Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Sinead M.; Coghill, David R.; Matthews, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence supports methylphenidate-induced enhancement of neuropsychological functioning in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study was designed to investigate the acute effects of the psychostimulant drug, methylphenidate (MPH), on neuropsychological performance in stimulant naive boys with ADHD.…

  16. The Effects of Acute Exposure to Neuroactive Drugs on the Locomotor Activity of Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae using prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially, we chose to define the beh...

  17. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  18. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Michael; Kredo, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In South Africa, trauma is a major concern, with violence and road traffic accidents being the fifth and seventh leading causes of death, respectively. Antifibrinolytic agents have been used in trauma and major surgery to prevent fibrinolysis and reduce blood loss. We highlight an updated Cochrane review investigating the effect of antifibrinolytic drugs in patients with acute traumatic injury. The review authorsconducted comprehensive literature searches in January 2015 with regard to all randomised controlled trials comparing antifibrinolytic agents after acute traumatic injury. Three randomised controlled trials, of which two (n=20 451) assessed the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA), were included. The authors concluded that TXA safely reduces mortality in trauma with bleeding without increasing the risk ofadverse events. TXA should be administered as early as possible, and within 3 hours of injury. There is still uncertainty with regard to the effect of TXA on patients with traumatic brain injury; however, ongoing randomised controlled trials should shed more light on this. PMID:27499400

  19. Prevention effects of ND-07, a novel drug candidate with a potent antioxidative action and anti-inflammatory action, in animal models of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hwan; An, Chun San; Yun, Bok Sun; Kang, Kum Suk; Lee, Young Ae; Won, Sun Mi; Gwag, Byoung Joo; Cho, Sung Ig; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2012-07-15

    Oxidative stress and inflammation both play major roles in the development of the acute pancreatitis. Currently, a pancreatic enzyme inhibitor with limited efficacy is only clinically available in a few countries, and antioxidants or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) provide only partial tissue protection in acute pancreatitis animal models. Here, we introduce a new drug candidate for treating acute pancreatitis named ND-07 [chemical name: 2-acetoxy-5-(2-4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenethylamino)-benzoic acid] that exhibits both potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In an electron spin resonance (ESR) study, ND-07 almost blocked hydroxyl radical generation as low as 0.05 μM and significantly suppressed DNA oxidation and cell death in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated pancreatic cell line. In a cerulein plus LPS-induced acute pancreatitis model, ND-07 pretreatment showed significant tissue protective effects, with reductions of serum amylase and lipase levels and pancreatic wet weights. ND-07 not only diminished the plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide but also significantly decreased prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and expression of tumor necrotizing factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the pancreatic tissue. In a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis model induced by a choline deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet, ND-07 dramatically protected the mortality even without any death, providing attenuation of pancreas, lung, and liver damages as well as the reductions in serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), amylase and lipase, MDA levels in the plasma and pancreatic tissues, plasma levels of TNF-α, and interleukin-1 (IL-1β). These findings suggest that current dual synergistic action mechanisms of ND-07 might provide a superior protection for acute pancreatitis than conventional drug treatments. PMID:22575522

  20. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  1. Acute Neuroactive Drug Exposures alter Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. Initially,...

  2. The effect of therapeutic drugs and other pharmacologic agents on activity of porphobilinogen deaminase, the enzyme that is deficient in intermittent acute porphyria.

    PubMed

    Tishler, P V

    1999-01-01

    Drugs and toxins precipitate life-threatening acute attacks in patients with intermittent acute porphyria. These materials may act by directly inhibiting enzyme activity, thus further reducing porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase activity below the ca. 50% level that results from the gene defect. To test this, we studied the effects of drugs that precipitate acute attacks (lead, phenobarbital, griseofulvin, phenytoin, sulfanilamide, sulfisoxazole, 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol, 5beta-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one), drugs that are safe (lithium, magnesium, chlorpromazine, promethazine), and those with uncertain effects (ethyl alcohol, imipramine, diazepam, haloperidol) on activity of PBG deaminase in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies, of PBG deaminase from human erythrocytes from normals and individuals with IAP, only lead (> or = .01 mM) inhibited enzyme activity. Chlorpromazine (> or = .01 mM), promethazine (> or = .01 mM) and imipramine (1 mM) seemed to increase enzyme activity. In most in vivo experiments, male rats were injected intraperitoneally with test material twice daily for 3 days and once on day four; and erythrocyte and hepatic PBG deaminase activity was assayed thereafter. Effects on enzyme activity were observed only with 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.05 microg/kg/day; reduction of 11% in erythrocyte enzyme [NS], and of 20% in liver enzyme [P=.02]), and imipramine (12.5 mg/kg/day; reduction in erythrocyte enzyme activity of 13% [P<.001]). Rats given lead acetate in their drinking water (10 mg/ml) for the first 60 days of life, resulting in high blood and liver lead levels, had increased erythrocyte PBG deaminase (167% of control; P=.004). Thus, enzyme inhibition by lead in vitro was not reflected in a similar in vivo inhibition. The only inhibitory effects in vivo, with ethinyl estradiol and imipramine, appear to be mild and biologically inconsequential. We conclude that inhibition of PBG deaminase activity by materials that precipitate acute attacks is an

  3. Mechanisms of the hepatoprotective effects of tamoxifen against drug-induced and chemical-induced acute liver injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Yukitaka; Miyashita, Taishi; Higuchi, Satonori; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Endo, Shinya; Tsukui, Tohru; Toyoda, Yasuyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Although estrogen receptor (ER)α agonists, such as estradiol and ethinylestradiol (EE2), cause cholestasis in mice, they also reduce the degree of liver injury caused by hepatotoxicants as well as ischemia–reperfusion. The functional mechanisms of ERα have yet to be elucidated in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. The present study investigated the effects of an ERα agonist, selective ER modulators (SERMs) and an ER antagonist on drug-induced and chemical-induced liver injuries caused by acetaminophen, bromobenzene, diclofenac, and thioacetamide (TA). We observed hepatoprotective effects of EE2, tamoxifen (TAM) and raloxifene pretreatment in female mice that were exposed to a variety of hepatotoxic compounds. In contrast, the ER antagonist did not show any hepatoprotective effects. DNA microarray analyses suggested that monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated 2 (Mmd2) protein, which has an unknown function, is commonly increased by TAM and RAL pretreatment, but not by pretreatment with the ER antagonist. In ERα-knockout mice, the hepatoprotective effects of TAM and the increased expression of Mmd2 mRNA were not observed in TA-induced liver injury. To investigate the function of Mmd2, the expression level of Mmd2 mRNA was significantly knocked down to approximately 30% in mice by injection of siRNA for Mmd2 (siMmd2). Mmd2 knockdown resulted in a reduction of the protective effects of TAM on TA-induced liver injury in mice. This is the first report of the involvement of ERα in drug-induced or chemical-induced liver injury. Upregulation of Mmd2 protein in the liver was suggested as the mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of EE2 and SERMs. -- Highlights: ► Liver injury induced by drugs or chemicals was investigated in mice. ► Liver injury was suppressed by pretreatment with tamoxifen in female mice. ► Mmd2, whose function was unknown, could be a candidate gene for liver protection. ► Tamoxifen up-regulated Mmd2 mRNA expression

  4. Acute cytogenetic effect of benzene on rat bone marrow cells in vivo and the effect of inducers or inhibitors of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fujie, K; Ito, Y; Maeda, S

    1992-12-01

    Acute cytogenetic effects of benzene in LE rat bone marrow cells in vivo were studied. Chromosome aberrations (CA) induced by benzene consisted mainly of gaps and breaks. Cells with exchanges were rarely observed. The incidence of benzene-induced CA was at its maximum level 12 h after the p.o. or i.p. administration of benzene, dependent on the dose of benzene administered, and higher in male rats than in female rats. However, the sex difference was not observed in the repeated inhalation experiment. Chromosome damage was higher with the p.o. than the i.p. administration. LE rats were more sensitive than Wistar and SD rats to the clastogenic action of benzene. Phenobarbital and Sudan III are well known as inducers of drug-metabolizing enzymes. The peak percentage of benzene-induced CA in the rats pretreated with phenobarbital was observed 6 h after the benzene injection, and it occurred at a higher level than in the rats given only benzene. On the other hand, Sudan III pretreatment suppressed benzene-induced CA at all periods after the benzene injection. SKF-525A (a cytochrome P-450 inhibitor) and cyclohexene oxide (an epoxide hydrase inhibitor) pretreatment also suppressed benzene-induced CA.

  5. Conventional anticonvulsant drugs in the guinea-pig kindling model of partial seizures: effects of acute phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, T H; Bharadia, V; Teskey, G C

    2001-10-01

    This study addressed some of the controversial issues surrounding the anticonvulsant effect of phenytoin, and the predictive validity of the guinea-pig kindling model for the screening of anticonvulsant drugs. Following an intraperitoneal injection of either 50 or 75 mg/kg phenytoin, we analysed plasma concentrations of phenytoin at various time intervals. Behavioural toxicity was assessed at 0.5 h postinjection using quantitative locomotor tests, as well as scores on a sedation/muscle relaxation rating index. The anticonvulsant efficacy of phenytoin was evaluated from measurements of afterdischarge threshold (ADT), afterdischarge duration (ADD) and behavioural seizure severity at three phases of kindling: non-kindled, kindling acquisition (early and late) and kindled (50+ ADs). ADD and seizure severity were also measured in response to both threshold and suprathreshold kindling stimulation. Plasma levels of phenytoin corresponded to the human therapeutic range at the time of behavioural testing and kindling. Phenytoin did not exert significant adverse effects in guinea-pigs on both the behavioural tests and rating index. Phenytoin increased ADT in non-kindled and kindled guinea-pigs and effectively reduced ADD and seizure severity, indicating that the guinea-pig model correctly predicted phenytoin's anticonvulsant effect. Phenytoin produced reliable anticonvulsant activity in the guinea-pig at threshold stimulation but a somewhat reduced efficacy on seizure severity at suprathreshold stimulation intensities. Kindling in the guinea-pig is a valid model of human partial seizures.

  6. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients.

  7. A drug from poison: how the therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide on acute promyelocytic leukemia was discovered.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yi; Li, Runhong; Zhang, Daqing

    2013-06-01

    It is surprising that, while arsenic trioxide (ATO) is now considered as "the single most active agent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)", the most important discoverer remains obscure and his original papers have not been cited by a single English paper. The discovery was made during the Cultural Revolution when most Chinese scientists and doctors struggled to survive. Beginning with recipes from a countryside practitioner that were vague in applicable diseases, Zhang TingDong and colleagues proposed in the 1970s that a single chemical in the recipe is most effective and that its target is APL. More than 20 years of work by Zhang and colleagues eliminated the confusions about whether and how ATO can be used effectively. Other researchers, first in China and then in the West, followed his lead. Retrospective analysis of data from his own group proved that APL was indeed the most sensitive target. Removal of a trace amount of mercury chloride from the recipe by another group in his hospital proved that only ATO was required. Publication of Western replication in 1998 made the therapy widely accepted, though neither Western, nor Chinese authors of English papers on ATO cited Zhang's papers in the 1970s. This article focuses on the early papers of Zhang, but also suggests it worth further work to validate Chinese reports of ATO treatment of other cancers, and infers that some findings published in Chinese journals are of considerable value to patients and that doctors from other countries can benefit from the clinical experience of Chinese doctors with the largest population of patients. PMID:23645104

  8. Acute exposure to waterborne psychoactive drugs attract zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Ana Cristina V; Gusso, Darlan; Rosa, João G S; Koakoski, Gessi; Kalichak, Fabiana; Idalêncio, Renan; Oliveira, Thiago A; Barcellos, Heloísa H A; Bonan, Carla D; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic medications are widely used, and their prescription has increased worldwide, consequently increasing their presence in aquatic environments. Therefore, aquatic organisms can be exposed to psychotropic drugs that may be potentially dangerous, raising the question of whether these drugs are attractive or aversive to fish. To answer this question, adult zebrafish were tested in a chamber that allows the fish to escape or seek a lane of contaminated water. These attraction and aversion paradigms were evaluated by exposing the zebrafish to the presence of acute contamination with these compounds. The zebrafish were attracted by certain concentrations of diazepam, fluoxetine, risperidone and buspirone, which were most likely detected by olfaction, because this behavior was absent in anosmic fish. These findings suggest that despite their deleterious effects, certain psychoactive drugs attract fish.

  9. [Drugs of abuse acute intoxication in paediatric emergencies].

    PubMed

    García-Algar, O; Papaseit, E; Velasco, M; López, N; Martínez, L; Luaces, C; Vall, O

    2011-06-01

    Documented cases show that acute drugs of abuse intoxication in children usually is the Fritz clinical evidence of a chronic exposure. Published clinical reports of drugs of abuse acute poisonings in children are reviewed, above all those with an underlying chronic exposure to the same or another substance. Biological matrices and exposure biomarkers useful in toxicology analysis in Paediatrics are reviewed. In toxicology, biomarkers refer to original parental substances and its metabolites and matrices refer to body substances where biomarkers are detected. In these matrices acute and chronic (previous days, weeks or months) exposures can be detected. Hair analysis has become the gold standard of drugs of abuse chronic exposure. Recommendation includes to confirm previous chronic exposure to drugs of abuse by hair analysis of children and their parents. This protocol must be applied in all cases with suspicion of acute drugs of abuse intoxication, parental consumption and/or children living in a risk environment.

  10. Drugs and acute porphyrias: reasons for a hazardous relationship.

    PubMed

    Roveri, Giulia; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Rocchi, Emilio; Ventura, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    The porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases caused by inherited or acquired enzymatic deficiency in the metabolic pathway of heme biosynthesis. Simplistically, they can be considered as storage diseases, because the partial enzymatic defect gives rise to a metabolic "bottleneck" in the biosynthetic pathway and hence to an accumulation of different metabolic intermediates, potentially toxic and responsible for the various (cutaneous or neurovisceral) clinical manifestations observed in these diseases. In the acute porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, variegate porphyria, and the very rare delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ALAD-d porphyria), the characteristic severe neurovisceral involvement is mainly ascribed to a tissue accumulation of delta-aminolevulinic acid, a neurotoxic nonporphyrin precursor. Many different factors, both endogenous and exogenous, may favor the accumulation of this precursor in patients who are carriers of an enzymatic defect consistent with an acute porphyria, thus contributing to trigger the serious (and potentially fatal) clinical manifestations of the disease (acute porphyric attacks). To date, many different drugs are known to be able to precipitate an acute porphyric attack, so that the acute porphyrias are also considered as pharmacogenetic or toxygenetic diseases. This article reviews the different biochemical mechanisms underlying the capacity of many drugs to precipitate a porphyric acute attack (drug porphyrogenicity) in carriers of genetic mutations responsible for acute porphyrias, and addresses the issue of prescribing drugs for patients affected by these rare, but extremely complex, diseases.

  11. Acute Migraine Therapy: New Drugs and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Monteith, Teshamae S.

    2010-01-01

    Opinion Statement The conceptual shift of our understanding of migraine from a vascular disorder to a brain disorder has dramatically altered the approach to the development of new medicines in the field. Current pharmacologic treatments of acute migraine consist of nonspecific and relatively specific agents. Migraine-specific drugs comprise two classes, the ergot alkaloid derivatives and the triptans, serotonin 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists. The ergots, consisting of ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (DHE), are the oldest specific antimigraine drugs available and are considered relatively safe and effective. Ergotamine has been used less extensively because of its adverse effects; DHE is better tolerated. The triptan era, beginning in the 1990s, was a period of considerable change, although these medicines retained vasoconstrictor actions. New methods of delivering older drugs include orally inhaled DHE and the transdermal formulation of sumatriptan, both currently under study. Novel medicines being developed are targeted at neural sites of action. Serotonin 5-HT1F receptor agonists have proven effective in phase II studies and have no vascular actions. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists are another promising nonvasoconstrictor approach to treating acute migraine. Olcegepant (BIBN4096BS) and telcagepant (MK-0974) have been shown to be safe and effective in phase I, II, and (for telcagepant) phase III clinical trials. Other targets under investigation include glutamate (AMPA/kainate), TRPV1, prostanoid EP4, and nitric oxide synthase. With new neural targets and the potential for therapeutic advances, the next era of antimigraine medications is near. PMID:21110235

  12. Gastroprotective Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Byoung Hwan; Seo, Pyoung Ju; Kang, Jung Mook; Jo, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The major compounds of Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) include momordica saponins. We report that the gastroprotective effect of SK-MS10 in an ethanol-induced gastric damage rat model is mediated by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and downregulating cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study, we evaluated the gastroprotective effects of SK-MS10 in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage rat model. Methods The pretreatment effect of SK-MS10 was evaluated in the NSAID-induced gastric damage rat model using aspirin, indomethacin, and diclofenac in 7-week-old rats. Gastric damage was evaluated based on the gross ulcer index by gastroenterologists, and the damage area (%) was measured using the MetaMorph 7.0 video image analysis system. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting was used to analyze the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, cPLA2, and 5-LOX. Results All NSAIDs induced gastric damage based on the gross ulcer index and damage area (p<0.05). Gastric damage was significantly attenuated by SK-MS10 pretreatment compared with NSAID treatment alone (p<0.05). The SK-MS10 pretreatment group exhibited lower MPO levels than the diclofenac group. The expression of cPLA2 and 5-LOX was decreased by SK-MS10 pretreatment in each of the three NSAID treatment groups. Conclusions SK-MS10 exhibited a gastroprotective effect against NSAID-induced acute gastric damage in rats. However, its protective mechanism may be different across the three types of NSAID-induced gastric damage models in rats. PMID:24516701

  13. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide.

  14. Pharmacology of acute mountain sickness: old drugs and newer thinking.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Erik R

    2016-01-15

    Pharmacotherapy in acute mountain sickness (AMS) for the past half century has largely rested on the use of carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, and corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone. The benefits of CA inhibitors are thought to arise from their known ventilatory stimulation and resultant greater arterial oxygenation from inhibition of renal CA and generation of a mild metabolic acidosis. The benefits of corticosteroids include their broad-based anti-inflammatory and anti-edemagenic effects. What has emerged from more recent work is the strong likelihood that drugs in both classes act on other pathways and signaling beyond their classical actions to prevent and treat AMS. For the CA inhibitors, these include reduction in aquaporin-mediated transmembrane water transport, anti-oxidant actions, vasodilation, and anti-inflammatory effects. In the case of corticosteroids, these include protection against increases in vascular endothelial and blood-brain barrier permeability, suppression of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species production, and sympatholysis. The loci of action of both classes of drug include the brain, but may also involve the lung as revealed by benefits that arise with selective administration to the lungs by inhalation. Greater understanding of their pluripotent actions and sites of action in AMS may help guide development of better drugs with more selective action and fewer side effects. PMID:26294748

  15. Acute marijuana effects on social conversation.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L

    1986-01-01

    The present study assessed the acute effects of smoked marijuana on social conversation. Speech quantity was recorded continuously in seven moderate marijuana users during separate 1 h experimental sessions following the paced smoking of 0, 1.01, 1.84, and 2.84% THC marijuana cigarettes. Subjects engaged in conversation with undrugged partners who smoked placebo marijuana cigarettes. The active marijuana produced significant decreases in speech quantity, increases in heart rate, and increases in self-reports of "high" and sedation. Partners showed no effects in speech quantity or self-reports of drug effects that were systematically related to the doses administered to the subject pair members. The effects on speech quantity observed in the present study after acute dosing are similar to the effects on social conversation reported previously during chronic marijuana dosing. Marijuana appears to be an exception to the general rule that drugs of abuse increase verbal interaction.

  16. Drug effects on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-10-01

    Many drugs can adversely affect spermatogenesis. These effects can occur either by directly inhibiting sperm or testicular function or indirectly by impairing the hypothalamic pituitary testicular axis. In this paper, we will review the drugs that are known to adversely impact spermatogenesis, and/or sperm function and detail what is known about the mechanisms through which these compounds impair fertility in men.

  17. Acute renal failure following binge drinking and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Wen, S F; Parthasarathy, R; Iliopoulos, O; Oberley, T D

    1992-09-01

    Two college students who developed reversible acute deterioration in renal function following binge drinking of beer and the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported. Both patients presented with back and flank pain with muscle tenderness, but showed no evidence of overt rhabdomyolysis. The first case had marked renal failure, with a peak serum creatinine reaching 575 mumol/L (6.5 mg/dL), and acute tubular necrosis was documented by renal biopsy. The second case had only modest elevation in serum creatinine, and renal function rapidly improved on rehydration. The contribution of the potential muscle damage associated with alcohol ingestion to the changes in renal function in these two cases is not clear. However, the major mechanism for the acute renal failure was thought to be related to inhibition of renal prostaglandin synthesis in the face of compromised renal hemodynamics secondary to alcohol-induced volume depletion. PMID:1519610

  18. Drug-Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis with Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Golbin, Léonard; Dolley-Hitze, Thibault; Lorcy, Nolwenn; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Vigneau, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a frequent cause of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Drug hypersensitivity is the most common etiology and the list of drugs that can induce AIN is not exhaustive yet. Case Report. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old man who was treated with nifedipine (Adalate®) for Raynaud's syndrome. After nifedipine introduction, serum creatininemia progressively increased from 91 to 188 μmol/L in a few months and AKI was diagnosed. Laboratory work-up results indicated the presence of tubular proteinuria and nonspecific inflammatory syndrome. Histological analysis found granulomatous interstitial nephropathy without necrosis in 20% of the kidney biopsy without immunofluorescent deposit. Nifedipine was stopped and corticosteroid treatment was started with a rapid but incomplete reduction of serum creatininemia level to 106 μmol/L. Conclusion. This is the first case of AIN caused by nifedipine. PMID:26955492

  19. Drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis: report of 10 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, S P

    1986-01-01

    Between January 1979 and June 1985, 10 patients with acute allergic interstitial nephritis were seen in a clinical nephrology service at a large regional hospital. The onset of renal failure was temporally related to the use of a drug: a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) (in four patients), cimetidine (in three), antibiotics (in two) or allopurinol (in one). The onset of renal failure was acute in three patients and insidious in seven. Two patients also exhibited marked proteinuria. Clinical features such as fever, rash, hematuria, pyuria with or without eosinophiluria, and mild to marked proteinuria had led to suspicion of the disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by renal biopsy findings of inflammatory cells, predominantly lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Three patients required hemodialysis; two of them received steroids as well. Steroid therapy was also used in two patients with NSAID-induced proteinuria. Renal function improved in nine patients by 35 days, but one patient continued to have slow but progressive deterioration of renal function. Acute interstitial nephritis can be distinguished from other forms of acute renal failure by heavy renal uptake of gallium 67, maximal 48 hours or more after injection. The improvement in renal function after discontinuation of the implicated drug, the characteristic histopathological findings of allergic interstitial nephritis, and the presence of eosinophils and sometimes IgE in the blood suggest a hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:3779558

  20. Alcohol effects on drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of ethanol with drugs and xenobiotics is complex because ethanol can affect any of the following steps; absorption, plasma protein binding, hepatic blood flow, distribution, hepatic uptake of drugs, and phase I and II hepatic metabolism. The ingestion of ethanol can lead to malabsorption of a variety of nutrients and can modify the absorption of various drugs. High concentrations of ethanol in conjunction with aspirin causes gastric mucosal damage. The principal effect of acute ethanol ingestion on drug metabolism is inhibition of microsomal drug metabolism. The synergistic effects of ethanol on central nervous system depressants can be explained by this mechanism. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption increases mixed function oxidation and drug metabolism. The cross tolerance between ethanol and sedatives in chronic alcoholics may be due to this effect of alcohol. In addition, enhanced production of hepatotoxic products from certain drugs and xenobiotics and an increased activation of procarcinogens to carcinogens can result from this microsomal induction. The increased susceptibility to hepatotoxins and the enhanced carcinogenesis in the alcoholic may be explained by this fact. Other effects of the interaction between drugs and ethanol are the result of changes in organ susceptibility, best demonstrated for the central nervous system. Subsequently, the presence of liver disease has a great effect on drug metabolism in alcoholics.

  1. Despite Federal Legislation, Shortages Of Drugs Used In Acute Care Settings Remain Persistent And Prolonged.

    PubMed

    Chen, Serene I; Fox, Erin R; Hall, M Kennedy; Ross, Joseph S; Bucholz, Emily M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    Early evidence suggests that provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012 are associated with reductions in the total number of new national drug shortages. However, drugs frequently used in acute unscheduled care such as the care delivered in emergency departments may be increasingly affected by shortages. Our estimates, based on reported national drug shortages from 2001 to 2014 collected by the University of Utah's Drug Information Service, show that although the number of new annual shortages has decreased since the act's passage, half of all drug shortages in the study period involved acute care drugs. Shortages affecting acute care drugs became increasingly frequent and prolonged compared with non-acute care drugs (median duration of 242 versus 173 days, respectively). These results suggest that the drug supply for many acutely and critically ill patients in the United States remains vulnerable despite federal efforts. PMID:27140985

  2. Acute marijuana effects on human risk taking.

    PubMed

    Lane, Scott D; Cherek, Don R; Tcheremissine, Oleg V; Lieving, Lori M; Pietras, Cythia J

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies have established a relationship between marijuana use and risky behavior in natural settings. A limited number of laboratory investigations of marijuana effects on human risk taking have been conducted. The present study was designed to examine the acute effects of smoked marijuana on human risk taking, and to identify behavioral mechanisms that may be involved in drug-induced changes in the probability of risky behavior. Using a laboratory measure of risk taking designed to address acute drug effects, 10 adults were administered placebo cigarettes and three doses of active marijuana cigarettes (half placebo and half 1.77%; 1.77%; and 3.58% Delta9-THC) in a within-subject repeated-measures experimental design. The risk-taking task presented subjects with a choice between two response options operationally defined as risky and nonrisky. Data analyses examined cardiovascular and subjective effects, response rates, distribution of choices between the risky and nonrisky option, and first-order transition probabilities of trial-by-trial data. The 3.58% THC dose increased selection of the risky response option, and uniquely shifted response probabilities following both winning and losing outcomes following selection of the risky option. Acute marijuana administration thereby produced measurable changes in risky decision making under laboratory conditions. Consistent with previous risk-taking studies, shifts in trial-by-trial response probabilities at the highest dose suggested a change in sensitivity to both reinforced and losing risky outcomes. Altered sensitivity to consequences may be a mechanism in drug-induced changes in risk taking. Possible neurobiological sites of action related to THC are discussed.

  3. Influence of drugs of abuse and alcohol upon patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards: physician's assessment compared to blood drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mordal, Jon; Medhus, Sigrid; Holm, Bjørn; Mørland, Jørg; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2013-06-01

    In acute psychiatric services, rapid and accurate detection of psychoactive substance intake may be required for appropriate diagnosis and intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) drug influence as assessed by physicians and (b) blood drug concentrations among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. We also explored the possible effects of age, sex, and psychotic symptoms on physician's assessment of drug influence. In a cross-sectional study, the sample comprised 271 consecutive admissions from 2 acute psychiatric wards. At admission, the physician on call performed an overall judgment of drug influence. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Blood samples were screened for a wide range of psychoactive substances, and quantitative results were used to calculate blood drug concentration scores. Patients were judged as being under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol in 28% of the 271 admissions. Psychoactive substances were detected in 56% of the blood samples. Altogether, 15 different substances were found; up to 8 substances were found in samples from 1 patient. Markedly elevated blood drug concentration scores were estimated for 15% of the patients. Physician's assessment was positively related to the blood drug concentration scores (r = 0.52; P < 0.001), to symptoms of excitement, and to the detection of alcohol, cannabis, and amphetamines. The study demonstrates the major impact of alcohol and drugs in acute psychiatric settings and illustrates the challenging nature of the initial clinical assessment.

  4. The anticipatory effects of Medicare Part D on drug utilization.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Abby

    2016-09-01

    While health care policies are frequently signed into law well before they are implemented, such lags are ignored in most empirical work. This paper demonstrates the importance of implementation lags in the context of Medicare Part D, the prescription drug benefit that took effect two years after it was signed into law. Exploiting the differential responses of chronic and acute drugs to anticipated future prices, I show that individuals reduced drug utilization for chronic but not acute drugs in anticipation of Part D's implementation. Accounting for this anticipatory response substantially reduces the estimated total treatment effect of Part D. PMID:27372577

  5. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  6. Novel and Emerging Drugs for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, E.M.; Tallman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a challenging disease to treat with the majority of patients dying from their illness. While overall survival has been markedly prolonged in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), survival in younger adults with other subtypes of AML has only modestly improved over the last twenty years. Physicians who treat AML eagerly await drugs like Imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, Cladribine for hairy cell leukemia, and Rituximab for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma which have had an important impact on improving outcome. Recent research efforts have focused on refining traditional chemotherapeutic agents to make them more active in AML, targeting specific genetic mutations in myeloid leukemia cells, and utilizing novel agents such as Lenalidomide that have shown activity in other hematologic malignancies. Here, we focus on reviewing the recent literature on agents that may assume a role in clinical practice for patients with AML over the next five years. PMID:22483153

  7. Acute Thrombocytopenia: An Unusual Complication Occurring After Drug-Eluting Microspheres Transcatheter Hepatic Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Poggi, Guido; Quaretti, Pietro; Montagna, Benedetta Sottotetti, Federico Tagliaferri, Barbara Pozzi, Emma Amatu, Alessio Pagella, Chiara; Bernardo, Giovanni

    2011-02-15

    Image-guided transcatheter hepatic chemoembolization (TACE) is accepted worldwide as an effective treatment for patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors, colorectal carcinomas, and uveal melanomas. Although the technique is relatively safe, it has been associated with several complications. We report the cases of two patients with colorectal liver metastases who developed acute thrombocytopenia a few hours after TACE. To our knowledge, acute thrombocytopenia occurring after TACE with drug-eluting microspheres has not yet been reported. Here we discuss the hypothetical etiopathogenetic mechanisms.

  8. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  9. HIV infection and drugs of abuse: role of acute phase proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV infection and drugs of abuse such as methamphetamine (METH), cocaine, and alcohol use have been identified as risk factors for triggering inflammation. Acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are the biomarkers of inflammation. Hence, the interactive effect of drugs of abuse with acute phase proteins in HIV-positive subjects was investigated. Methods Plasma samples were utilized from 75 subjects with METH use, cocaine use, alcohol use, and HIV-positive alone and HIV-positive METH, cocaine, and alcohol users, and age-matched control subjects. The plasma CRP and SAA levels were measured by ELISA and western blot respectively and the CD4 counts were also measured. Results Observed results indicated that the CRP and SAA levels in HIV-positive subjects who are METH, cocaine and alcohol users were significantly higher when compared with either drugs of abuse or HIV-positive alone. The CD4 counts were also dramatically reduced in HIV-positive with drugs of abuse subjects compared with only HIV-positive subjects. Conclusions These results suggest that, in HIV-positive subjects, drugs of abuse increase the levels of CRP and SAA, which may impact on the HIV infection and disease progression. PMID:24044608

  10. After-effects of acute alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    York, J L; Regan, S G

    1988-01-01

    Female, Long-Evans hooded rats (N = 10, 4 months of age) were given ethanol via intragastric intubation in doses of 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 g/kg (repeated measures design). After-effects (hypothermia, free operant activity, motor performance) were measured at six, twelve and sixteen hours, respectively, for the above doses and were compared to the effects observed after the intubation of equivolume amounts of tap water. The after-effects of ethanol on rectal temperature were varied. Both rotarod performance and free operant activity were impaired after each of the above doses of ethanol. Blood ethanol analyses revealed low blood levels of ethanol (range 6.6 +/- 1.5 to 24.6 +/- 3.4 mg/100 ml) at the time behavioral tests were performed. Thus, quantifiable behavioral impairment was observed after blood ethanol values had declined following acute intoxication episodes. These changes may be related to "hangover" symptomatology in man and may serve as a model for investigating the influence of a variety of factors related to drug dosage, rate of ethanol ingestion, type of alcoholic beverage, and prophylactic or acute intervention therapeutics.

  11. A longitudinal analysis of the effect of mass drug administration on acute inflammatory episodes and disease progression in lymphedema patients in Leogane, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Brittany A; Blackstock, Anna J; Williamson, John M; Addiss, David G; Streit, Thomas G; Beau de Rochars, Valery M; Fox, Leanne M

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a longitudinal analysis of 117 lymphedema patients in a filariasis-endemic area of Haiti during 1995-2008. No difference in lymphedema progression between those who received or did not receive mass drug administration (MDA) was found on measures of foot (P = 0.24), ankle (P = 0.87), or leg (P = 0.46) circumference; leg volume displacement (P = 0.09), lymphedema stage (P = 0.93), or frequency of adenolymphangitis (ADL) episodes (P = 0.57). Rates of ADL per year were greater after initiation of MDA among both groups (P < 0.01). Nevertheless, patients who received MDA reported improvement in four areas of lymphedema-related quality of life (P ≤ 0.01). Decreases in foot and ankle circumference and ADL episodes were observed during the 1995-1998 lymphedema management study (P ≤ 0.01). This study represents the first longitudinal, quantitative, leg-specific analysis examining the clinical effect of diethylcarbamazine on lymphedema progression and ADL episodes. PMID:24218408

  12. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the... treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes the revised draft guidance of...

  13. A controlled multi-centre study of herbal versus synthetic secretolytic drugs for acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; März, R; Sieder, C

    1997-12-01

    Herbal expectorants and secretolytic drugs hold a sizeable share of the European market. Therefore it is essential to test their clinical effectiveness and safety. The aim of the present study was to compare the herbal medication Bronchipret(®) with various other pharmacotherapeutical options for acute bronchitis. The study was designed as a matched-pair comparison of 7783 patients. Clinical outcomes of bronchitis and adverse reactions were documented. The data were evaluated by comparing the treatment success of the test medication and 3 control groups using ordinal regression. The results suggest that clinical effectiveness of Bronchipret(®) was not less than with synthetic drugs. There was a tendency for better results with Bronchipret(®), particularly in the treatment of adults. Similar results were obtained with respect to adverse reactions. Particularly in the adult sub-group, these were markedly less with herbals as compared to synthetic drugs. These findings imply that a risk/benefit evaluation would favour Bronchipret(®) over synthetic drugs for acute bronchitis. Their interpretation is limited through the fact that this study could not be randomised nor blinded. The results therefore require confirmation through randomised, double-blind trials.

  14. Antiretroviral drugs and acute pancreatitis in HIV/AIDS patients: is there any association? A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Natalia Mejias; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Yamauti; Yonamine, Raquel Yumi; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In HIV-seropositive individuals, the incidence of acute pancreatitis may achieve 40% per year, higher than the 2% found in the general population. Since 1996, when combined antiretroviral therapy, known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), was introduced, a broad spectrum of harmful factors to the pancreas, such as opportunistic infections and drugs used for chemoprophylaxis, dropped considerably. Nucleotide analogues and metabolic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis have emerged as new conditions that can affect the pancreas. To evaluate the role of antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS in a scenario of high incidence of acute pancreatitis in this population, a systematic review was performed, including original articles, case reports and case series studies, whose targets were HIV-seropositive patients that developed acute pancreatitis after exposure to any antiretroviral drugs. This association was confirmed after exclusion of other possible etiologies and/or a recurrent episode of acute pancreatitis after re-exposure to the suspected drug. Zidovudine, efavirenz, and protease inhibitors are thought to lead to acute pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipidemia. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite being powerful inhibitors of viral replication, induce a wide spectrum of side effects, including myelotoxicity and acute pancreatitis. Didanosine, zalcitabine and stavudine have been reported as causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. They pose a high risk with cumulative doses. Didanosine with hydroxyurea, alcohol or pentamidine are additional risk factors, leading to lethal pancreatitis, which is not a frequent event. In addition, other drugs used for prophylaxis of AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, such as sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and pentamidine, can produce necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite comorbidities that can lead to pancreatic involvement in the HIV/AIDS population, antiretroviral drug

  15. Sex, drugs, and cognition: effects of marijuana.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Beth M; Rizzo, Matthew; Block, Robert I; Pearlson, Godfrey D; O'Leary, Daniel S

    2010-12-01

    Despite the knowledge that many drugs affect men and women differently, few studies exploring the effects of marijuana use on cognition have included women. Findings from both animal and human studies suggest marijuana may have more marked effects in women. This study examined sex differences in the acute effects of marijuana on cognition in 70 (n=35 male, 35 female) occasional users of marijuana. Tasks were chosen to tap a wide variety of cognitive domains affected by sex and/or marijuana including attention, cognitive flexibility, time estimation, and visuospatial processing. As expected, acute marijuana use impaired performance on selective and divided attention, time estimation, and cognitive flexibility. While there did not appear to be sex differences in marijuana's effects on cognition, women requested to discontinue the smoking session more often than men, likely leading to an underestimation of differences. Further study of psychological differences in marijuana's effects on men and women following both acute and residual effects of marijuana is warranted. PMID:21305906

  16. Acute and chronic toxicity of six anticancer drugs on rotifers and crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Alfredo; Lavorgna, Margherita; Criscuolo, Emma; Russo, Chiara; Fiumano, Vittorio; Isidori, Marina

    2014-11-01

    The growing use of cytostatic drugs is gaining relevance as an environmental concern. Environmental and distribution studies are increasing due to the development of accurate analytical methods, whereas ecotoxicological studies are still lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute and chronic toxicity of six cytostatics (5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, etoposide, and imatinib) belonging to five classes of Anatomical Therapeutic Classification (ATC) on primary consumers of the aquatic chain (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Brachionus calyciflorus, and Thamnocephalus platyurus). Acute ecotoxicological effects occurred at concentrations in the order of mgL(-)(1), higher than those predicted in the environment, and the most acutely toxic drugs among those tested were cisplatin and doxorubicin for most aquatic organisms. For chronic toxicity, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil showed the highest toxic potential in all test organisms, inducing 50% reproduction inhibition in crustaceans at concentrations on the order of μgL(-)(1). Rotifers were less susceptible to these pharmaceuticals. On the basis of chronic results, the low effective concentrations suggest a potential environmental risk of cytostatics. Thus, this study could be an important starting point for establishing the real environmental impact of these substances.

  17. Acute epigastric and low back pain during amiodarone infusion; is it the drug or the vehicle to blame?

    PubMed

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Iakovou, Ioannis; Boutsikou, Maria; Girasis, Chrysafios; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Pavlides, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Amiodarone is a Class III antiarrhythmic agent used for cardioversion and prevention of recurrences of atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to its side-effects resulting from the drug's long-term administration. We have described acute epigastric pain following treatment with intravenous amiodarone for atrial fibrillation in a previous report. Hereby, we describe a second patient who suffered acute epigastric pain, as well as one who suffered acute low back pain. Intravenous amiodarone has been related to a series of minor and major adverse reactions, indicating other constituents of the intravenous solution as the possible cause, possibly polysorbate-80. A possible correlation between acute epigastric and low back pain after intravenous amiodarone loading is unproven; however it is of crucial importance for clinicians to be aware of this phenomenon, and especially since an acute epigastric pain is implicated in the differential diagnosis of cardiac ischemia. PMID:24239300

  18. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for... drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). This guidance finalizes...

  19. Drugs under preclinical and clinical study for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Joe Antony; Salmani, Jumah Masoud Mohammad; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapy has modernized the treatment of both chronic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The introduction of monoclonal antibodies and combinational drugs has increased the survival rate of patients. Preclinical studies with various agents have resulted in positive outputs with Phase III trial drugs and monoclonal antibodies entering clinical trials. Most of the monoclonal antibodies target the CD20 and CD22 receptors. This has led to the approval of a few of these drugs by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on the drugs under preclinical and clinical study in the ongoing efforts for treatment of acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27382259

  20. Drug Education Effects. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael L.

    This is a research project that was intended to study the effects of a factual drug education program on the attitudes on high school and junior high students toward the use of psychoactive drugs. The approximately 250 eighth and twelfth grade students involved in the study filled out a number of questionnaires designed to measure a variety of…

  1. The depressogenic-like effect of acute and chronic treatment with dexamethasone and its influence on the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Andrzej; Serefko, Anna; Wlaź, Piotr; Poleszak, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    There is a close relationship between chronic stress, glucocorticoids and depression. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms resembling major depression have been observed in patients experiencing elevated glucocorticoid levels, and a high percentage of people suffering from depression have undergone a stressful event/events prior to the onset of this mental disorder. In our study, we investigated whether acute and chronic treatment of dexamethasone induces depression-like behavior in mice and if dexamethasone therapy influences the activity of antidepressant drugs with diverse modes of action. The antidepressant-like effect was assessed by the forced swim test in adult mice. The depressogenic-like activity of dexamethasone turned out to be dose-dependent: only the highest tested dose of the glucocorticoid (i.e., 64μg/kg) given as a single injection increased immobility time, whereas 16μg/kg/day of dexamethasone (but not 4μg/kg/day) administered repeatedly induced a significant alteration in animal behavior. These depressogenic doses of dexamethasone (i.e., 64μg/kg and 16μg/kg/day for an acute and repeated administration, respectively) diminished the antidepressant potential of the therapeutic doses of imipramine (10mg/kg), amitriptyline (10mg/kg), tianeptine (25mg/kg), mianserin (10mg/kg), citalopram (15mg/kg) and moclobemide (25mg/kg). Two main findings of our study should be particularly underlined: (1) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone evoked a depression-like behavior of mice, (2) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone were able to modify the activity of the antidepressant agents from various pharmacological groups, which may lead to a considerable reduction in the efficacy of pharmacotherapy prescribed for patients with mood disorders. PMID:24984273

  2. The depressogenic-like effect of acute and chronic treatment with dexamethasone and its influence on the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Andrzej; Serefko, Anna; Wlaź, Piotr; Poleszak, Ewa

    2014-10-01

    There is a close relationship between chronic stress, glucocorticoids and depression. Psychiatric and cognitive symptoms resembling major depression have been observed in patients experiencing elevated glucocorticoid levels, and a high percentage of people suffering from depression have undergone a stressful event/events prior to the onset of this mental disorder. In our study, we investigated whether acute and chronic treatment of dexamethasone induces depression-like behavior in mice and if dexamethasone therapy influences the activity of antidepressant drugs with diverse modes of action. The antidepressant-like effect was assessed by the forced swim test in adult mice. The depressogenic-like activity of dexamethasone turned out to be dose-dependent: only the highest tested dose of the glucocorticoid (i.e., 64μg/kg) given as a single injection increased immobility time, whereas 16μg/kg/day of dexamethasone (but not 4μg/kg/day) administered repeatedly induced a significant alteration in animal behavior. These depressogenic doses of dexamethasone (i.e., 64μg/kg and 16μg/kg/day for an acute and repeated administration, respectively) diminished the antidepressant potential of the therapeutic doses of imipramine (10mg/kg), amitriptyline (10mg/kg), tianeptine (25mg/kg), mianserin (10mg/kg), citalopram (15mg/kg) and moclobemide (25mg/kg). Two main findings of our study should be particularly underlined: (1) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone evoked a depression-like behavior of mice, (2) both single and repeated administration of dexamethasone were able to modify the activity of the antidepressant agents from various pharmacological groups, which may lead to a considerable reduction in the efficacy of pharmacotherapy prescribed for patients with mood disorders.

  3. Signal Transduction in Astrocytes during Chronic or Acute Treatment with Drugs (SSRIs, Antibipolar Drugs, GABA-ergic Drugs, and Benzodiazepines) Ameliorating Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoman; Du, Ting; Xu, Junnan; Chen, Ye; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic treatment with fluoxetine or other so-called serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) or with a lithium salt “lithium”, carbamazepine, or valproic acid, the three classical antibipolar drugs, exerts a multitude of effects on astrocytes, which in turn modulate astrocyte-neuronal interactions and brain function. In the case of the SSRIs, they are to a large extent due to 5-HT2B-mediated upregulation and editing of genes. These alterations induce alteration in effects of cPLA2, GluK2, and the 5-HT2B receptor, probably including increases in both glucose metabolism and glycogen turnover, which in combination have therapeutic effect on major depression. The ability of increased levels of extracellular K+ to increase [Ca2+]i is increased as a sign of increased K+-induced excitability in astrocytes. Acute anxiolytic drug treatment with benzodiazepines or GABAA receptor stimulation has similar glycogenolysis-enhancing effects. The antibipolar drugs induce intracellular alkalinization in astrocytes with lithium acting on one acid extruder and carbamazepine and valproic acid on a different acid extruder. They inhibit K+-induced and transmitter-induced increase of astrocytic [Ca2+]i and thereby probably excitability. In several cases, they exert different changes in gene expression than SSRIs, determined both in cultured astrocytes and in freshly isolated astrocytes from drug-treated animals. PMID:24707399

  4. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic.

  5. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, J. G.; van Wel, J. H.; Spronk, D. B.; Toennes, S. W.; Kuypers, K. P. C.; Theunissen, E. L.; Verkes, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  6. Cannabis and tolerance: acute drug impairment as a function of cannabis use history.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, J G; van Wel, J H; Spronk, D B; Toennes, S W; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Verkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use history as predictor of neurocognitive response to cannabis intoxication remains subject to scientific and policy debates. The present study assessed the influence of cannabis on neurocognition in cannabis users whose cannabis use history ranged from infrequent to daily use. Drug users (N = 122) received acute doses of cannabis (300 μg/kg THC), cocaine HCl (300 mg) and placebo. Cocaine served as active control for demonstrating neurocognitive test sensitivity. Executive function, impulse control, attention, psychomotor function and subjective intoxication were significantly worse after cannabis administration relative to placebo. Cocaine improved psychomotor function and attention, impaired impulse control and increased feelings of intoxication. Acute effects of cannabis and cocaine on neurocognitive performance were similar across cannabis users irrespective of their cannabis use history. Absence of tolerance implies that that frequent cannabis use and intoxication can be expected to interfere with neurocognitive performance in many daily environments such as school, work or traffic. PMID:27225696

  7. Kinetics of drug action in disease states. XXXVII. Effects of acute fluid overload and water deprivation on the hypnotic activity of phenobarbital and the neurotoxicity of theophylline in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhi, J G; Levy, G

    1989-12-01

    Fluid overload and dehydration are potentially serious physiologic perturbations. Their effects on the pharmacodynamics of drugs are essentially unknown. This investigation was designed to determine the effects of acute fluid overload or water deprivation on the hypnotic activity of phenobarbital and on the neurotoxicity of theophylline in male Lewis rats. In the first experiment, 5% dextrose in water (D5W) was infused i.v. in an amount equal to 5 or 10% of body weight and phenobarbital was infused immediately thereafter until the onset of loss of righting reflex (LRR). The total infused dose and the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of phenobarbital at that time were significantly lower than in control animals. When phenobarbital was infused about 2.5 hr after D5W, the infused dose and the serum and CSF concentrations of phenobarbital at LRR were normal. When the rats received D5W and an injection of vasopressin, 25 I.U./kg, or vasopressin only, the infused dose and the serum and CSF concentrations of phenobarbital at LRR were significantly lower than in controls despite the 2.5-hr interval between the respective pretreatments and the phenobarbital infusion. Water deprivation for 24 or 48 hr had no significant effect on phenobarbital dose and concentrations at LRR. Intravenous infusion of D5W to 10% of body weight immediately or 2.5 hr before theophylline infusion had no significant effect on the total infused dose and the serum and CSF concentrations of theophylline at onset of maximal seizures. This lack of effect occurred despite appreciable hyponatremia and hypomagnesemia immediately after D5W infusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Rapid chemotherapy-induced acute endothelial progenitor cell mobilization: implications for antiangiogenic drugs as chemosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Henke, Erik; Roodhart, Jeanine; Mancuso, Patrizia; Langenberg, Marlies; Colleoni, Marco; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Emmenegger, Urban; Tang, Terence; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Strieter, Robert M.; Bertolini, Francesco; Voest, Emile; Benezra, Robert; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how antiangiogenic drugs enhance the treatment efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy including impairing the ability of chemotherapy-responsive tumors to regrow after therapy. With respect to the latter, we show that certain chemotherapy drugs, e.g. paclitaxel, can rapidly induce pro-angiogenic bone marrow derived circulating endothelial cell (CEP) mobilization, and subsequent tumor homing, whereas others, e.g. gemcitabine, did not. Acute CEP mobilization was mediated, at least in part, by systemic induction of SDF-1α and could be prevented by various procedures such as treatment with anti-VEGFR2 blocking antibodies or by paclitaxel treatment in CEP-deficient Id-mutant mice, both of which resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects mediated by paclitaxel, but not gemcitabine. PMID:18772115

  9. Effects of acute exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on the developing North American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpole.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Skirrow, Rachel C; Brown, Lorraine L Y; van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-09-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical chemicals can represent constituents of municipal effluent outflows that are dispersed into aquatic receiving environments worldwide. Increasingly, there is concern as to the potential of such bioactive substances to interact with wildlife species at sensitive life stages and affect their biology. Using a combination of DNA microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and quantitative nuclease protection assays, we assessed the ability of sub-lethal and environmentally relevant concentrations of ibuprofen (IBF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent and prevalent environmental contaminant, to function as a disruptor of endocrine-mediated post-embryonic development of the frog. While the LC50 of IBF for pre-metamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles is 41.5 mg/L (95% confidence interval: 32.3-53.5 mg/L), exposure to concentrations in the ppb range elicited molecular responses both in vivo and in organ culture. A nominal concentration of 15 μg/L IBF (actual = 13.7 μg/L) altered the abundance of 26 mRNA transcripts within the liver of exposed pre-metamorphic R. catesbeiana tadpoles within 6 d. IBF-treated animals demonstrated subsequent disruption of thyroid hormone-mediated reprogramming in the liver transcriptome affecting constituents of several metabolic, developmental, and signaling pathways. Cultured tadpole tail fin treated with IBF for 48 h also demonstrated altered mRNA levels at drug concentrations as low as 1.5 μg/L. These observations raise the possibility that IBF may alter the post-embryonic development of anuran species in freshwater environs, where IBF is a persistent or seasonal pollutant. PMID:25111458

  10. Effects of acute exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on the developing North American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) tadpole.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Nik; Skirrow, Rachel C; Brown, Lorraine L Y; van Aggelen, Graham; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-09-01

    A variety of pharmaceutical chemicals can represent constituents of municipal effluent outflows that are dispersed into aquatic receiving environments worldwide. Increasingly, there is concern as to the potential of such bioactive substances to interact with wildlife species at sensitive life stages and affect their biology. Using a combination of DNA microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and quantitative nuclease protection assays, we assessed the ability of sub-lethal and environmentally relevant concentrations of ibuprofen (IBF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent and prevalent environmental contaminant, to function as a disruptor of endocrine-mediated post-embryonic development of the frog. While the LC50 of IBF for pre-metamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles is 41.5 mg/L (95% confidence interval: 32.3-53.5 mg/L), exposure to concentrations in the ppb range elicited molecular responses both in vivo and in organ culture. A nominal concentration of 15 μg/L IBF (actual = 13.7 μg/L) altered the abundance of 26 mRNA transcripts within the liver of exposed pre-metamorphic R. catesbeiana tadpoles within 6 d. IBF-treated animals demonstrated subsequent disruption of thyroid hormone-mediated reprogramming in the liver transcriptome affecting constituents of several metabolic, developmental, and signaling pathways. Cultured tadpole tail fin treated with IBF for 48 h also demonstrated altered mRNA levels at drug concentrations as low as 1.5 μg/L. These observations raise the possibility that IBF may alter the post-embryonic development of anuran species in freshwater environs, where IBF is a persistent or seasonal pollutant.

  11. State-dependent and environmental modulation of brain hyperthermic effects of psychoactive drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a known effect induced by psychomotor stimulants and pathological hyperthermia is a prominent symptom of acute intoxication with these drugs in humans. In this manuscript, I will review our recent work concerning the brain hyperthermic effects of several known and recently appeared psychostimulant drugs of abuse (cocaine, methamphetamine, MDMA, methylone, and MDPV). Specifically, I will consider the role of activity state and environmental conditions in modulating the brain temperature effects of these drugs and their acute toxicity. Although some of these drugs are structurally similar and interact with the same brain substrates, there are important differences in their temperature effects in quiet resting conditions and the type of modulation of these temperature effects under conditions that mimic basic aspects of human drug use (social interaction, moderately warm environments). These data could be important for understanding the potential dangers of each drug and ultimately preventing adverse health complications associated with acute drug-induced intoxication. PMID:27626047

  12. State-dependent and environmental modulation of brain hyperthermic effects of psychoactive drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a known effect induced by psychomotor stimulants and pathological hyperthermia is a prominent symptom of acute intoxication with these drugs in humans. In this manuscript, I will review our recent work concerning the brain hyperthermic effects of several known and recently appeared psychostimulant drugs of abuse (cocaine, methamphetamine, MDMA, methylone, and MDPV). Specifically, I will consider the role of activity state and environmental conditions in modulating the brain temperature effects of these drugs and their acute toxicity. Although some of these drugs are structurally similar and interact with the same brain substrates, there are important differences in their temperature effects in quiet resting conditions and the type of modulation of these temperature effects under conditions that mimic basic aspects of human drug use (social interaction, moderately warm environments). These data could be important for understanding the potential dangers of each drug and ultimately preventing adverse health complications associated with acute drug-induced intoxication.

  13. [Endocrine effects of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Lasoń, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    Both seizures and antiepileptic drugs may induce disturbances in hormonal system. Regarding endocrine effects of anticonvulsants, an interaction of these drugs with gonadal, thyroid, and adrenal axis deserves attention. Since majority of antiepileptic drugs block voltage dependent sodium and calcium channels, enhance GABAergic transmission and/or antagonize glutamate receptors, one may expect that similar neurochemical mechanisms are engaged in the interaction of these drugs with synthesis of hypothalamic neurohormones such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). Moreover some antiepileptic drugs may affect hormone metabolism via inhibiting or stimulating cytochrome P-450 iso-enzymes. An influence of antiepileptic drugs on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appears to be sex-dependent. In males, valproate decreased follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) but elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations. Carbamazepine decreased testosterone/sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) ratio, whereas its active metabolite--oxcarbazepine--had no effect on androgens. In females, valproate decreased FSH-stimulated estradiol release and enhanced testosterone level. On the other hand, carbamazepine decreased testosterone level but enhanced SHBG concentration. It has been reported that carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or joined administration of carbamazepine and valproate decrease thyroxine (T4) level in patients with no effect on thyrotropin (TSH). While valproate itself has no effect on T4, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone, as metabolic enzyme inducers, can decrease the level of free and bound thyroxine. On the other hand, new antiepileptics such as levetiracetam, tiagabine, vigabatrine or lamotrigine had no effect on thyroid hormones. With respect to hormonal regulation of metabolic processes, valproate was

  14. Acute effect of the anti-addiction drug bupropion on extracellular dopamine concentrations in the human striatum: an [11C]raclopride PET study.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Alice; Shotbolt, John P; Stokes, Paul R A; Hirani, Ella; Ahmad, Rabia; Lappin, Julia M; Reeves, Suzanne J; Mehta, Mitul A; Howes, Oliver D; Grasby, Paul M

    2010-03-01

    Bupropion is an effective medication in treating addiction and is widely used as an aid to smoking cessation. Bupropion inhibits striatal dopamine reuptake via dopamine transporter blockade, but it is unknown whether this leads to increased extracellular dopamine levels at clinical doses in man. The effects of bupropion on extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum were investigated using [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in rats administered saline, 11 or 25 mg/kg bupropion i.p. and in healthy human volunteers administered either placebo or 150 mg bupropion (Zyban Sustained-Release). A cognitive task was used to stimulate dopamine release in the human study. In rats, bupropion significantly decreased [(11)C]raclopride specific binding in the striatum, consistent with increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations. In man, no significant decreases in striatal [(11)C]raclopride specific binding were observed. Levels of dopamine transporter occupancy in the rat at 11 and 25 mg/kg bupropion i.p. were higher than predicted to occur in man at the dose used. Thus, these data indicate that, at the low levels of dopamine transporter occupancy achieved in man at clinical doses, bupropion does not increase extracellular dopamine levels. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanism of action underlying bupropions' therapeutic efficacy and for the development of novel treatments for addiction and depression. PMID:19969097

  15. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  16. The role of multifunctional drug therapy against carbamate induced neuronal toxicity during acute and chronic phase in rats.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Karan Singh; Prakash, Atish; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-07-01

    The current study has been designed to examine the effect of multifunctional drug therapy on carbofuran induced acute (2.187 mg/kg, s.c.) and sub-acute (0.2187 mg/kg, s.c.) neurotoxicity in male wistar rats. Drug treatment which includes nimodipine (Ca(2+) channel blocker), diazepam, ropinirole (dopamine agonist) and GSPE (antioxidant) was started 2h after carbofuran administration. Morris water maze was employed for aiming spatial memory. Narrow beam walk and rotarod were employed for testing motor functions. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes were also estimated. Carbofuran treatment resulted in significant development of cognitive and motor functions manifested as impairment in learning and memory along with increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite levels and decreased acetylcholinesterase activity, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes. The standard antidote therapy (atropine) was not able to provide neuroprotection but was able to provide symptomatic relief. The multifunctional drug therapy attenuated carbofuran induced cognitive and motor dysfunction, acetylcholinesterase activity and other biochemical parameters. The triple combination in sub-acute study may be avoided in future as two drug combinations provide adequate neuroprotection. Thus it can be concluded that standard antidotal therapy may not provide neuroprotection while the multifunctional drug therapy offers neuroprotection against carbofuran and may dramatically increase survival and life quality. PMID:26151868

  17. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  18. How assess drugs in the treatment of acute bipolar mania?

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Thibaut, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a serious mental disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Good-quality research available to guide treatment strategies remains insufficient, particularly with regard to manic or hypomanic episodes. A critical review of the various stages of mania might be helpful for pharmaceutical companies and investigators as a prerequisite for the clinical evaluation of potential antimanic properties of medications. The main difficulty is with a comparison between anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers such as lithium (with equal efficacy in the acute phase and the prevention of recurrent manic episodes). No consensus has been reached with regard to the treatment of bouts of acute mania in various parts of the world. Controlled clinical trials have, at last, provided irrefutable evidence of the activity of lithium, which has long been used alone, as well as that of divalproate or its derivatives and, to a lesser extent, carbamazepine. The new antipsychotic agents have more recently established their efficacy, especially aripiprazole, asenapine, quetiapine; olanzapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone (not sure where the paradox is). In Europe, haloperidol is still the reference substance used in clinical trials despite the fact that it is not officially indicated in the treatment of mania. In the USA, lithium, divalproate, or antipsychotics can be prescribed as first-line treatment. In Europe, lithium remains the first-line medication, whereas divalproate and atypical antipsychotic agents are used only as second-line therapy. Although both types of medication (antipsychotics, normothymic agents, and/or anticonvulsants) have proved to be clinically effective in the management of mania by reducing the mania scores overall, the same does not apply, however, to all symptoms of mania. Factorial approaches to mania have all shown that since there are several clinical forms of mania, several clusters of manic symptoms can

  19. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    PubMed

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  20. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Arthur J.; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures • coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. Case Report: A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Conclusions: Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema

  1. Targeted drug delivery into reversibly injured myocardium with silica nanoparticles: surface functionalization, natural biodistribution, and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael M; Korolev, Dmitry V; Sonin, Dmitry L; Postnov, Viktor N; Papayan, Garry V; Uskov, Ivan S; Belozertseva, Anastasia V; Shlyakhto, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with ischemic heart disease can be significantly improved with the implementation of targeted drug delivery into the ischemic myocardium. In this paper, we present our original findings relevant to the problem of therapeutic heart targeting with use of nanoparticles. Experimental approaches included fabrication of carbon and silica nanoparticles, their characterization and surface modification. The acute hemodynamic effects of nanoparticle formulation as well as nanoparticle biodistribution were studied in male Wistar rats. Carbon and silica nanoparticles are nontoxic materials that can be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. Concepts of passive and active targeting can be applied to the development of targeted drug delivery to the ischemic myocardial cells. Provided that ischemic heart-targeted drug delivery can be proved to be safe and efficient, the results of this research may contribute to the development of new technologies in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20463939

  2. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Bahareh; Nakhsaz, Alireza; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) were evaluated using forced swim test (FST). In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals), antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST). Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg) and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg). Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration. PMID:26468466

  3. Interactions between P-glycoprotein and drugs used in the supportive care of acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Möllgård, L; Hellberg, E; Smolowicz, A; Paul, C; Tidefelt, U

    2001-06-01

    Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) leads to reduced intracellular drug accumulation and makes the cells resistant to chemotherapy. In this study we focused on how drugs used in the supportive care of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients interfere with Pgp. The effect on intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) was studied in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 and two anthracycline resistant, Pgp expressing, sublines. Each drug was used at two different concentrations: plasma peak concentration and half the plasma peak concentration. Drugs which increased the Rh 123 uptake by > 10% were included in the second part of the study where the cytotoxic effect was tested in combination with daunorubicin. In the Rhodamine assay none of the tested drugs had any significant effect on the Rh 123 efflux in the resistant cell lines. Amphotericin B, cefuroxime, erythromycin and dixyrazin had minor effects on Rh 123 uptake but showed a significant additive effect to the toxicity of daunorubicin suggesting other mechanisms of action than reversal of Pgp. In conclusion this in vitro model where Rh 123 uptake was studied in an anthracycline resistant leukemia cell line could not demonstrate any significant interactions with Pgp for the tested drugs.

  4. [Background factors in the detection of drug-resistant bacteria in adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Michio

    2014-02-01

    In the treatment of adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis, it has been assumed that subjects over 65 years of age or living with children attending a day nursery, are at higher risk for infection with drug-resistant bacteria. However there are few reports which have discussed the relationship between those risk factors and adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis. I investigated the association between adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis living with children attending a day nursery and gender, ages, and frequency of detection of drug-resistant bacteria. From 2010 to 2012, a total of 598 adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis were enrolled. The majority of the study subjects were women, and the largest 10-year age group was 30-39 years. By sex, a greater proportion of the female subjects than the male subjects lived with children attending a day nursery. By age, the proportion of subjects who lived with children attending a day nursery was significantly higher in the 30-39-year age group than other age groups. Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and ampicillin (ABPC)-resistant Haemophilus influenzae were detected at significantly higher rates in subjects with children attending a day nursery than in those without. There were no significant difference in drug-resistant bacteria detection between subjects over 65 years of age, and under 65 years. These findings suggested that living with children attending a day nursery is a risk factor and source of infection by drug-resistant organisms that may cause intra-familial infections of adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis. These results suggested we must ask adult patients with acute rhinosinusitis whether they are living with children attending a day nursery or not, when we plan their treatment strategy.

  5. Oligonucleotide aptamer-drug conjugates for targeted therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nianxi; Pei, Sung-Nan; Qi, Jianjun; Zeng, Zihua; Iyer, Swaminathan P.; Pei, Lin; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Zu, Youli

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide aptamers can specifically bind biomarkers on cancer cells and can be readily chemically modified with different functional molecules for personalized medicine. To target acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, we developed a single-strand DNA aptamer specific for the biomarker CD117, which is highly expressed on AML cells. Sequence alignment revealed that the aptamer contained a G-rich core region with a well-conserved functional G-quadruplex structure. Functional assays demonstrated that this synthetic aptamer was able to specifically precipitate CD117 proteins from cell lysates, selectively bound cultured and patient primary AML cells with high affinity (Kd < 5 nM), and was specifically internalized into CD117-expressing cells. For targeted AML treatment, aptamer-drug conjugates were fabricated by chemical synthesis of aptamer (Apt) with methotrexate (MTX), a central drug used in AML chemotherapy regimens. The formed Apt-MTX conjugates specifically inhibited AML cell growth, triggered cell apoptosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Importantly, Apt-MTX had little effect on CD117-negative cells under the same treatment conditions. Moreover, exposure of patient marrow specimens to Apt-MTX resulted in selective growth inhibition of primary AML cells and had no toxicity to off-target background normal marrow cells within the same specimens. These findings indicate the potential clinical value of Apt-MTX for targeted AML therapy with minimal to no side effects in patients, and also open an avenue to chemical synthesis of new, targeted biotherapeutics. PMID:26204224

  6. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    KUE, Chin Siang; TAN, Kae Yi; LAM, May Lynn; LEE, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD50) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD50 values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson’s correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r2=0.42 − 0.68, P<0.005–0.05) between the ideal LD50 values obtained using the CAM model with LD50 values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  7. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM): an alternative predictive model in acute toxicological studies for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kue, Chin Siang; Tan, Kae Yi; Lam, May Lynn; Lee, Hong Boon

    2015-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a preclinical model widely used for vascular and anti-vascular effects of therapeutic agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the suitability of CAM as a predictive model for acute toxicology studies of drugs by comparing it to conventional mouse and rat models for 10 FDA-approved anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, carmustine, camptothecin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cisplatin, aloin, mitomycin C, actinomycin-D, melphalan). Suitable formulations for intravenous administration were determined before the average of median lethal dose (LD50) and median survival dose (SD(50)) in the CAM were measured and calculated for these drugs. The resultant ideal LD(50) values were correlated to those reported in the literature using Pearson's correlation test for both intravenous and intraperitoneal routes of injection in rodents. Our results showed moderate correlations (r(2)=0.42 - 0.68, P<0.005-0.05) between the ideal LD(50) values obtained using the CAM model with LD(50) values from mice and rats models for both intravenous and intraperitoneal administrations, suggesting that the chick embryo may be a suitable alternative model for acute drug toxicity screening before embarking on full toxicological investigations in rodents in development of anticancer drugs. PMID:25736707

  8. Acute neuroactive drug exposures alter locomotor activity in larval zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA's prioritization of toxic chemicals, we are characterizing the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae after exposure to prototypic drugs that act on the central nervous system. MPTP (1-methyl-4phenyl- 1 ,2,3,6-...

  9. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care. PMID:21497111

  10. Prevalence and types of drug-resistant variants in Chinese patients with acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Su, Feifei; Dai, Jianyi; Yang, Shoufeng; Jiang, Xiangao; Cui, Xiaoya; Ning, Hongye; Li, Junhua; Huang, Mohe

    2015-09-01

    The presence of therapy-associated hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants is the main drawback of antiviral therapy for HBV infection. Moreover, drug-resistant variants are more insensitive to a second agent and more therapy-associated mutations will be present. To apply better nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) and reduce the occurrence of resistance, the prevalence and types of drug-resistant mutations in acute hepatitis B patients were investigated in this study. One hundred three HBV DNA-positive patients with symptomatic acute hepatitis B that were observed from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled. Direct polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used firstly to screen HBV reverse-transcriptase domain to detect HBV mutants. Five lamivudine-resistant variants were identified. Clonal sequencing was performed for 5 resistance-positive samples and 10 other random samples. Interestingly, all detected samples harbored drug-resistant mutations, although with different percentage. Thirteen harbored lamivudine-related alone (five) or together with other NA related mutations (five with adefovir, one with entecavir, and one with telbivudine), and two of them harbored adefovir-related mutations. Also, mutations associated with four currently used NA were all detected, and the frequency is in accordance with the popularity of NA used in clinical practice. These data suggest that drug-resistant variants are present in patients with acute hepatitis B and NA should be applied more carefully for chronic hepatitis B patients developed from acute hepatitis B.

  11. Drug-induced acute autoimmune hepatitis during combination therapy with atorvastatin and ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    van Heyningen, Charles

    2005-09-01

    A case is presented of a patient who developed acute hepatitis during cholesterol-lowering treatment with atorvastatin and ezetimibe. Further investigations reveal a probable drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis, and ezetimibe is considered to be the most likely causal agent. This case is the first report of an autoimmune hepatitis associated with ezetimibe therapy.

  12. Aspects of the relationship between drug dose and drug effect.

    PubMed

    Peper, Abraham

    2009-02-09

    It is generally assumed that there exists a well-defined relationship between drug dose and drug effect and that this can be expressed by a dose-response curve. This paper argues that there is no such clear relation and that the dose-response curve provides only limited information about the drug effect. It is demonstrated that tolerance development during the measurement of the dose-response curve may cause major distortion of the curve and it is argued that the curve may only be used to indicate the response to the first administration of a drug, before tolerance has developed. The precise effect of a drug on an individual depends on the dynamic relation between several variables, particularly the level of tolerance, the dose anticipated by the organism and the actual drug dose. Simulations with a previously published mathematical model of drug tolerance demonstrate that the effect of a dose smaller than the dose the organism has developed tolerance to is difficult to predict and may be opposite to the action of the usual dose.

  13. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca.

    PubMed

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8-13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30-50 and 50-100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca's chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  14. Acute Biphasic Effects of Ayahuasca

    PubMed Central

    Schenberg, Eduardo Ekman; Alexandre, João Felipe Morel; Filev, Renato; Cravo, Andre Mascioli; Sato, João Ricardo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Yonamine, Maurício; Waguespack, Marian; Lomnicka, Izabela; Barker, Steven A.; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Ritual use of ayahuasca, an amazonian Amerindian medicine turned sacrament in syncretic religions in Brazil, is rapidly growing around the world. Because of this internationalization, a comprehensive understanding of the pharmacological mechanisms of action of the brew and the neural correlates of the modified states of consciousness it induces is important. Employing a combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and quantification of ayahuasca's compounds and their metabolites in the systemic circulation we found ayahuasca to induce a biphasic effect in the brain. This effect was composed of reduced power in the alpha band (8–13 Hz) after 50 minutes from ingestion of the brew and increased slow- and fast-gamma power (30–50 and 50–100 Hz, respectively) between 75 and 125 minutes. Alpha power reductions were mostly located at left parieto-occipital cortex, slow-gamma power increase was observed at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal and right frontal cortices while fast-gamma increases were significant at left centro-parieto-occipital, left fronto-temporal, right frontal and right parieto-occipital cortices. These effects were significantly associated with circulating levels of ayahuasca’s chemical compounds, mostly N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine and some of their metabolites. An interpretation based on a cognitive and emotional framework relevant to the ritual use of ayahuasca, as well as it's potential therapeutic effects is offered. PMID:26421727

  15. The effects of heroin administration and drug cues on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jermaine D; Vadhan, Nehal P; Luba, Rachel R; Comer, Sandra D

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse. PMID:27062912

  16. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption. PMID:21186925

  17. Proteomic study of acute respiratory distress syndrome: current knowledge and implications for drug development.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Joseph E; Rogers, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common cause of acute respiratory failure, and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. Dozens of clinical trials targeting ARDS have failed, with no drug specifically targeting lung injury in widespread clinical use. Thus, the need for drug development in ARDS is great. Targeted proteomic studies in ARDS have identified many key pathways in the disease, including inflammation, epithelial injury, endothelial injury or activation, and disordered coagulation and repair. Recent studies reveal the potential for proteomic changes to identify novel subphenotypes of ARDS patients who may be most likely to respond to therapy and could thus be targeted for enrollment in clinical trials. Nontargeted studies of proteomics in ARDS are just beginning and have the potential to identify novel drug targets and key pathways in the disease. Proteomics will play an important role in phenotyping of patients and developing novel therapies for ARDS in the future. PMID:27031735

  18. A practical classification of untoward drug effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gysling, E.; Heisler, S.

    1975-01-01

    All drug effects can be explained as results of complex interactions between the drug, the patient and his condition, and additional extrinsic factors. On the basis of these three "determinants", a practical classification of untoward drug effects (UDE) is suggested. UDE lists using this classification would fulfill the physician's informational needs better than the material with which he is presently provided. PMID:1148971

  19. Neurodevelopmental effects of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2002-07-01

    Although the vast majority of children born to women with epilepsy are normal, these children are at increased risk for both anatomic and cognitive impairments. Current evidence suggests that the defects are the result of in utero antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure combined with a genetic predispositon. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be delineated. AED polytherapy increases the risk, but it remains uncertain if specific AEDs pose an overall greater threat. Most women with epilepsy cannot avoid AEDs during pregnancy because of the greater risks posed by seizures to the mother and fetus. Therefore, current recommendations emphasize definitive diagnosis and the use of AED monotherapy at the lowest effective dose if treatment is indicated. Prenatal folate and multivitamins should also be given routinely to women of childbearing age who require AED therapy. PMID:12044257

  20. Sentinel Surveillance of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance, Acute Infection and Recent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; McFarland, Willi; Louie, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Philip, Susan S.; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 acute infection, recent infection and transmitted drug resistance screening was integrated into voluntary HIV counseling and testing (VCT) services to enhance the existing surveillance program in San Francisco. This study describes newly-diagnosed HIV cases and characterizes correlates associated with infection. Methodology/Principal Findings A consecutive sample of persons presenting for HIV VCT at the municipal sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic from 2004 to 2006 (N = 9,868) were evaluated by standard enzyme-linked immunoassays (EIA). HIV antibody-positive specimens were characterized as recent infections using a less-sensitive EIA. HIV-RNA pooled testing was performed on HIV antibody-negative specimens to identify acute infections. HIV antibody-positive and acute infection specimens were evaluated for drug resistance by sequence analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate associations. The 380 newly-diagnosed HIV cases included 29 acute infections, 128 recent infections, and 47 drug-resistant cases, with no significant increases or decreases in prevalence over the three years studied. HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance prevalence was 11.0% in 2004, 13.4% in 2005 and 14.9% in 2006 (p = 0.36). Resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) was the most common pattern detected, present in 28 cases of resistance (59.6%). Among MSM, recent infection was associated with amphetamine use (AOR = 2.67; p<0.001), unprotected anal intercourse (AOR = 2.27; p<0.001), sex with a known HIV-infected partner (AOR = 1.64; p = 0.02), and history of gonorrhea (AOR = 1.62; p = 0.03). Conclusions New HIV diagnoses, recent infections, acute infections and transmitted drug resistance prevalence remained stable between 2004 and 2006. Resistance to NNRTI comprised more than half of the drug-resistant cases, a worrisome finding given its role as the backbone of first

  1. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  2. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Robin; Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form. PMID:27672457

  3. Acute Liver and Renal Failure: A Rare Adverse Effect Exclusive to Intravenous form of Amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Prerna; Suman, Saurav; Acharya, Saurav; Matta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug which is highly effective against a wide spectrum of ventricular tachyarrhythmias making it irreplaceable in certain group of patients. We report an unusual case of acute liver and renal failure within 24 hours of initiation of intravenous (IV) amiodarone which resolved after stopping the medication. The mechanism of acute liver and renal toxicity is not clearly known but is believed to be secondary to amiodarone induced (relative) hypotension, idiosyncratic reaction to the drug, and toxicity of the vector that carries the medication, polysorbate-80. In this case review, we discuss the hyperacute drug toxicity caused by IV amiodarone being a distinctly different entity compared to the adverse effects shown by oral amiodarone and support the suggestion that oral amiodarone can be safely administered even in patients who manifest acute hepatitis with the IV form.

  4. Acute effects of meals, noise and nightwork.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Miles, C

    1986-08-01

    An experimental study of the acute effects of meals, noise and nightwork showed that there was a post-meal impairment in detection of targets in a cognitive vigilance task. This was found both during the day and at night, although certain features of the results suggested that the day and night effects were not equivalent. Noise increased the number of false alarms but reduced the post-meal impairment in hit rate. Subjects with low levels of trait or state anxiety showed the greatest post-lunch impairments in performance, but this effect was reduced when the meal was eaten at night.

  5. Acute effects of tianeptine on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Hernández, Gerardo; Orozco, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Simon; Baez, Scarlet

    2006-03-01

    Tianeptine is a serotonin-uptake enhancer drug whose antidepressant effectiveness is based on its ability to reduce rather than increase serotonin availability at the synaptic cleft. This paradoxical neuropharmacological mechanism has raised doubt among neuropharmacologists and psychiatrists as to the role of tianeptine as a trusty-reliable antidepressant drug. This controversial issue led us to investigate the acute effects of a single, oral dose (12.5 mg) of this drug on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters in 50 healthy subjects. The drug provoked a striking and significant reduction of plasma noradrenaline (NA) and plasma serotonin (f-5-HT) while it increased plasma dopamine (DA) and platelet serotonin (p-5-HT) concentrations within the 4-h study period. No adrenaline (Ad) changes were registered. The NA/Ad ratio and the f-5-HT/p-5-HT ratio showed significant reduction throughout the test. Finally, although diastolic blood pressure (DBP) showed significant decrease, neither systolic blood pressure (SBP) nor heart rate (HR) showed significant change. These findings are consistent with the postulation that tianeptine reduces both neural sympathetic activity and parasympathetic activity without affecting adrenal sympathetic activity, enabling us to discuss the possible mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of tianeptine. The well-known fact that major depressed patients always show raised NA plus lower than normal p-5-HT levels, both disorders which are normalized by tianeptine, gives neurochemical support to the clinical improvement triggered by the drug in these patients. Summarizing, the results presented in this study demonstrate that tianeptine triggers significant reduction of circulating noradrenaline and plasma serotonin while increasing circulating dopamine and platelet serotonin. Other possible neuropharmacological effects are also discussed.

  6. Acute lumbosacral plexopathy from gluteal compartment syndrome after drug abuse: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Salacha, Andromachi; Tzanos, George

    2013-01-01

    Acute lumbosacral plexus injury from gluteal compartment syndrome is extremely rare. Physicians should be aware of this diagnosis when examining patients with altered mental status, prolonged immobilization, and gluteal muscle compression. This case report presents a patient with acute complete left lumbosacral plexus paralysis and acute renal failure after gluteal compartment syndrome secondary to prolonged immobilization from drug abuse. Clinical examination, imaging of the pelvis, renal function, creatine phosphokinase, and urine myoglobin were indicative of gluteal compartment syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. Electrodiagnostic studies showed complete limb paralysis. Medical treatment and rehabilitation was administered. Renal function recovered within the 1st week; function at the proximal muscles of the left lower limb improved within 6 months, with mild discomfort on sitting at the buttock, foot drop, and sensory deficits at the leg and dorsum of foot.

  7. [Acute tonsillopharyngitis: the effectiveness of topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Nosulya, E V; Kim, I A; Chernykh, N M; Karnoukhova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a furasol sore throat gargle solution for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis. Forty patients presenting with acute tonsillopharyngitis were allocated to two groups, 20 subjects in each, by means of independent sequential randomization. Prior to the onset of the treatment, all the patients were examined for determining the species composition of pharyngeal microflora with the use of an «AutoScan4 System» analyzer («Siemens», USA) and estimating the resistance to antibacterial preparations (by the disk diffusion method). All the participants of the study were prescribed antibacterial therapy. In the patients of group 1 (study group), the antibacterial treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis was supplemented by a furasol sore throat gargle solution whereas those of group 2 (controls) were treated without topical therapy. The quantitative evaluation of the severity of manifestations of the disease before and after the treatment was based on a 5-point visual-analog scale. It was shown that systemic antibacterial therapy resulted in the consistent decrease of the frequency of occurrence of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic microflora in the patients comprising both groups. Treatment with a furasol sore throat gargle solution did not lead to the appearance of bacterial species alien to the oropharynx, nor was it accompanied by the impairment of resistance of its mucous membrane to the colonization by microorganisms. The results of the study give evidence of the well apparent regression of the subjective signs of tonsillopharyngitis and the inflammatory changes in the mucous membrane of the pharynx in the patients given the topical treatment in the form of a furasol sore throat gargle solution in addition to antibacterial therapy. It is concluded that a furasol sore throat gargle solution can be recommended for the introduction into the combined treatment of the patients

  8. The Effects of Psychotropic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnardeaux, Jef-Louis

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on psychotropic drugs for individuals who are not specialists in pharmacology. Discusses: alcohol and barbituates; dependence and withdrawal; central nervous system depressors (anaesthetics, narcotic analgesics, sedatives and hypnotic drugs, tranquilizers), central nervous stimulants (amphetamines, cocaine, tobacco, caffeine),…

  9. Clinical Risk Factors for In-Hospital Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Acute Drug Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Stimmel, Barry; Vlahov, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It was recently demonstrated that adverse cardiovascular events (ACVE) complicate a high proportion of hospitalizations for patients with acute drug overdoses. The aim of this study was to derive independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdoses. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted over 3 years at two urban university hospitals. Patients were adults with acute drug overdoses enrolled from the ED. In-hospital ACVE was defined as any of myocardial injury, shock, ventricular dysrhythmia, or cardiac arrest. Results There were 1,562 patients meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria (mean age, 41.8 years; female, 46%; suicidal, 38%). ACVE occurred in 82 (5.7%) patients (myocardial injury, 61; shock, 37; dysrhythmia, 23; cardiac arrests, 22) and there were 18 (1.2%) deaths. On univariate analysis, ACVE risk increased with age, lower serum bicarbonate, prolonged QTc interval, prior cardiac disease, and altered mental status. In a multivariable model adjusting for these factors as well as patient sex and hospital site, independent predictors were: QTc > 500 msec (3.8% prevalence, odds ratio [OR] 27.6), bicarbonate < 20 mEql/L (5.4% prevalence, OR 4.4), and prior cardiac disease (7.1% prevalence, OR 9.5). The derived prediction rule had 51.6% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity, and 97.1% negative predictive value; while presence of two or more risk factors had 90.9% positive predictive value. Conclusions The authors derived independent clinical risk factors for ACVE in patients with acute drug overdose, which should be validated in future studies as a prediction rule in distinct patient populations and clinical settings. PMID:25903997

  10. Nanosizing of drugs: Effect on dissolution rate

    PubMed Central

    Dizaj, S. Maleki; Vazifehasl, Zh.; Salatin, S.; Adibkia, Kh.; Javadzadeh, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The solubility, bioavailability and dissolution rate of drugs are important parameters for achieving in vivo efficiency. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs depends on their ability to be absorbed via gastrointestinal tract. For drugs belonging to Class II of pharmaceutical classification, the absorption process is limited by drug dissolution rate in gastrointestinal media. Therefore, enhancement of the dissolution rate of these drugs will present improved bioavailability. So far several techniques such as physical and chemical modifications, changing in crystal habits, solid dispersion, complexation, solubilization and liquisolid method have been used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. It seems that improvement of the solubility properties ofpoorly water soluble drugscan translate to an increase in their bioavailability. Nowadays nanotechnology offers various approaches in the area of dissolution enhancement of low aqueous soluble drugs. Nanosizing of drugs in the form of nanoparticles, nanocrystals or nanosuspensions not requiring expensive facilities and equipment or complicated processes may be applied as simple methods to increase the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. In this article, we attempted to review the effects of nanosizing on improving the dissolution rate of poorly aqueous soluble drugs. According to the reviewed literature, by reduction of drug particle size into nanometer size the total effective surface area is increased and thereby dissolution rate would be enhanced. Additionally, reduction of particle size leads to reduction of the diffusion layer thickness surrounding the drug particles resulting in the increment of the concentration gradient. Each of these process leads to improved bioavailability. PMID:26487886

  11. Drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis: a case with elevated urinary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Subat-Dezulović, Mirna; Slavić, Irena; Rozmanić, Vojko; Persić, Mladen; Medjimurec, Branka; Sćukanec-Spoljar, Mira

    2002-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) has many different causes, but is most frequently caused by drugs. We report a 13-year-old vegetarian girl with drug-induced ATIN, confirmed by renal biopsy, and simultaneous occurrence of elevated urinary cadmium. Four weeks prior to admission she had been treated with antibiotics and acetaminophen for respiratory infection, and remaining febrile, was treated with different "home-made" herbal mixtures. She presented with acute non-oliguric renal failure, tubular dysfunction, and sterile pyuria, but without skin rash or edema. Laboratory data showed a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, normal white blood count with eosinophilia, and a serum creatinine of 245 micromol/l. Urinalysis was remarkable for glycosuria, tubular proteinuria, and elevated beta(2)-microglobulin and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase excretion. Immunoserological tests characteristic of acute glomerulonephritis and systemic diseases were negative. She was treated with steroids and her renal function improved. Follow-up analyses disclosed normal urinary cadmium and enzyme excretion within 6 months. Heavy metal analysis of herbal preparations that she had taken confirmed the presence of cadmium, but within approved concentrations. In conclusion, elevated urinary cadmium in the case of drug-induced ATIN may be assumed to be an accidental finding. However, consumption of different herbs containing cadmium and cadmium-induced nephro-toxicity could be the reason for such serious renal damage. PMID:12042900

  12. Amphiphilogels as drug carriers: effects of drug incorporation on the gel and on the active drug.

    PubMed

    Jibry, Nadeen; Sarwar, Tanzeem; Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2006-02-01

    Amphiphilogels (a subset of organogels) are being studied as drug carriers in our laboratories. In this paper, the effects of drug incorporation on the drugs and the gels are discussed. Amphiphilogels were prepared by heating a mixture of the gelator (sorbitan monostearate or sorbitan monopalmitate) and the liquid (e.g. Tweens or liquid Spans) to form a solution/dispersion, which was cooled to the gel state. Drugs were dissolved by heating a mixture of the drug and the gel and cooling the resulting solution. Hydrophilic gels (composed of hydrophilic Tweens as the liquid) were more effective solvents than hydrophobic ones (composed of hydrophobic Span 20 or 80 liquids). The latter's solvent capacity could, however, be increased by the inclusion of co-solvents, such as propylene glycol and ethanol. Drug incorporation at 10% w/w did not cause any detrimental changes in gel stability, while the drug's release rate was dependent on its concentration and on the nature of the gel's liquid component (which influences drug solubility), but not on gelator concentration or on the method of drug incorporation. This study shows the importance of the nature of the gels' liquid component and the possibility of using hydrophilic amphiphilogels as solvents for poorly water-soluble drugs.

  13. Psychoactive-drug response is affected by acute low-level microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various psychoactive drugs were studied in rats exposed for 45 min in a circularly polarized, pulsed microwave field (2450 MHz; SAR 0.6 W/kg; 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps). Apomorphine-induced hypothermia and stereotypy were enhanced by irradiation. Amphetamine-induced hyperthermia was attenuated while stereotypy was unaffected. Morphine-induced catalepsy and lethality were enhanced by irradiation at certain dosages of the drug. Since these drugs have different modes of action on central neural mechanisms and the effects of microwaves depend on the particular drug studied, these results show the complex nature of the effect of microwave irradiation on brain functions.

  14. Drug effects on male sexual function.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G

    1982-09-01

    The reproductive system is considered to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of drugs. Hypothalamic neurotransmitters are sensitive to drugs that alter their synthesis, release, or action; disruption of these pathways changes the levels or patterns of secretion of the pituitary gonadotropins. Drugs also exert direct action on the gonadal functions of androgen production and spermatogenesis. Drugs that decrease testosterone levels produce a multitude of effects on male reproduction. Neuropharmacologic agents that either inhibit central nervous system (CNS) activities (e.g., analgesics, anesthetics, sedatives, tranquilizers) or stimulate CNS activities (e.g., antidepressants, stimulants, hallucinogens) modify the hypothalamic-pituitary control of the gonadotropins and prolactin. The changes in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin result in changes in libido, impotence, inability to ejaculate, testicular swelling, and gynecomastia. Narcotic drugs exert their primary effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and their secondary effects on the gonads and sex accessory organs. Narcotics decrease gonadotropin secretion and stimulate prolactin secretion, both of which are inhibitory to male sexual function. With marijuana, the primary drug effect is at the level of the hypothalamus, with subsequent effects on gonadotropins and testosterone. Additional studies are needed on the association of marijuana with disruption of reproduction to resolve conflicing findings. The drugs most likely to affect suxual function are those that act on the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. Antihypertensive drugs are likely to interfere with autonomic transmission, resulting in impotence or failure of ejaculation. However, it is difficult to determine whether this increased incidence of impotence is entirely a drug side effect of a complication of blood pressure changes. Chemotherapeutic agents, especially anticancer drugs, can cause prolonged but

  15. A review of drug-induced acute angle closure glaucoma for non-ophthalmologists

    PubMed Central

    Ah-kee, Elliott Yann; Egong, Eric; Shafi, Ahad; Lim, Lik Thai; Yim, James Li

    2015-01-01

    Acute angle closure glaucoma is an ophthalmic emergency and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Several types of drugs have the potential to precipitate acute angle closure glaucoma. These include adrenergic, cholinergic and anticholinergic, antidepressants, anticoagulants and sulfa-based agents. This article provides a basic overview of the risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in angle closure glaucoma and focuses on drug-induced angle closure glaucoma for the non-ophthalmologist. A PubMed search limited to the English language was conducted to find relevant literature for the purpose of this article. Most attacks occur in subjects unaware that they are at risk due to innately narrow iridocorneal angles. Clinicians should always review medications in patients presenting with symptoms of acute angle closure glaucoma. The aim of this article is to bring this ophthalmic condition to the attention of clinicians, particularly those outside the field of ophthalmology who commonly prescribe these medications or see these patients prior to referring to ophthalmologists. PMID:26535174

  16. A review of drug-induced acute angle closure glaucoma for non-ophthalmologists.

    PubMed

    Ah-Kee, Elliott Yann; Egong, Eric; Shafi, Ahad; Lim, Lik Thai; Yim, James Li

    2015-01-01

    Acute angle closure glaucoma is an ophthalmic emergency and can lead to blindness if left untreated. Several types of drugs have the potential to precipitate acute angle closure glaucoma. These include adrenergic, cholinergic and anticholinergic, antidepressants, anticoagulants and sulfa-based agents. This article provides a basic overview of the risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in angle closure glaucoma and focuses on drug-induced angle closure glaucoma for the non-ophthalmologist. A PubMed search limited to the English language was conducted to find relevant literature for the purpose of this article. Most attacks occur in subjects unaware that they are at risk due to innately narrow iridocorneal angles. Clinicians should always review medications in patients presenting with symptoms of acute angle closure glaucoma. The aim of this article is to bring this ophthalmic condition to the attention of clinicians, particularly those outside the field of ophthalmology who commonly prescribe these medications or see these patients prior to referring to ophthalmologists.

  17. Acute toxic effects of fragrance products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Anderson, J H

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate whether fragrance products can produce acute toxic effects in mammals, we allowed groups of male Swiss-Webster mice to breathe the emissions of five commercial colognes or toilet water for 1 h. We used the ASTM-E-981 test method to evaluate sensory irritation and pulmonary irritation. We used a computerized version of this test to measure the duration of the break at the end of inspiration and the duration of the pause at the end of expiration. Decreases in expiratory flow velocity indicated airflow limitation. We subjected the mice to a functional observational battery to probe for changes in nervous system function. The emissions of these fragrance products caused various combinations of sensory irritation, pulmonary irritation, decreases in expiratory airflow velocity, as well as alterations of the functional observational battery indicative of neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity was more severe after mice were repeatedly exposed to the fragrance products. Evaluation of one of the test atmospheres with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed the presence of chemicals for which irritant and neurotoxic properties had been documented previously. In summary, some fragrance products emitted chemicals that caused a variety of acute toxicities in mice.

  18. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  19. The effects of burial on drug detection in skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Watterson, James H

    2010-07-01

    Skeletal tissues have recently been investigated for use in post-mortem toxicology. Variables affecting drug concentration in these tissues, however, are still poorly characterized. In this work, the relative effects of burial on the response of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assays were examined. Rats were acutely exposed to ketamine or diazepam, euthanized and buried outdoors. After one month, the remains were exhumed and skeletal tissue drug levels were compared those of non-buried rats. A climate-controlled burial was also undertaken using defleshed bones to approximate an extended decomposition. Long bones (femora, tibiae) were isolated and separated into tissue type (diaphyseal bone, epiphyseal bone, and marrow), and according to treatment (i.e. buried or non-buried). Following methanolic extraction (bone) or simple homogenization (marrow), samples were analyzed with ELISA. Samples were then pooled according to treatment, extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) and confirmed with GC-MS. Under the conditions examined, the effects of burial appear to be drug and tissue dependent. Ketamine-exposed tissues demonstrated the greatest differences, especially in bone marrow. In diazepam-exposed tissues, burial did not seem to greatly affect drug response and some gave greater assay response compared to the non-buried set. Overall, the data suggest that fresh tissue samples may not be representative of decomposed samples in terms of skeletal tissue drug levels.

  20. Teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Denise S; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Palacios, Ana M; Finnell, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have therapeutic applications that extend beyond epilepsy to include neuropathic pain, migraine headaches and psychiatric disorders. The risk of some AEDs has been clearly established, but for newer drugs, small sample sizes and polytherapy exposures preclude a conclusive determination of their teratogenic potential. Most women with epilepsy will require AED therapy throughout their entire pregnancy to control seizures; the vast majority of pregnancies in women with epilepsy have positive outcomes. A conservative estimate suggests that AED monotherapy doubles, and polytherapy triples, the risk for major congenital malformations. Furthermore, while evidence is still accruing, recent investigations suggest that exposure to select AEDs results in altered cognitive function later in development. There is no evidence to suggest that additional folic acid supplementation ameliorates the increased risk of congenital malformations conferred by in utero AED exposure. PMID:20518610

  1. Metabolic Network Prediction of Drug Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Itay; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Atias, Nir; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-03-23

    Drug side effects levy a massive cost on society through drug failures, morbidity, and mortality cases every year, and their early detection is critically important. Here, we describe the array of model-based phenotype predictors (AMPP), an approach that leverages medical informatics resources and a human genome-scale metabolic model (GSMM) to predict drug side effects. AMPP is substantially predictive (AUC > 0.7) for >70 drug side effects, including very serious ones such as interstitial nephritis and extrapyramidal disorders. We evaluate AMPP's predictive signal through cross-validation, comparison across multiple versions of a side effects database, and co-occurrence analysis of drug side effect associations in scientific abstracts (hypergeometric p value = 2.2e-40). AMPP outperforms a previous biochemical structure-based method in predicting metabolically based side effects (aggregate AUC = 0.65 versus 0.59). Importantly, AMPP enables the identification of key metabolic reactions and biomarkers that are predictive of specific side effects. Taken together, this work lays a foundation for future detection of metabolically grounded side effects during early stages of drug development. PMID:27135366

  2. Reference drug programs: effectiveness and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2007-04-01

    In the current economic environment, health care systems are constantly struggling to contain rapidly rising costs. Drug costs are targeted by a wide variety of measures. Many jurisdictions have implemented reference drug programs (RDPs) or similar therapeutic substitution programs. This paper summarizes the mechanism and rationale of RDPs and presents evidence of their economic effectiveness and clinical safety. RDPs for pharmaceutical reimbursement are based on the assumption that drugs within specified medication groups are therapeutically equivalent and clinically interchangeable and that a common reimbursement level can thus be established. If the evidence documents that a higher price for a given drug does not buy greater effectiveness or reduced toxicity, then under RDP such extra costs are not covered. RDPs or therapeutic substitutions based on therapeutic equivalence are seen as logical extensions of generic substitution that is based on bioequivalence of drugs. If the goal is to achieve full drug coverage for as many patients as possible in the most efficient manner, then RDPs in combination with prior authorization programs are safer and more effective than simplistic fiscal drug policies, including fixed co-payments, co-insurances, or deductibles. RDPs will reduce spending in the less innovative but largest market, while fully covering all patients. Prior authorization will ensure that patients with a specified indication will benefit from the most innovative therapies with full coverage. In practice, however, not all patients and drugs will fit exactly into one of the two categories. Therefore, a process of medically indicated exemptions that will consider full coverage should accompany an RDP. In the current economic environment, health care systems are constantly struggling to contain rapidly rising costs. Drug costs are targeted by a wide variety of measures. Many jurisdictions have implemented reference drug programs, and others are considering

  3. A challenge for diagnosing acute liver injury with concomitant/sequential exposure to multiple drugs: can causality assessment scales be utilized to identify the offending drug?

    PubMed

    Lim, Roxanne; Choudry, Hassan; Conner, Kim; Karnsakul, Wikrom

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hepatotoxicity most commonly manifests as an acute hepatitis syndrome and remains the leading cause of drug-induced death/mortality and the primary reason for withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. We report a case of acute liver injury in a 12-year-old Hispanic boy, who received a series of five antibiotics (amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, ampicillin/sulbactam, and clindamycin) for cervical lymphadenitis/retropharyngeal cellulitis. Histopathology of the liver biopsy specimen revealed acute cholestatic hepatitis. All known causes of acute liver injury were appropriately excluded and (only) drug-induced liver injury was left as a cause of his cholestasis. Liver-specific causality assessment scales such as Council for the International Organization of Medical Sciences/Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method scoring system (CIOMS/RUCAM), Maria and Victorino scale, and Digestive Disease Week-Japan were applied to seek the most likely offending drug. Although clindamycin is the most likely cause by clinical diagnosis, none of causality assessment scales aid in the diagnosis.

  4. Stromal cell-mediated mitochondrial redox adaptation regulates drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jizhong; Masurekar, Ashish; Johnson, Suzanne; Chakraborty, Sohini; Griffiths, John; Smith, Duncan; Alexander, Seema; Dempsey, Clare; Parker, Catriona; Harrison, Stephanie; Li, Yaoyong; Miller, Crispin; Di, Yujun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Krishnan, Shekhar; Saha, Vaskar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high cure rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), relapsed ALL remains a significant clinical problem. Genetic heterogeneity does not adequately explain variations in response to therapy. The chemoprotective tumor microenvironment may additionally contribute to disease recurrence. This study identifies metabolic reprogramming of leukemic cells by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as a putative mechanism of drug resistance. In a BMSC-extracellular matrix culture model, BMSC produced chemoprotective soluble factors and facilitated the emergence of a reversible multidrug resistant phenotype in ALL cells. BMSC environment induced a mitochondrial calcium influx leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in ALL cells. In response to this oxidative stress, drug resistant cells underwent a redox adaptation process, characterized by a decrease in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential with an upregulation of antioxidant production and MCL-1 expression. Similar expanded subpopulations of low ROS expressing and drug resistant cells were identified in pre-treatment bone marrow samples from ALL patients with slower response to therapy. This suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment induces a redox adaptation in ALL subclones that protects against cytotoxic stress and potentially gives rise to minimal residual disease. Targeting metabolic remodeling by inhibiting antioxidant production and antiapoptosis was able to overcome drug resistance. Thus metabolic plasticity in leukemic cell response to environmental factors contributes to chemoresistance and disease recurrence. Adjunctive strategies targeting such processes have the potential to overcome therapeutic failure in ALL. PMID:26474278

  5. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect.

    PubMed

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W; McGeary, John E; Monti, Peter M; Rohsenow, Damaris J

    2011-02-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marijuana on physiological and subjective stimulation, subjective intoxication, and self-reported negative and positive affect with 114 weekly marijuana smokers. Individuals were first tested under a baseline/no smoking condition and again under experimental condition. Relative to placebo, THC significantly increased arousal and confusion/bewilderment. However, the direction of effect on anxiety varied depending on instructional set: Anxiety increased after THC for those told placebo but decreased among other participants. Furthermore, marijuana users who expected more impairment from marijuana displayed more anxiety after smoking active marijuana, whereas those who did not expect the impairment became less anxious after marijuana. Both pharmacologic and stimulus expectancy main effects significantly increased positive affect. Frequent marijuana users were less anxious after smoking as compared to less frequent smokers. These findings show that expectancy instructions and pharmacology play independent roles in effects of marijuana on negative affect. Further studies examining how other individual difference factors impact marijuana's effects on mood are needed.

  6. Acute Effects of Marijuana Smoking on Negative and Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Metrik, Jane; Kahler, Christopher W.; McGeary, John E.; Monti, Peter M.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2013-01-01

    Human studies and animal experiments present a complex and often contradictory picture of the acute impact of marijuana on emotions. The few human studies specifically examining changes in negative affect find either increases or reductions following delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration. In a 2 × 2, instructional set (told THC vs. told no THC) by drug administration (smoked marijuana with 2.8% THC vs. placebo) between-subjects design, we examined the pharmacologic effect of marijuana on physiological and subjective stimulation, subjective intoxication, and self-reported negative and positive affect with 114 weekly marijuana smokers. Individuals were first tested under a baseline/no smoking condition and again under experimental condition. Relative to placebo, THC significantly increased arousal and confusion/bewilderment. However, the direction of effect on anxiety varied depending on instructional set: Anxiety increased after THC for those told placebo but decreased among other participants. Furthermore, marijuana users who expected more impairment from marijuana displayed more anxiety after smoking active marijuana, whereas those who did not expect the impairment became less anxious after marijuana. Both pharmacologic and stimulus expectancy main effects significantly increased positive affect. Frequent marijuana users were less anxious after smoking as compared to less frequent smokers. These findings show that expectancy instructions and pharmacology play independent roles in effects of marijuana on negative affect. Further studies examining how other individual difference factors impact marijuana's effects on mood are needed. PMID:24319318

  7. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  8. Traumeel – an emerging option to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of acute musculoskeletal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are on the rise. First-line management of such injuries usually employs the RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) approach to limit excessive inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also commonly used to limit inflammation and to control pain. Traumeel®, a preparation with bioregulatory effects is also used to treat the symptoms associated with acute musculoskeletal injuries, including pain and swelling. Traumeel is a fixed combination of biological and mineral extracts, which aims to apply stimuli to multiple targets to restore normal functioning of regulatory mechanisms. This paper presents the accumulating evidence of Traumeel’s action on the inflammatory process, and of its efficacy and tolerability in randomized trials, as well as observational and surveillance studies for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Traumeel has shown comparable effectiveness to NSAIDs in terms of reducing symptoms of inflammation, accelerating recovery, and improving mobility, with a favorable safety profile. While continued research and development is ongoing to broaden the clinical evidence of Traumeel in acute musculoskeletal injury and to further establish its benefits, current information suggests that Traumeel may be considered as an anti-inflammatory agent that is at least as effective and appears to be better tolerated than NSAIDs. PMID:21556350

  9. The acute extracellular flux (XF) assay to assess compound effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruolan; Novick, Steven J; Mangum, James B; Queen, Kennedy; Ferrick, David A; Rogers, George W; Stimmel, Julie B

    2015-03-01

    Numerous investigations have linked mitochondrial dysfunction to adverse health outcomes and drug-induced toxicity. The pharmaceutical industry is challenged with identifying mitochondrial liabilities earlier in drug development and thereby reducing late-stage attrition. Consequently, there is a demand for reliable, higher-throughput screening methods for assessing the impact of drug candidates on mitochondrial function. The extracellular flux (XF) assay described here is a plate-based method in which galactose-conditioned HepG2 cells were acutely exposed to test compounds, then real-time changes in the oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate were simultaneously measured using a Seahorse Bioscience XF-96 analyzer. The acute XF assay was validated using marketed drugs known to modulate mitochondrial function, and data analysis was automated using a spline curve fitting model developed at GlaxoSmithKline. We demonstrate that the acute XF assay is a robust, sensitive screening platform for evaluating drug-induced effects on mitochondrial activity in whole cells.

  10. Profiles of Serum Cytokines in Acute Drug-Induced Liver Injury and Their Prognostic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Parsons, Judith C.; Chalasani, Naga; Fontana, Robert J.; Watkins, Paul B.; Lee, William M.; Reddy, K. Rajender; Stolz, Andrew; Talwalkar, Jayant; Davern, Timothy; Saha, Dhanonjoy; Bell, Lauren N.; Barnhart, Huiman; Gu, Jiezhun; Serrano, Jose; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the United-States. The aim of the study was to describe serum immune profiles associated with acute DILI, to investigate whether there are profiles associated with clinical features or types of DILI and/or with prognosis, and to assess temporal changes in levels. Twenty-seven immune analytes were measured in the sera of 78 DILI subjects in the Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) and compared with 40 healthy controls. Immune analytes (14 cytokines, 7 chemokines and 6 growth factors) were measured by BioPlex multiplex ELISA at DILI onset and after 6 months. A modeling process utilizing immune principles was used to select a final set of variables among 27 immune analytes and several additional clinical lab values for prediction of early death (within 6 months of DILI onset). Nineteen of the 27 immune analytes were differentially expressed among healthy control, DILI onset and 6-month cohorts. Disparate patterns of immune responses, especially innate and adaptive cellular (mostly TH17) immunity were evident. Low values of four immune analytes (IL-9, IL-17, PDGF-bb and RANTES) and serum albumin are predictive of early death [PPV = 88% (95% CI, 65%-100%), NPV = 97% (95% CI, 93%-100%), accuracy = 96% (95% CI, 92%-100%)]. Conclusions Acute DILI is associated with robust and varying immune responses. High levels of expression of cytokines associated with innate immunity are associated with a poor prognosis, whereas high levels of expression of adaptive cytokines are associated with good long-term prognosis and eventual recovery. Serum immune analyte profiles at DILI onset appear to be of prognostic, and perhaps, diagnostic significance. PMID:24386086

  11. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  12. Adverse Effects of Common Drugs: Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Felix, Todd Matthew; Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Lewis, Peter R

    2015-09-01

    Dietary supplement-induced adverse effects often resolve quickly after discontinuation of the offending product, especially in younger patients. The potential for unwanted outcomes can be amplified in elderly patients or those taking multiple prescription drugs, especially where interactions exist with drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes. Attributing injury or illness to a specific supplement can be challenging, especially in light of multi-ingredient products, product variability, and variability in reporting, as well as the vast underreporting of adverse drug reactions. Clinicians prescribing a new drug or evaluating a patient with a new symptom complex should inquire about use of herbal and dietary supplements as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Clinicians should report suspected supplement-related adverse effects to the local or state health department, as well as the Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program (available at https://www.safetyreporting.hhs.gov). Clinicians should consider discussing suspected adverse effects involving drugs, herbal products, or dietary supplements with their community- and hospital-based pharmacists, and explore patient management options with medical or clinical toxicology subspecialists.

  13. Acute toxic and genotoxic activities of widely used cytostatic drugs in higher plants: Possible impact on the environment.

    PubMed

    Mišík, Miroslav; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard; Filipic, Metka; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2014-11-01

    Cytostatic drugs are highly toxic pharmaceuticals and it was repeatedly postulated that they may cause adverse effects in ecosystems. The acute toxic and genotoxic properties of these drugs have not been adequately investigated in higher plants so far; therefore, we studied the most widely used drugs (5-flurouracil, 5FU; etoposide, Et; cisplatin, CisPt; carboplatin, CaPt; vincristine sulfate, VinS and cyclophosphamide monohydrate, CP) in micronucleus (MN) assays with meiotic pollen tetrad cells of Tradescantia and with root cells from Allium cepa. MNi are formed as a consequence of chromosome breaks and aneuploidy. We monitored also the acute toxic properties of the drugs, i.e. inhibition of cell division (mitotic indices and retardation of root growth) in the latter species. All compounds caused in both indicator plants genotoxic effects. The order of genotoxic potencies expressed as NOELs in µM was CisPt (0.1)≥ Et (0.5)>CP (1.0)>CaPt (10)>5FU (30)>VinS (100) in Tradescantia. A similar order was seen in Allium MN but Et was less active (5.0µM). Four compounds caused alterations of the mitotic indices under the present conditions namely CisPt (0.5), Et (10.0), 5FU (10.0) and VinS (100). Inhibition of root growth decreased in the order CisPt (0.5)>Et (1.0)≥VinS (1.0)>5FU (5.0)>CaPt (33.0)>CP (>1000). Comparisons of the NOELs with the predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) show that the latter values are at least 5 orders of magnitude lower and indicate that it is unlikely that their release in the environment may cause adverse effects in higher plants. However, it is notable that the levels of both platinum compounds and of 5FU in hospital effluents may reach levels which may induce damage of the genetic material.

  14. The nocebo effect of drugs.

    PubMed

    Planès, Sara; Villier, Céline; Mallaret, Michel

    2016-04-01

    While the placebo effect has been studied for a long time, much less is known about its negative counterpart, named the nocebo effect. However, it may be of particular importance because of its impact on the treatment outcomes and public health. We conducted a review on the nocebo effect using PubMed and other databases up to July 2014. The nocebo effect refers by definition to the induction or the worsening of symptoms induced by sham or active therapies. Examples are numerous and concerns both clinical trials and daily practice. The underlying mechanisms are, on one hand, psychological (conditioning and negative expectations) and, on the other hand, neurobiological (role of cholecystokinin, endogenous opioids and dopamine). Nocebo effects can modulate the outcome of a given therapy in a negative way, as do placebo effects in a positive way. The verbal and nonverbal communications of physicians contain numerous unintentional negative suggestions that may trigger a nocebo response. This raises the important issue of how physicians can at the same time obtain informed consent and minimize nocebo-related risks. Every physician has to deal with this apparent contradiction between primum non nocere and to deliver truthful information about risks. Meticulous identification of patients at risk, information techniques such as positive framing, contextualized informed consent, and even noninformation, is valuable.

  15. Antidepressant Effects of Mallotus oppositifolius in Acute Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Kukuia, Kennedy K. E.; Mante, Priscilla K.; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Adongo, Donatus W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Mallotus oppositifolius (MOE), a plant used for CNS conditions in Ghana, was investigated for acute antidepressant effects in the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). Results. In both FST and TST, MOE (10, 30, and 100 mg kg−1) significantly decreased immobility periods and frequencies. A 3-day pretreatment with 200 mg kg−1, i.p., para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, reversed the decline in immobility and the increase of swimming score induced by MOE in the modified FST. Pretreatment with reserpine alone (1 mg kg−1), α-methyldopa alone (400 mg kg−1, i.p.), or a combination of both drugs failed to reverse the decline in immobility or the increase in swimming score caused by the extract in the modified FST. The extract potentiated the frequency of head twitch responses induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine. Pretreatment with d-serine (600 mg kg−1, i.p.), glycine/NMDA agonist, abolished the behavioural effects of MOE while d-cycloserine (2.5 mg kg−1, i.p.), a glycine/NMDA partial agonist, potentiated it in both TST and modified FST. Conclusion. The extract exhibited antidepressant effects in mice which is mediated by enhancement of serotoninergic neurotransmission and inhibition of glycine/NMDA receptor activation. PMID:25045543

  16. Arrhythmogenic effects of illicit drugs in athletes.

    PubMed

    Furlanello, Francesco; Bentivegna, Stefano; Cappato, Riccardo; De Ambroggi, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are among the most important causes of non-eligibility to sports activities, and may be due to different causes (cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, coronary abnormalities, valvular diseases, primary electrical disorders, abuse of illicit drugs). The list of illicit drugs banned by the International Olympic Committee and yearly updated by the World Anti-Doping Agency includes the following classes: stimulants, narcotics, anabolic agents (androgenic steroids and others such as beta-2 stimulants), peptide hormones, mimetics and analogues, diuretics, agents with an antiestrogenic activity, masking agents. Almost all illicit drugs may cause, through a direct or indirect arrhythmogenic effect, in the short, medium or long term, a wide range of cardiac arrhythmias (focal or reentry type, supraventricular and/or ventricular), lethal or not, even in healthy subjects with no previous history of cardiac diseases. Therefore, given the widespread abuse of illicit drugs among athletes, in the management of arrhythmic athletes the cardiologist should always take into consideration the possibility that the arrhythmias be due to the assumption of illicit drugs (sometimes more than one type), especially if no signs of cardiac diseases are present. On the other hand, in the presence of latent underlying arrhythmogenic heart disease including some inherited cardiomyopathies at risk of sudden cardiac death, illicit drugs could induce severe cardiac arrhythmic effects.

  17. The antidepressant effects of anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2009-06-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that is important for communication between neurons and muscle, is involved in direct neurotransmission in the autonomic parasympathetic nervous system, and has been implicated in cognitive processing, arousal, and attention in the brain. The cholinergic-adrenergic hypothesis of mood disorders states that a given affective state might represent a balance between central cholinergic and adrenergic neurotransmitter activity in those areas of the brain regulating moods. According to this hypothesis, depression would be the clinical manifestation of a state of cholinergic dominance, whereas mania would reflect adrenergic dominance. On the basis of this hypothesis, anticholinergic drugs have been investigated as potential treatments for depression, but study results have not shown consistent antidepressant effects. However, the dosage dependency of scopolamine's effect across different studies and the lack of antidepressant effects with other anticholinergic drugs suggest that a specific muscarinic receptor subtype might be most relevant to the potential antidepressant mechanism of action of anticholinergic drugs.

  18. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  19. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer M.; Moynihan, James R.; Mott, Bryan T.; Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Anders, Nicole M.; Brown, Patrick A.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Liu, Jun O.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens. PMID:26771236

  20. Behavioral economic analysis of stress effects on acute motivation for alcohol.

    PubMed

    Owens, Max M; Ray, Lara A; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    Due to issues of definition and measurement, the heavy emphasis on subjective craving in the measurement of acute motivation for alcohol and other drugs remains controversial. Behavioral economic approaches have increasingly been applied to better understand acute drug motivation, particularly using demand curve modeling via purchase tasks to characterize the perceived reinforcing value of the drug. This approach has focused on using putatively more objective indices of motivation, such as units of consumption, monetary expenditure, and price sensitivity. To extend this line of research, the current study used an alcohol purchase task to determine if, compared to a neutral induction, a personalized stress induction would increase alcohol demand in a sample of heavy drinkers. The stress induction significantly increased multiple measures of the reinforcing value of alcohol to the individual, including consumption at zero price (intensity), the maximum total amount of money spent on alcohol (Omax), the first price where consumption was reduced to zero (breakpoint), and the general responsiveness of consumption to increases in price (elasticity). These measures correlated only modestly with craving and mood. Self-reported income was largely unrelated to demand but moderated the influence of stress on Omax. Moderation based on CRH-BP genotype (rs10055255) was present for Omax, with T allele homozygotes exhibiting more pronounced increases in response to stress. These results provide further support for a behavioral economic approach to measuring acute drug motivation. The findings also highlight the potential relevance of income and genetic factors in understanding state effects on the perceived reinforcing value of alcohol.

  1. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  2. Drug-Like Property Profiling of Novel Neuroprotective Compounds to Treat Acute Ischemic Stroke: Guidelines to Develop Pleiotropic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of novel neuroprotective compounds to treat acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been problematic and quite complicated, since many candidates that have been tested clinically lacked significant pleiotropic activity, were unable to effectively cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), had poor bioavailability or were toxic. Moreover, the compounds did not confer significant neuroprotection or clinical efficacy measured using standard behavioral endpoints, when studied in clinical trials in a heterogeneous population of stroke patients. To circumvent some of the drug development problems describe above, we have used a rational funnel approach to identify and develop promising candidates. Using a step-wise approach, we have identified a series of compounds based upon two different neuroprotection assays. We have then taken the candidates and determined their “drug-like” properties. This guidelines article details in vitro screening assays used to show pleiotropic activity of a series of novel compounds; including enhanced neuroprotective activity compared to the parent compound fisetin. Moreover, for preliminary drug de-risking or risk reduction during development, we used compound assessment in the CeeTox assay, ADME toxicity using the AMES test for genotoxicity and interaction with Cytochrome P450 using CYP450 inhibition analysis against a spectrum of CYP450 enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) as a measure of drug interaction. Moreover, the compounds have been studied using a transfected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell assay to assess blood brain barrier penetration (BBB). Using this series of assays, we have identified 4 novel molecules to be developed as an AIS treatment. PMID:23687519

  3. Comparative placebo-controlled polysomnographic and psychometric studies on the acute effects of gabapentin versus ropinirole in restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saletu, Michael; Anderer, Peter; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda Maria; Parapatics, Silvia; Gruber, Georg; Nia, Saba; Saletu, Bernd

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present placebo-controlled sleep laboratory study was to compare the acute effects of gabapentin (GBT) and ropinirole (ROP) in restless legs syndrome (RLS). In a parallel-group design, 40 RLS patients received 300 mg GBT and another 40 patients 0.5 mg ROP as compared with placebo. Polysomnographic and psychometric measures were obtained in three sleep laboratory nights (screening/placebo/drug). Statistics included a Wilcoxon test for differences between drug and placebo and a U test for inter-group differences. Sleep efficiency and latency were found significantly improved after GBT, while they remained unchanged after ROP, with significant inter-drug differences. Sleep architecture showed oppositional changes after the two drugs: While GBT decreased S1, increased slow-wave sleep and SREM and shortened REM latency, ROP increased S2, decreased slow-wave sleep and SREM and increased REM latency. Periodic leg movements (PLM) showed a significantly greater decrease after ROP (-73%) than after GBT (-35%). Subjective sleep quality improved significantly only after GBT; mental performance improved after both drugs with no inter-drug differences. In conclusion, the dopamine agonist ROP showed acute therapeutic efficacy with regard to PLM measures only, whereas GBT had a less pronounced effect on these measures, but improved objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality as compared with both placebo and ROP. Differential acute drug effects may serve as prognostic indicators of therapeutic response of individual patients.

  4. PPARα mediates acute effects of palmitoylethanolamide on sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Xiong, Yee; Coicou, Lia G.; Piomelli, Daniele; Seybold, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The amplitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient is larger in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from tumor-bearing mice compared to that of neurons from naive mice, and the change is mimicked by co-culturing DRG neurons with the fibrosarcoma cells used to generate the tumors (Khasabova et al., 2007). The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a ligand for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα), was determined on the evoked-Ca2+ transient in the co-culture condition. The level of PEA was reduced in DRG cells from tumor-bearing mice as well as those co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. Pretreatment with PEA, a synthetic PPARα agonist (GW7647), or ARN077, an inhibitor of the enzyme that hydrolyses PEA, acutely decreased the amplitude of the evoked Ca2+ transient in small DRG neurons co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. The PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocked the effect of each. In contrast, the PPARα agonist was without effect in the control condition, but the antagonist increased the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient suggesting that PPARα receptors are saturated by endogenous ligand under basal conditions. Effects of drugs on mechanical sensitivity in vivo paralleled their effects on DRG neurons in vitro. Local injection of ARN077 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in tumor-bearing mice, and the effect was blocked by GW6471. These data support the conclusion that the activity of DRG neurons is rapidly modulated by PEA through a PPARα-dependent mechanism. Moreover, agents that increase the activity of PPARα may provide a therapeutic strategy to reduce tumor-evoked pain. PMID:22972997

  5. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy for Sustained Ventricular Arrhythmias Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Pieper, Karen S.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; White, Harvey D.; Van de Werf, Frans; Ardissino, Diego; Califf, Robert M.; Granger, Christopher B.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Alexander, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few data exist to guide antiarrhythmic drug therapy for sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) after acute myocardial infarction (MI). The objective of this analysis was to describe survival of patients with sustained VT/VF post-MI according to antiarrhythmic drug treatment. Design & Setting We conducted a retrospective analysis of ST-segment elevation MI patients with sustained VT/VF in GUSTO IIB and III and compared all-cause death in patients receiving amiodarone, lidocaine, or no antiarrhythmic. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling and inverse weighted estimators to adjust for baseline characteristics, beta-blocker use, and propensity to receive antiarrhythmics. Due to non-proportional hazards for death in early follow-up (0–3 hours after sustained VT/VF) compared with later follow-up (>3 hours), we analyzed all-cause mortality using time-specific hazards. Patients & Interventions Among 19,190 acute MI patients, 1126 (5.9%) developed sustained VT/VF and met the inclusion criteria. Patients received lidocaine (n=664, 59.0%), amiodarone (n=50, 4.4%), both (n=110, 9.8%), or no antiarrhythmic (n=302, 26.8%). Results In the first 3 hours after VT/VF, amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.39, 95% CI 0.21–0.71) and lidocaine (adjusted HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.53–0.96) were associated with a lower hazard of death—likely evidence of survivor bias. Among patients who survived 3 hours, amiodarone was associated with increased mortality at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02–2.86) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.21–3.16) but lidocaine was not at 30 days (adjusted HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.77–1.82) and 6 months (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.73–1.66). Conclusion Among patients with acute MI complicated by sustained VT/VF who survive 3 hours, amiodarone, but not lidocaine, is associated with an increased risk of death; reinforcing the need for randomized trials in this population. PMID:20959785

  6. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Due to Labetalol; Drug Fever and Leukocytosis Caused by Tigecycline; Toxic Hepatitis Induced by Methylprednisolone Intravenous Pulse Dosing; Mitoxantrone-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw; Medications with Anticholinergic Effects and Their Implications in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Mancano, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Med Watch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to Med Watch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA's Med Watch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA Med Watch partner. PMID:27354743

  7. Acute Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity after Drug Holiday: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed; Saad, Marwan; Ayan, Mohamed; Kabach, Amjad; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Arouni, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone is reported to cause a wide continuum of serious clinical effects. It is often challenging to detect Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). Typically, the diagnosis is made based on the clinical settings and may be supported by histopathology results, if available. We describe a 57-year-old patient who developed severe rapidly progressive respiratory failure secondary to AIPT with acute bilateral infiltrates and nodular opacities on chest imaging. Interestingly, Amiodarone was discontinued 3 weeks prior to his presentation. He had normal cardiac filling pressures confirmed by echocardiography. To our knowledge, this is the first case of isolated acute lung injury induced by Amiodarone, three weeks after therapy cessation, with adequate clinical improvement after supportive management and high dose steroid therapy. PMID:26075108

  8. Effects of antiepileptic drugs in electrophysiological tests.

    PubMed

    Rump, S; Kowalczyk, M

    1987-01-01

    Methods of the study of antiepileptic drugs activity by means of analysis of their effects on bioelectrical ictal phenomena in the animal brain are described. The paper deals especially with EEG signal processing methods. Application of various nonparametric models (e.g. interval-amplitude scatter plots, power spectra analysis) as well as parametric models (e.g. autoregressive model, segmentation analysis) is discussed. A discriminative approach to some of these methods (especially to autoregressive model) is also presented. Special attention is stressed on the value of these methods for the study of anticonvulsant drugs activity.

  9. An Integrated Analysis of Heterogeneous Drug Responses in Acute Myeloid Leukemia That Enables the Discovery of Predictive Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihsu C; Yuan, Julie S; Xing, Yan; Mitchell, Amanda; Mbong, Nathan; Popescu, Andreea C; McLeod, Jessica; Gerhard, Gitte; Kennedy, James A; Bogdanoski, Goce; Lauriault, Stevan; Perdu, Sofie; Merkulova, Yulia; Minden, Mark D; Hogge, Donna E; Guidos, Cynthia; Dick, John E; Wang, Jean C Y

    2016-03-01

    Many promising new cancer drugs proceed through preclinical testing and early-phase trials only to fail in late-stage clinical testing. Thus, improved models that better predict survival outcomes and enable the development of biomarkers are needed to identify patients most likely to respond to and benefit from therapy. Here, we describe a comprehensive approach in which we incorporated biobanking, xenografting, and multiplexed phospho-flow (PF) cytometric profiling to study drug response and identify predictive biomarkers in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. To test the efficacy of our approach, we evaluated the investigational JAK2 inhibitor fedratinib (FED) in 64 patient samples. FED robustly reduced leukemia in mouse xenograft models in 59% of cases and was also effective in limiting the protumorigenic activity of leukemia stem cells as shown by serial transplantation assays. In parallel, PF profiling identified FED-mediated reduction in phospho-STAT5 (pSTAT5) levels as a predictive biomarker of in vivo drug response with high specificity (92%) and strong positive predictive value (93%). Unexpectedly, another JAK inhibitor, ruxolitinib (RUX), was ineffective in 8 of 10 FED-responsive samples. Notably, this outcome could be predicted by the status of pSTAT5 signaling, which was unaffected by RUX treatment. Consistent with this observed discrepancy, PF analysis revealed that FED exerted its effects through multiple JAK2-independent mechanisms. Collectively, this work establishes an integrated approach for testing novel anticancer agents that captures the inherent variability of response caused by disease heterogeneity and in parallel, facilitates the identification of predictive biomarkers that can help stratify patients into appropriate clinical trials. PMID:26833125

  10. Effective management of acute deep vein thrombosis: direct oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Roussin, A

    2015-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and accounts for most venous thromboembolic events. Although DVT is not directly life-threatening, thrombi in the proximal veins of the leg can embolize to the lungs to form a pulmonary embolism, which may prove rapidly fatal. If untreated, DVT can also lead to significant morbidity, including development of post-thrombotic syndrome. Among many risk factors, surgery, hospitalization, older age and active cancer increase the risk of VTE, and a previous event increases the risk of recurrence. Early detection and effective clot resolution are vital in managing DVT. Conventional approaches to acute treatment of VTE involve initial fast-acting parenteral heparin overlapping with and followed by vitamin K antagonist therapy. However, vitamin K antagonists have a narrow therapeutic window, require regular monitoring, and have multiple food and drug interactions. Results from phase III clinical studies involving direct Factor Xa and IIa inhibitors suggest that these agents provide an alternative therapeutic option that overcomes some of the complications associated with conventional treatment with predictable pharmacological properties and convenient dosing schedules. Analysis of data from the rivaroxaban EINSTEIN studies also suggests that these agents have the potential to improve patient-reported treatment satisfaction and reduce the length of hospital stay compared with conventional therapy. This review considers these treatment options, suitable treatment durations to prevent recurrence, and the management of DVT treatment in challenging patient groups. PMID:24927023

  11. Incretin-based drugs and risk of acute pancreatitis: A nested-case control study within a healthcare database.

    PubMed

    Soranna, Davide; Bosetti, Cristina; Casula, Manuela; Tragni, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Vecchia, Carlo L A; Merlino, Luca; Corrao, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    To assess the association between use of incretin-based drugs for diabetes mellitus and the occurrence of acute pancreatitis. A population-based, nested case-control study was performed within a cohort of 166,591 patients from the Lombardy region (Italy) aged 40 years or older who were newly treated with oral antihyperglycaemic agents between 2004 and 2007. Cases were 666 patients who experienced acute pancreatitis from April 1, 2008 until December 31, 2012. For each case patient, up to 20 controls were randomly selected from the cohort and matched on gender, age at cohort entry, and date of index prescription. Conditional logistic regression was used to model the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days before hospitalization, after adjustment for several risk factors, including the use of other antihyperglycaemic agents. Sensitivity analyses were performed in order to account for possible sources of systematic uncertainty. Use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days was reported by 17 (2.6%) cases of acute pancreatitis versus 193 (1.5%) controls. The corresponding multivariate odds ratio was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.99). Slightly lower and no significant excess risks were observed by shortening (15 days) and increasing (60 and 90 days) the time-window at risk. This study supports a possible increased risk of acute pancreatitis in relation to use of incretin-based drugs reported in a few previous studies. However, given the potential for bias and the inconsistency with other studies, additional investigations are needed to clarify the safety of incretin-based-drugs. PMID:25748827

  12. Incretin-based drugs and risk of acute pancreatitis: A nested-case control study within a healthcare database.

    PubMed

    Soranna, Davide; Bosetti, Cristina; Casula, Manuela; Tragni, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Vecchia, Carlo L A; Merlino, Luca; Corrao, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    To assess the association between use of incretin-based drugs for diabetes mellitus and the occurrence of acute pancreatitis. A population-based, nested case-control study was performed within a cohort of 166,591 patients from the Lombardy region (Italy) aged 40 years or older who were newly treated with oral antihyperglycaemic agents between 2004 and 2007. Cases were 666 patients who experienced acute pancreatitis from April 1, 2008 until December 31, 2012. For each case patient, up to 20 controls were randomly selected from the cohort and matched on gender, age at cohort entry, and date of index prescription. Conditional logistic regression was used to model the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days before hospitalization, after adjustment for several risk factors, including the use of other antihyperglycaemic agents. Sensitivity analyses were performed in order to account for possible sources of systematic uncertainty. Use of incretin-based drugs within 30 days was reported by 17 (2.6%) cases of acute pancreatitis versus 193 (1.5%) controls. The corresponding multivariate odds ratio was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.99). Slightly lower and no significant excess risks were observed by shortening (15 days) and increasing (60 and 90 days) the time-window at risk. This study supports a possible increased risk of acute pancreatitis in relation to use of incretin-based drugs reported in a few previous studies. However, given the potential for bias and the inconsistency with other studies, additional investigations are needed to clarify the safety of incretin-based-drugs.

  13. Side Effects of Side Effects Information in Drug Information Leaflets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maat, H. Pander; Klaassen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study in which drug information leaflets given to patients were improved in two ways, first by adding a short introductory paragraph on the nature of side effects generally, and second by adjusting frequency descriptors to more accurately reflect pretesting of the drug. Explains that participants in the study were less likely to…

  14. Nitisinone: new drug. Type 1 tyrosinemia: an effective drug.

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    (1) Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia is a rare disease due to an enzyme deficiency. It is associated with life-threatening liver disorders, starting during the very first months of life. If left untreated (other than with a diet low in tyrosine and phenylalanine), most patients die during childhood. Liver transplantation is currently the only treatment to have an effect on survival. (2) Nitisinone is the first drug to be approved in Europe for the treatment of type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia. (3) An international non comparative trial included 207 patients treated with nitisinone in addition to a diet low in tyrosine and phenylalanine. Children treated before the age of 6 months had a far better four-year survival rate than patients treated previously with dietary measures alone (94% versus 60%). The difference was even greater in the subgroups treated before the age of two months (88% versus 29%). When disease onset occurred after the age of 6 months, the ten-year survival rate was about 85% with nitisinone, compared to 60% with dietary measures alone. Only one patient had a neurological crisis during nitisinone therapy. Early nitisinone treatment also reduced the incidence of liver transplantation (13%, compared to 25% with dietary measures alone). (4) Nitisinone seems to have few adverse effects, mainly consisting of thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, cutaneous disorders, and various visual disorders (most of which resolve spontaneously). There may also be a risk of seizures. (5) In practice, nitisinone seems to provide a major benefit for children with type 1 tyrosinemia, provided they are diagnosed and treated during the first 6 months of life. Adverse effects appear to be acceptable but need to be monitored.

  15. Effect of acute and chronic cholinesterase inhibition on biogenic amines in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Soininen, H; Unni, L; Shillcutt, S

    1990-12-01

    The effects of five cholinesterase inhibitors on forebrain monoamine and their metabolite levels, and on forebrain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity in rat were studied in acute and chronic conditions. Acute tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) dosing caused lower brain (68%) and higher plasma (90%) ChE inhibition than the other drugs studied and increased levels of brain dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) (236%), homovanillic acid (HVA) (197%) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) (130%). Acute physostigmine (PHY) administration caused a 215% increase in brain DOPAC content. Despite high brain ChE inhibition induced by metrifonate (MTF), dichlorvos (DDVP) or naled no changes in brain noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) occurred due to treatment with the study drugs in the acute study. In the chronic 10-day study THA or PHY caused no substantial ChE inhibition in brain when measured 18 hours after the last dose, whereas MTF induced 74% ChE inhibition. Long-term treatment with THA or MTF caused no changes in monoamine levels, but PHY treatment resulted in slightly increased 5-HT values. These results suggest that MTF, DDVP and naled seem to act solely by cholinergic mechanisms. However, the central neuropharmacological mechanism of action of THA and PHY may involve changes in cholinergic as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems. PMID:1711162

  16. Resolution of norfloxacin-induced acute liver failure after N-acetylcysteine therapy: further support for the use of NAC in drug-induced ALF?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Timothy Ross; Symes, Tiffany; Kannourakis, George; Angus, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Liver injury due to idiosyncratic drug reactions can be difficult to diagnose and may lead to acute liver failure (ALF), which has a high mortality rate. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is effective treatment for paracetamol toxicity, but its role in non-paracetamol drug-induced ALF is controversial. We report on the use of a validated bedside tool to establish causality for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and describe the first case of resolution of norfloxacin-induced ALF after NAC therapy. NAC is easy to administer and generally has a good safety profile. We discuss the evidence to support the use of NAC in ALF secondary to DILI and possibilities for further clinical research in this field. PMID:26740270

  17. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Wu, Wen-Tien; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Ing-Ho; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT) was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT). The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the elevation of hepatic

  18. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Wu, Wen-Tien; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Ing-Ho; Wang, Jen-Hung; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT) was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT) and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT). The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the elevation of hepatic

  19. Acute effects of ethanol or d-amphetamine on the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish in a microtiter plate format.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. We are assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that are known to act on the central ...

  20. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Changes of pathological and physiological indicators affecting drug metabolism in rats after acute exposure to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    LI, WENBIN; WANG, RONG; XIE, HUA; ZHANG, JUANHONG; JIA, ZHENGPING

    2015-01-01

    High altitude environments cause the human body to undergo a series of pathological, physiological and biochemical changes, which have a certain effect on drug pharmacokinetics. The objective of the present study was to observe changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in rats following acute exposure to high altitude and return to low altitude. A total of 21 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups. The rats in group A were maintained at low altitude in Shanghai, 55 m above sea level; those in group B were acutely exposed to high altitude in Maqu, Gansu, 4,010 m above sea level; and those in group C were acutely exposed to high altitude and then returned to low altitude. Blood was collected from the orbit for the analysis of significant biochemical indicators and from the abdominal aorta for blood gas analysis. Brain, lung and kidney tissues were removed to observe pathological changes. In group B, the pH, buffer base (BB), base excess (BE), total carbon dioxide content (ctCO2), oxygen saturation of arterial blood (sO2), oxygen tension of arterial blood (pO2), serum sodium (Na+) concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and total protein (TP) level were significantly reduced, and the carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood (pCO2), serum chloride (Cl−) concentration, serum total bilirubin (TBIL) level and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were significantly increased compared with those in group A (P<0.05). In group C, the pH, BB, BE, sO2, pO2, hemoglobin (Hb) level, serum Na+ concentration, LDH activity and TP level were significantly reduced, and the pCO2, serum Cl− concentration, alanine transaminase activity, TBIL and urea levels were significantly increased (P<0.05) compared with those in group A. The Hb and ALP levels in group C were significantly lower than those in group B (P<0.05); and the TP, TBIL and urea levels in group C were significantly higher than those in group B (P<0.05). Pathological observation revealed that

  2. A European pharmaceutical company initiative challenging the regulatory requirement for acute toxicity studies in pharmaceutical drug development.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally; Delongeas, Jean-Luc; Donald, Elizabeth; Dreher, David; Festag, Matthias; Kervyn, Sophie; Lampo, Ann; Nahas, Kamil; Nogues, Vicente; Ockert, Deborah; Quinn, Kirsty; Old, Sally; Pickersgill, Nigel; Somers, Kev; Stark, Claudia; Stei, Peter; Waterson, Lynne; Chapman, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    Regulatory guidelines indicate acute toxicity studies in animals are considered necessary for pharmaceuticals intended for human use. This is the only study type where lethality is mentioned as an endpoint. The studies are carried out, usually in rodents, to support marketing of new drugs and to identify the minimum lethal dose. A European initiative including 18 companies has undertaken an evidence-based review of acute toxicity studies and assessed the value of the data generated. Preclinical and clinical information was shared on 74 compounds. The analysis indicated acute toxicity data was not used to (i) terminate drugs from development (ii) support dose selection for repeat dose studies in animals or (iii) to set doses in the first clinical trials in humans. The conclusion of the working group is that acute toxicity studies are not needed prior to first clinical trials in humans. Instead, information can be obtained from other studies, which are performed at more relevant doses for humans and are already an integral part of drug development. The conclusions have been discussed and agreed with representatives of regulatory bodies from the US, Japan and Europe.

  3. Characteristics and clinical outcome of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ya-Li; Tian, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen-Ge; Cheng, Dan-Ying; Yang, Yan-Fang; Gao, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathological characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code for acute kidney injury (AKI) (584.5 or 584.9) and for acute liver injury (ALI) (570.0 or 573.3) from January 2004 to December 2013. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AKI and ALI and to quantify NSAID administration. RESULTS: Seven of 59 patients (11.8%) were identified with acute hepato-nephrotoxicity induced by NSAIDs. Five patients (71.4%) received over the recommended NSAIDs dose. Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere AKI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), a high prevalence of alcohol use (71.4%) and positive hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers (85.7%). Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere ALI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), increased extracellular volume depletion (71.4%), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor combined use (57.1%). Acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubulointerstitial disease were apparent in three out of six (42.9%) kidney biopsy patients, respectively. Acute hepatitis was found in four out of six (66.7%) liver biopsy patients. Overall complete recovery occurred in four patients within a mean of 118.25 ± 55.42 d. CONCLUSION: The injury typically occurred after an overdose of NSAIDs. The risk factors include age older than 60 years, alcohol use, positive HBV markers, extracellular volume depletion and RAAS inhibitor combined use. PMID:25320533

  4. [Endocrinologic adverse effects of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Elenitza, Irene María

    2005-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs affect the regulatory mechanisms of different neuroendocrine axis. This chapter reviews the interactions between psychotropic drugs and prolactin, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Hyperprolactinemia can cause galactorrhea, amenorrhea, sexual disfunction, impaired spermatogenesis and increased risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Atypical antipsychotics cause less hyperprolactinemia than conventional antipsychotics. Lithium has important effects on thyroid function. During lithium treatment, affectively ill patients show, in varying degrees and combinations, reduced levels of thyroid hormones and clinical evidence of subclinical hypothyroidism, overt hypothyroidism and goiter. Recent literature reports suggest that valproic acid, may be associated with polycistic ovarian syndrome. Until additional data is available, women starting valproate therapy should be warned about the possibility of endocrinology side effects.

  5. Effects of drugs on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, E; Gosselink, R; Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    1999-08-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC), the process in which airway mucus together with substances trapped within are moved out of the lungs, is an important defence mechanism of the human body. Drugs may alter this process, such that it is necessary to know the effect of the drugs on MCC. Indeed, agents stimulating MCC may be used therapeutically in respiratory medicine, especially in patients suspected of having an impairment of their mucociliary transport system. In contrast, caution should be taken with drugs depressing MCC as an undesired side-effect, independently of their therapeutic indication. Since cough clearance (CC) serves as a back-up system when MCC fails, the influence of drugs must be examined not only on MCC but also on CC. Ultimately, the clinical repercussions of alterations in mucus transport induced by drug administration must be studied. Tertiary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), aspirin, anaesthetic agents and benzodiazepines have been shown to be capable of depressing the mucociliary transport system. Cholinergics, methylxanthines, sodium cromoglycate, hypertonic saline, saline as well as water aerosol have been shown to increase MCC. Adrenergic antagonists, guaifenesin, S-carboxymethylcysteine, sodium 2-mercapto-ethane sulphonate and frusemide have been reported not to alter the mucociliary transport significantly. Amiloride, uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), quaternary ammonium compounds (anticholinergics), adrenergic agonists, corticosteroids, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase), N-acetylcysteine, bromhexine and ambroxol have been reported either not to change or to augment MCC. Indirect data suggest that surfactant as well as antibiotics may improve the mucociliary transport system. As for the influence of drugs on CC, amiloride and rhDNase have been demonstrated to increase the effectiveness of cough. A trend towards an improved CC was noted after treatment with adrenergic agonists. The anticholinergic agent ipratropium bromide, which

  6. Effects of an acute seizure on associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Holley, Andrew J; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed adult 129SvEvTac mice to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1h, but not 6h, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared with controls 24h later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1h after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open-field test 2h but not 24h later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge.

  7. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-03-02

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption.

  8. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption. PMID:26990265

  9. Adverse skeletal effects of drugs - beyond Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Grey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures are an important public health problem with significant individual and societal costs. In addition to the major risk factors for osteoporotic fracture, low bone mineral density (BMD), age, low body weight and history of fracture or falls, some drugs are now considered to be important secondary risk factor for bone loss and fracture, particularly amongst predisposed individuals. Currently available data are often generated from small observational clinical studies, making risk assessment and development of management guidelines difficult. In many cases, the exposed population has a low baseline risk for fracture and additional assessment and treatment may not be necessary. In this review, we focus on drugs other than glucocorticoids identified as potentially causing adverse skeletal effects, summarizing the existing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies, and suggest recommendations for patient management. PMID:25039381

  10. [Experience using antihypoxic drugs in the treatment of acute neurosensory hearing loss in children with meningitis].

    PubMed

    Ryndina, A M; Lin'kov, V I; Dadiomova, M A; Buriakova, A V

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes beneficial affects of the therapy of neurosensory hypoacusia that complicated such neuroinfectious diseases as meningococcemia, meningococcic meningitis and meningitides of other etiology using traditional drugs (ATP, aloe, B and C vitamins) in combination with the antihypoxic agent gutimine and its analog. Positive effects were recorded in 17 (81%) out of 21 children. It is indicated that the agent shows higher efficacy when used within the first weeks after the onset of the disease. PMID:2728172

  11. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water).

  12. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water). PMID:26590695

  13. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  14. Acute marijuana effects on response-reinforcer relations under multiple variable-interval schedules.

    PubMed

    Lane, S D; Cherek, D R; Pietras, C J; Tcheremissine, O V

    2004-07-01

    Acute marijuana administration may alter response-reinforcer relationships via a change in reinforcer efficacy, but may also impair coordination and motor function. One approach to evaluating drug effects on both motor function and reinforcer efficacy involves fitting the matching law equation to data obtained under multiple variable interval (VI) schedules. The present report describes an experiment that examined the effects of acute marijuana on response properties using this approach. Six human subjects responded under a multiple VI schedule for monetary reinforcers after smoking placebo and two active doses of marijuana. The low marijuana dose produced unsystematic changes in responding. As measured by the matching law equation parameters (k and rB), at the high dose five subjects showed a decrease-motor-related properties of response rate and four subjects' responding indicated a decrease in reinforcer efficacy. These data raise the possibility that, at high doses, marijuana administration alters both motor function and reinforcer efficacy.

  15. Low dose acute alcohol effects on GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Hanchar, H. Jacob; Olsen, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and have long been implicated in mediating at least part of the acute actions of ethanol. For example, ethanol and GABAergic drugs including barbiturates and benzodiazepines share many pharmacological properties. Besides the prototypical synaptic GABAAR subtypes, nonsynaptic GABAARs have recently emerged as important regulators of neuronal excitability. While high doses (≥100 mM) of ethanol have been reported to enhance activity of most GABAAR subtypes, most abundant synaptic GABAARs are essentially insensitive to ethanol concentrations that occur during social ethanol consumption (<30 mM). However, extrasynaptic δ and β3 subunit-containing GABAARs, associated in the brain with α4or α6 subunits, are sensitive to low millimolar ethanol concentrations, as produced by drinking half a glass of wine. Additionally, we found that a mutation in the cerebellar α6 subunit (α6R100Q), initially reported in rats selectively bred for increased alcohol sensitivity, is sufficient to produce increased alcohol-induced motor impairment and further increases of alcohol sensitivity in recombinant α6β3δ receptors. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 blocks the low dose alcohol enhancement on α4/6/β3δ receptors, without reducing GABA-induced currents. In binding assays α4β3δ GABAARs bind [3H] Ro15-4513 with high affinity, and this binding is inhibited, in an apparently competitive fashion, by low ethanol concentrations, as well as analogs of Ro15-4513 that are active to antagonize ethanol or Ro15-4513’s block of ethanol. We conclude that most low to moderate dose alcohol effects are mediated by alcohol actions on alcohol/Ro15-4513 binding sites on GABAAR subtypes. PMID:16814864

  16. Neonatal Adaptation Issues After Maternal Exposure to Prescription Drugs: Withdrawal Syndromes and Residual Pharmacological Effects.

    PubMed

    Convertino, Irma; Sansone, Alice Capogrosso; Marino, Alessandra; Galiulo, Maria T; Mantarro, Stefania; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Tuccori, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to drugs during pregnancy has the potential to harm offspring. Teratogenic effects are the most feared adverse outcomes in newborns; however, a wide spectrum of less known, usually reversible and often acute, neonatal adverse events can also occur due to drug intake by mothers during pregnancy, particularly in close proximity to delivery. This narrative review is aimed at the description of drugs and drug classes for which licit maternal use in the predelivery period has been associated with neonatal non-teratogenic disorders. For each drug class, epidemiology, clinical features, biological mechanism and management of these adverse reactions have been discussed in detail. Although these adverse reactions have been described mainly for substances used illicitly for recreational purposes, several prescription drugs have also been involved; these include mainly psychotropic medications such as opioids, antidepressants, antiepileptics and antipsychotics. These effects can be partly explained by withdrawal syndromes (defined also as 'neonatal abstinence syndrome') caused by the delivery-related discontinuation of the drug disposition from the mother to the fetus, with symptoms that may include feeding disorders, tremors, irritability, hypotonia/hypertonia, vomiting and persistent crying, occurring a few hours to 1 month after delivery. Otherwise, neonatal neurological and behavioral effects can also be caused by a residual pharmacological effect due to an accumulation of the drug in the blood and tissues of the newborn, with various symptoms related to the toxic effects of the specific drug class, usually developing a few hours after birth. With few exceptions, validated protocols for the assessment and management of withdrawal or residual pharmacological effects of these drugs in neonates are often lacking or incomplete. Spontaneous reporting of these adverse reactions seems limited, although it might represent a useful tool for improving our knowledge about

  17. Adverse immunologic effects of antithyroid drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S S; Fantus, I G

    1987-01-01

    Propylthiouracil and methimazole are frequently used in the management of hyperthyroidism. Two patients in whom adverse immunologic effects other than isolated agranulocytosis developed during treatment with propylthiouracil are described. A review of the literature revealed 53 similar cases over a 35-year period. Rash, fever, arthralgias and granulocytopenia were the most common manifestations. Vasculitis, particularly with cutaneous manifestations, occurs and may be fatal. The clinical evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism is involved. A number of different autoantibodies were reported, but antinuclear antibodies were infrequent, and none of the cases met the criteria for a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Thus, the reactions do not represent a true drug-induced lupus syndrome. Current hypotheses and experimental data regarding the cause of the reactions are reviewed. No specific clinical subgroup at high risk can be identified, and manifestations may occur at any dosage and at any time during therapy. Cross-reactivity between the two antithyroid drugs can be expected. Except for minor symptoms (e.g., mild arthralgias or transient rash), such reactions are an indication for withdrawal of the drug and the use of alternative methods to control the hyperthyroidism. In rare cases of severe vasculitis a short course of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy may be helpful. PMID:3539299

  18. The Effects of Social Contact on Drug Use: Behavioral Mechanisms Controlling Drug Intake

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Justin C.; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The social environment plays a critical role in determining the likelihood that an individual will use drugs or will develop a drug use disorder. Recent evidence obtained from preclinical studies reveals that proximal social factors (i.e., those factors that are immediately present at the time of drug exposure) exert a particularly strong influence on both drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. These studies are advancing our understanding of the role of the social environment in drug use by showing that the rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs depend on (1) whether other individuals are immediately present and (2) whether those individuals are also using drugs. Furthermore, the preclinical literature examining the role of social learning in behavior maintained by nondrug reinforcers reveals a number of behavioral mechanisms by which social contact may influence drug use, as well as potential ways the social environment may be modified to prevent or reduce drug use. Additional research is needed to determine potential age and sex differences in the effects of social contact on drug use, to determine the generality of the current findings across different pharmacological classes of drugs, and to determine the role of social contact on drug intake during different transitional stages of drug use disorders; however, enough evidence now exists to begin implementing social interventions in clinical and at-risk populations. PMID:24188170

  19. Effects of diabetes drugs on the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Meier, Christian; Schwartz, Ann V; Egger, Andrea; Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased fracture risk and the mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of diabetes on skeletal health are only partially understood. Antidiabetic drugs are indispensable for glycemic control in most type 2 diabetics, however, they may, at least in part, modulate fracture risk in exposed patients. Preclinical and clinical data clearly demonstrate an unfavorable effect of thiazolidinediones on the skeleton with impaired osteoblast function and activated osteoclastogenesis. The negative effect of thiazolidinediones on osteoblastogenesis includes decreased activity of osteoblast-specific transcription factors (e.g. Runx2, Dlx5, osterix) and decreased activity of osteoblast-specific signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt, TGF-β/BMP, IGF-1). In contrast, metformin has a positive effect on osteoblast differentiation due to increased activity of Runx2 via the AMPK/USF-1/SHP regulatory cascade resulting in a neutral or potentially protective effect on bone. Recently marketed antidiabetic drugs include incretin-based therapies (GLP-1 receptor agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors) and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2)-inhibitors. Preclinical studies indicate that incretins (GIP, GLP-1, and GLP-2) play an important role in the regulation of bone turnover. Clinical safety data are limited, however, meta-analyses of trials investigating the glycemic-lowering effect of both, GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP4-inhibitors, suggest a neutral effect of incretin-based therapies on fracture risk. For SGLT2-inhibitors recent data indicate that due to their mode of action they may alter calcium and phosphate homeostasis (secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by increased phosphate reabsorption) and thereby potentially affect bone mass and fracture risk. Clinical studies are needed to elucidate the effect of SGLT2-inhibitors on bone metabolism. Meanwhile SGLT2-inhibitors should be used with caution in patients with high fracture risk, which is specifically true

  20. Acute oxidant damage promoted on cancer cells by amitriptyline in comparison with some common chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio; Bautista-Ferrufino, María Rosa; Carmona-López, María Inés; Illanes, Matilde; Ríos, María José; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Alcudia, Ana; Navas, Plácido; de Miguel, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative therapy is a relatively new anticancer strategy based on the induction of high levels of oxidative stress, achieved by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or by depleting the protective antioxidant machinery of tumor cells. We focused our investigations on the antitumoral potential of amitriptyline in three human tumor cell lines: H460 (lung cancer), HeLa (cervical cancer), and HepG2 (hepatoma); comparing the cytotoxic effect of amitriptyline with three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs: camptothecin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate. We evaluated apoptosis, ROS production, mitochondrial mass and activity, and antioxidant defenses of tumor cells. Our results show that amitriptyline produces the highest cellular damage, inducing high levels of ROS followed by irreversible serious mitochondrial damage. Interestingly, an unexpected decrease in antioxidant machinery was observed only for amitriptyline. In conclusion, based on the capacity of generating ROS and inhibiting antioxidants in tumor cells, amitriptyline emerges as a promising new drug to be tested for anticancer therapy.

  1. Acute neuropsychological effects of MDMA and ethanol (co-)administration in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wezenberg, E.; Valkenberg, M. M. G. J.; de Jong, C. A. J.; Buitelaar, J. K.; van Gerven, J. M. A.; Verkes, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale In Western societies, a considerable percentage of young people expose themselves to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or “ecstasy”). Commonly, ecstasy is used in combination with other substances, in particular alcohol (ethanol). MDMA induces both arousing as well as hallucinogenic effects, whereas ethanol is a general central nervous system depressant. Objective The aim of the present study is to assess the acute effects of single and co-administration of MDMA and ethanol on executive, memory, psychomotor, visuomotor, visuospatial and attention function, as well as on subjective experience. Materials and methods We performed a four-way, double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled study in 16 healthy volunteers (nine male, seven female) between the ages of 18–29. MDMA was given orally (100 mg) and blood alcohol concentration was maintained at 0.6‰ by an ethanol infusion regime. Results Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol was well tolerated and did not show greater impairment of performance compared to the single-drug conditions. Impaired memory function was consistently observed after all drug conditions, whereas impairment of psychomotor function and attention was less consistent across drug conditions. Conclusions Co-administration of MDMA and ethanol did not exacerbate the effects of either drug alone. Although the impairment of performance by all drug conditions was relatively moderate, all induced significant impairment of cognitive function. PMID:18305926

  2. The multinational drug companies in Zaire: their adverse effect on cost and availability of essential drugs.

    PubMed

    Glucksberg, H; Singer, J

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the types and costs of drugs imported by seven multinational pharmaceutical companies in Zaire, an underdeveloped country in Africa, reveals that three-fourths of the drugs consisted of expensive and nonessential items. The prices of essential drugs (24 percent of their total imports) were much higher than those of available generic sources (average difference of 300 percent). The importation of nonessential drugs and high prices paid for essential drugs exacerbate the scarcity of needed items because of Zaire's limited supply of hard currency. In addition, two drug firms imported and promoted the sale of aminopyrone-dipyrone analgesic-antipyretics, drugs now rarely used in Western industrialized countries because of potentially fatal complications. Thus, in Zaire, the multinational pharmaceutical industry has an adverse effect on the availability and cost of drugs, as well as on the pattern of drug usage.

  3. Drug Court Effectiveness: A Matched Cohort Study in the Dane County Drug Treatment Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Randall

    2011-01-01

    Drug treatment courts (DTCs) are widely viewed as effective diversion programs for drug-involved offenders; however, previous studies frequently used flawed comparison groups. In the current study, the author compared rates of recidivism for drug court participants to rates for a traditionally adjudicated comparison group matched on potentially…

  4. Dynamic enhancement of drug product labels to support drug safety, efficacy, and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-date or incomplete drug product labeling information may increase the risk of otherwise preventable adverse drug events. In recognition of these concerns, the United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA) requires drug product labels to include specific information. Unfortunately, several studies have found that drug product labeling fails to keep current with the scientific literature. We present a novel approach to addressing this issue. The primary goal of this novel approach is to better meet the information needs of persons who consult the drug product label for information on a drug’s efficacy, effectiveness, and safety. Using FDA product label regulations as a guide, the approach links drug claims present in drug information sources available on the Semantic Web with specific product label sections. Here we report on pilot work that establishes the baseline performance characteristics of a proof-of-concept system implementing the novel approach. Claims from three drug information sources were linked to the Clinical Studies, Drug Interactions, and Clinical Pharmacology sections of the labels for drug products that contain one of 29 psychotropic drugs. The resulting Linked Data set maps 409 efficacy/effectiveness study results, 784 drug-drug interactions, and 112 metabolic pathway assertions derived from three clinically-oriented drug information sources (ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Drug File – Reference Terminology, and the Drug Interaction Knowledge Base) to the sections of 1,102 product labels. Proof-of-concept web pages were created for all 1,102 drug product labels that demonstrate one possible approach to presenting information that dynamically enhances drug product labeling. We found that approximately one in five efficacy/effectiveness claims were relevant to the Clinical Studies section of a psychotropic drug product, with most relevant claims providing new information. We also identified several cases where all of the drug-drug

  5. Systemic vascular effects of acute electrical baroreflex stimulation.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Steven; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Belenkie, Israel; Tyberg, John V

    2014-07-15

    We intended to determine if acute baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) increases venous capacitance and aortic conductance. BAT is effective in resistant hypertension, but its effect on the systemic vasculature is poorly understood. Left ventricular (LV) and aortic pressures and subdiaphragmatic aortic and caval flows (ultrasonic) were measured in six anesthetized dogs. Changes in abdominal blood volume (Vabdominal) were estimated as the integrated difference in abdominal aortic inflow and caval outflow. An electrode was implanted on the right carotid sinus. Data were measured during control and BAT. Next, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was infused and BAT was subsequently added. Finally, angiotensin II (ANG II) was infused, and three increased BAT currents were added. We found that BAT decreased mean aortic pressure (PAo) by 22.5 ± 1.3 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased aortic conductance by 16.2 ± 4.9% (P < 0.01) and Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01). SNP decreased PAo by 17.4 ± 0.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) and increased Vabdominal at a rate of 2.2 ± 0.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.05). During the SNP infusion, BAT decreased PAo further, by 26.0 ± 2.1 mmHg (P < 0.001). ANG II increased PAo by 40.4 ± 3.5 mmHg (P = 0.001). When an increased BAT current was added, PAo decreased to baseline (P < 0.01) while aortic conductance increased from 62.3 ± 5.2% to 80.2 ± 3.3% (P < 0.05) of control. Vabdominal increased at a rate of 1.8 ± 0.9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (P < 0.01), reversing the ANG II effects. In conclusion, BAT increases arterial conductance, decreases PAo, and increases venous capacitance even in the presence of powerful vasoactive drugs. Increasing venous capacitance may be an important effect of BAT in hypertension. PMID:24816258

  6. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Kabbani, Ahmad A; Chhabra, Akansha

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals. PMID:26170677

  7. Thyroid receptor β involvement in the effects of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Connor, David A; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite adverse health effects. Nicotine's effects on learning may contribute to addiction by enhancing drug-context associations. Effects of nicotine on learning could be direct or could occur by altering systems that modulate cognition. Because thyroid signaling can alter cognition and nicotine/smoking may change thyroid function, nicotine could affect learning through changes in thyroid signaling. These studies investigate the functional contributions of thyroid receptor (TR) subtypes β and α1 to nicotine-enhanced learning and characterize the effects of acute nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels. We conducted a high throughput screen of transcription factor activity to identify novel targets that may contribute to the effects of nicotine on learning. Based on these results, which showed that combined nicotine and learning uniquely acted to increase TR activation, we identified TRs as potential targets of nicotine. Further analyses were conducted to determine the individual and combined effects of nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels, but no changes were seen. Next, to determine the role of TRβ and TRα1 in the effects of nicotine on learning, mice lacking the TRβ or TRα1 gene and wildtype littermates were administered acute nicotine prior to fear conditioning. Nicotine enhanced contextual fear conditioning in TRα1 knockout mice and wildtypes from both lines but TRβ knockout mice did not show nicotine-enhanced learning. This finding supports involvement of TRβ signaling in the effect of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory. Acute nicotine enhances learning and these effects may involve processes regulated by the transcription factor TRβ. PMID:25666034

  8. Thyroid Receptor β Involvement in the Effects of Acute Nicotine on Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Prescott T.; Kenney, Justin W.; Connor, David; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is common despite adverse health effects. Nicotine’s effects on learning may contribute to addiction by enhancing drug-context associations. Effects of nicotine on learning could be direct or could occur by altering systems that modulate cognition. Because thyroid signaling can alter cognition and nicotine/smoking may change thyroid function, nicotine could affect learning through changes in thyroid signaling. These studies investigate the functional contributions of thyroid receptor (TR) subtypes β and α1 to nicotine-enhanced learning and characterize the effects of acute nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels. We conducted a high throughput screen of transcription factor activity to identify novel targets that may contribute to the effects of nicotine on learning. Based on these results, which showed that combined nicotine and learning uniquely acted to increase TR activation, we identified TRs as potential targets of nicotine. Further analyses were conducted to determine the individual and combined effects of nicotine and learning on thyroid hormone levels, but no changes were seen. Next, to determine the role of TRβ and TRα1 in the effects of nicotine on learning, mice lacking the TRβ or TRα1 gene and wildtype littermates were administered acute nicotine prior to fear conditioning. Nicotine enhanced contextual fear conditioning in TRα1 knockout mice and wildtypes from both lines but TRβ knockout mice did not show nicotine-enhanced learning. This finding supports involvement of TRβ signaling in the effect of acute nicotine on hippocampus-dependent memory. Acute nicotine enhances learning and these effects may involve processes regulated by the transcription factor TRβ. PMID:25666034

  9. Effects of Acute Exercise on Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labban, Jeffrey D.; Etnier, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of…

  10. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  11. Behavioral economic analysis of stress effects on acute motivation for alcohol.

    PubMed

    Owens, Max M; Ray, Lara A; MacKillop, James

    2015-01-01

    Due to issues of definition and measurement, the heavy emphasis on subjective craving in the measurement of acute motivation for alcohol and other drugs remains controversial. Behavioral economic approaches have increasingly been applied to better understand acute drug motivation, particularly using demand curve modeling via purchase tasks to characterize the perceived reinforcing value of the drug. This approach has focused on using putatively more objective indices of motivation, such as units of consumption, monetary expenditure, and price sensitivity. To extend this line of research, the current study used an alcohol purchase task to determine if, compared to a neutral induction, a personalized stress induction would increase alcohol demand in a sample of heavy drinkers. The stress induction significantly increased multiple measures of the reinforcing value of alcohol to the individual, including consumption at zero price (intensity), the maximum total amount of money spent on alcohol (Omax), the first price where consumption was reduced to zero (breakpoint), and the general responsiveness of consumption to increases in price (elasticity). These measures correlated only modestly with craving and mood. Self-reported income was largely unrelated to demand but moderated the influence of stress on Omax. Moderation based on CRH-BP genotype (rs10055255) was present for Omax, with T allele homozygotes exhibiting more pronounced increases in response to stress. These results provide further support for a behavioral economic approach to measuring acute drug motivation. The findings also highlight the potential relevance of income and genetic factors in understanding state effects on the perceived reinforcing value of alcohol. PMID:25413719

  12. Quantitative analysis of eosinophils in acute graft-versus-host disease compared with drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Joshua; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2010-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), if not detected and treated early, is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs), the most frequent clinical and histopathological mimickers of early aGVHD, are often still distinguished from aGVHD by the presence of eosinophils within the inflammatory infiltrate on skin biopsy. Distinguishing these entities is important because the delay of appropriate treatment of aGVHD may lead to advanced stages of the disease process with a poor prognosis. To determine whether the existence or amount of eosinophilic infiltrate could be used to differentiate these entities, we employed a quantitative method of analyzing eosinophils in skin biopsies of rashes from patients with aGVHD and DHR. Eosinophils were counted in 50 high-power fields (HPFs) in skin biopsies of patients with clinical grade >or=2 aGVHD (+aGVHD), with clinical grade <2 aGVHD (-aGVHD), and those with clinical DHR (+DHR). The average number of eosinophils per 10 HPFs (ave. eos/10 HPFs) increased throughout each group. The ave. eos/10 HPFs in +DHR was significantly different from both aGVHD groups (P < 0.001). The specificity to completely rule out aGVHD did not reach 100% until 16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs was observed. There is a significant difference between the numbers of eosinophils found in differentiating DHR from aGVHD, but a very high number (>16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs) is necessary to rule out aGVHD completely. Therefore, a quantitative analysis of eosinophils in all biopsies to rule out aGVHD would be of limited value and should only be considered in those biopsies with significant eosinophilia.

  13. Acute drug-induced spine changes in the nucleus accumbens are dependent on β-adducin.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Olivia; Giralt, Albert; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2016-11-01

    Chronic modifications of dopamine transmission alter striatal dendritic spines. Here, we show that spine density and length are increased in the nucleus accumbens 24 h after a single injection of caffeine or quinpirole, a dopamine D2/D3 dopamine receptors agonist, whereas the dopamine antagonist haloperidol has opposite effects. These effects are absent in mice lacking β-adducin, a protein that stabilizes actin/spectrin cortical cytoskeleton and modulates synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of adducin (Ser713 in β-adducin), which disrupts actin/spectrin interaction, is increased by quinpirole, haloperidol, or caffeine. We previously demonstrated that DARPP-32 interacts with β-adducin and facilitates its phosphorylation. Quinpirole increased DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr75 and haloperidol at Ser97, two modifications that can have similar consequences on adducin phosphorylation through distinct mechanisms. Experiments in DARPP-32 mutant mice confirmed that the apparently paradoxical similar effects of quinpirole and haloperidol on adducin phosphorylation may result from differential effects of these drugs on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr75 and Ser97. Our data provide novel insights on how a single dose of widely used psychoactive drugs can affect spine plasticity in the nucleus accumbens, a component of the reward system. PMID:27480796

  14. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-05-06

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects.

  15. Is racecadotril effective for acute diarrhea in children? -First update.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Josefina; Cifuentes, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    This article updates the December 2015 Living FRISBEE (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos), based on the detection of two systematic reviews not identified in the previous version. Gastroenteritis or acute watery diarrhea is usually a self-limited disease, but it is still associated to substantial healthcare costs and remains a frequent demand for medical care. Racecadotril, an intestinal enkephalinase inhibitor, has been used as treatment because it would decrease the duration of acute diarrhea and fluid loss. However there is still no evidence supporting its routine use. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including nine randomized trials relevant for our question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded racecadotril probably reduces the duration of acute diarrhea in pediatric patients, without increasing adverse effects. PMID:26731112

  16. Influence of acute uraemia on percutaneous absorption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Príborský, J; Takayama, K; Nagai, T

    1998-01-01

    The influence of uraemia on percutaneous absorption of three model drugs (diclofenac, ibuprofen and indomethacin) which are eliminated entirely via nonrenal route was investigated in the rats. Following day after bilateral nephrectomy (BUN levels were between 30-50 mmol/l), gel ointment containing drugs under test was applied on the abdominal site of the skin. Comparing with the sham operated controls the percutaneous absorption significantly decreased in all three challenged substances. Influence on percutaneous absorption of indomethacin was investigated more in depth as this compound can serve as a model for other nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs. The 50 mmol/l concentration of urea (equal to uraemia) added to the gel ointment did not influence percutaneous absorption while 10% concentration of urea decreased percutaneous absorption of indomethacin approximately 5 times. Solubility of indomethacin increased in the presence of 10% urea in the gel more than two times. Elimination ratios Q0 were estimated to find if there is any effect on pharmacokinetics linked directly to the renal elimination. None of such changes were observed.

  17. Acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of pain control on leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, J; Kokalj, A

    2014-03-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on leg stiffness of patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Twenty-eight eligible male athletes (aged 39.1 ± 10.3 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were treated with etoricoxib (120 mg oral once daily) during 7 days. Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), and leg stiffness were evaluated pre- and post- anti-inflammatory treatment. Results of this study showed that over the 7-day treatment period, etoricoxib provided significant relief of Achilles tendon pain (VAS) compared to that experienced at baseline: 54.5 ± 21.6 and 24.5 ± 24.8, respectively (p<0.001). Leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week NSAID therapy: LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.97 ± 0.1; (p=0.02). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated that patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy increased their leg stiffness of the affected side after oral anti-inflammatory therapy. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may contribute to improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24583548

  18. Effect of Several Drugs on Gastric Potential Difference in Man

    PubMed Central

    Murray, H. S.; Strottman, M. P.; Cooke, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of gastric mucosal potential difference was used to study the effect on the gastric mucosal barrier in six volunteer subjects of several drugs known to provoke ulcers. Potential differences were also recorded in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis being treated with long-term aspirin and five patients on long-term prednisone. Unbuffered aspirin and ethanol “broke” the barrier as shown by a rapid fall in potential difference. The effects of aspirin were dose related, with 600 mg causing a greater reduction than 300 mg. The effects of aspirin and ethanol given together were additive and caused the greatest fall in potential difference. Sodium acetylsalicylate did not alter the normal potential difference. Indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone all failed to cause any change in potential difference. The patients on long-term aspirin and prednisone had readings within the normal range and responded the same as normal subjects to an acute challenge. These studies show that aspirin and ethanol will damage the gastric mucosal barrier but that indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone do not. PMID:4808815

  19. Effect of nanoparticles on transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cappel, M J; Kreuter, J

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess by in vitro means the effect of poly (methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles and poly (butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles on transdermal drug delivery. Methanol and octanol were chosen as test permeants. In order to distinguish between thermodynamic effect and those due to biological consequences, two different membranes were employed, i.e., full thickness hairless mouse skin and silicone elastomer sheeting (175 microns). It is evident that poly (methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles and poly (butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles increase the permeability of methanol through hairless mouse skin by a factor of 1.2-2. The permeability of lipophilic octanol is either unaffected by nanoparticles or decreases as a function of nanoparticle concentration depending on the lipophilicity of the polymer material.

  20. Emergency department presentations in determining the effectiveness of drug control in the United Kingdom: mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) control appears to be effective using this model.

    PubMed

    Wood, David M; Greene, Shaun L; Dargan, Paul I

    2013-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and related cathinones were controlled in the United Kingdom on 16 April 2010. An analysis of presentations to the emergency department of patients with acute toxicity related to the use of mephedrone demonstrated that there was a peak in presentations prior to and a significant fall in presentations following the control of mephedrone. This suggests that the control of mephedrone in the United Kingdom may have been effective in reducing the acute harm associated with the drug.

  1. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  2. Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study Doctors should weigh the risk-benefit ratio, researcher ... of drugs that boost the immune system," said study author Dr. Laura Cappelli. She is a rheumatologist ...

  3. [Alteration of the acute toxicity and various pharmacologic effects of streptomycin sulfate by calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate].

    PubMed

    Dorofeev, B F; Korablev, M V; Kopelevich, V M

    1983-10-01

    The effect of calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CPP) on acute toxicity of streptomycin and the decrease by the antibiotic of the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex, body temperature and oxygen intake was studied on 258 albino mice weighing 22-26 g. Medical calcium pantothenate (CPA) was used for control purposes. CPP is an antagonist of streptomycin sulfate. In a dose of 1/10 or 1/5 of the LD50 injected intraperitoneally CPP lowered acute toxicity of streptomycin and prevented its effect in a dose of 0.11--1.1 g/kg injected subcutaneously on the muscle working capacity, "holes" reflex and body temperature. The spectrum index of the CPP antitoxic effect was equal to 22.5. By its acute toxicity CPP (LD50 1.18 +/- 0.07 g/kg) did not differ from CPA (LD50 1.25 +/- 0.08 g/kg). The efficacy of CPP, by its antitoxic spectrum, was 1.8 times higher than that of CPA. CPA lowered the streptomycin effect on the "holes" reflex and body temperature, while CPP prevented it. Both the drugs did not influence the decrease in the oxygen consumption induced by streptomycin. PMID:6651265

  4. Acute effects of tea consumption on attention and mood.

    PubMed

    Einöther, Suzanne J; Martens, Vanessa E

    2013-12-01

    Tea has historically been associated with mood and performance benefits, such as relaxation and concentration. This review summarizes the research on the acute effects of tea, and its ingredients theanine and caffeine, on attention and mood. Consistent with abundant research on the benefits of caffeine, the performance benefits of tea were identified in a number of studies, with particularly consistent evidence for improved attention. Tea consumption also consistently improved self-reported alertness and arousal, whereas effects on pleasure or relaxation were less consistent. In addition to the research on caffeine in real-life performance, 2 recent studies have provided a broader perspective on tea's effects on psychological function in that they showed beneficial effects in related areas such as work performance and creativity. These studies showed the validity of laboratory findings by supporting the idea that tea consumption has acute benefits on both mood and performance in real-life situations.

  5. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  6. The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research finds drug-using peers and religiosity to be key predictors of drug use among youth, but the effects of childhood exposure to drug users and religion on later drug use have been understudied. The authors hypothesize a child's exposure to parental drug use and religious upbringing have a causal influence on drug use in youth…

  7. Hepatic cytochrome P450 3A drug metabolism is reduced in cancer patients who have an acute-phase response

    PubMed Central

    Rivory, L P; Slaviero, K A; Clarke, S J

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory disease states (infection, arthritis) are associated with reduced drug oxidation by the cytochrome P450 3A system. Many chemotherapy agents are metabolised through this pathway, and disease may therefore influence inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to assess cytochrome P450 3A function in patients with advanced cancer, and its relation to the acute-phase response. We evaluated hepatic cytochrome P450 3A function in 40 patients with advanced cancer using the erythromycin breath test. Both the traditional C20min measure and the recently proposed 1/TMAX values were estimated. The marker of acute-phase response, C-reactive protein and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 were measured in serum or plasma at baseline. Cancer patients with an acute phase response (C-reactive protein >10 mg l−1, n=26) had reduced metabolism as measured with the erythromycin breath test 1/TMAX (Kruskal–Wallis Anova, P=0.0062) as compared to controls (C-reactive protein ⩽10 mg l−1, n=14). Indeed, metabolism was significantly associated with C-reactive protein over the whole concentration range of this acute-phase marker (r=−0.64, Spearman Rank Correlation, P<0.00001). C-reactive protein serum levels were significantly correlated with those of IL-6 (Spearman coefficient=0.58, P<0.0003). The reduction in cytochrome P450 3A function with acute-phase reaction was independent of the tumour type and C-reactive protein elevation was associated with poor performance status. This indicates that the sub-group of cancer patients with significant acute-phase response have compromised drug metabolism, which may have implications for the safety of chemotherapy in this population. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 277–280. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600448 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177794

  8. An Acute Retinal Model for Evaluating Blood Retinal Barrier Breach and Potential Drugs for Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Rodriguez, Ana R; Spur, Bernd W; Venkataraman, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use and powerful model system is established to evaluate potential treatments that could ameliorate blood retinal barrier breach. An inflammatory factor, histamine, is demonstrated to compromise vessel integrity in the cultured retina through positive staining of IgG outside of the blood vessels. The effects of histamine itself and those of candidate drugs for potential treatments, such as lipoxin A4, are assessed using three parameters: blood vessel leakage via IgG immunostaining, activation of Müller cells via GFAP staining and change in neuronal dendrites through staining for MAP2. Furthermore, the layered organization of the retina allows a detailed analysis of the processes of Müller and ganglion cells, such as changes in width and continuity. While the data presented is with swine retinal culture, the system is applicable to multiple species. Thus, the model provides a reliable tool to investigate the early effects of compromised retinal vessel integrity on different cell types and also to evaluate potential drug candidates for treatment. PMID:27684428

  9. Acute and chronic alcohol administration: effects on performance of zebrafish in a latent learning task.

    PubMed

    Luchiari, Ana C; Salajan, Diana C; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major medical problem. Zebrafish have been proposed to model alcohol related human disorders. Alcohol impairs learning and memory. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on performance of zebrafish in a recently developed latent learning paradigm. We employ a 2×3×2 experimental design (chronic×acute alcohol treatment×path blocked). The latent learning task had two phases: one, 30min long exploration trials (16 days, 1 trial/day) with left or right path of a complex maze blocked, and two, a subsequent probe trial with all paths open leading to a goal box that now contained stimulus fish. During the 16 days each fish received one of two chronic treatments: freshwater or 0.50% (v/v%) alcohol. Subsequently, fish were immersed for 1h in one of the following solutions: 0.00 (freshwater), 0.50% or 1.00% alcohol, the acute challenge. Behavior of fish was recorded during the probe trial that commenced immediately after the acute treatment. Path choices, latency to leave the start box and to enter the goal box, time spent in the goal box, distance traveled, and duration of freezing were quantified. We found that acute exposure to 1.00% alcohol after chronic freshwater disrupted learning performance, so did exposure to freshwater after chronic alcohol treatment (withdrawal). We also found exposure to chronic alcohol to diminish the effect of subsequent acute alcohol suggesting development of tolerance. Our results demonstrate that analysis of learning performance of zebrafish allows detection of alcohol-induced functional changes. The simplicity and scalability of the employed task also imply the utility of the zebrafish in high throughput drug screens. PMID:25557800

  10. Acute and Chronic Alcohol Administration: Effects on Performance of Zebrafish in a Latent Learning Task

    PubMed Central

    Luchiari, Ana C; Salajan, Diana C; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major medical problem. Zebrafish have been proposed to model alcohol related human disorders. Alcohol impairs learning and memory. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on performance of zebrafish in a recently developed latent learning paradigm. We employ a 2 × 3 × 2 experimental design (chronic × acute alcohol treatment × path blocked). The latent learning task had two phases: one, 30 min long exploration trials (16 days, 1 trial/day) with left or right path of a complex maze blocked, and two, a subsequent probe trial with all paths open leading to a goal box that now contained stimulus fish. During the 16 days each fish received one of two chronic treatments: freshwater or 0.50% (vol/vol%) alcohol. Subsequently, fish were immersed for 1h in one of the following solutions: 0.00 (freshwater), 0.50 or 1.00% alcohol, the acute challange. Behavior of fish was recorded during the probe trial that commenced immediately after the acute treatment. Path choices, latency to leave the start box and to enter the goal box, time spent in the goal box, distance travelled, and duration of freezing were quantified. We found that acute exposure to 1.00% alcohol after chronic freshwater disrupted learning performance, so did exposure to freshwater after chronic alcohol treatment (withdrawal). We also found exposure to chronic alcohol to diminish the effect of subsequent acute alcohol suggesting development of tolerance. Our results demonstrate that analysis of learning performance of zebrafish allows detection of alcohol-induced functional changes. The simplicity and scalability of the employed task also imply the utility of the zebrafish in high throughput drug screens. PMID:25557800

  11. Side effects of antimotion sickness drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. D.; Manno, J. E.; Manno, B. R.; Redetzki, H. M.; Wood, M. D.; Vekovius, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects on operational proficiency of the antimotion sickness drugs scopolamine, promethazine and d-amphetamine are tested using a computerized pursuit meter. Proficiency is not significantly affected by oral doses of 0.25 mg or 0.50 mg scopolamine but is descreased by oral or I.M. doses of 25 mg promethazine. The performance decrement associated with 25 mg oral promethazine is prevented when combined with 10 mg oral d-amphetamine. The combination of 25 mg I.M. promethazine, 25 mg oral promethazine and 10 mg d-amphetamine produces less performance decrement than oral or I.M. doses of promethazine alone, though more performance decrement than a placebo. I.M. promethazine is adsorbed slowly and consequently may provoke drowsiness.

  12. Drug-disease interactions: reduced β-adrenergic and potassium channel antagonist activities of sotalol in the presence of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kulmatycki, Kenneth M; Abouchehade, Kassem; Sattari, Saeed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2001-01-01

    Inflammation may influence response to pharmacotherapy. We investigated the effect of inflammation on response to sotalol, a β-adrenergic receptor and potassium channel antagonist. Racemic sotalol (40 mg kg−1) was administered to healthy, acutely (interferonα 2a-induced) and chronically (Mycobacterium butyricum-induced adjuvant arthritis) inflamed male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4 – 6/group). Another group of interferon-treated rats received 3 mg kg−1 of anti-TNF antibody infliximab. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma sotalol concentration monitored for 6 h. The study was repeated in acutely inflamed rats following administration of stereochemically pure individual sotalol enantiomers [40 mg kg−1 S (potassium channel blocker) or 20 mg kg−1 R (β-adrenergic/potassium channel blocker)]. Chronic arthritis was readily evident. Acute arthritis was associated with elevated segmented neutrophils and increased plasma nitrite and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations. Sotalol affected ECG in all rats. In both inflamed groups, however, response to sotalol in prolongation of QT interval (potassium channel sensitivity) was reduced. The effect of PR interval (β-adrenergic activity) was also reduced following administration of the racemate and R-enantiomer. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between control and inflamed rats. Infliximab reduced nitrite and TNF concentrations and reversed the effect of acute inflammation on both PR and QT intervals. The reduced electrocardiographic responses to sotalol is likely due to the influence of inflammation on the action of the drug on both β-adrenergic and potassium channel receptors secondary to over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or nitric oxide. Our observation may have therapeutic consequences in all conditions where inflammatory mediators are increased. PMID:11350865

  13. Acute and long-term effects of cannabis use: a review.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Roux, Perrine; Rolland, Benjamin; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Lançon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis remains the most commonly used and trafficked illicit drug in the world. Its use is largely concentrated among young people (15- to 34-year-olds). There is a variety of cannabis use patterns, ranging from experimental use to dependent use. Men are more likely than women to report both early initiation and frequent use of cannabis. Due to the high prevalence of cannabis use, the impact of cannabis on public health may be significant. A range of acute and chronic health problems associated with cannabis use has been identified. Cannabis can frequently have negative effects in its users, which may be amplified by certain demographic and/or psychosocial factors. Acute adverse effects include hyperemesis syndrome, impaired coordination and performance, anxiety, suicidal ideations/tendencies, and psychotic symptoms. Acute cannabis consumption is also associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, especially fatal collisions. Evidence indicates that frequent and prolonged use of cannabis can be detrimental to both mental and physical health. Chronic effects of cannabis use include mood disorders, exacerbation of psychotic disorders in vulnerable people, cannabis use disorders, withdrawal syndrome, neurocognitive impairments, cardiovascular and respiratory and other diseases.

  14. The effects of acute and chronic stress on diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Marcovecchio, M Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2012-10-23

    Stress is an important contributor to pathological conditions in humans. Hormonal changes that occur during acute and chronic stress situations can affect glucose homeostasis in both healthy people and in those with diabetes. Several studies have reported a negative effect of acute stress on maintenance of blood glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The effect of stress on glycemic control in people with diabetes may be related to a direct effect of stress hormones on blood glucose levels and an indirect effect of stress on patient behaviors related to diabetes treatment and monitoring and meal and exercise plans. In contrast, there is no clear evidence that stressful life events promote the development of diabetes in children or in adults. Stress hyperglycemia, the development of hyperglycemia during acute illness, represents another interesting connection between the stress system and glucose homeostasis. A large body of evidence supports an association between stress hyperglycemia and increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Interestingly, there is some evidence supporting a beneficial effect of insulin in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units. Finally, stress can influence the development of type 2 diabetes indirectly by promoting obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23092890

  15. Assessment of non-linear combination effect terms for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Schropp, Johannes; Jusko, William J

    2016-10-01

    Drugs interact with their targets in different ways. A diversity of modeling approaches exists to describe the combination effects of two drugs. We investigate several combination effect terms (CET) regarding their underlying mechanism based on drug-receptor binding kinetics, empirical and statistical summation principles and indirect response models. A list with properties is provided and the interrelationship of the CETs is analyzed. A method is presented to calculate the optimal drug concentration pair to produce the half-maximal combination effect. This work provides a comprehensive overview of typically applied CETs and should shed light into the question as to which CET is appropriate for application in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models to describe a specific drug-drug interaction mechanism. PMID:27638639

  16. Effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Seolhwa; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Insub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Roh, Changhyun

    2012-08-08

    Ionizing radiation has become an inevitable health concern emanating from natural sources like space travel and from artificial sources like medical therapies. In general, exposure to ionizing radiation such as γ-rays is one of the methods currently used to stress specific model systems. In this study, we elucidated the long-term effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on DCX-positive cells in hippocampal neurogenesis. Groups of two-month-old C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at acute dose (5 Gy) or fractional doses (1 Gy × 5 times and 0.5 Gy × 10 times). Six months after exposure to γ-irradiation, the hippocampus was analyzed. Doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry was used to measure changes of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The number of DCX-positive cells was significantly decreased in all acute and fractionally irradiation groups. The long-term changes in DCX-positive cells triggered by radiation exposure showed a very different pattern to the short-term changes which tended to return to the control level in previous studies. Furthermore, the number of DCX-positive cells was relatively lower in the acute irradiation group than the fractional irradiation groups (approximately 3.6-fold), suggesting the biological change on hippocampal neurogenesis was more susceptible to being damaged by acute than fractional irradiation. These results suggest that the exposure to γ-irradiation as a long-term effect can trigger biological responses resulting in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

  17. [New drugs with positive effects on bones].

    PubMed

    Zofková, I; Kanceva, R L

    1997-07-30

    The paper concerns the nontraditional treatment of osteoporosis using endogenous substances regulating bone metabolism, and also new drugs. NO in high concentrations decreases the activity of osteoclasts, scavenges superoxides which destroy connective tissue, and activates 1 alpha-hydroxylase in kidneys. Bone metabolism is effectively influenced by donors of NO or by modulators of NO synthase. Osteoclastic function is also inhibited by vitamin K. The administration of the vitamin is indicated in osteoporotic patients with proven vitamin K deficiency. Antiestrogens (tamoxifen), ipriflavon and analogues of wortmannin have antiresorptive activity. Under certain conditions parathyroid hormone (PTH) is anabolic for bone. The positive effect on bone was confirmed with the subcutaneous administration of small doses of PTH simulating physiologic pulsatile secretion, as well as the intact somatotropin-IGF-I (insulin like growth factor-I) axis. PTH is extremely useful, especially in osteoporosis induced by hypoestrinism. Somatotropin (GH) also has an anabolic effect on bone. The hormone stimulates bone metabolism with a prevalence of formation due to direct action on bone, as well as by means of IGF-I. Further growth factors with positive osteoprotic effect are TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta), FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and calcium conserving dihomogammalinoleic acid. Magnesium influences bone in different ways. It activates osteoblasts, increases bone mineralization, and enhances the sensitivity of target tissues (incl. bone) to PTH and 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3, Under certain conditions however, magnesium can stimulate bone resorption. A more potent factor than magnesium is stroncium, which not only activates osteoblats but decreases the number of osteoclasts, thus abolishing bone resorption and enhancing formation. Bicarbonates are also favourable for bone. NaHCO3 together with potassium citrate stimulates osteoblasts and enhances bone mineralisation. In the

  18. Acute cognitive effects of high doses of dextromethorphan relative to triazolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Reissig, Chad J.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although concerns surrounding high-dose dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have recently increased, few studies have examined the acute cognitive effects of high doses of DXM. The aim of this study was to compare the cognitive effects of DXM with those of triazolam and placebo. METHODS Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg /70 kg), and placebo were administered p.o. to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Effects on cognitive performance were examined at baseline and after drug administration for up to 6 hours. RESULTS Both triazolam and DXM produced acute impairments in attention, working memory, episodic memory, and metacognition. Impairments observed following doses of 100-300 mg/70 kg DXM were generally smaller in magnitude than those observed after 0.5 mg/70 kg triazolam. Doses of DXM that impaired performance to the same extent as triazolam were in excess of 10-30 times the therapeutic dose of DXM. CONCLUSION The magnitude of the doses required for these effects and the absence of effects on some tasks within the 100-300 mg/70 kg dose range of DXM, speak to the relatively broad therapeutic window of over-the-counter DXM preparations when used appropriately. However, the administration of supratherapeutic doses of DXM resulted in acute cognitive impairments on all tasks that were examined. These findings are likely relevant to cases of high-dose DXM abuse. PMID:22989498

  19. Acute toxicological effects on the earthworm Eisenia fetida of 18 common pharmaceuticals in artificial soil.

    PubMed

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Val, Jonatan; Mainar, Ana Ma; Zuriaga, Estefanía; Español, Cecilia; Langa, Elisa

    2015-06-15

    Following soil applications of recycled water and biosolids, pharmaceutical residues can eventually enter the terrestrial environment. In vitro and in vivo assays have largely focused on the acute ecotoxicity of these compounds in aquatic systems. However, studies on the ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceuticals in soil biota are especially scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute toxicity of 18 pharmaceuticals (4 NSAIDs, 5 blood lipid-lowering agents, 6 β-blockers and 3 antibiotics) that are usually found in the environment by using an Eisenia fetida bioassay. In addition, the presence of these pharmaceuticals in artificial soil was verified at the end of the test. Our results indicate that seven of the studied drugs cause acute adverse effects in E. fetida, in particular, the NSAIDs and the blood lipid-lowering agents. Ibuprofen (LC50=64.80 mg/kg) caused the highest acute toxicity for all tested compounds, followed by diclofenac (LC50=90.49 mg/kg) and simvastatin (LC50=92.70 mg/kg). Other tested pharmaceuticals from NSAIDs and blood lipid-lowering families have toxicity effects, from a LC50=140.87 mg/kg for gemfibrozil to 795.07 mg/kg for lovastatin. Atorvastatin, bezafibrate, β-blockers and antibiotics showed no detectable lethality in E. fetida. The four NSAIDs showed evidence of modification of their original chemical structure after 14 days so the detected toxicity may be due to the original product as well as their degradation products. The three blood lipid-lowering agents seem to be more stable in soil. From an environmental perspective, the lethal concentrations of the tested drugs are much greater than those reported in wastewater and biosolids, therefore acute toxic effects may be improbable. However, little is known about the accumulation of these substances in soils after regular applications, so accumulative and chronic effects cannot be excluded. Moreover, more studies are needed to determine the role of the degradation

  20. Acute IOP elevation with scleral suction: effects on retrobulbar haemodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, A; Joos, K; Kay, M; Evans, D; Shetty, R; Sponsel, W E; Martin, B

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Mechanical and vascular factors may both contribute to glaucoma. This study investigated the relation of mechanical to vascular factors by examining how acute IOP elevation altered flow velocities in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries. METHODS: IOP was elevated from a baseline near 14 to approximately 45 mm Hg using suction ophthalmodynamometry. During recovery from scleral suction, IOP fell to near 8 mm Hg. At each IOP, peak systolic and end diastolic velocities (PSV and EDV) were measured in the central retinal and ophthalmic arteries using colour Doppler imaging (Siemens Quantum 2000). Eleven healthy people served as subjects. RESULTS: Acute elevation in IOP had no effect upon PSV, EDV, or the derived resistance index in the ophthalmic artery: flow velocities in this vessel were identical at IOP of 8 mm Hg or 45 mm Hg. In contrast, in the central retinal artery, PSV and EDV fell, and the resistance index rose, in steady progression as IOP was acutely elevated (each p < 0.01). At IOP of 45 mm Hg, EDV was virtually absent and the resistance index was very nearly 1.0. CONCLUSION: Ophthalmic arterial haemodynamics are unrelated to acute fluctuations of the IOP over a wide range, suggesting that ocular hypertension itself cannot induce vascular dysfunction in this artery. In contrast, flow velocities in the central retinal artery were highly IOP dependent, implying that haemodynamic and mechanical factors are closely linked in this vascular bed. PMID:9059269

  1. A systematic review of acute pancreatitis as an adverse event of type 2 diabetes drugs: from hard facts to a balanced position.

    PubMed

    Giorda, C B; Nada, E; Tartaglino, B; Marafetti, L; Gnavi, R

    2014-11-01

    The question whether antidiabetes drugs can cause acute pancreatitis dates back to the 1970s. Recently, old concerns have re-emerged following claims that use of incretins, a new class of drugs for type 2 diabetes, might increase the relative risk of acute pancreatitis up to 30-fold. Given that diabetes is per se a potent risk factor for acute pancreatitis and that drug-related acute pancreatitis is rare and difficult to diagnose, we searched the medical databases for information linking acute pancreatitis and type 2 diabetes drugs. Among the biguanides, both phenformin and metformin (the latter in patients with renal insufficiency) have been cited in case reports as a potential cause of acute pancreatitis. Sulphonylureas, as both entire class and single compound (glibenclamide), have also been found in cohort studies to increase its risk. No direct link was found between pancreatic damage and therapy with metaglinide, acarbose, pramlintide or SGLT-2 inhibitors. In animal models, thiazolinediones have demonstrated proprieties to attenuate pancreatic damage, opening perspectives for their use in treating acute pancreatitis in humans. Several case reports and the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacovigilance database indicate an association between acute pancreatitis and incretins, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists. To date, however, a clear-cut odds ratio for this association has been reported in only one of eight pharmacoepidemiological studies. Finally, none of the intervention trials investigating these compounds, including two large randomized controlled trials with cardiovascular endpoints, confirmed the purportedly increased risk of acute pancreatitis with incretin use.

  2. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  3. Acute effects of aerobic exercise promote learning

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Renza; Bortoletto, Marta; Capogrosso, Michela; Fertonani, Anna; Miniussi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The benefits that physical exercise confers on cardiovascular health are well known, whereas the notion that physical exercise can also improve cognitive performance has only recently begun to be explored and has thus far yielded only controversial results. In the present study, we used a sample of young male subjects to test the effects that a single bout of aerobic exercise has on learning. Two tasks were run: the first was an orientation discrimination task involving the primary visual cortex, and the second was a simple thumb abduction motor task that relies on the primary motor cortex. Forty-four and forty volunteers participated in the first and second experiments, respectively. We found that a single bout of aerobic exercise can significantly facilitate learning mechanisms within visual and motor domains and that these positive effects can persist for at least 30 minutes following exercise. This finding suggests that physical activity, at least of moderate intensity, might promote brain plasticity. By combining physical activity–induced plasticity with specific cognitive training–induced plasticity, we favour a gradual up-regulation of a functional network due to a steady increase in synaptic strength, promoting associative Hebbian-like plasticity. PMID:27146330

  4. Combined effects of acute, very-low-dose ethanol and delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in healthy human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; de Wit, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies examining the combined effects of ethanol and cannabis, or its primary psychoactive ingredient, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), have provided mixed results. Data from an in vitro study suggests that combined, sub-threshold doses of these drugs may interact to produce synergistic effects. Very low doses of the two drugs in combination have not been tested in humans. Materials and Methods This study assessed whether combinations of acute, very-low doses of ethanol and THC produce synergistic effects on subjective, cognitive, and physiological measures. Healthy volunteers (n=11) received capsules containing placebo or THC (2.5mg), and beverages containing placebo or ethanol (0.1 and 0.2g/kg) alone, and in combination, across separate sessions, in a within-subjects, randomized, double-blind design. During each session, participants completed measures of working memory, psychomotor ability, and simple reaction time, and provided subjective mood and drug effect ratings. Cardiovascular measures were obtained at regular intervals. Results As intended, when administered alone, these very-low doses of ethanol and THC had only moderate effects on isolated measures. The combined effects of these drugs were not synergistic, and in some cases appeared to be less-than-additive. Conclusions Our data provide no evidence for synergistic effects of acute combinations of very-low-dose ethanol and THC on subjective or physiologic response, or on cognitive performance. PMID:21110996

  5. The Protective Effects of Buzui on Acute Alcoholism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Da-Chao; Gao, Shu-di; Hu, Xiao-yu; Yi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of a traditional buzui recipe in anti-inebriation treatment. Buzui consists of Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis, Fructus Chebulae, Fructus Mume, Fructus Crataegi, Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli, and Excrementum Bombycis. The buzui mixture was delivered by gavage, and ethanol was delivered subsequent to the final treatment. The effects of buzui on the righting reflex, inebriation rates, and the survival curve are depicted. Blood alcohol concentrations, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were recorded. The activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as malonaldehyde (MDA) levels, were also measured. Our results demonstrated that a traditional buzui recipe showed significant effects on promoting wakefulness and the prevention of acute alcohol intoxication, accelerating the metabolism of alcohol in the liver and reducing the oxidative damage caused by acute alcoholism. PMID:26884793

  6. Effects of acute exercise on long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Labban, Jeffrey D; Etnier, Jennifer L

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we tested the effect of acute exercise on long-term memory, specifically the timing of exercise relative to the memory challenge. We assessed memory via paragraph recall, in which participants listened to two paragraphs (exposure) and recounted them following a 35-min delay. Participants (n = 48) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: exercise prior to exposure, exercise after exposure, or no-exercise. Exercise consisted of 30 min on a cycle ergometer including 20 min at moderate intensity. Only the exercise prior group recalled significantly more than the control group (p < .05). Differences among the exercise groups failed to reach significance (p = .09). Results indicated that acute exercise positively influenced recall and that exercise timing relative to memory task may have an impact on this effect.

  7. Multistep, effective drug distribution within solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shemi, Amotz; Khvalevsky, Elina Zorde; Gabai, Rachel Malka; Domb, Abraham; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of drugs within solid tumors presents a long-standing barrier for efficient cancer therapies. Tumors are highly resistant to diffusion, and the lack of blood and lymphatic flows suppresses convection. Prolonged, continuous intratumoral drug delivery from a miniature drug source offers an alternative to both systemic delivery and intratumoral injection. Presented here is a model of drug distribution from such a source, in a multistep process. At delivery onset the drug mainly affects the closest surroundings. Such ‘priming’ enables drug penetration to successive cell layers. Tumor ‘void volume’ (volume not occupied by cells) increases, facilitating lymphatic perfusion. The drug is then transported by hydraulic convection downstream along interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) gradients, away from the tumor core. After a week tumor cell death occurs throughout the entire tumor and IFP gradients are flattened. Then, the drug is transported mainly by ‘mixing’, powered by physiological bulk body movements. Steady state is achieved and the drug covers the entire tumor over several months. Supporting measurements are provided from the LODER™ system, releasing siRNA against mutated KRAS over months in pancreatic cancer in-vivo models. LODER™ was also successfully employed in a recent Phase 1/2 clinical trial with pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26416413

  8. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  9. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:20680706

  10. A Novel Drug-Mouse Phenotypic Similarity Method Detects Molecular Determinants of Drug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Jeanette; Vogt, Ingo; Adornetto, Gianluca; Campillos, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that translate drug treatment into beneficial and unwanted effects are largely unknown. We present here a novel approach to detect gene-drug and gene-side effect associations based on the phenotypic similarity of drugs and single gene perturbations in mice that account for the polypharmacological property of drugs. We scored the phenotypic similarity of human side effect profiles of 1,667 small molecules and biologicals to profiles of phenotypic traits of 5,384 mouse genes. The benchmarking with known relationships revealed a strong enrichment of physical and indirect drug-target connections, causative drug target-side effect links as well as gene-drug links involved in pharmacogenetic associations among phenotypically similar gene-drug pairs. The validation by in vitro assays and the experimental verification of an unknown connection between oxandrolone and prokineticin receptor 2 reinforces the ability of this method to provide new molecular insights underlying drug treatment. Thus, this approach may aid in the proposal of novel and personalized treatments. PMID:27673331

  11. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive changes in sensorimotor function during spaceflight are reflected by spatial disorientation, motion sickness, gaze destabilization and decrements in balance, locomotion and eye-hand coordination that occur during and following transitions between different gravitational states. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-synthesis of data from spaceflight analogs to evaluate their effectiveness in simulating adaptive changes in sensorimotor function. METHODS. The analogs under review were categorized as either acute analogs used to simulate performance decrements accompanied with transient changes, or adaptive analogs used to drive sensorimotor learning to altered sensory feedback. The effectiveness of each analog was evaluated in terms of mechanisms of action, magnitude and time course of observed deficits compared to spaceflight data, and the effects of amplitude and exposure duration. RESULTS. Parabolic flight has been used extensively to examine effects of acute variation in gravitational loads, ranging from hypergravity to microgravity. More recently, galvanic vestibular stimulation has been used to elicit acute postural, locomotor and gaze dysfunction by disrupting vestibular afferents. Patient populations, e.g., with bilateral vestibular loss or cerebellar dysfunction, have been proposed to model acute sensorimotor dysfunction. Early research sponsored by NASA involved living onboard rotating rooms, which appeared to approximate the time course of adaptation and post-exposure recovery observed in astronauts following spaceflight. Exposure to different bed-rest paradigms (6 deg head down, dry immersion) result in similar motor deficits to that observed following spaceflight. Shorter adaptive analogs have incorporated virtual reality environments, visual distortion paradigms, exposure to conflicting tilt-translation cues, and exposure to 3Gx centrifugation. As with spaceflight, there is considerable variability in responses to most of the analogs

  12. A prospective study on drug monitoring of PEGasparaginase and Erwinia asparaginase and asparaginase antibodies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wing H; Pieters, Rob; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; te Loo, D Maroeska W M; Bierings, Marc B; van den Bos, Cor; Kollen, Wouter J W; Hop, Wim C J; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Relling, Mary V; Tissing, Wim J E; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2014-03-27

    This study prospectively analyzed the efficacy of very prolonged courses of pegylated Escherichia coli asparaginase (PEGasparaginase) and Erwinia asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Patients received 15 PEGasparaginase infusions (2500 IU/m(2) every 2 weeks) in intensification after receiving native E coli asparaginase in induction. In case of allergy to or silent inactivation of PEGasparaginase, Erwinia asparaginase (20 000 IU/m(2) 2-3 times weekly) was given. Eighty-nine patients were enrolled in the PEGasparaginase study. Twenty (22%) of the PEGasparaginase-treated patients developed an allergy; 7 (8%) showed silent inactivation. The PEGasparaginase level was 0 in all allergic patients (grade 1-4). Patients without hypersensitivity to PEGasparaginase had serum mean trough levels of 899 U/L. Fifty-nine patients were included in the Erwinia asparaginase study; 2 (3%) developed an allergy and none silent inactivation. Ninety-six percent had at least 1 trough level ≥100 U/L. The serum asparagine level was not always completely depleted with Erwinia asparaginase in contrast to PEGasparaginase. The presence of asparaginase antibodies was related to allergies and silent inactivation, but with low specificity (64%). Use of native E coli asparaginase in induction leads to high hypersensitivity rates to PEGasparaginase in intensification. Therefore, PEGasparaginase should be used upfront in induction, and we suggest that the dose could be lowered. Switching to Erwinia asparaginase leads to effective asparaginase levels in most patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been added to our ALL-11 protocol to individualize asparaginase therapy.

  13. Effects of chloroquine on viral infections: an old drug against today's diseases?

    PubMed

    Savarino, Andrea; Boelaert, Johan R; Cassone, Antonio; Majori, Giancarlo; Cauda, Roberto

    2003-11-01

    Chloroquine is a 9-aminoquinoline known since 1934. Apart from its well-known antimalarial effects, the drug has interesting biochemical properties that might be applied against some viral infections. Chloroquine exerts direct antiviral effects, inhibiting pH-dependent steps of the replication of several viruses including members of the flaviviruses, retroviruses, and coronaviruses. Its best-studied effects are those against HIV replication, which are being tested in clinical trials. Moreover, chloroquine has immunomodulatory effects, suppressing the production/release of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, which mediate the inflammatory complications of several viral diseases. We review the available information on the effects of chloroquine on viral infections, raising the question of whether this old drug may experience a revival in the clinical management of viral diseases such as AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome, which afflict mankind in the era of globalisation.

  14. How to Assess Drugs in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Mania?

    PubMed Central

    Bourin, Michel; Thibaut, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a serious mental disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Good-quality research available to guide treatment strategies remains insufficient, particularly with regard to manic or hypomanic episodes. A critical review of the various stages of mania might be helpful for pharmaceutical companies and investigators as a prerequisite for the clinical evaluation of potential antimanic properties of medications. The main difficulty is with a comparison between anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers such as lithium (with equal efficacy in the acute phase and the prevention of recurrent manic episodes). No consensus has been reached with regard to the treatment of bouts of acute mania in various parts of the world. Controlled clinical trials have, at last, provided irrefutable evidence of the activity of lithium, which has long been used alone, as well as that of divalproate or its derivatives and, to a lesser extent, carbamazepine. The new antipsychotic agents have more recently established their efficacy, especially aripiprazole, asenapine, quetiapine; olanzapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone (not sure where the paradox is). In Europe, haloperidol is still the reference substance used in clinical trials despite the fact that it is not officially indicated in the treatment of mania. In the USA, lithium, divalproate, or antipsychotics can be prescribed as first-line treatment. In Europe, lithium remains the first-line medication, whereas divalproate and atypical antipsychotic agents are used only as second-line therapy. Although both types of medication (antipsychotics, normothymic agents, and/or anticonvulsants) have proved to be clinically effective in the management of mania by reducing the mania scores overall, the same does not apply, however, to all symptoms of mania. Factorial approaches to mania have all shown that since there are several clinical forms of mania, several clusters of manic symptoms can

  15. Accounting for the drug life cycle and future drug prices in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Economic evaluations of health technologies typically assume constant real drug prices and model only the cohort of patients currently eligible for treatment. It has recently been suggested that, in the UK, we should assume that real drug prices decrease at 4% per annum and, in New Zealand, that real drug prices decrease at 2% per annum and at patent expiry the drug price falls. It has also recently been suggested that we should model multiple future incident cohorts. In this article, the cost effectiveness of drugs is modelled based on these ideas. Algebraic expressions are developed to capture all costs and benefits over the entire life cycle of a new drug. The lifetime of a new drug in the UK, a key model parameter, is estimated as 33 years, based on the historical lifetime of drugs in England over the last 27 years. Under the proposed methodology, cost effectiveness is calculated for seven new drugs recently appraised in the UK. Cost effectiveness as assessed in the future is also estimated. Whilst the article is framed in mathematics, the findings and recommendations are also explained in non-mathematical language. The 'life-cycle correction factor' is introduced, which is used to convert estimates of cost effectiveness as traditionally calculated into estimates under the proposed methodology. Under the proposed methodology, all seven drugs appear far more cost effective in the UK than published. For example, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio decreases by 46%, from £61, 900 to £33, 500 per QALY, for cinacalcet versus best supportive care for end-stage renal disease, and by 45%, from £31,100 to £17,000 per QALY, for imatinib versus interferon-α for chronic myeloid leukaemia. Assuming real drug prices decrease over time, the chance that a drug is publicly funded increases over time, and is greater when modelling multiple cohorts than with a single cohort. Using the methodology (compared with traditional methodology) all drugs in the UK and New

  16. REINFORCEMENT ENHANCING EFFECTS OF ACUTE NICOTINE VIA ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Kenneth A.; Karelitz, Joshua L.; Michael, Valerie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent human studies confirm animal research showing that nicotine enhances reinforcement from rewards unrelated to nicotine. These effects of acute nicotine via tobacco smoking may also occur when consumed from non-tobacco products. Methods We assessed acute effects of nicotine via electronic cigarettes (“e-cigarettes”) on responding reinforced by music, video, or monetary rewards, or for no reward (control). In a fully within-subjects design, adult dependent smokers (N=28) participated in three similar experimental sessions, each following overnight abstinence (verified by CO≤10 ppm). Varying only in e-cigarette condition, sessions involved controlled exposure to a nicotine (labeled “36 mg/ml”) or placebo (“0”) e-cigarette, or no e-cigarette use. A fourth session involved smoking one’s own tobacco cigarette brand after no abstinence, specifically to compare responses under typical nicotine satiation with these acute e-cigarette conditions after abstinence. Results Reinforced responding for video reward, but not the other rewards, was greater due to use of the nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette (i.e., nicotine per se), while no differences were found between the placebo e-cigarette and no e-cigarette conditions (i.e., e-cigarette use per se). For nicotine via tobacco smoking, responding compared to the nicotine e-cigarette was similar for video but greater for music, while both video and music reward were enhanced relative to the non-nicotine conditions (placebo and no e-cigarette). Conclusions Acute nicotine from a non-tobacco product has some reinforcement enhancing effects in humans, in a manner partly consistent with nicotine via tobacco smoking and perhaps contributing to the rising popularity of nicotine e-cigarette use. PMID:26070455

  17. Effects of imidazoline I2 receptor ligands on acute nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Cristal; Zhang, Yanan; Del Bello, Fabio; Li, Jun-Xu

    2012-01-25

    This study examined the antinociceptive effects of seven imidazoline I2 receptor ligands in a rat warm water tail withdrawal procedure (46 and 50 °C). Agmatine, 2-BFI, phenyzoline, and diphenyzoline produced a significant antinociceptive activity at 46 °C. BU224, S22687, and idazoxan had no effect at 46 °C up to doses that altered the locomotor activity. None of the drugs showed antinociceptive activity at 50 °C. It is suggested that I2 receptor agonists have antinociceptive activity for acute phasic pain under weak noxious stimulus, and the effects are efficacy-dependent. These data explain the findings that I2 receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of opioids and support developing higher-efficacy I2 receptor agonists for the treatment of pain.

  18. The SIDER database of drugs and side effects.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michael; Letunic, Ivica; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted side effects of drugs are a burden on patients and a severe impediment in the development of new drugs. At the same time, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) recorded during clinical trials are an important source of human phenotypic data. It is therefore essential to combine data on drugs, targets and side effects into a more complete picture of the therapeutic mechanism of actions of drugs and the ways in which they cause adverse reactions. To this end, we have created the SIDER ('Side Effect Resource', http://sideeffects.embl.de) database of drugs and ADRs. The current release, SIDER 4, contains data on 1430 drugs, 5880 ADRs and 140 064 drug-ADR pairs, which is an increase of 40% compared to the previous version. For more fine-grained analyses, we extracted the frequency with which side effects occur from the package inserts. This information is available for 39% of drug-ADR pairs, 19% of which can be compared to the frequency under placebo treatment. SIDER furthermore contains a data set of drug indications, extracted from the package inserts using Natural Language Processing. These drug indications are used to reduce the rate of false positives by identifying medical terms that do not correspond to ADRs.

  19. Temporary overdriving pacing as an adjunct to antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Inoue, Ichiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Ishihara, Masaharu; Shimatani, Yuji; Mitsuba, Naoya; Hata, Takaki; Nakama, Yasuharu; Kisaka, Tomohiko; Kijima, Yasufumi

    2005-05-01

    A-55-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was admitted to hospital because of chest pain. He was diagnosed as anterior acute myocardial infarction and treated with stent placement. After 7 days, ventricular fibrillation occurred because of a subacute reocclusion and balloon angioplasty was performed. Despite reperfusion therapy, intraaortic balloon pumping, antiarrhythmic drugs and beta-blocker, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation relapsed and cardioversion was performed 29 times during 32 h. Temporary overdrive atrioventricular sequential pacing was initiated and the malignant arrhythmia finally disappeared. Even after stoppage of 25 h overdride pacing, it never recurred. Temporary overdrive pacing is an easy and feasible therapy for a drug-resistant electrical storm associated with AMI and should be performed in the early stage.

  20. Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Management of Acute Toxicity and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D

    2016-05-01

    Although several chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) were recently classified as Schedule I substances, rates of use and cases of serious toxic effects remain high. While case reports and media bring attention to severe SC toxicity, daily SC use resulting in dependence and withdrawal is a significant concern that is often overlooked when discussing the risks of these drugs. There is a rich literature on evidence-based approaches to treating substance use disorders associated with most abused drugs, yet little has been published regarding how to best treat symptoms related to SC dependence given its recency as an emerging clinically significant issue. This review provides a background of the pharmacology of SCs, recent findings of adverse effects associated with both acute intoxication and withdrawal as a consequence of daily use, and treatment approaches that have been implemented to address these issues, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapies for managing detoxification. In order to determine prevalence of use in cannabis smokers, a population at high risk for SC use, we obtained data on demographics of SC users, frequency of use, and adverse effects over a 3.5-year period (2012-2015) in the New York City metropolitan area, a region with a recent history of high SC use. While controlled studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of SCs are lacking, it is clear that risks associated with using these drugs pertain not only to the unpredictable and severe nature of acute intoxication but also to the effects of long-term, chronic use. Recent reports in the literature parallel findings from our survey, indicating that there is a subset of people who use SCs daily. Although withdrawal has not been systematically characterized and effective treatments have yet to be elucidated, some symptom relief has been reported with benzodiazepines and the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Given the continued use and abuse of SCs, empirical studies

  1. Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Management of Acute Toxicity and Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although several chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) were recently classified as Schedule I substances, rates of use and cases of serious toxic effects remain high. While case reports and media bring attention to severe SC toxicity, daily SC use resulting in dependence and withdrawal is a significant concern that is often overlooked when discussing the risks of these drugs. There is a rich literature on evidence-based approaches to treating substance use disorders associated with most abused drugs, yet little has been published regarding how to best treat symptoms related to SC dependence given its recency as an emerging clinically significant issue. This review provides a background of the pharmacology of SCs, recent findings of adverse effects associated with both acute intoxication and withdrawal as a consequence of daily use, and treatment approaches that have been implemented to address these issues, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapies for managing detoxification. In order to determine prevalence of use in cannabis smokers, a population at high risk for SC use, we obtained data on demographics of SC users, frequency of use, and adverse effects over a 3.5-year period (2012–2015) in the New York City metropolitan area, a region with a recent history of high SC use. While controlled studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of SCs are lacking, it is clear that risks associated with using these drugs pertain not only to the unpredictable and severe nature of acute intoxication but also to the effects of long-term, chronic use. Recent reports in the literature parallel findings from our survey, indicating that there is a subset of people who use SCs daily. Although withdrawal has not been systematically characterized and effective treatments have yet to be elucidated, some symptom relief has been reported with benzodiazepines and the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Given the continued use and abuse of SCs, empirical studies

  2. Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Management of Acute Toxicity and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D

    2016-05-01

    Although several chemical structural classes of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) were recently classified as Schedule I substances, rates of use and cases of serious toxic effects remain high. While case reports and media bring attention to severe SC toxicity, daily SC use resulting in dependence and withdrawal is a significant concern that is often overlooked when discussing the risks of these drugs. There is a rich literature on evidence-based approaches to treating substance use disorders associated with most abused drugs, yet little has been published regarding how to best treat symptoms related to SC dependence given its recency as an emerging clinically significant issue. This review provides a background of the pharmacology of SCs, recent findings of adverse effects associated with both acute intoxication and withdrawal as a consequence of daily use, and treatment approaches that have been implemented to address these issues, with an emphasis on pharmacotherapies for managing detoxification. In order to determine prevalence of use in cannabis smokers, a population at high risk for SC use, we obtained data on demographics of SC users, frequency of use, and adverse effects over a 3.5-year period (2012-2015) in the New York City metropolitan area, a region with a recent history of high SC use. While controlled studies on the physiological and behavioral effects of SCs are lacking, it is clear that risks associated with using these drugs pertain not only to the unpredictable and severe nature of acute intoxication but also to the effects of long-term, chronic use. Recent reports in the literature parallel findings from our survey, indicating that there is a subset of people who use SCs daily. Although withdrawal has not been systematically characterized and effective treatments have yet to be elucidated, some symptom relief has been reported with benzodiazepines and the atypical antipsychotic, quetiapine. Given the continued use and abuse of SCs, empirical studies

  3. Effects of acute and chronic sunitinib treatment on cardiac function and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, L; Skinner, M; Coker, S J; Currie, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) is an important regulator of cardiac contractile function and dysfunction and may be an unwanted secondary target for anti-cancer drugs such as sunitinib and imatinib that have been reported to alter cardiac performance. This study aimed to determine whether anti-cancer kinase inhibitors may affect CaMKII activity and expression when administered in vivo. Experimental Approach Cardiovascular haemodynamics in response to acute and chronic sunitinib treatment, and chronic imatinib treatment, were assessed in guinea pigs and the effects compared with those of the known positive and negative inotropes, isoprenaline and verapamil. Parallel studies from the same animals assessed CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity following drug treatments. Key Results Acute administration of sunitinib decreased left ventricular (LV) dP/dtmax. Acute administration of isoprenaline increased LVdP/dtmax dose-dependently, while LVdP/dtmax was decreased by verapamil. CaMKII activity was decreased by acute administration of sunitinib and was increased by acute administration of isoprenaline, and decreased by acute administration of verapamil. CaMKIIδ expression following all acute treatments remained unchanged. Chronic imatinib and sunitinib treatments did not alter fractional shortening; however, both CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity were significantly increased. Chronic administration of isoprenaline and verapamil decreased LV fractional shortening with parallel increases in CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity. Conclusions and Implications Chronic sunitinib and imatinib treatment increased CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity. As these compounds are associated with cardiac dysfunction, increased CaMKII expression could be an early indication of cellular cardiotoxicity marking potential progression of cardiac contractile dysfunction. PMID:26040813

  4. The contribution of impurities to the acute morbidity of illegal drug use.

    PubMed

    Shesser, R; Jotte, R; Olshaker, J

    1991-07-01

    Although emergency physicians treat many patients who use illegal drugs, little is known about the relative toxicities of the abused drug versus those that result from drug impurities and additives. Although case reports suggest significant contribution of contaminants to the morbidity and mortality of street drugs, most physicians' clinical experience and a comprehensive review of the clinical and forensic science literature demonstrate that impurities and additives play only a minor role in the majority of drug-related emergency department presentations. The strengths and weaknesses of several of the currently available drug abuse information data bases are reviewed, and qualitative information concerning the scope of contaminants that have been reported in preparations of cocaine, heroin, and phencyclidine is presented. More research is needed in this area, and a closer liaison between law enforcement, forensic scientists, and emergency physicians should be developed.

  5. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally). Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years). The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05) increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05) lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes. PMID:25789226

  6. Values of using QTc and N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide as markers for early detection of acute antipsychotic drugs-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Mohamed A M; Abdelrahman, Tarek M; Abbas, Mohamed F

    2011-03-01

    We aimed at studying the acute cardiotoxicity of the most commonly used antipsychotics in Egypt using QTc interval and NT-proBNP as markers for the early detection of such cases. Eighty-two admitted patients, at El-Minia PCC (period from 1-7-2005 to 30-6-2010), were classified into 3 groups: I: acute thioridazine overdose (n = 28), II: acute pimozide overdose (n = 23), and III: acute clozapine overdose (n = 31). Patients were investigated for NT-proBNP level and QTc on admission (day 0) and after 24 h (day 1). All the studied drugs had the ability to induce cardiotoxicity in the form of hypotension and dysrhythmias. Thioridazine and pimozide had potentially serious cardiotoxic effects than clozapine. NT-proBNP levels were elevated significantly in all groups on days 0 and 1 when compared with the reference value and a significant decrease in the same parameter on day 1 when compared with that of day 0 within the same group. QTc showed a significant prolongation in all studied groups on days 0 and 1, and there was a significant shortening of QTc on day 1 when compared with that of day 0 within the same group. A significant positive correlation of NT-proBNP level elevation with QTc prolongation was reported in all groups on days 0 and 1. Serious dysrhythmias were associated with QTc prolongation greater than 500 ms. And it was concluded that NT-proBNP, in adjunction with QTc measurement, may be a valuable and sensitive laboratory biomarker to predict cardiotoxicity of antipsychotic overdose. Larger multicenter studies are still needed to verify this possible relationship.

  7. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  8. Understanding how data triangulation identifies acute toxicity of novel psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Wood, D M; Dargan, P I

    2012-09-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increase in the availability and use of novel psychoactive substances (also known as "legal highs"). There is limited information available on the potential acute toxicity (harms) associated with the use of these novel psychoactive substances. Gold standard evidence, such as animal studies or human clinical trials, is rarely available to users or healthcare professionals. However, it is possible to use triangulation of data on the acute toxicity from multiple sources to describe the overall pattern of toxicity associated with a novel psychoactive substance. In this review, we will describe these potential data sources, which include self-reported toxicity on internet discussion fora, data from sub-population user surveys, data from regional and national poisons information services and published case reports and case series. We will then describe how pattern of acute toxicity associated with the use of the cathinone mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) was established using triangulation of these different data sources.

  9. [Drug treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. Current options and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Telek, Béla; Rejtő, László; Batár, Péter; Miltényi, Zsófia; Reményi, Gyula; Simon, Zsófia; Ujj, Zsófia; Mezei, Gabriella; Szász, Róbert; Kiss, Attila; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Árpád

    2016-05-29

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is a heterogeneous disease. Recent molecular mutational analysis techniques have shed more light on different, genetically well characterised types of the disease. Treatment approach is uniform except for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Application of the "3 + 7" induction treatment has been the gold standard in the past 40 years. While the dose of cytarabine has not been changed, escalating daunorubicine dose in younger (<60 years) patients with good performance status to 90 mg/m(2) had a positive impact on overall survival. High dose chemotherapy is tolerated poorly in patients older than 60 years of age and, as treatment is not curative in the elderly, improvement of overall survival and quality of life remains the main goal of management in these patients. Low intensity treatment is beneficial and can provide additional advantage over supportive care. Innovative and targeted therapy approaches might give promise to better management of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.

  10. Acute and chronic glue sniffing effects and consequences of withdrawal on aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Bouchatta, Otmane; Ouhaz, Zakaria; Ba-Mhamed, Saadia; Kerekes, Nóra; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Drug abuse act on brain mechanisms that cause a high-risk individual to engage in aggressive and violent behavior. While a drug-violence relationship exists, the nature of this relationship is often complex, with intoxication, neurotoxic, and withdrawal effects often being confused and/or confounded. Glue sniffing is often a springboard to the abuse of more addictive drugs. Despite its high prevalence and serious consequences, we know relatively little about the aggressive behavioral effects of volatile inhalants abuse, especially glue. The aim of the present study was to investigate the link between the duration of glue exposure, a common substance abuse problem in Morocco, and the level of aggressive behavior during withdrawal. For this we used the isolation-induced aggression model "residents" in three groups of mice. The first group served as control resident animals (n=10, without exposure); the second group as experimental resident mice (n=10) tested before and after acute (first day) and chronic exposure to the glue, and at 1 and 2weeks of withdrawal; and the third group of 10 intruder animals. The results showed that the number of attacks decreased (halved) and the latency of the first attack increased (doubled) following acute glue sniffing. However, the effects of chronic exposure and of 1week of withdrawal led to an increase in the intensity of agonistic encounters. After 2weeks of withdrawal, the intensity of aggressive behavior decreased again. These results indicated that chronic glue exposure and the first week of withdrawal are associated with increased aggression in mice. PMID:26969766

  11. Hair analysis for drug abuse. XIV. Identification of substances causing acute poisoning using hair root. I. Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Y; Kikura, R; Yasuhara, M; Mukai, T

    1997-01-17

    A hair root was evaluated as a specimen for proving acute methamphetamine (MA) poisonings using an animal model and fatal cases of MA intoxicaton. First of all, male pigmented hairy rats (n = 5) were administered with acute poisonous doses (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg) of MA and the hair roots were plucked out with a hair nipper 5 min and 0.5, 1, 2, 6 and 24 h after i.p. injection. The hair root samples were, directly or after washing with detergent, extracted with methanol/5 N HCl (20:1) under vortex mixing at room temperature for 14 h. After evaporation, the residue was derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and analyzed with GC/MS. From all samples including a 5-min sample, MA was detected at high concentrations (approximately 150 ng/mg) with a small amount of amphetamine (AP). Many animals died within 120 min of administration, but the concentrations in the hair roots increased up to 120 min and then slowly decreased until 24 h. Although MA was definitely detected anytime in the hair roots, almost no MA was found in 24-h plasma. In comparison of the drug levels in hair roots between the washed group and the unwashed group, the levels of the washed group were as a whole 4-5-fold higher than those of the unwashed group. These differences show that most of the drug incorporated into hair root is still not immobilized in the early stage. The ratios of the MA remainder in the washed samples increased with the elapse of time in all cases. However, the slope of the curves definitely dropped after the death of rats, probably due to the stopping of the hair growth and the incorporation of drug into the hair shaft. The ratios of AP/MA after death became a plateau probably due to the stoppage of the activity of metabolism after death, while those before death had increased over time. We analyzed the specimens of hair root of four men who died mainly due to acute poisonings with MA. Consequently, MA in the hair roots was detected at high concentrations, 30.5-134.6 ng

  12. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  13. Acute, subacute and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans: a pooled analysis of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Studerus, Erich; Kometer, Michael; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-11-01

    Psilocybin and related hallucinogenic compounds are increasingly used in human research. However, due to limited information about potential subjective side effects, the controlled medical use of these compounds has remained controversial. We therefore analysed acute, short- and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans by pooling raw data from eight double-blind placebo-controlled experimental studies conducted between 1999 and 2008. The analysis included 110 healthy subjects who had received 1-4 oral doses of psilocybin (45-315 µg/kg body weight). Although psilocybin dose-dependently induced profound changes in mood, perception, thought and self-experience, most subjects described the experience as pleasurable, enriching and non-threatening. Acute adverse drug reactions, characterized by strong dysphoria and/or anxiety/panic, occurred only in the two highest dose conditions in a relatively small proportion of subjects. All acute adverse drug reactions were successfully managed by providing interpersonal support and did not need psychopharmacological intervention. Follow-up questionnaires indicated no subsequent drug abuse, persisting perception disorders, prolonged psychosis or other long-term impairment of functioning in any of our subjects. The results suggest that the administration of moderate doses of psilocybin to healthy, high-functioning and well-prepared subjects in the context of a carefully monitored research environment is associated with an acceptable level of risk.

  14. Acute effects of ethanol on renal folate clearance in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenga, B.H.; McMartin, K.E.

    1986-03-05

    Studies of the renal clearance of folic acid in primates demonstrate net reabsorption of folate by a saturable system. The acute administration of ethanol to rats causes a significant increase in urinary folate excretion. The mechanism for this effect is unknown and thus the effect of acute administration of ethanol on the renal absorption and urinary clearance of folate was studied in rats. Folic acid was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats via continuous intravenous infusion in doses ranging from 3-75 micromoles/kg and renal clearance relative to inulin was determined. The effects of various dose levels of ethanol on these parameters were then determined. At a dose of 15 micromoles/kg, the renal clearance of folate relative to that of inulin was about 0.65 mg/min. At a plasma ethanol level about 100 mg/dl, the renal clearance of folate was not markedly altered. These results suggests that there is net reabsorption of folate in the rat kidney and that moderate doses of ethanol have little effect on renal effect on renal folate reabsorption.

  15. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  16. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  17. Antipsychotic Drug Side Effects for Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Mahan, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are the most frequently prescribed of the psychotropic drugs among the intellectually disabled (ID) population. Given their widespread use, efforts to systematically assess and report side effects are warranted. Specific scaling methods such as the "Matson Evaluation of Side Effects" ("MEDS"), the "Abnormal Inventory Movement…

  18. First- Versus Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents in Acute Coronary Syndromes (Katowice-Zabrze Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Kawecki, Damian; Morawiec, Beata; Dola, Janusz; Waha, Wojciech; Smolka, Grzegorz; Pluta, Aleksandra; Marcinkiewicz, Kamil; Ochała, Andrzej; Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background There are sparse data on the performance of different types of drug-eluting stents (DES) in acute and real-life setting. Objective The aim of the study was to compare the safety and efficacy of first- versus second-generation DES in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Methods This all-comer registry enrolled consecutive patients diagnosed with ACS and treated with percutaneous coronary intervention with the implantation of first- or second-generation DES in one-year follow-up. The primary efficacy endpoint was defined as major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE), a composite of all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, target-vessel revascularization and stroke. The primary safety outcome was definite stent thrombosis (ST) at one year. Results From the total of 1916 patients enrolled into the registry, 1328 patients were diagnosed with ACS. Of them, 426 were treated with first- and 902 with second-generation DES. There was no significant difference in the incidence of MACCE between two types of DES at one year. The rate of acute and subacute ST was higher in first- vs. second-generation DES (1.6% vs. 0.1%, p < 0.001, and 1.2% vs. 0.2%, p = 0.025, respectively), but there was no difference regarding late ST (0.7% vs. 0.2%, respectively, p = 0.18) and gastrointestinal bleeding (2.1% vs. 1.1%, p = 0.21). In Cox regression, first-generation DES was an independent predictor for cumulative ST (HR 3.29 [1.30-8.31], p = 0.01). Conclusions In an all-comer registry of ACS, the one-year rate of MACCE was comparable in groups treated with first- and second-generation DES. The use of first-generation DES was associated with higher rates of acute and subacute ST and was an independent predictor of cumulative ST. PMID:27058257

  19. Effects of acute exposure to aluminum on cognition in humans.

    PubMed

    Molloy, D W; Standish, T I; Nieboer, E; Turnbull, J D; Smith, S D; Dubois, S

    2007-12-01

    There is epidemiological evidence suggesting an association between aluminum in drinking water and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and between aluminum in dialysate and dialysis dementia. The exact role of aluminum in the pathogenesis of these and other dementias is not clear. This study examined the acute effects of aluminum on cognitive function in patients with AD and related dementias and in age-matched and younger volunteers with normal cognitive function. Whether individuals with AD and/or the APOE epsilon4 genotype had enhanced gastrointestinal absorption of aluminum was tested, and whether individuals with elevated blood aluminum concentrations exhibited acute cognitive effects was determined. Subjects were randomized to receive a single dose of aluminum orally (Amphojel plus citrate) for 3 d followed by a 3-wk washout, and then 3 d of matched placebo administration, or vice versa. Serum aluminum levels were measured and the daily dose of Amphojel was adjusted to a target aluminum level between 50 and 150 microg/L. Neuropsychological tests were administered at baseline and 90 min after the third dose of Amphojel or placebo. There was a large interindividual variation in aluminum serum levels in all study groups after the same initial dose of Amphojel. There were no significant differences in neuropsychological test scores after aluminum ingestion in normal volunteers or in patients with cognitive impairment. There was no association between APOE epsilon4 genotype and aluminum absorption. The results did not support the hypothesis that aluminum ingested at these doses produces acute effects on cognition or adverse effects, nor did they reveal that AD patients are more vulnerable to such outcomes. Further inquiry is required to explore any possible association between aluminum and cognition, but controlled trials may be limited by safety concerns.

  20. Exploring Spanish health social media for detecting drug effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Adverse Drug reactions (ADR) cause a high number of deaths among hospitalized patients in developed countries. Major drug agencies have devoted a great interest in the early detection of ADRs due to their high incidence and increasing health care costs. Reporting systems are available in order for both healthcare professionals and patients to alert about possible ADRs. However, several studies have shown that these adverse events are underestimated. Our hypothesis is that health social networks could be a significant information source for the early detection of ADRs as well as of new drug indications. Methods In this work we present a system for detecting drug effects (which include both adverse drug reactions as well as drug indications) from user posts extracted from a Spanish health forum. Texts were processed using MeaningCloud, a multilingual text analysis engine, to identify drugs and effects. In addition, we developed the first Spanish database storing drugs as well as their effects automatically built from drug package inserts gathered from online websites. We then applied a distant-supervision method using the database on a collection of 84,000 messages in order to extract the relations between drugs and their effects. To classify the relation instances, we used a kernel method based only on shallow linguistic information of the sentences. Results Regarding Relation Extraction of drugs and their effects, the distant supervision approach achieved a recall of 0.59 and a precision of 0.48. Conclusions The task of extracting relations between drugs and their effects from social media is a complex challenge due to the characteristics of social media texts. These texts, typically posts or tweets, usually contain many grammatical errors and spelling mistakes. Moreover, patients use lay terminology to refer to diseases, symptoms and indications that is not usually included in lexical resources in languages other than English. PMID:26100267

  1. Opposing effects of target overexpression reveal drug mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Adam C.; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of a drug's molecular target often increases drug resistance, offering a pathway for adaptive evolution and a tool for target identification. It is unclear though why this phenomenon applies to some drugs but not others. Here we gradually overexpressed antibiotic targets in Escherichia coli and found that drug resistance can increase, remain unchanged, decrease, or even change non-monotonically. Even a single target can produce opposing responses to its different inhibitors. We explain these contradicting effects with quantitative models of enzyme inhibition that account for fitness costs and the biochemical activity or inactivity of drug-enzyme complexes. Thus, target overexpression confers resistance or sensitivity as a predictable property of drug mechanism, explaining its variable presence in nature as a resistance mechanism. Though overexpression screens may fail at identifying unknown targets, overexpressing known or putative targets provides a systematic approach to distinguish between simple inhibition and complex mechanisms of drug action. PMID:24980690

  2. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Roshni; Myles, Puja R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52–0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55–0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  3. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  4. Acute and chronic cardiovascular effects of hyperkalemia: new insights into prevention and clinical management.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Peter A; Beaver, Thomas M; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott; Emmett, Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C; Goyal, Abhinav; Herzog, Charles A; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Palmer, Biff F

    2014-01-01

    The plasma pool of potassium is a partial reflection of the overall body, transient cellular shifts, and potassium elimination regulated by the kidneys. Potassium concentrations elevating above the upper limit of normal (> 5.0 mEq/L) have become more common in cardiovascular practice due to the growing population of patients with chronic kidney disease and the broad applications of drugs that modulate potassium excretion by either reducing production of angiotensin II (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, direct renin inhibitors, beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists), blocking angiotensin II receptors (angiotensin receptor blockers), or antagonizing the action of aldosterone on mineralocorticoid receptors (mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists). In addition, acute kidney injury, critical illness, crush injuries, and massive red blood cell transfusions can result in hyperkalemia. Progressively more severe elevations in potassium are responsible for abnormalities in cardiac depolarization and repolarization and contractility. Untreated severe hyperkalemia results in sudden cardiac death. Traditional management steps have included reducing dietary potassium and discontinuing potassium supplements; withdrawal of exacerbating drugs; acute treatment with intravenous calcium gluconate, insulin, and glucose; nebulized albuterol; correction of acidosis with sodium bicarbonate for short-term shifts out of the plasma pool; and, finally, gastrointestinal ion exchange with oral sodium polystyrene sulfonate in sorbitol, which is mainly used in the hospital and is poorly tolerated due to gastrointestinal adverse effects. This review explores hyperkalemia as a complication in cardiovascular patients and highlights new acute, chronic, and preventative oral therapies (patiromer calcium, cross-linked polyelectrolyte, ZS-9) that could potentially create a greater margin of safety for vulnerable patients with combined heart and kidney disease.

  5. Effects of acute fluoxetine, paroxetine and desipramine on rats tested on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Drapier, Dominique; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Laviolle, Bruno; Millet, Bruno; Allain, Hervé; Bourin, Michel; Reymann, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-25

    Antidepressants are usually prescribed for the treatment of depression but more recently have also been recommended for the treatment of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiogenic- or anxiolytic-like effects of an acute administration of antidepressants (serotonergic and noradrenergic compounds) in male Wistar rats submitted to the elevated plus-maze. Fluoxetine (2.5, 5, 10, 15mg/kg), paroxetine (0.1, 0.5, 3, 12mg/kg) and desipramine (2.5, 5, 10mg/kg) or their vehicles were administered intraperitoneally 30min prior to testing. Diazepam (0.5, 1.5, 2.5mg/kg) was used as a positive comparator for anxiolytic effect. In comparison with control animals, the percentage of time the rats treated with fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (3 and 12mg/kg) spent in the open arms decreased. The percent of inactive time spent in the open arms also decreased in rats given fluoxetine (5 and 10mg/kg) and paroxetine (12mg/kg). Desipramine was inactive on all these parameters. In conclusion, acute treatment with fluoxetine and paroxetine, but not with desipramine, produced a pattern of anxiety behavior. Thus, the pharmacological mechanism appears to be due more to serotonergic than adrenergic neurotransmission. The elevated plus-maze exhibits good sensitivity for detecting anxiogenic effects of antidepressant drugs and the conventional parameters are sufficient and reliable for detecting such effects.

  6. Protective effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Antonio; Alfieri, Alessio; Mazzella, Marialuisa; Mazzella, Antonio; Scognamiglio, Mattia; Scognamiglio, Gianluigi; Mascolo, Nicola; Cicala, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an organic compound widely used as solvent in biological studies and as vehicle for drug administration. DMSO has been shown to possess several biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive effects, and it has been proposed to be therapeutic in several disorders, such as gastrointestinal diseases, rheumatologic diseases, and for the treatment of several manifestations of amyloidosis. To better define the biological profile of DMSO, we investigated its effect on an in vivo model of acute myocardial infarction in rats, caused by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Our results show that pretreatment of rats with intraperitoneal (ip) DMSO (500 microL/Kg) for 3 consecutive days before left anterior descending coronary artery ligation significantly (P < 0.05) reduced cardiac damage from 18.75 +/- 4.88% (n = 12) to 4.46 +/- 2.01% (n = 8); serum levels of troponin I from 29.35 +/- 12.32 ng/mL (n = 8) to 2.95 +/- 1.32 ng/mL (n = 4); and serum levels of myoglobin from 46.86 +/- 10.35 ng/mL (n = 7) to 13.75 +/- 0.85 ng/mL (n = 4). Our data demonstrate that DMSO has a protective effect in a model of acute myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:19904216

  7. A monoclonal antibody specific for 6-monoacetylmorphine reduces acute heroin effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Inger Lise; Boix, Fernando; Nerem, Elisabeth; Mørland, Jørg; Andersen, Jannike Mørch

    2014-06-01

    Immunotherapy against drugs of abuse is being studied as an alternative treatment option in addiction medicine and is based on antibodies sequestering the drug in the bloodstream and blocking its entry into the brain. Producing an efficient vaccine against heroin has been considered particularly challenging because of the rapid metabolism of heroin to multiple psychoactive molecules. We have previously reported that heroin's first metabolite, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), is the predominant mediator for heroin's acute behavioral effects and that heroin is metabolized to 6-MAM primarily prior to brain entry. On this basis, we hypothesized that antibody sequestration of 6-MAM is sufficient to impair heroin-induced effects and therefore examined the effects of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for 6-MAM. In vitro experiments in human and rat blood revealed that the antibody was able to bind 6-MAM and block the metabolism to morphine almost completely, whereas the conversion of heroin to 6-MAM remained unaffected. Mice pretreated with the mAb toward 6-MAM displayed a reduction in heroin-induced locomotor activity that corresponded closely to the reduction in brain 6-MAM levels. Intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of the anti-6-MAM mAb gave equivalent protection against heroin effects, and the mAb was estimated to have a functional half-life of 8 to 9 days in mice. Our study implies that an antibody against 6-MAM is effective in counteracting heroin effects.

  8. Infrared spectroscopic studies to understand the effect of drugs at molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhawana; Gautam, Rekha; Chandrasekar, Bhagawat; Rakshit, Srabanti; Kumar B. N., Vinay; Boopathy, Sivaraman; Nandi, Dipankar; Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Umapathy, Siva

    2012-06-01

    In the recent past, there have been enormous efforts to understand effect of drugs on human body. Prior to understand the effect of drugs on human body most of the experiments are carried out on cells or model organisms. Here we present our study on the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs on cancer cells and the acetaminophen (APAP) induced hepatotoxicity in mouse model. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) have attracted attention as potential drug molecules for the treatment of cancer. These are the chemotherapeutic drugs which have indirect mechanistic action against cancer cells via acting against histone deacetylases (HDAC). It has been known that different HDAC enzymes are over-expressed in various types of cancers for example; HDAC1 is over expressed in prostate, gastric and breast carcinomas. Therefore, in order to optimise chemotherapy, it is important to determine the efficacy of various classes of HDAC inhibitor drugs against variety of over-expressed HDAC enzymes. In the present study, FTIR microspectroscopy has been employed to predict the acetylation and propionylation brought in by HDIs. The liver plays an important role in cellular metabolism and is highly susceptible to drug toxicity. APAP which is an analgesic and antipyretic drug is extensively used for therapeutic purposes and has become the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF). In the current study, we have focused to understand APAP induced hepatotoxicity using FTIR microspectroscopy. In the IR spectrum the bands corresponding to glycogen, ester group and were found to be suitable markers to predict liver injury at early time point (0.5hr) due to APAP both in tissue and serum in comparison to standard biochemical assays. Our studies show the potential of FTIR spectroscopy as a rapid, sensitive and non invasive detection technique for future clinical diagnosis.

  9. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... current thinking regarding the overall development program and clinical trial designs for drugs to support... Administration Safety and Innovation Act that FDA review guidances for the conduct of clinical trials...

  10. Evaluation of the usefulness of novel biomarkers for drug-induced acute kidney injury in beagle dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Ma, Ben; Lin, Zhi; Qu, Zhe; Huo, Yan; Wang, Jufeng; Li, Bo

    2014-10-01

    As kidney is a major target organ affected by drug toxicity, early detection of renal injury is critical in preclinical drug development. In past decades, a series of novel biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity were discovered and verified in rats. However, limited data regarding the performance of novel biomarkers in non-rodent species are publicly available. To increase the applicability of these biomarkers, we evaluated the performance of 4 urinary biomarkers including neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), clusterin, total protein, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), relative to histopathology and traditional clinical chemistry in beagle dogs with acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin. The results showed that urinary NGAL and clusterin levels were significantly elevated in dogs on days 1 and 3 after administration of gentamicin, respectively. Gene expression analysis further provided mechanistic evidence to support that NGAL and clusterin are potential biomarkers for the early assessment of drug-induced renal damage. Furthermore, the high area (both AUCs = 1.000) under receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve also indicated that NGAL and clusterin were the most sensitive biomarkers for detection of gentamicin-induced renal proximal tubular toxicity. Our results also suggested that NAG may be used in routine toxicity testing due to its sensitivity and robustness for detection of tissue injury. The present data will provide insights into the preclinical use of these biomarkers for detection of drug-induced AKI in non-rodent species. - Highlights: • Urinary NGAL, clusterin and NAG levels were significantly elevated in canine AKI. • NGAL and clusterin gene expression were increased following treatment with gentamicin. • NGAL and clusterin have high specificity and sensitivity for detection of AKI.

  11. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Kershenbaum, Aaron; Wray, Lisa; McWilliams, Thomas; Cannon, Shannon; Devidas, Meenakshi; Stork, Linda; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9). Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1. PMID:26605150

  12. Physiological and behavioral effects of acute ethanol hangover in juvenile, adolescent, and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Brasser, Susan M; Spear, Norman E

    2002-04-01

    This study examined differential responding of juvenile, adolescent, and adult rats after intoxication from an acute alcohol challenge. Experiment I generated blood ethanol curves for subjects 25, 35, or 110 days postnatal, after doses of 2.0 or 4.0 g/kg, assessing elimination rates and time of drug clearance. Experiment 2 compared ethanol's initial hypothermic and delayed hyperthermic effect across age by 48-hr temperature measurement with telemetry. At clearance or 24 hr after alcohol exposure, Experiment 3 tested subjects for changes in acoustic startle reactivity and ultrasonic vocalization (USV). Younger rats showed an absent or reduced tendency for residual hyperthermia, and adults showed alterations in USV observed as aftereffects of intoxication, despite greater initial blood alcohol levels and ethanol hypothermia in the former. The lesser ethanol hangover effects in weanlings and adolescents may be due in part to faster ethanol elimination at these ages compared with adults.

  13. An unbiased metric of antiproliferative drug effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leonard A; Frick, Peter L; Garbett, Shawn P; Hardeman, Keisha N; Paudel, B Bishal; Lopez, Carlos F; Quaranta, Vito; Tyson, Darren R

    2016-06-01

    In vitro cell proliferation assays are widely used in pharmacology, molecular biology, and drug discovery. Using theoretical modeling and experimentation, we show that current metrics of antiproliferative small molecule effect suffer from time-dependent bias, leading to inaccurate assessments of parameters such as drug potency and efficacy. We propose the drug-induced proliferation (DIP) rate, the slope of the line on a plot of cell population doublings versus time, as an alternative, time-independent metric. PMID:27135974

  14. Declining trend in transmitted drug resistance detected in a prospective cohort study of acute HIV infection in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Donn J; Crowell, Trevor A; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Kroon, Eugene; Benjapornpong, Khunthalee; Intasan, Jintana; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Robb, Merlin; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As availability of antiretroviral therapy expands in developing countries, the risk for transmission of drug-resistant HIV also increases. Patients with acute HIV infection (AHI) provide an opportunity for real-time monitoring of transmitted drug resistance (TDR). SEARCH 010/RV 254 study is a prospective, longitudinal study of AHI. This analysis was performed to characterize changes in TDR over time in persons enrolled in the AHI cohort. Methods Genotype testing for TDR mutations was performed on 229 subjects enrolled from 2009 to 2014. Results The cohort was predominantly male (95%) and men who have sex with men (92%). TDR prevalence was 7.0%, declining from 12.5% in 2009–2010 to 4.8% in 2013–2014 (p=0.08). By drug class, resistance prevalence was 3.6% for proteases inhibitors, 2.6% for nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors and 2.2% for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The greatest decline in prevalence was seen in the non-nucleoside reverses transcriptase inhibitors, from 9.4% in 2009–2010 to 0.7% in 2013–2014 (p=0.005). Conclusions TDR appears to be declining among individuals with AHI in Bangkok and in 2013 to 2014 met the World Health Organization definition for low prevalence. Continued surveillance is necessary to determine if this trend persists. PMID:27802846

  15. G-749, a novel FLT3 kinase inhibitor, can overcome drug resistance for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Kyu; Kim, Hong Woo; Lee, In Yong; Lee, Jungmi; Lee, Jaekyoo; Jung, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Yeop; Park, Sung Ho; Hwang, Haejun; Choi, Jang-Sik; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Jung Keun; Cools, Jan; Koh, Jong Sung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activations of Fms-like tyrosine receptor kinase (FLT) 3 are implicated in the pathogenesis of 20% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). G-749 is a novel FLT3 inhibitor that showed potent and sustained inhibition of the FLT3 wild type and mutants including FLT3-ITD, FLT3-D835Y, FLT3-ITD/N676D, and FLT3-ITD/F691L in cellular assays. G-749 retained its inhibitory potency in various drug-resistance milieus such as patient plasma, FLT3 ligand surge, and stromal protection. Furthermore, it displayed potent antileukemic activity in bone marrow blasts from AML patients regardless of FLT3 mutation status, including those with little or only minor responses to AC220 or PKC412. Oral administration of G-749 yielded complete tumor regression and increased life span in animal models. Thus, G-749 appears to be a promising next-generation drug candidate for the treatment of relapsed and refractory AML patients with various FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD mutants and further shows the ability to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24532805

  16. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance. PMID:26849997

  17. Acute Effects of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide on Circulating Steroid Levels in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Strajhar, P; Schmid, Y; Liakoni, E; Dolder, P C; Rentsch, K M; Kratschmar, D V; Odermatt, A; Liechti, M E

    2016-03-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A ) receptor agonist that is used recreationally worldwide. Interest in LSD research in humans waned after the 1970s, although the use of LSD in psychiatric research and practice has recently gained increasing attention. LSD produces pronounced acute psychedelic effects, although its influence on plasma steroid levels over time has not yet been characterised in humans. The effects of LSD (200 μg) or placebo on plasma steroid levels were investigated in 16 healthy subjects using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Plasma concentration-time profiles were determined for 15 steroids using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. LSD increased plasma concentrations of the glucocorticoids cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone compared to placebo. The mean maximum concentration of LSD was reached at 1.7 h. Mean peak psychedelic effects were reached at 2.4 h, with significant alterations in mental state from 0.5 h to > 10 h. Mean maximal concentrations of cortisol and corticosterone were reached at 2.5 h and 1.9 h, and significant elevations were observed 1.5-6 h and 1-3 h after drug administration, respectively. LSD also significantly increased plasma concentrations of the androgen dehydroepiandrosterone but not other androgens, progestogens or mineralocorticoids compared to placebo. A close relationship was found between plasma LSD concentrations and changes in plasma cortisol and corticosterone and the psychotropic response to LSD, and no clockwise hysteresis was observed. In conclusion, LSD produces significant acute effects on circulating steroids, especially glucocorticoids. LSD-induced changes in circulating glucocorticoids were associated with plasma LSD concentrations over time and showed no acute pharmacological tolerance.

  18. Acute Nicotine Administration Increases BOLD fMRI Signal in Brain Regions Involved in Reward Signaling and Compulsive Drug Intake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jon C.; Perez, Pablo D.; Bauzo-Rodriguez, Rayna; Hall, Gabrielle; Klausner, Rachel; Guerra, Valerie; Zeng, Huadong; Igari, Moe; Febo, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute nicotine administration potentiates brain reward function and enhances motor and cognitive function. These studies investigated which brain areas are being activated by a wide range of doses of nicotine, and if this is diminished by pretreatment with the nonselective nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine. Methods: Drug-induced changes in brain activity were assessed by measuring changes in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal using an 11.1-Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. In the first experiment, nicotine naïve rats were mildly anesthetized and the effect of nicotine (0.03–0.6mg/kg) on the BOLD signal was investigated for 10min. In the second experiment, the effect of mecamylamine on nicotine-induced brain activity was investigated. Results: A high dose of nicotine increased the BOLD signal in brain areas implicated in reward signaling, such as the nucleus accumbens shell and the prelimbic area. Nicotine also induced a dose-dependent increase in the BOLD signal in the striato-thalamo-orbitofrontal circuit, which plays a role in compulsive drug intake, and in the insular cortex, which contributes to nicotine craving and relapse. In addition, nicotine induced a large increase in the BOLD signal in motor and somatosensory cortices. Mecamylamine alone did not affect the BOLD signal in most brain areas, but induced a negative BOLD response in cortical areas, including insular, motor, and somatosensory cortices. Pretreatment with mecamylamine completely blocked the nicotine-induced increase in the BOLD signal. Conclusions: These studies demonstrate that acute nicotine administration activates brain areas that play a role in reward signaling, compulsive behavior, and motor and cognitive function. PMID:25552431

  19. Acute effects of routine firefighting on lung function.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D; Distefano, S; Morse, L; Becker, C

    1986-01-01

    We undertook a study to determine the acute effects of routine firefighting on lung function and the relationship between these acute effects and nonspecific airway responsiveness. For 29 firefighters from a single fire station, we calculated the concentration of methacholine aerosol that caused a 100% increase in specific airway resistance (Pc100). Over an 8-week period we than measured FEV1 and FVC in each firefighter before and after each 24-hr workshift and after every fire. From 199 individual workshifts without fires, we calculated the mean +/- 2 SD across-workshift change in FEV1 and FVC for each firefighter. Eighteen of 76 measurements obtained within 2 hr after a fire (24%) showed a greater than 2 SD fall in FEV1 and/or FVC compared to two of 199 obtained after routine workshifts without fires (1%; p less than .001). On 13 of 18 occasions when spirometry decreased significantly, we obtained repeat spirometry (postshift) 3-18.5 hr after fires, and on four of these occasions FEV1 and/or FVC were still more than 2 SD below baseline. Decrements in spirometry occurred as often in firefighters with high Pc100s as in those with low Pc100s. In two firefighters in whom FEV1 and FVC fell by more than 10% after fires, we repeated measurements of methacholine sensitivity, and it was increased over the prestudy baseline. These findings suggest that routine firefighting is associated with a high incidence of acute decrements in lung function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients.

  1. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients. PMID:25271215

  2. The effect of globalization of drug manufacturing, production, and sourcing and challenges for American drug safety.

    PubMed

    Woo, J; Wolfgang, S; Batista, H

    2008-03-01

    Americans benefit from one of the safest drug supplies and one of the highest standards of consumer protection in the world. Over the past decade, though, a general trend toward globalization of the supply chains for finished pharmaceutical products and active pharmaceutical ingredients has created new challenges for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in ensuring the safety and quality of the drug supply. Explosive growth in pharmaceutical manufacturing for the US market is particularly evident in the developing regions of Asia. Manufacturing sites in China and India now comprise approximately 40% of all FDA-registered foreign sites, having increased from 30% in 2002. (In 2001, when legislation first went into effect requiring registration of all foreign drug manufacturing sites, 140 registered sites in China listed 797 drug items for potential importation; as of 1 October 2007, that number had grown to 815 registered sites and well over 3,000 listed items.) In total in 2006, the United States received >145,000 line entries of imported drug products from >160 countries, up from only 1,300 line entries in 2000. FDA regulatory oversight resources (e.g., those allocated to inspection and testing of imports) are being challenged to keep up with the explosive growth of imported drugs. (In 2006, the FDA performed inspections at 212 foreign drug firms. This number has remained relatively consistent over the past 6 years, starting at 249 in 2001 and ranging from 190 to 260 on an annual basis.)

  3. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This study investigated whether MGIB is associated with the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin (LDA), thienopyridines, anticoagulants, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and whether PPI use affects the interactions between MGIB and antithrombotic drugs. Methods In this multicenter, hospital-based, case-control study, 400 patients underwent upper and lower endoscopy, 80 had acute overt MGIB and 320 had no bleeding and were matched for age and sex as controls (1:4). MGIB was additionally evaluated by capsule and/or double-balloon endoscopy, after excluding upper and lower GI bleeding. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) for MGIB risk were calculated using conditional logistic regression. To estimate the propensity score, we employed a logistic regression model for PPI use. Results In patients with MGIB, mean hemoglobin level was 9.4 g/dL, and 28 patients (35%) received blood transfusions. Factors significantly associated with MGIB were chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), liver cirrhosis (p = 0.034), NSAIDs (p<0.001), thienopyridines (p<0.001), anticoagulants (p = 0.002), and PPIs (p<0.001). After adjusting for these factors, NSAIDs (AOR, 2.5; p = 0.018), thienopyridines (AOR, 3.2; p = 0.015), anticoagulants (AOR, 4.3; p = 0.028), and PPIs (AOR; 2.0; p = 0.021) were independently associated with MGIB. After adjusting for propensity score, the use of PPIs remained an independent risk factors for MGIB (AOR, 1.94; p = 0.034). No significant interactions were observed between PPIs and NSAIDs (AOR, 0.7; p = 0.637), LDA (AOR, 0.3; p = 0.112), thienopyridine (AOR, 0.7, p = 0.671), or anticoagulants (AOR, 0.5; p = 0.545). Conclusions One-third of patients with acute small intestinal bleeding required blood transfusion. NSAIDs

  4. Effective Drug Delivery, in vitro and in vivo, By Carbon-Based Nanovectors Non-Covalently Loaded With Unmodified Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Leonard, Ashley D.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Marcano, Daniela C.; Yan, Shayou; Fiorentino, Stefania; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Katherine Price, B.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca M.; Wen, XiaoXia; Gabriela Raso, M.; Craig, Suzanne L.; Tran, Hai T.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Many new drugs have low aqueous solubility and high therapeutic efficacy. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a classic example of this type of compound. Here we show that extremely small (<40 nm) hydrophilic carbon clusters (HCCs) that are PEGylated (PEG-HCCs) are effective drug delivery vehicles when simply mixed with paclitaxel. This formulation of PTX sequestered in PEG-HCCs (PTX/PEG-HCCs) is stable for at least twenty weeks. The PTX/PEG-HCCs formulation was as effective as PTX in a clinical formulation in reducing tumor volumes in an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Preliminary toxicity and biodistribution studies suggest that the PEG-HCCs are not acutely toxic and, like many other nanomaterials, are primarily accumulated in the liver and spleen. This work demonstrates that carbon nanomaterials are effective drug delivery vehicles in vivo when non-covalently loaded with an unmodified drug. PMID:20681596

  5. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html. PMID:26196247

  6. The effects of irradiation on controlled drug delivery/controlled drug release systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ražem, Dušan; Katušin-Ražem, Branka

    2008-03-01

    The research of radiation effects on drugs over the past 60 years has mainly dealt with radiation sterilization of individual active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the form of pure substances or injectable solutions. However, the emergence of novel systems for drug administration and targeting via controlled drug delivery (CDD) and/or controlled drug release (CDR) has extended the use of irradiation with respect to pharmaceuticals: the capacity of radiation to act as an initiator of crosslinking has been used in the manufacturing and modification of a number of polymeric carriers with an added advantage of reducing the microbial load of products at the same time. The application of irradiation to these novel systems requires the understanding of radiation action not only on APIs alone but also on drug carriers and on the functioning of the integral CDD/CDR systems. In this paper, the significance of CDD/CDR systems is considered with a special emphasis on the role of irradiation for sterilization and crosslinking in the developments over the past 15 years. Radiation sterilization, crosslinking and degradation of the principal forms of drug carrier systems and the effects of irradiation on the release kinetics of APIs are discussed in light of radiation chemical principles. Regulatory aspects pertaining to radiation sterilization of drugs are also considered. Relevant results are summarized in tabular form.

  7. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html.

  8. Using Literature-Based Discovery to Explain Adverse Drug Effects.

    PubMed

    Hristovski, Dimitar; Kastrin, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Burgun, Anita; Žiberna, Lovro; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2016-08-01

    We report on our research in using literature-based discovery (LBD) to provide pharmacological and/or pharmacogenomic explanations for reported adverse drug effects. The goal of LBD is to generate novel and potentially useful hypotheses by analyzing the scientific literature and optionally some additional resources. Our assumption is that drugs have effects on some genes or proteins and that these genes or proteins are associated with the observed adverse effects. Therefore, by using LBD we try to find genes or proteins that link the drugs with the reported adverse effects. These genes or proteins can be used to provide insight into the processes causing the adverse effects. Initial results show that our method has the potential to assist in explaining reported adverse drug effects. PMID:27318993

  9. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  10. Mustard gas toxicity: the acute and chronic pathological effects.

    PubMed

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S; Ghanei, Mostafa; Ansarin, Khalil; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2010-10-01

    Ever since it was first used in armed conflict, mustard gas (sulfur mustard, MG) has been known to cause a wide range of acute and chronic injuries to exposure victims. The earliest descriptions of these injuries were published during and in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, and a further series of accounts followed the Second World War. More recently, MG has been deployed in warfare in the Middle East and this resulted in large numbers of victims, whose conditions have been studied in detail at hospitals in the region. In this review, we bring together the older and more recent clinical studies on MG toxicity and summarize what is now known about the acute and chronic effects of the agent on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and other physiological systems. In the majority of patients, the most clinically serious long-term consequences of MG poisoning are on the respiratory system, but the effects on the skin and other systems also have a significant impact on quality of life. Aspects of the management of these patients are discussed.

  11. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  12. Measuring Effects of a Skills Training Intervention for Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A test was conducted of a supplemental skills training and social-network-development aftercare program with 130 drug abusers from four residential therapeutic communities. The intervention produced positive effects on subjects' performance at the conclusion of treatment. Performance improved in situations involving avoidance of drug use, coping…

  13. Effects of Drugs on Body Systems [1970 Edition].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Designed for use in biology classes at the senior high school level, this informational booklet can serve as a resource in an interdisciplinary drug abuse education program. Its purpose is to assist the teacher who wishes to supplement the regular program with instruction in the effects of drugs on body systems by providing materials to be used at…

  14. The effects of drugs on human models of emotional processing: an account of antidepressant drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, Abbie; Harmer, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Human models of emotional processing suggest that the direct effect of successful antidepressant drug treatment may be to modify biases in the processing of emotional information. Negative biases in emotional processing are documented in depression, and single or short-term dosing with conventional antidepressant drugs reverses these biases in depressed patients prior to any subjective change in mood. Antidepressant drug treatments also modulate emotional processing in healthy volunteers, which allows the consideration of the psychological effects of these drugs without the confound of changes in mood. As such, human models of emotional processing may prove to be useful for testing the efficacy of novel treatments and for matching treatments to individual patients or subgroups of patients. PMID:26869848

  15. The effects of drugs on human models of emotional processing: an account of antidepressant drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Abbie; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-12-01

    Human models of emotional processing suggest that the direct effect of successful antidepressant drug treatment may be to modify biases in the processing of emotional information. Negative biases in emotional processing are documented in depression, and single or short-term dosing with conventional antidepressant drugs reverses these biases in depressed patients prior to any subjective change in mood. Antidepressant drug treatments also modulate emotional processing in healthy volunteers, which allows the consideration of the psychological effects of these drugs without the confound of changes in mood. As such, human models of emotional processing may prove to be useful for testing the efficacy of novel treatments and for matching treatments to individual patients or subgroups of patients.

  16. Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high

  17. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  18. Effects of intracisternal administration of cannabidiol on the cardiovascular and behavioral responses to acute restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Granjeiro, Erica M; Gomes, Felipe V; Guimarães, Francisco S; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2011-10-01

    Systemic administration of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa, attenuates the cardiovascular and behavioral responses to restraint stress. Although the brain structures related to CBD effects are not entirely known, they could involve brainstem structures responsible for cardiovascular control. Therefore, to investigate this possibility the present study verified the effects of CBD (15, 30 and 60 nmol) injected into the cisterna magna on the autonomic and behavioral changes induced by acute restraint stress. During exposure to restraint stress (1h) there was a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Also, 24h later the animals showed a decreased percentage of entries onto the open arms of the elevated plus-maze. These effects were attenuated by CBD (30 nmol). The drug had no effect on MAP and HR baseline values. These results indicate that intracisternal administration of CBD can attenuate autonomic responses to stress. However, since CBD decreased the anxiogenic consequences of restraint stress, it is possible that the drug is also acting on forebrain structures. PMID:21771609

  19. The effect of grapefruit juice on drug disposition

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Michael J.; Cancalon, Paul; Widmer, Wilbur W.; Greenblatt, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Since their initial discovery in 1989, grapefruit juice-drug interactions have received extensive interest from the scientific, medical, regulatory, and lay communities. Although knowledge regarding the effects of grapefruit juice on drug disposition continues to expand, the list of drugs studied in the clinical setting remains relatively limited. Areas covered This article reviews the in vitro effects of grapefruit juice and its constituents on the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, P-glycoprotein, esterases and sulfotransferases. The translational applicability of the in vitro findings to the clinical setting is discussed for each drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter. Reported area under the plasma concentration-time curve ratios for available grapefruit juice-drug interaction studies are also provided. Relevant investigations were identified by searching the Pubmed electronic database from 1989 to 2010. Expert opinion Grapefruit juice increases the bioavailability of some orally-administered drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A and normally undergo extensive presystemic extraction. In addition, grapefruit juice can decrease the oral absorption of a few drugs that rely on organic anion-transporting polypeptides in the gastrointestinal tract for their uptake. The number of drugs shown to interact with grapefruit juice in vitro is far greater than the number of clinically relevant grapefruit juice-drug interactions. For the majority of patients, complete avoidance of grapefruit juice is unwarranted. PMID:21254874

  20. [Side effects of drugs on the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bascones-Ilundain, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Although drugs are the most powerful therapeutic tools we have for improving the quality of life of the population, their use is not free of adverse effects. Today there are many polymedicated patients, and it is difficult to find the cause of their adverse effects that increase exponentially when more than 4 drugs are combined. There are a large number of drugs that can result in numerous adverse effects in the oral cavity. The most common are xerostomia, altered taste, gingival enlargement and mucositis caused by cancer treatment. We also review other disorders of the salivary glands, oral mucosal changes, pigmentations, halitosis, osteonecrosis, opportunistic infections and bleeding diathesis.

  1. [The morphofunctional features of the heart associated with acute morphine poisoning during the period of chronic drug intoxication].

    PubMed

    Altaeva, A Zh; Galitsky, F A; Zhakupova, T Z; Aidarkulov, A Sh; Selivokhina, N V; Zhunisov, S S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve forensic medical diagnostics of the cases of death associated with morphine poisoning based on the investigation into the biochemical changes in blood and pericardial fluid as well as morphological changes in the myocardial structures. The studies were carried out with the use of thin-layer chromatography, colorimetric and morphological methods including hematoxylin and eosin, Lee's methylene blue, and van Gieson's picrofuscin staining. These techniques were supplemented by light and polarization microscopy. The study has demonstrated the presence of morphine in 99.16% of the blood and pericardial samples obtained in the cases of poisoning. The comparison of the results of biochemical and pathomorphological studies of the myocardium made it possible to evaluate the functional and morphological conditions of the heart in the case of acute morphine poisoning during the period of chronic drug intoxication.

  2. Effect of Some Psychoactive Drugs Used as 'Legal Highs' on Brain Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Jurczak, Alexandra; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Noworyta-Sokołowska, Karolina; Górska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    New psychoactive "designer drugs" are synthetic compounds developed to provide similar effects to illicit drugs of abuse, but not subjected to legal control. The rapidly changing legal status of novel psychoactive drugs triggers the development of new compounds, analogs of well-known amphetamine or mescaline. New designer drugs used as substitutes in ecstasy pills are the least investigated and can cause life-threatening effects on users. The aim of our research was to examine the effects of acute administration of 4-methoxyamphetamine (PMA, 5 and 10 mg/kg), 4-methoxy-N-methylamphetamine (PMMA, 5 and 10 mg/kg), and mephedrone (MEPH, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) on extracellular and tissue level of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites in rat brain, by microdialysis method in freely moving animals and HPLC. Similarly to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 5 and 10 mg/kg) PMA, PMMA and MEPH enhanced the release of DA and 5-HT in rat striatum, nucleus accumbens, and frontal cortex. DA tissue content was increased by MEPH and PMMA in striatum, by MEPH, PMA, and PMMA in nucleus accumbens, and by PMA in frontal cortex. Instead, cortical DA level was decreased by MEPH and PMMA. MEPH did not influence 5-HT tissue level in striatum and nucleus accumbens, but decreased its level in frontal cortex. PMMA increased 5-HT content in striatum, while PMA enhanced it in nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex. Observed changes in brain monoamines and their metabolites by new psychoactive drugs suggest that these drugs may be capable of development of dependence. Further experiments are needed to fully investigate the neurotoxic and abuse potential of those drugs. PMID:26501352

  3. Developing an effective generic prescription drug program.

    PubMed

    Jones, John D

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) use a variety of pricing strategies. When employers have a thorough knowledge of those strategies, they can use them to their advantage to help manage pharmacy benefits. This article discusses PBM strategies in terms of what employers need to know, the questions employers need to ask and goals employers must keep in mind in order to secure the affordable cost and quality prescription drug management programs that they and their employees need and deserve.

  4. Transmitted Drug Resistance in Persons with Acute/Early HIV-1 in San Francisco, 2002-2009

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vivek; Liegler, Teri; Vittinghoff, Eric; Hartogensis, Wendy; Bacchetti, Peter; Poole, Lauren; Loeb, Lisa; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance (TDR) is an ongoing public health problem, representing 10–20% of new HIV infections in many geographic areas. TDR usually arises from two main sources: individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who are failing to achieve virologic suppression, and individuals who acquired TDR and transmit it while still ART-naïve. TDR rates can be impacted when novel antiretroviral medications are introduced that allow for greater virologic suppression of source patients. Although several new HIV medications were introduced starting in late 2007, including raltegravir, maraviroc, and etravirine, it is not known whether the prevalence of TDR was subsequently affected in 2008–2009. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed population sequence genotyping on individuals who were diagnosed with acute or early HIV (<6 months duration) and who enrolled in the Options Project, a prospective cohort, between 2002 and 2009. We used logistic regression to compare the odds of acquiring drug-resistant HIV before versus after the arrival of new ART (2005–2007 vs. 2008–2009). From 2003–2007, TDR rose from 7% to 24%. Prevalence of TDR was then 15% in 2008 and in 2009. While the odds of acquiring TDR were lower in 2008–2009 compared to 2005–2007, this was not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.65, 95% CI 0.31–1.38; p = 0.27). Conclusions Our study suggests that transmitted drug resistance rose from 2003–2007, but this upward trend did not continue in 2008 and 2009. Nevertheless, the TDR prevalence in 2008–2009 remained substantial, emphasizing that improved management strategies for drug-resistant HIV are needed if TDR is to be further reduced. Continued surveillance for TDR will be important in understanding the full impact of new antiretroviral medications. PMID:21170322

  5. Injecting risk behaviours following treatment for hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs: the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Maryam; Spelman, Tim; Matthews, Gail V.; Haber, Paul S.; Day, Carolyn; van Beek, Ingrid; Walsh, Nick; Yeung, Barbara; Bruneau, Julie; Petoumenos, Kathy; Dolan, Kate; Kaldor, John M.; Dore, Gregory J; Hellard, Margaret; Grebely, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background A barrier to hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment among people who inject drugs (PWID) has been a concern that interferon-based HCV treatment may increase injecting risk behaviours. This study evaluated recent (past month) injecting risk behaviours during follow-up among PWID that did and did not receive HCV treatment. Methods The Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC) was a prospective study of natural history and treatment of recent HCV infection. Analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations. Results Among 124 participants with a history of injecting drug use (median age 32 years), 69% were male, and 68% were treated for HCV infection. HCV treatment was not associated with an increase in recent injecting drug use [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.06, 95% CI 0.93, 1.21] or recent used needle and syringe borrowing during follow-up (aOR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89, 1.08). HCV treatment was associated with a decrease in recent ancillary injecting equipment sharing during follow-up (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74, 0.99). Further, among treated participants who remained in follow-up (n=24), ancillary injecting equipment sharing significantly decreased from 54% at enrolment to 17% during follow-up (P=0.012). Conclusions HCV treatment was not associated with drug use or used needle and syringe borrowing during follow-up, but was associated with decreased ancillary injecting equipment sharing during follow-up. Programs to enhance HCV assessment and treatment among PWID should be expanded, given that HCV treatment does not lead to increases in injecting risk behaviours and has previously been demonstrated to be safe and effective among PWID. PMID:26115881

  6. Seasonal pattern of the acute mortality effects of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhengmin; Lin, Hung-Mo; Stewart, Walter F; Kong, Linli; Xu, Fen; Zhou, Denjin; Zhu, Zhicao; Liang, Shengwen; Chen, Weiqing; Shah, Nirav; Stetter, Christy; He, Qingci

    2010-04-01

    Evidence of seasonal variation of acute mortality effects of air pollution is inconsistent. The seasonal patterns of associations between daily mortality and daily mean concentrations of particulate matter 10 microm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were examined using 4 yr of data (2001-2004) in Wuhan, China. Four distinct seasons occur in Wuhan, where approximately 4.5 million residents live in the city core area of 201 km2. Air pollution levels are higher and pollution ranges are wider in Wuhan than in most cities. Quasi-likelihood estimation within the context of the generalized additive models (natural spline [NS] models in R) was used to model the natural logarithm of the expected daily death counts as a function of the predictor variables. The estimates of the interaction between seasons and pollution were obtained from the main effects and pollutant season interaction models. It was found that the interactions between three pollutants and cause-specific mortality were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The strongest effects occurred consistently in winter for all-natural, cardiovascular, stroke, and respiratory mortality. Every 10-microg/m3 increase in PM10 daily concentration at lag 0-1 days was associated with an increase in all-natural mortality of 0.69% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-0.94%) for winter, 0.34% (95% CI: 0.00-0.69%) for spring, 0.45% (95% CI: -0.13 to 1.04%) for summer, and -0.21% (95% CI: -0.54 to 0.12%) for fall. The results show a clear seasonal pattern of acute mortality effects of ambient air pollution and the strongest effects occurred during winter in the study city.

  7. Cost-effectiveness and Pricing of Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Growing resistance to antibacterial agents has increased the need for the development of new drugs to treat bacterial infections. Given increasing pressure on limited health budgets, it is important to study the cost-effectiveness of these drugs, as well as their safety and efficacy, to find out whether or not they provide value for money and should be reimbursed. In this article, we systematically reviewed 38 cost-effectiveness analyses of new antibacterial agents. Most studies showed the new antibacterial drugs were cost-effective compared to older generation drugs. Drug pricing is a complicated process, involving different stakeholders, and has a large influence on cost-effectiveness. Value-based pricing is a method to determine the price of a drug at which it can be cost-effective. It is currently unclear what the influence of value-based pricing will be on the prices of new antibacterial agents, but an important factor will be the definition of ‘value’, which as well as the impact of the drug on patient health might also include other factors such as wider social impact and the health impact of disease. PMID:25521641

  8. How porphyrinogenic drugs modeling acute porphyria impair the hormonal status that regulates glucose metabolism. Their relevance in the onset of this disease.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, Laura B; D'Andrea, Florencia; Fornes, Daiana; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Mazzetti, Marta B

    2011-11-28

    This work deals with the study of how porphyrinogenic drugs modeling acute porphyrias interfere with the status of carbohydrate-regulating hormones in relation to key glucose enzymes and to porphyria, considering that glucose modulates the development of the disease. Female Wistar rats were treated with 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA) and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) using different doses of AIA (100, 250 and 500mg/kg body weight) and a single dose of DDC (50mg DDC/kg body weight). Rats were sacrificed 16h after AIA/DDC administration. In the group treated with the highest dose of AIA (group H), hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALA-S) increased more than 300%, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activities were 43% and 46% lower than the controls, respectively, plasmatic insulin levels exceeded normal values by 617%, and plasmatic glucocorticoids (GC) decreased 20%. GC results are related to a decrease in corticosterone (CORT) adrenal production (33%) and a significant reduction in its metabolization by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) (62%). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulated adrenal production 3-fold and drugs did not alter this process. Thus, porphyria-inducing drugs AIA and DDC dramatically altered the status of hormones that regulate carbohydrate metabolism increasing insulin levels and reducing GC production, metabolization and plasmatic levels. In this acute porphyria model, gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic blockages caused by PEPCK and GP depressed activities, respectively, would be mainly a consequence of the negative regulatory action of insulin on these enzymes. GC could also contribute to PEPCK blockage both because they were depressed by the treatment and because they are positive effectors on PEPCK. These disturbances in carbohydrates and their regulation, through ALA-S de-repression, would enhance the porphyria state promoted by the drugs on heme synthesis and destruction

  9. Protective effects of isolated polyphenolic and alkaloid fractions of Ruta graveolens L. on acute and chronic models of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ratheesh, M; Shyni, G L; Sindhu, G; Helen, A

    2010-02-01

    Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae) are traditionally used for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis and other inflammatory conditions in the traditional medicine of India, were evaluated for their protective effect in acute and chronic models of inflammation. Carrageenan induced rat paw edema and adjuvant induced arthritis were employed as the experimental models of acute and chronic inflammation respectively. Isolated polyphenolic and alkaloid fraction (AFR) from Ruta graveolens and evaluated its anti inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced acute model. AFR with a dose 10 mg/kg showed higher anti inflammatory effect than polyphenols and standard drug diclofenec. AFR significantly decreased the paw edema in arthritic rats. TBARS, COX-2, 5-LOX and MPO level were decreased and the levels of antioxidant enzymes and GSH level were increased on treatment with AFR. The increment in CRP level and ceruloplasmin level observed in arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in AFR treated rats. The results demonstrated the potential beneficiary effect of isolated polyphenolic and alkaloid fraction of Ruta graveolens L. on acute and chronic models of inflammation in rats.

  10. Protective Effect of Metformin against Acute Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Rat.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhimanu; Kumar, Vijay L

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The antidiabetic drug, metformin, can inhibit the release of inflammatory mediators in several disease conditions. The present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of metformin in ameliorating edema formation, oxidative stress, mediator release and vascular changes associated with acute inflammation in the rat carrageenan model. Metformin dose-dependently inhibited paw swelling induced by carrageenan and normalized the tissue levels of the inflammatory markers myeloperoxidase and nitrite. It also maintained oxidative homeostasis as indicated by near normal levels of the oxidative stress markers glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, catalase and superoxide dismutase. The histopathology of the paw tissue in metformin-treated animals was similar to that in normal paw and had similar effects to diclofenac. In a rat peritonitis model, metformin reduced vascular permeability and cellular infiltration. In conclusion, this study shows that metformin has a potential for use in treating various inflammatory conditions. PMID:27510757

  11. Therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation in acute acoustic trauma.

    PubMed

    Vavrina, J; Müller, W

    1995-01-01

    Retrospectively 78 patients with uni- or bilateral acute acoustic trauma (AAT) were evaluated to assess the therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO). All subjects received saline or dextran (Rheomacodrex) infusions with Ginkgo extracts (Tebonin) and prednisone. Thirty six patients underwent additional hyperbaric oxygenation at a pressure of 2 atmospheres absolute for 60 minutes once daily. Both treatment groups were comparable as far as age, gender, initial hearing loss and prednisone dose are concerned. The delay of therapy onset was 15 hours in both groups and treatment was started within 72 hours in all cases. Control audiometry was performed after 6.5 days, when the HBO group had had 5 exposures to hyperbaric oxygenation. The average hearing gain in the group without HBO was 74.3 dB and in the group treated additionally with HBO 121.3 dB (P < 0.004). It is concluded, that hyperbaric oxygenation significantly improves hearing recovery after AAT. Therefore acute acoustic trauma with significant hearing threshold depression remains an otological emergency. Minimal therapy involving waiting for spontaneous recovery, which is mostly incomplete leaving a residual C5 or C6 and handicapping tinnitus, is not the treatment of choice. Randomized prospective clinical trials with a larger patient series are needed and further experimental studies are required to understand the physiological mechanisms of HBO responsible for the clinical success in AAT.

  12. Acute and chronic respiratory effects of sodium borate particulate exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Wegman, D H; Eisen, E A; Hu, X; Woskie, S R; Smith, R G; Garabrant, D H

    1994-01-01

    This study examined work-related chronic abnormality in pulmonary function and work-related acute irritant symptoms associated with exposure to borate dust in mining and processing operations. Chronic effects were examined by pulmonary function at the beginning and end of a 7-year interval. Time-specific estimates of sodium borate particulate exposures were used to estimate cumulative exposure during the study interval. Change in pulmonary function over the 7 years was found unrelated to the estimate of cumulative exposure during that interval. Exposure-response associations also were examined with respect to short-term peak exposures and incidence of five symptoms of acute respiratory irritation. Hourly measures of health outcome and continuous measures of particulate exposure were made on each subject throughout the day. Whenever a subject reported one of the irritant symptoms, a symptom intensity score was also recorded along with the approximate time of onset. The findings indicated that exposure-response relationships were present for each of the specific symptoms at several symptom intensity levels. The associations were present when exposure was estimated by both day-long and short-term (15-min) time-weighted average exposures. Associations persisted after taking account of smoking, age, and the presence of a common cold. No significant difference in response rate was found between workers exposed to different types of sodium borate dusts. PMID:7889871

  13. Impairment of inhibitory control processing related to acute psychotomimetic effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Atakan, Z; Martin-Santos, R; Crippa, J A; Kambeitz, J; Malhi, S; Giampietro, V; Williams, S; Brammer, M; Rubia, K; Collier, D A; McGuire, P K

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use can induce acute psychotic symptoms and increase the risk of schizophrenia. Impairments in inhibitory control and processing are known to occur both under the influence of cannabis and in schizophrenia. Whether cannabis-induced impairment in inhibitory processing is related to the acute induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence is unclear. We investigated the effects of acute oral administration of 10mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, on inhibitory control and regional brain activation during inhibitory processing in humans and examined whether these effects are related to the induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence using a repeated-measures, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subject design. We studied thirty-six healthy, English-speaking, right-handed men with minimal previous exposure to cannabis and other illicit drugs twice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed a response inhibition (Go/No-Go) task. Relative to placebo, delta-9-THC caused transient psychotic symptoms, anxiety, intoxication and sedation, inhibition errors and impaired inhibition efficiency. Severity of psychotic symptoms was directly correlated with inhibition error frequency and inversely with inhibition efficiency under the influence of delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC attenuated left inferior frontal activation which was inversely correlated with the frequency of inhibition errors and severity of psychotic symptoms and positively with inhibition efficiency under its influence. These results provide experimental evidence that impairments in cognitive processes involved in the inhibitory control of thoughts and actions and inferior frontal function under the influence of cannabis may have a role in the emergence of transient psychotic symptoms under its influence.

  14. Impairment of inhibitory control processing related to acute psychotomimetic effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Atakan, Z; Martin-Santos, R; Crippa, J A; Kambeitz, J; Malhi, S; Giampietro, V; Williams, S; Brammer, M; Rubia, K; Collier, D A; McGuire, P K

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use can induce acute psychotic symptoms and increase the risk of schizophrenia. Impairments in inhibitory control and processing are known to occur both under the influence of cannabis and in schizophrenia. Whether cannabis-induced impairment in inhibitory processing is related to the acute induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence is unclear. We investigated the effects of acute oral administration of 10mg of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, on inhibitory control and regional brain activation during inhibitory processing in humans and examined whether these effects are related to the induction of psychotic symptoms under its influence using a repeated-measures, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-subject design. We studied thirty-six healthy, English-speaking, right-handed men with minimal previous exposure to cannabis and other illicit drugs twice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed a response inhibition (Go/No-Go) task. Relative to placebo, delta-9-THC caused transient psychotic symptoms, anxiety, intoxication and sedation, inhibition errors and impaired inhibition efficiency. Severity of psychotic symptoms was directly correlated with inhibition error frequency and inversely with inhibition efficiency under the influence of delta-9-THC. Delta-9-THC attenuated left inferior frontal activation which was inversely correlated with the frequency of inhibition errors and severity of psychotic symptoms and positively with inhibition efficiency under its influence. These results provide experimental evidence that impairments in cognitive processes involved in the inhibitory control of thoughts and actions and inferior frontal function under the influence of cannabis may have a role in the emergence of transient psychotic symptoms under its influence. PMID:25532865

  15. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  16. Comparison the effectiveness of aripiprazole and risperidone for the treatment of acute bipolar mania

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Amir Akhavan; Hebrani, Paria; Behdani, Fatemeh; Salaran, Mohamad; Marvast, Majid Nabizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Second-generation antipsychotics, approved for the treatment of mania, are associated with adverse effects such as weight gain and metabolic disorders. Aripiprazole, a recently introduced second-generation antipsychotic, are thought to account for its low propensity for weight gain, metabolic disturbances and sedation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of risperidone versus aripiprazole in the treatment of acute mania. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with acute episodes of mania were enrolled in this study, and they were randomly assigned into a risperidone group of 24 cases and an aripiprazole group of 26 cases. In group A, aripiprazole with a dose of 5-30 mg/day and in group B, risperidone with a dose of 2-8 mg/day was given to patients. The average dose of aripiprazole was 27 mg/day, and the average dose of risperidone was 6 mg/day. The effects of each drug for the treatment of acute mania were assessed on the 1st day of admission and on days 2, 4, 6, 8 and at weeks 2, 4 and 6 after therapy using the young mania rating scale (YMRS) and at the baseline and on weeks 3 and 6 after admission using the clinical global impression (CGI) scale. Results: The mean age of the group of risperidone was 34 ± 8.6 years and in a group of aripiprazole it was 34 ± 9.1 years (P = 0.83). Comparison of YMRS scores over the period of 6 weeks revealed a statistically significant difference in both groups (P < 0.0001). There was also a statistically significant difference in YMRS scores between risperidone and aripiprazole at day 8 (P = 0.026) and weeks 2 (P = 0.035) and 4 (P = 0.042). There was also a statistically significant difference in CGI-Severity scale score at weeks 3 (P = 0.003) and 6 (P = 0.000) and in CGI-Improvement scale score at weeks 3 (P = 0.005) and 6 (P = 0.002). The most common side-effect observed in both groups was headache (0%15/4 in aripiprazole vs. %16/7 in risperidone) Conclusion: Aripiprazole that is readily available

  17. Molecular Mechanism: ERK Signaling, Drug Addiction, and Behavioral Effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants has been considered as a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by craving and compulsive drug seeking and use. Over the past two decades, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that repeated drug exposure causes long-lasting neurochemical and cellular changes that result in enduring neuroadaptation in brain circuitry and underlie compulsive drug consumption and relapse. Through intercellular signaling cascades, drugs of abuse induce remodeling in the rewarding circuitry that contributes to the neuroplasticity of learning and memory associated with addiction. Here, we review the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and its related intracellular signaling pathways in drug-induced neuroadaptive changes that are associated with drug-mediated psychomotor activity, rewarding properties and relapse of drug seeking behaviors. We also discuss the neurobiological and behavioral effects of pharmacological and genetic interferences with ERK-associated molecular cascades in response to abused substances. Understanding the dynamic modulation of ERK signaling in response to drugs may provide novel molecular targets for therapeutic strategies to drug addiction. PMID:26809997

  18. Antithyroid Drug Side Effects in the Population and in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Olsen, Jørn; Laurberg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In a Danish population study using health registers, agranulocytosis caused by antithyroid drugs was 4 times more frequent than liver failure. Both were very rare in pregnancy, where birth defects were the dominant side effect. PMID:26815881

  19. Testing a Sociological Theory of Recreational Drug Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orcutt, James D.; Briggs, Donald A.

    1975-01-01

    The hypothesis that the normal effects of recreationally used drugs vary across substances, users, and situations as a function of normative content, normative clarity, and situational context was tested. (Author/JC)

  20. Generic Biologic Drugs Seem as Effective as Originals

    MedlinePlus

    ... the healthcare system significant amounts of money, the Johns Hopkins University researchers noted. "The billion-dollar question has ... of Public Health, and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness in Baltimore. ...

  1. Effect of Kidney Function on Drug Kinetics and Dosing in Neonates, Infants, and Children.

    PubMed

    Rodieux, Frederique; Wilbaux, Melanie; van den Anker, Johannes N; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Neonates, infants, and children differ from adults in many aspects, not just in age, weight, and body composition. Growth, maturation and environmental factors affect drug kinetics, response and dosing in pediatric patients. Almost 80% of drugs have not been studied in children, and dosing of these drugs is derived from adult doses by adjusting for body weight/size. As developmental and maturational changes are complex processes, such simplified methods may result in subtherapeutic effects or adverse events. Kidney function is impaired during the first 2 years of life as a result of normal growth and development. Reduced kidney function during childhood has an impact not only on renal clearance but also on absorption, distribution, metabolism and nonrenal clearance of drugs. 'Omics'-based technologies, such as proteomics and metabolomics, can be leveraged to uncover novel markers for kidney function during normal development, acute kidney injury, and chronic diseases. Pharmacometric modeling and simulation can be applied to simplify the design of pediatric investigations, characterize the effects of kidney function on drug exposure and response, and fine-tune dosing in pediatric patients, especially in those with impaired kidney function. One case study of amikacin dosing in neonates with reduced kidney function is presented. Collaborative efforts between clinicians and scientists in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies are required to evaluate new renal biomarkers, collect and share prospective pharmacokinetic, genetic and clinical data, build integrated pharmacometric models for key drugs, optimize and standardize dosing strategies, develop bedside decision tools, and enhance labels of drugs utilized in neonates, infants, and children.

  2. Comparison of Boric Acid and Combination Drug of Polymyxin, Neomycin and Hydrocortisone (polymyxin NH) in the Treatment of Acute Otitis Externa

    PubMed Central

    Moeini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute otitis externa is an inflammation of the external auditory canal known as "swimmer’s ear". Direct costs including medical treatment, painkillers, antibiotics, steroids or both and indirect costs are also remarkable. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effect of boric acid and polymyxin, neomycin and hydrocortisone composition in the treatment of acute otitis externa. Materials and Methods This randomized clinical trial was carried out on 80 patients aged more than 17-year-old who were referred to Kashani hospital clinic with a diagnosis of acute otitis externa by otolaryngologist. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups (A: Boric acid and B: polymyxin NH ear drops) and Painkiller was prescribed and administered orally for all patients and in the presence of fever, cellulitis around the ears and neck adenopathy, broad-spectrum systemic antibiotics were used besides topical treatment. Symptoms of patients who were evaluated by a physician includes pain, discharge from the ear, swelling of the ear canal, auricle swelling, tenderness, and ear itching. In addition, pain was evaluated in patients and was recorded by Macgill Pain Questionnaire, in the first, third, seventh and tenth days. Results Results showed that itching on third day (p=0.007) and swelling of the ear canal in the examination of the third day (p=0.006) and the seventh day (p=0.001) in the polymyxin NH group was more than those of boric acid group. Overall mean pain based on McGill questionnaire was 11.10±1.49 in boric acid group in the examination on the first day and was 4.05±0.22 in the examination on the tenth day and in the polymyxin NH group, it was 10.9±0.99 on the first day and 4.20±0.40 on the tenth day. In both groups, pain relief was the same and there was no significant difference between two groups (p=0.075). Conclusion The findings of this study showed slight differences in the effectiveness of the boric acid drug and combination of polymyxin

  3. Comparison of Boric Acid and Combination Drug of Polymyxin, Neomycin and Hydrocortisone (polymyxin NH) in the Treatment of Acute Otitis Externa

    PubMed Central

    Moeini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute otitis externa is an inflammation of the external auditory canal known as "swimmer’s ear". Direct costs including medical treatment, painkillers, antibiotics, steroids or both and indirect costs are also remarkable. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effect of boric acid and polymyxin, neomycin and hydrocortisone composition in the treatment of acute otitis externa. Materials and Methods This randomized clinical trial was carried out on 80 patients aged more than 17-year-old who were referred to Kashani hospital clinic with a diagnosis of acute otitis externa by otolaryngologist. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups (A: Boric acid and B: polymyxin NH ear drops) and Painkiller was prescribed and administered orally for all patients and in the presence of fever, cellulitis around the ears and neck adenopathy, broad-spectrum systemic antibiotics were used besides topical treatment. Symptoms of patients who were evaluated by a physician includes pain, discharge from the ear, swelling of the ear canal, auricle swelling, tenderness, and ear itching. In addition, pain was evaluated in patients and was recorded by Macgill Pain Questionnaire, in the first, third, seventh and tenth days. Results Results showed that itching on third day (p=0.007) and swelling of the ear canal in the examination of the third day (p=0.006) and the seventh day (p=0.001) in the polymyxin NH group was more than those of boric acid group. Overall mean pain based on McGill questionnaire was 11.10±1.49 in boric acid group in the examination on the first day and was 4.05±0.22 in the examination on the tenth day and in the polymyxin NH group, it was 10.9±0.99 on the first day and 4.20±0.40 on the tenth day. In both groups, pain relief was the same and there was no significant difference between two groups (p=0.075). Conclusion The findings of this study showed slight differences in the effectiveness of the boric acid drug and combination of polymyxin

  4. In Silico Augmentation of the Drug Development Pipeline: Examples from the study of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Bartels, John; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    The clinical translation of promising basic biomedical findings, whether derived from reductionist studies in academic laboratories or as the product of extensive high-throughput and –content screens in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, has reached a period of stagnation in which ever higher research and development costs are yielding ever fewer new drugs. Systems biology and computational modeling have been touted as potential avenues by which to break through this logjam. However, few mechanistic computational approaches are utilized in a manner that is fully cognizant of the inherent clinical realities in which the drugs developed through this ostensibly rational process will be ultimately used. In this article, we present a Translational Systems Biology approach to inflammation. This approach is based on the use of mechanistic computational modeling centered on inherent clinical applicability, namely that a unified suite of models can be applied to generate in silico clinical trials, individualized computational models as tools for personalized medicine, and rational drug and device design based on disease mechanism. PMID:21552346

  5. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Mullighan, Charles G

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic test systems that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limited amounts of primary tumor material. A popular assay is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice. The protocol includes injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice with subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated are then used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. Detailed in this unit are procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for use in basic research and translational studies. PMID:25737157

  6. Generation of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts for use in oncology drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of reproducible mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is necessary to provide in vivo therapeutic models that recapitulate human ALL, and for amplification of limiting amounts of primary tumor material. A frequently used model is the primary xenograft model that utilizes immunocompromised mice and involves injection of primary patient tumor specimens into mice, and subsequent serial passaging of the tumors by retransplants of cells harvested from the mouse bone marrow and spleen. The tumors generated can then be used for genomic profiling, ex vivo compound testing, mechanistic studies and retransplantation. This unit describes detailed procedures for the establishment and maintenance of primary ALL xenograft panels for potential use in basic research or translational studies. PMID:25737157

  7. Effectiveness, safety and cost of drug substitution in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Atholl; Stafylas, Panagiotis; Stergiou, George S

    2010-01-01

    Cost-containment measures in healthcare provision include the implementation of therapeutic and generic drug substitution strategies in patients whose condition is already well controlled with pharmacotherapy. Treatment for hypertension is frequently targeted for such measures. However, drug acquisition costs are only part of the cost-effectiveness equation, and a variety of other factors need to be taken into account when assessing the impact of switching antihypertensives. From the clinical perspective, considerations include maintenance of an appropriate medication dose during the switching process; drug equivalence in terms of clinical effectiveness; and safety issues, including the diverse adverse-event profiles of available alternative drugs, differences in the ‘inactive’ components of drug formulations and the quality of generic formulations. Patients' adherence to and persistence with therapy may be negatively influenced by switching, which will also impact on treatment effectiveness. From the economic perspective, the costs that are likely to be incurred by switching antihypertensives include those for additional clinic visits and laboratory tests, and for hospitalization if required to address problems arising from adverse events or poorly controlled hypertension. Indirect costs and the impact on patients' quality of life also require assessment. Substitution strategies for antihypertensives have not been tested in large outcome trials and there is little available clinical or economic evidence on which to base decisions to switch drugs. Although the cost of treatment should always be considered, careful assessment of the human and economic costs and benefits of antihypertensive drug substitution is required before this practice is recommended. PMID:20716230

  8. Effectiveness, safety and cost of drug substitution in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Atholl; Stafylas, Panagiotis; Stergiou, George S

    2010-09-01

    Cost-containment measures in healthcare provision include the implementation of therapeutic and generic drug substitution strategies in patients whose condition is already well controlled with pharmacotherapy. Treatment for hypertension is frequently targeted for such measures. However, drug acquisition costs are only part of the cost-effectiveness equation, and a variety of other factors need to be taken into account when assessing the impact of switching antihypertensives. From the clinical perspective, considerations include maintenance of an appropriate medication dose during the switching process; drug equivalence in terms of clinical effectiveness; and safety issues, including the diverse adverse-event profiles of available alternative drugs, differences in the 'inactive' components of drug formulations and the quality of generic formulations. Patients' adherence to and persistence with therapy may be negatively influenced by switching, which will also impact on treatment effectiveness. From the economic perspective, the costs that are likely to be incurred by switching antihypertensives include those for additional clinic visits and laboratory tests, and for hospitalization if required to address problems arising from adverse events or poorly controlled hypertension. Indirect costs and the impact on patients' quality of life also require assessment. Substitution strategies for antihypertensives have not been tested in large outcome trials and there is little available clinical or economic evidence on which to base decisions to switch drugs. Although the cost of treatment should always be considered, careful assessment of the human and economic costs and benefits of antihypertensive drug substitution is required before this practice is recommended.

  9. Mapping the effects of drugs on the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Brian A; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Boland, Mary R; Agudo, Judith; Merad, Miriam; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Brown, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how drugs affect the immune system has consequences for treating disease and minimizing unwanted side effects. Here we present an integrative computational approach for predicting interactions between drugs and immune cells in a system-wide manner. The approach matches gene sets between transcriptional signatures to determine their similarity. We apply the method to model the interactions between 1,309 drugs and 221 immune cell types and predict 69,995 known and novel interactions. The resulting immune-cell pharmacology map is used to predict how 5 drugs influence 4 immune cell types in humans and mice. To validate the predictions, we analyzed patient records and examined cell population changes from in vivo experiments. Our method offers a tool for screening thousands of interactions to identify relationships between drugs and the immune system. PMID:26619012

  10. Economic access to effective drugs for falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Panosian, Claire B

    2005-03-01

    The increasing death toll from drug-resistant falciparum malaria is cause for international concern. In 2002, the US Agency for International Development commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to recommend global actions to ensure the broadest possible access to new, effective antimalarial treatments. In a report issued in 2004, the IOM Committee on Economics of Antimalarial Drugs recommended a global subsidy of 300 million dollars to 500 million dollars per year to replace increasingly ineffective drugs with coformulated artemisinin combination treatments to be distributed through public and private channels in affected areas. This approach allows the existing market to support the switch to new drugs and keeps treatment costs for consumers at levels similar to the current price of chloroquine. The leverage of an international subsidy of combination therapy can also discourage the distribution of monotherapies (such as solo artemisinins), the use of which might foster increasing resistance to antimalarial drugs in the future. PMID:15714418

  11. Mapping the effects of drugs on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Brian A; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Boland, Mary R; Agudo, Judith; Merad, Miriam; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Brown, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how drugs affect the immune system has consequences for treating disease and minimizing unwanted side effects. Here we present an integrative computational approach for predicting interactions between drugs and immune cells in a system-wide manner. The approach matches gene sets between transcriptional signatures to determine their similarity. We apply the method to model the interactions between 1,309 drugs and 221 immune cell types and predict 69,995 interactions. The resulting immune-cell pharmacology map is used to predict how five drugs influence four immune cell types in humans and mice. To validate the predictions, we analyzed patient records and examined cell population changes from in vivo experiments. Our method offers a tool for screening thousands of interactions to identify relationships between drugs and the immune system. PMID:26619012

  12. Mapping the effects of drugs on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Brian A; Wroblewska, Aleksandra; Boland, Mary R; Agudo, Judith; Merad, Miriam; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Brown, Brian D; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how drugs affect the immune system has consequences for treating disease and minimizing unwanted side effects. Here we present an integrative computational approach for predicting interactions between drugs and immune cells in a system-wide manner. The approach matches gene sets between transcriptional signatures to determine their similarity. We apply the method to model the interactions between 1,309 drugs and 221 immune cell types and predict 69,995 interactions. The resulting immune-cell pharmacology map is used to predict how five drugs influence four immune cell types in humans and mice. To validate the predictions, we analyzed patient records and examined cell population changes from in vivo experiments. Our method offers a tool for screening thousands of interactions to identify relationships between drugs and the immune system.

  13. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26290296

  14. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease.

  15. Acute effects of diclofenac and DMSO to Daphnia magna: immobilisation and hsp70-induction.

    PubMed

    Haap, Timo; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2008-09-01

    To determine the toxicity of the anti-rheumatic drug diclofenac to Daphnia magna, acute toxicity tests according to the OECD guideline 202 were combined with biochemical investigations of the hsp70 level as a biomarker for proteotoxicity. Particular attention was paid to the impact of the solvent DMSO as a confounding factor to diclofenac toxicity by means of testing different variations of producing stock solutions. In the acute immobilisation tests, diclofenac was most toxic as a singular test substance, with indication of a slight antagonistic interaction between the two substances. The highest EC50 values were obtained in those approaches using diclofenac pre-dissolved in DMSO. Thus, the observed antagonism seems to be intensified by pre-dissolution. Hsp70 levels of 12- to 19-days-old D. magna were determined after 48h exposure using a highly reproducible immunological protocol. Hsp70 induction occurred at a LOEC of 30mgl(-1) diclofenac plus 0.6mll(-1) DMSO, and at a LOEC of 40mgl(-1) for diclofenac alone. In summary, DMSO showed only slight confounding effects on diclofenac action in the applied range of concentrations. PMID:18649920

  16. Interferon lambda 3 genotype predicts hepatitis C virus RNA levels in early acute infection among people who inject drugs: The InC3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Geskus, Ronald B; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA level in acute HCV infection is predictive of spontaneous clearance. This study assessed factors associated with HCV RNA levels during early acute infection among people who inject drugs with well-defined acute HCV infection. Study design Data were from International Collaboration of Incident HIV and Hepatitis C in Injecting Cohorts (InC3) Study, an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts studying acute HCV infection. Individuals with available HCV RNA levels during early acute infection (first two months following infection) were included. The distribution of HCV RNA levels during early acute infection were compared by selected host and virological factors. Results A total of 195 individuals were included. Median HCV RNA levels were significantly higher among individuals with interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3, formerly called IL28B) CC genotype compared to those with TT/CT genotype (6.28 vs. 5.39 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.01). IFNL3 CC genotype was also associated with top tertile HCV RNA levels (≥6.3 IU/mL; vs. TT/CT genotype; adjusted Odds Ratio: 4.28; 95%CI: 2.01, 9.10; P<0.01). Conclusions This study indicates that IFNL3 CC genotype predicts higher HCV RNA levels in early acute HCV infection. PMID:25256151

  17. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  18. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  19. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  20. [Effect of anticholinergic drugs on cognitive impairment in the elderly].

    PubMed

    López-Álvarez, Jorge; Zea Sevilla, María Ascensión; Agüera Ortiz, Luis; Fernández Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí Soler, Meritxell; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even in people with cognitive impairment. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed (anticholinergic effects, anticholinergic and dementia) to define the effects of anticholinergic drugs in the elderly. We emphasized the search in patterns of use, the combined use with AChEIs, the measurement of the Serum Anticholinergic Activity, and the short-term and long-term cognitive effects. The conclusions are that the use of anticholinergic drugs is common in the elderly, even more so than the medical prescription of AChEIs in Alzheimer's disease. The use of anticholinergic drugs may result in cognitive impairment. In long-term use it may generate a worsening of cognitive functions. It can lead to a wrong diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia, and they can also initiate signs of dementia. Greater cognitive effects appear when there is a previous deficit, but cognitive effects from anticholinergic drugs disappear in severe dementia. The presence of ApoEɛ4 increases the vulnerability for cognitive impairment when these drugs are employed. PMID:25087132

  1. Gold nanoparticles enhance the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Petrushev, Bobe; Boca, Sanda; Simon, Timea; Berce, Cristian; Frinc, Ioana; Dima, Delia; Selicean, Sonia; Gafencu, Grigore-Aristide; Tanase, Alina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Florea, Adrian; Suarasan, Sorina; Dima, Liana; Stanciu, Raluca; Jurj, Ancuta; Buzoianu, Anca; Cucuianu, Andrei; Astilean, Simion; Irimie, Alexandru; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Every year, in Europe, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is diagnosed in thousands of adults. For most subtypes of AML, the backbone of treatment was introduced nearly 40 years ago as a combination of cytosine arabinoside with an anthracycline. This therapy is still the worldwide standard of care. Two-thirds of patients achieve complete remission, although most of them ultimately relapse. Since the FLT3 mutation is the most frequent, it serves as a key molecular target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit FLT3 kinase. In this study, we report the conjugation of TKIs onto spherical gold nanoparticles. Materials and methods The internalization of TKI-nanocarriers was proved by the strongly scattered light from gold nanoparticles and was correlated with the results obtained by transmission electron microscopy and dark-field microscopy. The therapeutic effect of the newly designed drugs was investigated by several methods including cell counting assay as well as the MTT assay. Results We report the newly described bioconjugates to be superior when compared with the drug alone, with data confirmed by state-of-the-art analyses of internalization, cell biology, gene analysis for FLT3-IDT gene, and Western blotting to assess degradation of the FLT3 protein. Conclusion The effective transmembrane delivery and increased efficacy validate its use as a potential therapeutic. PMID:26929621

  2. Effect of aerosolized milrinone during drug-induced pulmonary hypertension in lambs.

    PubMed

    Gelvez, Javier; Fakioglu, Harun; Olarte, Jose L; Soliz, Amed; Totapally, Balagangadhar R; Torbati, Dan

    2004-07-01

    We tested whether aerosolized milrinone in lambs selectively reduces drug-induced acute pulmonary hypertension without reducing the mean systemic blood pressure (MSBP). Seven, 2-3-week-old lambs were anesthetized (50 mg/kg ketamine), paralyzed (0.1 mg/kg vecuronium bromide) and mechanically ventilated. A femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and jugular vein were catheterized for continuous monitoring of MSBP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, periodic gas-exchange analyses, and determination of cardiac output by thermodilution technique. An Airlife Misty nebulizer was used in a dry state to establish a stable baseline of an inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO(2)) at 0.21. Acute pulmonary hypertension with hypoxemia was then induced by increasing the mean pulmonary artery pressure up to 30-35% of the MSBP using 2-6 microg/kg/min of Thromboxane A(2) mimetic (U-46619), intravenously. The lambs were then subjected to 15 min of saline nebulization without milrinone followed by 30 min saline nebulization with a relatively high concentration of milrinone (10 mg/ml, total dose of 40 mg). Aerosolized milrinone had no effect on systemic or pulmonary artery pressure during combined acute pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia. We speculate that our nebulization procedures failed to deliver sufficient amount of milrinone for producing a detectable hemodynamic effect. PMID:15082033

  3. Effects of drug price reduction and prescribing restrictions on expenditures and utilisation of antihypertensive drugs in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ki-Bong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cho, Mee-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the quantitative effects of the drug price reduction on pharmaceutical expenditures and the new guidelines to restrict prescribing on drug utilisation for antihypertensive drugs. Design We used an interrupted time series design with the National patient sample data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in South Korea. Methods 54 295 participants who were with primary hypertension from the National patient sample data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service were included. The study period was from March 2011 to December 2013. The dependent variables were antihypertensive drug costs, antihypertensive drug cost per prescribing day, daily drug utilisation, average number of drugs per month, percentage of original drugs per prescription, drug overutilisation and prohibited combinations. Segmented regression analysis was used. Results The drug price reduction reduced expenditure (US$−1.51, −10.2%), and the new guidelines reduced expenditures even more (US$−2.13; −16.2%). These policies saved US$4.22 (28%) of antihypertensive drug costs per patient in December 2013 compared to March 2012. Drug price reduction policy was introduced in April 2012. We established the policy effect by comparing it before (March 2012) with after(21 months later-December 2012). The effects of the guidelines decreased expenditures, daily drug utilisation and the average number of drugs per month more than did the drug price reduction. Conclusions Both policies saved money. The guidelines were more effective over time and had fewer side effects such as increasing daily drug utilisation and number of drugs than the effects of drug price reduction. PMID:26179644

  4. Metabolic fingerprinting to understand therapeutic effects and mechanisms of silybin on acute liver damage in rat

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qun; Wang, Cong; Li, Binbing; Zhang, Ai-hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic fingerprinting is a rapid and noninvasive analysis, representing a powerful approach for the characterization of phenotypes and the distinction of specific metabolic states due to environmental alterations. It has become a valuable analytical approach for the characterization of phenotypes and is the rapidly evolving field of the comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in bio-samples. Silybin has displayed bright prospects in the prevention and therapy of liver injury, and we had conducted a preliminary exploration on the molecular mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of silybin. Because the knowledge on the metabolic responses of an acute liver damage rat to the silybin is still scarce, metabolic fingerprinting can provide relevant information on the intrinsic metabolic adjustments. Materials and Methods: Here, the physiological and metabolic changes in the acute liver damage rat were investigated by performing a metabolic analysis. The phenotypic response was assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) combined with pattern recognition approaches such as principal components analysis and partial least squares projection to supervised latent structures and discriminant analysis. Multivariate analysis of the data showed trends in scores plots that were related to the concentration of the silybin. Results: Results indicate 10 ions (7 upregulated and 3 downregulated) as differentiating metabolites. Key observations include perturbations of metabolic pathways linked to glutathione metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, etc., Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the LC/MS combined with the pattern recognition methods that can engender new insights into silybin affecting on metabolism pathways of an acute liver damage rat. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that the combination of metabolic fingerprinting with appropriate chemometric analysis is a

  5. Effects of drug-carrier interactions on drug dissolution from binary and ternary matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Zafar

    formulation with the highest polymer content) allowed calculation of relative volume normalized dissolution rates (RNV). The various RNV were used in the thermodynamic model for data analyses and to determine the interactions between the drug and carrier molecules. It was generally seen that RNV increased with decreased drug fraction, and was adequately modeled by the equations derived from the extended thermodynamic model. It was concluded that the model proposed for the binary and ternary systems successfully represented the mechanism of drug-polymer interaction and the energy changes taken place within the dispersion systems. The dissolution data analysis and subsequent understanding of physical modifications in the dispersion systems characterized by XRD, NIRS and DSC further substantiated the findings. The understanding of the fundamental physical might help scientists to predict the effects of mixing various drugs and polymers, and the effects of varying ratios.

  6. Marijuana and Cocaine Effect Expectancies and Drug Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, John; Brown, Sandra A.

    1991-01-01

    Content analyzed self-reports from 704 college students and used results to develop Marijuana Effect Expectancy Questionnaire and Cocaine Effect Expectancy Questionnaire. Identified six marijuana expectancies and five cocaine expectancies. Drug effect expectancies distinguished between patterns of nonuse and varying degrees of use of these two…

  7. Effects of different inotropes with antioxidant properties on acute regional myocardial ischemia in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Rump, A F; Schüssler, M; Acar, D; Cordes, A; Ratke, R; Theisohn, M; Rösen, R; Klaus, W; Fricke, U

    1995-05-01

    1. The antiischemic properties of the flavonoids acetylvitexin-rhamnoside (AVR) and luteolin-7-glucoside-(LUT), combining phosphodiesterase (PDE)-inhibitory and antioxidant properties, were studied in comparison to amrinone (AMR) or superoxide dismutase (SOD). The effects of the new dihydropyridine-type calcium-agonist Bay T 5006 were studied in comparison to Bay K 8644. 2. In isolated Langendorff-rabbit hearts perfused at constant pressure, acute regional ischemia (MI) was induced by coronary artery occlusion (CAO) and quantitated from epicardial NADH-fluorescence photography. Drugs were applied either before or after CAO (pre-treatment or treatment) to permit distinguishing the influence of functional and direct cytoprotective actions in the poorly collateralized rabbit hearts. 3. SOD did not affect left ventricular pressure (LVP) or coronary flow (CF) and reduced MI only if applied before CAO. LVP and CF were enhanced by LUT or AMR but not by AVR. MI was reduced to a similar extent in hearts treated with either drug. Cardioprotection by LUT was not improved by starting drug application before CAO. 4. Bay K 8644 reduced LVP and particularly CF, whereas Bay T 5006 did not affect functional parameters. MI was enlarged by Bay K 8644 and remained unaffected by treatment or pretreatment with Bay T 5006. 5. AMR, LUT and AVR possess antiischemic properties related to an improvement of myocardial perfusion. Although oxygen free radicals contribute to ischemic tissue injury, as shown by the cardioprotective effectiveness of SOD, antioxidant properties of the flavonoids LUT and AVR do not seem to be relevant for the antiischemic effects. Our findings also give no evidence for antioxidant properties of dihydropyridines relevant for cardioprotection. PMID:7789735

  8. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  9. Integrating Multiscale Modeling with Drug Effects for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangfang L.; Oduola, Wasiu O.; Qian, Lijun; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review multiscale modeling for cancer treatment with the incorporation of drug effects from an applied system’s pharmacology perspective. Both the classical pharmacology and systems biology are inherently quantitative; however, systems biology focuses more on networks and multi factorial controls over biological processes rather than on drugs and targets in isolation, whereas systems pharmacology has a strong focus on studying drugs with regard to the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relations accompanying drug interactions with multiscale physiology as well as the prediction of dosage-exposure responses and economic potentials of drugs. Thus, it requires multiscale methods to address the need for integrating models from the molecular levels to the cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is a common belief that tumorigenesis and tumor growth can be best understood and tackled by employing and integrating a multifaceted approach that includes in vivo and in vitro experiments, in silico models, multiscale tumor modeling, continuous/discrete modeling, agent-based modeling, and multiscale modeling with PK/PD drug effect inputs. We provide an example application of multiscale modeling employing stochastic hybrid system for a colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with the application of Lapatinib drug. It is observed that the simulation results are similar to those observed from the setup of the wet-lab experiments at the Translational Genomics Research Institute. PMID:26792977

  10. WHY DO THE ACUTE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OT TOLUENE IN RATS DEPEND ON THE ROUTE OF EXPOSURE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite evidence suggesting that the acute effects of organic solvents are related to their concentration in the brain, we have observed route-dependent differences in the acute behavioral effects of toluene. Whereas inhaled toluene disrupts the performance of rats on a visual si...

  11. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cocaine on the Spontaneous Behavior of Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment examined the effects of acute and daily cocaine on spontaneous behavior patterns of pigeons. After determining the acute effects of a range of doses, 9 pigeons were divided into three groups that received one of three doses of cocaine daily, either 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 mg/kg cocaine. Measures were taken of spontaneous…

  12. Effects of anticancer drugs on transcription factor-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2005-06-01

    DNA-interacting anticancer drugs are able to affect the propensity of DNA to interact with proteins through either reversible binding or covalent bond formation. The effect of the drugs on transcription factor interactions with DNA is reviewed. These effects can be classified as (i) competition between a drug and regulatory protein for target sequences; (ii) weakening of this interaction; (iii) enhancement of this interaction by chemical modification of the DNA and the creation of non-natural binding sites; and (iv) a 'suicide' mechanism, which is observed when a transcription factor induces changes in DNA structure, allowing a drug to bind to a target sequence. Several new strategies -- the antigene approach with oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids or locked nucleic acids, and sequence-specific polyamides -- are also reviewed. PMID:15948668

  13. No increase in drug dispensing for acute gastroenteritis after Storm Klaus, France 2009.

    PubMed

    Pirard, P; Goria, S; Nguengang Wakap, S; Galey, C; Motreff, Y; Guillet, A; Le Tertre, A; Corso, M; Beaudeau, P

    2015-09-01

    During the night of 23-24 January 2009, Storm Klaus hit south-western France and caused power outages affecting 1,700,000 homes and stopping numerous pumping and drinking water disinfection systems. In France, medicalized acute gastroenteritis (MAGE) outbreaks are monitored by analysing the daily amount of reimbursements of medical prescriptions, registered in the French National Health Insurance database, at the 'commune' administrative level. As AGE is suspected to be associated with perturbations to water supply systems as well as power outages, Storm Klaus provided an opportunity to test its influence on the incidence of MAGE in the communes of three affected French departments (administrative areas larger than communes). The geographical exposure indicator was built by using the mapping of the water distribution zones, the reported distribution/production stoppages and their duration. Irrespective of exposure class, a relative risk of MAGE of 0.86 (95% confidence 0.84-0.88) was estimated compared with the 'unexposed' reference level. Although these results must be considered with caution because of a potential marked decrease in global medical consultation probably due to impassable roads, they do not suggest a major public health impact of Klaus in terms of increased MAGE incidence. PMID:26322759

  14. No increase in drug dispensing for acute gastroenteritis after Storm Klaus, France 2009.

    PubMed

    Pirard, P; Goria, S; Nguengang Wakap, S; Galey, C; Motreff, Y; Guillet, A; Le Tertre, A; Corso, M; Beaudeau, P

    2015-09-01

    During the night of 23-24 January 2009, Storm Klaus hit south-western France and caused power outages affecting 1,700,000 homes and stopping numerous pumping and drinking water disinfection systems. In France, medicalized acute gastroenteritis (MAGE) outbreaks are monitored by analysing the daily amount of reimbursements of medical prescriptions, registered in the French National Health Insurance database, at the 'commune' administrative level. As AGE is suspected to be associated with perturbations to water supply systems as well as power outages, Storm Klaus provided an opportunity to test its influence on the incidence of MAGE in the communes of three affected French departments (administrative areas larger than communes). The geographical exposure indicator was built by using the mapping of the water distribution zones, the reported distribution/production stoppages and their duration. Irrespective of exposure class, a relative risk of MAGE of 0.86 (95% confidence 0.84-0.88) was estimated compared with the 'unexposed' reference level. Although these results must be considered with caution because of a potential marked decrease in global medical consultation probably due to impassable roads, they do not suggest a major public health impact of Klaus in terms of increased MAGE incidence.

  15. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents. PMID:25693658

  16. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  17. Neurochemical effects of minaprine, a novel psychotropic drug, on the central cholinergic system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Garattini, S; Forloni, G L; Tirelli, S; Ladinsky, H; Consolo, S

    1984-01-01

    Minaprine, a novel psychotropic drug with antidepressant, anticataleptic and antiaggressive properties, produced an increase in rat brain regional acetylcholine content at a subconvulsant dose of 30 mg/kg IP. The greatest increase (60%) was produced in the striatum, whereas an increase of about 35% was obtained in the hippocampus and the rest of the cortex. A small but significant increase of 14% was also found in the midbrain-hindbrain region. Minaprine decreased choline content only in the striatum. No tolerance to acute challenge was observed after 10-day chronic treatment. In vitro, the drug had no effect on striatal choline acetyltransferase activity up to a concentration of 160 microM and only weakly displaced (3H) dexetimide from its specific muscarinic receptor binding sites in striatum (IC50, 2 X 10(-4) M). After in vivo administration the drug did not affect sodium-dependent high affinity choline uptake by a hippocampal homogenate. On the other hand, the drug inhibited both striatal and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase activity at high (40-160 microM) concentrations in vitro. In vivo the drug produced a brief (5 min), small (18%) decrease in the enzymic activity which corresponded in time to the peak drug level attained in the brain, but was not concomitant with a change in striatal acetylcholine content. By contrast, the increase in striatal acetylcholine appeared after 30 min when there was no longer inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and when the level of minaprine in brain was reduced by 78%. Blockade of dopamine receptors by pimozide pretreatment partially prevented the increase in striatal acetylcholine produced by minaprine, whereas interference with cholinergic or serontonergic neurotransmission was without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6425901

  18. Effect of diluents on tablet integrity and controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y E; Schwartz, J B

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of diluents and wax level on tablet integrity during heat treatment and dissolution for sustained-release formulations and the resultant effect on drug release. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and lactose were evaluated for their effect on tablet integrity during drug dissolution and heat treatment in wax matrix formulations. A newly developed direct compression diluent, dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), was also evaluated. Compritol 888 ATO was used as the wax matrix material, with phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride (PPA) as a model drug. Tablets were made by direct compression and then subjected to heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 30 min. The results showed that MCC, lactose, and DCPA could maintain tablets intact during heat treatment above the melting point of wax (70 degrees C-75 degrees C). However, DCPD tablets showed wax egress during the treatment. MCC tablets swelled and cracked during drug dissolution and resulted in quick release. DCPD and lactose tablets remained intact during dissolution and gave slower release than MCC tablets. DCPA tablets without heat treatment disintegrated very quickly and showed immediate release. In contrast, heat-treated DCPA tablets remained intact through the 24-hr dissolution test and only released about 80% PPA at 6 hr. In the investigation of wax level, DCPD was used as the diluent. The drug release rate decreased as the wax content increased from 15% to 81.25%. The dissolution data were best described by the Higuchi square-root-of-time model. Diluents showed various effects during heat treatment and drug dissolution. The integrity of the tablets was related to the drug release rate. Heat treatment retarded drug release if there was no wax egress.

  19. Effects of Acute and Chronic Flunitrazepam on Delay Discounting in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppolito, Amy K.; France, Charles P.; Gerak, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Delay to delivery of a reinforcer can decrease responding for that reinforcer and increase responding for smaller reinforcers that are available concurrently and delivered without delay; acute administration of drugs can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers, although the impact of chronic treatment on delay discounting is not well…

  20. Antitumoral effect of Ocoxin on acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Hernández-García, Susana; Sanz, Eduardo; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy whose incidence is growing in developed countries. In the relapse setting, very limited therapeutic options are available and in most cases only palliative care can be offered to patients. The effect of a composite formulation that contains several antioxidants, Ocoxin Oral solution (OOS), was tested in this condition. When analyzed in vitro, OOS exhibited anti-AML action that was both time and dose dependent. In vivo OOS induced a ralentization of tumor growth that was due to a decrease in cell proliferation. Such effect could, at least partially, be due to an increase in the cell cycle inhibitor p27, although other cell cycle proteins seemed to be altered. Besides, OOS induced an immunomodulatory effect through the induction of IL6. When tested in combination with other therapeutic agents normally used in the treatment of AML patients, OOS demonstrated a higher antiproliferative action, suggesting that it may be used in combination with those standard of care treatments to potentiate their antiproliferative action in the AML clinic. PMID:26756220

  1. The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal on motor performance and dopaminergic receptor sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, N; Fernandez, W; Lees, A J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of acute levodopa withdrawal were studied in nine patients with levodopa related on-off oscillations. One patient withdrew from the study due to off period confusion and hallucinations. A marked deterioration in motor disability occurred in all patients following overnight withdrawal of levodopa and a further mild delayed deterioration was present over a mean withdrawal period of 44 hours. Patients with more severe disease were able to tolerate levodopa withdrawal for a shorter period of time than those with milder disease severity. The minimum therapeutic dose of subcutaneous apomorphine needed to produce a similar improvement in patients' mobility, before and after several days of drug withdrawal, did not differ, thus providing no clinical evidence for alterations in striatal dopamine receptor sensitivity after acute levodopa withdrawal. PMID:8331352

  2. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  3. Nephrotoxic effects of common and emerging drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, William F; Herlitz, Leal C; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Rosner, Mitchell; Niles, John L

    2014-11-01

    The kidneys can be injured in diverse ways by many drugs, both legal and illegal. Novel associations and descriptions of nephrotoxic effects of common and emerging drugs of abuse have appeared over the past several years. Anabolic androgenic steroids, illicitly used by athletes and others for decades to increase muscle mass and decrease body fat, are emerging as podocyte toxins given recent descriptions of severe forms of FSGS in long-term abusers. Synthetic cannabinoids, a new group of compounds with marijuana-like effects, recently became popular as recreational drugs and have been associated with an atypical form of AKI. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, commonly known as ecstasy, is a widely used synthetic recreational drug with mood-enhancing properties and a constellation of toxicities that can result in death. These toxic effects include hyperthermia, hypotonic hyponatremia due to its arginine vasopressin secretagogue-like effects, rhabdomyolysis, and cardiovascular collapse. Cocaine, a serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor that serves as an illegal stimulant, appetite suppressant, and anesthetic, also causes vasoconstriction and rhabdomyolysis. Recent adulteration of much of the world's supply of cocaine with levamisole, an antihelminthic agent with attributes similar to but distinct from those of cocaine, appears to have spawned a new type of ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis. This review discusses the nephrotoxic effects of these common and emerging drugs of abuse, of which both community and health care providers should become aware given their widespread abuse. Future investigation into pathogenetic mechanisms associated with these drugs is critical and may provide a window into ways to lessen and even prevent the nephrotoxic effects of these drugs of abuse and perhaps allow a deeper understanding of the nephrotoxicities themselves.

  4. Aspiration Thrombectomy and Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation Decrease the Occurrence of Angina Pectoris One Year After Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chieh; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Huang-Chung; Hsueh, Shu-Kai; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yang, Cheng-Hsu; Yip, Hon-Kan; Hang, Chi-Ling; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Fang, Hsiu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angina pectoris is a treatable symptom that is associated with mortality and decreased quality of life. Angina eradication is a primary care goal of care after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our aim was to evaluate factors influencing angina pectoris 1 year after an AMI. From January 2005 to December 2013, 1547 patient received primary percutaneous intervention in our hospital for an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI). Of these patients, 1336 patients did not experience post-MI angina during a 1-year follow-up, and 211 patients did. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the factors influencing angina pectoris 1 year after an AMI. Propensity score matched analyses were performed for subgroups analyses. The average age of the patients was 61.08 ± 12.77 years, with a range of 25 to 97 years, and 82.9% of the patients were male. During 1-year follow-up, 13.6% of the patients experienced post-MI angina. There was a longer chest pain-to-reperfusion time in the post-MI angina group (P = 0.01), as well as a higher fasting sugar level, glycohemoglobin (HbA1C), serum creatinine, troponin-I and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB). The post-MI angina group also had a higher prevalence of multiple-vessel disease. Manual thrombectomy, and distal protective device and intracoronary glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor injection were used frequently in the no post-MI angina group. Antiplatelet agents and post-MI medication usage were similar between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that prior MI was a positive independent predictor of occurrence of post-MI angina. Manual thrombectomy use and drug-eluting stent implantation were negative independent predictors of post-MI angina. Higher troponin-I and longer chest pain-to-reperfusion time exhibited a trend toward predicting post-MI angina. Prior MIs were strong, independent predictors of post-MI angina. Manual thrombectomy

  5. Aspiration Thrombectomy and Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation Decrease the Occurrence of Angina Pectoris One Year After Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Chieh; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Huang-Chung; Hsueh, Shu-Kai; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yang, Cheng-Hsu; Yip, Hon-Kan; Hang, Chi-Ling; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Fang, Hsiu-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Angina pectoris is a treatable symptom that is associated with mortality and decreased quality of life. Angina eradication is a primary care goal of care after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our aim was to evaluate factors influencing angina pectoris 1 year after an AMI.From January 2005 to December 2013, 1547 patient received primary percutaneous intervention in our hospital for an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI). Of these patients, 1336 patients did not experience post-MI angina during a 1-year follow-up, and 211 patients did. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the factors influencing angina pectoris 1 year after an AMI. Propensity score matched analyses were performed for subgroups analyses.The average age of the patients was 61.08 ± 12.77 years, with a range of 25 to 97 years, and 82.9% of the patients were male. During 1-year follow-up, 13.6% of the patients experienced post-MI angina. There was a longer chest pain-to-reperfusion time in the post-MI angina group (P = 0.01), as well as a higher fasting sugar level, glycohemoglobin (HbA1C), serum creatinine, troponin-I and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB). The post-MI angina group also had a higher prevalence of multiple-vessel disease. Manual thrombectomy, and distal protective device and intracoronary glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor injection were used frequently in the no post-MI angina group. Antiplatelet agents and post-MI medication usage were similar between the 2 groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that prior MI was a positive independent predictor of occurrence of post-MI angina. Manual thrombectomy use and drug-eluting stent implantation were negative independent predictors of post-MI angina. Higher troponin-I and longer chest pain-to-reperfusion time exhibited a trend toward predicting post-MI angina.Prior MIs were strong, independent predictors of post-MI angina. Manual thrombectomy and drug

  6. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  7. 21 CFR 350.60 - Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guidelines for effectiveness testing of antiperspirant drug products. 350.60 Section 350.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANTIPERSPIRANT DRUG PRODUCTS FOR...

  8. [Acute Toxic Effects of Bromate on Aquatic Organisms].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Liu, Dong-mei; Zhang, Wen-juan; Cui, Fu-yi

    2016-02-15

    Acute toxic effects of potassium bromate, sodium bromate and potassium bromide on luminescent bacteria, water flea, green alga and zebrafish were studied using standard toxic testing methods. The results showed that the pollutants had no effect on the luminous intensity of luminescent bacteria. The 96 h EC5. of potassium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 738.18 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 on Daphnia magna and Moina was 154.01 mg x L(-1) was 161.80 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 198 52 mg x L(-1), 175.68 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 931.4 mg x L(-1). The 96 h EC50 of sodium bromate on Scenedesmus obliquus was 540.26 mg x L(-1), 48 h EC50 Daphnia magna and Moina was 127.90 mg x L(-1), 111.07 mg x L(-1), while 48 h LC50 was 161.80 mg x L(-1), 123.47 mg x L(-1), and 96 h LC50 on zebrafish was 1065.6 mg x L(-1). But the effects of potassium bromide on the above several kinds of aquatic organisms were far smaller than those of potassium bromate and sodium bromate. The toxic effects on test organisms were due to the impacts of bromate after the comparison of different pollutants, and the effects were more obvious with the increase of exposure time. The order of sensitivity to the toxic effects of bromate was Daphnia magna, Moina > Scenedesmus obliquus > zebrafish > Chlorella vulgaris, luminescent bacteria. PMID:27363170

  9. Clinical effect of ticagrelor administered in acute coronary syndrome patients following percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    LU, YANJIAO; LI, YANSHEN; YAO, RUI; LI, YAPENG; LI, LING; ZHAO, LUOSHA; ZHANG, YANZHOU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively analyze the clinical effect and safety of ticagrelor administration in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In total, 203 patients were enrolled, who were confirmed with ACS between March 2013 and May 2013, and had successfully undergone PCI. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including the clopidogrel (group A, n=108) and ticagrelor groups (group B, n=95). Patients in group A were treated with a 600 mg loading dose of clopidogrel followed by 75 mg/day clopidogrel plus 100 mg/day aspirin. Patients in group B received a 180 mg loading dose of ticagrelor followed by 90 mg ticagrelor twice daily plus 100 mg/day aspirin. Light transmission aggregometry was performed to measure the platelet aggregation rate prior to and following 4 weeks of anti-platelet drug treatment. In addition, the rate of cardiovascular events and the adverse drug reactions were recorded within a 1-year treatment period. Compared with the clopidogrel group, the rate of recurrent angina in the ticagrelor group was significantly lower (P=0.05). However, the rate of dyspnea in the ticagrelor group was significantly higher when compared with that in the clopidogrel group (P=0.03). After 4 weeks of treatment, the reduction in the platelet aggregation rate was significantly different between the two groups (P<0.05). Therefore, ticagrelor, which is a novel antiplatelet aggregation drug, may reduce the rate of the adverse cardiovascular events in ACS patients following PCI, but a higher incidence of side-effects, such as dyspnea, may be observed. PMID:27284299

  10. Chemotherapy drug scheduling for the induction treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pefani, E; Panoskaltsis, N; Mantalaris, A; Georgiadis, M C; Pistikopoulos, E N

    2014-07-01

    Leukemia is an immediately life-threatening cancer wherein immature blood cells are overproduced, accumulate in the bone marrow (BM) and blood and causes immune and blood system failure. Treatment with chemotherapy can be intensive or nonintensive and can also be life-threatening since only relatively few patient-specific and leukemia-specific factors are considered in current protocols. We have already presented a mathematical model for one intensive chemotherapy cycle with intravenous (i.v.) daunorubicin (DNR), and cytarabine (Ara-C). This model is now extended to nonintensive subcutaneous (SC) Ara-C and for a standard intensive chemotherapy course (four cycles), consistent with clinical practice. Model parameters mainly consist of physiological patient data, indicators of tumor burden and characteristics of cell cycle kinetics. A sensitivity analysis problem is solved and cell cycle parameters are identified to control treatment outcome. Simulation results using published cell cycle data from two acute myeloid leukemia patients are presented for a course of standard treatment using intensive and nonintensive protocols. The aim of remission-induction therapy is to debulk the tumor and achieve normal BM function; by treatment completion, the total leukemic population should be reduced to at most 10(9) cells, at which point BM hypoplasia is achieved. The normal cell number should be higher than that of the leukemic, and a 3-log reduction is the maximum permissible level of population reduction. This optimization problem is formulated and solved for the two patient case studies. The results clearly present the benefits from the use of optimization as an advisory tool for treatment design.

  11. Opposing effects of acute versus chronic blockade of frontal cortex somatostatin-positive inhibitory neurons on behavioral emotionality in mice.

    PubMed

    Soumier, Amelie; Sibille, Etienne

    2014-08-01

    Reduced expression of somatostatin (SST) is reported across chronic brain conditions including major depression and normal aging. SST is a signaling neuropeptide and marker of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurons, which specifically inhibit pyramidal neuron dendrites. Studies in auditory cortex suggest that chronic reduction in dendritic inhibition induces compensatory homeostatic adaptations that oppose the effects of acute inhibition. Whether such mechanisms occur in frontal cortex (FC) and affect behavioral outcome is not known. Here, we used two complementary viral vector strategies to examine the effects of acute vs chronic inhibition of SST-positive neurons on behavioral emotionality in adult mice. SST-IRES-Cre mice were injected in FC (prelimbic/precingulate) with CRE-dependent adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding the engineered Gi/o-coupled human muscarinic M4 designer receptor exclusively activated by a designer drug (DREADD-hM4Di) or a control reporter (AAV-DIO-mCherry) for acute or chronic cellular inhibition. A separate cohort was injected with CRE-dependent AAV vectors expressing diphtheria toxin (DTA) to selectively ablate FC SST neurons. Mice were assessed for anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (defined as emotionality). Results indicate that acute inhibition of FC SST neurons increased behavioral emotionality, whereas chronic inhibition decreased behavioral emotionality. Furthermore, ablation of FC SST neurons also decreased behavioral emotionality under baseline condition and after chronic stress. Together, our results reveal opposite effects of acute and chronic inhibition of FC SST neurons on behavioral emotionality and suggest the recruitment of homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that have implications for understanding the neurobiology of chronic brain conditions affecting dendritic-targeting inhibitory neurons.

  12. Acute effects of tetracycline exposure in the freshwater fish Gambusia holbrooki: antioxidant effects, neurotoxicity and histological alterations.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Antunes, S C; Gomes, R; Campos, J C; Braga, M R; Ramos, A S; Correia, A T

    2015-02-01

    A large body of evidence was compiled in the recent decades showing a noteworthy increase in the detection of pharmaceutical drugs in aquatic ecosystems. Due to its ubiquitous presence, chemical nature, and practical purpose, this type of contaminant can exert toxic effects in nontarget organisms. Exposure to pharmaceutical drugs can result in adaptive alterations, such as changes in tissues, or in key homeostatic mechanisms, such as antioxidant mechanisms, biochemical/physiological pathways, and cellular damage. These alterations can be monitored to determine the impact of these compounds on exposed aquatic organisms. Among pharmaceutical drugs in the environment, antibiotics are particularly important because they include a variety of substances widely used in medical and veterinary practice, livestock production, and aquaculture. This wide use constitutes a decisive factor contributing for their frequent detection in the aquatic environment. Tetracyclines are the individual antibiotic subclass with the second highest frequency of detection in environmental matrices. The characterization of the potential ecotoxicological effects of tetracycline is a much-required task; to attain this objective, the present study assessed the acute toxic effects of tetracycline in the freshwater fish species Gambusia holbrooki by the determination of histological changes in the gills and liver, changes in antioxidant defense [glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), and lipoperoxidative damage] as well as potential neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase activity). The obtained results suggest the existence of a cause-and-effect relationship between the exposure to tetracycline and histological alterations (more specifically in gills) and enzymatic activity (particularly the enzyme CAT in liver and GST in gills) indicating that this compound can exert a pro-oxidative activity. PMID:25475590

  13. Sensory and Cognitive Effects of Acute Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Kipen, Howard; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Zhang, Junfeng; Weisel, Clifford; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Olejeme, Kelechi; Lioy, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Some epidemiologic studies have reported compromised cognitive and sensory performance among individuals exposed to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Objectives We hypothesized a dose–response increase in symptom severity and reduction in sensory and cognitive performance in response to controlled H2S exposures. Methods In separate exposure sessions administered in random order over three consecutive weeks, 74 healthy subjects [35 females, 39 males; mean age (± SD) = 24.7 ± 4.2; mean years of education = 16.5 ± 2.4], were exposed to 0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm H2S. During each exposure session, subjects completed ratings and tests before H2S exposure (baseline) and during the final hour of the 2-hr exposure period. Results Dose–response reduction in air quality and increases in ratings of odor intensity, irritation, and unpleasantness were observed. Total symptom severity was not significantly elevated across any exposure condition, but anxiety symptoms were significantly greater in the 5-ppm than in the 0.05-ppm condition. No dose–response effect was observed for sensory or cognitive measures. Verbal learning was compromised during each exposure condition. Conclusions Although some symptoms increased with exposure, the magnitude of these changes was relatively minor. Increased anxiety was significantly related to ratings of irritation due to odor. Whether the effect on verbal learning represents a threshold effect of H2S or an effect due to fatigue across exposure requires further investigation. These acute effects in a healthy sample cannot be directly generalized to communities where individuals have other health conditions and concomitant exposures. PMID:18197303

  14. Drugs and Pregnancy: The Effects of Nonmedical Use of Drugs on Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Neonates. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Issues 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse presents this report as the fifth in a series intended to summarize the empirical research findings and major theoretical approaches relating to the the issues of drug use and abuse. Included in this volume are summaries of the major research findings concerning the effects of nonmedical drug use on pregnancy.…

  15. Aflatrem: a tremorgenic mycotoxin with acute neurotoxic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, J J; Cameron, J E; Cole, R J

    1985-01-01

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins induce neurologic symptoms ranging from mental confusion to tremors, seizures and death, and are apparently the only class of mycotoxins with significant central nervous system activity. Tremorgens have been implicated in a number of neurologic diseases of cattle collectively known as staggers syndromes, and pose significant agricultural and health problems for both cattle and humans. Although the effects of tremorgens are thought to result from transient perturbations of amino acid neurotransmitter release mechanisms, there is reason to believe that acute exposures to toxins with such synaptic effects may result in degeneration of neuronal fiber processes. To test this hypothesis, rats were given a single tremorgenic (3 mg/kg, IP) dose of aflatrem, and kinetics of amino acid neurotransmitter uptake was assessed in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals at 1 day, 1 week, and 2 weeks after injection. Results indicate a decrease in the capacity of the GABA and glutamate uptake systems, which was interpreted as a loss of nerve terminals. The affinity constants suggest a decrease in release of these transmitters as well. In addition to its transient influence on transmitter release, a single low dose of aflatrem is able to induce degeneration of neuronal processes in hippocampal neurotransmitter systems and therefore represents a long-term health threat. PMID:2867895

  16. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  17. Evaluation of acute effects of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Zahoor Ahmad; Chowta, Mukta N.; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rakesh, K. B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the acute effect of melatonin on ethanol drinking in ethanol naïve rats and to determine the specificity of the effect of melatonin on ethanol intake as compared to an intake of plain tap water or sugar water. Materials and Methods: A total of three experiments (2 weeks duration each) using different drinking solutions (ethanol, plain tap water, sugar water) was conducted in individually housed male wistar rats of 5 weeks age. Each animal had access to bottles containing drinking solutions for 2 h a day. In each experiment, on day 1, day 2, day 4, day 5, day 8, day 9, day 11, day 12 rats received drinking solutions. Each individual rat received single doses of saline, melatonin (50 mg and 100 mg/kg), and naltrexone on day 2, 5, 9, and 12, 1-h before receiving drinking solution. The order of drug administration is permuted such a way that each animal received the drugs in a different order in different experiments. Results: Melatonin has significantly decreased ethanol consumption by the rats and effect is dose-dependent. Naltrexone also has caused a significant reduction in the ethanol consumption. The maximum reduction in ethanol consumption was seen with melatonin 100 mg/kg dose compared to melatonin 50 mg/kg and naltrexone. There was no statistically significant effect of melatonin on plain water and sugar solution intake. Conclusions: Melatonin decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol naïve rats. The effect of melatonin is similar to naltrexone affecting selectively ethanol consumption, but not plain water and sugar water consumption. PMID:26288469

  18. Orlistat-associated adverse effects and drug interactions: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Derdemezis, Christos S; Gazi, Irene F; Nakou, Eleni S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses S

    2008-01-01

    Orlistat, an anti-obesity drug, is a potent and specific inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In light of the recent US FDA approval of the over-the-counter sale of orlistat (60 mg three times daily), clinicians need to be aware that its use may be associated with less well known, but sometimes clinically relevant, adverse effects. More specifically, the use of orlistat has been associated with several mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as oily stools, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and faecal spotting. A few cases of serious hepatic adverse effects (cholelithiasis, cholostatic hepatitis and subacute liver failure) have been reported. However, the effects of orlistat on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are beneficial. Orlistat-induced weight loss seems to have beneficial effects on blood pressure. No effect has been observed on calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper or zinc balance or on bone biomarkers. Interestingly, the use of orlistat has been associated with rare cases of acute kidney injury, possibly due to the increased fat malabsorption resulting from the inhibition of pancreatic and gastric lipase by orlistat, leading to the formation of soaps with calcium and resulting in increased free oxalate absorption and enteric hyperoxaluria. Orlistat has a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. No significant effect on cancer risk has been reported with orlistat.Orlistat interferes with the absorption of many drugs (such as warfarin, amiodarone, ciclosporin and thyroxine as well as fat-soluble vitamins), affecting their bioavailability and effectiveness. This review considers orlistat-related adverse effects and drug interactions. The clinical relevance and pathogenesis of these effects is also discussed.

  19. Drug cutaneous side effect: focus on skin ulceration.

    PubMed

    D'Epiro, S; Salvi, M; Luzi, A; Mattozzi, C; Luci, C; Macaluso, L; Marzocca, F; Salvo, V; Cantisani, C; Paolino, G; Calvieri, S; Richetta, A G

    2014-01-01

    Skin ulcers are defined as tissue loss interesting the deeper layers of the dermis and hypodermis, with low tendency to spontaneous healing. They cause disability related to pain, risk of infection and amputation, chronic management, requiring working absence with notably economic burden. The major cause is often related to underlying vascular disease, infections, tumors, autoimmunity, trauma, even if literature occasionally reported several cases of drug inducing skin ulceration. Most of drugs involved are chemotherapy agents and more recently molecular target therapies. Evidences supporting these drugs as the major cause of skin ulcers include delay of onset after therapy initiation, improvement after withdrawal of the drug, recurrence after its reintroduction and, sometimes, simultaneous occurrence of other skin lesions that have previously been reported to be associated with these agents. Attention should be reserved to patients undergoing antineoplastic agents, especially if previously affected by predisposing comorbidities, considering such side effect as possible differential diagnosis for skin ulceration in neoplastic patients. PMID:25203350

  20. Effect of Tamoxifen and Lithium on Treatment of Acute Mania Symptoms in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Elham; Arman, Sorror; Najafi, Mostafa; Shayegh, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies have supported the role of protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors in the physiopathology and treatment of bipolar disorder in adults. Tamoxifen is one of the drugs with the effect of PKC inhibition. This study aimed to determine the effect of tamoxifen on the rate of improvement mania symptoms in the sample of children and adolescents with acute mania. Materials & Methods In this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial study, registered in www.irct.ir with the code of IRCT201410126418N3, overall 44 patients with bipolar disorder with acute manic episode were randomly assigned into treatment and control groups. The serum levels of lithium and tamoxifen among the participants in the treatment groups were 0.8 -1.1 mg and 20-40 mg per day respectively. Serum level of lithium among participants in the control group was similar. The main comparisons were made based on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Children Depression Inventory (CDI) scores of the participants at baseline and at the end of each study week. The pharmacological side effects of serum level of lithium were examined weekly. Analysis of Covariance(ANCOVA) test was used for the statistical analysis. Results There was no difference in the baseline score of YMRS and CDI in the treatment and control groups while a statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) in these scores was found between and within the groups. Conclusion The addition of tamoxifen to lithium causes a significant difference in reducing the symptoms of mania and depression in the treatment group compared to the control group. PMID:27247580

  1. Acute hemodynamic effects and blood pool kinetics of polystyrene microspheres following intravenous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Slack, J.D.; Kanke, M.; Simmons, G.H.; DeLuca, P.P.

    1981-06-01

    The acute hemodynamic effect of intravenous administration of polystyrene microspheres was investigated and correlated with their distribution pattern and kinetics. Microspheres of three diameters (3.4, 7.4, and 11.6 micrometer) were administered. The 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres were filtered by the pulmonary capillary network following intravenous administration, the majority during the first pass. There was no significant hemodynamic effect following administrations of the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres in doses as high as 3.0 X 10(9) and 6.1 X 10(8) respectively (total cross-sectional area of 1.3 X 10(11) and 6.4 X 10(10) micrometer2, respectively). Intravenous administration of 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres produced significant dose-dependent systemic hypotension and depression of myocardial performance at dosages as slow as 1.0 X 10(10) (cross-sectional area of 9.1 X 10(10) micrometer2). These differences in acute hemodynamic effect from the 7.4- and 11.6-micrometer diameter microspheres may be due to the differences in distribution kinetics and fate of the 3.4-micrometer diameter microspheres, which readily pass through the lungs to the spleen. Although elimination of the smaller spheres from the blood during the first 6-8 min was rapid, i.e., t 1/2 . 1.62 and 1.72 min from the venous and arterial blood circulation, respectively, levels of 10(3) spheres/g of blood were present in the circulation for greater than 1 hr. These findings must be considered in the planning of intravenous administration of microspheres as a drug delivery system to target organs.

  2. Predicting unintended effects of drugs based on off-target tissue effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Docyong; Lee, Jaehyun; Lee, Sunjae; Park, Junseok; Lee, Doheon

    2016-01-15

    Unintended effects of drugs can be caused by various mechanisms. Conventional analysis of unintended effects has focused on the target proteins of drugs. However, an interaction with off-target tissues of a drug might be one of the unintended effect-related mechanisms. We propose two processes to predict a drug's unintended effects by off-target tissue effects: 1) identification of a drug's off-target tissue and; 2) tissue protein - symptom relation identification (tissue protein - symptom matrix). Using this method, we predicted that 1,177 (10.7%) side-effects were related to off-target tissue effects in 11,041 known side-effects. Off-target tissues and unintended effects of successful repositioning drugs were also predicted. The effectiveness of relations of the proposed tissue protein - symptom matrix were evaluated by using the literature mining method. We predicted unintended effects of drugs as well as those effect-related off-target tissues. By using our prediction, we are able to reduce drug side-effects on off-target tissues and provide a chance to identify new indications of drugs of interest.

  3. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  4. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy. PMID:26817927

  5. Emerging lessons from the drug effectiveness review project.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    The Drug Effectiveness Review Project (DERP) is an alliance of fifteen states and two private organizations, which have pooled resources to synthesize and judge clinical evidence for drug-class reviews. The experience shines a bright light on challenges involved in implementing an evidence-based medicine process to inform drug formulary decisions: When should evidence reviewers accept surrogate markers and assume therapeutic class effects? How open and participatory should review procedures be? Should reviewers consider cost-effectiveness information? What is the appropriate role of the public sector in judging evidence? The DERP illustrates that attempts to undertake evidence-based reviews, apart from the methods themselves, which continue to evolve, involve questions of organization, process, and leadership. PMID:16757486

  6. Punishing versus reinforcing strategies of drug discontinuance: effect of persuaders' drug use.

    PubMed

    Le Poire, B A; Erlandson, K T; Hallett, J S

    1998-01-01

    This study tests and extends inconsistent nurturing as control theory (Le Poire, 1992,1995) by exploring the use of reinforcing and punishing drug discontinuance strategies based on the drug-use status of the functional/persuading partners (past abuse, current abuse, current use, and nonuse). All partners were inconsistent in their use of reinforcement and punishment of substance abuse, with past abusers punishing the substance abuse most before they labeled the drug use as problematic, and current users and nonusers punishing the substance abuse the most following the labeling and in the postfrustration period. Additionally, current abusers were the most reinforcing of alternative behavior during every time period, a strategy that was most highly related to reduction in relapse. Furthermore, nonusers utilized the most indulgence and antidrink strategies, that are in opposition based on their reinforcing and punishing natures. Past abusers were rated as most persuasively effective by their partners, whereas nonusers were evaluated as the least persuasively effective. Finally, drug use was related to the mental health of the persuading partner, in that current abusers and nonusers were significantly more depressed and anxious than past abusers or current users.

  7. Acute effects of acrolein in human volunteers during controlled exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Aishwarya M.; Johanson, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Johnny C.; Palmberg, Lena; Sjögren, Bengt; Ernstgård, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Acrolein is a reactive aldehyde mainly formed by combustion. The critical effect is considered to be irritation of the eyes and airways; however, the scarce data available make it difficult to assess effect levels. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine thresholds for acute irritation for acrolein. Methods: Nine healthy volunteers of each sex were exposed at six occasions for 2 h at rest to: clean air, 15 ppm ethyl acetate (EA), and 0.05 ppm and 0.1 ppm acrolein with and without EA (15 ppm) to mask the potential influence of odor. Symptoms related to irritation and central nervous system effects were rated on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Results: The ratings of eye irritation were slightly but significantly increased during exposure to acrolein in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.001, Friedman test) with a median rating of 8 mm (corresponding to “hardly at all”) at the 0.1 ppm condition and with no influence from EA. No significant exposure-related effects were found for pulmonary function, or nasal swelling, nor for markers of inflammation and coagulation in blood (IL-6, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and Clara cell protein) or induced sputum (cell count, differential cell count, IL-6 and IL-8). Blink frequency recorded by electromyography was increased during exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein alone but not during any of the other five exposure conditions. Conclusion: Based on subjective ratings, the present study showed minor eye irritation by exposure to 0.1 ppm acrolein. PMID:26635308

  8. Teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs on Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Marina; Piscitelli, Concetta; Russo, Chiara; Smutná, Marie; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the environmental presence of pharmaceuticals - including anticancer drugs - is an emerging issue. Because of the lack of appropriate critical studies about anticancer drug effects in frogs, the aim of the present study was to investigate lethal and teratogenic effects of five anticancer drugs widely used in large quantities, i.e. 5-flourouracil, capecitabine, cisplatin, etoposide, and imatinib, in the embryos of the South African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, using FETAX - Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay in Xenopus. None of the studied anticancer drugs induced statistically significant mortality within the concentrations tested (0.01-50mg/L, depending on the studied compound), and no growth inhibition of embryos after a 96-h exposure was observed. Except for cisplatin, the other pharmaceuticals induced an increase of developmental malformations such as abdominal edema, axial flexure, head, eyes, gut and heart malformations with statistically significant effects observed at the highest concentrations tested (50mg/L for 5-flourouracil; 30mg/L for etoposide and 20mg/L for capecitabine and imatinib). The results indicate that anticancer drugs can affect embryogenesis mechanisms. PMID:27423131

  9. Acute respiratory effects of summer smog in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, C E; Swaen, G M; Wesseling, G; Wouters, E F

    1994-06-01

    In 535 primary school children we studied the effects of exposure to summer smog on respiratory health. Baseline measurements were performed during low air pollution levels (max. 24-h concentrations of SO2, O3 and NO2 were 55, 49 and 58 micrograms/m3, respectively) consisting of lung function measurements using spirometry and the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, determined by a written questionnaire. During a summer smog episode, 212 randomly chosen children were re-examined, characterised by 8-h ozone levels > 120 micrograms/m3 (max. 163 micrograms/m3) and 1-h ozone levels > 160 micrograms/m3 (max. 215 micrograms/m3). Overall, small decrements were observed in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), (P < 0.05) and the forced expiratory volume between 25 and 75% of the vital capacity (FEF25-75%) (P < 0.01). On the contrary, there was a statistically significant decrease in resistance parameters. No increases were observed in the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, in this study we found small inconsistent changes in lung function and no increase of respiratory symptoms after short-time exposure to moderately high ozone levels.

  10. Acute effects of ethanol on left ventricular diastolic function.

    PubMed Central

    Kupari, M; Koskinen, P; Hynynen, M; Salmenperä, M; Ventilä, M

    1990-01-01

    Transmitral flow velocities were measured by Doppler echocardiography in nine healthy men who ingested 1 g/kg of ethanol within one hour. The measurements were made before the first drink and every hour thereafter for three hours. The peak mean (SE) blood ethanol concentration was 21.4 (1.0) mmol/l. Each man was also studied after drinking fruit juice. Ethanol increased the heart rate but did not change the peak transmitral velocities, the normalised peak filling rate, the deceleration of early flow, or the duration of relaxation as measured from the second heart sound to the peak early diastolic velocity. The ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity rose from 0.41 (0.03) to 0.44 (0.03) after ethanol but remained unchanged after juice. The difference between juice and ethanol was independent of changes in heart rate. The fluid balance was more negative in the ethanol experiment (-727 (114) ml v -107 (70) ml), suggesting a reduction in preload, and the ethanol-induced net loss of fluid correlated with the concomitant change in the velocity ratio. A moderate dose of ethanol causes a small acute increase of the ratio of the peak atrial to the peak early diastolic velocity of mitral flow in healthy subjects. Although this change indicates altered diastolic function of the left ventricle, most of it may result from the diuretic effect of ethanol. Any major impairment of ventricular relaxation seems unlikely. PMID:2393610

  11. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  12. Effect of β-Blockers on the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pesaro, Antonio Eduardo; de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Serrano, Carlos Vicente; Giraldez, Roberto Rocha; Ladeira, Renata Teixeira; Nicolau, José Carlos

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral β-blockers improve the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction, while atrial fibrillation worsens the prognosis of this population. The reduction of atrial fibrillation incidence in patients treated with β-blockers could at least in part explain the benefits of this drug. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of β-blockers on the incidence of atrial fibrillation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS: We analyzed 1401 patients with acute myocardial infarction and evaluated the occurrence or absence of atrial fibrillation, the use of oral β-blockers and mortality during the first 24 hours. RESULTS: a) The use of β-blockers was inversely correlated with the presence of atrial fibrillation (ρ = 0.004; OR = 0.54). b) Correlations with mortality were as follows: 31.5% in patients with atrial fibrillation, 9.2% in those without atrial fibrillation (ρ < 0.001; Odds Ratio = 4.52), and 17.5% in patients not treated with β-blockers and 6.7% in those who received the drug (ρ < 0.001; OR = 0.34). c) Adjusted Models: The presence of atrial fibrillation was independently correlated with mortality (OR = 2.48, ρ = 0.002). The use of β-blockers was inversely and independently correlated with mortality (OR = 0.53; ρ = 0.002). The patients who used β-blockers showed a lower risk of atrial fibrillation (OR = 0.59; ρ = 0.029) in the adjusted model. CONCLUSION: The presence of atrial fibrillation and the absence of oral β-blockers increased in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Oral β-blockers reduced the incidence of atrial fibrillation, which might be at least partially responsible for the drug’s benefit. PMID:20360916

  13. Acute ethanol effects on focal cerebral ischemia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Yang, G Y; Ben-Joseph, O; Ross, B D; Chenevert, T L; Domino, E F

    1998-05-01

    The effects of acute ethanol intoxication were investigated in a rat model of unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion. Groups of 5 to 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 hr of left middle cerebral artery occlusion. All groups were deprived of food overnight and were pretreated intraperitoneally with 5% dextrose solution (10 ml/kg), 20% ethyl alcohol in 5% dextrose solution (2 g/kg), or 30% ethyl alcohol in a 5% dextrose solution (3 g/kg) 1 hr before middle cerebral artery occlusion. Regional cerebral blood flow during ipsilateral occlusion was approximately 9.1 to 10% of baseline in all groups. The mean % brain water content in control, 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups, and 3 g/kg ethanol-treated groups were: in the ischemic core--81.6, 81.2, and 82.4; intermediate zone--80.5, 80.6, and 81.7; and outer zone--79.7, 79.7, and 80.8, respectively. Brain Na+ and K+ content in the three groups was related to water content, but much greater with ethanol pretreatment. The water content of the intermediate zones in the 3 g/kg ethanol-treated animals was significantly greater than in the control (p < 0.01 and 0.001) and the 2 g/kg ethanol-treated groups. One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant dose-effect relationship in which the lower dose of ethanol tended to reduce ischemic core water content, and the larger dose increased ischemic core water, compared with the control. None of the overnight fasted groups had any significant hyperglycemia. The group given 3 g/kg i.p. ethanol 1 hr before had exacerbated edema formation with a mean whole blood level of ethanol of approximately 230 mg/dl. The neurotoxic effects of high concentrations of ethanol were unrelated to any change in plasma glucose concentrations.

  14. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao-xin; Han, Bing; Hou, Li-Min; An, Ting-Ting; Jia, Guang; Cheng, Zhuo-Xin; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Yi-Nan; Kong, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Jia; Wang, Yong-Wei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Pan, Shang-Ha; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight). Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP. PMID:27115738

  15. Acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Gottesdiener, K.; Jordan, J.; Chen, K.; Flattery, S.; Larson, P. J.; Candelore, M. R.; Gertz, B.; Robertson, D.; Sun, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine is used to help achieve weight control. Data on its true efficacy and mechanisms in altering energy balance in human subjects are limited. We aimed to determine the acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work and urinary catecholamines in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study. Ten healthy volunteers were given ephedrine (50 mg) or placebo thrice daily during each of two 24-h periods (ephedrine and placebo) in a whole-room indirect calorimeter, which accurately measures minute-by-minute energy expenditure and mechanical work. Measurements were taken of 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work, urinary catecholamines and binding of (+/-)ephedrine in vitro to human beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenoreceptors. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was 3.6% greater (8965+/-1301 versus 8648+/-1347 kJ, P<0.05) with ephedrine than with placebo, but mechanical work was not different between the ephedrine and placebo periods. Noradrenaline excretion was lower with ephedrine (0.032+/-0.011 microg/mg creatinine) compared with placebo (0.044+/-0.012 microg/mg creatinine) (P<0.05). (+/-)Ephedrine is a relatively weak partial agonist of human beta1- and beta2-adrenoreceptors, and had no detectable activity at human beta3-adrenoreceptors. Ephedrine (50 mg thrice daily) modestly increases energy expenditure in normal human subjects. A lack of binding of ephedrine to beta3-adrenoreceptors and the observed decrease in urinary noradrenaline during ephedrine treatment suggest that the thermogenic effect of ephedrine results from direct beta1-/beta2-adrenoreceptor agonism. An indirect beta3-adrenergic effect through the release of noradrenaline seems unlikely as urinary noradrenaline decreased significantly with ephedrine.

  16. The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ivaska, Kaisa K; Heliövaara, Maikki K; Ebeling, Pertti; Bucci, Marco; Huovinen, Ville; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Koistinen, Heikki A

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling in bone-forming osteoblasts stimulates bone formation and promotes the release of osteocalcin (OC) in mice. Only a few studies have assessed the direct effect of insulin on bone metabolism in humans. Here, we studied markers of bone metabolism in response to acute hyperinsulinemia in men and women. Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of infusions to determine the markers of bone formation (PINP, total OC, uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC)) and resorption (CTX, TRAcP5b). During 4 h insulin infusion (40 mU/m2 per min, low insulin), CTX level decreased by 11% (P<0.05). High insulin infusion rate (72 mU/m2 per min) for 4 h resulted in more pronounced decrease (−32%, P<0.01) whereas shorter insulin exposure (40 mU/m2 per min for 2 h) had no effect (P=0.61). Markers of osteoblast activity remained unchanged during 4 h insulin, but the ratio of uncarboxylated-to-total OC decreased in response to insulin (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for low and high insulin for 4 h respectively). During 2 h low insulin infusion, both total OC and ucOC decreased significantly (P<0.01 for both). In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC. Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin. PMID:26047829

  17. AKT1 genotype moderates the acute psychotomimetic effects of naturalistically smoked cannabis in young cannabis smokers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, C J A; Freeman, T P; Powell, J; Curran, H V

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cannabis daily doubles an individual's risk of developing a psychotic disorder, yet indicators of specific vulnerability have proved largely elusive. Genetic variation is one potential risk modifier. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the AKT1 and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes have been implicated in the interaction between cannabis, psychosis and cognition, but no studies have examined their impact on an individual's acute response to smoked cannabis. A total 442 healthy young cannabis users were tested while intoxicated with their own cannabis—which was analysed for delta-9-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC) and cannabidiol content—and also ±7 days apart when drug-free. Psychotomimetic symptoms and working memory were assessed on both the sessions. Variation at the rs2494732 locus of the AKT1 gene predicted acute psychotic response to cannabis along with dependence on the drug and baseline schizotypal symptoms. Working memory following cannabis acutely was worse in females, with some suggestion of an impact of COMT polymorphism on working memory when drug-free. These findings are the first to demonstrate that AKT1 mediates the acute response to cannabis in otherwise healthy individuals and implicate the AKT1 pathway as a possible target for prevention and treatment of cannabis psychosis. PMID:26882038

  18. AKT1 genotype moderates the acute psychotomimetic effects of naturalistically smoked cannabis in young cannabis smokers.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C J A; Freeman, T P; Powell, J; Curran, H V

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cannabis daily doubles an individual's risk of developing a psychotic disorder, yet indicators of specific vulnerability have proved largely elusive. Genetic variation is one potential risk modifier. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the AKT1 and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes have been implicated in the interaction between cannabis, psychosis and cognition, but no studies have examined their impact on an individual's acute response to smoked cannabis. A total 442 healthy young cannabis users were tested while intoxicated with their own cannabis-which was analysed for delta-9-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC) and cannabidiol content-and also ± 7 days apart when drug-free. Psychotomimetic symptoms and working memory were assessed on both the sessions. Variation at the rs2494732 locus of the AKT1 gene predicted acute psychotic response to cannabis along with dependence on the drug and baseline schizotypal symptoms. Working memory following cannabis acutely was worse in females, with some suggestion of an impact of COMT polymorphism on working memory when drug-free. These findings are the first to demonstrate that AKT1 mediates the acute response to cannabis in otherwise healthy individuals and implicate the AKT1 pathway as a possible target for prevention and treatment of cannabis psychosis. PMID:26882038

  19. Differential Effects of Opioid-Related Ligands and NSAIDs in Nonhuman Primate Models of Acute and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sukhtankar, Devki D.; Lee, Heeseung; Rice, Kenner C.; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia is a widely used pain model in rodents. However, characteristics of carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia and effects of analgesic drugs under these conditions are unknown in nonhuman primates. Objective The aims of this study were to develop carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in rhesus monkeys and determine the efficacy and potency of agonists selective for the four opioid receptor subtypes in this model versus acute pain, as compared to NSAIDs. Results Tail-injection of carrageenan produced long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia in monkeys. Systemically administered agonists selective for opioid receptor subtypes i.e. fentanyl (mu/MOP), U-50488H (kappa/KOP), SNC80 (delta/DOP) and Ro 64-6198 (nociceptin/orphanin FQ/NOP) dose-dependently attenuated carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia with different potencies. In absence of carrageenan, these agonists, except SNC80, blocked acute thermal nociception. Opioid-related ligands, especially Ro 64-6198, were much more potent for their antihyperalgesic than antinociceptive effects. Both effects were mediated by the corresponding receptor mechanisms. Only fentanyl produced scratching at antihyperalgesic and antinociceptive doses consistent with its pruritic effects in humans, illustrating a translational profile of MOP agonists in nonhuman primates. Similar to SNC80, systemically administered NSAIDs ketorolac and naproxen dose-dependently attenuated carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia but not acute nociception. Conclusion Using two different pain modalities in nonhuman primates, effectiveness of clinically available analgesics like fentanyl, ketorolac and naproxen was distinguished and their efficacies and potencies were compared with the selective KOP, DOP, and NOP agonists. The opioid-related ligands displayed differential pharmacological properties in regulating hyperalgesia and acute nociception in the same subjects. Such preclinical primate models can be used to investigate novel

  20. Hemodynamic and symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, V. M.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Novak, V.; Low, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to alleviate symptoms in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Drugs reported to be of benefit include midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, and phenobarbital. Other measures used include volume expansion and physical countermaneuvers. These treatments may influence pathophysiologic mechanisms of POTS such as alpha-receptor dysfunction, beta-receptor supersensitivity, venous pooling, and brainstem center dysfunction. The authors prospectively studied hemodynamic indices and symptom scores in patients with POTS who were acutely treated with a variety of interventions. Twenty-one subjects who met the criteria for POTS were studied (20 women, 1 man; mean age, 28.7 +/- 6.8 y; age range, 14-39 y). Patients were studied with a 5-minute head-up tilt protocol, ECG monitoring, and noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure monitoring, all before and after the administration of an intervention (intravenous saline, midodrine, propranolol, clonidine, or phenobarbital). The hemodynamic indices studied were heart rate (ECG) and systolic, mean, and diastolic blood pressure. Patients used a balanced verbal scale to record any change in their symptoms between the tilts. Symptom scores improved significantly after the patients received midodrine and saline. Midodrine and propranolol reduced the resting heart rate response to tilt (p <0.005) and the immediate and 5-minute heart rate responses to tilt (p <0.002). Clonidine accentuated the immediate decrease in blood pressure on tilt up (p <0.05). It was concluded that midodrine and intravenous saline are effective in decreasing symptoms on tilt in patients with POTS when given acutely. Effects of treatments on heart rate and blood pressure responses generally reflected the known pharmacologic mechanisms of the agents.

  1. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  2. The heart of Daphnia magna: effects of four cardioactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Navarro, Arturo; Rosas-L, Esperanza; Reyes, José L

    2003-10-01

    We used Daphnia magna bioassays to determine the LC(50) and the effects on the heart of the cardioactive drugs ouabain, verapamil, metaproterenol and metoprolol. Distinctions were made between the pharmacological and toxicological effects of these drugs and the adequacy of physicochemical characteristics of its habitat (reconstituted water). Video microscopy and digital image processing were used to study the pharmacological effects on the heart. D. magna exhibited the expected sensitivity to the reference toxicant sodium dodecyl sulfate with a LC(50) of 15.6+/-4.5 mg/l. All drugs were toxic with 48 h-LC(50) of 2.03 mg/l ouabain, 7.04 mg/l verapamil, 32.45 mg/l metaproterenol and 76.21 mg/l metoprolol. Ouabain was the most toxic and caused a positive concentration-dependent inotropic effect. Verapamil caused positive chronotropic and inotropic effects, while metaproterenol showed positive concentration-dependent chronotropic effects at high concentrations (10(-3) and 10(-4) M). Metoprolol induced a positive chronotropic effect at low concentrations (10(-8), 10(-7), 10(-6) M) and a negative chronotropic effect at high concentration (10(-4) M). Ouabain, metaproterenol and metoprolol in D. magna caused similar effects to those produced in mammals. In contrast, verapamil caused opposite effects. The results suggest the presence of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase receptors to verapamil and of non-specific adrenergic receptors in heart of D. magna.

  3. Silica Ouzo Effect: Amphiphilic Drugs Facilitate Nanoprecipitation of Polycondensed Mercaptosilanes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chou, Hung-Chang; Hu, Teh-Min

    2016-01-12

    Amphiphilic drugs are therapeutic agents whose molecular structures contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions. Here we report a systematic study on how amphiphilic drugs can assist in silica nanoprecipitation. 3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) was used as the sole silica material and 12 amphiphilic drugs spanning a wide spectrum of therapeutic categories were included. MPTMS polycondensation was conducted in a DMSO-based organic phase. After a sufficient time, particle formation was induced by injecting a small amount of the organic phase into a water solution containing various amphiphiles. The results show that all amphiphilic drugs studied exerted concentration-dependent facilitating effect on nanoparticle formation. Under certain preparation conditions, the particle solution showed physical stability over a long period and the formed particles could be as small as 100 nm. By systematically varying drug concentrations and injection volumes, the ability of each amphiphile to promote nanoprecipitation can be quantified and compared, based on two novel indices: the area under the critical volume-concentration curve (AUC) and the critical stabilization concentration (CSC). We demonstrate that both ability indices significantly correlated with the drug's log P and critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Furthermore, we have optimized the aging and particle purification condition and extensively characterized our system through comprehensive TEM and zeta-potential measurements, as well as determinations for drug entrapment and release. In conclusion, we have established a quantitative structure-activity relationship for amphiphilic small-molecular drugs in their ability to interact with poly(mercaptopropyl)silsesquioxane species and form nanoparticles via solvent shifting. We speculate that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play important roles in the formation and stabilization of nanoparticles. PMID:26673354

  4. Silica Ouzo Effect: Amphiphilic Drugs Facilitate Nanoprecipitation of Polycondensed Mercaptosilanes.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chou, Hung-Chang; Hu, Teh-Min

    2016-01-12

    Amphiphilic drugs are therapeutic agents whose molecular structures contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions. Here we report a systematic study on how amphiphilic drugs can assist in silica nanoprecipitation. 3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) was used as the sole silica material and 12 amphiphilic drugs spanning a wide spectrum of therapeutic categories were included. MPTMS polycondensation was conducted in a DMSO-based organic phase. After a sufficient time, particle formation was induced by injecting a small amount of the organic phase into a water solution containing various amphiphiles. The results show that all amphiphilic drugs studied exerted concentration-dependent facilitating effect on nanoparticle formation. Under certain preparation conditions, the particle solution showed physical stability over a long period and the formed particles could be as small as 100 nm. By systematically varying drug concentrations and injection volumes, the ability of each amphiphile to promote nanoprecipitation can be quantified and compared, based on two novel indices: the area under the critical volume-concentration curve (AUC) and the critical stabilization concentration (CSC). We demonstrate that both ability indices significantly correlated with the drug's log P and critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Furthermore, we have optimized the aging and particle purification condition and extensively characterized our system through comprehensive TEM and zeta-potential measurements, as well as determinations for drug entrapment and release. In conclusion, we have established a quantitative structure-activity relationship for amphiphilic small-molecular drugs in their ability to interact with poly(mercaptopropyl)silsesquioxane species and form nanoparticles via solvent shifting. We speculate that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play important roles in the formation and stabilization of nanoparticles.

  5. Acute and Chronic Administrations of Rheum palmatum Reduced the Bioavailability of Phenytoin in Rats: A New Herb-Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Ying-Chang; Juang, Shin-Hun; Chui, Wai Keung; Hou, Yu-Chi; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee

    2012-01-01

    The rhizome of Rheum palmatum (RP) is a commonly used herb in clinical Chinese medicine. Phenytoin (PHT) is an antiepileptic with narrow therapeutic window. This study investigated the acute and chronic effects of RP on the pharmacokinetics of PHT in rat. Rats were orally administered with PHT (200 mg/kg) with and without RP decoction (single dose and seven doses of 2 g/kg) in a crossover design. The serum concentrations of PHT, PHT glucuronide (PHT-G), 4-hydroxyphenytoin (HPPH), and HPPH glucuronide (HPPH-G) were determined by HPLC method. Cell line models were used to identify the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that coadministration of single dose or multiple doses of RP significantly decreased the Cmax and AUC0-t as well as the K10 of PHT, PHT-G, HPPH, and HPPH-G. Cell line studies revealed that RP significantly induced the P-gp-mediated efflux of PHT and inhibited the MRP-2-medicated transport of PHT and HPPH. In conclusion, acute and chronic coadministrations of RP markedly decreased the oral bioavailability of PHT via activation of P-gp, although the MRP-2-mediated excretion of PHT was inhibited. It is recommended that caution should be exercised during concurrent use of RP and PHT. PMID:22829856

  6. Identifying Drug (Cocaine) Intake Events from Acute Physiological Response in the Presence of Free-living Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Syed Monowar; Ali, Amin Ahsan; Rahman, Mahbubur; Ertin, Emre; Epstein, David; Kennedy, Ashley; Preston, Kenzie; Umbricht, Annie; Chen, Yixin; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    A variety of health and behavioral states can potentially be inferred from physiological measurements that can now be collected in the natural free-living environment. The major challenge, however, is to develop computational models for automated detection of health events that can work reliably in the natural field environment. In this paper, we develop a physiologically-informed model to automatically detect drug (cocaine) use events in the free-living environment of participants from their electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements. The key to reliably detecting drug use events in the field is to incorporate the knowledge of autonomic nervous system (ANS) behavior in the model development so as to decompose the activation effect of cocaine from the natural recovery behavior of the parasympathetic nervous system (after an episode of physical activity). We collect 89 days of data from 9 active drug users in two residential lab environments and 922 days of data from 42 active drug users in the field environment, for a total of 11,283 hours. We develop a model that tracks the natural recovery by the parasympathetic nervous system and then estimates the dampening caused to the recovery by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system due to cocaine. We develop efficient methods to screen and clean the ECG time series data and extract candidate windows to assess for potential drug use. We then apply our model on the recovery segments from these windows. Our model achieves 100% true positive rate while keeping the false positive rate to 0.87/day over (9+ hours/day of) lab data and to 1.13/day over (11+ hours/day of) field data. PMID:25531010

  7. An effective solution to discover synergistic drugs for anti-cerebral ischemia from traditional Chinese medicinal formulae.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaojing; Wu, Chuanhong; Chen, Jianxin; Lu, Peng; Chen, Chang; Fu, Meihong; Fang, Jing; Gao, Jian; Zhu, Li; Liang, Rixin; Shen, Xin; Yang, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the pharmaceutical industry has shifted to pursuing combination therapies that comprise more than one active ingredient. Interestingly, combination therapies have been used for more than 2500 years in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Understanding optimal proportions and synergistic mechanisms of multi-component drugs are critical for developing novel strategies to combat complex diseases. A new multi-objective optimization algorithm based on least angle regression-partial least squares was proposed to construct the predictive model to evaluate the synergistic effect of the three components of a novel combination drug Yi-qi-jie-du formula (YJ), which came from clinical TCM prescription for the treatment of encephalopathy. Optimal proportion of the three components, ginsenosides (G), berberine (B) and jasminoidin (J) was determined via particle swarm optimum. Furthermore, the combination mechanisms were interpreted using PLS VIP and principal components analysis. The results showed that YJ had optimal proportion 3(G): 2(B): 0.5(J), and it yielded synergy in the treatment of rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion induced focal cerebral ischemia. YJ with optimal proportion had good pharmacological effects on acute ischemic stroke. The mechanisms study demonstrated that the combination of G, B and J could exhibit the strongest synergistic effect. J might play an indispensable role in the formula, especially when combined with B for the acute stage of stroke. All these data in this study suggested that in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, besides restoring blood supply and protecting easily damaged cells in the area of the ischemic penumbra as early as possible, we should pay more attention to the removal of the toxic metabolites at the same time. Mathematical system modeling may be an essential tool for the analysis of the complex pharmacological effects of multi-component drug. The powerful mathematical analysis method could greatly

  8. An Effective Solution to Discover Synergistic Drugs for Anti-Cerebral Ischemia from Traditional Chinese Medicinal Formulae

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Chen, Chang; Fu, Meihong; Fang, Jing; Gao, Jian; Zhu, Li; Liang, Rixin; Shen, Xin; Yang, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the pharmaceutical industry has shifted to pursuing combination therapies that comprise more than one active ingredient. Interestingly, combination therapies have been used for more than 2500 years in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Understanding optimal proportions and synergistic mechanisms of multi-component drugs are critical for developing novel strategies to combat complex diseases. A new multi-objective optimization algorithm based on least angle regression-partial least squares was proposed to construct the predictive model to evaluate the synergistic effect of the three components of a novel combination drug Yi-qi-jie-du formula (YJ), which came from clinical TCM prescription for the treatment of encephalopathy. Optimal proportion of the three components, ginsenosides (G), berberine (B) and jasminoidin (J) was determined via particle swarm optimum. Furthermore, the combination mechanisms were interpreted using PLS VIP and principal components analysis. The results showed that YJ had optimal proportion 3(G): 2(B): 0.5(J), and it yielded synergy in the treatment of rats impaired by middle cerebral artery occlusion induced focal cerebral ischemia. YJ with optimal proportion had good pharmacological effects on acute ischemic stroke. The mechanisms study demonstrated that the combination of G, B and J could exhibit the strongest synergistic effect. J might play an indispensable role in the formula, especially when combined with B for the acute stage of stroke. All these data in this study suggested that in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, besides restoring blood supply and protecting easily damaged cells in the area of the ischemic penumbra as early as possible, we should pay more attention to the removal of the toxic metabolites at the same time. Mathematical system modeling may be an essential tool for the analysis of the complex pharmacological effects of multi-component drug. The powerful mathematical analysis method could greatly

  9. Drugs, non-drugs, and disease category specificity: organ effects by ligand pharmacology.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, A T; Maran, U

    2013-01-01

    Important understanding can be gained from using molecular biology-based and chemistry-based techniques together. Bayesian classifiers have thus been developed in the present work using several statistically significant molecular properties of compiled datasets of drugs and non-drugs, including their disease category or organ. The results show they provide a useful classification and simplicity of several different ligand efficiencies and molecular properties. Early recall of drugs among non-drugs using the classifiers as a ranking tool is also provided. As the chemical space of compounds is addressed together with their anatomical characterization, chemical libraries can be improved to select for specific organ or disease. Eventually, by including even finer detail, the method may help in designing libraries with specific pharmacological or toxicological target chemical space. Alternatively, a lack of statistically significant differences in property density distributions may help in further describing compounds with possibility of activity on several organs or disease groups, and given their very similar or considerably overlapping chemical space, therefore wanted or unwanted side-effects. The overlaps between densities for several properties of organs or disease categories were calculated by integrating the area under the curves where they intersect. The naïve Bayesian classifiers are readily built, fast to score, and easily interpretable.

  10. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rinner, Christoph; Grossmann, Wilfried; Sauter, Simone Katja; Wolzt, Michael; Gall, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Shared electronic health records (EHRs) systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI) and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems. PMID:26682218

  11. The acute effects of nicotine on positive and negative affect in adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Kassel, Jon D; Evatt, Daniel P; Greenstein, Justin E; Wardle, Margaret C; Yates, Marisa C; Veilleux, Jennifer C

    2007-08-01

    Although adolescent cigarette smoking remains a critical public health concern, little is known about the reinforcing mechanisms governing smoking in this vulnerable population. To assess predictions derived from both positive and negative reinforcement models of drug use, the authors measured the acute effects of nicotine, as administered via tobacco cigarettes, on both positive and negative affect in a group of 15- to 18-year-old smokers. A matched group of nonsmokers served as a comparison group. Findings revealed that whereas adolescents who smoked a cigarette experienced reductions in both positive and negative affect, the observed reductions in negative affect were moderated by nicotine content of the cigarette (high yield vs. denicotinized), level of nicotine dependence, level of baseline craving, and smoking expectancies pertinent to negative affect regulation. Nonsmokers experienced no change in affect over the 10-min assessment period, and no interaction effects were observed for positive affect. Overall, the findings conform to a negative reinforcement model of nicotine effects and strongly suggest that, even among young light smokers, nicotine dependence and resultant withdrawal symptomatology may serve as motivating factors governing smoking behavior.

  12. The acute effects of nicotine on positive and negative affect in adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Kassel, Jon D; Evatt, Daniel P; Greenstein, Justin E; Wardle, Margaret C; Yates, Marisa C; Veilleux, Jennifer C

    2007-08-01

    Although adolescent cigarette smoking remains a critical public health concern, little is known about the reinforcing mechanisms governing smoking in this vulnerable population. To assess predictions derived from both positive and negative reinforcement models of drug use, the authors measured the acute effects of nicotine, as administered via tobacco cigarettes, on both positive and negative affect in a group of 15- to 18-year-old smokers. A matched group of nonsmokers served as a comparison group. Findings revealed that whereas adolescents who smoked a cigarette experienced reductions in both positive and negative affect, the observed reductions in negative affect were moderated by nicotine content of the cigarette (high yield vs. denicotinized), level of nicotine dependence, level of baseline craving, and smoking expectancies pertinent to negative affect regulation. Nonsmokers experienced no change in affect over the 10-min assessment period, and no interaction effects were observed for positive affect. Overall, the findings conform to a negative reinforcement model of nicotine effects and strongly suggest that, even among young light smokers, nicotine dependence and resultant withdrawal symptomatology may serve as motivating factors governing smoking behavior. PMID:17696710

  13. Effects of oral montelukast on airway function in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cýllý, A; Kara, A; Ozdemir, T; Oğüş, C; Gülkesen, K H

    2003-05-01

    Montelukast, a specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve pulmonary function within 1 h of ingestion. This study was undertaken to compare the effects on peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of oral montelukast added to intravenous steroid, intravenous steroid alone and placebo during the 24 h period following administration. Seventy asthmatic patients (FEV1 40-80% predicted and > or = 15% improvement after inhaled beta agonist) were enrolled in a single blind study to receive oral montelukast (10 mg) plus intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg), intravenous prednisolone (1 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomised fashion. The patients received one ofthe above three groups of medication before any other treatments. This was immediately followed by the aerosol treatments of 100 mcg of terbutaline sulphate divided into three doses during 1 h as described in the consensus statement. Thereafter, patients were observed for 24 h to document the effects on PEFR, Borg dyspnoea score and need for rescue medication. The primary end point was percentage change at different time points. Secondary end points were Borg dyspnoea score and use of rescue medication. Compared with placebo, montelukast added to the prednisolone group and the prednisolone alone group had significant percentage change from baseline in PEFR in the entire 24 h period (P<0.05). The difference in PEFR between montelukast plus prednisolone group and prednisolone group favoured the montelukast plus prednisolone group but did not reach statistical significance. Furthermore, montelukast plus prednisolone group required less inhaled short-acting beta agonistthan other two groups. The results of this study indicate that adding montelukast to steroid in acute asthma may have some additive improvement in lung functions. PMID:12735671

  14. Effect of fluid ingestion on orthostatic responses following acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is impaired following an acute bout of exercise. This study examined the effect of fluid ingestion following treadmill exercise in restoring the cardiovascular responses to an orthostatic stress. Five men (age, 29.6 +/- 3.4 yrs) were exposed to a graded lower body negative (LBNP) pressure protocol (0 to -50 mmHg) during euhydration without exercise (C), 20 minutes after exercise dehydration (D), 20 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI20), and 60 minutes after exercise and fluid ingestion (FI60). Fluid ingestion (mean +/- SE) consisted of water-ingestion equivalent to 50% of the body weight lost during exercise (520 +/- 15 ml). Exercise dehydration resulted in significantly higher heart rates (119 +/- 8 vs 82 +/- 7 bpm), lower systolic blood pressures (95 +/- 1.7 vs 108 +/- 2.3 mmHg), a smaller increase in leg circumference (3.7 +/- 4 vs 6.9 +/- 1.0 mm), and an attenuated increase in total peripheral resistance (2.58 +/- 1.2 vs 4.28 +/- 0.9 mmHg/L/min) at -50 mmHg LBNP compared to the C condition. Fluid ingestion (both 20 and 60), partially restored the heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance responses to LBNP, but did not influence the change in leg circumference during LBNP (4 +/- 0.3 for R20 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 mm for R60). These data illustrate the effectiveness of fluid ingestion on improving orthostatic responses following exercise, and suggest that dehydration is a contributing factor to orthostatic intolerance following exercise.

  15. Comparison of acute effects of heroin and Kerack on sensory and motor activity of honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpour-Ezatti, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Previous studies demonstrated a functional similarity between vertebrate and honey bee nervous systems. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of heroin and Iranian street Kerack, a combination of heroin and caffeine, on sensory threshold and locomotor activity in honey bees. Materials and Methods: All drugs were given orally to honey bees 30 min before each experiment. The levels of these drugs and their metabolites in brain samples of honey bees were determined by GC/MS. The sucrose sensitivity test was used for evaluation of changes in honey bees’ sensory threshold. Following the administration of both drugs, the honey bees’ locomotor activity changes were evaluated in open fields. Results: 6-acetylmorphine had a higher concentration in comparison with other heroin metabolites in honey bees’ brains. Concentration of the compound in the brain was directly proportional to the amount ingested. Heroin reduced the sensory threshold of honey bees, but Kerack increased it in the same doses. Locomotor activity of honey bee in open field was enhanced after the administration of both drugs. However, immobility time of honey bees was only affected by high doses of heroin. Conclusion: Acute effects of heroin andKerack on the sensory and motor functions of honey bees were different. Findings of this research suggest that these differences originated from the activation of different neurotransmitter systems by caffeine together with activation of opioid receptors by heroin. PMID:26019799

  16. Variants of CEP68 Gene Are Associated with Acute Urticaria/Angioedema Induced by Multiple Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-García, José Antonio; Flores, Carlos; Plaza-Serón, María C.; Acosta-Herrera, Marialbert; Blanca-López, Natalia; Doña, Inmaculada; Torres, María J.; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Guéant-Rodríguez, Rosa M.; Ayuso, Pedro; Fernández, Javier; Laguna, José J.; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Canto, Gabriela; Blanca, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most consumed drugs worldwide because of their efficacy and utility in the treatment of pain and inflammatory diseases. However, they are also responsible for an important number of adverse effects including hypersensitivity reactions. The most important group of these reactions is triggered by non-immunological, pharmacological mechanisms catalogued under the denomination of cross-intolerance (CRI), with acute urticaria/angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs (MNSAID-UA) the most frequently associated clinical entity. A recent genome-wide association study identified the gene encoding the centrosomal protein of 68 KDa (CEP68) as the major locus associated with aspirin intolerance susceptibility in asthmatics. In this study, we aimed to assess the role of this locus in susceptibility to CRI to NSAIDs by examining 53 common gene variants in a total of 635 patients that were classified as MNSAID-UA (n = 399), airway exacerbations (n = 110) or blended pattern (n = 126), and 425 controls. We found in the MNSAID-UA group a number of variants (17) associated (lowest p-value = 1.13×10−6), including the non-synonymous Gly74Ser variant (rs7572857) previously associated with aspirin intolerance susceptibility in asthmatics. Although not being significant in the context of multiple testing, eight of these variants were also associated with exacerbated respiratory disease or blended reactions. Our results suggest that CEP68 gene variants may play an important role in MNSAID-UA susceptibility and, despite the different regulatory mechanisms involved depending on the specific affected organ, in the development of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. PMID:24618698

  17. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  18. Bone effects of biologic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Addolorata; Neve, Anna; Maruotti, Nicola; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNF α , IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical practice has not yet clearly assessed. Many clinical studies showed a trend to a positive effect of biologic agents in preventing systemic bone loss observed in RA. Although the suppression of inflammation is the main goal in the treatment of RA and the anti-inflammatory effects of biologic drugs exert a positive effect on bone metabolism, the exact relationship between the prevention of bone loss and control of inflammation has not been clearly established, and if the available biologic drugs against TNF α , IL-1, and IL-6 can exert their effect on systemic and local bone loss also through a direct mechanism on bone cell metabolism is still to be clearly defined.

  19. Peer Effects in Drug Use and Sex among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J.; Boisjoly, Johanne; Kremer, Michael; Levy, Dan M.; Eccles, Jacque

    2005-01-01

    Past research suggests that congregating delinquent youth increases their likelihood of problem behavior. We test for analogous peer effects in the drug use and sexual behavior of male (n = 279) and female (n = 435) college students, using data on the characteristics of first-year roommates to whom they were randomly assigned. We find that males…

  20. DRUG EFFECTS ON THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF LARVAL ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae and the effects of prototype drugs. Zebrafish larvae (6-7 days post-fertilization) were indiv...

  1. Adolescent Initiation of Drug Use: Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Gale A.; Larkby, Cynthia; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Day, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the direct effects of prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) on adolescent drug use, while controlling for other predictors of adolescent use. Method: Data are from a longitudinal study of PCE in which women and their offspring were assessed throughout childhood. Adolescents were interviewed at 15 years about their age at…

  2. Is immunotherapy an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction?

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga

    2015-11-27

    Immunotherapy has a great potential of becoming a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of addiction to psychoactive drugs. It may be used to treat addiction but also to prevent neurotoxic complications of drug overdose. In preclinical studies two immunological methods have been tested; active immunization, which relies on the administration of vaccines and passive immunization, which relies on the administration of monoclonal antibodies. Until now researchers have succeeded in developing vaccines and/or antibodies against addiction to heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine and phencyclidine. Their effectiveness has been confirmed in preclinical studies. At present, clinical studies are being conducted for vaccines against nicotine and cocaine and also anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. These preclinical and clinical studies suggest that immunotherapy may be useful in the treatment of addiction and drug overdose. However, there are a few problems to be solved. One of them is controlling the level of antibodies due to variability between subjects. But even obtaining a suitable antibody titer does not guarantee the effectiveness of the vaccine. Additionally, there is a risk of intentional or unintentional overdose. As vaccines prevent passing of drugs through the blood/brain barrier and thereby prevent their positive reinforcement, some addicted patients may erroneously seek higher doses of psychoactive substances to get "high". Consequently, vaccination should be targeted at persons who have a strong motivation to free themselves from drug dependency. It seems that immunotherapy may be an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction if directed to adequate candidates for treatment. For other addicts, immunotherapy may be a very important element supporting psycho- and pharmacotherapy. PMID:26432911

  3. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol pre-treatment on the disposition of phencyclidine (PCP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1982-05-01

    Disposition of [H] Phencyclidine in brain, plasma and adipose tissue of rats acutely and chronically-treated with ethanol was studied using a method possessing high sensitivity and specificity for PCP. In rats acutely-treated with ethanol (5 g/kg PO dose) and PCP (10 mg/kg IP dose), dispositional factors did not play a role in the intensifies pharmacological and behavioral effects of PCP. However in rats chronically-treated with 2.5 g/kg PO dose of ethanol twice a day for 19 days, the disposition of PCP (5 mg/kg IP dose) was significantly altered and the values of PCP in brain, plasma and adipose tissue were significantly higher than those in the control group. Although inhibition of PCP metabolism and a comparatively slower rate of its elimination appear to account for the potentiation of drug effects in animals chronically-treated with ethanol, interaction of drugs at the level of the central nervous system cannot be ruled out. PMID:7089042

  4. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress. PMID:27635201

  5. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  6. Effect of Dextran 40 and aprotinin on experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Crocket, K V; Reising, J R; Wirman, J A; Gau, N; Joffe, S N

    1984-03-01

    This study examines and compares the prophylactic role of aprotinin and Dextran 40 in acute pancreatitis. Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced in 70 male Wistar rats using the closed-duodenal-loop technique. The rats were randomly divided into four groups; sham operation, untreated acute pancreatitis, and therapy with aprotinin or Dextran 40. Samples of blood and urine were collected at the beginning and at the end of the 24-hr period for measurement of amylase and creatinine which allowed calculation of the amylase-creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR). Mortality in the aprotinin group was the same as the untreated rats (20%). Dextran 40 therapy was associated with a lower mortality rate (6.7%). Light microscopic examination confirmed that the histologic changes of acute pancreatitis were less severe in both the aprotinin- and Dextran 40-treated rats. The ACCR was elevated after Dextran 40 therapy, which was due mainly to high urinary amylase levels. These results suggest that Dextran 40 may have a prophylactic role in acute experimental pancreatitis but again emphasizes the high false-positive rate of the ACCR determination. PMID:6199589

  7. Solvent drag effect in drug intestinal absorption. II. Studies on drug absorption clearance and water influx.

    PubMed

    Karino, A; Hayashi, M; Awazu, S; Hanano, M

    1982-09-01

    In order to study the solvent drag effect, it was shown that back flux of absorbed drug from blood to intestinal lumen can be ignored but the back flux of water cannot. Then, apparent water influx was calculated as a new measure of solvent drag based on the model in which the back flux of D2O from blood to lumen was considered during absorption. Consequently, the correlation between drug absorption clearance (CLdrug) and apparent water influx was highly significant for benzoic acid, salicylic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, antipyrine, cephalexin (CEX) and cefroxadine (CXD), resulting the high solvent drag effects were detected. The mean values of the slopes in the regression lines of CLdrug versus apparent water influx, i.e., sieving coefficients, were smaller than one for benzoic acid and salicylic acid, but the values were not significantly different from one. The sieving coefficients of the other drugs were significantly smaller than one. From these results, the molecular size dependence in the reflection from the intestinal membrane during absorption was clearly shown. And the intercepts of the regression lines including diffusive permeabilities were found to be significantly different from zero in CEX and CXD. On the basis of the sieving coefficients and intercept values obtained in such ways, the appropriateness of this model was discussed.

  8. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  9. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic Alas1 effectively prevents and treats the induced acute attacks in acute intermittent porphyria mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Chen, Brenden; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Yu, Chunli; Phillips, John D; New, Maria I; Liebow, Abigail; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Querbes, William; Desnick, Robert J

    2014-05-27

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Factors that induce the expression of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) result in the accumulation of the neurotoxic porphyrin precursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), which recent studies indicate are primarily responsible for the acute attacks. Current treatment of these attacks involves i.v. administration of hemin, but a faster-acting, more effective, and safer therapy is needed. Here, we describe preclinical studies of liver-directed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Alas1 (Alas1-siRNAs) in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria, the most common acute hepatic porphyria. A single i.v. dose of Alas1-siRNA prevented the phenobarbital-induced biochemical acute attacks for approximately 2 wk. Injection of Alas1-siRNA during an induced acute attack significantly decreased plasma ALA and PBG levels within 8 h, more rapidly and effectively than a single hemin infusion. Alas1-siRNA was well tolerated and a therapeutic dose did not cause hepatic heme deficiency. These studies provide proof-of-concept for the clinical development of RNA interference therapy for the prevention and treatment of the acute attacks of the acute hepatic porphyrias.

  10. Effect of Acute Surgical Stress on Serum Ghrelin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kontoravdis, Nikolaos; Vassilikostas, George; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Pappas, Apostolos; Seretis, Charalampos; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Koronakis, Nikolaos; Chrysikos, John; Karanikas, George; Manouras, Ioannis; Legakis, Ioanis; Voros, Dionysios

    2012-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is an appetite hormone that influences the gastrointestinal function and regulates energy metabolism. Growing evidence also suggests that this hormone plays a central role in immune modulation. Each surgical operation is followed by a series of inflammatory and metabolic changes that constitute the stress response. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effect of stress during different types of abdominal surgery in ghrelin serum levels. Methods An overall of 25 patients were prospectively allocated in two groups based on the type of surgical operation. Group A (n = 10) patients were scheduled to undergo cholecystectomy, whereas Group B (n = 15) patients underwent colectomy. Serum ghrelin concentrations were evaluated in each patient preoperatively, after the induction of general anesthesia and tracheal intubation, one and five hours after the beginning of surgery and the morning of the first and second postoperative day. Results In both groups serum ghrelin concentrations reached their peak level at 24 hr (Group A: 8.4 ± 3.4 ng/mL; Group B: 7.4 ± 1.8 ng/mL) and these values were significantly higher than those in the preoperative period (Group A: 5.0 ±1.5 ng/mL; Group B: 4.8 ± 0.6 ng/mL) (P < 0.05). Forty eight hours after surgery the levels of ghrelin returned to their preoperative status. Patients’ gender, age, ASA score and type of surgical procedure did not influence the serum ghrelin levels. Conclusions Serum ghrelin concentration appears to elevate in response to surgical stress. Future studies are needed to improve comprehension of the mechanisms underlying responses of this hormone to acute surgical stress and to evaluate their possible clinical implications.

  11. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıc, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  12. Acute effects of smoking on QT dispersion in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Yazdani, Shahrooz; Ghaidari, Mohamad Esmail; Asadpour-Piranfar, Mohammad; Bahrololoumi-Bafruee, Negar; Golabchi, Allahyar; Azhari, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cigarette smoking increases the risk of ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death (SCD). QT dispersion (QTD) is an important predictor of cardiac arrhythmia. The aim of this study was to assess the acute effect of smoking a single standard cigarette containing 1.7 mg nicotine on QT interval and QTD in healthy smokers and nonsmokers. METHODS The study sample population consisted of 40 healthy male hospital staff, including 20 smokers and 20 nonsmokers. They were asked to refrain from smoking at least 6 h before attending the study. A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram (ECG), recorded at paper speed of 50 mm/s, was obtained from all participants before and 10 min after smoking of a single complete cigarette. QT interval, corrected QT interval, QTD, and corrected QT dispersion (QTcD) were measured before and after smoking. RESULTS Smokers and nonsmokers did not have any significant differences in heart rate (HR) (before smoking = 67.35 ± 5.14 vs. 67.70 ± 5.07, after smoking = 76.70 ± 6.50 vs. 76.85 ± 6.50, respectively), QTD (before smoking = 37.75 ± 7.16 vs. 39.15 ± 6.55, after smoking = 44.75 ± 11.97 vs. 45.50 ± 9.58, respectively), and QTcD (before smoking = 39.85 ± 7.40 vs. 41.55 ± 6.57, after smoking = 50.70 ± 14.31 vs. 51.50 ± 11.71, respectively). However, after smoking a single cigarette, HR, mean QTD, and QTcD significantly increased (all had P value <0.001) in comparison to the measures before smoking. CONCLUSION Smoking of a single complete cigarette in both smokers and nonsmokers results in significant QTD increase, which can cause arrhythmia and SCD. PMID:25161676

  13. Acute exposure to acid fog. Effects on mucociliary clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Laube, B.L.; Bowes, S.M. III; Links, J.M.; Thomas, K.K.; Frank, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Submicrometric sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosol can affect mucociliary clearance without eliciting irritative symptoms or changes in pulmonary function. The effect of larger fog droplets containing H2SO4 on mucociliary clearance is unknown. We quantified mucociliary clearance from the trachea (n = 4) and small airways (n = 7) of young healthy male adults after an acute exposure to H2SO4 fog (MMAD = 10.3 microns; pH = 2.0; liquid water content = 481 +/- 65 mg/m3; osmolarity = 30 mOsm). Acid fog (AF) or saline fog (SF) (10.9 microns; 492 +/- 116 mg/m3; 30 mOsm) was administered for 40 min of unencumbered breathing (no mouth-piece) at rest and for 20 min of exercise sufficient to produce oronasal breathing. Fog exposures were followed by a methacholine (MCh) challenge (a measure of airway reactivity) or inhalation of technetium-99M radioaerosol (MMAD = 3.4 microns) on 2 study days each. Changes in symptoms and forced ventilatory function were also assessed. Clearance was quantified from computer-assisted analyses of gamma camera images of the lower respiratory tract in terms of %removal/min of the radiolabel from the trachea 25 min after inhalation and from the outer zone of the right lung after 1.9 to 3 h. Symptoms, forced ventilatory function, and MCh response were unaffected by either fog. Tracheal clearance was more rapid in four of four subjects after AF (0.83 +/- 1.58% removal/min) compared with that after SF (-0.54 +/- 0.85% removal/min). Outer zone clearance was more rapid in six of seven subjects after AF (0.22 +/- 0.15% removal/min) compared with that after SF (0.01 +/- 0.09% removal/min).

  14. Effects of Montelukast in an Experimental Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Angı, Serkan; Eken, Hüseyin; Kılıç, Erol; Karaköse, Oktay; Balci, Gürhan; Somuncu, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the hematological, biochemical, and histopathological effects of Montelukast on pancreatic damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model created by cerulein in rats before and after the induction of pancreatitis. Materials/Methods Forty rats were divided into 4 groups with 10 rats each. The study groups were: the Cerulein (C) group, the Cerulein + early Montelukast (CMe) group, the Cerulein + late Montelukast (CMl) group, and the Control group. The pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, leukocyte, hematocrit, pancreatic amylase, and lipase values were measured in the arterial blood samples taken immediately before rats were killed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the C group and the Control group in the values of pancreatic amylase, lipase, blood leukocyte, hematocrit, pH, pO2, pCO2, HCO3, and pancreatic water content, and also in each of the values of edema, inflammation, vacuolization, necrosis, and total histopathological score (P<0.05). When the CMl group and C group were compared, no statistically significant differences were found in any parameter analyzed. When the CMe group was compared with the C group, pancreatic amylase, lipase, pH, PO2, pCO2, HCO3, pancreatic water content, histopathological edema, inflammation, and total histopathological score values were significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). Finally, when the CMe group and the Control group were compared, significant differences were found in all except 2 (leukocyte and pO2) parameters (P<0.05). Conclusions Leukotriene receptor antagonists used in the late phases of pancreatitis might not result in any benefit; however, when they are given in the early phases or prophylactically, they may decrease pancreatic damage. PMID:27479458

  15. Examining factors that influence the effectiveness of cleaning antineoplastic drugs from drug preparation surfaces: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hon, Chun-Yip; Chua, Prescillia Ps; Danyluk, Quinn; Astrakianakis, George

    2014-06-01

    Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs has been documented to result in various adverse health effects. Despite the implementation of control measures to minimize exposure, detectable levels of drug residual are still found on hospital work surfaces. Cleaning these surfaces is considered as one means to minimize the exposure potential. However, there are no consistent guiding principles related to cleaning of contaminated surfaces resulting in hospitals to adopt varying practices. As such, this pilot study sought to evaluate current cleaning protocols and identify those factors that were most effective in reducing contamination on drug preparation surfaces. Three cleaning variables were examined: (1) type of cleaning agent (CaviCide®, Phenokil II™, bleach and chlorhexidine), (2) application method of cleaning agent (directly onto surface or indirectly onto a wipe) and (3) use of isopropyl alcohol after cleaning agent application. Known concentrations of antineoplastic drugs (either methotrexate or cyclophosphamide) were placed on a stainless steel swatch and then, systematically, each of the three cleaning variables was tested. Surface wipes were collected and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine the percent residual of drug remaining (with 100% being complete elimination of the drug). No one single cleaning agent proved to be effective in completely eliminating all drug contamination. The method of application had minimal effect on the amount of drug residual. In general, application of isopropyl alcohol after the use of cleaning agent further reduced the level of drug contamination although measureable levels of drug were still found in some cases.

  16. Predicting the acute behavioral effects in rats inhaling toluene (or up to 24 hrs: Inhaled vs. internal dose metrics.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The acute toxicity oftoluene, a model volatile organic compound (VOC), depends on the concentration (C) and duration (t) ofexposure, and guidelines for acute exposures have traditionally used ext relationships to extrapolate protective and/or effective concentrations across durat...

  17. Acute herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia: effects of acyclovir and outcome of treatment with amitriptyline.

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, D

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to assess the effects of acyclovir treatment of acute herpes zoster on subsequent postherpetic neuralgia, and to examine the effects of amitriptyline in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. Eighty seven patients with postherpetic neuralgia of three or more months' duration were studied: 24 of them had had their herpes zoster treated with oral acyclovir. At first presentation, only 25% of the 24 patients who had had their herpes zoster treated with acyclovir selected the word group containing burning on the McGill pain questionnaire compared with 76% of the 63 patients who had not received acyclovir. A higher proportion of patients who had had acyclovir than had not selected the word group which contains the word aching (63% versus 49%). Acyclovir thus appears to change the nature of postherpetic neuralgia. Postherpetic neuralgia was treated with amitriptyline, alone or in combination with distigmine and/or sodium valproate. There was a strong correlation between pain relief and the interval between the occurrence of herpes zoster and the initiation of treatment with amitriptyline--early treatment is almost twice as likely to be successful as late. Since conventional analgesics and sympatholytic drugs are of no benefit in the treatment of established postherpetic neuralgia, the sequelae of herpes zoster must, therefore, be recognized and treated with amitriptyline as soon as possible. PMID:1419247

  18. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  19. Radiotherapy and "new" drugs-new side effects?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Targeted drugs have augmented the cancer treatment armamentarium. Based on the molecular specificity, it was initially believed that these drugs had significantly less side effects. However, currently it is accepted that all of these agents have their specific side effects. Based on the given multimodal approach, special emphasis has to be placed on putative interactions of conventional cytostatic drugs, targeted agents and other modalities. The interaction of targeted drugs with radiation harbours special risks, since the awareness for interactions and even synergistic toxicities is lacking. At present, only limited is data available regarding combinations of targeted drugs and radiotherapy. This review gives an overview on the current knowledge on such combined treatments. Materials and methods Using the following MESH headings and combinations of these terms pubmed database was searched: Radiotherapy AND cetuximab/trastuzumab/panitumumab/nimotuzumab, bevacizumab, sunitinib/sorafenib/lapatinib/gefitinib/erlotinib/sirolimus, thalidomide/lenalidomide as well as erythropoietin. For citation crosscheck the ISI web of science database was used employing the same search terms. Results Several classes of targeted substances may be distinguished: Small molecules including kinase inhibitors and specific inhibitors, antibodies, and anti-angiogenic agents. Combination of these agents with radiotherapy may lead to specific toxicities or negatively influence the efficacy of RT. Though there is only little information on the interaction of molecular targeted radiation and radiotherapy in clinical settings, several critical incidents are reported. Conclusions The addition of molecular targeted drugs to conventional radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants a careful consideration especially when used in conjunction in hypo-fractionated regimens. Clinical trials are urgently needed in order to address the open question in regard

  20. Acute Effects of Fine Particulate Air Pollution on ST Segment Height: A Longitudinal Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms for the relationship between particulate air pollution and cardiac disease are not fully understood. Air pollution-induced myocardial ischemia is one of the potentially important mechanisms. Methods: We investigate the acute effects and the time cours...

  1. Behavioral effects of acute and long-term administration of catnip (Nepeta cataria) in mice.

    PubMed

    Massoco, C O; Silva, M R; Gorniak, S L; Spinosa, M S; Bernardi, M M

    1995-12-01

    Catnip or catmint (Nepeta cataria) is a plant used extensively to treat human diseases and in toys for pets. We investigated the effects of acute and long-term administration of the plant on some behaviors of mice. The plant was fed as 10% of the normal diet for 2 h/d for 1 or 7 d. Acute and long-term dosing increased both rearing and locomotion frequencies observed in an open field. Acute exposure to catnip increased stereotyped behavior and susceptibility to seizures, did not interfere with haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and decreased sleeping time after sodium pentobarbital administration. Long-term exposure induced tolerance to stereotypic behavior, catalepsy and sleeping time, and increased the susceptibility to seizures induced by picrotoxin and strychnine. An amphetamine-like effect of catnip was suggested to explain the acute effects, while dispositional and functional adaptative changes were considered involved with the long-term effects.

  2. Severe adverse effects of 5-fluorouracil in S-1 were lessened by haemodialysis due to elimination of the drug.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazunori; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Omori, Hiroki; Kimura, Tomonori; Tomida, Kodo; Furumatsu, Yoshiyuki; Imai, Enyu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2009-04-01

    S-1 and cisplatin are used as one of the first-line chemotherapies for gastric cancer in Japan. The plasma concentration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is increased in patients with renal dysfunction because gimeracil in S-1 inhibits the degradation of 5-FU and about 50% of gimeracil is excreted in the urine. We describe a 35-year-old man with acute kidney injury while taking S-1 and cisplatin for advanced gastric cancer and who presented severe adverse effects of 5-FU. This case report describes the evolution of the plasma concentrations of 5-FU with haemodialysis along with a decrease in the adverse drug effects.

  3. Opiates or cocaine: mortality from acute reactions in six major Spanish cities. State Information System on Drug Abuse (SEIT) Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Rodríguez, B; de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Roca, J; Royuela, L

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To describe temporal and geographical variations in mortality from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine and the demographic and toxicological characteristics of persons who died from these in major Spanish cities between 1983 and 1991. DESIGN--Descriptive study. Data were obtained retrospectively from pathologists' reports. SETTING--Cities of Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, and Bilbao. SUBJECTS--Deaths from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine were defined as those in which pathologists' reports did not indicate any other cause of death and in which evidence was found of recent consumption of these drugs. MAIN RESULTS--The mortality rate from acute reactions to opiate/cocaine per 100,000 population in the six cities as a whole rose from 1.2 in 1983 to 8.2 in 1991. Average annual rates for the whole period ranged from 1.7 in Seville to 4.9 in Barcelona. The male/female rates ratio was 5.9:1. The mean age of persons who died rose from 25.1 years in 1983 to 28 years in 1991. In more than 90% of the cases in whom toxicological tests were undertaken opiates were detected, and the proportion in which benzodiazepines or cocaine were detected increased during the period studied. CONCLUSIONS--Between 1983 and 1991 mortality from acute reactions to opiates/cocaine rose dramatically in major Spanish cities and significant differences in mortality between cities were found. Deaths were concentrated among men and young people. Acute drug reactions became one of the leading causes of death in persons 15-39 years of age, representing 11.1% of mortality from all causes in 1988 for this age group. Future studies should examine the relationship between the temporal and geographical variations in this type of mortality and various personal, environmental and social factors. PMID:7707007

  4. Analysis of HBV genotype, drug resistant mutations, and pre-core/basal core promoter mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Hong, Sun Pyo; Jang, Eun Sun; Park, Sang Jong; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kang, Sook-Kyoung; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2015-06-01

    Acute hepatitis B, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains with drug resistant mutations or pre-core/basal core promoter (PC/BCP) mutations, is a public health concern, because this infection is often associated with poor disease outcome or difficulty in therapeutic choice. The HBV genotype, the prevalence of drug resistant mutations, and PC/BCP mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B were studied. From 2006 to 2008, 36 patients with acute hepatitis B were enrolled prospectively in four general hospitals. Among them, 20 showed detectable HBV DNA (median value was 4.8 log copies/mL). HBV genotyping and analysis of HBV mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine, adefovir, or entecavir and of PC/BCP mutations were performed using highly sensitive restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) analysis. All 20 patients were infected with HBV genotype C, which causes almost all cases of chronic hepatitis B in Korea. No patient showed mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine (L180M, M204V/I), adefovir (A181T, N236S), or entecavir (I169M, A184T/V, S202I/G, M250V/I/L). However, four patients had BCP mutations, and two had PC mutations. Platelet counts were significantly lower in the four patients with PC/BCP mutations compared to those with wild type. In this study, all acute hepatitis B patients had genotype C HBV strains with no drug resistant mutations. However, 20% showed PC/BCP mutations. This highlights the need for further study on the significance of PC/BCP mutations.

  5. Effects of Acute Stress on Decision Making under Ambiguous and Risky Conditions in Healthy Young Men.

    PubMed

    Cano-López, Irene; Cano-López, Beatriz; Hidalgo, Vanesa; González-Bono, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Acute stress and decision making (DM) interact in life - although little is known about the role of ambiguity and risk in this interaction. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of acute stress on DM under various conditions. Thirty-one young healthy men were randomly distributed into two groups: experimental and control. DM processes were evaluated before and after an experimental session. For the experimental group, the session consisted of an acute stress battery; and the protocol was similar for the control group but the instructions were designed to minimize acute stress. Cardiovascular variables were continuously recorded 30 minutes before the DM tasks and during the experimental session. Cortisol, glucose, mood responses, and personality factors were also assessed. Acute stress was found to enhance disadvantageous decisions under ambiguous conditions (F(1, 29) = 4.16, p = .05, η2 p = .13), and this was mainly explained by the stress induced cortisol response (26.1% of variance, F(1, 30) = 11.59, p = .002). While there were no significant effects under risky conditions, inhibition responses differed between groups (F(1, 29) = 4.21, p = .05, η2 p = .13) and these differences were explained by cardiovascular and psychological responses (39.1% of variance, F(3, 30) = 7.42, p < .001). Results suggest that DM tasks could compete with cognitive resources after acute stress and could have implications for intervention in acute stress effects on DM in contexts such as addiction or eating disorders. PMID:27644414

  6. New problems arising from old drugs: second-generation effects of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Tiegs, Gisa; Karimi, Khalil; Brune, Kay; Arck, Petra

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)/paracetamol is one of the most commonly used over-the-counter drugs taken worldwide for treatment of pain and fever. Although considered as safe when taken in recommended doses not higher than 4 g/day, APAP overdose is currently the most important cause of acute liver failure (ALF). ALF may require liver transplantation and can be fatal. The reasons for APAP-related ALF are mostly intentional (suicidal) or unintentional overdose. However, results from large scale epidemiological studies provide increasing evidence for second generation effects of APAP, even when taken in pharmacological doses. Most strikingly, APAP medication during pregnancy has been associated with health problems including neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and increase in the risk of wheezing and incidence of asthma among offspring. This article reviews the epidemiological findings and aims to shed light into the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for APAP-mediated prenatal risk for asthma. PMID:25075430

  7. Regulators should better leverage effectiveness standards to enhance drug value.

    PubMed

    Naci, Huseyin; Alexander, George Caleb

    2014-10-01

    Regulators show some flexibility in the evidentiary standards of effectiveness that must be demonstrated for a drug prior to its market authorization. Adopting a more formal framework for when and how effectiveness standards should vary would improve the therapeutic value of new medicines at the time of market entry. We identify three factors-the number and effectiveness of existing treatment alternatives, magnitude of unmet need, and expected clinical application-to guide the effectiveness threshold for a given therapy. Using these factors, regulators should actively guide sponsors regarding appropriate comparators and end points in pivotal trials, as well as determining the size and characteristics of the patient populations enrolled. PMID:25041851

  8. Acute Metabolic Effects of Olanzapine Depend on Dose and Injection Site

    PubMed Central

    Stipanovic, Michelle E.; Hajnal, Andras; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAPs), such as olanzapine (OLZ), are associated with metabolic side effects, including hyperglycemia. Although a central mechanism of action for the acute effects on glycemia has been suggested, evidence for peripheral versus central effects of AAPs has been mixed and has not been explored for an effect of OLZ on the respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Here, we tested the hypothesis that some inconsistencies in the glycemic responses are likely a result of different doses and central sites of injection. We also compared the effects of central versus peripherally administered OLZ on the RER of unsedated rats. Third ventricle infusion of OLZ at 0.3 mg/kg caused hyperglycemia within 30 minutes, with a higher dose (1.8 mg/kg) needed to elicit a similar response in the lateral ventricles. In contrast, 3 mg/kg of OLZ was needed to raise blood glucose within 30 minutes when given intragastrically, and 10 mg/kg resulted in a prolonged hyperglycemia lasting at least 60 minutes. Third ventricle injection of OLZ significantly decreased RER after 75 minutes, whereas intragastric OLZ resulted in a faster drop in RER after 30 minutes. Since changes in glycemia were most sensitive when OLZ was infused into the third ventricle, but effects on RER were more rapidly and efficaciously observed when the drug was given peripherally, these results raise the likelihood of a dual mechanism of action involving hypothalamic and peripheral mechanisms. Some discrepancies in the literature arising from central administration appear to result from the injection site and dose. PMID:26740814

  9. Specific Effects of Acute Moderate Exercise on Cognitive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davranche, Karen; McMorris, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The main issue of this study was to determine whether cognitive control is affected by acute moderate exercise. Twelve participants [4 females (VO[subscript 2 max]=42 ml/kg/min) and 8 males (VO[subscript 2 max]=48 ml/kg/min)] performed a Simon task while cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity corresponding to their individual…

  10. EFFECTS OF ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE ON THERMOREGULATION IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce acute neurotoxicity in mammals. According to the FQPA mandate, the USEPA is required to consider the risk of cumulative toxicity posed to humans through exposure to pyrethroid mixtures. Thermoregulatory response (TR) is being used to determine if t...

  11. EFFECTS OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ON OSSEOINTEGRATION: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Aragão, Maria Gerusa Brito; Pinto, Vicente de Paulo Teixeira; Gondim, Delane Viana; Barbosa, Francisco Cesar Barroso; Silva, Antonio Alfredo Rodrigues E; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos

    2013-10-31

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to review the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on osseointegration and determine whether they cause failures in dental implants and whether patients who use them chronically can receive dental implants safely.A bibliographic electronic search was performed using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Medline databases, selecting articles published between January 1982 and December 2012. The search included the following keywords, either alone or combined: "non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs," "dental implants," "bone healing," and "osteoprogenitor cells." The inclusion criteria were the following: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies, in vivo animal model studies of osseointegration, and in vitro studies of the effects of these agents on osteoprogenitor cells. The literature search revealed 360 references. A total of 31 articles met the inclusion criteria, including two clinical trials, 20 animal studies, and nine osteoprogenitor cell studies. The clinical trials revealed that cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors did not impair osseointegration. The animal studies showed that any drug that is capable of inhibiting COX-2 may impair the osseointegration process. The in vitro studies showed that COX-2 inhibitors are the most potent depressors of osseointegration at the cellular level. Caution must be taken when selecting COX-2 nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs during the postoperative period. PMID:24175941

  12. [Effectiveness and limitation of newly approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Galantamine, rivastigmine, and memantine, for the treatment of Alzheimer-type dementia, became covered by national health insurance last year in Japan. Galantamine and rivastigmine are choline esterase inhibitors, and memantine is a glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist. Galantamine also acts on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, in addition to ChEI, and it has an APL action and modulates the receptor function by inducing a structural change of the receptor, as its characteristics. Rivastigmine is used only in patch form, and exhibits an inhibitory effect on butyryl choline esterase. Memantine protects nerve cells by inhibiting excess actions of glutamate. These drugs are also effective for BPSD accompanying dementia. Particularly, memantine exhibits an inhibitory effect on aggressiveness and excitement, as its characteristic. The administration of these 3 drugs for diseases other than Alzheimer-type dementia is not covered by national health insurance. These are expected to be effective for dementia with Lewy bodies, but there has been no evidence reported of an effect on frontotemporal dementia. Dementia manifests diverse symptoms in the course, and consideration of the physical symptoms is indispensable. The thoughtless continuation of anti-dementia and psychiatric agents without consideration of temporary changes and diversity and changes in needs for medical care impair a patient's vital functions and QOL. Those who are involved in the treatment of dementia should always consider the clinical course and changes in needs for psychiatric and physical medical care, and novel anti-dementia drugs should be used based on these.

  13. Effects of alcohol on human carboxylesterase drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Meibohm, Bernd; Laizure, S. Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) and human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) play an important role in metabolizing many medications. Alcohol is a known inhibitor of these enzymes but the relative effect on CES1 and CES2 is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of alcohol on the metabolism of specific probes for CES1 (oseltamivir) and CES2 (aspirin). Methods The effect of alcohol on CES1- and CES2-mediated probe drug hydrolysis was determined in vitro using recombinant human carboxylesterase. To characterize the in vivo effects of alcohol, healthy volunteers received each probe drug alone and in combination with alcohol followed by blood sample collection and determination of oseltamivir, aspirin, and respective metabolite pharmacokinetics. Results Alcohol significantly inhibited oseltamivir hydrolysis by CES1 in vitro but did not affect aspirin metabolism by CES2. Alcohol increased the oseltamivir area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0-6 h by 27% (range 11-46%, p=0.011) and decreased the metabolite/oseltamivir AUC 0-6 h ratio by 34% (range 25-41%, p<0.001). Aspirin pharmacokinetics were not affected by alcohol. Conclusions Alcohol significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of oseltamivir by CES1 both in vitro and in humans, but did not affect the hydrolysis of aspirin to salicylic acid by CES2. These results suggest that alcohol's inhibition of CES1 could potentially result in clinically significant drug interactions with other CES1-substrate drugs, but it is unlikely to significantly affect CES2-substrate drug hydrolysis. PMID:25511794

  14. [Effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tanase, H; Matsunuma, N; Suzuki, Y

    1979-10-01

    The present study was performed in order to elucidate the effect of proximate environment on drug susceptibility of mice. Three experiments were carried out independently. In the first experiment, mongrel and ddS mice produced under an unsatisfactory control of proximate environment were purchased, and acute toxicity tests of thiamine hydrochloride (B1HCl) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INAH) were practiced at two different conditioned rooms. In the second experiment, ddY mice produced under the conventional environment controlled to a certain extent were purchased, and the toxic effect of B1HCl was examined under the similar environment. In the third experiment, the sensitivity to B1HCl of RFVL mice produced under the strict barrier system was tested at the severe air-conditioned room. LD50 and their fLD50 values were calculated by Litchfield-Wilcoxon's method, and the variance analyses were carried out. The severer the environmental control after the purchase of mice turned to the higher the drug sensitivity. This respect was more remarkable in INAH of which the toxic response is appeared slowly compared with B1HCl. Furthermore, seasonal variation was found in LD50 values. However, seasonal effect differed from rearing and experimental conditions. In the third experiment which these proximate environments were controlled severely, seasonal variation was very small. From the results of these experiments, it was defined that the use of animals produced under the satisfactory rearing condition and severe environmental control are necessary for animal experiments.

  15. Acute and chronic cocaine behavioral effects in novel versus familiar environments: open-field familiarity differentiates cocaine locomotor stimulant effects from cocaine emotional behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; DePalma, Gail; Damianopoulos, Ernest

    2005-03-30

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant drug, but its stimulant effects can be substantially modulated by environmental novelty versus familiarity. In this report, we varied exposures to a novel environment as a way to assess the impact of environmental familiarity versus novelty upon the locomotor activation induced by acute and chronic cocaine treatments. In experiment 1, the effects of 1 (PE1) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures to the test environment were compared for their impact upon the locomotor stimulant, central zone entry and grooming effects induced by an acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) treatment. In experiment 2, the effects of 10 (PE10) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures upon the cocaine effects were compared. Experiment 3 assessed the effects of nine cocaine treatments (10.0 mg/kg) initiated in a novel environment (PE0) versus familiar environment (PE10). In all experiments, cocaine had a potent locomotor stimulant effect in a novel environment, which was attenuated by environmental familiarity such that in PE10 groups, cocaine did not reliably induce an acute locomotor stimulant effect. Environmental novelty/familiarity, however, did not reliably alter cocaine effects upon central zone penetration, grooming behavior, or the neurochemical effects induced by cocaine. In the chronic treatment regimen, the PE0 group exhibited a tolerance-like decrease in locomotor activation, but the PE10 group exhibited a sensitization-like increase in locomotor activation. Despite the marked directional changes in the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine treatments, initiated in a novel (PE0) versus familiar (PE10) environment, the same asymptotic levels of locomotor activation were achieved. In contrast, the behavioral measures of central zone activity progressively increased with repeated treatments regardless of whether the environment was initially novel (PE0) or familiar (PE10). Thus, habituation factors can profoundly alter the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine and can induce pseudo

  16. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  17. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  18. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  19. A Factual Approach to Drug Education and Its Effects on Drug Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serdahely, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Literature suggests that the factual approach to drug education may cause an increase in drug usage. The pharmacological approach was used in a college drug education course, and an assessment of students' drug consumption was made. No statistically significant changes were found for the substances surveyed. (Author)

  20. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  1. Effects of chronic and acute stimulants on brain functional connectivity hubs.

    PubMed

    Konova, Anna B; Moeller, Scott J; Tomasi, Dardo; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution and strength of information processing 'hubs' are essential features of the brain׳s network topology, and may thus be particularly susceptible to neuropsychiatric disease. Despite growing evidence that drug addiction alters functioning and connectivity of discrete brain regions, little is known about whether chronic drug use is associated with abnormalities in this network-level organization, and if such abnormalities could be targeted for intervention. We used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping to evaluate how chronic and acute stimulants affect brain hubs (i.e., regions with many short-range or long-range functional connections). Nineteen individuals with cocaine use disorders (CUD) and 15 healthy controls completed resting-state fMRI scans following a randomly assigned dose of methylphenidate (MPH; 20mg) or placebo. Short-range and long-range FCD maps were computed for each participant and medication condition. CUD participants had increased short-range and long-range FCD in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and putamen/amygdala, which in areas of the default mode network correlated with years of use. Across participants, MPH decreased short-range FCD in the thalamus/putamen, and decreased long-range FCD in the supplementary motor area and postcentral gyrus. Increased density of short-range and long-range functional connections to default mode hubs in CUD suggests an overrepresentation of these resource-expensive hubs. While the effects of MPH on FCD were only partly overlapping with those of CUD, MPH-induced reduction in the density of short-range connections to the putamen/thalamus, a network of core relevance to habit formation and addiction, suggests that some FCD abnormalities could be targeted for intervention.

  2. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  3. Effects of Acute Methamphetamine on Emotional Memory Formation in Humans: Encoding vs Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  4. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-dose evaluation of the acute behavioural effects of guaraná in humans.

    PubMed

    Haskell, C F; Kennedy, D O; Wesnes, K A; Milne, A L; Scholey, A B

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to systematically assess acute, dose-related behavioural effects of an extract of guaraná plant for the first time in humans. This double-blind, counterbalanced, placebo-controlled study (n=26) assessed the acute mood and cognitive effects throughout the day of four different doses (37.5 mg, 75 mg, 150 mg and 300 mg) of a standardised guaraná extract (PC-102). Assessment included the Cognitive Drug Research computerized test battery and Bond-Lader mood scales. Guaraná improved secondary memory performance and increased alert and content mood ratings. The two lower doses produced more positive cognitive effects than the higher doses. This research supports previous findings of cognitive improvements following 75 mg guaraná and provides the first exploration of different dose effects of guaraná in humans. The findings suggest that the effects cannot be attributed to caffeine alone.

  5. Effects of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine on human erythrocytes.

    PubMed</